WorldWideScience

Sample records for 8b final environmental

  1. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west.

  2. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 2, Appendices A-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NW, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this EN there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constricting Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER, which consists of Appendices A, B, and C, assesses the potential geologic impacts of the proposed Section 8B construction, presents the results of the Section 8B soil survey, and describes the water quality studies and analyses performed for the ER. The following summary sections provide information for geology, soils, and water quality.

  3. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 6, Appendix N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER documents the results of the architectural, historical, and cultural resources assessment for the entire Section 8B ROW that was completed in May 1995 to document the architectural, historical, and cultural resources located within the project area. The assessment included evaluation of the potential for cultural (i.e., rural historic) landscapes in the area of the ROW. The assessment showed that one National Register-listed property is located 0.3 mile south of the ROW

  4. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 3, Appendix D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER inventories the fishes and benthic macroinvertebrates inhabiting the aquatic ecosystems potentially affected by the proposed construction of Section 8B. Stream biological surveys were completed at 31 stream sites during the Fall of 1994. The sampling strategy for both invertebrates and fish was to survey the different taxa from all available habitats. For benthic invertebrates, a standardized qualitative manual collection technique was employed for all 31 stations. For fish

  5. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 4, Appendices E-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical, resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER consists of Appendices E through I (all ecological survey reports), which are summarized individually in the sections that follow. The following conclusions result from the completion of these surveys and the ER impact analysis: (1) Forest clearing should be limited as much as possible; (2) Disturbed areas should be replanted with native trees; (3) Drainages should be bridged rather than leveled with cut and fill; (4) For areas of steep slopes and potential erosion

  6. 75 FR 80068 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Report/Final Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Report/ Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Southern California Edison Eldorado-Ivanpah Transmission Project... (CPUC) have prepared a Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR)/Final Environmental Impact Statement...

  7. INEL Geothermal Environmental Program. Final environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurow, T.L.; Cahn, L.S.

    1982-09-01

    An overview of environmental monitoring programs and research during development of a moderate temperature geothermal resource in the Raft River Valley is presented. One of the major objectives was to develop programs for environmental assessment and protection that could serve as an example for similar types of development. The monitoring studies were designed to establish baseline conditions (predevelopment) of the physical, biological, and human environment. Potential changes were assessed and adverse environmental impacts minimized. No major environmental impacts resulted from development of the Raft River Geothermal Research Facility. The results of the physical, biological, and human environment monitoring programs are summarized.

  8. Environmental Prosperity Game. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, M.; Boyack, K.; VanDevender, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Prosperity Games are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from a global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions in specific industries. All Prosperity Games are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Environmental Prosperity Game conducted under the sponsorship of the Silicon Valley Environmental Partnership. Players were drawn from all stakeholders involved in environmental technologies including small and large companies, government, national laboratories, universities, environmentalists, the legal profession, finance, and the media. The primary objectives of this game were to: investigate strategies for developing a multi-agency (national/state/regional), one-step regulatory approval process for certifying and implementing environmental technologies and evaluating the simulated results; identify the regulatory hurdles and requirements, and the best approaches for surmounting them; identify technical problems and potential resources (environmental consultants, labs, universities) for solving them. The deliberations and recommendations of these players provided valuable insights as to the views of this diverse group of decision makers concerning environmental issues, including the development, licensing, and commercialization of new technologies.

  9. 76 FR 62442 - Final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement for Upper Truckee River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement for Upper Truckee.... ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact... publication of the final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement. ADDRESSES: The...

  10. 15 CFR 8b.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 8b.4 Section 8b.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROHIBITION OF DISCRIMINATION... Provisions § 8b.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No qualified handicapped individual shall, on...

  11. 15 CFR 8b.16 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 8b.16 Section 8b.16 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROHIBITION OF DISCRIMINATION... Accessibility § 8b.16 Discrimination prohibited. No qualified handicapped individual shall, because a...

  12. 15 CFR 8b.11 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 8b.11 Section 8b.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROHIBITION OF DISCRIMINATION... Practices § 8b.11 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. (1) No qualified handicapped individual shall,...

  13. 77 FR 45652 - Final Program Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for the San Joaquin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Final Program Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for the... prepared a joint Final Program Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (Final PEIS/R...: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and the...

  14. 15 CFR 8b.5 - Assurances required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assurances required. 8b.5 Section 8b.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROHIBITION OF DISCRIMINATION AGAINST THE... otherwise encumber the real property as security to finance construction of new, or improvement of...

  15. 15 CFR 8b.18 - New construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards (UFAS) (Appendix A to 41 CFR subpart 101-19.6) shall be deemed to comply with the requirements of... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New construction. 8b.18 Section 8b.18... construction. (a) Design and construction. Each facility or part of a facility constructed by, on behalf of,...

  16. 78 FR 32269 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Office of the Secretary Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for Klamath Facilities Removal AGENCY: Office of Environmental Policy and Compliance... Department of Fish and Wildlife have prepared a final environmental impact statement and environmental...

  17. Measurement of the $^{8}B$ neutrino spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, W; Jiang, C L; Ahmad, I; Freedman, S J; Greene, J; Heinz, A; Henderson, D; Janssens, R V F; Moore, E F; Mukherjee, G; Pardo, R C; Paul, M; Pennington, T; Savard, G; Schiffer, J P; Seweryniak, D; Zinkann, G P; 10.1016/S0375-9474(03)01122-9

    2003-01-01

    The neutrino spectrum from the decay of /sup 8/B is a crucial ingredient in interpreting recent data from solar neutrino detectors. The beta /sup +/ decay of /sup 8/B proceeds to a broad state in /sup 8/Be, and the shape of the neutrino spectrum may be obtained from a measurement of the alpha spectrum following the beta /sup +/ decay. A new technique has been used at the ATLAS accelerator to measure this spectrum by implanting /sup 8/B particles into the midplane of a 91 mu m thick Si detector. The advantage of this method is that both alpha particles are detected and systematic effects due to energy loss in catcher foils and dead layers of the detector are eliminated. To calibrate the detector, alpha 's from the decay of /sup 20/Na ions produced and implanted with the same technique were used. (5 refs).

  18. Integrated environmentally compatible soldering technologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Frear, D.R.; Iman, R.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Lopez, E.P.; Peebles, H.C.; Sorensen, N.R.; Vianco, P.T.

    1994-05-01

    Chemical fluxes are typically used during conventional electronic soldering to enhance solder wettability. Most fluxes contain very reactive, hazardous constituents that require special storage and handling. Corrosive flux residues that remain on soldered parts can severely degrade product reliability. The residues are removed with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC), or other hazardous solvents that contribute to ozone depletion, release volatile organic compounds into the atmosphere, or add to the solvent waste stream. Alternative materials and processes that offer the potential for the reduction or elimination of cleaning are being developed to address these environmental issues. Timing of the effort is critical, since the targeted chemicals will soon be heavily taxed or banned. DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (DOE/EM) has supported Sandia National Laboratories` Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration (ECMID). Part of the ECM program involves the integration of several environmentally compatible soldering technologies for assembling electronics devices. Fluxless or {open_quotes}low-residue/no clean{close_quotes} soldering technologies (conventional and ablative laser processing, controlled atmospheres, ultrasonic tinning, protective coatings, and environmentally compatible fluxes) have been demonstrated at Sandia (SNL/NM), the University of California at Berkeley, and Allied Signal Aerospace-Kansas City Division (AS-KCD). The university demonstrations were directed under the guidance of Sandia staff. Results of the FY93 Soldering ID are presented in this report.

  19. Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

    1994-09-01

    To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

  20. 75 FR 26272 - Final Environmental Impact Statement; Environmental Education Center, Yosemite National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement; Environmental Education Center, Yosemite... Environmental Impact Statement for development of a new environmental education center in Yosemite National Park... practical the NPS will begin to implement development of a new environmental education center at...

  1. Final report, International Symposium on Environmental Biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Donald L.

    2000-03-20

    This meeting included technical presentations of state-of-the-art research which were integrated with tutorials and workshops by practicing technologies in the broad field of environmental biotechnology. This meeting was designed to be, in every respect, truly global. Over 150 excellent abstracts from around the world were accepted. For example, presentations were heard from technical workers in Southeast Asia, Russia, China, Europe, North Africa, India, and the US. By having these selected presenters, as well as identified experienced tutors with focused workshops, all participants benefited from this interactive symposium. A number of social events further promoted informal exchange of ideas, discussions of technical problems, and exploration of new applications. This international symposium on environmental biotechnology was on the campus of Northeastern University but all Boston area universities were included and participated using designed conference Co-Chairs. This symposium, with an attendance of several hundred people, was considered a major success. Workers with experience in one area of environmental biotechnology learned from the wealth of established backgrounds of those in other areas of environmental biotechnology. To formally disseminate conference results, it was pre-arranged that all technical presentations were reviewed for formal publications.

  2. 15 CFR 8b.25 - Nonacademic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 8b.22(d) and only if no qualified handicapped student is denied the opportunity to compete for teams... of particular careers. (c) Social organizations. A recipient that provides significant assistance to fraternities, sororities, or similar organizations shall assure itself that the membership practices of...

  3. 15 CFR 8b.13 - Employment criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... sensory, manual, or speaking skills, the test results accurately to reflect the applicant's or employee's....13 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROHIBITION OF DISCRIMINATION... Practices § 8b.13 Employment criteria. (a) A recipient may not make use of any employment test or...

  4. Urban Environmental Education--Demonstration. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Roselyn; And Others

    This publication is composed of four parts. Part I, The Final Report, consists of the program foundations, description of the target group, description of resources, analysis of processes developed, creating the resource role, creation awareness, developing a problem solving orientation, curriculum integration, evolution of the group process,…

  5. Gulfport Harbor, Mississippi. Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    the finback whale (Balaenoptera physalus), humpback whale ( Megaptera novaeangliae ), sei whale (B. borealis), green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas...Environmental Policy Act, as amended, 42 USC 4321, et seq. Rivers and Harbors Act, 33 USC 401 et seq. Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act, 16...USC 1001, et seq. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, as amended, 16 USC 1271, et seq. Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act

  6. Environmental training research project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    Santa Fe Community College serves an area including the city and county of Santa Fe. The population has a high percentage of Hispanics and a Native American population of about 3%. The student body at the college generally reflects that of the service district. The college strives to recruit students from all segments of the population so there is representation among all ethnic and economic groups. The college strives to serve students and the community by offering educational opportunities that meet the needs of both elements and which will lead to gainful employment. Instruction is also offered to meets needs for retraining, upgrades, and personal enlightenment. The college started a hazardous materials management program in the fall of 1991 which has since been renamed environmental management. The purpose of this program is to prepare students for environmental careers, to provide required training such as OSHA HAZWOPER and refresher courses, and to provide educational opportunities that would make the public more environmentally aware. The program content needs to be studied to ensure we`re meeting the needs of the students and the business community. There had not been a significant opportunity to conduct this research.

  7. Environmentally conscious manufacturing integrated demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, D.E.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration was to show that several of the individually developed materials and processes to reduce hazardous materials and waste could be successfully used on a single assembly. A methodology was developed that could be used on any product to plan the approach to eliminating hazardous materials. Sample units of an existing design electronic unit were fabricated applying this methodology and substituting nonhazardous materials and processes. The results of this project show that total waste can be drastically reduced by at least an order of magnitude and hazardous material and waste can be essentially eliminated in the manufacture of this type of electronic devices.

  8. Final Range Wide Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Department of Fish and Game. The Rincon Indian Reservation also commented. Agencies expressed concern for biological, cultural, and water resources...Environmental Impact Statement 49 Figure 12. Vegetative Provinces of the Sonoran Desert. SO U RC E : Shreve & W igg ins, 1964 Needles Yum a San Luis ...County 76,205 106,895 119,650 Major Communities San Luis 1,946 4,212 7,910 Somerton 3,969 5,282 5,970 Wellton 911 1,066 1,075 Yuma 42,481 54,923 60,150

  9. Final Environmental Impact Statement Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This final environmental impact statement identifies the purpose and need for a management plan; outlines the legal foundation for management of the Rocky Mountain...

  10. Final Environmental Assessment Ohio River Islands National Wildlife Refuge Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In this Final Environmental Assessment, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service describes various alternatives that could provide long-term protection to the...

  11. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Environmental Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This is volume 1 of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration Information is included on the following: Purpose of and need for action; alternatives including the proposed action; affected environment; and environmental consequences.

  12. Final environmental statement for the geothermal leasing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-12-31

    This second of the four volumes of the Geothermal Leasing Program final impact statement contains the individual environmental statements for the leasing of federally owned geothermal resources for development in three specific areas: Clear Lake-Geysers; Mono Lake-Long Valley; and Imperial Valley, all in California. It also includes a summary of the written comments received and departmental responses relative to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement issued in 1971; comments and responses on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement; consultation and coordination in the development of the proposal and in the preparation of the Draft Environmental Statement; and coordination in the review of the Draft Environmental Statement.

  13. Griffith Energy Project Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-04-02

    Griffith Energy Limited Liability Corporation (Griffith) proposes to construct and operate the Griffith Energy Project (Project), a natural gas-fuel, combined cycle power plant, on private lands south of Kingman, Ariz. The Project would be a ''merchant plant'' which means that it is not owned by a utility and there is currently no long-term commitment or obligation by any utility to purchase the capacity and energy generated by the power plant. Griffith applied to interconnect its proposed power plant with the Western Area Power Administration's (Western) Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie and Parker-Davis transmission systems. Western, as a major transmission system owner, needs to provide access to its transmission system when it is requested by an eligible organization per existing policies, regulations and laws. The proposed interconnection would integrate the power generated by the Project into the regional transmission grid and would allow Griffith to supply its power to the competitive electric wholesale market. Based on the application, Western's proposed action is to enter into an interconnection and construction agreement with Griffith for the requested interconnections. The proposed action includes the power plant, water wells and transmission line, natural gas pipelines, new electrical transmission lines and a substation, upgrade of an existing transmission line, and access road to the power plant. Construction of segments of the transmission lines and a proposed natural gas pipeline also require a grant of right-of-way across Federal lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. Public comments on the Draft EIS are addressed in the Final EIS, including addenda and modifications made as a result of the comments and/or new information.

  14. Quantification of environmental impacts of various energy technologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selfors, A. [ed.

    1994-10-01

    This report discusses problems related to economic assessment of the environmental impacts and abatement measures in connection with energy projects. Attention is called to the necessity of assessing environmental impacts both in the form of reduced economic welfare and in the form of costs of abatement measures to reduce the impact. In recent years, several methods for valuing environmental impacts have been developed, but the project shows that few empirical studies have been carried out. The final report indicates that some important factors are very difficult to evaluate. In addition environmental impacts of energy development in Norway vary considerably from project to project. This makes it difficult to obtain a good basis for comparing environmental impacts caused by different technologies, for instance hydroelectric power versus gas power or wind versus hydroelectric power. It might be feasible however to carry out more detailed economic assessments of environmental impacts of specific projects. 33 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. 78 FR 68860 - Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for the Proposed Stateline Solar Farm and Proposed California Desert Conservation... Impact Statement (EIS) and Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Stateline Solar Farm...

  16. Low-lying states in 8B

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, J P; Johnson, E D; Baby, L T; Kemper, K W; Moro, A M; Peplowski, P N; Volya, A; Wiedenhoever, I

    2010-01-01

    Excitation functions of elastic and inelastic 7Be+p scattering were measured in the energy range between 1.6 and 2.8 MeV in the c.m. An R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions provides strong evidence for new positive parity states in 8B. A new 2+ state at an excitation energy of 2.55 MeV was observed and a new 0+ state at 1.9 MeV is tentatively suggested. The R-matrix and Time Dependent Continuum Shell Model were used in the analysis of the excitation functions. The new results are compared to the calculations of contemporary theoretical models.

  17. 75 FR 62133 - Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment (FINAL EA) and a Finding of No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... Availability of Final Environmental Assessment (FINAL EA) and a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for... Environmental Assessment (FINAL EA) for Land Purchase, Access Road Construction and Access Tunnel Construction... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Notice of Availability of Final...

  18. Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-02-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report (Final EIS/EIR) has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The Proposed Action includes the construction, operation, and decommissioning of a 48 megawatt (gross) geothermal power plant with ancillary facilities (10-12 production well pads and 3-5 injection well pads, production and injection pipelines), access roads, and a 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Modoc National Forest in Siskiyou County, California. Alternative locations for the power plant site within a reasonable distance of the middle of the wellfield were determined to be technically feasible. Three power plant site alternatives are evaluated in the Final EIS/EIR.

  19. Proposed Owyhee Resource Management Plan and Final Environmental Impact Statement

    OpenAIRE

    U.S. Bureau of Land Management

    1999-01-01

    Five alternatives are described and analyzed i9n the final Environmental Impact Statement. Alternative A is a continuation of current management. Alternative B was developed through BLM staff interpretation and analysis of information submitted by the Owyhee Country Commissioners with the assistance of the Owyhee County Natural Resources Committee. Alternative C was developed by the BLM lower Snake River District interdisciplinary planning team. Alternative D was developed through BLM staff i...

  20. 17 CFR 270.8b-14 - Riders; inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Riders; inserts. 270.8b-14 Section 270.8b-14 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.8b-14 Riders; inserts. Riders shall not be...

  1. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described.

  2. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This volume contains the appendices for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Alternative geologic environs are considered. Salt, crystalline rock, argillaceous rock, and tuff are discussed. Studies on alternate geologic regions for the siting of WIPP are reviewed. President Carter's message to Congress on the management of radioactive wastes and the findings and recommendations of the interagency review group on nuclear waste management are included. Selection criteria for the WIPP site including geologic, hydrologic, tectonic, physicochemical compatability, and socio-economic factors are presented. A description of the waste types and the waste processing procedures are given. Methods used to calculate radiation doses from radionuclide releases during operation are presented. A complete description of the Los Medanos site, including archaeological and historic aspects is included. Environmental monitoring programs and long-term safety analysis program are described. (DMC)

  3. Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-02-01

    This document is the Comments and Responses to Comments volume of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report prepared for the proposed Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project (Final EIS/EIR). This volume of the Final EIS/EIR provides copies of the written comments received on the Draft EIS/EIR and the leady agency responses to those comments in conformance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

  4. 75 FR 22829 - National Environmental Policy Act; Final Environmental Impact Statement on U.S. Coast Guard...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard National Environmental Policy Act; Final Environmental Impact Statement on U.S. Coast... Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) to implement enhanced environmental protection measures, as necessary, for... potential environmental impacts of specific Coast Guard vessel and aircraft operations on MPS and MPAs...

  5. 78 FR 7450 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems... a Final Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing... a manner that supports long-term ecosystem protection, supports natural ecosystem recovery...

  6. 75 FR 1359 - Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Construction of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement for...: Notice; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The comment period for the Final Environmental Impact... Web version of the Final Environmental Impact Statement had problems with the Web links. The...

  7. 77 FR 22361 - Energy Northwest, Columbia Generating Station; Final Supplement 47 to the Generic Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... COMMISSION Energy Northwest, Columbia Generating Station; Final Supplement 47 to the Generic Environmental...: Final Supplement 47 to the Generic Environmental Impact Statement for License Renewal of Nuclear Plants... Commission) has published the final plant- specific supplement 47 to the ``Generic Environmental...

  8. 78 FR 28873 - Availability of Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... of availability. SUMMARY: This notice announces the availability of a Final Environmental Assessment (Final EA) which examines the reasonably foreseeable environmental impacts and socio-economic impacts of... SECURITY Coast Guard Availability of Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...

  9. 15 CFR 8b.21 - Treatment of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Treatment of students. 8b.21 Section... Secondary Education § 8b.21 Treatment of students. (a) General. No qualified handicapped student shall, on... recipient to which this subpart applies that considers participation by students in education programs...

  10. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  11. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  12. 2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental ImpactReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philliber, Jeff

    2007-01-22

    This environmental impact report (EIR) has been prepared pursuant to the applicable provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and its implementing guidelines (CEQA Guidelines), and the Amended University of California Procedures for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (UC CEQA Procedures). The University of California (UC or the University) is the lead agency for this EIR, which examines the overall effects of implementation of the proposed 2006 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP; also referred to herein as the 'project' for purposes of CEQA) for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL; also referred to as 'Berkeley Lab,' 'the Laboratory,' or 'the Lab' in this document). An LRDP is a land use plan that guides overall development of a site. The Lab serves as a special research campus operated by the University employees, but it is owned and financed by the federal government and as such it is distinct from the UC-owned Berkeley Campus. As a campus operated by the University of California, the Laboratory is required to prepare an EIR for an LRDP when one is prepared or updated pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21080.09. The adoption of an LRDP does not constitute a commitment to, or final decision to implement, any specific project, construction schedule, or funding priority. Rather, the proposed 2006 LRDP describes an entire development program of approximately 980,000 gross square feet of new research and support space construction and 320,000 gross square feet of demolition of existing facilities, for a total of approximately 660,000 gross square feet of net new occupiable space for the site through 2025. Specific projects will undergo CEQA review at the time proposed to determine what, if any, additional review is necessary prior to approval. As described in Section 1.4.2, below, and in Chapter 3 of this EIR (the Project Description), the size of the project has been

  13. Environmental assessment of advanced thin film manufacturing process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, D.W.; Mopas, E.; Skinner, D. [BP Solar, Inc., Fairfield, CA (United States); McGuire, L.; Strehlow, M. [Radian International, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This report describes work performed by BP Solar, Inc., to provide an extensive preproduction analysis of waste-stream abatement at its plant in Fairfield, California. During the study, numerous technologies were thoroughly evaluated, which allowed BP Solar to select systems that outperformed the stringent federal and state regulations. The main issues were originally perceived to be controlling cadmium compound releases to both air and wastewater to acceptable levels and adopting technologies for air and water waste streams in an efficient, cost-effective manner. BP Solar proposed high-efficiency, reliable control equipment that would reduce air-contaminant emission levels below levels of concern. Cadmium telluride dust is successfully controlled with high-efficiency (>99.9%) bag-in/bag-out filters. For air abatement, carbon canisters provide efficient VOC reduction, and wastewater pretreatment is required per federal pretreatment standards. BP Solar installed a cadmium-scavenging ion exchange system and electrowinning system capable of removing cadmium to <10 ppb (local publicly-owned-treatment-works limits for cadmium is 30 ppb). BP Solar plans to maximize potential reuse of rinse waters by phasing in additional wastewater treatment technologies. Finally, the work to date has identified the areas that need to be revisited as production scales up to ensure that all health, safety, and environmental goals are met.

  14. 77 FR 39503 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Proposed Rawlins Resource...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... Madre (CCSM) Wind Energy Project (Volume II) Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and by this... direct, indirect and cumulative environmental impacts of constructing and operating the CCSM wind... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement,...

  15. 77 FR 41774 - Notice of Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... of Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Construction and... significant impact. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA) (42... Final Environmental Assessment (EA) for construction and operation of a radiological work and...

  16. 75 FR 21343 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Round Mountain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ...: 14X5017] Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Round Mountain... prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Round Mountain Expansion Project and by this... the Federal Register. ADDRESSES: Copies of the Round Mountain Expansion Project Final EIS...

  17. Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Proposal : Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This environmental document assesses the potential environmental effects of establishment of a national wildlife refuge for the primary purpose of preserving and...

  18. Final Environmental Assessment for the CV-22 Interim Beddown

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Experience : 16 Ann Slaughter, Environmental Analyst, HDR M.E.S. Environmental Policy and Science and Sustainable Development B.S. Chemistry Years...LPES, Inc. M.S., Civil and Environmental Engineering B.S., Mechanical Engineering Years of Experience : 25 Christopher McJetters, Technical Editor... Experience : 18 Steve Pyle, Esq. Senior NEPA Project Manager, HDR J.D. with Certification in Environmental Law B.S. Natural Resources Management Years of

  19. 8B+27Al scattering at low energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcelle, V.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Guimarães, V.; Pires, K. C. C.; Lubian, J.; Mendes Junior, D. R.; de Faria, P. N.; Kolata, J. J.; Becchetti, F. D.; Jiang, H.; Aguilera, E. F.; Lizcano, D.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Garcia, H.

    2017-01-01

    We present 8B 27Al elastic scattering angular distributions for the proton-halo nucleus 8B at two energies above the Coulomb barrier, namely Elab=15.3 and 21.7 MeV. The experiments were performed in the Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil facility (RIBRAS) in São Paulo, and in the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame, USA. The angular distributions were measured in the angular range of 15-80 degrees. Optical model and continuum discretized coupled channels calculations were performed, and the total reaction cross sections were derived. A comparison of the 8B+27Al total reaction cross sections with similar systems including exotic, weakly bound, and tightly bound projectiles impinging on the same target is presented.

  20. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 1 is comprised of chapters on: background and description; environmental impacts of add-on gaseous diffusion plant; unavoidable adverse environmental effects; alternatives; relationship between short-term uses and long-term productivity; relationship of program to land-use plans, policies, and controls; irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources; cost-benefit analysis; and response to comment letters. (LK)

  1. Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-14

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

  2. 77 FR 61632 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for Cattle Point Road Relocation, San Juan Island National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement for Cattle Point Road Relocation, San Juan.... ACTION: Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for Cattle Point Road... bluff erosion that threatens a segment of the Cattle Point Road located in San Juan Island...

  3. 75 FR 72836 - Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Tonopah Solar Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ...: 14X5017] Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Tonopah Solar Energy Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project, Nye County, NV AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... (BLM) has prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Crescent Dunes Solar...

  4. 76 FR 74074 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Windy Gap Firming Project, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Windy Gap Firming Project, Colorado AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The Final Environmental... construction and address any project impacts to waters of the United States and jurisdictional wetlands....

  5. 78 FR 32441 - Grand Ditch Breach Restoration, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Rocky Mountain National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... National Park Service Grand Ditch Breach Restoration, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Rocky Mountain... Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Grand Ditch Breach Restoration, Rocky Mountain... Grand Ditch Breach Restoration, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. DATES: The National Park...

  6. 76 FR 24050 - Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Biscayne National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... National Park Service Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement... Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Biscayne National... Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan (Plan/FEIS) for Biscayne National Park, Florida....

  7. Final Addendum to the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Addendum is to clarify actions that will be taken under the selected alternative for the Fire Management Plan Environmental Assessment that was...

  8. Environmental impacts of proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-17

    This report describes environmental impacts from a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility for spent fuels to be located in Tennessee. Areas investigated include: water supply, ground water, air quality, solid waste management, and health hazards. (CBS)

  9. Final Environmental Assessment : Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Assessment for the acquisition of approximately 9,300 acres known as Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge for the purpose of protecting...

  10. Environmental-performance research priorities: Wood products. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-15

    This report describes a research plan to establish environmental, energy, and economic performance measures for renewable building materials, and to identify management and technology alternatives to improve environmental performance in a cost-effective manner. The research plan is designed to: (1) collect environmental and economic data on all life-cycle stages of the materials, (2) ensure that the data follows consistent definitions and collection procedures, and (3) develop analytical procedures for life-cycle analysis to address environmental performance questions. The research will be subdivided into a number of individual project modules. The five processing stages of wood used to organize the research plan are: (1) resource management and harvesting; (2) processing; (3) design and construction of structures; (4) use, maintenance, and disposal; and (5) waste recycling. Individual research module descriptions are provided in the report, as well as assessment techniques, research standards and protocol, and research management. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Environmental implications of increased biomass energy use. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, T.R. Sr.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This study reviews the environmental implications of continued and increased use of biomass for energy to determine what concerns have been and need to be addressed and to establish some guidelines for developing future resources and technologies. Although renewable biomass energy is perceived as environmentally desirable compared with fossil fuels, the environmental impact of increased biomass use needs to be identified and recognized. Industries and utilities evaluating the potential to convert biomass to heat, electricity, and transportation fuels must consider whether the resource is reliable and abundant, and whether biomass production and conversion is environmentally preferred. A broad range of studies and events in the United States were reviewed to assess the inventory of forest, agricultural, and urban biomass fuels; characterize biomass fuel types, their occurrence, and their suitability; describe regulatory and environmental effects on the availability and use of biomass for energy; and identify areas for further study. The following sections address resource, environmental, and policy needs. Several specific actions are recommended for utilities, nonutility power generators, and public agencies.

  12. 76 FR 29217 - Notice of Availability of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    .... Details on the proposed action, location and areas of environmental concern addressed in the FPEIS are... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Notice of Availability of the Final Programmatic Environmental... accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended, the U.S. Army Corps of...

  13. 10 CFR 51.92 - Supplement to the final environmental impact statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; (6) Include an analysis of any environmental issue related to the impacts of construction or... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplement to the final environmental impact statement. 51.92 Section 51.92 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL...

  14. 75 FR 52967 - Final Environmental Impact Statement and South Florida and Caribbean Parks Exotic Plant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Palm Beach, Florida. A Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) for South... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement and South Florida and Caribbean Parks Exotic... environmental impact statement for the South Florida and Caribbean Parks Exotic Plant Management Plan....

  15. 64 FR 34266 - Notice of Availability of Proposed Owyhee Resource Management Plan and Final Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of Proposed Owyhee Resource Management Plan and Final... Resource Management Plan (RMP) and associated final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Owyhee... the Owyhee Proposed Resource Management Plan, which is Alternative E in the final EIS. The...

  16. Expansion of U. S. uranium enrichment capacity. Final environmental statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-04-01

    Reasonably foreseeable environmental, social, economic, and technological costs and benefits of postulated expansion of U. S. enrichment capacity through the year 2000 and reasonably available alternatives to such expansion are described. Both the gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion methods for the enrichment of uranium are considered in this impact assessment. (JGB)

  17. Possible future environmental issues for fossil fuel technologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attaway, L.D.

    1979-07-01

    The work reported here was carried out for the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy to identify and assess 15 to 20 major environmental issues likely to affect the implementation of fossil energy technologies between 1985 and 2000. The energy technologies specifically addressed are: oil recovery and processing; gas recovery and processing; coal liquefaction; coal gasification (surface); in situ coal gasification; direct coal combustion; advanced power systems; magnetohydrodynamics; surface oil shale retorting; and true and modified in situ oil shale retorting. Environmental analysis of these technologies included, in addition to the main processing steps, the complete fuel cycle from resource extraction to end use. The 16 environmental issues identified as those most likely for future regulatory actions and the main features of, and the possible regulatory actions associated with, each are as follows: disposal of solid waste from coal conversion and combustion technologies; water consumption by coal and oil shale conversion technologies; siting of coal conversion facilities; the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect; emission of polycyclic organic matter (POM); impacts of outer continental shelf (OCS) oil development; emission of trace elements; groundwater contamination; liquefied natural gas (LNG), safety and environmental factors; underground coal mining - health and safety; fugitive emissions from coal gasification and liquefaction - health and safety; boomtown effects; emission of fine particulates from coal, oil and oil shale technologies; emission of radioactivity from the mining and conversion of coal; emission of nitrogn oxides; and land disturbance from surface mining. (LTN)

  18. Final Environmental assessment for the Uranium Lease Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a programmatic environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue leasing withdrawn lands and DOE-owned patented claims for the exploration and production of uranium and vanadium ores. The Domestic Uranium Program regulation, codified at Title 10, Part 760.1, of the US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), gives DOE the flexibility to continue leasing these lands under the Uranium Lease Management Program (ULMP) if the agency determines that it is in its best interest to do so. A key element in determining what is in DOE`s ``best interest`` is the assessment of the environmental impacts that may be attributable to lease tract operations and associated activities. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA for the ULMP, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 United States Code 4321 et seq.), as amended.Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for the ULMP,and DOE is issuing this Finding, of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. 77 FR 18879 - Department of Transportation Final Environmental Justice Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... Strategy AGENCY: Office of the Secretary of Transportation, DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Transportation is issuing a revised environmental justice strategy, which sets forth DOT's commitment to... agency policies and activities on minority and low-income populations. This strategy is published as...

  20. Child Development Center Construction Project Final Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    3-9 3.5.1 Noise Sensitive Receptors...Project Page iii Environmental Assessment LIST OF ACRONYMS 96 ABW 96th Airbase Wing 96 ABW/SEU Range Safety 96 AMDS/ SGB Base Bioenvironmental...site is classified as landscaped/urban. Some longleaf pines would be removed as a result of the construction, but no sensitive species would be

  1. Properties of nuclear and Coulomb breakup of 8B

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, K; Iseri, Y; Yahiro, M

    2008-01-01

    Dependence of breakup cross sections of 8B at 65 MeV/nucleon on target mass number A_T is investigated by means of the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) with more reliable distorting potentials than in preceding study. The scaling law of the nuclear breakup cross section as A_T^(1/3) is found to be satisfied only in the middle A_T region of 40 < A_T < 150. Interference between nuclear and Coulomb breakup amplitudes turns out to vanish at very forward angles with respect to the center-of-mass of 8B, independent of target nucleus. Truncation of the relative energy between the p and 7Be fragments slightly reduces contribution from nuclear breakup at very forward angles, while the angular region in which the first-order perturbation theory works well does not change essentially.

  2. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this document as environmental input to future decisions regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which would include the disposal of transuranic waste, as currently authorized. The alternatives covered in this document are the following: (1) Continue storing transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as it is now or with improved confinement. (2) Proceed with WIPP at the Los Medanos site in southeastern New Mexico, as currently authorized. (3) Dispose of TRU waste in the first available repository for high-level waste. The Los Medanos site would be investigated for its potential suitability as a candidate site. This is administration policy and is the alternative preferred by the DOE. (4) Delay the WIPP to allow other candidate sites to be evaluated for TRU-waste disposal. This environmental impact statement is arranged in the following manner: Chapter 1 is an overall summary of the analysis contained in the document. Chapters 2 and 4 set forth the objectives of the national waste-management program and analyze the full spectrum of reasonable alternatives for meeting these objectives, including the WIPP. Chapter 5 presents the interim waste-acceptance criteria and waste-form alternatives for the WIPP. Chapters 6 through 13 provide a detailed description and environmental analysis of the WIPP repository and its site. Chapter 14 describes the permits and approvals necessary for the WIPP and the interactions that have taken place with Federal, State, and local authorities, and with the general public in connection with the repository. Chapter 15 analyzes the many comments received on the DEIS and tells what has been done in this FEIS in response. The appendices contain data and discussions in support of the material in the text.

  3. Final Environmental Assessment: Hurlburt Field Skeet & Trap Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Consideration Operational Technical Environmental Old Hurlburt Archery Range No existing utilities – High support costs Wetlands – Site is not large...Old Hurlburt Archery Range No existing utilities – High support costs Wetlands – Site is not large enough to accommodate desired end state facility... Archery Range Field 4 Spray Field Site B Spray Field Site A Wright Land Fill Proposed Action: Field 4 South Alternative Action

  4. Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) considers underground nuclear detonations with yields of one megaton or less, along with the preparations necessary for such detonations. The testing activities considered also include other continuing and intermittent activities, both nuclear and nonnuclear, which can best be conducted in the remote and controlled area of the Nevada Test Site. These activities are listed, with emphasis on weapons testing programs which do not remain static.

  5. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  6. Stability of volatile organics in environmental soil samples. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.; Johnson, L.H.; Holladay, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report focuses on data generated for the purpose of establishing the stability of 19 volatile organic compounds in environmental soil samples. The study was carried out over a 56 day (for two soils) and a 111 day (for one reference soil) time frame and took into account as many variables as possible within the constraints of budget and time. The objectives of the study were: 1) to provide a data base which could be used to provide guidance on pre-analytical holding times for regulatory purposes; and 2) to provide a basis for the evaluation of data which is generated outside of the currently allowable holding times.

  7. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  8. Environmental impacts of thermochemical biomass conversion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; McKinney, M.D.; Norton, M.V.; Abrams, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Thermochemical conversion in this study is limited to fast pyrolysis, upgrading of fast pyrolysis oils, and gasification. Environmental impacts of all types were considered within the project, but primary emphasis was on discharges to the land, air, and water during and after the conversion processes. The project discussed here is divided into five task areas: (1) pyrolysis oil analysis; (2) hydrotreating of pyrolysis oil; (3) gas treatment systems for effluent minimization; (4) strategic analysis of regulatory requirements; and (5) support of the IEA Environmental Systems Activity. The pyrolysis oil task was aimed at understanding the oil contaminants and potential means for their removal. The hydrotreating task was undertaken to better define one potential means for both improving the quality of the oil but also removing contaminants from the oil. Within Task 3, analyses were done to evaluate the results of gasification product treatment systems. Task 4 was a review and collection of regulatory requirements which would be applicable to the subject processes. The IEA support task included input to and participation in the IEA Bioenergy activity which directly relates to the project subject. Each of these tasks is described along with the results. Conclusions and recommendations from the overall project are given.

  9. 78 FR 14111 - Final Candidate Conservation Agreement With Assurances, Final Environmental Assessment, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... development, wind energy development, loss of native rangelands to cropland conversion, herbicide use, fire... on multiple environmental and social factors, including potential impacts to the LEPC, the benefits... Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impact; Lesser Prairie Chicken, Oklahoma AGENCY: Fish and...

  10. Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge Final Feasibility Study and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), as amended, the Service has developed a Final EA in response to the Cherry Valley National Wildlife...

  11. Final Environmental Assessment : Livestock Grazing Management Seven Blackfeet Habitat Unit : Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final environmental assessment for the grazing management within the Seven Blackfeet Habitat Unit of the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge, in relation to...

  12. Department of the Interior : Final Environmental Statement : FES 75-76 : Proposed Desert Wilderness Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a final analysis of the environmental impact wilderness designation would pose for the Desert Wilderness Area. Topics covered include where the...

  13. 78 FR 52909 - Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Notice of Availability of Final Environmental... Organization Headquarters Building, Washington, DC AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection....

  14. Department of the Interior : Final Environmental Statement : FES 75-4 : Proposed Cape Romain Wilderness Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a final analysis of the environmental impact wilderness designation would pose for the Cape Romain Wilderness Area. Topics covered include where the...

  15. 75 FR 77897 - Long Walk National Historic Trail Feasibility Study, Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... trail would be designated, emphasizing the removal experiences common to both tribes. An auto tour route... National Park Service Long Walk National Historic Trail Feasibility Study, Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement, National Trails Intermountain Region, NM AGENCY: National Park Service,...

  16. Final Environmental Impact Statement Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This final environmental impact statement identifies the purpose and need for a management plan; outlines the legal foundation for management of the Rocky Mountain...

  17. Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact Statement: San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This final Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and Environmental Impact Statement was written to guide management on Alamosa, Monte Vista, and Baca National...

  18. Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Wallkill River National Wildlife Refuge 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final Environmental Assessment for the proposed acquisition and establishment of Wallkill River National Wildlife Refuge in Sussex Country, New Jersey. The...

  19. Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan, Environmental Impact Statement, and Wilderness Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document includes a final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Alaska Peninsula Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan. It describes five alternative...

  20. Environmental friendly high efficient light source plasma lamp - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courret, G.; Calame, L. [Haute Ecole d' ingenierie et de gestion du canton de Vaud, Institut de micro et nano techniques, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Meyer, A. [Solaronix SA, Aubonne (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    This illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at work done on the development of a sulphur-based plasma lamp. In 2007, the capability of a new modulator has been explored. The most important results are discussed. With the production of a 1.2 cm{sup 3} bulb, the way towards the production of a 100 W lamp has been opened. The authors comment that modulation by impulses increases the luminous efficiency in comparison to modulation using a continuous sinusoidal wave. The report deals with the history of the project, the development of the new modulator, the use of rotational effects and the optimisation of the amount of active substances - tellurium and selenium - in the bulb. The electromagnetic coupling system used is described and discussed.

  1. Environmental management requirements/defensible costs project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) used a systems engineering approach to develop the first formal requirements baseline for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Management (EM) Programs. The recently signed Settlement Agreement with the State of Idaho (Batt Agreement), along with dramatically reduced EM funding targets from Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters, drove the immediacy of this effort. Programs have linked top-level requirements to work scope to cost estimates. All EM work, grouped by decision units, was scrubbed by INEL EM programs and by an independent {open_quotes}Murder Board.{close_quotes} Direct participation of upper level management from LITCO and the DOE-Idaho Operations Office ensured best information and decisions. The result is a scrubbed down, defensible budget tied to top-level requirements for use in the upcoming DOE-Headquarters` budget workout, the Internal Review Board, the FY98 Activity Data Sheets submittal, and preparation of the FY97 control accounts and out-year plans. In addition to the remarkable accomplishments during the past eight weeks, major issues were identified and documented and follow-on tasks are underway which will lead to further improvements in INEL EM program management.

  2. 77 FR 71446 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the West Chocolate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ...In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended, and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the West Chocolate Mountains Renewable Energy Evaluation Area (REEA) and a California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA) Proposed Plan Amendment, and by......

  3. 76 FR 77249 - Winter Use Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, Yellowstone National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... National Park Service Winter Use Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, Yellowstone..., Yellowstone National Park. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Sec. 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act of... announces the availability of the Record of Decision for the Winter Use Plan for Yellowstone National...

  4. 77 FR 44267 - Notice of Availability of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States AGENCY: Bureau of Land... availability of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six... Programmatic EIS and Proposed RMP Amendments, references, and additional information regarding solar...

  5. 76 FR 63923 - Notice of Availability To Distribute a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Notice of Availability To Distribute a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Construction of a New Land Port of Entry in International Falls, MN AGENCY: Public Buildings Service, General... distribute a FEIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to assess the potential...

  6. 76 FR 67178 - Wells Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wells Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Wells Hydrolectric Project In accordance with the National Environmental... reviewed the application for license for the Wells Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 2149), located on...

  7. 76 FR 81962 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan, Ross Lake National Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Final Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan, Ross Lake National... Plan for Ross Lake National Recreation Area (Ross Lake NRA) in Washington State. This Final EIS... management of the Ross Lake NRA. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The original public information process began...

  8. 77 FR 74865 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Searchlight Wind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ...) has prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Searchlight Wind Energy Project and..., phone 702-515-5173, or email to: BLM_NV_SNDO_SearchlightWindEnergyEIS@blm.gov . Interested persons may.../searchlight_wind_energy.html . Copies of the Final EIS are available for public inspection at the BLM...

  9. 76 FR 75556 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Resource Management Plan and Final Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Proposed Resource Management Plan and Final... of Land Management (BLM) has prepared the Proposed Resource Management Plan/Final Environmental...; address 226 Cruz Alta Road, Taos, New Mexico 87571; email bhigdon@blm.gov . Persons who use...

  10. Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-07-15

    what future CCC/USDA actions may be necessary, with the ultimate goal of achieving classification of the Sylvan Grove site at no further action status. The proposed activities are to be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy. Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA concerning environmental site characterization and remediation at former grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. That document should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove.

  11. 77 FR 35946 - Notice of Availability for the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... Building Los Angeles City Library, San Pedro Branch Los Angeles City Library, Wilmington Branch Los Angeles Public Library, Central Branch Questions or requests concerning the Final EIS/EIR should be directed...

  12. Geothermal environmental studies, Heber Region, Imperial Valley, California. Environmental baseline data acquisition. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-02-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been studying the feasibility of a Low Salinity Hydrothermal Demonstration Plant as part of its Geothermal Energy Program. The Heber area of the Imperial Valley was selected as one of the candidate geothermal reservoirs. Documentation of the environmental conditions presently existing in the Heber area is required for assessment of environmental impacts of future development. An environmental baseline data acquisition program to compile available data on the environment of the Heber area is reported. The program included a review of pertinent existing literature, interviews with academic, governmental and private entities, combined with field investigations and meteorological monitoring to collect primary data. Results of the data acquisition program are compiled in terms of three elements: the physical, the biological and socioeconomic settings.

  13. Leading trends in environmental regulation that affect energy development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, R V; Attaway, L D; Christerson, J A; Kikel, D A; Kuebler, J D; Lupatkin, B M; Liu, C S; Meyer, R; Peyton, T O; Sussin, M H

    1980-01-01

    Major environmental issues that are likely to affect the implementation of energy technologies between now and the year 2000 are identified and assessed. The energy technologies specifically addressed are: oil recovery and processing; gas recovery and processing; coal liquefaction; coal gasification (surface); in situ coal gasification; direct coal combustion; advanced power systems; magnetohydrodynamics; surface oil shale retorting; true and modified in situ oil shale retorting; geothermal energy; biomass energy conversion; and nuclear power (fission). Environmental analyses of these technologies included, in addition to the main processing steps, the complete fuel cycle from resource extraction to end use. A comprehensive survey of the environmental community (including environmental groups, researchers, and regulatory agencies) was carried out in parallel with an analysis of the technologies to identify important future environmental issues. Each of the final 20 issues selected by the project staff has the following common attributes: consensus of the environmental community that the issue is important; it is a likely candidate for future regulatory action; it deals with a major environmental aspect of energy development. The analyses of the 20 major issues address their environmental problem areas, current regulatory status, and the impact of future regulations. These analyses are followed by a quantitative assessment of the impact on energy costs and nationwide pollutant emissions of possible future regulations. This is accomplished by employing the Strategic Environmental Assessment System (SEAS) for a subset of the 20 major issues. The report concludes with a more general discussion of the impact of environmental regulatory action on energy development.

  14. Final Environmental Impact Statement C.J. Strike Project Idaho, FERC Project No. 2055

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Energy, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    2002-01-01

    Idaho Power Company (Idaho Power) filed an application for a new license for the existing C.J. Strike Project located on the Snake River and Bruneau River in Owyhee and Elmore Counties, Idaho, between the towns of Grandview and Bruneau. A major issue in this relicensing proceeding is how project-induced water-level fluctuations from load following operations affect aquatic and terrestrial resources. The final environmental impact statement (final EIS) presents the staff's evaluation of the ...

  15. 78 FR 59659 - Correction to the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... of the corrected HSTT Final EIS/OEIS are available for public review at the following libraries: 1. Lihue Public Library, 4344 Hardy Street, Lihue, Hawaii 96766. 2. Wailuku Public Library, 251 High Street, Wailuku, Hawaii 96793. 3. Hilo Public Library, 300 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo, Hawaii 96720. 4....

  16. 76 FR 49786 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... Reclamation (Reclamation), the lead Federal agency, and the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), the lead State agency, have prepared a joint Final EIS/EIR for the proposed Nimbus Fish Hatchery Weir... Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Nimbus Hatchery Fish Passage Project, Lower American River,...

  17. Zachary-Fort Lauderdale pipeline construction and conversion project: final supplement to final environmental impact statement. Docket No. CP74-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-01

    This Final Supplement to the Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final Supplement) evaluates the economic, engineering, and environmental aspects of newly developed alternatives to an abandonment/conversion project proposed by Florida Gas Transmission Company (Florida Gas). It also updates the staff's previous FEIS and studies revisions to the original proposal. Wherever possible, the staff has adopted portions of its previous FEIS in lieu of reprinting portions of that analysis which require no change. 60 references, 8 figures, 35 tables.

  18. Environmental Impact Statement. March 2011. Interim storage, encapsulation and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) shall be prepared and submitted along with applications for permissibility and a licence under the Environmental Code and a licence under the Nuclear Activities Act for new nuclear facilities. This Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared by Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB) to be included in the licence applications for continued operation of Clab (central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel) in Simpevarp in Oskarshamn Municipality and construction and operation of facilities for encapsulation (integrated with Clab) and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  19. 78 FR 11672 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Alta East Wind Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... (CDCA) Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Alta East Wind Project (Project... Project's final EIS in the Federal Register. ADDRESSES: Copies of the Alta East proposed plan amendment... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the...

  20. 76 FR 12103 - Notice of Availability of the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex AGENCY: National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S... the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex (Final Y-12 SWEIS, DOE/EIS-0387). The Final Y-12 SWEIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts of ongoing...

  1. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 4, Comments and Responses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This volume of the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) contains public comments addressing the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Draft EIS, August 1990 and Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) responses. The Introduction provides information about the process BPA follows in addressing these comments. Part I contains a listing of the Alternative Actions evaluated in the Final EIS; Part II is organized by Alternatives and includes summaries of the comments and BPA responses; Part III provides copies of the original comments letters, and, for ease of identification, are coded in the margins according to the alternative(s) addressed.

  2. 75 FR 63503 - Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Solar Millennium, Amargosa...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... includes the solar fields, power blocks, buildings, parking area, laydown area, stormwater retention pond...] Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Solar Millennium, Amargosa Farm Road Solar Power Project, Nye County, NV AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  3. 78 FR 38072 - General Management Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Guadalupe Mountains National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... National Park Service General Management Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Guadalupe Mountains... Plan, Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas. DATES: The NPS will execute a Record of Decision no... CONTACT: Dennis A. V squez, Superintendent, Guadalupe Mountains National Park, HC 60, Box 400, Salt...

  4. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

  5. 78 FR 12347 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Resource Management Plan and Final Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Proposed Resource Management Plan and Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Lander Field Office Planning Area, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... of 1969, as amended, and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, as amended, the...

  6. 75 FR 52969 - Final Environmental Impact Statement; Prisoners Harbor Wetland Restoration, Santa Cruz Island...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement; Prisoners Harbor Wetland Restoration, Santa... coastal wetland on Santa Cruz Island, Channel Islands National Park. The requisite no-action ``wait period... restoration of palustrine wetlands and deepwater habitat at Prisoners Harbor, as well as remove a...

  7. 76 FR 60815 - Final Legislative Environmental Impact Statement (LEIS) for the Limestone Hills Training Area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Final Legislative Environmental Impact Statement (LEIS) for the Limestone Hills... land within the Limestone Hills Training Area (LHTA) from BLM administration. The LEIS proposes that..., mining, recreation, transportation, utility right-of-ways, and wildlife management. A limestone mine...

  8. 76 FR 21403 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ...] Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Project, Eureka County... available for public inspection at the BLM Elko District Office, 3900 E. Idaho Street, Elko, Nevada during...: Newmont Mining Corporation's Genesis- Bluestar mining operations area is located in northeastern Nevada...

  9. 75 FR 33273 - Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Disposal and Reuse of Fort Monroe, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Department of the Army Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Disposal and Reuse of Fort Monroe, VA... socioeconomic impacts associated with the disposal and reuse of Fort Monroe, Virginia. DATES: The waiting period... reuse of Fort Monroe. The 2005 BRAC Commission Report directed the closure of Fort Monroe and...

  10. 77 FR 5505 - Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project In accordance with... of Energy Projects has reviewed the application for license for the Eagle Mountain Pumped...

  11. Strain background modifies phenotypes in the ATP8B1-deficient mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.; Sanford, U.R.; Vargas, J.C.; Xu, H.; Groen, A.; Paulusma, C.C.; Grenert, J.P.; Pawlikowska, L.; Sen, S.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bull, L.N.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1) underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis) to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis). The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficie

  12. Proceedings of a workshop on environmental impacts of marine biomass. Final report, February-October 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschard, R.; Berg, V.; Killeen, S.

    1981-09-01

    The workshop identified and evaluated potential environmental issues of an open ocean biomass system and made research recommendations to GRI for needed environmental studies. Several critical issues were identified that need to be addressed by the GRI environmental research program. A detailed assessment is needed of the particulate organic matter (POM) flux from the kelp to the deep water column and sediments in order to determine the impact of kelp farming on ocean oxygen budgets, considering kelp fragments and residues from the anaerobic digestion process. Also, it is necessary to understand the dynamics of upwelled water especially related to nutrient availability and uptake. In addition, from an engineering and operations aspect, a critical test farm experiment is required of the farm structure, including its associated pumps (wave-driven) and attachment lines. Finally, the issue of digester residue disposal must be evaluated to suggest environmentally acceptable disposal or utilization practices.

  13. Proposed Owyhee resource management plan and final environmental impact statement, Volume 2

    OpenAIRE

    U.S. Bureau of Land Management

    1999-01-01

    Five alternatives are described and analyzed in the final Environmental Impact Statement. Alternative A is a continuation of current management. Alternative B was developed through BLM staff interpretation and analysis of information submitted by the Owyhee Country Commissioners with the assistance of the Owyhee County Natural Resources Committee. Alternative C was developed by the BLM lower Snake River District interdisciplinary planning team. Alternative D was developed through BLM staff in...

  14. Proposed Owyhee Resource Management Plan and Final Environmental Impact Statement, Vol. 3

    OpenAIRE

    U.S. Bureau of Land Management

    1999-01-01

    Five alternatives are described and analyzed in the final Environmental Impact Statement. Alternative A is a continuation of current management. Alternative B was developed through BLM staff interpretation and analysis of information submitted by the Owyhee Country Commissioners with the assistance of the Owyhee County Natural Resources Committee. Alternative C was developed by the BLM lower Snake River District interdisciplinary planning team. Alternative D was developed through BLM staff in...

  15. Final Environmental Assessment for Gate 5 (Central Avenue) Interchange Improvements on F. E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    PHONE TYPIST’S SUSPENSE DATE INITIALS Beckwith, GS -11 90 CES/CEAN 773-3667 rs SUBJECT DATE Final Environmental Assessment, Gate 5 (Central Avenue... Kirk Schaumman Air Quality Manager F. E. Warren AFB WY 82005 10 Final Environmental Assessment for Gate 5 (Central Avenue) Interchange Improvements

  16. 78 FR 27416 - Notice of Availability of the Final Record of Decision for the Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ..., analysis, and review; John Petrilla (CBP), B.S. Environmental Economics and Policy, M.P.P. Policy Studies... Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Northern Border Activities and Technical Corrections to the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Northern Border Activities AGENCY: U.S....

  17. Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

  18. Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

    1991-05-01

    The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

  19. Final Environmental Assessment for the Military Housing Privatization Initiative (MHPI), Moody Air Force Base, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Leconte’s wild indigo Baptisia lecontei G4?/S1 No Hop sedge Carex lupulifomis G4?/S1 No Tracy’s dew threads Drosera tracyi G3G4/S1 No...Green fly orchid Epidendrum magnoliae U G4/S3 Yes Southern umbrella sedge Fuirena scirpoidea G5/S1 No Final – Moody AFB MHPI Environmental...aristata ( Sedge ) approx. 2.0 mi, SW of site GA Macrochdy~ temmim;kil (Alligator Snapping Turtle) approx. 1.0 mi. SE of site f’teronotropis mP.tallicus

  20. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report Exhibits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d` Alene tribe.

  1. Global gene profiling of aging lungs in Atp8b1 mutant mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Ramani; Stearns, Timothy M.; Czachor, Alexander; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Turn, Christina; Westermann-Clark, Emma; Breitzig, Mason; Tan, Lee; Lockey, Richard F.; King, Benjamin L.; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent studies implicate cardiolipin oxidation in several age-related diseases. Atp8b1 encoding Type 4 P-type ATPases is a cardiolipin transporter. Mutation in Atp8b1 gene or inflammation of the lungs impairs the capacity of Atp8b1 to clear cardiolipin from lung fluid. However, the link between Atp8b1 mutation and age-related gene alteration is unknown. Therefore, we investigated how Atp8b1 mutation alters age-related genes. Methods We performed Affymetrix gene profiling of lungs isolated from young (7-9 wks, n=6) and aged (14 months, 14 M, n=6) C57BL/6 and Atp8b1 mutant mice. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was performed. Differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results Global transcriptome analysis revealed 532 differentially expressed genes in Atp8b1 lungs, 157 differentially expressed genes in C57BL/6 lungs, and 37 overlapping genes. IPA of age-related genes in Atp8b1 lungs showed enrichment of Xenobiotic metabolism and Nrf2-mediated signaling pathways. The increase in Adamts2 and Mmp13 transcripts in aged Atp8b1 lungs was validated by qRT-PCR. Similarly, the decrease in Col1a1 and increase in Cxcr6 transcripts was confirmed in both Atp8b1 mutant and C57BL/6 lungs. Conclusion Based on transcriptome profiling, our study indicates that Atp8b1 mutant mice may be susceptible to age-related lung diseases. PMID:27689529

  2. Strain background modifies phenotypes in the ATP8B1-deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohela Shah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1 underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis. The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficiency. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effect of genetic background on phenotypes of ATP8B1-deficient and wild-type mice, using C57Bl/6 (B6, 129, and (B6-129 F1 strain backgrounds. B6 background resulted in greater abnormalities in ATP8B1-deficient mice than did 129 and/or F1 background. ATP8B1-deficient pups of B6 background gained less weight. In adult ATP8B1-deficient mice at baseline, those of B6 background had lower serum cholesterol levels, higher serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and larger livers. After challenge with cholate-supplemented diet, these mice exhibited higher serum alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin levels, greater weight loss and larger livers. ATP8B1-deficient phenotypes in mice of F1 and 129 backgrounds are usually similar, suggesting that susceptibility to manifestations of ATP8B1 deficiency may be recessive. We also detected differences in hepatobiliary phenotypes between wild-type mice of differing strains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the ATP8B1-deficient mouse in a B6 background may be a better model of human ATP8B1 deficiency and highlight the importance of informed background strain selection for mouse models of liver disease.

  3. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1TU8B-2AAWC [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n>1TU8B SIKSQ---FQFGQ > GGG--- re... C 2AAWC KNFKKEKDTPFEQ ...>HHHHHH > ATOM 2082 CA LYS C 46 3.335 27.932 37.753 1.00 ...bChain> 1TU8B LLATR----GNGRN >HGGG ----GGG ...tryIDChain> LLKKNHTNNNNDKY >HHHH

  4. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Requirements as to paper, printing and language. (a) Registration statements and reports shall be filed on good.... (d) The body of all printed registration statements and reports and all notes to financial...

  5. First studies of the (8)B(alpha,p)(11)C reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rehm, KE; Jiang, CL; Greene, JP; Henderson, D; Janssens, RVF; Moore, EF; Mukherjee, G; Pardo, RC; Pennington, T; Schiffer, JP; Sinha, S; Tang, XD; Siemssen, RH; Jisonna, L; Segel, RE; Wuosmaa, AH

    2004-01-01

    The (8)B(alpha,p)(11)C reaction is part of the network that can bypass the triple a process leading to the production of (12)C. We have measured the astrophysical reaction rate for this reaction by studying the inverse (11)C(p,alpha)(8)B process. The radioactive (11)C beam was produced via the p((11

  6. 17 CFR 270.8b-33 - XBRL-Related Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false XBRL-Related Documents. 270.8b...) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.8b-33 XBRL-Related Documents. A registrant that participates in the voluntary XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language) program may submit,...

  7. Final environmental assessment : Using livestock grazing as a management tool to provide quality wildlife habitat : Silver Dollar Habitat Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This final environmental assessment is for the use of livestock grazing to improve the quality of wildlife habitats within the Silver Dollar Habitat Unit on Charles...

  8. Record of Decision for the Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact for the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record of decision (ROD) for the final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado provides the basis...

  9. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  10. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  11. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-06-23

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides

  12. 77 FR 64097 - Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the 2011 Final EIS for the Leasing and Underground...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... Forest Service Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the 2011 Final EIS for the Leasing and... (EIS) and Record of Decision to the 2011 Final EIS For the Leasing and Undeground Mining of the Greens... reserves. The ] tract is being considered for competitive coal leasing under BLM regulations at 43 CFR...

  13. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt (US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions

  14. Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

  15. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  16. Radiological and environmental consequences. Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute (Iceland)

    2002-11-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-2, Radiological and Environmental Consequences. The project was carried out 1998-2001 with participants from all the Nordic countries. Representatives from the Baltic States were also invited to some of the meetings and seminars. The project consisted of work on terrestrial and marine radioecology and had a broad scope in order to enable participation of research groups with various fields of interest. This report focuses on the project itself and gives a general summary of the studies undertaken. A separate technical report summarises the work done by each research group and gives references to papers published in scientific journals. The topics in BOK-2 included improving assessment of old and recent fallout, use of radionuclides as tracers in Nordic marine areas, improving assessment of internal doses and use of mass spectrometry in radioecology. (au)

  17. Environmental screening and evaluation of energy-using products (EuP). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesnaes, M. (2.-0 LCA consultants ApS, Aalborg, (Denmark)); Thestrup, J. (In-JeT ApS, Birkeroed (Denmark)); Remmen, A. (Aalborg Univ., Aalborg (Denmark))

    2009-07-01

    , existing Ecolabelling and related regulations, market access and growth, technology trends, etc. The memorandum is structured so that overall conclusions and comments are provided first followed by a detailed description of each product group or cluster of product groups. Following this structure, chapter 2 provides an executive summary with the main conclusions and findings from the work performed up till now. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the methodology used in the environmental screening. Hereafter, chapters 4 through 19 provides the background data and individual conclusions for each product group or cluster of product groups. Finally, chapter 20 through 22 provides references to all the Preparatory Studies and other literature references. (LN)

  18. Final report on the meteorological database, December 1944--1949. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stage, S.A.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.; Berg, L.K.

    1993-11-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is estimating radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at Hanford from 1944 to the present. A number of computer programs are being developed by the HEDR Project to estimate doses and confidence ranges associated with radionuclides transported through the atmosphere and the Columbia River. One computer program is the Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emissions Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET combines release data with information on atmospheric conditions including wind direction and speed. The RATCHET program uses these data to produce estimates of time-integrated air concentrations and surface contamination. These estimates are used in calculating dose by the Dynamic EStimates of Concentrations And Radionuclides in Terrestrial EnvironmentS (DESCARTES) and the Calculations of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides (CIDER) computer programs. This report describes the final status of the meteorological database used by RATCHET. Data collection procedures and the preparation and control of the meteorological database are described, along with an assessment of the data quality.

  19. Study supporting the phasing out of environmentally harmful subsidies. Annexes to Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withana, S.; Ten Brink, P.; Franckx, L.; Hirschnitz-Garbers, M.; Mayeres, I.; Oosterhuis, F.; Porsch, L.

    2012-10-15

    The need to reform ineffective or harmful public subsidies has long been recognised and has been a contentious point of discussion for several years. The EU has a long-standing commitment to removing or phasing out environmentally harmful subsidies (EHS). Most recently, the need to phase out EHS is reiterated in the 'Roadmap for a resource efficient Europe' which includes a milestone that 'by 2020 EHS will be phased out, with due regard to the impact on people in need'. Despite several commitments, progress has been slow and subsidies remain an issue in most EU countries. This study focuses specifically on EHS at the level of EU Member States; it identifies key types of EHS and examines cases of existing EHS across a range of environmental sectors and issues, including subsidies from non-action. The study also analyses examples of good practices in the reform of EHS in EU Member States and the lessons that can be learnt from these cases. Finally, based on this analysis, it develops practical recommendations on phasing out and reforming EHS to support the objectives of the Europe 2020 Strategy and the resource efficiency agenda. The study was carried out between January and October 2012 and is based on an analysis of literature and consultation with experts and policy makers. The sectoral cases studied are listed and discussed in this annex report: agriculture, climate and energy, fisheries, food, forestry, materials, transport, waste, and water.

  20. Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-10-01

    This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

  1. Coulomb dissociation of {sup 8}B at 254 A MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suemmerer, K.; Boue, F.; Baumann, T.; Geissel, H.; Hellstroem, M.; Koczon, P.; Schwab, E.; Schwab, W.; Senger, P.; Surowiecz, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Iwasa, N.; Ozawa, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany)]|[RIKEN Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan); Surowka, G. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Blank, B.; Czajkowski, S.; Marchand, C.; Pravikoff, M.S. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, 33 (France); Foerster, A.; Lauer, F.; Oeschler, H.; Speer, J.; Sturm, C.; Uhlig, F.; Wagner, A. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany); Gai, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Grosse, E. [Inst. fuer Kern- und Hadronenphysik, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kohlmeyer, B. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Kulessa, R.; Walus, W. [Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Motobayashi, T. [Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Teranishi, T. [RIKEN Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    As an alternative method for determining the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B reaction we have measured the Coulomb dissociation of {sup 8}B at 254 A MeV. From our preliminary results, we obtain good agreement with both the accepted direct-reaction measurements and the low-energy Coulomb dissociation study of Iwasa et al. performed at about 50 A MeV. (orig.)

  2. 78 FR 760 - Notice of Availability of the Final General Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... opportunities to enjoy appropriate low-impact outdoor recreation. Ecological resources would largely be managed to reveal the glacial landscape. The most sensitive ecological areas would be carefully protected... alternative. The Final GMP/EIS assesses impacts to soil resources, water quality, soundscapes, vegetation...

  3. 78 FR 59729 - Final Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... alter any important attribute of the resource. Moderate. The environmental effects are sufficient to noticeably alter, but not destabilize important attributes of the resource. Large. The environmental effects... Commission. Aby Mohseni, Deputy Director, Environmental Protection and Performance Directorate, Division...

  4. Evidence for a functional subdivision of Premotor Ear-Eye Field (Area 8B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eLanzilotto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Supplementary Eye Field (SEF and the Frontal Eye Field (FEF have been described as participating in gaze shift control. Recent evidence suggests, however, that other areas of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex also influence gaze shift. Herein, we have investigated electrically evoked ear- and eye movements from the Premotor Ear-Eye Field, or PEEF (area 8B of macaque monkeys. We stimulated PEEF during spontaneous condition (outside the task performance and during the execution of a visual fixation task (VFT. In the first case, we functionally identified two regions within the PEEF: a core and a belt. In the core region, stimulation elicited forward ear movements; regarding the evoked eye movements, in some penetrations, stimulation elicited contraversive fixed-vectors with a mean amplitude of 5.14°; while in other penetrations, we observed prevalently contralateral goal-directed eye movements having end-points that fell within 15° in respect to the primary eye position. On the contrary, in the belt region, stimulation elicited backward ear movements; regarding the eye movements, in some penetrations stimulation elicited prevalently contralateral goal-directed eye movements having end-points that fell within 15° in respect to the primary eye position, while in the lateral edge of the investigated region, stimulation elicited contralateral goal-directed eye movements having end-points that fell beyond 15° in respect to the primary eye position. Stimulation during VFT either did not elicit eye movements or evoked saccades of only a few degrees. Finally, even though no head rotation movements were observed during the stimulation period, we viewed a relationship between the duration of stimulation and the neck forces exerted by the monkey’s head. We propose an updated vision of the PEEF composed of two functional regions, core and belt, which may be involved in integrating auditory and visual information important to the programming of gaze

  5. Final Environmental Impact Statement Related to Reclamation of the Uranium Mill Tailings at the Atlas Site, Moab, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Division of Waste Management, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    1999-01-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) has been prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, to address potential environmental impacts associated with a request by Atlas Corporation to amend its existing NRC License no. SUA-917 to reclaim in place an existing uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodia...

  6. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Appendices A--L.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This report consists of appendices A-L of the final environmental impact statement for the Bonneville Power Administration. The appendices provide information on the following: Ninth circuit Court opinion in Forelaws on Board v. Johnson; guide to Northwest Power act contracts; guide to hydro operations; glossary; affected environment supporting documentation; environmental impacts of generic resource types; information on models used; technical information on analysis; public involvement activities; bibliography; Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act; and biological assessment. (CBS)

  7. Scattering of $^{7}$Be and $^{8}$B and the astrophysical S$_{17}$ factor

    CERN Document Server

    Tabacaru, G; Brinkley, J; Burjan, V; Cãrstoiu, F; Fu, C; Gagliardi, C A; Kroha, V; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Tang, X; Trache, L; Tribble, R E; Zhou, S

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of scattering of $^{7}$Be at 87 MeV on a melamine (C$_{3}$N$ _{6}$H$_{6}$) target and of $^{8}$B at 95 MeV on C were performed. For $^{7}$Be the angular range was extended over previous measurements and monitoring of the intensity of the radioactive beam was improved. The measurements allowed us to check and improve the optical model potentials used in the incoming and outgoing channels for the analysis of existing data on the proton transfer reaction $^{14}$N($^{7}$Be,$^{8}$B)$^{13}$C. The resultslead to an updated determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the virtual decay $^{8}$B $\\to$ $^{7}$Be + $p$. We find a slightly larger value, $C_{tot}^{2}(^{8}B)=0.466\\pm 0.047$ fm$^{-1}$, for the melamine target. This implies an astrophysical factor, $S_{17}(0)=18.0\\pm 1.8$ eV$\\cdot$b, for the solar neutrino generating reaction $^{7}$Be($p$,$\\gamma $)$^{8}$B.

  8. RAB8B Is Required for Activity and Caveolar Endocytosis of LRP6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubilay Demir

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. When Wnt ligands bind to the receptor complex, LRP5/6 coreceptors are activated by phosphorylation and concomitantly endocytosed. In vertebrates, Wnt ligands induce caveolin-dependent endocytosis of LRP6 to relay signal downstream, whereas antagonists such as Dickkopf promote clathrin-dependent endocytosis, leading to inhibition. However, little is known about how LRP6 is directed to different internalization mechanisms, and how caveolin-dependent endocytosis is mediated. In an RNAi screen, we identified the Rab GTPase RAB8B as being required for Wnt/β-catenin signaling. RAB8B depletion reduces LRP6 activity, β-catenin accumulation, and induction of Wnt target genes, whereas RAB8B overexpression promotes LRP6 activity and internalization and rescues inhibition of caveolar endocytosis. In Xenopus laevis and Danio rerio, RAB8B morphants show lower Wnt activity during embryonic development. Our results implicate RAB8B as an essential evolutionary conserved component of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through regulation of LRP6 activity and endocytosis.

  9. HATS-8b: A Low-Density Transiting Super-Neptune

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, D; Bakos, G Á; Penev, K; Zhou, G; Brahm, R; Rabus, M; Jordán, A; Mancini, L; de Val-Borro, M; Bhatti, W; Espinoza, N; Csubry, Z; Howard, A W; Fulton, B J; Buchhave, L A; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Ciceri, S; Noyes, R W; Isaacson, H; Marcy, G W; Suc, V; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    HATS-8b is a low density transiting super-Neptune discovered as part of the HATSouth project. The planet orbits its solar-like G dwarf host (V=14.03 $\\pm$ 0.10 and T$_{eff}$ =5679 $\\pm$ 50 K) with a period of 3.5839 d. HATS-8b is the third lowest mass transiting exoplanet to be discovered from a wide-field ground based search, and with a mass of 0.138 $\\pm$ 0.019 M$_J$ it is approximately half-way between the masses of Neptune and Saturn. However HATS-8b has a radius of 0.873 (+0.123,-0.075) R$_J$, resulting in a bulk density of just 0.259 $\\pm$ 0.091 g.cm$^{-3}$. The metallicity of the host star is super-Solar ([Fe/H]=0.210 $\\pm$ 0.080), arguing against the idea that low density exoplanets form from metal-poor environments. The low density and large radius of HATS-8b results in an atmospheric scale height of almost 1000 km, and in addition to this there is an excellent reference star of near equal magnitude at just 19 arcsecond separation on the sky. These factors make HATS-8b an exciting target for future a...

  10. Reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by $^{8}$B beam close to the barrier

    CERN Multimedia

    The aim of the proposed experiment is to investigate the reaction dynamics of proton-halo induced collisions at energies around the Coulomb barrier where coupling to continuum effects are expected to be important. We propose to measure the $^{8}$B + $^{64}$Zn elastic scattering angular distribution together with the measurement, for the first time, of p - $^{7}$Be coincidences coming from transfer and/or break-up of $^{8}$B. The latter will allow a better understanding of the relative contribution of elastic $\\textit{vs}$ non-elastic break-up in reactions induced by extremely weakly-bound nuclei. We believe that with the availability of the post accelerated $^{8}$B beam at REX-ISOLDE we will be able to collect for the first time high quality data for the study of such an important topic.

  11. Determination of 8B(p,gamma)9C reaction rate from 9C breakup

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Minomo, Kosho; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    The astrophysical factor of the 8B(p,gamma)9C at zero energy, S18(0), is determined from three-body model analysis of 9C breakup processes. The elastic breakup 208Pb(9C,p8B)208Pb at 65 MeV/nucleon and the one-proton removal reaction of 9C at 285 MeV/nucleon on C and Al targets are calculated with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) and the eikonal reaction theory (ERT), respectively. The asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) of 9C in the p-8B configuration extracted from the two reactions show good consistency, in contrast to in the previous studies. As a result of the present analysis, S18(0) = 66 \\pm 10 eVb is obtained.

  12. Analysis of Human TAAR8 and Murine Taar8b Mediated Signaling Pathways and Expression Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Mühlhaus

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid hormone derivative 3-iodothyronamine (3-T1AM exerts metabolic effects in vivo that contradict known effects of thyroid hormones. 3-T1AM acts as a trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 agonist and activates Gs signaling in vitro. Interestingly, 3-T1AM-meditated in vivo effects persist in Taar1 knockout-mice indicating that further targets of 3-T1AM might exist. Here, we investigated another member of the TAAR family, the only scarcely studied mouse and human trace-amine-associated receptor 8 (Taar8b, TAAR8. By RT-qPCR and locked-nucleic-acid (LNA in situ hybridization, Taar8b expression in different mouse tissues was analyzed. Functionally, we characterized TAAR8 and Taar8b with regard to cell surface expression and signaling via different G-protein-mediated pathways. Cell surface expression was verified by ELISA, and cAMP accumulation was quantified by AlphaScreen for detection of Gs and/or Gi/o signaling. Activation of G-proteins Gq/11 and G12/13 was analyzed by reporter gene assays. Expression analyses revealed at most marginal Taar8b expression and no gender differences for almost all analyzed tissues. In heart, LNA-in situ hybridization demonstrated the absence of Taar8b expression. We could not identify 3-T1AM as a ligand for TAAR8 and Taar8b, but both receptors were characterized by a basal Gi/o signaling activity, a so far unknown signaling pathway for TAARs.

  13. 7Be- and 8B-reaction dynamics at Coulomb barrier energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzocco M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the reaction dynamics induced by the Radioactive Ion Beams 7Be and 8B on a 208Pb target at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The two measurements are strongly interconnected, being 7Be (Sα = 1.586 MeV the loosely bound core of the even more exotic 8B (Sp = 0.1375 MeV nucleus. Here we summarize the present status of the data analysis for the measurement of the elastic scattering process for both reactions and the preliminary results for the optical model analysis of the collected data.

  14. 7Be- and 8B-reaction dynamics at Coulomb barrier energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Acosta, L.; Di Meo, P.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Iwasa, N.; Jeong, S. C.; Jia, H. M.; Keeley, N.; Kim, Y. H.; Kimura, S.; Kubono, S.; Lay, J. A.; Lin, C. J.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Miyatake, H.; Mukai, M.; Nakao, T.; Nicoletto, M.; Pakou, A.; Rusek, K.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sava, T.; Sgouros, O.; Stefanini, C.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stiliaris, E.; Stroe, L.; Teranishi, T.; Toniolo, N.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. Y.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the reaction dynamics induced by the Radioactive Ion Beams 7Be and 8B on a 208Pb target at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The two measurements are strongly interconnected, being 7Be (Sα = 1.586 MeV) the loosely bound core of the even more exotic 8B (Sp = 0.1375 MeV) nucleus. Here we summarize the present status of the data analysis for the measurement of the elastic scattering process for both reactions and the preliminary results for the optical model analysis of the collected data.

  15. Detecting the upturn of the solar {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum with LENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Möllenberg, R., E-mail: randolph.moellenberg@ph.tum.de [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Feilitzsch, F. von; Hellgartner, D.; Oberauer, L.; Tippmann, M. [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Winter, J.; Wurm, M. [Institut für Physik, Excellence Cluster PRISMA, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Zimmer, V. [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) has been proposed as a next generation 50 kt liquid scintillator detector. The large target mass allows a high precision measurement of the solar {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum, with an unprecedented energy threshold of 2 MeV. Hence, it can probe the MSW-LMA prediction for the electron neutrino survival probability in the transition region between vacuum and matter-dominated neutrino oscillations. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of the solar neutrino and the corresponding background spectra, it was found that the predicted upturn of the solar {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum can be detected with 5σ significance after 5 years.

  16. Detecting the Upturn of the Solar $^8$B Neutrino Spectrum with LENA

    CERN Document Server

    Möllenberg, Randolph; Hellgartner, Dominikus; Oberauer, Lothar; Tippmann, Marc; Winter, Jürgen; Wurm, Michael; Zimmer, Vincenz

    2014-01-01

    LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) has been proposed as a next generation 50 kt liquid scintillator detector. The large target mass allows a high precision measurement of the solar $^8$B neutrino spectrum, with an unprecedented energy threshold of 2 MeV. Hence, it can probe the MSW-LMA prediction for the electron neutrino survival probability in the transition region between vacuum and matter-dominated neutrino oscillations. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of the solar neutrino and the corresponding background spectra, it was found that the predicted upturn of the solar $^8$B neutrino spectrum can be detected with 5 sigma significance after 5 y.

  17. New measurement and analysis of the $^{7}Be(p,\\gamma) ^{8}B$ cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Hammache, F; Aguer, P; Angulo, C; Barhoumi, S; Brillard, L; Chemin, J F; Claverie, G; Coc, A; Hussonnois, M; Jacotin, M; Kiener, J; Lefebvre, A; Scheurer, J N; Thibaud, J P; Virassamynaïken, E

    1998-01-01

    Cross sections for the 7Be(p,gamma)8B reaction have been measured for E_c.m.= 0.35-1.4 MeV using radioactive 7Be targets. Two independent measurements carried out with different beam conditions, different targets and detectors are in excellent agreement. A statistical comparison of these measurements with previous results leads to a restricted set of consistent data. The deduced zero-energy S-factor S(0) is found to be 15-20% smaller than the previously recommended value. This implies a 8B solar neutrino flux lower than previously predicted in various standard solar models.

  18. Detecting the upturn of the solar 8B neutrino spectrum with LENA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Möllenberg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy has been proposed as a next generation 50 kt liquid scintillator detector. The large target mass allows a high precision measurement of the solar 8B neutrino spectrum, with an unprecedented energy threshold of 2 MeV. Hence, it can probe the MSW-LMA prediction for the electron neutrino survival probability in the transition region between vacuum and matter-dominated neutrino oscillations. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of the solar neutrino and the corresponding background spectra, it was found that the predicted upturn of the solar 8B neutrino spectrum can be detected with 5σ significance after 5 years.

  19. 76 FR 70169 - Draft Supplement 2 to Final Environmental Statement Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is requesting comments on NUREG-0498, ``Final Environmental Statement, Supplement 2, Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant [WBN], Unit 2-- Draft Report for Comment'' (draft SFES). The NRC will hold a public meeting on the draft SFES on December 8,...

  20. 75 FR 60804 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the West Butte Wind Power...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Butte Wind Power Right-of-Way, Crook and Deschutes Counties, OR AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the West Butte Wind Power Right-of-Way and by... Federal Register notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steve Storo, BLM West Butte Wind Power Right...

  1. 76 FR 29218 - Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement To Consider Issuance of a Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... impacts to the natural, physical and human environment as a result of the Sabine Mining Company's proposal... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement To Consider... Mining Company's Proposal To Construct, Operate, and Reclaim the Rusk Permit Area, Rusk, Panola,...

  2. 76 FR 12373 - Notice of Availability of Final Supplement to the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Pa...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... Hawaii, LLC Irradiator in Honolulu, HI AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of... Final Supplement to the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the irradiator proposed by Pa'ina Hawaii, LLC... from earthquakes, tsunamis, and hurricanes at the alternative locations will be small....

  3. 75 FR 19422 - Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan (FEIS/GMP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Plan (FEIS/GMP), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site AGENCY: National Park Service. ACTION: Notice of availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan (FEIS/GMP... Decision- making) the NPS announces the availability of a FEIS/GMP for the Tuskegee Airmen...

  4. 77 FR 15795 - Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Gasco Energy Inc. Uinta...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Federal oil and gas leases. The Final EIS analysis allows the BLM to choose a course of action that.... would develop their existing oil and gas leases by drilling 1,491 wells from the same number of well... Vernal BLM Web site, and Utah BLM's Environmental Notification Bulletin Board. Juan Palma, State...

  5. 76 FR 19744 - Final Tropic to Hatch 138 kV Transmission Line Project Environmental Impact Statement and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... Forest Service Final Tropic to Hatch 138 kV Transmission Line Project Environmental Impact Statement and Proposed Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Management Plan Amendment AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... Forest, USDA Forest Service, Tropic to Hatch 138kV Transmission Line Project EIS Project Leader, 1789...

  6. 77 FR 40079 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Hycroft Mine Expansion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... on private land in Humboldt and Pershing counties, approximately 55 miles west of Winnemucca, Nevada..., Humboldt and Pershing Counties, NV AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... District, Black Rock Field Office, Winnemucca, Nevada, has prepared a Final Environmental Impact...

  7. 78 FR 36743 - Adoption of Final Environmental Assessment (UT-040-09-03) Prepared for the Upper Kanab Creek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Adoption of Final Environmental Assessment (UT-040-09-03) Prepared... Lake City, Utah 84138; email at gary.mcrae@ut.usda.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: NRCS announces its intent to adopt the Kanab Creek Watershed Vegetation Management Project EA (UT-040-09-03) prepared by...

  8. Final Environmental Assessment for the Target Enhancement Railway At Avon Park Air Force Range, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Proposed Action. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will not be prepared. Date HENRY J. SANTICOLA: Colonel , USAF Chairperson EPC ACRONYMS AND...2001 and 2003 by a contractor for the Environmental Restoration Program at APAFR. In late 2006 this site was transferred to the Environmental...Grayson - RPA, Contractor Archeologist Avon Park AFR, FL Florida State University, 2004 Years of Experience: 3 Roger Grebing Chief

  9. Resource Contingency Program - Oregon : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hermiston Power Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-09-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by Federal system load growth, the outcome of BPA`s Business Plan, required operational changes in Columbia-Snake River Hydroelectric facilities, and the loss of major generating resources. In September 1993, three option development agreements were signed with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop, Washington, and near Hermiston, Oregon. Together these three projects could supply BPA with 1,090 average megawatts (aMW) of power. Under these agreements, sponsors are obtaining permits and conducting project design work, and BPA is completing this EIS process. In September 1993, BPA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on these three proposed gas-fired combustion turbine projects and held public scoping meetings in October 1993 at each site. In February 1994, BPA released an Implementation Plan on the proposed scope of the EIS. A draft EIS on the three proposed projects was published in February 1995. The impacts of the Chehalis and Satsop projects located in Washington State will be covered in one EIS document, while the impacts of the Hermiston project located in Oregon are covered in this final EIS document. It is BPA`s intent to continue to base the analysis of impacts on the assumption that all three projects may be constructed at some point in the future.

  10. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

  11. 77 FR 2993 - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision on Oncor Electric Delivery Company's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... the HCP and to evaluate alternatives, along with the draft HCP (76 FR 41808). We included public... Comments You may obtain copies of the final EIS, final ROD, and final HCP by going to http://www.fws.gov...., Washington, DC 20240. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 500 Gold Avenue SW., Room 6034, Albuquerque, NM...

  12. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1VL8B-2UVDB [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1VL8B-2UVDB 1VL8 2UVD B B VFDLRGRVALVTGGSRGLGFGIAQGLAEAGCSVVVASRN...>GLU CA 241 ALA CA 324 SER CA 282 2UV...D B 2UVDB VNYAGNEQKAN 2.647510051727295 1 2UV...D B 2UVDB EIKKL-GSDAI

  13. The expansion of Phytophthora clade 8b: three new species associated with winter grown vegetable crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertier, L.; Brouwer, H.; Cock, de A.W.A.M.; Cooke, D.E.L.; Olsson, C.H.B.; Höfte, M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite its association with important agricultural crops, Phytophthora clade 8b is a poorly studied group of species. The clade currently consists of three officially described species (Phytophthora porri, P. brassicae and P. primulae) that are host-specific pathogens of leek, cabbages and Primula

  14. The expansion of Phytophthora clade 8b: three new species associated with winter grown vegetable crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertier, L; Brouwer, H; de Cock, A W A M; Cooke, D E L; Olsson, C H B; Höfte, M

    2013-12-01

    Despite its association with important agricultural crops, Phytophthora clade 8b is a poorly studied group of species. The clade currently consists of three officially described species (Phytophthora porri, P. brassicae and P. primulae) that are host-specific pathogens of leek, cabbages and Primula spp., respectively. However, over the past few decades, several other clade 8b-like Phytophthoras have been found on a variety of different host plants that were all grown at low temperatures in winter seasons. In this study, a collection of 30 of these isolates was subjected to a phylogenetic study using two loci (the rDNA ITS region and the mitochondrial cox1 gene). This analysis revealed a clear clustering of isolates according to their host plants. To verify whether these isolates belong to separate species, a detailed morphological study was conducted. On the basis of genetic and morphological differences and host specificity, we now present the official description of three new species in clade 8b: Phytophthora cichorii sp. nov., P. dauci sp. nov. and P. lactucae sp. nov. Two other groups of isolates (Phytophthora taxon castitis and Phytophthora taxon parsley) might also represent new species but the data available at this time are insufficient for an official description. This brings Phytophthora clade 8b to a group of six species that are all host-specific, slow-growing and specifically infect herbaceous crops at low temperatures.

  15. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1DR8B-3DMSA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1DR8B-3DMSA 1DR8 3DMS B A --------------------------MKVAVLPGDGIGP...D>3DMS A 3DMSA AVEKAYGGKKKIH ...entryChain> 3DMS A 3DMSA TKVYGPDV...90 SER CA 526 3DMS A 3DMSA...ine>PHE CA 324 3DMS A 3DMSA

  16. Discovery and Rossiter-McLauglin effect of exoplanet kepler-8b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenkins...[], Jon M.; Borucki, W.J.; Koch, D. G.;

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery and the Rossiter-McLaughlin (R-M) effect of Kepler-8b, a transiting planet identified by the NASA Kepler Mission. Kepler photometry and Keck-HIRES radial velocities yield the radius and mass of the planet around this F8IV subgiant host star. The planet has a radius R P ...

  17. P-Wave Nuclear Halos in 8B and 11Be

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zu-Hua; BAO Jing-Dong

    2004-01-01

    @@ We use a procedure to extract valuable information regarding the p-wave halos in 8B and 11Be from the measured nuclear asymptotic normalization coefficients. With this procedure, we evaluate the probabilities of valence particle being outside the binding potential, which are 0.31 ± 0.03 for the 8B ground state and 0.59 ± 0.06 for the 11 Be first excited state. More than 50% probability outside the binding potential means that the 11 Be first excited state has a typical p-wave neutron halo. The rms radii are obtained to be 3.9 ± 0.2 fm for the valence proton in the 8B ground state and to be 6.5 ± 0.3 fm for the valence neutron in the 11Be first excited state.The probabilities of the valence particle being in the non-classical region are extracted to be 0.41 ± 0.04 and 0.46 ± 0.05 for the 8B ground state and the 11 Be first excited state, respectively. The results demonstrate that although hindered by the effects of Coulomb and/or centrifugal barriers, their valence particle wave function still penetrates substantially into the classically forbidden region.

  18. Determination of S17 from Systematic Analysis of 8B Coulomb Dissociation

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, K; Iseri, Y; Matsumoto, T; Yamashita, N; Kamimura, M; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    Systematic analysis of 8B Coulomb dissociation with the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) method is proposed to determine the astrophysical factor S17 accurately. An important advantage of the analysis is that uncertainties of the extracted S17 coming from the use of the ANC method can quantitatively be evaluated, in contrast to previous analyses using the Virtual Photon Theory (VPT). Calculation of measured spectra in dissociation experiments is done by means of the method of Continuum-Discretized Coupled-Channels (CDCC). From the analysis of 58Ni(8B,7Be+p)58Ni at 25.8 MeV, S17=22.83 +/- 0.51(theo) +/- 2.28(expt) (eVb) is obtained; the ANC method turned out to work in this case within 1% of error. Preceding systematic analysis of experimental data at intermediate energies, we propose hybrid (HY) Coupled-Channels (CC) calculation of 8B Coulomb dissociation, which makes numerical calculation much simple, retaining its accuracy. The validity of the HY calculation is tested for 58Ni(8B,7Be+p)58Ni at 240...

  19. Biodegradation of endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate by Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain C8B in broth medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ngangbam Sarat; Singh, Dileep K

    2011-09-01

    Endosulfan is one of the most widely used wide spectrum cyclodiene organochlorine insecticide. In environment, endosulfan can undergo either oxidation or hydrolysis reaction to form endosulfan sulfate and endosulfan diol respectively. Endosulfan sulfate is as toxic and as persistent as its parent isomers. In the present study, endosulfan degrading bacteria were isolated from soil through selective enrichment technique using sulfur free medium with endosulfan as sole sulfur source. Out of the 8 isolated bacterial strains, strain C8B was found to be the most efficient endosulfan degrader, degrading 94.12% α-endosulfan and 84.52% β-endosulfan. The bacterial strain was identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain C8B on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence similarity. Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain C8B was also found to degrade 80.10% endosulfan sulfate using it as sulfur source. No known metabolites were found to be formed in the culture media during the entire course of degradation. Besides, the bacterial strain was found to degrade all the known endosulfan metabolites. There was marked increase in the quantity of released CO(2) from the culture media with endosulfan as sulfur source as compared to MgSO(4) suggesting that the bacterial strain, Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain C8B probably degraded endosulfan completely through the formation of endosulfan ether.

  20. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1BT8B-1UNFX [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1BT8B-1UNFX 1BT8 1UNF B X ---AVYTLPELPYDYSALEPYISGEIMELHHDKHHKAYV...EEEEEEEEEGGG EEEEEEE EEE EEE HHHH HHHHHHHHHH EEHHHHHHHHHHHHHH EVID> 1UNF X 1UNFX VN...d>2.942183017730713 5.374790191650391 ...> TRP CA 395 ASP CA 318 ASP CA 362 1UNF

  1. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1: Environmental Analysis and Technical Appendices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    BPA is considering whether to purchase electrical power from a proposed privately-owned combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Washington. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate 240 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Tenaska Washington Partners II, L.P. The project would be located about 19 kilometers (12 miles) southeast of downtown Tacoma in the Frederickson Industrial Area, Pierce County. The proposed plant would occupy about half of a 6.4-hectare (16-acre) parcel and would be consistent with the industrial character of its surroundings. The proposed site is currently undeveloped and zoned for industrial use by the county. Main environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and in comments on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) include: (1) potential air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contribution to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) potential health and safety impacts, such as nuisance odors, plant safety, visibility and heat-emission systems which may affect low-flying planes and potential health effects of electric and magnetic fields; and (3) potential water quality and quantity impacts, such as the amount of wastewater to be discharged, the source and amount of water required for plant operation. These and other issues are discussed in detail in the EIS. The proposed project already includes many features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on investigations performed for the EIS, no significant unavoidable adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial. The EIS is being mailed to numerous agencies, groups, and individuals (see Section 8.0). There will be a 30-day no-action period before any decisions are made and the Record of Decision is signed.

  2. Final Environmental Assessment/Overseas Environmental Assessment Joint Strile Fighter System Development and Demonstration Developmental Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    daily maximum. j. The Federal secondary standard to protect the public welfare is 1,300 µg/m3. A geographic area where the air quality meets the...four species of cetaceans have been identified from sightings or strandings in the SCB. These include 26 species of odontocetes (toothed whales...and Welfare , Chapter 85 Air Pollution Prevention and Control. AESO 1990. AESO 6-90 Aircraft Environmental Support Office (AESO). “Summary Tables

  3. 78 FR 21907 - Energy Answers Arecibo, LLC: Notice of Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Final Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... processing building; processed refuse fuel storage building; boiler and steam turbine; emission control... Industrial Development Company (PRIDCO) served as lead agency in preparation of a Final EIS prepared...

  4. Strategic petroleum reserve, Byran Mound Salt Dome, Brazoria County, Texas. Final environmental impact statement (final supplement to FEA FES 76/77-6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    On January 7, 1977, the Federal Energy Administration issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the development of the Bryan Mound salt dome as a storage site for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (FES 76/77-6). On October 1, 1977, the U.S. Department of Energy was created and the programs of the Federal Energy Administration were transferred to the new Department. As such, this final supplement is being issued by the Department of Energy. The salt dome is located in Brazoria County, Texas. Since the EIS was published, it has been determined that this arrangement would be inadequate to meet the long term requirements for filling and withdrawing oil at the site, although the disposal of brine to Dow Chemical would be utilized to the maximum extent possible. Therefore, on July 15, 1977, a Draft Supplement to FES 76/77-6 was issued addressing the environmental impacts of construction and operation of two types of brine disposal systems and a new water supply system. This final supplement addresses a brine injection well system and a water intake system. Construction of this new system component would cause temporary disruption to land use, water quality, air quality, and terrestrial and aquatic ecology. The new facilities would permanently change 17 acres of land from its present use. Operation of the systems would have relatively small, short-term impacts. Use of the brine surge pit could adversely affect air quality by emitting hydrocarbon vapors (maximum rate of 51.4 tons per year). Operation of the disposal wells would increase the salinity of an already saline aquifer. All operational impacts would be relatively minor and short-term, occurring only during periods of fill or withdrawal of the storage facility.

  5. Environmental Shortcourse Final report [Joint US-EC Short Course on Environmental Biotechnology: Microbial Catalysts for the Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, Gerben; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2013-03-05

    The Joint US-EC Short Course on Environmental Biotechnology is designed for several purposes. One of the central tenets is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that will set the groundwork for future overseas collaborative interactions. The course is also designed to give the scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods for the analysis of microbes and their activities pertinent to the remediation of pollutants in the environment. The 2011 course covered multiple theoretical and practical topics in environmental biotechnology. The practical part was centered around a full concise experiment to demonstrate the possibility for targeted remediation of contaminated soil. Experiments included chemical, microbiological, and molecular analyses of sediments and/or waters, contaminant bioavailability assessment, seeded bioremediation, gene probing, PCR amplification, microbial community analysis based on 16S rRNA gene diversity, and microarray analyses. Each of these topics is explained in detail. The practical part of the course was complemented with two lectures per day, given by distinguished scientists from the US and from Europe, covering a research area related to what the students are doing in the course.

  6. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

  7. Final Environmental Assessment For Wing Infrastructure Development Outlook (WINDO) Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Tucson, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    processing tools (Davis-Monthan AFB 2004e). Eventually some groups adopted the cultivation of domesticated plants and became less mobile as they...regulations that govern transportation of hazardous materials (EPA530-F- 96-032 et seq.). All waste ACM will be transported to the Tangerine Landfill...which is located at 10220 West Tangerine Road and operated by Pima County. FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 4-24 Wing Infrastructure Development

  8. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 3, Appendix M, Contract Copies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This report, is part of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration, consists of an appendix of contract copies related to the following: Detailed Index to Generic Utility Power Sales Contracts, Text of Generic Utility Contract, Detailed Index to Generic DSI Power Sales Contracts, Text of Generic DSI Contract, Text of Residential Purchase and Sale Agreement (Residential Exchange), and Detailed Index to General Contract Provisions -- GCP Form PSC-2 (Incorporated into all three types of contracts as an Exhibit).

  9. Measurement of the 8B Solar Neutrino Flux with KamLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O' Donnell, T.; Steiner, H.M.; Winslow, L.A.; Dwyer, D.A.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R.D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B.E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; Tang, A.; Downum, K.E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K.M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M.P.

    2011-06-04

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from {sup 8}B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77 {+-} 0.26(stat) {+-} 0.32(syst) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The analysis threshold is driven by {sup 208}Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic {sup 11}Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with standard solar model predictions which include matter-enhanced neutrino oscillation.

  10. Breakup and finite-range effects on the 8B(d,n)9C reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    The astrophysical factor of 8B(p,{\\gamma})9C at zero energy, S18(0), is determined by a three-body coupled-channels analysis of the transfer reaction 8B(d,n)9C at 14.4 MeV/nucleon. Effects of the breakup channels of deuteron are investigated with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC). It is found that the transfer process through the deuteron breakup states, its interference with that through the deuteron ground state in particular, gives a large increase in the transfer cross section. The finite-range effects with respect to the proton- neutron relative coordinate are found to be less than 5%. As a result of the present analysis, S18(0) = 33 +/- 10 eVb is obtained that is smaller than the result of the previous DWBA analysis by about 26%.

  11. How to observe 8B solar neutrinos in liquid scintillator detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ianni, A; Villante, F L

    2016-01-01

    We show that liquid organic scintillator detectors (e.g., KamLAND and Borexino) can measure the 8B solar neutrino flux by means of the nu_e charged current interaction with the 13C nuclei naturally contained in the scintillators. The neutrino events can be identified by exploiting the time and space coincidence with the subsequent decay of the produced 13N nuclei. We perform a detailed analysis of the background in KamLAND, Borexino and in a possible liquid scintillator detector at SNOLab, showing that the 8B solar neutrino signal can be extracted with a reasonable uncertainty in a few years of data taking. KamLAND should be able to extract about 18 solar neutrino events from the already collected data. Prospects for gigantic scintillator detectors (such as LENA) are also studied.

  12. Measurement of the 8B Solar Neutrino Flux with KamLAND

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, S; Gando, A; Gando, Y; Ichimura, K; Ikeda, H; Inoue, K; Kibe, Y; Kimura, W; Kishimoto, Y; Koga, M; Minekawa, Y; Mitsui, T; Morikawa, T; Nagai, N; Nakajima, K; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, M; Narita, K; Shimizu, I; Shimizu, Y; Shirai, J; Suekane, F; Suzuki, A; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, N; Takemoto, Y; Tamae, K; Watanabe, H; Xu, B D; Yabumoto, H; Yonezawa, E; Yoshida, H; Yoshida, S; Enomoto, S; Kozlov, A; Murayama, H; Grant, C; Keefer, G; McKee, D; Piepke, A; Banks, T I; Bloxham, T; Detwiler, J A; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Han, K; Kadel, R; O'Donnell, T; Steiner, H M; Winslow, L A; Dwyer, D A; Mauger, C; McKeown, R D; Zhang, C; Berger, B E; Lane, C E; Maricic, J; Miletic, T; Batygov, M; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Pakvasa, S; Sakai, M; Horton-Smith, G A; Tang, A; Downum, K E; Gratta, G; Tolich, K; Efremenko, Y; Kamyshkov, Y; Perevozchikov, O; Karwowski, H J; Markoff, D M; Tornow, W; Heeger, K M; Piquemal, F; Ricol, J -S; Decowski, M P

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from 8B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5 MeV analysis threshold is 1.49+/-0.14(stat)+/-0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a 8B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77+/-0.26(stat)+/-0.32(syst) x 10^6 cm^-2s^-1. The analysis threshold is driven by 208Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic 11Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with Standard Solar Model predictions which include matter enhanced neutrino oscillation.

  13. Beta-ray angular distributions of spin aligned {sup 8}Li and {sup 8}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumikama, T. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Iwakoshi, T. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Nagatomo, T. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ogura, M. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Nakashima, Y. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Fujiwara, H. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Matsuta, K. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Minamisono, T. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Mihara, M. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Fukuda, M. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Minamisono, K. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Yamaguchi, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2004-12-27

    The alignment correlation terms in the {beta}-ray angular distributions from spin aligned {sup 8}Li and {sup 8}B have been measured precisely. The difference of these terms between the mirror pair is compared with the prediction. As a result, the G-parity violating induced tensor term is found to be small. The significant contribution from the second-forbidden matrix elements is shown by comparing with the {beta}-{alpha} correlation coefficients.

  14. Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) outbreak associated with fowl adenovirus type 8b in broilers

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The causative agent of inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) was identified as fowl adenovirus (FAdV) type 8b, a member of the Fowl adenovirus E species, based on PCR results of adenoviral polymerase and the hexon gene in an outbreak of acute mortality that affected a broiler flock of 12,000 animals. In two waves of elevated mortality rate, a total of 264 chickens were found dead. Affected birds showed ruffled feathers, depression, watery droppings and limping. Th...

  15. Measurement of the 8B solar neutrino flux with the KamLAND liquid scintillator detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abe, S.; et al., [Unknown; Decowski, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from 8B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 ± 0.14(stat) ± 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due t

  16. 76 FR 55723 - Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Units 1 and 2 License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ..., Recommendations for Enhancing Reactor Safety in the 21st Century: The Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from... environmentally unacceptable conditions. Following the events at the Fukushima (Japan) Daiichi Nuclear Power...

  17. 58th SOW Low-Dust Helicopter Landing Zone Final Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Gases HLZ Helicopter Landing Zone IICEP Interagency and Intergovernmental Coordination for Environmental Planning IFR Instrument Flight Rule IR...to Instrument Flight Rule ( IFR ) flights and to VFR flights in accordance with the airspace classification (FAA 2008). Controlled airspace is

  18. Final Environmental Assessment Hunt Program Proposal Ohio River Islands National Wildlife Refuge 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this environmental assessment is to address the impacts of opening the Ohio River Islands National Wildlife Refuge to hunting. The ultimate purpose of...

  19. 75 FR 7522 - United States Section; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Flood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Environmental Impact Statement, Flood Control Improvements and Partial Levee Relocation, Presidio Flood Control... EIS) for flood control improvements to the Presidio Flood Control Project, Presidio, Texas (Presidio... Impact Statement, Flood Control Improvements and Partial Levee Relocation, USIBWC Presidio Flood......

  20. Final Environmental Assessment : Recreation management on the Lake Minatare Unit, North Platte National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Environmental Assessment is to evaluate the feasibility of removing portions of the North Platte National Wildlife Refuge from the National...

  1. San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Predator Management Plan and Final Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has prepared an environmental assessment to evaluate the effects associated with the implementation of a predator management...

  2. 76 FR 28964 - Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Populations and Low Income Populations and EO 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks... executive orders, including an analysis of the effects of its actions in compliance with the...

  3. 78 FR 48716 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Arkansas Valley...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... Arkansas River Basin, groundwater, climate change, recreation biological resources, human environment, socioeconomics, environmental justice, and historic properties. A Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS was... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  4. Bayou Savage NWR Final Environmental Impact Statement-Refuge Master Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Final EIS-Refuge Master Plan outlines 4 major alternatives for the management, policies, facilities, and administration of the Refuge and identifies the...

  5. Indoor Measurements of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Final Report to the Tobacco Related Disease Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Dod, Raymond L.; Russell, Marion L.; Singer, Brett C.; Sohn, Michael D.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Chang, Gee-Minn; Sextro, Richard G.

    2004-03-02

    The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and ''real-world'' buildings to (1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, (2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and (3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles--using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand

  6. Environmental impact analysis of electric and hybrid vehicle batteries. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-16

    This environmental impact analysis of electric and hybrid vehicle batteries is intended to identify principal environmental impacts resulting directly or indirectly from the development of electric vehicle batteries. Thus, the result of this study could be used to determine the appropriate following step in the U.S. DOE's EIA process. The environmental impacts considered in this document are the incremental impacts generated during the various phases in the battery life cycle. The processes investigated include mining, milling, smelting, and refining of metallic materials for electrode components; manufacturing processes of inorganic chemicals and other materials for electrolytes and other hardware components; battery assembly processes; operation and maintenance of batteries; and recycling and disposal of used batteries. The severity of the incremental impacts is quantified to the extent consistent with the state-of-knowledge. Many of the industrial processes involve proprietary or patent information; thus, in many cases, the associated environmental impacts could not be determined. In addition, most candidate battery systems are still in the development phase. Thus, the manufacturing and recycling processes for most battery systems either have not been developed by industry, or the information is not available. For these cases, the associated environmental impact evaluations could only be qualitative, and the need for further investigations is indicated. 26 figures, 27 tables. (RWR)

  7. Integrated environmental control and monitoring in the intelligent workplace. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project involved the design and engineering of the control and monitoring of environmental quality - visual, thermal, air - in the Intelligent Workplace. The research objectives were to study the performance of the individual systems, to study the integration issues related to each system, to develop a control plan, and to implement and test the integrated systems in a real setting. In this project, a control strategy with related algorithms for distributed sensors, actuators, and controllers for negotiating central and individual control of HVAC, lighting, and enclosure was developed in order to maximize user comfort, and energy and environmental effectiveness. The goal of the control system design in the Intelligent Workplace is the integration of building systems for optimization of occupant satisfaction, organizational flexibility, energy efficiency and environmental effectiveness. The task of designing this control system involves not only the research, development and demonstration of state-of-the-art mechanical and electrical systems, but also their integration. The ABSIC research team developed functional requirements for the environmental systems considering the needs of both facility manager and the user. There are three levels of control for the environmental systems: scheduled control, sensor control, and user control. The challenges are to achieve the highest possible levels of energy effectiveness simultaneously with the highest levels of user satisfaction. The report describes the components of each system, their implementation in the Intelligent Workplace and related control and monitoring issues.

  8. Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan 1990-1999 : Environmental Strategy. Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-09-01

    In operating and maintaining its regional power transmission system, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) must address environmental concerns. Pollution sources and pathways for pollution migration, including potential contamination from hazardous or toxic materials, are present. BPA must develop and follow precautionary measures, respond to emergencies, minimize wastes, redress past problems, alert and train employees to problems and safety needs, constantly evaluate this effort and update the program for improvements and changes in regulations and technology. Part of BPA's mission is to conduct its operation, maintenance, and replacement programs in an environmentally sound manner. BPA recognizes its responsibility to be good stewards of the environment. BPA will meet its environmental obligations as set forth in environmental laws and regulations. BPA intends to make consistent and measurable progress toward meeting these responsibilities. The target for the 10-Year Plan is to achieve environmental compliance and meet the following goals: (1) protect human health and the environment; (2) avoid or limit liability (3) set up an effective internal management structure to maintain compliance; and (4) achieve cost-effective compliance. 6 figs.

  9. Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

  10. Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1994-10-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to the Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Yakama Indian Nation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities for the Project within the boundaries of the Yakama Indian Reservation. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large 20, 340 hectare (50, 308 acre) project area. As individual properties are secured for the Project, three site-specific activities (habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) may be subject to further site-specific environmental review. All required Federal/Tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground disturbing activities.

  11. Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-05-24

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program, a small-scale production initiative designed to increase numbers of a weak but potentially recoverable population of spring chinook salmon in the Tucannon River in the State of Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-l326) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  12. Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction Feasibility Project : Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation; Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife

    1999-04-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund research for 2 to 3 years on the feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon into mid-Columbia River basin tributaries. The research would take place in the Methow and Wenatchee river basins in Chelan and Okanogan Counties, Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1282) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  13. Environmental transformations and cultural changes: A multidisciplinary case study for the Late Glacial and Final Palaeolithic from Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, F.; Tolksdorf, J. F.; Viehberg, F.; Schwarz, A.; von Bramann, U.; Bittmann, F.; Kaiser, K.; Schwalb, A.; Staesche, U.; Breest, K.; Pott, R.; Veil, S.

    2012-04-01

    In contrast to younger periods, studies integrating archaeological and environmental records for the Palaeolithic are still rare. Especially our knowledge about interactions between the drastic climatic/environmental changes and cultural developments during the Late Glacial is very limited. This multidisciplinary case study from river Jeetzel, a western Elbe tributary in Northern Germany, combines high resolution palaeoenvironmental investigations with fine-scaled archaeological research on stratified and surface sites. Various dating methods (palynostratigraphy, radiocarbon- and OSL-dating) and analyses of environmental and climatological proxies (pollen and plant macro-remains, ostracods, diatoms and green algae) on river palaeochannel sediments allow detailed reconstruction of interactions between Late Glacial climate, vegetation and fluvial developments. Biostratigraphical analyses on stratified archaeological sites and dating of charcoal / bone fragments from artefact scatters place the Late Palaeolithic occupation of Early Federmesser groups in an environmental context. Thus the former production of hitherto unknown amber art (amongst others a figurine representing a moose) can be ascribed to the Older Dryas and Early Allerød, which are the periods of main Late Glacial afforestation. Therewith our investigations suggest that Final Palaeolithic cultural changes may have been triggered by climatic and environmental transformations.

  14. Review and assessments of potential environmental, health and safety impacts of MHD technology. Final draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop an environmental, health and safety (EH and S) assessment and begin a site - specific assessment of these and socio - economic impacts for the magnetohydrodynamics program of the United States Department of Energy. This assessment includes detailed scientific and technical information on the specific EH and S issues mentioned in the MHD Environmental Development Plan. A review of current literature on impact-related subjects is also included. This document addresses the coal-fired, open-cycle MHD technology and reviews and assesses potential EH and S impacts resulting from operation of commercially-installed technology.

  15. 78 FR 75913 - Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... Agreement (as amended on June 5, 2008) signed by DOE, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology... Parts 1500-1508; 10 CFR Part 1021). The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Ecology were... configuration supplemented with thermal treatment capacity (bulk vitrification). Under Tank Closure...

  16. Final Environmental Assessment: For Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling Master Plan District of Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    Environmental Assessment pg. 62 Table 8: Travel Mode Splits 1853 1854 Travel Type Percentage Single-Occupant Vehicle 75% Carpool and Vanpool...place. Service provided on two routes. 4) Ridesharing ( Carpools and Vanpools) Agency subsidizes vanpools. Informal carpools encouraged. No

  17. 76 FR 53994 - Final Environmental Impact Statement, Single Nuclear Unit at the Bellefonte Plant Site, Jackson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... capacity, alternatives considered by TVA, the history of the Bellefonte project, environmental consequences... sources were not found sufficient to meet power needs in the required time frame. Completing Bellefonte... finding of no effects on historic properties associated with completion and operation of a nuclear unit...

  18. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Closure (Withdrawal of Units) of Norton Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    0.43 A Alabama Street Northbound Increase 652 0.47 A Southbound 668 Barton Road Eastbound Increase 860 0.58 B Westbound 560 aLevel -of-service...compliance programs Gary J. Mariner Ph.D., Physics Project leader 17 years experience in environmental assessment Thomas A. O’Neil M.S., Wildlife Biology

  19. Final Environmental Assessment Prescribed Burning for Weed Management on F. E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    TO Coord ~~A-LL Z:> 90 MW/ ’/6 ~r Zf/IZ- 6 ccs ~ Coord Coord Coord Coord SURNAME OF ACTION OFFICER AND GRADE ?𔄁 I S~BOL PHONE Beckwith, GS ...Manager Chief, Environmental Restoration F. E. Warren AFB F. E. Warren AFB Kirk Schaumann Ernest Cisneros Air Quality Manager Grounds Maintenance

  20. Environmental overview for the development of geothermal resources in the State of New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, M.; Starkey, A.H.; Dick-Peddie, W.A.

    1980-06-01

    A brief overview of the present day geothermal applications for hydrothermal electrical generation and direct heat use and their environmental implications is provided. Technologies and environmental impacts are considered at all points on the pathway of development resource exploration; well field, plant and transmission line construction; and plant operation. The technologies for electrical generation-direct, dry steam conversion; separated steam conversion; single-flash conversion, separated-steam/single-flash conversion and binary cycle conversion and the technologies for direct heat use - direct use of geothermal waters, surface heat exhanger, down-the hole heat exchanger and heat pump are described. A summary of the geothermal technologies planned or in operation within New Mexico geothermal areas is provided. A review of regulations that affect geothermal development and its related environmental impact in New Mexico is presented. The regulatory pathway, both state and federal, of geothermal exploration after the securing of appropriate leases, development, and construction and implementation of a geothermal facility are described. Six categories (Geophysical, Water, Air, Noise, Biota and Socioeconomics) were selected for environmental assessment. The data available is described.

  1. Final Environmental Assessment for New Golf Driving Range at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    include plains cottonwood, Russian olive ( Elaeagnus angustifolia ), Virginia Environmental Assessment New Golf Driving Range Affected Environment...Chenopodium album Lamb’s quarter Chondrosum gracile Blue grama Convolvulus arvensis Bindweed Cynoglossum officinale Hound’s tongue Elaeagnus ... angustifolia Russian olive Lygodesmia juncea Skeleton Plant Opuntia mercerize Prickly pear Pathenocissus quinquifolia Virginia creeper Plantago major

  2. 78 FR 8184 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review (Phase II ERP/ER) describing the second set of... availability of the Phase II ERP/ER. ADDRESSES: Obtaining Documents: You may download the Phase II ERP/ER and... the Phase II ERP/ER at any of the public repositories listed at...

  3. Southwest Center for Environmental Excellence and Opportunity Year End Report (Final Deliverable)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-11-09

    The Southwest Center for Environmental Excellence and Opportunity (Southwest CEEO) has been in existence since October 1996 at Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute's (TVI) South Valley Campus. The Special Project was comprised of three objectives: (1) Increasing the number of Hispanics in careers related to the environment by improving education and job training opportunities; (2) Strengthening the infrastructure of Hispanic businesses and building their capacity to participate in environmental clean-up activities and potential technology commercialization; and (3) Increasing the Hispanic community's understanding of and participation in environmental protection through improved access to information and outreach activities, paying attention to cultural and linguistic issues. The Southwest CEEO has been successful in each of the above objective areas and continues to provide valuable services to TVI and the community. The Southwest CEEO has developed a scholarship/mentorship program involving business and industry, community organizations, and TVI faculty that will be replicated by other student mentorship programs. The Southwest CEEO has awarded approximately $50,000 over the two-year program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office. The Southwest CEEO has also developed a K-12 partnership with Albuquerque Public Schools (APS) to enhance environmental education for students and professional development for teachers. Incorporated into these student activities are experimental learning opportunities and curriculum development and/or enhancement. The Southwest CEEO has worked closely with the TVI Small Business Development Center (SBDC) to support Hispanic businesses in technology partnership activities. The Southwest CEEO in partnership the TVI SBDC has provided a large business forum and business workshops. In addition, the Southwest CEEO has developed a Technology Transfer Model that will be expanded in the future to a

  4. Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, B.J.

    1995-03-01

    Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

  5. Enhanced invasion and tumor growth of fibroblast growth factor 8b-overexpressing MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohola, J K; Viitanen, T P; Valve, E M; Seppänen, J A; Loponen, N T; Keskitalo, J J; Lakkakorpi, P T; Härkönen, P L

    2001-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is a secreted heparin-binding protein, which has mitogenic and transforming activity. Increased expression of FGF-8 has been found in human breast cancer, and it has a potential autocrine role in its progression. Human FGF-8 is alternatively spliced to generate four protein isoforms (a, b, e, and f). Isoform b has been shown to be the most transforming. In this work, we studied the role of FGF-8b in the growth (in vitro and in vivo) of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, which proliferate in an estrogen-dependent manner. Constitutive overexpression of FGF-8b in MCF-7 cells down-regulated FGF-8b-binding receptors FGF receptor (FGFR) 1IIIc, FGFR2IIIc, and FGFR4 found to be expressed in these cells. FGF-8b overexpression led to an increase in the anchorage-independent proliferation rate in suspension culture and colony formation in soft agar, when MCF-7 cells were cultured with or without estradiol. FGF-8b also provided an additional growth advantage for cells stimulated with estradiol. In addition, FGF-8b-transfected cells invaded more actively through Matrigel than did control cells. This was possibly due to the increased secretion of matrix metalloproteinase 9. In vivo, FGF-8b-transfected MCF-7 cells formed faster growing tumors than vector-only-transfected cells when xenografted into nude mice. The tumors formed by FGF-8b-transfected cells were more vascular than the tumors formed by vector-only-transfected cells. In conclusion, FGF-8b expression confers a growth advantage to MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, both in vitro and in vivo. In addition to stimulation of proliferation, this growth advantage probably arises from increased invasion and tumor vascularization induced by FGF-8b. The results suggest that FGF-8b signaling may be an important factor in the regulation of tumorigenesis and progression of human breast cancer.

  6. 77 FR 23740 - Sears Point Wetland and Watershed Restoration Project, Sonoma County, CA; Final Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... restore 955 acres of tidal marsh; preserve and enhance a 106-acre area of non-tidal seasonal wetland while... Fish and Wildlife Service Sears Point Wetland and Watershed Restoration Project, Sonoma County, CA... Wetland and Watershed Restoration Project is now available. The final EIR/EIS, which we prepared and...

  7. 77 FR 16558 - General Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hampton National Historic Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    .... Baltimore County Tourism Office and Towson Chamber of Commerce, 44 West Chesapeake Avenue, Towson, Maryland... review from October 11, 2010, through December 24, 2010. Printed copies of the Draft GMP/EIS were... responses are provided on page 135 of the Final GMP/EIS. After careful review of all comments...

  8. 75 FR 19989 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for Drought Management Planning at the Kerr Hydroelectric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... review and comment. DATES: The BIA will issue a final decision on drought management planning at the Kerr... section of this notice for locations where the FEIS will be available for review and instructions for... to, effects on hydroelectric power production, recreation, tourism, irrigation, flooding,...

  9. 77 FR 23741 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase I Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase I Early Restoration Plan and... DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill (Framework Agreement), notice is hereby given that ] the Federal and State... the DEEPWATER HORIZON oil spill, which occurred on or about April 20, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico....

  10. 78 FR 41418 - Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Harney County, OR; Record of Decision for Final Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... Refuge, 36391 Sodhouse Lane, Princeton, OR 97221. In-Person Viewing or Pickup: Call the Refuge at (541... meadows, grain fields, and shrub-steppe uplands. With its abundance of water in an otherwise arid... human environment in the final CCP/EIS. The CCP will guide us in managing and administering the...

  11. 76 FR 71619 - Availability of the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... concluded that there would be no significant short-term, long-term, or cumulative effects to the environment... discussion of existing SpaceX activities. The resource areas considered in the Final EA include air quality..., and cultural resources; hazardous materials, pollution prevention, and solid waste; light...

  12. AV-8B Map System II: Moving Map Composer Software Users Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Plan A4112-23). The authors thank Captain Reese Hines in the AV-8B Program Office for his support of this project. We also thank Ms. Diana Lemon and...Place monitor, keyboard, and mouse next to stack of equipment; • Place scanner on a table with enough clearance for the moving scan bed. (3) Plug...Team Leader: Diana Lemon Project Engineers: Luie Trudy, Jean Carlton 70 Lohrenz et al. C4.5 National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) NIMA

  13. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

  14. TOPSICLE Towards 20 Percent mc-Si Industrial Solar Cell Efficiency. Final Environmental Assessment. Excel file

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkeit, B. [SCHOTT Solar GmbH, Carl-Zeiss-Str. 4, 63755 Alzenau (Germany); Russell, R. [BP Solar, Poligono Industrial s/n Zona Oeste, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Weeber, A.W.; De Wild-Scholten, M.J. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-08-15

    The overall objective of the R and D project TOPSICLE was to define an industrial process to manufacture low-cost 20% mc-Si solar cells and modules. The work of TOPSICLE consisted of improving material quality of the mc-Si wafers and developing advanced processes to produce cost effective super high-efficiency m-Si solar cells and modules on an industrial scale. At the end of the project a road map towards 20% efficient industrial mc-Si PV, and a cost and environmental assessment was made for equipment, materials and processes. A comprehensive study on the developed processes was carried out with respect to the national legislation and the EC directives. For all newly developed processes a limited environmental effect is expected. All emissions will be below 10% of the limits when the exhaust of chemical and furnace processes is purified or recycled. All this can be done with state-of-the-art-technologies.

  15. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project: Final Supplemental Integrated Feasibility Report and Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    E ATTN: Robert Willis Attention: Judy Grigg P.O. Box 2946, Portland, OR 97208-2946 P.O. Box 1258, Longview, WA 98632-7739 Phone: (503) 808...the origin of many exotic species that could invade the Columbia River, the Chinese mitten crab, zebra mussel and Eurasian milfoil are known...found for their control. Transferred to the U.S. in ballast water and on the hulls of vessels, zebra mussels have caused great environmental and

  16. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This EIS reflects the public review of and comments offered on the draft statement. Included are descriptions of the characteristics of nuclear waste, the alternative disposal methods under consideration, and potential environmental impacts and costs of implementing these methods. Because of the programmatic nature of this document and the preliminary nature of certain design elements assumed in assessing the environmental consequences of the various alternatives, this study has been based on generic, rather than specific, systems. At such time as specific facilities are identified for particular sites, statements addressing site-specific aspects will be prepared for public review and comment.

  17. Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  18. Final Report: African Power/Energy and Environmental Development Plan, July 1, 1994 - August 21, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, John M.

    1999-08-21

    In 1994 AEF signed a Cooperative Agreement with DOE to address a program called the African Power /Energy and Environmental Development Plan. The Program initially addressed five area: (1) Historical Black Colleges and Universities Energy/Environmental Program; (2) The Department of Energy and United States Private Industry Africa Program; (3) The Annual United States Energy Study Tour; (4) South African Training Program, and (5) South African Environmental Program. The programs were implemented in conjunction with DOE, institutions, agencies and the private sector support in the USA and within African nations. AEF has worked with government and technical representatives from 13 African nations and expanded the program to address sponsorship of South African students in Historical Black Colleges and Universities, supporting DOE trade missions through participation and planning, and giving presentations in the U.S., and Africa regarding business opportunities in the African energy sector. The programs implemented have also opened doors for the US private sector to seek business opportunities in Africa and for African nations to gain exposure to US products and services.

  19. Modern Chemistry Techniques Applied to Metal Behavior and Chelation in Medical and Environmental Systems ? Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M; Andresen, B; Burastero, S R; Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Chinn, S C; Coronado, P R; Gash, A E; Perkins, J; Sawvel, A M; Szechenyi, S C

    2005-02-03

    This report details the research and findings generated over the course of a 3-year research project funded by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). Originally tasked with studying beryllium chemistry and chelation for the treatment of Chronic Beryllium Disease and environmental remediation of beryllium-contaminated environments, this work has yielded results in beryllium and uranium solubility and speciation associated with toxicology; specific and effective chelation agents for beryllium, capable of lowering beryllium tissue burden and increasing urinary excretion in mice, and dissolution of beryllium contamination at LLNL Site 300; {sup 9}Be NMR studies previously unstudied at LLNL; secondary ionization mass spec (SIMS) imaging of beryllium in spleen and lung tissue; beryllium interactions with aerogel/GAC material for environmental cleanup. The results show that chelator development using modern chemical techniques such as chemical thermodynamic modeling, was successful in identifying and utilizing tried and tested beryllium chelators for use in medical and environmental scenarios. Additionally, a study of uranium speciation in simulated biological fluids identified uranium species present in urine, gastric juice, pancreatic fluid, airway surface fluid, simulated lung fluid, bile, saliva, plasma, interstitial fluid and intracellular fluid.

  20. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

  1. Decommissioning of eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Addendum (Final Environmental Impact Statement)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The first section of this volume summarizes the content of the draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) and this Addendum, which together constitute the final environmental impact statement (FEIS) prepared on the decommissioning of eight surplus plutonium production reactors at Hanford. The FEIS consists of two volumes. The first volume is the DEIS as written. The second volume (this Addendum) consists of a summary; Chapter 9, which contains comments on the DEIS and provides DOE`s responses to the comments; Appendix F, which provides additional health effects information; Appendix K, which contains costs of decommissioning in 1990 dollars; Appendix L, which contains additional graphite leaching data; Appendix M, which contains a discussion of accident scenarios; Appendix N, which contains errata; and Appendix 0, which contains reproductions of the letters, transcripts, and exhibits that constitute the record for the public comment period.

  2. Final Environmental Impact Statement for National Aeronauties and Space Administration Office of Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    1973. (30) Rice, E. E., "Propellant and Exhaust Product Composition Data for 14 NASA Sounding Rockets", Battelle-Columbus Laboratories Report No. BMI -SG...Appendix F. The EPA comments are incorporated into the body of the greatly revised statement. 6. Draft Statement published April 21, 1971. Final Statement...E-1 APPENDIX F. COMMENTS ON DRAFT STATEMENT BY EPA AND PETER HUNT ASSOCIATES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-1 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1

  3. Louisiana State Penitentiary Levee, Mississippi River. Main Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement and Appendixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    deep-water areas providing suitable breeding habitat for the American alligator . 12. Recommendations of the Reporting Officer. The District Comander...would provide suitable habitat for courtship and breeding for the American alligator . Audubon Society Blue List. Plan A would not significantly affect any...Suitable spawning areas B-14 • • | I .. . * FINAL EIWVIRO"NTAL IMPACT .STATEMENT LOUISMAN STATE PENI ~fTEARY LEVE 11111W E M fjRER LUIM WEST , k

  4. Final Environmental Assessment for the Integrated Cultural Resources Management Plan for Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Ocean by the Coastal Range to the west and the San Gabriel Mountains to the south. The MDAB has an arid continental desert climate. The climate of...River Indian Tribes Beverly Folks Pauline Gallegos FINAL July 2005 70 ICRMP EA Ernie Garcia , Tejon Indian Tribe Christine Hernandez Lucille Hicks...Band of Mission Indians Deron Marquez , San Manuel Band of Mission Indians Kathy Morgan, Tejon Indian Tribe George Murillo, San Manuel Band of

  5. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3070)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitoun, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This two-volume Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Volume 1 contains the assessment of the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, by Louisiana Energy Services, LP. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are construction, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D)- of the site. Issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment. The FEIS supports issuance of a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility.

  6. Rescue of defective ATP8B1 trafficking by CFTR correctors as a therapeutic strategy for familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Woerd, Wendy L; Wichers, Catharina G K; Vestergaard, Anna L;

    2016-01-01

    in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), associated with cystic fibrosis, impair protein folding and trafficking. The aim of this study was to investigate whether compounds that rescue CFTR F508del trafficking are capable of improving p.I661T-ATP8B1 plasma membrane expression. METHODS...... functionality. Combination therapy of SAHA and compound C4 resulted in an additional improvement of ATP8B1 cell surface abundance. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that several CFTR correctors can improve trafficking of p.I661T-ATP8B1 to the plasma membrane in vitro. Hence, these compounds may be suitable...... in other protein folding diseases. Using these compounds, we could indeed show improved trafficking to the (apical) plasma membrane of a mutated ATP8B1 protein, carrying the p.I661T missense mutation. This is the most frequently identified mutation in this rare cholestatic disorder. Importantly, ATP8B1...

  7. Structure of 8B from elastic and inelastic 7Be+p scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, J P; Johnson, E D; Baby, L T; Kemper, K W; Moro, A M; Peplowski, P; Volya, A S; Wiedenhoever, I

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Detailed experimental knowledge of the level structure of light weakly bound nuclei is necessary to guide the development of new theoretical approaches that combine nuclear structure with reaction dynamics. Purpose: The resonant structure of 8B is studied in this work. Method: Excitation functions for elastic and inelastic 7Be+p scattering were measured using a 7Be rare isotope beam. Excitation energies ranging between 1.6 and 3.4 MeV were investigated. An R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions was performed. Results: New low-lying resonances at 1.9, 2.5, and 3.3 MeV in 8B are reported with spin-parity assignment 0+, 2+, and 1+, respectively. Comparison to the Time Dependent Continuum Shell (TDCSM) model and ab initio no-core shell model/resonating-group method (NCSM/RGM) calculations is performed. This work is a more detailed analysis of the data first published as a Rapid Communication. [J.P. Mitchell, et al, Phys. Rev. C 82, 011601(R) (2010)] Conclusions: Identification of the 0+, 2+, 1+...

  8. WASP-8b: Characterization of a Cool and Eccentric Exoplanet with Spitzer

    CERN Document Server

    Cubillos, Patricio; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Stevenson, Kevin B; Hardy, Ryan A; Blecic, Jasmina; Anderson, David R; Hardin, Matthew; Campo, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    WASP-8b has 2.18 times Jupiter's mass and is on an eccentric ($e=0.31$) 8.16-day orbit. With a time-averaged equilibrium temperature of 948 K, it is one of the least-irradiated hot Jupiters observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have analyzed six photometric light curves of WASP-8b during secondary eclipse observed in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {\\microns} Infrared Array Camera bands. The eclipse depths are $0.113\\pm 0.018$%, $0.069\\pm 0.007$%, and $0.093\\pm 0.023$%, respectively, giving respective brightness temperatures of 1552, 1131, and 938 K. We characterized the atmospheric thermal profile and composition of the planet using a line-by-line radiative transfer code and a Markov-chain Monte Carlo sampler. The data indicated no thermal inversion, independently of any assumption about chemical composition. We noted an anomalously high 3.6-{\\microns} brightness temperature (1552 K); by modeling the eccentricity-caused thermal variation, we found that this temperature is plausible for radiative time scales le...

  9. Halo effective field theory constrains the solar 7Be + p → 8B + γ rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xilin Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an improved low-energy extrapolation of the cross section for the process Be7(p,γB8, which determines the 8B neutrino flux from the Sun. Our extrapolant is derived from Halo Effective Field Theory (EFT at next-to-leading order. We apply Bayesian methods to determine the EFT parameters and the low-energy S-factor, using measured cross sections and scattering lengths as inputs. Asymptotic normalization coefficients of 8B are tightly constrained by existing radiative capture data, and contributions to the cross section beyond external direct capture are detected in the data at E<0.5 MeV. Most importantly, the S-factor at zero energy is constrained to be S(0=21.3±0.7 eVb, which is an uncertainty smaller by a factor of two than previously recommended. That recommendation was based on the full range for S(0 obtained among a discrete set of models judged to be reasonable. In contrast, Halo EFT subsumes all models into a controlled low-energy approximant, where they are characterized by nine parameters at next-to-leading order. These are fit to data, and marginalized over via Monte Carlo integration to produce the improved prediction for S(E.

  10. Adsorption of Procion Red MX 8B using spent tea leaves as adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heraldy, Eddy; Osa, Riesta Ramdhaniyati; Suryanti, Venty

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of Procion Red MX 8B using spent tea leaves (STL) as adsorbent, has been studied by batch adsorption technique. The adsorbent was activated by NaOH 4% for 24 hours for delignification process. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR to indetify the functional groups of cellulose was shown by uptake -OH, C-H and C-O. The optimum conditions of adsorption experiments were achieved when pH was set as 6 with contact time of 75 minutes and capacity of adsorption was 3.28 mg/g. The equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir and Isotherm Freundlichs. The kinetic models, pseudo first order and pseudo second order were employed to describe the adsorption mechanism. The experimental results showed that the pseudo second order equation was the best model that described the adsorption behavior with the coefficient of correlation (R2) was equal higher than 0.99 The results suggested that STL had high potential to be used as effective adsorbent for Procion Red MX 8B removal.

  11. HCN channel dendritic targeting requires bipartite interaction with TRIP8b and regulates antidepressant-like behavioral effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ye; Heuermann, Robert J.; Lyman, Kyle A.; Fisher, Daniel; Ismail, Quratul-Ain; Chetkovich, Dane M.

    2016-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder is a prevalent psychiatric condition with limited therapeutic options beyond monoaminergic therapies. Although effective in some individuals, many patients fail to respond adequately to existing treatments and new pharmacologic targets are needed. HCN channels regulate excitability in neurons and blocking HCN channel function has been proposed as a novel antidepressant strategy. However, systemic blockade of HCN channels produces cardiac effects that limit this approach. Knockout (KO) of the brain-specific HCN channel auxiliary subunit TRIP8b also produces antidepressant-like behavioral effects and suggests that inhibiting TRIP8b function could produce antidepressant-like effects without affecting the heart. We examined the structural basis of TRIP8b-mediated HCN channel trafficking and its relationship to antidepressant-like behavior using a viral rescue approach in TRIP8b KO mice. We found that restoring TRIP8b to the hippocampus was sufficient to reverse the impaired HCN channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavioral effects caused by TRIP8b KO. Moreover, we found that hippocampal expression of a mutated version of TRIP8b further impaired HCN channel trafficking and increased the antidepressant-like behavioral phenotype of TRIP8b KO mice. Thus, modulating the TRIP8b-HCN interaction bidirectionally influences channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavior. Overall, our work suggests that small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between TRIP8b and HCN should produce antidepressant-like behaviors and could represent a new paradigm for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. PMID:27400855

  12. Final Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Revitalization of Military Family Housing Keesler AFB, MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Officer cc: Clearinghouse for Federal Programs Board of Trustees: William F. Wimer, president I Arch Dalrymple III I K1ne Diuo I Lynn Crosby Gammill...Deputy Chief, Environmental Flight Slst Civil Engineer Squadron 508 L Street Keesler AFB MS 39534-2115 Mr. Phil Bass Mississippi Department of...Officer cc: Clearinghouse for Federal Programs Board of liu.m,es; Wdliam f. Wun•r, preiident I An::b Dal!ymplt ill I Kano Ditto I ~ Crosby GmuniU I L

  13. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  14. National Spill Control School. A pilot program in environmental training. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberholtzer, G.R.; Acuff, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Increased environmental awareness and the amended Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 required an increased level of expertise by the American Public in the field of oil spill prevention and control. The National Spill Control School was created at Corpus Christi State University to help meet this need. Drawing on the talents of a nationwide sample of experts in this field, the project team created a unique management oriented course. A review of the origination and experiences of two years of classes of this pilot program is provided in this report.

  15. Proposed IMS infrastructure improvement project, Seward, Alaska. Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) examines a proposal for improvements at the existing University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Institute of Marine Science (IMS), Seward Marine Center. The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (EVOS) Trustee Council is proposing to improve the existing research infrastructure to enhance the EVOS Trustee Council`s capabilities to study and rehabilitate marine mammals, marine birds, and the ecosystem injured by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The analysis in this document focuses on the effects associated with construction and operation of the proposed project and its proposed alternatives. The EIS gives a detailed description of all major elements of the proposed project and its alternatives; identifies resources of major concern that were raised during the scoping process; describes the environmental background conditions of those resources; defines and analyzes the potential effects of the proposed project and its alternatives on these conditions; and identifies mitigating measures that are part of the project design as well as those proposed to minimize or reduce the adverse effects. Included in the EIS are written and oral comments received during the public comment period.

  16. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, Harold

    2001-07-26

    The Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut, July 22-27, 2001. The conference was attended by 121 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: Environmental and applied genomics, Cell-to-cell signaling and multicellular behavior, Emerging technologies and methods, Novel metabolisms and ecosystems, Directed evolution of enzymes and pathways, Symbiotic and trophic relationships, Synthesis and application of novel biopolymers, and Microbes at the oxic-anoxic interface. There was also a special lecture titled ''Under the umbrella of the big tree: microbial biology into the 21st century.''

  17. Planning for a program design for energy environmental analysis. Final report, draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, J; Saaty, T; Blair, P; Ma, F; Buneman, P

    1976-04-01

    The objective of the work reported here is to assist BER/ERDA in program planning with respect to a regional assessment study program for energy environmental analysis. The focus of the work was to examine the use of operational gaming fof regional assessment studies. Specific concerns were gaming applications (1) in regional assessment or management and direction of regional assessments; (2) for achieving a higher level of public understanding of environmental, health, and safety problems of energy; (3) with respect to the supply of adequately trained manpower for energy; (4) with respect to computational requirements; and (5) with respect to current state-of-the-art in computer simulation. In order to investigate these concerns and examine the feasibility of using operational gaming in a regional assessment study program, a Regional Energy Environment Game (REEG) was designed and implemented on an IBM 370/168 digital computer employing APL (A Programming Language). The applicability of interactive operational gaming has been demonstrated by the REEG as applied to a region consisting of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia.

  18. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  19. Environmental Regulations on Waste Electrical Equipment Industry: The Production Chain to the Final Consumer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Tunes Mazon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the electronics industry requires its transition to sustainable production patterns, as defined by the European directives WEEE, RoHS, and the National Policy on Solid Waste. In 2010, the group began a national project whose purpose is to support sustainability with a focus on the triple bottom line Brazilian electronics industry. The implementation of these proposals began with the implementation of a pilot project with nine companies of electromedical equipment, chosen because they are technology intensive, and require exporters suit environmental regulations. This paper aims to present the main results obtained in the studies with these nine companies in the period Apr/2011 Mar/2012 regarding the suitability of its products, processes, management systems and supply chains. The study was divided into three stages: an assessment to identify general aspects of each organization, a thorough assessment to understand the characteristics of each organization ahead of the general characteristics of the group analyzed and a detailed diagnosis, performed individually during visits in companies. The main findings were that the waste management and reverse logistics associated are still incipient, the products still have dangerous substances and supply chain is still very poorly prepared for the challenges. The level of employment of employees and costs associated with the adequacy of its products and processes, constitute the two biggest problems for companies fit the relevant environmental legislation.

  20. Final Project Summary Report Bechtel Nevada and Fiberchem Environmental, Inc., Cooperative Research and Technology Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. J. Pollina

    1999-04-01

    This is a report summarizing work on a small project dedicated to adapting a new chemical sensing platform for the US Department of Energy and its customers. At the same time and in the spirit of technology transfer, FCI Environmental, Inc., would receive technical support in the form of expertise from the US Department of Energy to assist in developing this product. The sensor is a hybrid integrated-circuit, optical waveguide, chemical sensor that is patented by FCI Environmental, Inc., and manufactured under license by Texas Instruments, Inc. A down-hole penetrometer probe was designed for use in hot, 60 C, hydrocarbon-saturated, saline environment at a depth of 200 feet. The probe design includes three chemical sensing, hybrid integrated-circuits with chemical reference and measurement channels, a water seal, output electronics, and a removable measurement head for replacement in the field. A hand-held chemical detector prototype--containing a hybrid integrated-circuit chemical sensor with reference channel, user alarm, and level display--was designed and constructed, and a software interface developed to operate the hand-held sensor interfaced with a laboratory data acquisition system.

  1. Environmental and health effects review for obscurant graphite flakes. Final report, 1991 July--1993 May

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Landis, W.G.; Downs, J.L.; Tiller, B.L.; Moore, E.B. Jr.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    The health and environmental effects of obscurant graphite flakes were reviewed and compared to predicted levels of graphite flake material in the field during typical testing and training scenarios. Graphite flake dispersion and deposition for simulated mechanical and pyrotechnic releases were determined using a modified Gaussian atmospheric plume-dispersion model. The potential for wind resuspension of graphite flakes is controlled by weathering processes and incorporation rates in soil. Chemically, graphite flakes pose little risk to aquatic or terrestrial systems. Mechanical damage to plants and invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from the flakes is also minimal. In humans, the pathological and physiological response to inhaled graphite flake is similar to that induced by nuisance dusts and cause only transient pulmonary changes. Repeated exposure to very high concentrations (such as those near the source generator) may overwhelm the clearance mechanisms of the lung and result in pulmonary damage from the retained particles in unprotected individuals. However, these lesions either resolve with time or are of limited severity. Health effects of mixed aerosols of mixed aerosols of graphite and fog oil are similar to those produced by graphite flakes alone. Environmental impacts of fog oil-coated graphite flakes are not well known.

  2. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

  3. Final report on fiscal year 1992 activities for the environmental monitors line-loss study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenoyer, J.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-09

    The work performed on this Environmental Monitors Line-Loss Study has been performed under Contract Numbers MLW-SVV-073750 and MFH-SVV-207554. Work on the task was initiated mid-December 1991, and this report documents and summarizes the work performed through January 18, 1993. The sections included in this report summarize the work performed on the Environmental Monitors Line-Loss Study. The sections included in this report are arranged to reflect individual sub-tasks and include: descriptions of measurement systems and procedures used to obtain cascade impactor samples and laser spectrometer measurements from multiple stacks and locations; information on data acquisition, analyses, assessment, and software; discussion of the analyses and measurement results from the cascade impactor and laser spectrometer systems and software used; discussion on the development of general test methods and procedures for line-loss determinations; an overall summary and specific conclusions that can be made with regard to efforts performed on this task during FY 1992 and FY 1993. Supporting information for these sections is included in this report as appendices.

  4. Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Opening of Bogue Chitto National Wildlife Refuge to Upland Game Hunting, Migratory Waterfowl Hunting, Big Game Hunting and Sport and Commercial Fishing

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — 1985 Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Opening of Bogue Chitto National Wildlife Refuge to Upland Game Hunting, Migratory Waterfoul Hunting, Big Game Hunting...

  5. Environmental aspects of alternative wet technologies for producing energy/fuel from peat. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.T.

    1981-05-01

    Peat in situ contains up to 90% moisture, with about 50% of this moisture trapped as a colloidal gel. This colloidal moisture cannot be removed by conventional dewatering methods (filter presses, etc.) and must be removed by thermal drying, solvent extraction, or solar drying before the peat can be utilized as a fuel feedstock for direct combustion or gasification. To circumvent the drying problem, alternative technologies such as wet oxidation, wet carbonization, and biogasification are possible for producing energy or enhanced fuel from peat. This report describes these three alternative technologies, calculates material balances for given raw peat feed rates of 1000 tph, and evaluates the environmental consequences of all process effluent discharges. Wastewater discharges represent the most significant effluent due to the relatively large quantities of water removed during processing. Treated process water returned to the harvested bog may force in situ, acidic bog water into recieving streams, disrupting local aquatic ecosystems.

  6. Environmental and economic effects of subsidence: Category 4, Project 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viets, V.F.; Vaughan, C.K.; Harding, R.C.

    1979-05-01

    A list of more than 70 subsidence areas was screened to select those areas which seemed to have the best potential for providing reliable data. The screening process is described in an appendix. Nine areas were selected for detailed case studies to collect all available data on the environmental and economic effects of the subsidence. Available information from the subsidence areas not selected as case studies was tabulated for each area and is included in an appendix. The nine case study areas are: Arizona; San Joaquin Valley, California; Baldwin Hills, California; Santa Clara Valley, California; Wilmington, California; Las Vegas Valley, Nevada; Houston-Galveston area, Texas; Mexico City, Mexico; and Wairakei, New Zealand. (MHR)

  7. Tenth international symposium on environmental biogeochemistry. Final technical report, December 15, 1990--December 14, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlich, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary task of this Symposium on Environmental Biogeochemistry was to examine our current understanding of GLOBAL CHANGE AND THE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF RADIATIVE TRACE GASES. The symposium was divided into 12 non-overlapping sessions: Paleoatmospheres and paleoclimates; Global distributions and atmospheric reactions; Poster presentations on the topics of sessions 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7; Terrestrial systems and land use change - 1; Terrestrial and land use change - 11; Fluxes and cycling in aquatic systems; Metals, organics, and depositional environments; Poster presentations on the topics of sessions 6, 9, 10 and 12; Biological Mechanisms of formation and destruction - 1; Biological mechanisms of formation and destruction - 11; High latitude systems; and Global sources, sinks, and feedbacks.

  8. Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Solvent Substitution Program/switch tube assemblies final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E.P.; Ohlhausen, J.A.; Peebles, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Benkovich, M.G. [ERA Systems Inc., The MESERAN Co., Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1995-06-01

    As part of an Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing (ECM) Program, a study was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to identify an alternative cleaning process that would effectively replace trichloroethylene (TCE) for cleaning mechanical piece parts of Switch Tube assemblies. Eight aqueous alkaline cleaners, as well as an isopropyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol/Cyclohexane cleaning process, were studied as potential replacements. Cleaning efficacy, materials compatibility, etch rate and corrosion studies were conducted and used to screen potential candidates. Cleaning efficacy was determined using visual examination, goniometer/contact angle measurements, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy and an evaporative rate analysis technique known as MESERAN Surface Analysis. Several cleaners were identified as potential replacements for TCE based solely on the cleaning efficacy results. Some of the cleaners, however, left undesirable residues studies were completed, Brulin 815GD (an aqueous alkaline cleaner) was selected as the replacement for TCE.

  9. Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-13

    Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

  10. Environmental Remediation Science at Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, Paul

    2013-11-07

    The goal of this project was to provide support for an advanced X-ray microspectroscopy facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This facility is operated by the University of Chicago and the University of Kentucky. The facility is available to researchers at both institutions as well as researchers around the globe through the general user program. This facility was successfully supported during the project period. It provided access to advanced X-ray microanalysis techniques which lead to fundamental advances in understanding the behavior of contaminants and geochemistry that is applicable to environmental remediation of DOE legacy sites as well as contaminated sites around the United States and beyond.

  11. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  12. Achieving the Security, Environmental, and Economic Potential of Bioenergy. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggs, John A

    2006-06-07

    A group of business, government, environmental and academic leaders convened in a dialogue by the Aspen Institute proposed a series of actions to promote the widespread commercialization of both corn and cellulosic ethanol to improve energy security, the environment, and the economy. Co-chaired by Booz Allen Hamilton Vice President and former CIA Director R. James Woolsey and former Congressman Tom Ewing (R. IL), they developed a series of recommendations involving improved crop yields, processing of biomass into ethanol, manufacture of more cars that can burn either ethanol or gasoline, and the provision of ethanol pumps at more filling stations. Their report, "A High Growth Strategy for Ethanol, includes a discussion of the potential of ethanol, the group's recommendations, and a series of discussion papers commissioned for the dialogue.

  13. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils: Its environmental impact assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harness, J.; Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.; Zhang, H.; Maggon, D.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this program was to conduct an environmental impact assessment study for selenium from coal mine spoils. The use of in-situ lysimetry to predict selenium speciation, transformation, and mobility under natural conditions was evaluated. The scope of the study was to construct and test field-scale lysimeter and laboratory mini-column to assess mobility and speciation of selenium in coal mine overburden and soil systems; to conduct soil and groundwater sampling throughout the state of Oklahoma for an overall environmental impact assessment of selenium; and to conduct an in-depth literature review on the solubility, speciation, mobility, and toxicity of selenium from various sources. Groundwater and surface soil samples were also collected from each county in Oklahoma. Data collected from the lysimeter study indicated that selenium in the overburden of the abandoned mine site was mainly found in the selenite form. The amount of selenite found was too low and immobile to be of concern to the environment. The spoil had equilibrated long enough (over 50 years) that most of the soluble forms of selenium have already been lost. Examination of the overburden indicated the presence of pyrite crystals that precipitated over time. The laboratory mini-column study indicated that selenite is quite immobile and remained on the overburden material even after leaching with dilute acid. Data from groundwater samples indicated that based on the current permissible level for selenium in groundwater (0.01 mg Se/L), Oklahoma groundwater is widely contaminated with the element. However, according to the new regulation (0.05 mg Se/L), which is to be promulgated in 1992, only 9 of the 77 counties in the state exceed the limit.

  14. Final Report: Results of Environmental Site Investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina, Kansas (Figure 1.1). From 1954 to 1966, the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of Sylvan Grove. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use to preserve grain in storage. In 1998, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) found carbon tetrachloride above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 μg/L in groundwater from one private well used for livestock and lawn and garden watering. The 1998 KDHE sampling at Sylvan Grove was conducted under the USDA private well sampling program. To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA proposed to conduct an environmental site investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. Argonne National Laboratory, on behalf of the CCC/USDA, developed a work plan (Argonne 2012) for the site investigation and a supplemental work plan for indoor and ambient air sampling (Appendix A). The proposed work was approved by the KDHE (2012a, 2013). The investigations were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, on behalf of the CCC/USDA. The main activities for the site investigation were conducted in June 2012, and indoor and ambient air sampling was performed in February 2013. This report presents the findings of the investigations at Sylvan Grove.

  15. National Institute for Global Environmental Change. Final Technical Report 1990-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athanasios Toulopoulos

    2007-11-01

    Research conducted by the six NIGEC Regional Centers during recent years is reported. An overview of the NIGEC program from its beginnings provides a description and evaluation of the program's vision, strategy and major accomplishments. The program's purpose was to support academic research on environmental change in regions of the country that had historically received relatively little federal funding. The overall vision of NIGEC may be stated as the performance of academic research on the regional interactions between ecosystems and climate. NIGEC's research presents important evidence on the impacts of climate variability and change, and in some cases adaptability, for a broad range of both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, and has thereby documented significant regional issues on the environmental responses to climate change. NIGEC's research has demonstrated large regional differences in the atmospheric carbon exchange budgets of croplands and forests, that there are significant variations of this exchange on diurnal, synoptic, seasonal and interannual time scales due to atmospheric variability (including temperature, precipitation and cloudiness), and that management practices and past history have predominant effects in grasslands and croplands. It is the mid-latitude forests, however, that have received more attention in NIGEC than any other specific ecosystem, and NIGEC's initiation of and participation in the AmeriFlux program, network of carbon flux measurement sites in North American old-growth forests, is generally considered to be its most significant single accomplishment. By including appendices with complete listings of NIGEC publications, principal investigators and participating institutions, this report may also serve as a useful comprehensive documentation of NIGEC.

  16. Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

    1997-10-01

    A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine

  17. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are

  18. Summit-Watertown transmission line project, South Dakota. Final Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) needs to rebuild the existing Summit-Watertown 115-kV transmission line, located in northeastern South Dakota, and western Minnesota. Nearly 60 percent of the existing facility was replaced in 1965 after severe ice-loading broke structures and wires. Because of the extensive loss of the line, surplus poles had to be used to replace the damaged H-frame structures. These were of varying sizes, causing improper structure loading. Additionally, the conductors and overhead shield wires have been spliced in numerous places. This provides additional space on these wires for icing and wind resistance, which in turn create problems for reliability. Finally, a progressive fungal condition has weakened the poles and, along with the improper loading, has created an unsafe condition for maintenance personnel and the general public.

  19. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  20. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pueblo Depot Activity, Colorado. Final, Phase 1: Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.W.; Blasing, T.J.; Ensminger, J.T.; Johnson, R.O.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Shor, J.T.; Staub, W.P.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1995-04-01

    Under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the US Army proposes to dispose of lethal chemical agents and munitions stored at eight existing Army installations in the continental United States. In 1988, the US Army issued the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP. The FPEIS and the subsequent Record of Decision (ROD) identified an on-site disposal process as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. That is, the FPEIS determined the environmentally preferred alternative to be on-site disposal in high-temperature incinerators, while the ROD selected this alternative for implementation as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. In this Phase I report, the overall CSDP decision regarding disposal of the PUDA Stockpile is subjected to further analyses, and its validity at PUDA is reviewed with newer, more detailed data than those providing the basis for the conclusions in the FPEIS. The findings of this Phase I report will be factored into the scope of a site-specific environmental impact statement to be prepared for the destruction of the PUDA stockpile. The focus of this Phase I report is on those data identified as having the potential to alter the Army`s previous decision regarding disposal of the PUDA stockpile; however, several other factors beyond the scope of this Phase I report must also be acknowledged to have the potential to change or modify the Army`s decisions regarding PUDA.

  1. Projection of Environmental Pollutant Emissions From Different Final Waste Disposal Methods Based on Life Cycle Assessment Studies in Qazvin City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Torkashvand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the life cycle assessment (LCA method was used to expect the emissions of different environmental pollutants through qualitative and quantitative analyses of solid wastes of Qazvin city in different final disposal methods. Therefore, four scenarios with the following properties considering physical analysis of Qazvin’s solid wastes, the current status of solid waste management in Iran, as well as the future of solid waste management of Qazvin were described. In order to detect the quantity of the solid wastes, the volume-weighted analysis was used and random sampling method was used for physical analysis. Of course, regarding the method of LCA, it contains all stages from solid wastes generation to its disposal. However, since the main aim of this study was final disposal stage, the emissions of pollutants of these stages were ignored. Next, considering the mixture of the solid waste, the amount of pollution stemming from each of final disposal methods from other cities having similar conditions was estimated. The findings of the study showed that weight combination of Qazvin solid wastes is entirely similar to that of other cities. Thus, the results of this study can be applied by decision makers around the country. In scenarios 1 and 2, emission of leachate containing high amounts of COD and BOD is high and also the highest content of nitrate, which can contaminate water and soil resulting in high costs for their management. In scenarios 3 and 4, the amounts of gaseous pollutants, particularly CO2, as well as nitrogen oxides are very high. In conclusion, the LCA methods can effectively contribute to the management of municipal solid wastes (MSW to control environmental pollutants with least expenses.

  2. DOE Chair of Excellence in Environmental Disciplines-Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurunganty, Sastry; Loran, Roberto; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Hijazi, Yazan; Nieto, Santander; Gomez, Will A.; Duconge, Jose; Cotto, María del C.; Muniz, Carlos; Diaz, Francisco J.; Neira, Carlos F.; Marquez, Francisco; Del Valle, W.; Thommes, M.

    2014-02-19

    The report Massie Chair of Excellence Program at Universidad del Turabo, contract DE-FG02-95EW12610, during the period of 9/29/1995 to 9/29/2011. The initial program aims included development of academic programs in the Environmental Sciences and Engineering, and Research and Development focused initially on environmentally friendly processes and later revised also include: renewable energy and international cooperation. From 1995 -2005, the Program at UT lead the establishment of the new undergraduate program in electrical engineering at the School of Engineering (SoE), worked on requirements to achieve ABET accreditation of the SoE B.S. Mechanical Engineering and B.S. Electrical Engineering programs, mentored junior faculty, taught undergraduate courses in electrical engineering, and revised the electrical engineering curriculum. Engineering undergraduate laboratories were designed and developed. The following research sub-project was developed: Research and development of new perovskite-alumina hydrogen permeable asymmetrical nanostructured membranes for hydrogen purification, and extremely high specific surface area silica materials for hydrogen storage in the form of ammonia, Dr. Rolando Roque-Malherbe Subproject PI, Dr. Santander Nieto and Mr. Will Gómez Research Assistants. In 2006, the Massie Chair of Excellence Program was transferred to the National Nuclear Security Agency, NNSA and DNN. DoE required a revised proposal aligned with the priorities of the Administration. The revised approved program aims included: (1) Research (2) Student Development: promote the development of minority undergraduate and graduate students through research teams, internships, conferences, new courses; and, (3) Support: (a) Research administration and (b) Dissemination through international conferences, the UT Distinguished Lecturer Series in STEM fields and at the annual Universidad del Turabo (UT) Researchers Conference. Research included: Sub-Project 1: Synthesis and

  3. Environmental Assessment For Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-03-01

    DOE analyzed two cleanup and closure alternatives and the No Action Alternative, in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR Part 1021). Under Alternative 1, DOE is proposing to clean up the remaining ETEC facilities using the existing site specific cleanup standard of 15 mrem/yr. (plus DOE's As Low As Reasonably Achievable--ALARA-principle) for decontamination of radiological facilities and surrounding soils (Alternative 1). An annual 15-millirem additional radiation dose to the maximally exposed individual (assumed to be an individual living in a residential setting on Area IV) from all exposure pathways (air, soil, groundwater) equates to an additional theoretical lifetime cancer risk of no more than 3 x 10-4 (3 in 10,000). For perspective, it is estimated that the average individual in the United States receives a dose of about 300 millirem each year from natural sources of radiation. However, actual exposures generally will be much lower as a result of the application of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle. Based on post-remediation verification sampling previous cleanups have generally resulted in a 2 x 10-6 level of residual risk. DOE would decontaminate, decommission, and demolish the remaining radiological facilities. DOE would also decommission and demolish the one remaining sodium facility and all of the remaining uncontaminated support buildings for which it is responsible. The ongoing RCRA corrective action program, including groundwater treatment (interim measures), would continue. Other environmental impacts would include 2.5 x 10-3 fatalities as a result of LLW shipments and 6.0 x 10-3 fatalities as a result of emission exhaust from all shipments. DOE would also decommission and demolish the remaining sodium facility and decommission and

  4. t-C8B2N2: A potential superhard material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Shi, Rui; Gan, Li-Hua

    2017-02-01

    A potential superhard material C8B2N2 with I-4m2 space group is found and confirmed to be stable with first-principles calculations. The results show that its structure is highly incompressible with bulk modulus of 383.4 GPa and shear modulus of 383.0 GPa. It shows that this material is nearly isotropy with universal anisotropy index of 0.056, and its fractional anisotropy ratio of shear modulus and bulk modulus are 0.0055 and 0.0, respectively. Interestingly, its theoretical bulk modulus, shear modules, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and Vickers hardness are almost same to those of well-known superhard material c-BN.

  5. Searches for high frequency variations in the 8-B neutrino flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seibert, Stanley R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stonehill, L C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wouters, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aharmim, B [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ahmed, S N [QUEEN' S UNIV; Anthony, A E [UNIV OF TEXAS; Barros, N [PORTUGAL; Beier, E W [UNIV OF PA; Bellerive, A [CARLETON UNIV; Belttran, B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Bergevin, M [LBNL; Biller, S D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Boudjemline, K [CARLETON UNIV; Burritt, T H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Cai, B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Chan, Y D [LBNL; Chauhan, D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Chen, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Cleveland, B T [UNIV OF OXFORD; Cox - Mobrand, G A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Dai, X [QUEEN' S UNIV; Deng, H [UNIV OF PA; Detwiler, J [LBNL; Dimarco, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Doe, P J [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Drouin, P - L [CARLTON UNIV; Duba, C A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Duncan, F A [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Dunford, M [UNIV OF PA; Earle, E D [QUEEN' S UNIV; Evans, H C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Ewan, G T [QUEEN' S UNIV; Farine, J [LAURENTTIAN UNIV; Fergani, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; Fleurot, F [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ford, R J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Formaggilo, J A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Gagnon, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Goon, J Tm [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Guillian, E [QUEEN' S UNIV; Habib, S [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hahn, R L [BNL; Hallin, A L [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hallman, E D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Harvey, P J [QUEEN' S UNIV; Hazama, R [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Heintzelman, W J [UNIV OF PA; Heise, J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Helmer, R L [TRIUMF; Howard, C [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Howe, M A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Huang, M [UNIV OF TEXAS; Jamieson, B [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Jelley, N A [UNIV OF OXFORD; Keeter, K J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Klein, J R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Kos, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Kraus, C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Krauss, C B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Kutter, T [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Kyba, C C M [UNIV OF PA; Law, J [UNIV OF GUELPH; Lawson, I T [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Lesko, K T [LBNL; Leslie, J R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Loach, J C [UNIV OF OXFORD; Maclellan, R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Majerus, S [UNIV OF OXFORD; Mak, H B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Maneira, J [PORTUGAL; Martin, R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Mccauley, N [UNIV OF PA; Mc Donald, A B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Mcgee, S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Miffin, C [CARLETON UNIV; Miller, M L [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monreal, B [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monroe, J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH; Morissette, B [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Nickel, B G [UNIV OF GUELPH; Noble, A J [QUEEN' S UNIV; O' Keeffe, H M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oblath, N S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Orebi Gann, G D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oser, S M [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Ott, R A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Peeters, S J M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Poon, A W P [LBNL; Prior, G [LBNL; Reitzner, S D [UNIV OF GUELPH; Robertson, B C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Robertson, R G H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Rollin, E [CARLETON UNIV; Schwendener, M H [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Secrest, J A [UNIV OF PA; Seibert, S R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Simard, O [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, D [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, L [CARLETON UNIV; Skensved, P [QUEEN' S UNIV; Sonley, T J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Tesic, G [CARLETON UNIV; Tolich, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Tsui, T [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Tunnell, C D [UNIV OF TEXAS; Van Berg, R [UNIV OF PA; Van Devender, B A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Virtue, C J [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Wall, B L [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Waller, D [CARLETON UNIV; Wan Chan Tseung, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; West, N [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wilkerson, J F [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wilson, J R [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wright, A [QUEEN' S UNIV; Yeh, M [BNL; Zhang, F [CARLETON UNIV; Zuber, K [UNIV OF OXFORD

    2009-01-01

    We have peformed three searches for high-frequency signals in the solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), motivated by the possibility that solar g-mode oscillations could affect the production or propagation of solar {sup 8}B neutrinos. The first search looked for any significant peak in the frequency range l/day to 144/day, with a sensitivity to sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 12% or greater. The second search focused on regions in which g-mode signals have been claimed by experiments aboard the SoHO satellite, and was sensitive to signals with amplitudes of 10% or greater. The third search looked for extra power across the entire frequency band. No statistically significant signal was detected in any of the three searches.

  6. 1995 Bird survey Foothills parkway section 8B National Park Service, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.C.; Giffen, N.R.; Wade, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    The Foothills Parkway Section 8B right-of-way (ROW) is a stretch of land between Pittman Center and Cosby, Tennessee that is approximately 14.2 miles long and 1,000 ft wide, with a considerably wider section on Webb Mountain. A breeding bird survey was conducted at selected sample points along the ROW. The intent of the survey was to identify bird communities, area sensitive species (birds dependent on extensive forest systems for all their needs) and endangered, threatened, federal candidate, and state `in need of management` species now using the ROW. The survey also provides baseline data to assess future habitat impacts as well as cumulative impacts of the project.

  7. Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH outbreak associated with fowl adenovirus type 8b in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zadravec M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The causative agent of inclusion body hepatitis (IBH was identified as fowl adenovirus (FAdV type 8b, a member of the Fowl adenovirus E species, based on PCR results of adenoviral polymerase and the hexon gene in an outbreak of acute mortality that affected a broiler flock of 12,000 animals. In two waves of elevated mortality rate, a total of 264 chickens were found dead. Affected birds showed ruffled feathers, depression, watery droppings and limping. The most common pathological lesions seen on necropsy were pale, swollen and friable livers. On histological examination, acute hepatitis characterized by necrosis of hepatocytes, with large basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies, were observed. In addition, infectious bursal disease virus and infectious bronchitis virus were detected in the same flock.

  8. Growth in Biofuels Markets: Long Term Environmental and Socioeconomic Impacts (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth D. Meyer; Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes

    2010-12-02

    Over the last several years increasing energy and petroleum prices have propelled biofuels and the feedstocks used to produce them, to the forefront of alternative energy production. This growth has increased the linkages between energy and agricultural markets and these changes around the world are having a significant effect on agricultural markets as biofuels begin to play a more substantial role in meeting the world's energy needs. Biofuels are alternatively seen as a means to reduce carbon emissions, increase energy independence, support rural development and to raise farm income. However, concern has arisen that the new demand for traditional commodities or alternative commodities which compete for land can lead to higher food prices and the environmental effects from expanding crop acreage may result in uncertain changes in carbon emissions as land is converted both in the US and abroad. While a number of studies examine changes in land use and consumption from changes in biofuels policies many lack effective policy representation or complete coverage of land types which may be diverted in to energy feedstock production. Many of these biofuels and renewable energy induced land use changes are likely to occur in developing countries with at-risk consumers and on environmentally sensitive lands. Our research has improved the well known FAPRI-MU modeling system which represents US agricultural markets and policies in great detail and added a new model of land use and commodity markets for major commodity producers, consumers and trade dependent and food insecure countries as well as a rest of the world aggregate. The international modules include traditional annual crop lands and include perennial crop land, pasture land, forest land and other land uses from which land may be drawn in to biofuels or renewable energy feedstock production. Changes in calorie consumption in food insecure countries from changes in renewable energy policy can also be examined

  9. 2013 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology Standing Review Panel Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology (AEH/AFT) Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a WebEx/teleconference with members of the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element, representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP), and NASA Headquarters on November 22, 2013 (list of participants is in Section IX of this report). The SRP reviewed the updated research plans for the Risk of Adverse Health Effects Due to Alterations in Host-Microorganism Interactions (Host Microbe Risk) and the Risk of Performance Decrement and Crew Illness Due to an Inadequate Food System (Food Risk). The SRP also received a status update on the Risk of Adverse Health Effects of Exposure to Dust and Volatiles during Exploration of Celestial Bodies (Dust Risk). Overall, the SRP was impressed with the strong research plans presented by the scientists and staff associated with the SHFH Element. The SRP also thought that the updated research plans were thorough, well organized, and presented in a comprehensive manner. The SRP agrees with the changes made to the Host Microbe Risk and Food Risk portfolios and thinks that the targets for Gap closure are appropriate.

  10. Joint HVAC Transmission EMF Environmental Study : Final Report on Experiment 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Oregon Regional Primate Research Center

    1992-05-01

    This document describes the rationale, procedures, and results of a carefully controlled study conducted to establish whether chronic exposure of female (ewe) Suffolk lambs to the environment of a 500-kV 60-Hz transmission line would affect various characteristics of growth, endocrine function, and reproductive development. This experiment used identical housing and management schemes for control and line-exposed ewes, thus minimizing these factors as contributors to between-group experimental error. Further, throughout the 10-month duration of this study, changes in electric and magnetic fields, audible noise, and weather conditions were monitored continuously by a computerized system. Such measurements provided the opportunity to identify any relationship between environmental factors and biological responses. Because of reports in the literature that electric and magnetic fields alter concentrations of melatonin in laboratory animals, the primary objective of this study was to ascertain whether a similar effect occurs in lambs exposed to a 500-kV a-c line in a natural setting. In addition, onset of puberty, changes in body weight, wool growth, and behavior were monitored. To determine whether the environment of a 500-kV line caused stress in the study animals, serum levels of cortisol were measured. The study was conducted at Bonneville Power Administration`s Ostrander Substation near Estacada, Oregon.

  11. Understanding differences in the diffusion of environmentally beneficial technology. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackman, A.; Boyd, J.; Simpson, R.D.; Toman, M.

    1996-12-31

    The factors affecting the diffusion of technical discoveries among firms and nations remain one of the most interesting and important but least understood elements of economic behavior. Recently, interest in technology diffusion has been heightened by a recognition that the spread of technologies could have important implications for environmental quality as well as for market goods and services. A specific motivation for this study was the question of how rapidly technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions might diffuse. Technologies in this category include technologies that improve the efficiency of fossil energy use or promote substitution of renewable energy resources. The speed with which these technologies spread could have a significant effect on the rate of accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere. From a modeling perspective, the rate of innovation and diffusion of carbon-reducing technology is known to be a crucial parameter in integrated assessments of climate change risks and policy responses. Thus, a better understanding of factors that might influence the spread of carbon-reducing technologies could be valuable in studies on long-term global change and policy assessment.

  12. Physiological studies of environmental pollutants. Final report, September 1, 1975--March 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lengemann, F W; Wentworth, R A

    1978-01-01

    Physiological studies of environmental pollutants are reported in which a major emphasis is on factors involved in the secretion of these materials into milk. Elements of concern relate to the energy production field, both nuclear and non-nuclear. The distribution of /sup 207/Bi, /sup 203/Pb, /sup 210/Po, and /sup 201/Tl between milk, urine, and feces of lactating goats was determined after oral and intravenous administration. Data is presented showing that these elements are poorly absorbed and in consequence appear in milk in only small amounts. However levels in goats appear to be greater than in cows. Experiments relating to mammary transfer of non-actinide series elements are summarized. Included are observations of significant temperature effects on radioiodine transfer, sites and rates of resorption of iodine, zinc, and calcium from the mammary gland, and the use of radio indicators in determining in vivo milk volume. Experiments with zinc have provided blood level, secretion, and balance data necessary for modeling zinc metabolism in lactating goats. A method is presented for compartmental analysis of models involving a pool of cycling volume such as the mammary gland.

  13. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Lowman Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lowman, Idaho. Final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document assesses the environmental impacts of stabilization on site of the contaminated materials at the Lowman uranium mill tailings site. The Lowman site is 0.5 road mile northeast of the unincorporated village of Lowman, Idaho, and 73 road miles from Boise, Idaho. The Lowman site consists of piles of radioactive sands, an ore storage area, abandoned mill buildings, and windblown/waterborne contaminated areas. A total of 29.5 acres of land are contaminated and most of this land occurs within the 35-acre designated site boundary. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings and other contaminated materials on the site. A radon barrier would be constructed over the consolidated residual radioactive materials and various erosion control measures would be implemented to ensure the long-term stability of the disposal cell. Radioactive constituents and other hazardous constituents were not detected in the groundwater beneath the Lowman site. The groundwater beneath the disposal cell would not become contaminated during or after remedial action so the maximum concentration limits or background concentrations for the contaminants listed in the draft EPA groundwater protection standards would be met at the point of compliance. No significant impacts were identified as a result of the proposed remedial action at the Lowman site.

  14. Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-04-14

    The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel 20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some Americium/Curium Targets stored at SRS. Alternatives considered in this EIS encompass a range of new packaging, new processing, and conventional processing technologies, as well as the No Action Alternative. A preferred alternative is identified in which DOE would prepare about 97% by volume (about 60% by mass) of the aluminum-based fuel for disposition using a melt and dilute treatment process. The remaining 3% by volume (about 40% by mass) would be managed using chemical separation. Impacts are assessed primarily in the areas of water resources, air resources, public and worker health, waste management, socioeconomic, and cumulative impacts.

  15. Environmental impact of coal ash on tributary streams and nearshore water or Lake Erie. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, K.G.

    1978-08-01

    The environmental impact of coal ash disposal at a landfill site in north-central Chautauqua County, New York was studied from June 1975 through July 1977. Water samples taken from wells, ponds, and streams at 67 sites were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, arsenic, calcium, cadmium, chloride, chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, selenium, sodium, sulfate and zinc. Evidence suggests that ponds at the landfill were high in Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, and SO/sub 4/ compared to control pands. A stream adjacent to the site contained greater Mn (207 ug/1) and SO/sub 4/ (229 ppm) than control streams. Shallow alkaline test wells in the landfill had elevated As, Ca, and Se. Acid-neutral test wells had elevated As, Ca, Cr, Mg and Mn. Household wells in the vicinity of the landfill showed no evident contamination from the landfill. Average iron concentrations in the biota were tripled, and manganese concentrations doubled in biota affected by the coal ash dump. However, any effects of the disposal area on the distribution of the biota could not be separated from effects of varying environment factors such as water movements, substrate composition and food availability. No harmful effects could be demonstrated on the biota in the creek which flowed past the disposal area.

  16. Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

  17. Environmental studies related to the operation of wind energy conversion systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.E.; Cornaby, B.W.; Rodman, C.W.; Sticksel, P.R.; Tolle, D.A.

    1977-12-01

    This biophysical impact assessment explores the environmental consequences of the emerging wind energy conversion technology through field studies done at the DOE/NASA 100-kW Experimental Wind Turbine located at NASA Lewis Research Center's Plum Brook Station near Sandusky, Ohio. A micrometeorological field program monitored changes in the downwind wake of the wind turbine. Horizontal and/or vertical measurements of wind speed, temperature, carbon dioxide concentration, precipitation, and incident solar radiation showed measurable variation within the wake only for precipitation and wind speed. The changes were minor and not likely to result in any secondary effects to vegetation, including crops, because they are within the natural range of variability in the site environment. Effects are negligible beyond the physically altered area of the tower pad, access, and control structures. The wind turbine has not proved to be a high risk to airborne fauna, including the most vulnerable night-migrating songbirds. Behavioral studies indicate the birds will avoid the turbine if they can see it.

  18. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Cultural Resources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes.

  19. Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

  20. Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}. Final report volume 1, September 1994--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, E.E.; Herzog, H.J.

    1996-12-01

    One option to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels is to capture and sequester power plant CO{sub 2}. Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive, exists today. However, the ability to dispose of large quantities of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain. The deep ocean is one of only a few possible CO{sub 2} disposal options and is a prime candidate because the deep ocean is vast and highly unsaturated in CO{sub 2}. Ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will only make sense if the environmental impacts to the ocean are significantly less than the avoided impacts of atmospheric release. In this project, we examined these ocean impacts through a multi-disciplinary effort designed to summarize the current state of knowledge. In the process, we have developed a comprehensive method to assess the impacts of pH changes on passive marine organisms. This final report addresses the following six topics: CO{sub 2} loadings and scenarios, impacts of CO{sub 2} transport, near-field perturbations, far-field perturbations, environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} release, and policy and legal implications of CO{sub 2} release. While there are several important environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}, the acidification around the release point may be the most important. However, the size and severity of the impacted area varies substantially with the injection scenario. We have quantified the impacts of various injection scenarios relative to each other through mortality measures. Based on available data, it appears possible to inject CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean in such a way as to yield negligible environmental impacts.

  1. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-06-30

    This EIS assesses environmental issues associated with constructing and demonstrating a project that would be cost-shared by DOE and JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) under the Clean Coal Technology Program. The project would demonstrate circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology at JEA's existing Northside Generating Station in Jacksonville, Florida, about 9 miles northeast of the downtown area of Jacksonville. The new CFB combustor would use coal and petroleum coke to generate nearly 300 MW of electricity by repowering the existing Unit 2 steam turbine, a 297.5-MW unit that has been out of service since 1983. The proposed project is expected to demonstrate emission levels of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), and particulate matter that would be lower than Clean Air Act limits while at the same time producing power more efficiently and at less cost than conventional coal utilization technologies. At their own risk, JEA has begun initial construction activities without DOE funding. Construction would take approximately two years and, consistent with the original JEA schedule, would be completed in December 2001. Demonstration of the proposed project would be conducted during a 2-year period from March 2002 until March 2004. In addition, JEA plans to repower the currently operating Unit 1 steam turbine about 6 to 12 months after the Unit 2 repowering without cost-shared funding from DOE. Although the proposed project consists of only the Unit 2 repowering, this EIS analyzes the Unit 1 repowering as a related action. The EIS also considers three reasonably foreseeable scenarios that could result from the no-action alternative in which DOE would not provide cost-shared funding for the proposed project. The proposed action, in which DOE would provide cost-shared finding for the proposed project, is DOE's preferred alternative. The EIS evaluates the principal environmental issues, including air quality

  2. DOE Chair of Excellence in Environmental Disciplines-Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurunganty, Sastry; Loran, Roberto; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Hijazi, Yazan; Nieto, Santander; Gomez, Will A.; Duconge, Jose; Cotto, María del C.; Muniz, Carlos; Diaz, Francisco J.; Neira, Carlos F.; Marquez, Francisco; Del Valle, W.; Thommes, M.

    2014-02-19

    The report Massie Chair of Excellence Program at Universidad del Turabo, contract DE-FG02-95EW12610, during the period of 9/29/1995 to 9/29/2011. The initial program aims included development of academic programs in the Environmental Sciences and Engineering, and Research and Development focused initially on environmentally friendly processes and later revised also include: renewable energy and international cooperation. From 1995 -2005, the Program at UT lead the establishment of the new undergraduate program in electrical engineering at the School of Engineering (SoE), worked on requirements to achieve ABET accreditation of the SoE B.S. Mechanical Engineering and B.S. Electrical Engineering programs, mentored junior faculty, taught undergraduate courses in electrical engineering, and revised the electrical engineering curriculum. Engineering undergraduate laboratories were designed and developed. The following research sub-project was developed: Research and development of new perovskite-alumina hydrogen permeable asymmetrical nanostructured membranes for hydrogen purification, and extremely high specific surface area silica materials for hydrogen storage in the form of ammonia, Dr. Rolando Roque-Malherbe Subproject PI, Dr. Santander Nieto and Mr. Will Gómez Research Assistants. In 2006, the Massie Chair of Excellence Program was transferred to the National Nuclear Security Agency, NNSA and DNN. DoE required a revised proposal aligned with the priorities of the Administration. The revised approved program aims included: (1) Research (2) Student Development: promote the development of minority undergraduate and graduate students through research teams, internships, conferences, new courses; and, (3) Support: (a) Research administration and (b) Dissemination through international conferences, the UT Distinguished Lecturer Series in STEM fields and at the annual Universidad del Turabo (UT) Researchers Conference. Research included: Sub-Project 1: Synthesis and

  3. Final technology report for D-Area oil seepage basin bioventing optimization test, environmental restoration support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radway, J.C.; Lombard, K.H.; Hazen, T.C.

    1997-01-24

    One method proposed for the cleanup of the D-Area Oil Seepage Basin was in situ bioremediation (bioventing), involving the introduction of air and gaseous nutrients to stimulate contaminant degradation by naturally occurring microorganisms. To test the feasibility of this approach, a bioventing system was installed at the site for use in optimization testing by the Environmental Biotechnology Section of the Savannah River Technology Center. During the interim action, two horizontal wells for a bioventing remediation system were installed eight feet below average basin grade. Nine piezometers were also installed. In September of 1996, a generator, regenerative blower, gas cylinder station, and associated piping and nutrient injection equipment were installed at the site and testing was begun. After baseline characterization of microbial activity and contaminant degradation at the site was completed, four injection campaigns were carried out. These consisted of (1) air alone, (2) air plus triethylphosphate (TEP), (3) air plus nitrous oxide, and (4) air plus methane. This report describes results of these tests, together with conclusions and recommendations for further remediation of the site. Natural biodegradation rates are high. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, and methane levels in soil gas indicate substantial levels of baseline microbial activity. Oxygen is used by indigenous microbes for biodegradation of organics via respiration and hence is depleted in the soil gas and water from areas with high contamination. Carbon dioxide is elevated in contaminated areas. High concentrations of methane, which is produced by microbes via fermentation once the oxygen has been depleted, are found at the most contaminated areas of this site. Groundwater measurements also indicated that substantial levels of natural contaminant biodegradation occurred prior to air injection.

  4. BPA/Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Puget Sound Power & Light Company (Puget Power) propose to upgrade the existing high-voltage transmission system in the Whatcom and Skagit counties area between the towns of Custer and Sedro Woolley, including some areas within the City of Bellingham, starting in 1995. A Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the project was issued in November 1993, followed by a 45-day public comment period. Public response to the DEIS included the identification of several new transmission route alternatives in the Lake Whatcom area. BPA issued a Supplemental DEIS in April 1995 to provide a second public review-and-comment period. Rebuilding an existing 230-kV line to a double-circuit 230-kV transmission line was identified in the Supplemental DEIS as the Proposed Action. The Supplemental DEIS also examined in detail a North Shore Road alternative which was proposed by some members of the public. Public comments on the EIS were listed and responded to in the Supplemental DEIS. In May 1995, a second set of open houses and public meetings was held to review the Supplemental DEIS. Electromagnetic field (EMF) effects raised as an issue in the DEIS continued to be an issue of public concern in the meetings. The EIS has identified impacts that would generally be classified as low to moderate and localized. Effects on soils and water resources in sensitive areas (e.g., near Lake Whatcom) would be low to moderate; there would be little change in magnetic fields; noise levels would remain at existing levels; and land use and property value impacts would be minimal. Threatened and endangered species would not be adversely affected, and all proposed actions in wetlands would be covered by a Corps of Engineers Nationwide Permit. Visual and socioeconomic would be low to moderate. There would be no effect on cultural resources.

  5. Environmental Assessment For Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-03-01

    DOE analyzed two cleanup and closure alternatives and the No Action Alternative, in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR Part 1021). Under Alternative 1, DOE is proposing to clean up the remaining ETEC facilities using the existing site specific cleanup standard of 15 mrem/yr. (plus DOE's As Low As Reasonably Achievable--ALARA-principle) for decontamination of radiological facilities and surrounding soils (Alternative 1). An annual 15-millirem additional radiation dose to the maximally exposed individual (assumed to be an individual living in a residential setting on Area IV) from all exposure pathways (air, soil, groundwater) equates to an additional theoretical lifetime cancer risk of no more than 3 x 10-4 (3 in 10,000). For perspective, it is estimated that the average individual in the United States receives a dose of about 300 millirem each year from natural sources of radiation. However, actual exposures generally will be much lower as a result of the application of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle. Based on post-remediation verification sampling previous cleanups have generally resulted in a 2 x 10-6 level of residual risk. DOE would decontaminate, decommission, and demolish the remaining radiological facilities. DOE would also decommission and demolish the one remaining sodium facility and all of the remaining uncontaminated support buildings for which it is responsible. The ongoing RCRA corrective action program, including groundwater treatment (interim measures), would continue. Other environmental impacts would include 2.5 x 10-3 fatalities as a result of LLW shipments and 6.0 x 10-3 fatalities as a result of emission exhaust from all shipments. DOE would also decommission and demolish the remaining sodium facility and decommission and

  6. Final environmental assessment: Los Reales 115 kV transmission line alternative routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    The Central Arizona Project (CAP) was authorized as a part of the Colorado River Basin Project Act (Public Law 90-537) on September 30, 1968. The primary purpose of the CAP is to furnish water for agricultural, municipal, and industrial uses in central and southern Arizona, and western New Mexico. Due to its magnitude, the CAP is divided into several major features serving separate but interrelated functions. The Tucson Aqueduct Phase B pumping plants were designed and constructed to operate on a looped power system. The entire looped power system, including two switching stations and connecting 115-kv transmission lines, was identified in the FEIS and approved for construction in the Secretary of Interior's Record of Decision dated September 24, 1985. The loop begins in the vicinity of the Twin Peaks Pumping Plant -- the northernmost Phase B pumping station, at the Rattlesnake Switching Station. All of the looped power system has been constructed with the exception of the switching station and portion of transmission line proposed to be constructed in this project. Without construction of this final portion of the looped power system, the Phase B pumping plants will not be able to operate normally without negatively affecting nearby power sources. The CAP will also not be able to provide the reliability necessary for municipal water systems dependent upon CAP water. The purpose of this EA is to describe impacts that would result from relocating the Los Reales 115-kV transmission line, and possibly the switching station, originally identified in the FEIS. It should be mentioned the Department of Energy will complete a separate NEPA review.

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

  8. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-06-30

    This EIS assesses environmental issues associated with constructing and demonstrating a project that would be cost-shared by DOE and JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) under the Clean Coal Technology Program. The project would demonstrate circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology at JEA's existing Northside Generating Station in Jacksonville, Florida, about 9 miles northeast of the downtown area of Jacksonville. The new CFB combustor would use coal and petroleum coke to generate nearly 300 MW of electricity by repowering the existing Unit 2 steam turbine, a 297.5-MW unit that has been out of service since 1983. The proposed project is expected to demonstrate emission levels of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), and particulate matter that would be lower than Clean Air Act limits while at the same time producing power more efficiently and at less cost than conventional coal utilization technologies. At their own risk, JEA has begun initial construction activities without DOE funding. Construction would take approximately two years and, consistent with the original JEA schedule, would be completed in December 2001. Demonstration of the proposed project would be conducted during a 2-year period from March 2002 until March 2004. In addition, JEA plans to repower the currently operating Unit 1 steam turbine about 6 to 12 months after the Unit 2 repowering without cost-shared funding from DOE. Although the proposed project consists of only the Unit 2 repowering, this EIS analyzes the Unit 1 repowering as a related action. The EIS also considers three reasonably foreseeable scenarios that could result from the no-action alternative in which DOE would not provide cost-shared funding for the proposed project. The proposed action, in which DOE would provide cost-shared finding for the proposed project, is DOE's preferred alternative. The EIS evaluates the principal environmental issues, including air quality

  9. Binding of the auxiliary subunit TRIP8b to HCN channels shifts the mode of action of cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Santoro, Bina; Saponaro, Andrea; Liu, Haiying; Moroni, Anna; Siegelbaum, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated cation (HCN) channels generate the hyperpolarization-activated cation current Ih present in many neurons. These channels are directly regulated by the binding of cAMP, which both shifts the voltage dependence of HCN channel opening to more positive potentials and increases maximal Ih at extreme negative voltages where voltage gating is complete. Here we report that the HCN channel brain-specific auxiliary subunit TRIP8b produces opposing actions on these two effects of cAMP. In the first action, TRIP8b inhibits the effect of cAMP to shift voltage gating, decreasing both the sensitivity of the channel to cAMP (K1/2) and the efficacy of cAMP (maximal voltage shift); conversely, cAMP binding inhibits these actions of TRIP8b. These mutually antagonistic actions are well described by a cyclic allosteric mechanism in which TRIP8b binding reduces the affinity of the channel for cAMP, with the affinity of the open state for cAMP being reduced to a greater extent than the cAMP affinity of the closed state. In a second apparently independent action, TRIP8b enhances the action of cAMP to increase maximal Ih. This latter effect cannot be explained by the cyclic allosteric model but results from a previously uncharacterized action of TRIP8b to reduce maximal current through the channel in the absence of cAMP. Because the binding of cAMP also antagonizes this second effect of TRIP8b, application of cAMP produces a larger increase in maximal Ih in the presence of TRIP8b than in its absence. These findings may provide a mechanistic explanation for the wide variability in the effects of modulatory transmitters on the voltage gating and maximal amplitude of Ih reported for different neurons in the brain.

  10. Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Activities on White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Kirkland AFB, New Mexico 87117-5776 Dear Sir or madam : Please find enclosed the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Final Programmatic Environmental...0 9 -:g .~2 ISF ’R E vi0 OM Ŕ I; ba C6z I ts’a bO Ej 0~~I00 ) ~ ~ 2 E§ 4"D 0 . :! n0 0 -a -ý 00 -4 -c 0.0 0 -Z u o 0~. 00-~ U~~ . -Q. ý ’- Eam 0 r...0 bO 0’ 0 CIO 0 0 u. al S5 0 - t0. E ~ ~ U >0 - L .- m. 00. ’-o o- 00 co 0. 0. .. . m u. 0 -,I bo a - ’I it 00 u .00 0 n 0I ’t cl I ~ -~~ ~ Z u~O

  11. Chemistry and preliminary environmental effects of mixtures of triisopropyl phosphite, Bis-(2-ethylexyl)-phosphonate, and sulfur. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Harvey, S.D.; McVeety, B.D.; Fellows, R.J.; Van Noris, P.

    1991-12-01

    The present studies were performed to evaluate the reaction chemistry and preliminary biotic impacts of BIS, TIP, and TIPS. Reaction chemistry studies were designed to simulate in-flight mixing characteristics. The binary mixture undergoes rapid and nearly complete reaction. The final products released to the environment are TIPS and excess elemental sulfur. There is an apparent species sensitivity difference in algae for the simulants BIS, TIP, and TIPS, with Chlorella being more sensitive than Selenastrum based on cell number studies. However, the extent of adverse effects was not excessive for either algal species. There was no apparent effect of TIP or TIPS on the electron transport systems of isolated chloroplasts at the concentration tested (10 ppm). In general, it is unlikely that environmental release of these products would have significant or lasting effects, based on the preliminary algal tests and electron transport studies.

  12. Western Regional Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement: Rulemaking for Small Power Production and Cogeneration Facilities - Exemptions for Geothermal Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Jack M.; Nalder, Nan; Berger, Glen

    1981-02-01

    Section 643 of the Energy Security Act of 1980 directed the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to develop rules to further encourage geothermal development by Small Power Production Facilities. This rule amends rules previously established in Dockets No. RM79-54 and 55 under Section 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). The analysis shows that the rules are expected to stimulate the development of up to 1,200 MW of capacity for electrical generation from geothermal facilities by 1995--1,110 MW more than predicted in the original PURPA EIS. This Final Supplemental EIS to the DEIS, issued by FERC in June 1980, forecasts likely near term development and analyzes environmental effects anticipated to occur due to development of geothermal resources in the Western United States as a result of this additional rulemaking.

  13. Final master work plan : environmental investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, 2002 revision.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, J. C.; Environmental Research

    2003-01-23

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under which Argonne National Laboratory provides technical assistance for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation for the CCC/USDA. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites in Kansas where former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were located. Argonne applies its QuickSite(reg sign) Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) approach to these former facilities. The QuickSite environmental site characterization methodology is Argonne's proprietary implementation of the ESC process (ASTM 1998). Argonne has used this approach at several former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, including Agenda, Agra, Everest, and Frankfort. The Argonne ESC approach revolves around a multidisciplinary, team-oriented approach to problem solving. The basic features and steps of the QuickSite methodology are as follows: (1) A team of scientists with diverse expertise and strong field experience is required to make the process work. The Argonne team is composed of geologists, geochemists, geophysicists, hydrogeologists, chemists, biologists, engineers, computer scientists, health and safety personnel, and regulatory staff, as well as technical support staff. Most of the staff scientists are at the Ph.D. level; each has on average, more than 15 years of experience. The technical team works together throughout the process. In other words, the team that plans the program also implements the program in the field and writes the reports. More experienced scientists do not remain in the office while individuals with lesser degrees or experience carry out the field work. (2) The technical team reviews, evaluates, and interprets existing data for the site and the contaminants there to determine which data sets are technically valid and can be used in initially designing the field program. A basic

  14. Final master work plan : environmental investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, 2002 revision.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, J. C.; Environmental Research

    2003-01-23

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under which Argonne National Laboratory provides technical assistance for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation for the CCC/USDA. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites in Kansas where former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were located. Argonne applies its QuickSite(reg sign) Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) approach to these former facilities. The QuickSite environmental site characterization methodology is Argonne's proprietary implementation of the ESC process (ASTM 1998). Argonne has used this approach at several former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, including Agenda, Agra, Everest, and Frankfort. The Argonne ESC approach revolves around a multidisciplinary, team-oriented approach to problem solving. The basic features and steps of the QuickSite methodology are as follows: (1) A team of scientists with diverse expertise and strong field experience is required to make the process work. The Argonne team is composed of geologists, geochemists, geophysicists, hydrogeologists, chemists, biologists, engineers, computer scientists, health and safety personnel, and regulatory staff, as well as technical support staff. Most of the staff scientists are at the Ph.D. level; each has on average, more than 15 years of experience. The technical team works together throughout the process. In other words, the team that plans the program also implements the program in the field and writes the reports. More experienced scientists do not remain in the office while individuals with lesser degrees or experience carry out the field work. (2) The technical team reviews, evaluates, and interprets existing data for the site and the contaminants there to determine which data sets are technically valid and can be used in initially designing the field program. A basic

  15. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Final phase 1, Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  16. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final Phase 1 environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  17. The two Dictyostelium autophagy eight proteins, ATG8a and ATG8b, associate with the autophagosome in succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Jan; Meßling, Susanne; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an ancient cellular pathway that is conserved from yeast to man. It contributes to many physiological and pathological processes and plays a major role in the degradation of proteins and/or organelles in response to starvation and stress. In the autophagic process cytosolic material is captured into double membrane-bound vesicles, the autophagosomes. After fusion with lysosomes, the cargo is degraded in the generated autolysosomes and then recycled for further use. Autophagy 8 (ATG8, in mammals LC3), a well-established marker of autophagy, is covalently linked to phosphatidylethanolamine on the autophagic membrane during autophagosome formation. Bioinformatic analysis of the Dictyostelium genome revealed two atg8 genes which encode the ATG8a and ATG8b paralogs. They are with around 14kDa similar in size, 54 % identical to one another and more closely related to the corresponding proteins in fungi and plants than in animals. For ATG8a we found a strong up-regulation throughout the 24h developmental time course while ATG8b expression was highest in vegetative cells followed by a moderate reduction during early development. Confocal microscopy of fluorescently tagged ATG8a and ATG8b in vegetative AX2 wild-type and in ATG9(-) cells showed that both proteins mainly co-localized on vesicular structures with a diameter above 500nm while those smaller than 500nm were predominantly positive for ATG8b. In ATG9(-) cells we found a strong increase in the relative abundance of ATG8a-positive large vesicular structures and of total ATG8b-positive structures per cell indicating autophagic flux problems in this mutant. We also found that vesicular structures positive for ATG8a and/or ATG8b were also positive for ubiquitin. Live cell imaging of AX2 and ATG9(-) cells co-expressing combinations of red and green tagged ATG8a, ATG8b or ATG9 revealed transient co localizations of these proteins. Our results suggest that ATG8b associates with nascent autophagosomes before

  18. Nanocrystallization in Co67Cr7Fe4Si8B14 Amorphous Alloy Ribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jamili-Shirvan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The nanocrystallization of Co67Fe4Cr7Si8B14 amorphous ribbons which prepared by planar flow melt spinning process (PFMS was investigated. Crystallization of the ribbons was studied by differential thermal analysis (DTA, X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The DTA result of amorphous ribbon at heating rate of 10˚C/min showedoccurrence of phase transitions in two stages. The ribbons were isothermally annealed for 30 minutes in argon atmosphere at different temperatures between 300 and 650ºC with 25ºC steps. The magnetic properties of annealed samples were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The VSM results revealed that optimum soft magnetic properties occurred at 400ºC. XRD patterns showed that the samples isothermally annealed up to 450ºC were amorphous, while TEM results at 400ºC indicated 7-8 nm mean size nanocrytallites in amorphous matrix and size of the nanocrystallites increased by increasing temperature. Also by X-ray diffraction pattern, precipitation of different phases at higher temperatures confirmed.

  19. Discovery and Rossiter-McLaughlin Effect of Exoplanet Kepler-8b

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jon M; Koch, David G; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Cochran, William D; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie M; Buchhave, Lars A; Brown, Tim M; Caldwell, Douglas A; Dunham, Edward W; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra A; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Howell, Steve B; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John Asher; Latham, David W; Lissauer, Jack J; Monet, David G; Rowe, Jason F; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Welsh, William F; Howard, Andrew W; MacQueen, Phillip; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Twicken, Joseph D; Bryson, Stephen T; Quintana, Elisa V; Clarke, Bruce D; Li, Jie; Allen, Christopher; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Meibom, Soren; Klaus, Todd C; Middour, Christopher K; Cote, Miles T; McCauliff, Sean; Girouard, Forrest R; Gunter, Jay P; Wohler, Bill; Hall, Jennifer R; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Uddin, AKM Kamal; Wu, Michael S; Bhavsar, Paresh A; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Pletcher, David L; Dotson, Jessie A; Haas, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery and the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect of Kepler-8b, a transiting planet identified by the NASA Kepler Mission. Kepler photometry and Keck-HIRES radial velocities yield the radius and mass of the planet around this F8IV subgiant host star. The planet has a radius RP = 1.419 RJ and a mass, MP = 0.60 MJ, yielding a density of 0.26 g cm^-3, among the lowest density planets known. The orbital period is P = 3.523 days and orbital semima jor axis is 0.0483+0.0006/-0.0012 AU. The star has a large rotational v sin i of 10.5 +/- 0.7 km s^-1 and is relatively faint (V = 13.89 mag), both properties deleterious to precise Doppler measurements. The velocities are indeed noisy, with scatter of 30 m s^-1, but exhibit a period and phase consistent with the planet implied by the photometry. We securely detect the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, confirming the planet's existence and establishing its orbit as prograde. We measure an inclination between the projected planetary orbital axis and the projected stell...

  20. Pressure distribution for the wing of the YAV-8B airplane; with and without pylons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Edwin J.; Delfrate, John H.; Sabsay, Catherine M.; Yarger, Jill M.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure distribution data have been obtained in flight at four span stations on the wing panel of the YAV-8B airplane. Data obtained for the supercritical profiled wing, with and without pylons installed, ranged from Mach 0.46 to 0.88. The altitude ranged from approximately 20,000 to 40,000 ft and the resultant Reynolds numbers varied from approximately 7.2 million to 28.7 million based on the mean aerodynamic chord. Pressure distribution data and flow visualization results show that the full-scale flight wing performance is compromised because the lower surface cusp region experiences flow separation for some important transonic flight conditions. This condition is aggravated when local shocks occur on the lower surface of the wing (mostly between 20 and 35 percent chord) when the pylons are installed for Mach 0.8 and above. There is evidence that convex fairings, which cover the pylon attachment flanges, cause these local shocks. Pressure coefficients significantly more negative than those for sonic flow also occur farther aft on the lower surface (near 60 percent chord) whether or not the pylons are installed for Mach numbers greater than or equal to 0.8. These negative pressure coefficient peaks and associated local shocks would be expected to cause increasing wave and separation drag at transonic Mach number increases.

  1. WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b are Members of Triple Star Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bechter, Eric B; Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A; Batygin, Konstantin; Hinkley, Sasha; Muirhead, Phillip S; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W; Montet, Benjamin T; Matthews, Christopher T; Morton, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution images that demonstrate the hot Jupiters WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b orbit the primary star of hierarchical triple star systems. In each case, two distant companions with colors and brightness consistent with M dwarfs co-orbit the planet host as well as one another. Our adaptive optics images spatially resolve the secondary around WASP-12, previously identified by Bergfors et al. 2011 and Crossfield et al. 2012, into two distinct sources separated by 84.3+/-0.6 mas (21 +/- 3 AU). We find that the secondary to HAT-P-8, also identified by Bergfors et al. 2011, is in fact composed of two stars separated by 65.3+/-0.5 mas (15+/-1 AU). Our follow-up observations demonstrate physical association through common proper-motion. HAT-P-8 C has a particularly low mass, which we estimate to be 0.18+/-0.02Msun using photometry. Due to their hierarchy, WASP-12 BC and HAT-P-8 BC will enable the first dynamical mass determination for hot Jupiter stellar companions. These previously well-studied pl...

  2. WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b are Members of Triple Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechter, Eric B.; Crepp, Justin R.; Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Hinkley, Sasha; Muirhead, Philip S.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Matthews, Christopher T.; Morton, Timothy D.

    2014-06-01

    We present high spatial resolution images that demonstrate that WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b orbit the primary stars of hierarchical triple star systems. In each case, two distant companions with colors and brightnesses consistent with M dwarfs co-orbit the hot Jupiter planet host as well as one another. Our adaptive optics images spatially resolve the secondary around WASP-12, previously identified by Bergfors et al. and Crossfield et al. into two distinct sources separated by 84.3 ± 0.6 mas (21 ± 3 AU). We find that the secondary to HAT-P-8, also identified by Bergfors et al., is in fact composed of two stars separated by 65.3 ± 0.5 mas (15 ± 1 AU). Our follow-up observations demonstrate physical association through common proper motion. HAT-P-8 C has a particularly low mass, which we estimate to be 0.18 ± 0.02 M ⊙ using photometry. Due to their hierarchy, WASP-12 BC and HAT-P-8 BC will enable the first dynamical mass determination for hot Jupiter stellar companions. These previously well studied planet hosts now represent higher-order multi-star systems with potentially complex dynamics, underscoring the importance of diffraction-limited imaging and providing additional context for understanding the migrant population of transiting hot Jupiters.

  3. Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Housing - - - - - Public Finance 0O_’" Construction Resources ll -. . ..- .. - - :< -: Social Well-Being ...... Public Services and Facilities...Pine Bluffs, Chugwater, or Kimball in the short-term. Public Finance Public finance describes the budgets, fiscal resources, and obligations of all

  4. Discovery and Rossiter-Mclaughlin Effect of Exoplanet Kepler-8b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Cochran, William D.; Welsh, William F.; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie M.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Dunham, Edward W.; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra A.; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Geary, John C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John Asher; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Monet, David G.; Rowe, Jason F.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Howard, Andrew W.; MacQueen, Phillip; Orosz, Jerome A.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Twicken, Joseph D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Allen, Christopher; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Meibom, Søren; Klaus, Todd C.; Middour, Christopher K.; Cote, Miles T.; McCauliff, Sean; Girouard, Forrest R.; Gunter, Jay P.; Wohler, Bill; Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Kamal Uddin, AKM; Wu, Michael S.; Bhavsar, Paresh A.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Pletcher, David L.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Haas, Michael R.

    2010-12-01

    We report on the discovery and the Rossiter-McLaughlin (R-M) effect of Kepler-8b, a transiting planet identified by the NASA Kepler Mission. Kepler photometry and Keck-HIRES radial velocities yield the radius and mass of the planet around this F8IV subgiant host star. The planet has a radius R P = 1.419 R J and a mass M P = 0.60 M J, yielding a density of 0.26 g cm-3, one of the lowest planetary densities known. The orbital period is P = 3.523 days and the orbital semimajor axis is 0.0483+0.0006 -0.0012 AU. The star has a large rotational vsin i of 10.5 ± 0.7 km s-1 and is relatively faint (V ≈ 13.89 mag); both properties are deleterious to precise Doppler measurements. The velocities are indeed noisy, with scatter of 30 m s-1, but exhibit a period and phase that are consistent with those implied by transit photometry. We securely detect the R-M effect, confirming the planet's existence and establishing its orbit as prograde. We measure an inclination between the projected planetary orbital axis and the projected stellar rotation axis of λ = -26fdg4 ± 10fdg1, indicating a significant inclination of the planetary orbit. R-M measurements of a large sample of transiting planets from Kepler will provide a statistically robust measure of the true distribution of spin-orbit orientations for hot Jupiters around F and early G stars. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Excellent channels of evaporation in the fusion of {sup 8} B with {sup 58} Ni; Canales relevantes de evaporacion en la fusion de {sup 8} B con {sup 58} Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Q, E.; Aguilera, E.F.; Garcia M, H.; Lizcano, D. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Inside the systematic studies of nuclear reactions with radioactive beams carried out by our group, using the installation TWINSOL of the University of Notre Dame, it was carried out an experiment where the fusion of the system {sup 8} B + {sup 58} Ni was measured to investigate the effects of the proton halo of the radioactive nuclei {sup 8} B to the interactionate with a target of {sup 58} Ni. The protons were detected taken place in the reaction and values were determined for the fusion cross section. (Author)

  6. Development of biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-04-01

    Hazardous chemicals in the environment have received ever increasing attention in recent years. In response to ongoing problems with hazardous waste management, Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976. In 1980, Congress adopted the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly called Superfund to provide for emergency spill response and to clean up closed or inactive hazardous waste sites. Scientists and engineers have begun to respond to the hazardous waste challenge with research and development on treatment of waste streams as well as cleanup of polluted areas. The magnitude of the problem is just now beginning to be understood. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List as of September 13 1985, contained 318 proposed sites and 541 final sites (USEPA, 1985). Estimates of up to 30,000 sites containing hazardous wastes (1,200 to 2,000 of which present a serious threat to public health) have been made (Public Law 96-150). In addition to the large number of sites, the costs of cleanup using available technology are phenomenal. For example, a 10-acre toxic waste site in Ohio is to be cleaned up by removing chemicals from the site and treating the contaminated groundwater. The federal government has already spent more than $7 million to remove the most hazardous wastes and the groundwater decontamination alone is expected to take at least 10 years and cost $12 million. Another example of cleanup costs comes from the State of California Commission for Economic Development which predicts a bright economic future for the state except for the potential outlay of $40 billion for hazardous waste cleanup mandated by federal and state laws.

  7. Macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation -- Final project report by AST Environmental Services, LLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, T.L.

    1998-02-25

    This report summarizes the results of a full-scale demonstration of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) package, manufactured by Arrow Construction, Inc. of Montgomery, Alabama. The HDPE package, called ARROW-PAK, was designed and patented by Arrow as both a method to macroencapsulation of radioactively contaminated lead and as an improved form of waste package for treatment and interim and final storage and/or disposal of drums of mixed waste. Mixed waste is waste that is radioactive, and meets the criteria established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for a hazardous material. Results from previous testing conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1994 found that the ARROW-PAK fabrication process produces an HDPE package that passes all helium leak tests and drop tests, and is fabricated with materials impervious to the types of environmental factors encountered during the lifetime of the ARROW-PAK, estimated to be from 100 to 300 years. Arrow Construction, Inc. has successfully completed full-scale demonstration of its ARROW-PAK mixed waste macroencapsulation treatment unit at the DOE Hanford Site. This testing was conducted in accordance with Radiological Work Permit No. T-860, applicable project plans and procedures, and in close consultation with Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc.`s project management, health and safety, and quality assurance representatives. The ARROW-PAK field demonstration successfully treated 880 drums of mixed waste debris feedstock which were compacted and placed in 149 70-gallon overpack drums prior to macroencapsulation in accordance with the US EPA Alternate Debris Treatment Standards, 40 CFR 268.45. Based on all of the results, the ARROW-PAK process provides an effective treatment, storage and/or disposal option that compares favorably with current mixed waste management practices.

  8. Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}. Final report volume 2, September 1994--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, H.J.; Adams, E.E. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    One option to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels is to capture and sequester power plant CO{sub 2}. Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive, exists today. However, the ability to dispose of large quantities of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain. The deep ocean is one of only a few possible CO{sub 2} disposal options (others are depleted oil and gas wells or deep, confined aquifers) and is a prime candidate because the deep ocean is vast and highly unsaturated in CO{sub 2}. Technically, the term `disposal` is really a misnomer because the atmosphere and ocean eventually equilibrate on a time scale of 1000 years regardless of where the CO{sub 2} is originally discharged. However, peak atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations expected to occur in the next few centuries could be significantly reduced by ocean disposal. The magnitude of this reduction will depend upon the quantity of CO{sub 2} injected in the ocean, as well as the depth and location of injection. Ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will only make sense if the environmental impacts to the ocean are significantly less than the avoided impacts of atmospheric release. In this project, we examined these ocean impacts through a multi-disciplinary effort designed to summarize the current state of knowledge. In the process, we have developed a comprehensive method to assess the impacts of pH changes on passive marine organisms. This final report addresses the following six topics: CO{sub 2} loadings and scenarios, impacts of CO{sub 2} transport, near-field perturbations, far-field perturbations, environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} release, and policy and legal implications of CO{sub 2} release.

  9. On the near-barrier fusion of the proton-halo {sup 8}B + {sup 58}Ni system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, J.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P.R.S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Instituto de Fisica, Gragoata, Niteroi, R.J. (Brazil); Carlson, B.V. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Departamento de Fisica, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Chamon, L.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, CP 66318, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gomez Camacho, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones, Departamento de Aceleradores, Apartado Postal 18-1027, C.P. 11801, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-05-15

    We have performed two independent calculations, without any free parameter, to predict the near-barrier fusion cross section for the proton-halo {sup 8}B + {sup 58}Ni system, for which data were recently reported. Standard coupled channel calculations predict fusion cross sections smaller than the data, while CDCC calculations for the absorption cross section (fusion + transfer + inelastic cross sections) agree with the data above the barrier, although transfer cross sections are calculated to have non-negligible cross section at this energy regime. At sub-barrier energies, region where transfer cross sections are particularly important, the CDCC calculations overpredict the data. The fusion data of the {sup 8}B + {sup 58}Ni system fail to follow the systematics of other weakly bound nuclei and the UFF curve and do not agree with the fusion data of the {sup 8}B + {sup 28}Si system. We try to explain this anomalous behaviour. (orig.)

  10. A Search for Periodicities in the $^8$B Solar Neutrino Flux Measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Aharmim, B; Anthony, A E; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Bergevin, M; Biller, S D; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Costin, T; Cox, G A; Currat, C A; Dai, X; Deng, H; Detwiler, J; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Frati, W; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Goon, J T M; Graham, K; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heelan, L; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howe, M A; Huang, M; Inrig, E; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kormos, L L; Kos, M S; Krüger, A; Kraus, C V; Krauss, C B; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Loach, J C; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; Miin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; O'Keeffe, H M; Ollerhead, R W; Orebi-Gann, G D; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouvarova, T; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Pun, C S J; Rielage, K; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Schwendener, M H; Seibert, S R; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Sinclair, L; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesic, G; Thomson, M; Tsang, K V; Tsui, T; Van Berg, R; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Wark, D L; Wendland, J; West, N; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2005-01-01

    A search has been made for sinusoidal periodic variations in the $^8$B solar neutrino flux using data collected by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory over a 4-year time interval. The variation at a period of one year is consistent with modulation of the $^8$B neutrino flux by the Earth's orbital eccentricity. No significant sinusoidal periodicities are found with periods between 1 day and 10 years with either an unbinned maximum likelihood analysis or a Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis. The data are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the results of the recent analysis by Sturrock et al., based on elastic scattering events in Super-Kamiokande, can be attributed to a 7% sinusoidal modulation of the total $^8$B neutrino flux.

  11. PREPARATION MICRO-FILTRATION CERAMIC MEMBRANE FROM NATURAL ZEOLITE FOR PROCION RED MX8B AND METHYLENE BLUE FILTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Choiriyah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of ceramic membrane fabrication from natural zeolite and its utilization for filtration of procion red MX8B and methylene blue has been investigated. The purposes of this study are to determine the effect of pressure on membrane permeability and selectivity and utilize natural zeolite as ceramic membranes procion red MX8B and methylene blue filtration. The membrane was prepared by metide press pellets and then calcined at 850 oC. The membranes were characterized by mechanical test, flux and rejection of dye. The compression test of the membrane found the values of 1369.178 psi in dry conditions to 1388.933 psi in wet conditions. The flux test found that the higher the pressure applied, the flux was increase. However, the high pressure also decreased the selectivity. Rejection test found that the rejection of methylene blue filtration up to 70 %. Meanwhile, procion red MX8B filtration has rejectivity less than 20 %.

  12. Proposed modifications to the Lower Mokelumne River Project, California: FERC Project No. 2916-004. Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This final environmental impact statement (FEIS) has been prepared for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) to consider modifications to the existing Lower Mokelumne River Project (LMRP) (FERC Project No. 2916-004) in California. Chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations in the lower Mokelumne River have experienced recent declines and fish kills associated, in part, with discharges from Camanche Dam. The California Department of Fish and Game and the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance have asked the Commission to investigate and correct these problems. A wide range of different mitigation actions has been proposed by parties participating in the scoping of this proceeding, and staff has evaluated these proposed actions in this assessment. The staff is recommending a combination of flow and non-flow modifications to the existing license, including new minimum flow and minimum pool elevation requirements at Camanche Reservoir, ramping rates on dam releases, interim attraction and out-migrant spike flows, instream habitat improvements, and a series of studies and monitoring to determine feasible means for solving off-site fish passage problems.

  13. Radiative capture reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B in the continuum shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennaceur, K.; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France); Nowacki, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France)]|[Lab. de Physique Theorique Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Okolowicz, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France)]|[Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    1998-06-01

    We present here the first application of realistic shell model (SM) including coupling between many-particle (quasi-)bound states and the continuum of one-particle scattering states to the calculation of the total capture cross section and the astrophysical factor in the reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B. (orig.)

  14. A Functional Link between AMPK and Orexin Mediates the Effect of BMP8B on Energy Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Martins

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH and orexin (OX in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA modulate brown adipose tissue (BAT thermogenesis. However, whether these two molecular mechanisms act jointly or independently is unclear. Here, we show that the thermogenic effect of bone morphogenetic protein 8B (BMP8B is mediated by the inhibition of AMPK in the VMH and the subsequent increase in OX signaling via the OX receptor 1 (OX1R. Accordingly, the thermogenic effect of BMP8B is totally absent in ox-null mice. BMP8B also induces browning of white adipose tissue (WAT, its thermogenic effect is sexually dimorphic (only observed in females, and its impact on OX expression and thermogenesis is abolished by the knockdown of glutamate vesicular transporter 2 (VGLUT2, implicating glutamatergic signaling. Overall, our data uncover a central network controlling energy homeostasis that may be of considerable relevance for obesity and metabolic disorders.

  15. Final Environmental Assessment for Furbearer Management at the Nulhegan Basin Division of the Silvio O. Conte National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this environmental assessment is to discuss and evaluate the environmental impacts of establishing an annual trapping program as a component of an...

  16. Final Environmental Assessment: Addressing An Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) Lifestyle Center at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Federal agencies that promotes environmental practices, including acquisition of biobased , environmentally preferable, energy-efficient, water...of the area; these items include beer cans, bottles, plastic , etc. Report Organization Following the introduction is a brief overview of the

  17. Final Environmental Assessment for Implementation of Proposed Actions in the Moody Air Force Base Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Environmental Assessment B.S. Environmental Science/ Chemistry Years of Experience : 17 Christopher McJetters Certification in Copyediting... Environmental Science Years of Experience : 10 Stuart Gottlieb B.A. Geography GIS Professional Certificate Years of Experience : 11 Christopher... Experience : 26 Tanya Perry B.S. Environmental Science B.A. Communications Years of Experience : 14 Patrick Solomon M.S. Geography B.A. Geography

  18. 75 FR 29574 - Final Legislative Environmental Impact Statement for the Harvest of Glaucous-Winged Gull Eggs by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for the Harvest of Glaucous-Winged Gull Eggs by the Huna Tlingit in Glacier Bay... Legislative Environmental Impact Statement for the Harvest of Glaucous-Winged Gull Eggs by the Huna Tlingit in... Tlingit in Glacier Bay National Park. The document describes and analyzes the environmental impacts of...

  19. Analysis of environmental risks with an encapsulation plant and a final disposal repository; Miljoeriskanalys foer inkapslingsanlaeggning och slutfoervar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan; Herly, Lucien; Pettersson, Lars [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    This report covers non-radiological environmental risks related to an encapsulation plant and a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. All stages of the above are covered. This means construction, operation, demolition and sealing. A risk, in this report, is defined as a combination of probability and consequence of an undesired event. An extensive and systematic effort has been made in order to identify all risks. If risks remain undetected it should be low probability events. The risks are also evaluated to see which risks are the more serious ones. A large part of the existing risks are oil or diesel on the ground. In general the main risks occur during the construction phase and they are similar to normal risks at every large construction project. Most of the above are discharges of oil products on the ground within the construction area. With a good organisation and a high environmental profile these discharges can be minimized and when needed cleaned. For some of the other risks the same is valid - with a good preventive work they can be reduced considerably. One event which has a relatively high probability for occurrence and which may not easily be cleaned is a damaged lorry leaking oil. The resulting damage depends on where it occurs and maybe also when. Neither in Forsmark nor in Oskarshamn there are common sources of water supply in direct connection to where lorries pass and the probability for a lorry accident to cause damage to the environment is limited. After the assessment and evaluation of risk reducing measures there is one risk that appears serious even though the probability is low. This risk is the possible influence of the final repository on the subsoil water. It is most important that a large effort is put on reducing this risk. The probability of traffic accidents with injuries or fatalities will increase slightly, especially during the second phase of the construction period, since the amount of traffic is expected to increase then. Of

  20. Final EIS for the Proposed Homeporting of Additional Surface Ships at Naval Station, Mayport, FL. Volume 1. Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-21

    and the native population’s transition from nomadic, big game subsistence/settlement patterns to a more sedentary lifestyle residing along the...Dental Clinic, Chapel, Child Development Center, and NAVSTA Mayport Family Housing. Final EIS for the Proposed Homeporting of Additional Surface Ships...for the more coastal lifestyle (Brockington & Associates 1998, Hardy Heck Moore Inc. 2001). The Late Archaic sub-period underwent another climate

  1. Final environmental impact statement for the construction and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation to store the Three Mile Island Unit 2 spent fuel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Docket Number 72-20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) contains an assessment of the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) fuel debris at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory (INEEL). US Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is proposing to design, construct, and operate at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The TMI-2 fuel debris would be removed from wet storage, transported to the ISFSI, and placed in storage modules on a concrete basemat. As part of its overall spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management program, the US DOE has prepared a final programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS) that provides an overview of the spent fuel management proposed for INEEL, including the construction and operation of the TMI-2 ISFSI. In addition, DOE-ID has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to describe the environmental impacts associated with the stabilization of the storage pool and the construction/operation of the ISFSI at the ICPP. As provided in NRC`s NEPA procedures, a FEIS of another Federal agency may be adopted in whole or in part in accordance with the procedures outlined in 40 CFR 1506.3 of the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). Under 40 CFR 1506.3(b), if the actions covered by the original EIS and the proposed action are substantially the same, the agency adopting another agency`s statement is not required to recirculate it except as a final statement. The NRC has determined that its proposed action is substantially the same as actions considered in DOE`s environmental documents referenced above and, therefore, has elected to adopt the DOE documents as the NRC FEIS.

  2. Gulf of Mexico Sales 147 and 150: Central and Western planning areas. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 1: Sections 1 through 4.C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1994 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 147 (March 1994) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 150 (August 1994)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities.

  3. Life-style and genome structure of marine Pseudoalteromonas siphovirus B8b isolated from the northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Elena; Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Sà, Elisabet Laia; Ignacio-Espinoza, J Cesar; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Vaqué, Dolors; Sullivan, Matthew B; Acinas, Silvia G

    2015-01-01

    Marine viruses (phages) alter bacterial diversity and evolution with impacts on marine biogeochemical cycles, and yet few well-developed model systems limit opportunities for hypothesis testing. Here we isolate phage B8b from the Mediterranean Sea using Pseudoalteromonas sp. QC-44 as a host and characterize it using myriad techniques. Morphologically, phage B8b was classified as a member of the Siphoviridae family. One-step growth analyses showed that this siphovirus had a latent period of 70 min and released 172 new viral particles per cell. Host range analysis against 89 bacterial host strains revealed that phage B8b infected 3 Pseudoalteromonas strains (52 tested, >99.9% 16S rRNA gene nucleotide identity) and 1 non-Pseudoaltermonas strain belonging to Alteromonas sp. (37 strains from 6 genera tested), which helps bound the phylogenetic distance possible in a phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer event. The Pseudoalteromonas phage B8b genome size was 42.7 kb, with clear structural and replication modules where the former were delineated leveraging identification of 16 structural genes by virion structural proteomics, only 4 of which had any similarity to known structural proteins. In nature, this phage was common in coastal marine environments in both photic and aphotic layers (found in 26.5% of available viral metagenomes), but not abundant in any sample (average per sample abundance was 0.65% of the reads). Together these data improve our understanding of siphoviruses in nature, and provide foundational information for a new 'rare virosphere' phage-host model system.

  4. 76 FR 43278 - Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Order (EO) 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low Income Populations and EO 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks... an analysis of the effects of its actions in compliance with the Endangered Species Act, the...

  5. Final environmental impact report. Part I. Pacific Gas and Electric Company Geysers Unit 16, Geothermal Power Plant, Lake County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The environmental analysis includes the following: geology, soils, hydrology, water quality, vegetation, wildlife, air resources, health and safety, noise, waste management, cultural resources, land use, aesthetics, socioeconomics, public services, transportation, and energy and material resources. Also included are: the project description, a summary of environmental consequences, and alternatives to the proposed action. (MHR)

  6. Environmental biotechnology: Moving from the flask to the field. Final report, 1 Oct 90-30 Sep 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, J.W.

    1991-09-30

    Environmental biotechnology for hazardous wastes is operationally defined as the use of living organisms or their processes for socio-economic benefit in environmental protection and restoration. Often, biotechnology for control of wastes and toxic materials is viewed as the extremes of either conventional biological waste treatment technology or genetically engineered 'super bugs' of consequent risk to the environment. Between these extremes, environmental biotechnology has evolved from the integration of Engineering, Environmental and Biological sciences as an important new research field contributing to the development, application and optimization of biological processes in hazardous waste control. An analysis of applications of biological process in hazardous waste control leads to the identification of major areas in which environmental biotechnology can contribute new problem solutions and directions for the development or more reliable technology.

  7. Measurement of the $^{7}$Be$(p,\\gamma)^{8}$B Cross-Section with an Implanted Target

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS366\\\\ \\\\ The $^7$Be(p,$\\gamma)^8$B capture reaction is of major importance to the physics of the sun and the issues of the ``solar neutrino puzzle'' and neutrino masses. We report here on a new determination of the absolute cross section of this reaction, using a novel method which overcomes some of the major experimental uncertainties of previous measurements. We utilize an implanted $^7$Be target and a uniformly scanned particle beam larger than the target spot, eliminating issues of target homogeneity and backscattering loss of $^8$B reaction products. The target was produced using a beam of 1.8 10$^{10}$/s $^7$Be nuclei extracted at ISOLDE(CERN) from a graphite target bombarded by 1 GeV protons in a two-step resonant laser ionization source. The $^7$Be nuclei were directly implanted into a copper substrate to obtain a target of 2 mm diameter with a total of 3.10$^{15}$ atoms. The measurement of the $^8$B production cross section was carried out at the Van de Graaff laboratory of the Weizmann Institute...

  8. Determination of S17 from 8B breakup by means of the method of continuum-discretized coupled-channels

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, K; Iseri, Y; Kamimura, M; Yahiro, M

    2006-01-01

    The astrophysical factor for 7Be(p,\\gamma)8B at zero energy, S17(0), is determined from 208Pb(8B, p+7Be)208Pb at 52 MeV/nucleon. We use the method of continuum-discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) to accurately calculate the 8B breakup cross section, taking account of nuclear breakup, Coulomb dipole and quadrupole transitions and higher-order processes. The asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) method is used to extract S17(0) from the calculated breakup-cross-section. The main result of the present paper is S17(0)=21.4 +2.0/-1.9 eV b. This result has +4.5%/-2.6% theoretical error, which comes from ambiguity of the p-7Be scattering length, and 8.4% systematic experimental error. CDCC calculation with one-step Coulomb dipole transitions results in a smaller value of S17(0), 20.2 eV b, which is almost consistent with the extracted value with the first-order perturbation theory: 18.9 eV b. Inclusion of Coulomb quadrupole transitions in one-step CDCC calculation is found to give further reduction of S17(0), i...

  9. Final Environmental Assessment for Decommissioning and Demolition of the Central Heat Plant, GHLN 09-1010B F. E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    GRADE SYMBOL PHONE TYPIST’S SUSPENSE DATE INITIALS Beckwith, GS -11 90 CES/CEAN 773-3667 rs 701200U SUBJECT DATE Final Environmental Assessment (EA...82005 Travis Beckwith Kurt Warmbier (90 MW/JA) Kirk Schaumann (90 CES/CEAN) Attorney Advisor, (90 CES/CEAN) Historic Preservation Officer...signature today. You can contact Kirk Schaumann, Jennifer Howenstine, or Russell Littlejohn if you need to discuss the documents. Thanks Kurt

  10. Final environmental assessment and land protection plan proposal to expand the boundary of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This environmental assessment, completed in January 1994, outlines the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s proposal to expand the Edwin B. Forsythe National...

  11. Code development incorporating environmental, safety, and economic aspects of fusion reactors (FY 89--91). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, S.K.; Fowler, T.K.; Holdren, J.P. [eds.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following aspects of Fusion reactors.: Activation Analysis; Tritium Inventory; Environmental and Safety Indices and Their Graphical Representation; Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Decision Analysis; Plasma Burn Control -- Application to ITER; and Other Applications.

  12. 75 FR 55313 - Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Grow the Army Actions at Fort Lewis and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Lewis-McChord, WA 98433-9500. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Bill Van Hoesen, Joint Base Lewis- McChord National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Coordinator, at (253) 966-1780 during normal...

  13. Final Environmental Assessment of aerial application of glyphosate for control of phragmites on Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the aerial application of glyphosate to control Phragmites (Phragmites australis) on Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge....

  14. Final Environmental Assessment: Addressing Construction of a New Civil Engineering Workshop at Bellows Air Force Station, O’ahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Craig Gorsuch , Det 2, 18 FSS/CEE Environmental Program Manager, 515 Tinker Road, Waimanalo, Hawai?i 96795-1903. Requests can also be made by addressing...this document should be directed to Craig Gorsuch , Det 2, 18 FSS/CEE, Environmental Program Manager, 515 Tinker Road, Waimanalo, Hawai‘i 96795-1903...be conducted to rul611 Sect. 106, and CZMA requirements. 5. Please provide comments directly to Mr. Craig Gorsuch , Det 2, 18 FSS/CEE, Civil

  15. Environmental impact study due to end use energy technologies; Estudio prospectivo del impacto ambiental debido a tecnologias de uso final de la energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini Poli, Fabio

    1997-11-01

    Two thirds of the internal offer of energy in Mexico is consumed by end use sectors through end use technologies (TUF). Here is presented an integral conceptual frame for the environmental impact evaluation due to end use technologies, then the evolution of the interactions between technology-environment-fuel is analyzed in the long term (year 2025) according to three possible scenarios: business as usual, blocks and sustainable. [Spanish] Dos terceras partes de la oferta interna de energia en Mexico la utilizan los sectores de consumo final mediante tecnologias de uso final energetico. En el presente trabajo se introduce un marco conceptual integral para evaluar los impactos ambientales debidos a la utilizacion de tecnologias de uso final de la energia (TUF), luego se analiza la evolucion de las interacciones entre tecnologia-energetico-ambiente a largo plazo (ano 2025) de acuerdo a tres escenarios posibles: tendencial, bloques y sustentable.

  16. 76 FR 44042 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Salt Wells Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... an additional fiber optic line to connect communications from Highway 50 are considered to minimize... letters were received; the responses are included in the Final EIS. The majority of comments...

  17. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Expansion of the Melrose Air Force Range, Curry and Roosevelt Counties, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-18

    to cause the area to. e .ceed -the Fed era1amb±attp7-ar- tic Ll-ate- standarid. 37 The military aircraft would continue to emit particulate and gaseous...Environmental Impacto --- N C Statement (EIS), or file a Finding Of Nto Slni Icant Impact (FONSI). In either case, docu-nenrration of the environmental analysis...cr . t.,, Ch rr St tii~.i s tt rt tIC ,I. Vtla Ish ii. .t~b .01 .. 1t i -- ia wa i. imui.,di t 1d Ln’ ,j ,,p Conty! Du ie i Aq r 1ii W:;It 11i i (nil

  18. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

  19. EARLINET dust observations vs. BSC-DREAM8b modeled profiles: 12-year-long systematic comparison at Potenza, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, L.; Papagiannopoulos, N.; Basart, S.; Baldasano, J.; Binietoglou, I.; Cornacchia, C.; Pappalardo, G.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we report the first systematic comparison of 12-year modeled dust extinction profiles vs. Raman lidar measurements. We use the BSC-DREAM8b model, one of the most widely used dust regional models in the Mediterranean, and Potenza EARLINET lidar profiles for Saharan dust cases, the largest one-site database of dust extinction profiles. A total of 310 dust cases were compared for the May 2000-July 2012 period. The model reconstructs the measured layers well: profiles are correlated within 5% of significance for 60% of the cases and the dust layer center of mass as measured by lidar and modeled by BSC-DREAM8b differ on average 0.3 ± 1.0 km. Events with a dust optical depth lower than 0.1 account for 70% of uncorrelated profiles. Although there is good agreement in terms of profile shape and the order of magnitude of extinction values, the model overestimates the occurrence of dust layer top above 10 km. Comparison with extinction profiles measured by the Raman lidar shows that BSC-DREAM8b typically underestimates the dust extinction coefficient, in particular below 3 km. Lowest model-observation differences (below 17%) correspond to a lidar ratio at 532 nm and Ångström exponent at 355/532 nm of 60 ± 13 and 0.1 ± 0.6 sr, respectively. These are in agreement with values typically observed and modeled for pure desert dust. However, the highest differences (higher than 85%) are typically related to greater Ångström values (0.5 ± 0.6), denoting smaller particles. All these aspects indicate that the level of agreement decreases with an increase in mixing/modification processes.

  20. Microscopic substructure effects in potential-model descriptions of the $^{7}Be(p,\\gamma)^{8}B$ reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, J; Escher, Jutta; Jennings, Byron K.

    2000-01-01

    The spectroscopic factor arises from short-range effects in the nuclear wave function. On the other hand, cross sections for external capture reactions, such as $^7$Be$(p,\\gamma)^8$B at low energies, depend primarily on the asymptotic normalization of the bound-state wave function -- a long-range property. We investigate the relationship between potential models and the full many-body problem to illustrate how microscopic substructure effects arise naturally in the relevant transition matrix element and can be (in part) accounted for by a spectroscopic factor.

  1. Target-charge dependence of the breakup coupling effects in the elastic scattering of {sup 8}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucuk, Y. [University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy ' ' G. Galilei' ' (Italy); Akdeniz University, Department of Physics, Antalya (Turkey); INFN, Padova (Italy); Aciksoz, E. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Akdeniz University, Department of Physics, Antalya (Turkey)

    2016-04-15

    We perform continuum discretized coupled-channels calculations for the elastic scattering of {sup 8}B on different targets to trace where the Coulomb-nuclear breakup coupling effects start to be dominant in the interaction of the proton halo nuclei. We observe a qualitative difference in angular distributions when the charge of the target increases as seen in the case of neutron halos, but the Coulomb-nuclear interference peak begins to disappear clearly at a relatively smaller value of Z{sub T} for the proton halos. (orig.)

  2. Magnetostriction of the rapidly quenched Co80Nb8B12 alloy: Dependence on quenching rate, structural relaxation, and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madurga, V.; Barandiarán, J. M.; Vázquez, M.;

    1987-01-01

    Ribbons of nominal composition Co80Nb8B12 have been prepared by the single roller quenching method using different wheel velocities ranging from 26 to 42 ms−1. X-ray diffraction patterns for ribbons prepared at low velocities show crystalline peaks but characteristic for the amorphous state...... for samples prepared at velocities above 36 ms−1. Room-temperature values of the magnetostriction constant lambdas depend on the quenching rate and changes from 4×10−7 to −1×10−6 as the wheel speed increases. Zero magnetostriction samples are obtained at about 34 ms−1. Thermal treatments change the values...

  3. Quasi-elastic scattering of 6He, 7Be, and 8B nuclei by 12C nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, V I

    2016-01-01

    The observed cross sections of quasi-elastic scattering of 6He, 7Be, and 8B nuclei by 12C nuclei are described within the framework of the diffraction nuclear model and the model of nucleus-nucleus scattering in the high-energy approximation with a double folding potential, for intermediate energies of the incident particles. The calculations make use of realistic distributions of nucleon densities and take account of the Coulomb interaction and inelastic scattering with excitation of low-lying collective states of the target.

  4. Environmental assessment for the proposed CMR Building upgrades at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-04

    In order to maintain its ability to continue to conduct uninterrupted radioactive and metallurgical research in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound manner, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. The building was built in the early 1950s to provide a research and experimental facility for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy. Today, research and development activities are performed involving nuclear materials. A variety of radioactive and chemical hazards are present. The CMR Building is nearing the end of its original design life and does not meet many of today`s design codes and standards. The Proposed Action for this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes structural modifications to some portions of the CMR Building which do not meet current seismic criteria for a Hazard Category 2 Facility. Also included are upgrades and improvements in building ventilation, communications, monitoring, and fire protection systems. This EA analyzes the environmental effects of construction of the proposed upgrades. The Proposed Action will have no adverse effects upon agricultural and cultural resources, wetlands and floodplains, endangered and threatened species, recreational resources, or water resources. The Proposed Action would have negligible effects on human health and transportation, and would not pose a disproportionate adverse health or environmental impact on minority or low-income populations within an 80 kilometer (50 mile) radius of the CMR Building.

  5. 76 FR 53422 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision on the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ... environmental impacts as well as costs. ADDRESSES: Questions or comments on the ROD should be sent to... and costs, and could be incorporated if proven successful. The FPEIS describes the potential... overall ecology of the Missouri River. Concurrently with the ROD, an errata sheet is also being...

  6. 76 FR 18298 - Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement for the DesertXpress High-Speed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... Considering Environmental Impacts (64 FR 28545, May 26, 1999). The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Surface... DesertXpress High-Speed Passenger Train Project AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), United... High-Speed Passenger Train Project (DesertXpress project). FRA is the Lead Agency for the...

  7. 75 FR 65372 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Fee-to-Trust Conveyance of Property for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... of Property for the Cayuga Nation of New York in Cayuga and Seneca Counties, NY AGENCY: Bureau of... Indian gaming, operational at the time of the application, on one property in Seneca County and one... Nation, Seneca County, Cayuga County and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation....

  8. 78 FR 38359 - Notice of Availability of a Record of Decision on the Final General Management Plan/Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... wildlife and natural values within the Monument, two of the three purposes for which the Monument was.../Environmental Impact Statement, Effigy Mounds National Monument, Iowa AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... (GMP/EIS), Effigy Mounds National Monument (Monument), Iowa. ADDRESSES: Copies of the ROD are...

  9. Final Environmental Assessment for Beddown of the 610th Security Forces Squadron Regional Training Center at Fort Wolters, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Wolters 8-1 Section 8 - List of Preparers and Contributors David Eskew, Senior Environmental Scientist, OTIE B.S., Agronomy , University of...Tennessee, 1971 M.S., Agronomy , University of Wisconsin, 1973 Ph.D., Agronomy /Botany, Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin, 1975 Years of Experience

  10. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-04-01

    The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. One of these alternatives is the proposed action. These alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies because the PEIS is a planning document only. It assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. This PEIS differs substantially from a site-specific environmental impact statement because multiple ground water compliance strategies, each with its own set of potential impacts, could be used to implement all the alternatives except the no action alternative. In a traditional environmental impact statement, an impacts analysis leads directly to the defined alternatives. The impacts analysis for implementing alternatives in this PEIS first involves evaluating a ground water compliance strategy or strategies, the use of which will result in site-specific impacts. This PEIS impacts analysis assesses only the potential impacts of the various ground water compliance strategies, then relates them to the alternatives to provide a comparison of impacts.

  11. 75 FR 80480 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Disposal and Reuse...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... and Reuse of Fort McPherson, GA AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Availability... potential environmental impacts associated with the disposal and reuse of Fort McPherson, Georgia. DATES... reuse of Fort McPherson, Georgia. In accordance with the 2005 Base Closure and Realignment...

  12. Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Navigation Season Extension. Volume 1. Main Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    programmatic EIS reduces excessive paper work’by covee-ing a specific p rogram within a broad geological area, su- ..i~gthe environmental impactO within...the cost. 6.08 A number of publications and television programs have done features on the navigation season extension. Articles have appeared in such

  13. 77 FR 49825 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Lost Creek Uranium In...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery Project in Sweetwater County, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR) Project and by this notice is announcing its availability. DATES: The BLM... Creek Uranium ISR Project Final EIS are available for public inspection at: Bureau of Land...

  14. 78 FR 64003 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Jump Creek, Succor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Creek, Succor Creek, and Cow Creek Watersheds Grazing Permit Renewal, Owyhee County, ID AGENCY: Bureau... Statement (EIS) for the Owyhee Field Office Jump Creek, Succor Creek and Cow Creek Watersheds grazing permit... Creek Watersheds Grazing Permit Renewal Final EIS are available for public inspection at Owyhee...

  15. 78 FR 65606 - Availability of the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and a Finding of No Significant Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... Significant Impact (FONSI) of the J. Phil Campbell, Sr., National Resource Conservaton Center (JPC-NRCC... land and real estate at the JPC-NRCC in Watkinsville, Georgia, to the Board of Regents of the... the FONSI. Copies of the Final EA and FONSI for the JPC-NRCC Land Transfer are also available...

  16. Warm Spitzer Photometry of XO-4b, HAT-P-6b and HAT-P-8b

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Kamen O; Knutson, Heather A; Burrows, Adam; Sada, Pedro V; Cowan, Nicolas B; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fortney, Jonathan J; Charbonneau, David; Laughlin, Gregory; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P; Lewis, Nikole K

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed Warm Spitzer/IRAC observations of the secondary eclipses of three planets, XO-4b, HAT-P-6b and HAT-P-8b. We measure secondary eclipse amplitudes at 3.6{\\mu}m and 4.5{\\mu}m for each target. XO-4b exhibits a stronger eclipse depth at 4.5{\\mu}m than at 3.6{\\mu}m, which is consistent with the presence of a temperature inversion. HAT-P-8b shows a stronger eclipse amplitude at 3.6{\\mu}m, and is best-described by models without a temperature inversion. The eclipse depths of HAT-P-6b can be fitted with models with a small or no temperature inversion. We consider our results in the context of a postulated relationship between stellar activity and temperature inversions and a relationship between irradiation level and planet dayside temperature, as discussed by Knutson et al. (2010) and Cowan & Agol (2011), respectively. Our results are consistent with these hypotheses, but do not significantly strengthen them. To measure accurate secondary eclipse central phases, we require accurate ephemerides. W...

  17. Determination of $S_{17}$ from systematic analyses on $^8$B Coulomb breakup with the Eikonal-CDCC method

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, K; Iseri, Y; Matsumoto, T; Yamashita, N; Kamimura, M; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    A new version of the method of Continuum-Discretized Coupled-Channels method (CDCC) is proposed, that is, the Eikonal-CDCC method (E-CDCC). The E-CDCC equation, for Coulomb dissociation in particular, can easily and safely be solved, since it is a first-order differential equation and contains no huge angular momentum in contrast to the CDCC one. The scattering amplitude calculated by E-CDCC has a similar form to that by CDCC. Then one can construct hybrid amplitude in an intuitive way, i.e., CDCC amplitude is adopted for a smaller angular momentum $L$ and E-CDCC one for a larger $L$ related to an impact parameter $b$. The hybrid calculation is found to perfectly reproduce the quantum mechanical result for $^{58}$Ni($^8$B,$^7$Be$+p$)$^{58}$Ni at 240 MeV, which shows its applicability to systematic analysis of $^8$B dissociation to extract the astrophysical factor $S_{17}$ with high accuracy.

  18. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects. Final report, May--August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. [Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program of ``emerging clean coal technologies`` under the categories of ``in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen`` as well as ``post-combustion clean-up.`` The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

  19. Competitiveness effects of environmental tax reforms (COMETR). Final report to the European Commission, DG Research and DG TAXUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skou Andersen, M.; Speck, S. (Univ. of Aarhus, National Environmental Research Institute, Dept. of Policy Analysis (Denmark)); Barker, T.; Junankar, S.; Pollitt, H. (Cambridge Econometrics (United Kingdom)); Fitz Gerald, J.; Scott, S. (Economic and Social Research Institute (Ireland)); Jilkova, J. (Univ. of Economics Prague, Institute for Economic and Environmental Policy (Czech Republic)); Salmons, R.; Ekins, P. (Policy Studies Institute (United Kingdom)); Christie, E.; Michael Landesmann, M. (Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (Austria))

    2007-12-15

    COMETR provides an ex-post assessment of experiences and competitiveness impacts of using carbon-energy taxes as an instrument of an Environmental Tax Reform (ETR), which shifts the tax burden and helps reduce the carbon emissions that cause global warming. COMETR: reviews the experience in ETR in seven EU Member States (Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Finland, Slovenia, Sweden and UK); analyses world market conditions for a set of energy-intensive sectors, as a framework for considering competitiveness effects; analyses the effects of ETR on sector-specific energy usage and carbon emissions in Member States with carbon-energy taxes introduced on industry; presents a macroeconomic analysis of the competitiveness effects of ETR for individual Member States as well as for the EU as a whole; provides ex-post figures for environmental decoupling and assesses carbon leakage; reviews mitigation and compensation mechanisms for energy-intensive industries. (au)

  20. Final Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Falls City uranium mill tailings site, Falls City, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This EA examines the short- and long-term effects of the DOE`s proposed remedial action for the Falls City tailings site. The no action alternative is also examined. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented here to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an EIS will be prepared. If the impacts are not judged to be significant, the DOE will issue an official ``Finding of No Significant Impact`` and implement the proposed action.

  1. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operations Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

  2. Safe China final report. Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of environmental protection and industrial safety in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, A.; Guntrum, R.; Liu, Y. (eds.)

    2013-07-01

    This document presents the results of the international technology transfer and cooperation project SafeChina (''Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of Environmental Protection and Industrial Safety in China'', www.safechina.risk-technologies.com). The purpose of the project was to build an education, training and certification infrastructure and to offer to Chinese engineers and other professionals the possibility to learn about the EU HSE practices and regulation and qualify as Environmental- and Safety engineers according to the EU criteria, guidelines and practice. The main partners in the project have been Steinbeis University Berlin/Steinbeis Transfer Institute Advanced Risk Technologies, and the OEG mbH (Deutsche lnvestitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft mbH), subsidiary of KfW Banking Group, Germany. Main Chinese partners were Beijing Municipal Institute of Labour Protection and Capital University of Economics and Business, Beijing.

  3. Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-03-09

    The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) follows the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. In this case, the DOE decision to be made is whether to construct and operate a 19.5-mile (mi) (31-kilometer [km]) electric transmission line (power line) reaching from the Norton Substation, west across the Rio Grande, to locations within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Areas (TAs) 3 and 5 at Los Alamos, New Mexico. The construction of one electric substation at LANL would be included in the project as would the construction of two line segments less than 1,200 feet (ft) (366 meters [m]) long that would allow for the uncrossing of a portion of two existing power lines. Additionally, a fiber optics communications line would be included and installed concurrently as part of the required overhead ground conductor for the power line. The new power line would improve the reliability of electric service in the LANL and Los Aktrnos County areas as would the uncrossing of the crossed segments of the existing lines. Additionally, installation of the new power line would enable the LANL and the Los Alamos County electric grid, which is a shared resource, to be adapted to accommodate the future import of increased power when additional power service becomes available in the northern New Mexico area. Similarly, the fiber optics line would allow DOE to take advantage of

  4. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Disposal and Reuse of George Air Force Base, California. Volume 2. Public Comments and Responses, Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Included: airspace analysls/recommendations, environmental/socloeconomic Impact, comparative analysis of reuse alternatives, Impact of future technology ...TRANSPORTATION 7.1 •ment: VVEDA’s proposal, based on the P & D Technologies Projected Flight Operations, shows a total of 23,100 passenger operations...Increased moble source activity associated with economic and population growth, Including Increased vehicle actvty associated with reuse actions

  5. Final Environmental Assessment Construction of New Recreational Lodging at Bellows Air Force Station O’ahu, Hawai’i

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    considerable public opposition to military expansion on ceded lands. The Air Force has considered public comments received on the Draft EA, and in...military was not intended to be in the business of recreation, and that should be left to Walt Disney or Six Flags or some other private business...surrounding communities and concerns regarding military expansion on ceded lands. The Draft EA did not identify any significant adverse environmental

  6. Final Environmental Assessment for the Grace Hopper Bridge Embankment Repairs at Joint Base Charleston Weapons Station, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    5 FIGURE 2-1Work Space and Construction Area Grace Hopper Bridge Environmental AssessmentJoint Base Charleston - Weapons Station LEGEND ... LEGEND Approximate Construction Area Work Space Map Unit Name Aquic UdifluventsU Bohicket AssociationH Craveb loam, 0 to 2 percent slope Water ¯ 0 15075...danabeach@scccl.org Executive Director 843-723-8035 Coastal Conservation League –Charleston Office 328 East Bay Street Post Office Box 1765 Charleston

  7. Definite Project Report for Section 205 Flood Control, Illinois River, Liverpool, Illinois, with Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    maintains a flat pool elevation of 429.0 feet for the 9-foot navigation channel. The levee is above the normal pool elevation, although sections are...STUDIES: .... J/ck Carr SOCIAL ANALYSIS: 4 ,.-I . - Patricia Risser / / ,, ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES: (Nf &t’ LL r2 Ron Klump CULTURAL RESOURCES: 9~.t Ken...gravity outlet and a pump station for interior drainage, three road ramps, raising a parking area, and approximately 4,395 feet of levee ranging in height

  8. Environmental assessment for the transfer of the DP Road tract to the County of Los Alamos. Final document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-23

    The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide the DOE with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Additional considerations (such as costs, timing, or non-environmental legal issues) that influence DOE decisions are not analyzed in this EA. As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the County of Los Alamos (the County), in northern New Mexico, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to transfer ownership of the undeveloped, so called, DP Road property to the County. Transfer of this tract would permanently reduce the size of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by approximately 0.1%. Approximately 12 hectares (28 acres) would be changed from an undeveloped to a developed status. This would result in an equivalent loss of wildlife habitat. A hypothetical accident was analyzed that evaluated potential radiological dose to the public at the DP Road tract from LANL operations. The dose to the hypothetical worker population of 450 new employees could result in an increase of approximately three latent cancer fatalities in the population. The DOE finds that there would be no significant impact from proceeding with the transfer of the 28-acre tract for development and use as a business park or for light industrial purposes.

  9. Final sitewide environmental assessment for continued development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Secretary of Energy is required by law to explore, prospect, conserve, develop, use, and operate the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. The Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258), requires that the Naval Petroleum Reserves be produced at their maximum efficient rate (MER), consistent with sound engineering practices, for a period of six years. To fulfill this mission, DOE is proposing continued development activities which would include the drilling of approximately 250 oil production and injection (gas, water, and steam) wells, the construction of between 25 and 30 miles of associated gas, water, and steam pipelines, the installation of several production and support facilities, and the construction of between 15 and 20 miles of access roads. These drilling and construction estimates include any necessary activities related to the operation of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). The purpose of RMOTC will be to provide facilities and necessary support to government and private industry for testing and evaluating new oilfield and environmental technologies, and to transfer these results to the petroleum industry through seminars and publications. Continued development activities either have no potential to result in adverse environmental impacts or would only result in adverse impacts that could be readily mitigated. The small amounts of disturbed surface area will be reclaimed to its original natural state when production operations terminate. The preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 73 refs.

  10. Final Environmental Assessment for the Disposal of the Former Lynn Haven Fuel Depot, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    property has been deemed excess to Air Force needs, the Air Force cannot lease the property under the Military Leasing Act, 10 USC 2667, in lieu of...transfer by deed. However, if necessary, the Air Force could temporarily lease the property prior to final property conveyance. In September 2008...The planned development of the 40-acre FSU parcel for use as a satellite FSU campus is consistent with the current land use classification . A

  11. Final Environmental Impact Statement Relating to the Operation and Maintenance of the Fox River, Wisconsin Navigation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    deoxygenation can occur by reaction with spent sulfite liquor waste to the River. Major amounts of untreated sulfite liquor ace no longer discharged...and R. M. Engler, "Discussion of Regulatory Criteria (’r Ocean Disposal of Dredged Materials: Elutriate Test Rationale and Implemcntation Guidelines...34 Misc. Paper P-74-14, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, M,1iss. March 1974. 20. " Ocean Dumping Final Regulations

  12. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    This report provides a summary of the conceptual design and other information necessary to understand the proposed remedial action at the expanded Canonsburg, Pennsylvania site. This design constitutes the current approach to stabilizing the radioactively contaminated materials in place in a manner that would fully protect the public health and environment. This summary is intended to provide sufficient detail for the reader to understand the proposed remedial action and the anticipated environmental impacts. The site conceptual design has been developed using available data. In some cases, elements of the design have not been developed fully and will be made final during the detailed design process.

  13. ATP8B1 gene expression is driven by a housekeeping-like promoter independent of bile acids and farnesoid X receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Cebecauerová

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in ATP8B1 gene were identified as a cause of low γ-glutamyltranspeptidase cholestasis with variable phenotype, ranging from Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis to Benign Recurrent Intrahepatic Cholestasis. However, only the coding region of ATP8B1 has been described. The aim of this research was to explore the regulatory regions, promoter and 5'untranslated region, of the ATP8B1 gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 5'Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends using human liver and intestinal tissue was performed to identify the presence of 5' untranslated exons. Expression levels of ATP8B1 transcripts were determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and compared with the non-variable part of ATP8B1. Three putative promoters were examined in vitro using a reporter gene assay and the main promoter was stimulated with chenodeoxycholic acid. Four novel untranslated exons located up to 71 kb upstream of the previously published exon 1 and twelve different splicing variants were found both in the liver and the intestine. Multiple transcription start sites were identified within exon -3 and the proximal promoter upstream of this transcription start site cluster was proven to be an essential regulatory element responsible for 70% of total ATP8B1 transcriptional activity. In vitro analysis demonstrated that the main promoter drives constitutive ATP8B1 gene expression independent of bile acids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The structure of the ATP8B1 gene is complex and the previously published transcription start site is not significant. The basal expression of ATP8B1 is driven by a housekeeping-like promoter located 71 kb upstream of the first protein coding exon.

  14. Environmental stress-mediated changes in transcriptional and translational regulation of protein synthesis in crop plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The research described in this final report focused on the influence of stress agents on protein synthesis in crop plants (primarily soybean). Investigations into the `heat shock` (HS) stress mediated changes in transcriptional and translocational regulation of protein synthesis coupled with studies on anaerobic water deficit and other stress mediated alterations in protein synthesis in plants provided the basis of the research. Understanding of the HS gene expression and function(s) of the HSPs may clarify regulatory mechanisms operative in development. Since the reproductive systems of plants if often very temperature sensitive, it may be that the system could be manipulated to provide greater thermotolerance.

  15. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

  16. Final environmental information volume for the coke oven gas cleaning project at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Sparrows Point Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-24

    Bethelehem Steel Corporation (BSC) is planning to conduct a demonstration project involving an integrated system that can be retrofitted into coke oven gas handling systems to address a variety of environmental and operational factors in a more cost-effective manner. Successful application of this technology to existing US coke plants could: (1) reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, cyanide, and volatile organic compounds (including benzene) (2) reduce the cost and handling of processing feed chemicals, (3) disposal costs of nuisance by-products and (4) increase reliability and reduce operation/maintenance requirements for coke oven gas desulfurization systems. The proposed system will remove sulfur from the coke oven gas in the form of hydrogen sulfide using the ammonia indigenous to the gas as the primary reactive chemical. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide are also removed in this process. The hydrogen sulfide removed from the coke oven gas in routed to a modified Claus plant for conversion to a saleable sulfur by-product. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide will be catalytically converted to hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The tail gas from the sulfur recovery unit is recycled to the coke oven gas stream, upstream of the new gas cleaning system. The proposed demonstration project will be installed at the existing coke oven facilities at BSC's Sparrows Point Plant. This volume describes the proposed actions and the resulting environmental impacts. 21 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Measurement of the Total Active 8B Solar Neutrino Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with Enhanced Neutral Current Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, S N; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Biller, S D; Boger, J; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Bullard, T V; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hall, J C; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howe, M A; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kos, M S; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; McGregor, G; Miin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Miller, G G; Moffat, B A; Nally, C W; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouellet, C V; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Rusu, V L; Schwendener, M H; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Starinsky, N; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesic, G; Thomson, M; Thorman, M; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2004-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has precisely determined the total active (nu_x) 8B solar neutrino flux without assumptions about the energy dependence of the nu_e survival probability. The measurements were made with dissolved NaCl in the heavy water to enhance the sensitivity and signature for neutral-current interactions. The flux is found to be 5.21 +/- 0.27 (stat) +/- 0.38 (syst) x10^6 cm^{-2}s^{-1}, in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of these and other solar and reactor neutrino results yields Delta m^{2} = 7.1^{+1.2}_{-0.6}x10^{-5} ev^2 and theta = 32.5^{+2.4}_{-2.3} degrees. Maximal mixing is rejected at the equivalent of 5.4 standard deviations.

  18. Measurement of the total active 8B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with enhanced neutral current sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S N; Anthony, A E; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Biller, S D; Boger, J; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Bullard, T V; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hall, J C; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howe, M A; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kos, M S; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; McGregor, G; Mifflin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Miller, G G; Moffat, B A; Nally, C W; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouellet, C; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Rusu, V L; Schwendener, M H; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Starinsky, N; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesić, G; Thomson, M; Thorman, M; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Tseung, H Wan Chan; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2004-05-07

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has precisely determined the total active (nu(x)) 8B solar neutrino flux without assumptions about the energy dependence of the nu(e) survival probability. The measurements were made with dissolved NaCl in heavy water to enhance the sensitivity and signature for neutral-current interactions. The flux is found to be 5.21 +/- 0.27(stat)+/-0.38(syst) x 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1), in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of these and other solar and reactor neutrino results yields Deltam(2)=7.1(+1.2)(-0.6) x 10(-5) eV(2) and theta=32.5(+2.4)(-2.3) degrees. Maximal mixing is rejected at the equivalent of 5.4 standard deviations.

  19. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Li, Xiaokun [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Wu, Xiaoping, E-mail: twxp@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  20. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3-70). Volume 2, Public comments and NRC response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitoun, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (Volume 1), was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to assess the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana by Louisiana Energy Services, L.P. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are co on, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning of the site. In order to help assure that releases from the operation of the facility and potential impacts on the public are as low as reasonably achievable, an environmental monitoring program was developed by LES to detect significant changes in the background levels of uranium around the site. Other issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment, and proposes to issue a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility. The letters in this Appendix have been divided into three sections. Section One contains letters to which the NRC responded by addressing specific comments. Section Two contains the letters that concerned the communities of Forest Grove and Center Springs. Section Three is composed of letters that required no response. These letters were generally in support of the facility.

  1. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) Study, ambient water toxicity. Final report, October 21, 1993--October 28, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of October 21-28, 1993, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Due to serious reproduction/embryo abortion problems with the TVA daphnid cultures, TVA conducted tests during this study period using only fathead minnows. A split sample test using daphnids only will be scheduled during 1994 as a substitute for this study period. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 2.9, Mile 4.3, and Mile 5.1 on October 20, 22, and 25. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) in testing conducted by TVA.

  2. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tooman, T.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Exploratory Systems Technology Dept.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  3. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  4. Petroleum production at Maximum Efficient Rate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This document provides an analysis of the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, which is continued operation of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. I (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) as authorized by Public law 94-258, the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Act). The document also provides a similar analysis of alternatives to the proposed action, which also involve continued operations, but under lower development scenarios and lower rates of production. NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.SA Inc. (CUSA) pursuant to a Unit Plan Contract that became effective in 1944; the government`s interest is approximately 78% and CUSA`s interest is approximately 22%. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The facility is approximately 17,409 acres (74 square miles), and it is located in Kern County, California, about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield and 100 miles north of Los Angeles in the south central portion of the state. The environmental analysis presented herein is a supplement to the NPR-1 Final Environmental Impact Statement of that was issued by DOE in 1979 (1979 EIS). As such, this document is a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS).

  5. Angular Distribution and Cross Section Measurement of the 6Li(3He,n8B Reaction at 5.8 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinausero M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The reaction 6Li(3He,n8B was studied at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro in the framework of the EUROnu Design Study for a Beta Beam facility at CERN. The 8B production cross section was determined through neutron angular distribution by using the time-of-flight technique. Thanks to the high statistics achieved, the neutron angular distribution for the population of the 8B first excited state has been measured for the first time. Discrepancies with other available data sets for 8B ground state population are discussed and interpreted in the framework of DWBA calculations. Further measurements at beam energies above 10 MeV are needed to clarify the behaviour of the angular distribution

  6. Determination of S17 from 7Be(d,n)8B reaction CDCC analyses based on three-body model

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, K; Iseri, Y; Kamimura, M; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Yahiro, Masanobu; Iseri, Yasunori; Kamimura, Masayasu

    2003-01-01

    The astrophysical factor $S_{17}$ for $^7$Be($p,\\gamma$)$^8$B reaction is reliably extracted from the transfer reaction $^7$Be($d,n$)$^8$B at $E=7.5$ MeV with the asymptotic normalization coefficient method. The transfer reaction is accurately analyzed with CDCC based on the three-body model. This analysis is free from uncertainties of the optical potentials having been crucial in the previous DWBA analyses.

  7. Final Report: Research Study on Development of Environmental Friendly Spray-on Foam Insulation (SOFI) for the External Tank (ET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, James M.

    1996-01-01

    The selection and quantification of four foams using a more environmentally friendly HCFC-141b blowing agent replacing foams that used the CFC-11 blowing agent for the external tank (ET) LWT has been addressed along with problems and solutions that were encountered during verification. The effort on two lower density spray foams for the ET SLWT are presented, but predicted weight savings were not encouraging. Suggestions for possible problem solving are included along with a new approach for selecting foams for qualification as back-up foams for the foams used on the ET LWT. We investigated three resins for use as thermally sprayed coatings for corrosion prevention on metal. The best coating was obtained with a thermoplastic polyimide resin. This coating has a good chance of meeting ET requirements. Possible third generation blowing agents have been shown usable in polyurethane spray and pour foams, and solubility in isocyannate foam components are acceptable. We considered aerogels as insulation materials on space vehicles, and suggested a liner for a liquid oxygen (LOX) composite tank.

  8. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

  9. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal test block (TER) as the Pilot was operated under forced oxidation conditions. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued as investigations into various activated carbons, metal amalgams, and impinger capture solutions were conducted. Following these studies, a brief test of the Pilot High Velocity FGD configuration (PHV) was conducted. This test block will be continued at the end of the month after the Fall outage is completed. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. During this month`s outage, the inlet and outlet damper plates were sealed to isolate the SCR system from flue gas. Also, the internals of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) and catalyst reactor tower were inspected and cleaned so that the system could be available for future test activities. Monthly inspections of all SCR system equipment placed in this cold-standby mode, as well as the fire safety systems in the SCR building, will continue to be conducted by the ECTC maintenance department and will include manual rotation of the booster fan.

  10. Solid waste management of coal conversion residuals from a commercial-size facility: environmental engineering aspects. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, J.; Neufeld, R. D.; Shapiro, M. A.

    1980-11-30

    Major residuals generated by the conversion process and its auxiliary operations include: (a) coal preparation wastes; (b) gasifier ash; (c) liquefaction solids-char; (d) tail gas or flue gas desulfurization sludge; (e) boiler flyash and bottom ash; (f) raw water treatment sludge, and; (g) biosludges from process wastewater treatment. Recovered sulfur may also require disposal management. Potential environmental and health impacts from each of the residues are described on the basis of characterization of the waste in the perspective of water quality degradation. Coal gasification and liquefaction systems are described in great detail with respect to their associated residuals. Management options are listed with the conclusion that land disposal of the major residual streams is the only viable choice. On-site versus off-site disposal is analyzed with the selection of on-site operations to reduce political, social and institutional pressures, and to optimize the costs of the system. Mechanisms for prevention of leachate generation are described, and various disposal site designs are outlined. It is concluded that co-disposal feasibility of some waste streams must be established in order to make the most preferred solid waste management system feasible. Capacity requirements for the disposal operation were calculated for a 50,000 bbl/day coal liquefaction plant or 250 million SCF/day gasification operation.

  11. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, West Hackberry oil storage cavern fire and spill of September 21, 1978: an environmental assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A

    1980-02-29

    This report summarizes an environmental assessment of the fire and oil spill at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve site, West Hackberry, Louisiana. Subjective identification of oil contaminated habitats was supported by a more rigorous classification of samples utilizing discriminant analysis. Fourteen contaminated stations were identified along the shore of Black Lake just north and west of Wellpad 6, encompassing approximately 9 hectares. Seasonal variation in the structures of marsh and lake bottom communities in this contaminated area were not generally distinguishable from that of similar communities in uncontaminated habitats along the southern and southeastern shores of Black Lake. The major impact of spilled oil on the marsh vegetation was to accelerate the natural marsh deterioration which will eventually impact animals dependent on marsh vegetation for habitat structure. Vanadium, the predominate trace metal in the oil, and pyrogenic products due to the fire were found at the most distant sampling site (5 km) from Cavern 6 during Phase I, but were not detected downwind of the fire in excess of background levels in the later phases. Remote sensing evaluation of vegetation under the plume also indicated that stress existed immediately after the fire, but had disappeared by the end of the 1-year survey.

  12. Environmentally-assisted cracking in austenitic light water reactor structural materials. Final report of the KORA-I project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.-P.; Ritter, S

    2009-03-15

    The following document is the final report of the KORA-I project, which was performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) between 2006 and 2008 and was funded by the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI). The three sub-projects of KORA-I covered the experimental characterisation of the effect of the reactor coolant environment on fatigue initiation and crack growth in austenitic stainless steels under boiling and pressurised water reactor conditions, the experimental evaluation of the potential and limits of the electrochemical noise measurement technique for the early detection of stress corrosion cracking initiation in austenitic stainless steels under boiling water reactor/normal water chemistry conditions, as well as the characterisation of the stress corrosion crack growth behaviour in the fusion line region of an Alloy 182-low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel dissimilar metal weld. The main scientific results and major conclusions of the three sub-projects are discussed in three independent parts of this report. (author)

  13. Modern completion and start-up techniques for petroleum wells on Mittelplate: Mittelplate A 3a and 8b; Moderne Komplettierung und Inproduktionssetzung von Erdoelbohrungen auf Mittelplate am Beispiel Mittelplate A 3a und 8b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, P. [RWE-DEA AG, Friedrichskoog (Germany). Foerderbetrieb Holstein

    1998-12-31

    The Mittelplate offshore platform is located 7 km offshore Schleswig-Holstein in the Wattenmeer national park. The contribution describes the completion and start-up operations. (orig.) [Deutsch] Seit ueber zehn Jahren betreibt das Mittelplate Konsortium die Bohr- und Foerderinsel Mittelplate. Sie liegt 7 km vor der Nordseekueste Schleswig-Holsteins im Nationalpark Wattenmeer an der Position von einer der drei vorausgegangenen Erkundungsbohrungen. Auf der mit Spundwaenden eingefassten kuenstlichen Insel befinden sich die notwendigen Foerder-, Aufbereitungs- und Zwischenlagereinrichtungen fuer Erdoel, als auch die Energieversorgungs-, Prozesssteuer- und Wohnbereiche. Ein in die Insel integrierter Hafen nimmt zum Abtransport des Reinoels eine der drei Oeltransport-Bargen auf, mit denen das Reinoel zum Anlanden nach Brunsbuettel gebracht wird. Am Beispiel der beiden in 1997 komplettierten Bohrungen Mittelplate A 3a und 8b soll im Folgenden ueber die Komplettierung und Inproduktionssetzung von Bohrungen auf Mittelplate berichtet werden. Es werden die Anforderungen an die Komplettierungstechnik vorgestellt und im Hinblick darauf die Beispielbohrungen erlaeutert. Abschliessend soll ein Blick in die Praxis der Komplettierungsarbeiten und der Inproduktionssetzung geworfen werden. (orig.)

  14. State and national energy environmental risk analysis systems for underground injection control. Final report, April 7, 1992--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this effort is to develop and demonstrate the concept of a national Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis System that could support DOE policy analysis and decision-making. That effort also includes the development and demonstration of a methodology for assessing the risks of groundwater contamination from underground injection operations. EERAS is designed to enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities by working with DOE`s existing resource analysis models for oil and gas. The full development of EERAS was not planned as part of this effort. The design and structure for the system were developed, along with interfaces that facilitate data input to DOE`s other analytical tools. The development of the database for EERAS was demonstrated with the input of data related to underground injection control, which also supported the risk assessment being performed. The utility of EERAS has been demonstrated by this effort and its continued development is recommended. Since the absolute risk of groundwater contamination due to underground injection is quite low, the risk assessment methodology focuses on the relative risk of groundwater contamination. The purpose of this methodology is to provide DOE with an enhanced understanding of the relative risks posed nationwide as input to DOE decision-making and resource allocation. Given data problems encountered, a broad assessment of all oil reservoirs in DOE`s resource database was not possible. The methodology was demonstrated using a sample of 39 reservoirs in 15 states. While data difficulties introduce substantial uncertainties, the results found are consistent with expectations and with prior analyses. Therefore the methodology for performing assessments appears to be sound. Recommendations on steps that can be taken to resolve uncertainties or obtain improved data are included in the report.

  15. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    The environmental impacts associated with remedial actions in connection with residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site located in Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania are evaluated. The Canonsburg site is an 18.5-acre property that was formerly owned by the Vitro Rare Metals Company. The expanded Canonsburg site would be 30-acre property that would include the Canonsburg site (the former Vitro Rare Metals plant), seven adjacent private houses, and the former Georges Pottery property. During the period 1942 through 1957 the Vitro Manufacturing Company and its successor, the Vitro Corporation of America, processed onsite residues and ores, and government-owned ores, concentrates, and scraps to extract uranium and other rare metals. The Canonsburg site is now the Canon Industrial Park. In addition to storing the residual radioactive materials of this process at the Canonsburg site, about 12,000 tons of radioactively contaminated materials were transferred to a railroad landfill in Burrell Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. This Canonsburg FEIS evaluates five alternatives for removing the potential public health hazard associated with the radioactively contaminated materials. In addition to no action, these alternatives involve various combinations of stabilization of the radioactively contaminated materials in place or decontamination of the Canonsburg and Burrell sites by removing the radioactively contaminated materials to another location. In addition to the two sites mentioned, a third site located in Hanover Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania has been considered as a disposal site to which the radioactively contaminated materials presently located at either of the other two sites might be moved.

  16. DOE/EIS-0355 Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement (July 2005)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2005-08-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) is proposing to clean up surface contamination and implement a ground water compliance strategy to address contamination that resulted from historical uranium-ore processing at the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Site (Moab site), Grand County, Utah. Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 United States Code (U.S.C.) {section} 4321 et seq., DOE prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) to assess the potential environmental impacts of remediating the Moab site and vicinity properties (properties where uranium mill tailings were used as construction or fill material before the potential hazards associated with the tailings were known). DOE analyzed the potential environmental impacts of both on-site and off-site remediation and disposal alternatives involving both surface and ground water contamination. DOE also analyzed the No Action alternative as required by NEPA implementing regulations promulgated by the Council on Environmental Quality. DOE has determined that its preferred alternatives are the off-site disposal of the Moab uranium mill tailings pile, combined with active ground water remediation at the Moab site. The preferred off-site disposal location is the Crescent Junction site, and the preferred method of transportation is rail. The basis for this determination is discussed later in this Summary. DOE has entered into agreements with 12 federal, tribal, state, and local agencies to be cooperating agencies in the development and preparation of this EIS. Several of the cooperating agencies have jurisdiction by law and intend to use the EIS to support their own decisionmaking. The others have expertise relevant to potential environmental, social, or economic impacts within their geographic regions. During the preparation of the EIS, DOE met with the cooperating agencies, provided them with opportunities to review preliminary versions of the document, and addressed their comments

  17. Precision measurement of the $^{7}$Be(p, $\\gamma$)$\\,^{8}$B cross section with an implanted $^{7}$Be target

    CERN Document Server

    Baby, L T; Goldring, G; Hass, M; Weissman, L; Fedosseev, V; Köster, U; Nir-El, Y; Haquin, G; Gäggeler, H W; Weinreich, R

    2003-01-01

    The $^{7}$Be(p, $\\gamma$) $\\,^{8}$B reaction plays a central role in the evaluation of solar neutrino fluxes. We report on a new precision measurement of the cross section of this reaction, following our previous experiment with an implanted $^{7}$Be target, a raster- scanned beam, and the elimination of the backscattering loss. The new measurement incorporates a more abundant $^{7}$Be target and a number of improvements in design and procedure. The point at E$_{lab}$ = 991 keV was measured several times under varying experimental conditions, yielding a value of S$_{17}$(E$_{c.m.}$ = 850 keV) = 24.0 $\\pm$ 0.5 eV b. Measurements were carried out at lower energies as well. Because of the precise knowledge of the implanted $^{7}$Be density profile, it was possible to reconstitute both the off- and on-resonance parts of the cross section and to obtain from the entire set of measurements an extrapolated value of S$_{17}$(0)=21.2 $\\pm$ 0.7 eV b.

  18. Thermal and magnetic properties of amorphous Prx(Fe0.8B0.2)1 - x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabacoff, L.; Dallek, S.; Modzelewski, C.; Krull, W.

    1982-03-01

    Amorphous ribbons of the composition Prx(Fe0.8B0.2)1-, 0?x?0.30, have been produced by meltspinning onto a copper wheel under argon atmosphere. The alloys were characterized thermally using a DuPont 1090 Thermal Analysis System. The crystallization onset temperature Tx, measured at a heating rate of 20 K/min, has a maximum of 899 K at x = 0.10. Tx equals 696 and 729 K for x = 0 and x = 0.30, respectively. The activation energy of crystallization of 5.4 eV for x = 0.05, dropping to 4.3 eV at x = 0.10, remaining approximately constant betwen x = 0.10 and 0.20, then dropping to 2.7 eV for x = 0.30. There is evidence that the alloys phase-separate slowly at room temperature, rapidly at elevated temperature. The magnetic moment was measured as a function of applied field at room temperature and at 4.2 K. The saturation moment decreased from 142 to 50.2 emu/gm at room temperature, and from 171.5 to 93.5 emu/gm at 4.2 K. The low temperature moments were strongly time dependent. The room temperature coercive force was too small to measure (<5 Oe).

  19. Postprandial response and tissue distribution of the bile acid synthesis-related genes, cyp7a1, cyp8b1 and shp, in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Chisada, Shin-ichi; Furuita, Hirofumi; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Matsunari, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    In mammals, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and sterol 12α-hydroxylase (CYP8B1) are rate-limiting enzymes in bile acid synthesis. In addition, a small heterodimer partner (SHP) is also known to inhibit bile acid synthesis via the suppression of CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 expression. However, little information is currently available regarding primary structure of the genes involved in bile acid synthesis in fish. We therefore cloned cyp7a1, cyp8b1 and shp genes from rainbow trout and obtained cDNAs encoding two isoforms each of Cyp7a1 (-1 and -2), Cyp8b1 (-1 and -2) and Shp (-1 and -2). Both cyp7a1-1 and -2 encoded proteins of 512 amino acids. Trout cyp7a1-1 was expressed not only primarily in the kidney, pyloric caecum and mid-gut, but also weakly in the liver, eye, gill and ovary. cyp7a1-2 was highly expressed in the liver, pyloric caecum and mid-gut. cyp8b1-1 and -2, which encoded proteins of 512 and 509 amino acids, respectively, were principally expressed in the liver. Both shp-1 and -2, which encoded proteins of 288 and 290 amino acids, respectively, were strongly expressed in the liver, but shp-2 was also highly expressed in the gallbladder and digestive tract. The temporal changes in the expression of cyp7a1-1/-2, cyp8b1-1/-2 and shp-1/-2 in the liver were assessed after consumption of a single meal. Expression of cyp7a1-1/-2 and cyp8b1-1/-2 increased within 3h post feeding (hpf) when the stomach was still approximately 84% full and the gallbladder was almost completely empty. Although the expression of shp-1 did not change after feeding, the expression pattern of shp-2 was inversely related to the expression patterns of cyp7a1-1/-2 and cyp8b1-1/-2. Specifically, shp-2 expression decreased until 3 hpf before returning to initial levels at 24 hpf. These findings suggest that Cyp7a1s/8b1s and Shp-2 function antagonistically in bile acid synthesis in rainbow trout.

  20. Breakup Coupling Effects on Near-Barrier {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Be and {sup 8}B + {sup 58}Ni Elastic Scattering Compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, N. [Department of Nuclear Reactions, Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Mackintosh, R.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Beck, C. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien et Universite Louis Pasteur, Boite Postale 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2010-03-01

    New data for near-barrier {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Be and {sup 8}B + {sup 58}Ni elastic scattering enable a comparison of breakup coupling effects for these loosely-bound projectiles. Coupled Discretised Continuum Channels (CDCC) calculations suggest that the large total reaction cross sections for {sup 8}B + {sup 58}Ni are dominated by breakup at near-barrier energies, unlike {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Be where breakup makes a small contribution. In spite of this, the CDCC calculations show a small coupling influence due to breakup for {sup 8}B, in contrast to the situation for {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Be. An examination of the S matrices gives a clue to this counter-intuitive behaviour.

  1. Differential hepatocellular zonation pattern of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) and sterol 12alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp8b1) in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Olin, Maria; Rozell, Björn; Björkhem, Ingemar; Einarsson, Curt; Eggertsen, Gösta; Gåfvels, Mats

    2007-03-01

    The synthesis of primary bile acids is confined to the hepatocytes. This study aimed to evaluate the expression pattern within the liver architecture of the rate-limiting enzyme of the neutral pathway, cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), and sterol 12alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp8b1), the enzyme necessary for the synthesis of cholic acid. Specific Cyp8b1 and Cyp7a1 peptide antiserums were used for immunohistochemical staining of livers from wild type and Cyp8b1 null mice, the latter instead expressing beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) as a replacement reporter gene. Cyp8b1 was mainly expressed in the hepatocytes in a zonal pattern surrounding the central vein while the areas surrounding the portal zones showed much lower levels. The zonation was maintained in cholic acid-depleted mice using beta-Gal as a reporter protein. Cyp7a1 expression in wild type mice also showed a zonal distribution pattern, although less distinct, with a maximal expression within a 1-2 cell thick layer of hepatocytes surrounding the central vein. In Cyp8b1 null mice, a more intense staining was obtained, in accordance with the higher expression level of Cyp7a1, although the overall expression pattern was maintained. Our results in mice indicate possible differences in the regulation of the cellular zonation of Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1. Also, cholic acid affects the set-point of Cyp7a1 expression but not its zonal distribution.

  2. Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Intake Diversion Dam Modification Lower Yellowstone Project, Montana Draft Supplement to the 26 April 2010 Environmental Assessment and Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    February 8, 2013 Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Intake Diversion Dam Modification Lower Yellowstone Project, Montana...Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Intake Diversion Dam Modification Lower Yellowstone Project, Montana Draft Supplement to the...Intake Project IEPR Final IEPR Report Intake Project IEPR Final IEPR Report Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the

  3. Final Environmental Planning Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Southsider Cave 18. Sun River 19. Signal Butte 2-36 nz ANIS JUDITH MONTANA N. DAKOTA CRAZY Y& 4 r %k oil S. DAKOTA Titla"i AllTo. M 11TVIL1.11 Upu Rm $AMD...amounts of watered-down alcohol, basic to the Indian trade, tended to undermine tribal structures. Venereal disease was common, and smallpox eradicated

  4. Preliminary Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    across the Rio Grande to end the rebellion. The march by Santa Ana culminated in the Battle of San Jacinto in spring 1836. Texas was declared independent...of Mexico on March 2, 1836, and, after the defeat of Santa Ana at the Battle of San Jacinto , the Republic of Texas was formed. Texas was annexed by...Hutchinson U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Ciro Rodriguez , District 28 The Honorable Charles Gonzales, District 20 Elected Officials - State

  5. Final Environmental Planning Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    and Regional Hires, and Inmigration 1-8 For the Employment Demand Region of Influence 1.1-3 Estimated Material Requirements by Standard Industrial 1-10...Emissions Summary by Year D-14 D.4-1 Baseline - No Action Alternative Population Emissions D-16 D.4-2 Proposed Action Inmigrant Population Emissions... inmigrants , on an annual average basis. In general, locally available labor will fill all the road and construction jobs. 1-2 r .... . a.. ~ ...... . a

  6. Determination of water movement in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain using chloride, bromide, and chlorine isotopes as environmental tracers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-31

    This report, prepared by Hydro Geo Chem staff for Los Alamos National Laboratory, summarizes work conducted by the company under Subcontract 9-XG1-N3993-1. The ultimate objective of this work is to characterize the movement of subsurface water in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Data produced under this contract is to be used by the US Department of Energy in its Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) to help determine hydrologic flows that may affect the performance of a potential nuclear waste repository. The data may be used in the licensing proceedings, and certain quality assurance procedures have thus been required. The work has focussed on measuring the distribution of environmental tracers-chlorine-36, chlorine, and bromine-and on evaluating the depth to which these conservative solutes have percolated in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. The following discussion summarizes progress made on the tasks outlined in the original Scope of Work. Details of this work and all data acquired by Hydro Geo Chem for this subcontract have been systematically organized in logbooks and laboratory notebooks. These documents have been structured to make it easy to trace the analytical history of a sample, from time of receipt to the final analytical results.

  7. AV-8B Map System II: Moving-Map Composer (MMC) Version 3.5, Software User’s Manual (Third Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    writer; * Place CD changer on top of the CPU. * Place monitor, keyboard, and mouse next to stack of equipment. * Place scanner on a table with enough...workstation for AV-8B. The following are key NAWC personnel in this effort: Project Team Leader: Diana Lemon , Project Engineers: Luie Trudy, Jean Carlton

  8. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(8)(B)-1 - Remuneration for services performed in possession of the United States (other than Puerto Rico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remuneration for services performed in... TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3401(a)(8)(B)-1 Remuneration for services...) Remuneration paid for services for an employer (other than the United States or any agency thereof)...

  9. 30.1 8b thin-film microprocessor using a hybrid oxide-organic complementary technology with inkjet-printed P2ROM memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Smout, S.; Rockelé, M.; Bhoolokam, A.; Ke, T.H.; Steudel, S.; Obata, K.; Marinkovic, M.; Pham, D.V.; Hoppe, A.; Gulati, A.; Rodriguez, F.G.; Cobb, B.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present an 8b general-purpose microprocessor realized in a hybrid oxide-organic complementary thin-film technology. The n-type transistors are based on a solution-processed n-type metal-oxide semiconductor, and the p-type transistors use an organic semiconductor. As compared to previous work util

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Rt8.B8, Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Wai35.B1, and “Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Laura L.; Izquierdo, Javier A.; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E.; Zurawski, Jeffrey V.; Conway, Jonathan M.; Cottingham, Robert W.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, I-Min A.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T.B.K.; Shapiro, Nicole; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.; Hua, Susan X.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacteria capable of lignocellulose deconstruction. Currently, complete genome sequences for eleven Caldicellulosiruptor species are available. Here, we report genome sequences for three additional Caldicellulosiruptor species: Rt8.B8 DSM 8990 (New Zealand), Wai35.B1 DSM 8977 (New Zealand), and “Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus” strain NA10 DSM 8991 (Japan). PMID:25977428

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Rt8.B8, Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Wai35.B1, and "Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Laura L; Izquierdo, Javier A; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Zurawski, Jeffrey V; Conway, Jonathan M; Cottingham, Robert W; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, I-Min A; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Shapiro, Nicole; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Woyke, Tanja; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-05-14

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacteria capable of lignocellulose deconstruction. Currently, complete genome sequences for eleven Caldicellulosiruptor species are available. Here, we report genome sequences for three additional Caldicellulosiruptor species: Rt8.B8 DSM 8990 (New Zealand), Wai35.B1 DSM 8977 (New Zealand), and "Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus" strain NA10 DSM 8991 (Japan).

  12. Data integrity and electronic calibrations for the Neutral Current Detector phase measurement of the 8B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Mobrand, Gary A.

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a heavy water Cherenkov detector that observed solar neutrinos via elastic-scattering, charge-current and neutral-current interactions. SNO was designed to measure the flux the total 8B solar neutrino flux in three separate phases, making each measurement under a different set of detector conditions and detection mechanisms. In the third phase, an array of 3He proportional counters was installed, called Neutral Current Detectors (NCDs), which detected neutrons liberated in the neutral-current interactions with deuterium. The neutrino flux can be measured in the NCD phase by identification of neutron capture events via pulse-shape analysis techniques. To accomplish this, the transformation of the neutron capture signals caused by the NCD electronics and data acquisition system (NCD DAQ) must be well known. The NCD DAQ electronics model was developed and quantified, resulting in a small contribution to the systematic uncertainties of neutron identification. Of the four currently proposed neutron identification methods, the parameters which characterize the logarithmic amplification of pulse shapes contribute 1.65%, 0.65%, 0.05% and 0.0% to the systematic uncertainty in the number of identified neutrons. A mechanical problem in two NCDs was discovered that caused the detectors to disconnect from the signal cable with little evidence of being disconnected. The work presented here identified two NCDs that suffered from this mechanical problem and estimated the amount of time that each NCD was disconnected. The remaining NCDs are shown to be unaffected by this problem and an upper limit on the amount of time disconnected was estimated. This was accomplished by an analysis of the rate of thermal noise triggers, an instrumental background noise event. The detected rates of background alphas were also measured to test for anomalously low rates. It was determined that these two NCDs should be removed from the final neutrino flux

  13. Identification of fibroblast growth factor-8b target genes associated with early and late cell cycle events in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, E M; Brokken, L J S; Narvi, E; Kallio, M J; Härkönen, P L

    2012-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-8 (FGF-8) is implicated in the development and progression of breast cancer and its levels are frequently elevated in breast tumors. The mechanisms driving FGF-8-mediated tumorigenesis are not well understood. Herein we aimed to identify target genes associated with FGF-8b-mediated breast cancer cell proliferation by carrying out a cDNA microarray analysis of genes expressed in estrogen receptor negative S115 breast cancer cells treated with FGF-8b for various time periods in comparison with those expressed in non-treated cells. Gene and protein expression was validated for selected genes by qPCR and western blotting respectively. Furthermore, using TRANSBIG data, the expression of human orthologs of FGF-8-regulated genes was correlated to the Nottingham prognostic index and estrogen receptor status. The analysis revealed a number of significantly up- and down-regulated genes in response to FGF-8b at all treatment times. The most differentially expressed genes were genes related to cell cycle regulation, mitosis, cancer, and cell death. Several key regulators of early cell cycle progression such as Btg2 and cyclin D1, as well as regulators of mitosis, including cyclin B, Plk1, survivin, and aurora kinase A, were identified as novel targets for FGF-8b, some of which were additionally shown to correlate with prognosis and ER status in human breast cancer. The results suggest that in stimulation of proliferation FGF-8b not only promotes cell cycle progression through the G1 restriction point but also regulates key proteins involved in chromosomal segregation during mitosis and cytokinesis of breast cancer cells.

  14. Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-12-01

    This statement evaluates and compares the environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions of the residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site and associated vicinity properties at Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. This statement is also intended to aid the BLM in amending their management framework plans and final resource management plan, as well as assisting in compliance with the withdrawal application as appropriate. The site is a 114-acre tract of private and state owned land which contains approximately 3.1 million cubic yards of tailings and associated contaminated soils. The vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as building material. An estimated 3465 vicinity properties would be cleaned up during remedial action of the tailings pile. The tailings were produced by the former Climax Uranium Company which processed uranium ore, which it sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1951 to 1966 and to private sources from 1966 to 1970. This statement evaluates six alternatives for stabilization and disposal of the tailings and other contaminated materials: (1) No action. (2) Stabilization at the Grand Junction site. (3) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with truck transport. (4) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with train and truck transport. (5) Disposal at the Two Road site with truck transport. (6) Disposal at the Two Road site with train and truck transport. All of the alternatives except no action include remedial action at an estimated 3465 vicinity properties. Alternative 3 is DOE`s preferred alternative.

  15. Electron Energy Spectra, Fluxes, and Day-Night Asymmetries of $^{8}$B Solar Neutrinos from the 391-Day Salt Phase SNO Data Set

    CERN Document Server

    Aharmim, B; Anthony, A E; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Bergevin, M; Biller, S D; Boger, J; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bullard, T V; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Cox, G A; Currat, C A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Deng, H; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Frame, K; Frati, W; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hall, J C; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heelan, L; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howard, C; Howe, M A; Huang, M; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kormos, L L; Kos, M S; Krüger, A; Kraus, C V; Krauss, C B; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Loach, J C; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; McGregor, G; Miin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Moffat, B A; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouellet, C V; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Rielage, K; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Rusu, V L; Schwendener, M H; Seibert, S R; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Starinsky, N; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesic, G; Thomson, M; Thorman, M; Tsui, T; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Wark, D L; Wendland, J; West, N; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Wright, A; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2005-01-01

    Results are reported from the complete salt phase of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment in which NaCl was dissolved in the D$_2$O target. The addition of salt enhanced the signal from neutron capture, as compared to the pure D$_2$O detector. By making a statistical separation of charged-current events from other types based on event-isotropy criteria, the effective electron recoil energy spectrum has been extracted. In units of $ 10^6$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from $^8$B decay in the Sun is found to be $4.94^{+0.21}_{-0.21}{(stat)}^{+0.38}_{-0.34}{(syst)}$ and the integral flux of electron neutrinos for an undistorted $^8$B spectrum is $1.68^{+0.06}_{-0.06}{(stat)}^{+0.08}_{-0.09}{(syst)}$; the signal from ($\

  16. Measurement of the rate of nu(e) + d --> p + p + e(-) interactions produced by (8)B solar neutrinos at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Q R; Allen, R C; Andersen, T C; Anglin, J D; Bühler, G; Barton, J C; Beier, E W; Bercovitch, M; Bigu, J; Biller, S; Black, R A; Blevis, I; Boardman, R J; Boger, J; Bonvin, E; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Browne, M C; Bullard, T V; Burritt, T H; Cameron, K; Cameron, J; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, H H; Chen, X; Chon, M C; Cleveland, B T; Clifford, E T; Cowan, J H; Cowen, D F; Cox, G A; Dai, Y; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Davidson, W F; Doe, P J; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunmore, J; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Ferraris, A P; Ford, R J; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Frank, E D; Frati, W; Germani, J V; Gil, S; Goldschmidt, A; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A; Hamian, A A; Haq, R U; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heaton, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hepburn, J D; Heron, H; Hewett, J; Hime, A; Howe, M; Hykawy, J G; Isaac, M C; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Jillings, C; Jonkmans, G; Karn, J; Keener, P T; Kirch, K; Klein, J R; Knox, A B; Komar, R J; Kouzes, R; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lay, M; Lee, H W; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Locke, W; Lowry, M M; Luoma, S; Lyon, J; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McDonald, D S; McFarlane, K; McGregor, G; McLatchie, W; Meijer Drees, R; Mes, H; Mifflin, C; Miller, G G; Milton, G; Moffat, B A; Moorhead, M; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Newcomer, F M; Ng, H S; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Novikov, V M; O'Neill, M; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Omori, M; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Poon, A W; Radcliffe, T J; Roberge, A; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G; Rowley, J K; Rusu, V L; Saettler, E; Schaffer, K K; Schuelke, A; Schwendener, M H; Seifert, H; Shatkay, M; Simpson, J J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, A R; Smith, M W; Starinsky, N; Steiger, T D; Stokstad, R G; Storey, R S; Sur, B; Tafirout, R; Tagg, N; Tanner, N W; Taplin, R K; Thorman, M; Thornewell, P; Trent, P T; Tserkovnyak, Y I; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Waltham, C E; Wang, J X; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M

    2001-08-13

    Solar neutrinos from (8)B decay have been detected at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory via the charged current (CC) reaction on deuterium and the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. The flux of nu(e)'s is measured by the CC reaction rate to be straight phi(CC)(nu(e)) = 1.75 +/- 0.07(stat)(+0.12)(-0.11)(syst) +/- 0.05(theor) x 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1). Comparison of straight phi(CC)(nu(e)) to the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration's precision value of the flux inferred from the ES reaction yields a 3.3 sigma difference, assuming the systematic uncertainties are normally distributed, providing evidence of an active non- nu(e) component in the solar flux. The total flux of active 8B neutrinos is determined to be 5.44+/-0.99 x 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1).

  17. Dissertation Award in Nuclear Physics Prize Talk: Model-Independent Measurement of the ^8B Solar Neutrino Flux and Evidence for Neutrino Flavor Change at SNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2003-04-01

    With heavy water as a target medium the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is designed to study solar neutrinos by measuring both the total flux of ^8B neutrinos through the neutral-current interaction as well as the electron-type neutrino flux via charged-current dissociation of deuterium. Using data from the pure D_2O phase of SNO we have determined the interaction rates of solar neutrinos with deuterium and characterized the backgrounds throughout the SNO detector volume. Without assumptions about the shape of the underlying ^8B spectrum a model-independent measurement of the total flux of active solar ^8B neutrinos is made. The measurement of the neutral-current and charged-current interaction rates provides direct evidence for the flavor transformation of solar neutrinos and indicates that neutrinos have mass. A combined analysis of solar neutrino data from SNO and Super-Kamiokande can be used to constrain the leading weak axial two-body current, the dominant uncertainty of the low-energy weak interaction deuteron breakup process. It is shown that the theoretical inputs to SNO's determination of the CC and NC interaction rates are not a significant theoretical uncertainty and can be self-calibrated.

  18. Final Environmental Assessment for Temporary Aircraft Relocation to Maxwell Air Force Base 187th Fighter Wing Montgomery Regional Airport Montgomery, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Alabama. Mims, Donald L. Montgomery County Administrator, Montgomery, Alabama. Mueller, Heinz. Environmental Review Coordinator, U.S. Environmental...Mr. Donald L. Mims Montgomery County Administrator PO Box 1667 Montgomery, AL 36102-1667 Environmental Assessment for Temporary Aircraft...Experimental Study.” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 82, 479-492. Frericks, R.R., B.L. Beeman , and A.H. Coulson. 1980. “Los Angeles Airport Noise and

  19. Final annual site environmental report, calendar year 1997, for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR), University of California at Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) describes DOE activities for the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) Project at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) site at UC Davis California. The report provides information about the Site and its environmental monitoring operation throughout calendar year 1997 for both radiological and non-radiological parameters. This report also describes activities conducted during 1997 in support of the Site environmental restoration efforts, and information about the impact of these activities on the public and the environment.

  20. Hydrological and hydrogeological effects of an open repository in Forsmark. Final MIKE SHE flow modelling results for the Environmental Impact Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maartensson, Erik; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran (DHI Sverige AB (Sweden))

    2010-07-15

    This report presents methodology and modelling results concerning a deep-rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark. Specifically, the modelling tools MIKE SHE, MIKE 11 and MOUSE are used to quantify the groundwater inflow to the repository and associated hydrological and hydrogeological effects during the construction and operation phases. The modelling results presented in the report provide input to the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) that will be part of a permit application according to the Environmental Code. Based on an existing MIKE SHE model for Forsmark, the first step of the modelling process was to implement an updated hydrogeological model of the bedrock and to increase the vertical and horizontal extents of the model domain. Other model updates involve the vegetation classification, and implementation of SFR (final repository for short-lived radioactive waste) and the subsurface drainage system at the nearby nuclear power plant. The updated model was calibrated using measured data on groundwater levels in the Quaternary deposits and the bedrock, water levels in lakes, and stream discharges. The calibrated model was then used for simulation of undisturbed conditions (i.e. without the repository) as a reference for modelling results obtained for disturbed conditions (with the repository). The modelling results for undisturbed conditions that are presented in the report closely resemble those of the final MIKE SHE site descriptive modelling (SDM-Site Forsmark). The repository layout was implemented as pipe links (segments) in the modelling tool MOUSE, and the implemented layout was used for the modelling of disturbed conditions. The study uses an updated and verified MIKE SHE-MOUSE coupling routine that is specifically adapted for calculation of groundwater inflow to grouted rock tunnels. The vertical shafts of the repository are implemented in the form of MIKE SHE grid cells with atmospheric pressure. Modelling results for disturbed

  1. Maumee Bay State Park, Ohio. Shoreline Erosion Beach Restoration Study. Final Feasibility Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement. Interim to Western Lake Erie Shore Study. Volume 2. Appendices. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Women Voters Alice Geisel Northwest Ohio National Resource Council Hugh Gunderson Northwest Ohio National Resource Council Charles Giasburg Northwest...discussed. Also, the library at the University was used to obtain bibliographies, books, and other publications useful in the preparation of the final report

  2. Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

    1980-02-01

    This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

  3. The Chernobyl accident as an example of how environmental burden may lead to persistent mental stress. Final report. Laengerfristige psychische Folgen von Umweltbelastungen: Das Beispiel Tschernobyl. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legewie, H.; Boehm, A.; Boehnke, K.; Faas, A.; Gross, B.; Jaeggi, E.

    1990-01-01

    It was the aim of this qualitative analysis to give an account, as detailed and complete as possible, of time-dependent mental reactions to ecological afflictions through the Chernobyl accident as well as to describe reaction and compensation patterns typical for such challenges and to develop preliminary theories to explain the phenomena observed. These efforts make a contribution to basic research in that they pave the way to innovative methods and fields of knowledge that may be of equal relevance to environmental psychology, clinical psychology, social psychology and socioscientific technology. They make a contribution to field research in that the findings revealed elucidate generally held views about the toll of technocracy and environmental destruction. The results appear to be just as relevant to health and environmental counselling, environmental education and environment-oriented editorial work as they are to political decisions concerning future technologies. (orig.).

  4. Final Environmental Assessment Addressing 21st Explosive Ordinance Disposal Weapons of Mass Destruction Facilities Demolition and Expansion at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office for recycling or reuse. The nonhazardous demolition waste, such as asphalt, concrete, wood, and...Project Manager Ciudad Soil and Water Conservation District 6200 Jefferson NE, Room 125 Albuquerque NM 87109 Bemalillo County Environmental Health

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION COATINGS AND COATING EQUIPMENT PROGRAM (ETV CCEP), FINAL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS GROUP TAGNITE--TESTING AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN (T/QAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall objective of the Environmental Testing and Verification Coatings and Coating Equipment Program is to verify pollution prevention and performance characteristics of coating technologies and make the results of the testing available to prospective coating technology use...

  6. Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modifications to 500-kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada, Northern States Power Company. Addendum to the final Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This Addendum to the Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modifications to 500 kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada (DOE/EA-587) addresses Northern States Power Company`s (NSP) proposed expansion of the Forbes Substation. The applicant has requested that the expansion take place on the west side of the substation, within the existing property line, instead of on the north side as originally proposed. All of the proposed construction would take place on property already owned by NSP. DOE has reviewed the environmental impacts associated with this minor modification and has determined that the conclusions reached in the environmental assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact prepared in connection with NSP`s original amendment request remain valid.

  7. Final Environmental Impact Statement to construct and operate a facility to receive, store, and dispose of 11e.(2) byproduct material near Clive, Utah (Docket No. 40-8989)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    A Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) related to the licensing of Envirocare of Utah, Inc.`s proposed disposal facility in Tooele county, Utah (Docket No. 40-8989) for byproduct material as defined in Section 11e.(2) of the Atomic Energy Act, as amended, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. This statement describes and evaluates the purpose of and need for the proposed action, the alternatives considered, and the environmental consequences of the proposed action. The NRC has concluded that the proposed action evaluated under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and 10 CFR Part 51, is to permit the applicant to proceed with the project as described in this Statement.

  8. Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 5. Public comments and Nuclear Regulatory Commission responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    Copies of 69 letters are presented commenting on the Draft Generic Environmental Statement (GESMO) WASH-1327 and the NRC's responses to the comments received from Federal, State and local agencies; environmental and public interest groups, members of the academic and industrial communities, and individual citizens. An index to these letters indicating the number assigned to each letter, the author, and organization represented, is provided in the Table of Contents.

  9. Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S.; Badger, E.A.

    1980-02-01

    Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)

  10. Magnetic properties of ball-milled nanocrystalline alloys Fe sub 7 sub 8 B sub 1 sub 3 Si sub 9

    CERN Document Server

    Pekala, M; Jachimowicz, M

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Fe sub 7 sub 8 B sub 1 sub 3 Si sub 9 alloys are studied for three series prepared by ball milling starting from amorphous ribbons, crystallized ribbons, and elemental powders. Temperature variation of static magnetization results in strong ferromagnetic interaction which is weakly dependent on the initial material. Magnetic hysteresis loops show that saturation magnetization, magnetic remanence, and coercive field increase with frequency for both series of ribbon samples, whereas they decrease for alloys prepared from elemental powders. Power losses raise faster for the alloys prepared from elemental powders than for the two other alloys. (author)

  11. Maumee Bay State Park, Ohio. Shoreline Erosion Beach Restoration Study. Final Feasibility Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement. Interim to Western Lake Erie Shore Study. Volume 1. Main Report. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Oesirahie Comeb-ty lo loss lone lose loss CS) Caltacai oAss lose lo iopact on signifioant Sam as Alterallee 2a. Uase as Alternativo 2,. Samo...soils are underlain by thick sedimentary 56 rock sequences, including limestones, dolomites, and shales. The soil over- burden is relatively thick, and...However, several environmental features have been incorDorated into the Recommended Plan. All shoreline structures would be constructed of large rock

  12. Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with theSudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aharmim, B.; Ahmad, Q.R.; Ahmed, S.N.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen,T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Buehler, G.; Barton, J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch,M.; Bergevin, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler, M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Deng, H.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon,N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goon, J.T.M.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Henning, R.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime,A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Kirch, K.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar,R.J.; Kormos, L.L.; Kos, M.; Kouzes, R.; Krueger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss,C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,A.B.; McDonald, D.S.; McFarlane, K.; McGee, S.; McGregor, G.; MeijerDrees, R.; Mes, H.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, M.L.; Milton,G.; Moffat, B.A.; Monreal, B.; Moorhead, M.; Morrissette, B.; Nally,C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; et al.

    2007-02-01

    This article provides the complete description of resultsfrom the Phase I data set of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ThePhase I data set is based on a 0.65 kt-year exposure of heavy water tothe solar 8B neutrino flux. Included here are details of the SNO physicsand detector model, evaluations of systematic uncertainties, andestimates of backgrounds. Also discussed are SNO's approach tostatistical extraction of the signals from the three neutrino reactions(charged current, neutral current, and elastic scattering) and theresults of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the ?e flux. Under theassumption that the 8B spectrum is undistorted, the measurements fromthis phase yield a solar ?e flux of ?(?e) =1.76+0.05?0.05(stat.)+0.09?0.09 (syst.) x 106 cm?2 s?1, and a non-?ecomponent ?(? mu) = 3.41+0.45?0.45(stat.)+0.48?0.45 (syst.) x 106 cm?2s?1. The sum of these components provides a total flux in excellentagreement with the predictions of Standard Solar Models. The day-nightasymmetry in the ?e flux is found to be Ae = 7.0 +- 4.9 (stat.)+1.3?1.2percent (sys.), when the asymmetry in the total flux is constrained to bezero.

  13. Report on the CEPA activities [Consorcio Educativo para la Proteccion Ambiental/Educational Consortium for Environmental Preservation] [Final report of activities from 1998 to 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Miriam

    2003-02-01

    This report compiles the instances of scientific, educational, and institutional cooperation on environmental issues and other activities in which CEPA was engaged during the past five years, and includes several annual reports and meeting summaries. CEPA is a collaborative international consortium that brings together higher education institutions with governmental agencies, research laboratories, and private sector entities. CEPA's mission is to strengthen the technical, professional, and educational environmental infrastructure in the United States and Latin America. The CEPA program includes curriculum development, student exchange, faculty development, and creation of educational materials, joint research, and other cooperative activities. CEPA's goals are accomplished by actively working with Hispanic-serving institutions of higher education in the United States, in collaboration with institutions of higher education in Latin America and other Consortium members to deliver competitive environmental programs.

  14. El Paso Electric Company Diablo Substation to the US-Mexico border 115kV transmission line project. Final Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This Environmental Assessment documents the analysis of alternative corridors for development and operation of a proposed 115 kilovolt transmission line using private lands and transporting power to the US-Mexico international border. The project will require (1) an amendment to El Paso Electric Company`s existing export authorization to transfer power across this border, and (2) a Presidential Permit for construction of the transmission line. The project would be located in Dona Ana county in southern New Mexico, approximately five miles west of El Paso, Texas. The alternative corridors, specific locations within those corridors, and structure types are identified and analyzed in the environmental studies.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of angular distribution of elastic scattering for {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Be, and {sup 8}B in {sup 58}Ni; Medida simultanea de Distribuciones Angulares de Dispersion Elastica para {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Be, y {sup 8}B en {sup 58}Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz S, A. [Facultad de Ciencias, UAEM, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Martinez Q, E.; Aguilera R, E.F.; Murillo O, G.; Lizcano C, D.; Gomez C, A. [Departamento de Aceleradores, ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The experimental angular distributions of elastic scattering for the projectiles {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Be, {sup 8}B in {sup 58}Ni were obtained. Using the Optical model with a Woods-Saxon potential form, as much for the real part as for the imaginary one, an adjustment to the experimental data varying only the depth of the imaginary part of the potential is made. A comparison of the results obtained for each projectile is made. (Author)

  16. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  17. South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-07-01

    The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

  18. Studies of marine macroalgae: saline desert water cultivation and effects of environmental stress on proximate composition. Final subcontract report. [Gracilaria tikvahiae; Ulva lactuca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.; DeBusk, T.A.; Peterson, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    The results presented in this report address the growth potential of marine macroalgae cultivated in desert saline waters, and the effects of certain environmental stresses (e.g., nitrogen, salinity, and temperature) on the proximate composition of several marine macroalgae. Two major desert saline water types were assayed for their ability to support the growth of Gracilaria, Ulva, and Caulerpa. Both water types supported short term growth, but long term growth was not supported. Carbohydrate levels in Gracilaria were increased by cultivation under conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and low nitrogen and phosphorous availability. Data suggests that it may be possible to maximize production of useful proximate constituents by cultivating the algae under optimum conditions for growth, and then holding the resulting biomass under the environmental conditions which favor tissue accumulation of the desired storage products. 16 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Examination of the factors and issues for an environmental technology utilization partnership between the private sector and the Department of Energy. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouse, P.

    1997-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) held a meeting on November 12, 1992 to evaluate the DOE relations with industry and university partners concerning environmental technology utilization. The goal of this meeting was to receive feedback from DOE industry and university partners for the identification of opportunities to improve the DOE cooperative work processes with the private sector. The meeting was designed to collect information and to turn that information into action to improve private sector partnerships with DOE.

  20. Measurement of the νe and total 8B solar neutrino fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory phase-III data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Amsbaugh, J. F.; Anaya, J. M.; Anthony, A. E.; Banar, J.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Bowles, T. J.; Browne, M. C.; Bullard, T. V.; Burritt, T. H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chauhan, D.; Chen, M.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox, G. A.; Currat, C. A.; Dai, X.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J. A.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P. J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duba, C. A.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Earle, E. D.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J. V.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goon, J. TM.; Graham, K.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hamian, A. A.; Harper, G. C.; Harvey, P. J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M. A.; Huang, M.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Klein, J. R.; Kormos, L. L.; Kos, M.; Krüger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Loach, J. C.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S. R.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, G. G.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Morissette, B.; Myers, A. W.; Nickel, B. G.; Noble, A. J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Oblath, N. S.; Ollerhead, R. W.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Reitzner, S. D.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Sonley, T. J.; Steiger, T. D.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tešić, G.; Thornewell, P. M.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Tunnell, C. D.; Van Wechel, T.; Van Berg, R.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Wall, B. L.; Waller, D.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper details the solar neutrino analysis of the 385.17-day phase-III data set acquired by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). An array of 3He proportional counters was installed in the heavy-water target to measure precisely the rate of neutrino-deuteron neutral-current interactions. This technique to determine the total active 8B solar neutrino flux was largely independent of the methods employed in previous phases. The total flux of active neutrinos was measured to be 5.54-0.31+0.33(stat.)-0.34+0.36(syst.)×106 cm-2 s-1, consistent with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of solar and reactor neutrino mixing parameters yielded the best-fit values of Δm2=7.59-0.21+0.19×10-5eV2 and θ=34.4-1.2+1.3degrees.

  1. An Independent Measurement of the Total Active 8B Solar Neutrino Flux Using an Array of 3He Proportional Counters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Aharmim, B; Amsbaugh, J F; Anthony, A E; Banar, J; Barros, N; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Beltran, B; Bergevin, M; Biller, S D; Boudjemline, K; Boulay, M G; Bowles, T J; Browne, M C; Bullard, T V; Burritt, T H; Cai, B; Chan, Y D; Chauhan, D; Chen, M; Cleveland, B T; Cox-Mobrand, G A; Currat, C A; Dai, X; Deng, H; Detwiler, J; Di Marco, M; Doe, P J; Doucas, G; Drouin, P L; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Ford, R J; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Gagnon, N; Germani, J V; Goldschmidt, A; Goon, J T M; Graham, K; Guillian, E; Habib, S; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamian, A A; Harper, G C; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Henning, R; Hime, A; Howard, C; Howe, M A; Huang, M; Jagam, P; Jamieson, B; Jelley, N A; Keeter, K J; Klein, J R; Kormos, L L; Kos, M; Krüger, A; Kraus, C; Krauss, C B; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Loach, J C; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Martin, R; McBryde, K; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; Miin, C; Miller, G G; Miller, M L; Monreal, B; Monroe, J; Morissette, B; Myers, A; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Oblath, N S; O'Keeffe, H M; Ollerhead, R W; Orebi Gann, G D; Oser, S M; Ott, R A; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Reitzner, S D; Rielage, K; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Schwendener, M H; Secrest, J A; Seibert, S R; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sinclair, L; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Steiger, T D; Stonehill, L C; Tesic, G; Thornewell, P M; Tolich, N; Tsui, T; Tunnell, C D; Van Wechel, T; Van Berg, R; Van Devender, B A; Virtue, C J; Walker, T J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Wendland, J; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wouters, J M; Wright, A; Yeh, M; Zhang, F; Zuber, K

    2008-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) used an array of 3He proportional counters to measure the rate of neutral-current interactions in heavy water and precisely determined the total active (nu_x) 8B solar neutrino flux. This technique is independent of previous methods employed by SNO. The total flux is found to be 5.54(+0.33/-0.31 stat, +0.36/-0.34 syst) x 10^6 cm^-2 s^-1, in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of solar and reactor neutrino results yields Delta m^2 = 7.94(+0.42/-0.26) x 10^-5 eV^2 and theta = 33.8(+1.4/-1.3) degrees. The uncertainty on the mixing angle has been reduced from SNO's previous results.

  2. Navier-Stokes simulation of external/internal transonic flow on the forebody/inlet of the AV-8B Harrier II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysko, Stephen J.; Chyu, Wei J.; Stortz, Michael W.; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    In this work, the computation of combined external/internal transonic flow on the complex forebody/inlet configuration of the AV-8B Harrier II is performed. The actual aircraft has been measured and its surface and surrounding domain, in which the fuselage and inlet have a common wall, have been described using structured grids. The 'thin-layer' Navier-Stokes equations were used to model the flow along with the Chimera embedded multi-block technique. A fully conservative, alternating direction implicit (ADI), approximately factored, partially fluxsplit algorithm was employed to perform the computation. Comparisons to some experimental wind tunnel data yielded good agreement for flow at zero incidence and angle of attack. The aim of this paper is to provide a methodology or computational tool for the numerical solution of complex external/internal flows.

  3. Independent measurement of the total active 8B solar neutrino flux using an array of 3He proportional counters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharmim, B; Ahmed, S N; Amsbaugh, J F; Anthony, A E; Banar, J; Barros, N; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Beltran, B; Bergevin, M; Biller, S D; Boudjemline, K; Boulay, M G; Bowles, T J; Browne, M C; Bullard, T V; Burritt, T H; Cai, B; Chan, Y D; Chauhan, D; Chen, M; Cleveland, B T; Cox-Mobrand, G A; Currat, C A; Dai, X; Deng, H; Detwiler, J; DiMarco, M; Doe, P J; Doucas, G; Drouin, P-L; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Ford, R J; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Gagnon, N; Germani, J V; Goldschmidt, A; Goon, J T M; Graham, K; Guillian, E; Habib, S; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamian, A A; Harper, G C; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Henning, R; Hime, A; Howard, C; Howe, M A; Huang, M; Jagam, P; Jamieson, B; Jelley, N A; Keeter, K J; Klein, J R; Kormos, L L; Kos, M; Krüger, A; Kraus, C; Krauss, C B; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Loach, J C; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Martin, R; McBryde, K; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; Mifflin, C; Miller, G G; Miller, M L; Monreal, B; Monroe, J; Morissette, B; Myers, A; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Oblath, N S; O'Keeffe, H M; Ollerhead, R W; Gann, G D Orebi; Oser, S M; Ott, R A; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Reitzner, S D; Rielage, K; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Schwendener, M H; Secrest, J A; Seibert, S R; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sinclair, L; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Steiger, T D; Stonehill, L C; Tesić, G; Thornewell, P M; Tolich, N; Tsui, T; Tunnell, C D; Van Wechel, T; Van Berg, R; VanDevender, B A; Virtue, C J; Walker, T J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Tseung, H Wan Chan; Wendland, J; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wouters, J M; Wright, A; Yeh, M; Zhang, F; Zuber, K

    2008-09-12

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) used an array of 3He proportional counters to measure the rate of neutral-current interactions in heavy water and precisely determined the total active (nu_x) 8B solar neutrino flux. This technique is independent of previous methods employed by SNO. The total flux is found to be 5.54_-0.31;+0.33(stat)-0.34+0.36(syst)x10(6) cm(-2) s(-1), in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of solar and reactor neutrino results yields Deltam2=7.59_-0.21;+0.19x10(-5) eV2 and theta=34.4_-1.2;+1.3 degrees. The uncertainty on the mixing angle has been reduced from SNO's previous results.

  4. Pollen performance, cell number, and physiological state in the early-divergent angiosperm Annona cherimola Mill. (Annonaceae) are related to environmental conditions during the final stages of pollen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, J; Herrero, M; Hormaza, J I

    2012-09-01

    Pollen performance is an important determinant for fertilization success, but high variability in pollen behavior both between and within species occurs in different years and under varying environmental conditions. Annona cherimola, an early-divergent angiosperm, is a species that releases a variable ratio of bicellular and tricellular hydrated pollen at anther dehiscence depending on temperature. The presence of both bi- and tricellular types of pollen is an uncommon characteristic in angiosperms and makes Annona cherimola an interesting model to study the effect of varying environmental conditions on subsequent pollen performance during the final stages of pollen development. In this work, we study the influence of changes in temperature and humidity during the final stages of pollen development on subsequent pollen performance, evaluating pollen germination, presence of carbohydrates, number of nuclei, and water content. At 25 °C, which is the average field temperature during the flowering period of this species, pollen had a viability of 60-70 %, starch hydrolyzed just prior to shedding, and pollen mitosis II was taking place, resulting in a mixture of bi- and tricellular pollen. This activity may be related to the pollen retaining 70 % water content at shedding. Temperatures above 30 °C resulted in a decrease in pollen germination, whereas lower temperatures did not have a clear influence on pollen germination, although they did have a clear effect on starch hydrolysis. On the other hand, slightly higher dehydration accelerated mitosis II, whereas strong dehydration arrested starch hydrolysis and reduced pollen germination. These results show a significant influence of environmental conditions on myriad pollen characteristics during the final stages of pollen development modifying subsequent pollen behavior and contributing to our understanding of the variability observed in pollen tube performance.

  5. Inclusion body hepatitis associated with an outbreak of fowl adenovirus type 2 and type 8b in broiler flocks in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis H. Maartens

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body hepatitis is an acute disease of chickens ascribed to viruses of the genus Aviadenovirus and referred to as fowl adenovirus (FAdV. There are 12 FAdV types (FAdV1to FAdV8a and FAdV8b to FAdV11, classified into five species based on their genotype (designated FAdVA to FAdVE. A total of 218 000 chickens, 2–29 days of age, were affected over a 1-year period, all testing positive by microscopy, virus isolation and confirmation with polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Affected birds were depressed, lost body weight,were weak and had watery droppings. Pathological changes observed during necropsy indicated consistent changes in the liver, characterised by hepatomegaly, cholestasis and hepatitis. Lesions were also discernible in the spleen, kidney and gizzard wall and were characterised by splenomegaly, pinpoint haemorrhages, nephritis with haemorrhage,visceral gout and serosal ecchymosis of the gizzard wall. Histopathological lesions were most consistently observed in the liver but could also be seen in renal and splenic tissue. Virus isolation was achieved in embryonated eggs and most embryos revealed multifocalto diffuse hepatic necrosis, with a mixed cellular infiltrate of macrophages and heterophils(necro-granulomas, even in the absence of macroscopic pathology. Virus isolation results were verified by histopathology and PCR on embryonic material and further characterised by nucleotide sequence analysis. Two infectious bursal disease virus isolates were also made from the Klerksdorp flock. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the L1 hexon loop of all the FAdV isolates indicated homology (99% with prototype strains P7-A for FAdV-2, as well as for FAdV-8b.

  6. Epidemiological and pathological investigation of fowl aviadenovirus serotypes 8b and 11 isolated from chickens with inclusion body hepatitis in Spain (2011-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver-Ferrando, S; Dolz, R; Calderón, C; Valle, R; Rivas, R; Pérez, M; Biarnés, M; Blanco, A; Bertran, K; Ramis, A; Busquets, N; Majó, N

    2017-04-01

    Inclusion body hepatitis caused by different fowl aviadenovirus (FAdV) serotypes has been described in several countries in recent years. In Spain, from the spring of 2011 to 2013, an increased number of outbreaks in broiler and broiler breeder flocks from different regions occurred. The objectives of the present work were to carry out the molecular characterization of FAdV strains from Spanish inclusion body hepatitis cases and to study the pathogenicity and viral dynamics of these strains in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. A total of 52 inclusion body hepatitis clinical cases, including 45 from broiler farms and seven from broiler breeder farms, were analysed by conventional polymerase chain reaction and sequencing targeting the FAdV hexon gene. From these, 37 strains were classified as FAdV type 8b, while the remaining 15 were classified as FAdV types 11 (n = 10), 2 (n = 4) and 8a (n = 1). In addition, two different FAdVs belonging to the genotypes 8b and 11 were used for experimental infection. Specific pathogen-free five-day-old birds were inoculated intramuscularly with a high (10(6.5) tissue culture infective dose (TCID)50/ml) or low (10(4) TCID50/ml) dose of the above-mentioned FAdVs. No mortality was observed in any of the experimental groups, and only one bird showed evident clinical signs. However, macroscopic and microscopic hepatic lesions, as well as viral DNA, were detected in birds from all infection groups. Inclusion bodies and viral DNA were also detected in the pancreas and in the small and the large intestine in some birds. Long-lasting shedding and transmission to contact birds were confirmed in all infected groups.

  7. Measurement of the efficient cross section of the reaction {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B at low energies and implications in the problem of solar neutrinos; Mesures de la section efficace de la reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B a basses energies et implications dans le probleme des neutrinos solaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammache, Fairouz

    1999-07-01

    The {sup 8}B produced inside the sun through the reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B is the main, and even unique, source of high energy neutrinos detected in most solar neutrino detection experiments, except with Gallex and Sage. These experiments have all measured a neutrinos flux lower than the one predicted by solar models. Several explanations have been proposed to explain this deficit, but all require a precise knowledge of the efficient cross-section of the reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B, because the neutrinos flux of {sup 8}B is directly proportional to this reaction. The direct measurement of this cross section for the solar energy is impossible because of its low value (about 1 femto-barn). In order to get round this problem, the cross sections are measured at higher energy and extrapolated to the solar energy using a theoretical energy dependence. The 6 previous experimental determinations of the efficient cross section were shared in two distinct groups with differences of about 30% which leads to an uncertainty of the same order on the high energy neutrinos flux. The re-measurement of the cross section of this reaction with a better precision is thus of prime importance. A direct measurement of the cross section in the energy range comprised between 0.35 and 1.4 MeV (cm) has been performed first. These experiments have permitted the precise measurement of each parameter involved in the determination of the cross section. Then, measurements of the cross section have been carried out with the PAPAP accelerator at 185.8, 134.7 and 111.7 keV, the lowest mass center energy never reached before. The results are in excellent agreement with those obtained at higher energies. The value obtained by extrapolation of these data for the astrophysical factor S{sub 17}(0) is 19.21.3 EV-B, which leads to a significant reduction of the uncertainty on the high energy neutrinos flux of {sup 8}B. (J.S.)

  8. Final sitewide environmental assessment for preparation for transfer of ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Secretary of Energy is authorized to produce the Naval Petroleum Reserves No. 3 (NPR-3) at its maximum efficient rate (MER) consistent with sound engineering practices, for a period extending to April 5, 2000 subject to extension. Production at NPR-3 peaked in 1981 and has declined since until it has become a mature stripper field, with the average well yielding less than 2 barrels per day. The Department of Energy (DOE) has decided to discontinue Federal operation of NPR-3 at the end of its life as an economically viable oilfield currently estimated to be 2003. Although changes in oil and gas markets or shifts in national policy could alter the economic limit of NPR-3, it productive life will be determined largely by a small and declining reserve base. DOE is proposing certain activities over the next six years in anticipation of the possible transfer of NPR-3 out of Federal operation. These activities would include the accelerated plugging and abandoning of uneconomic wells, complete reclamation and restoration of abandoned sites including dismantling surface facilities, batteries, roads, test satellites, electrical distribution systems and associated power poles, when they are no longer needed for production, and the continued development of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). DOE has prepared this environmental assessment that analyzes the proposed plugging and abandonment of wells, field restoration and development of RMOTC. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). The preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  9. ProPIG - Farm specific strategies to reduce environmental impact by improving health, welfare and nutrition of organic pigs - Final project report

    OpenAIRE

    Leeb, Christine; Butler, Gillian; Bochicchio, Davide; Früh, Barbara; Illmann, Gudrun; Prunier, Armelle; Rousing, Tine; Urban, Jiri; Dippel, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    ProPIG consists of 9 partners in 8 countries (AT, CH, CZ, DE, DK, FR, IT, UK) with the aim to assess and improve animal welfare and environmental impact of organic pig farming: • Three husbandry systems: indoor with outside run (IN) / partly outdoor (POUT) / outdoor (OUT) were defined and compared. • Standard Operating Procedures (‘SOPs’) were created for Feed- and Soil Sampling and the process of assessment and feedback (‘Health and welfare planning’). • Animal welfare assessment pr...

  10. Production of environmentally benign surfactants from rape oil. Final report; Herstellung von 'Naturgerechten Tensiden' aus Rapsoel. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greif, D.

    2001-07-01

    The growing demand for detergents and their introduction into the environment in conjunction with the development of environmental awareness led to the development and industrial-scale production in the 1980s and 1990s of fully biologically degradable detergents, namely alkylpolyglycosides. These are synthesised from fat and oil-based substances derived from replenishable raw materials. Currently the most widely used fat raw material is palm oil, which is imported in large quantities from Indonesia and Malaysia. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether it is possible to substitute palm kernel oil with domestic rape oil (or equivalently with sunflower oil) as a fat raw material for the production of environmentally benign surfactants. [German] Der steigende Bedarf an Detergentien, deren Eintrag in die Umwelt verbunden mit einem sensibleren Umweltbewusstsein, fuehrte in den achtizger und neunziger Jahren zur Entwicklung und wirtschaftlichen Produktion von vollstaendig biologisch abbaubaren Detergentien, den Alkylpolyglycosiden. Fuer die Synthese der Alkylpolyglycoside werden Fett- und Oelstoffe aus nachwachsenden Rohstoffen genutzt. Der zur Zeit am meisten genutzte Fettrohstoff ist das Palmoel, das in grossen Mengen aus Indonesien und Malaysia importiert wird. Es sollte untersucht werden, ob eine Substitution des Plamkernoels durch den einheimischen Fettrohstoff Rapsoel (und damit gleichzusetzen Sonnenblumenoel) fuer die Herstellung naturgerechter Tenside moeglich ist. (orig.)

  11. CO{sub 2} exchange environmental productivity indices, and productivity of agaves and cacti under current and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    The research described in the proposal investigated net CO{sub 2} uptake and biomass accumulation for an extremely productive CAM plant, the prickly pear cactus Opuntia ficus-indica, under conditions of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations for relatively long periods. The influences of soil water status, air temperature, and the photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) on net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods were evaluated to enable predictions to be made based on an Environmental Productivity Index (EPI). Specifically, EPI predicts the fraction of maximal daily net CO{sub 2} uptake based on prevailing environmental conditions. It is the product of indices for temperature, soil water, and intercepted PPF, each of which range from 0.00 when that index factor completely inhibits net CO{sub 2} uptake to 1.00 when no limitation occurs. For instance, the Water Index is 1.00 under wet conditions and decreases to 0.00 during prolonged drought. Although the major emphasis of the research was on net C0{sub 2} uptake and the resulting biomass production for O. ficus-indica, effects of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations on root: shoot ratios and on the activities of the two carboxylating enzymes were also investigated. Moreover, experiments were also done on other CAM plants, including Agave deserti, Agave salmiana, and Hylocereus undatus, and Stenocereus queretaroensis.

  12. Technological assessment of demonstration plants for environmentally compatible processing and utilization of liquid manure. Final report; Technologische Bewertung von Demonstrationsanlagen zur umweltvertraeglichen Guelleaufbereitung und -verwertung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, P.; Huettner, A.

    1997-09-01

    The aim of the BMBF-sponsored research programme ``Environmentally compatible liquid manure processing and utilization`` was to develop and test technical processing methods permitting environmentally friendly storage, application and harnessing of liquid manure. For practical testing and optimization, five demonstration plants were erected, which achieve partial or total cleaning of liquid manure by applying different techniques. All processes had the objective of eliminating from the liquid manure nutrients, organic constituents and odourous components, recovering the nutrients in the form of transportable products, and harnessing the liquid manure for biogas generation. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel des BMBF-Foerderschwerpunktes `Umweltvertraegliche Guelleaufbereitung und -verwertung` war es, technische Aufbereitungsverfahren zu entwickeln und zu erproben, die eine umweltvertraegliche Lagerung, Ausbringung und Verwertung der Guelle ermoeglichen. Zur Praxiserprobung und Optimierung wurden fuenf Demonstrationsanlagen errichtet, die durch Anwendung unterschiedlicher Verfahren eine Teil- bzw. Totalreinigung der Guelle bewirken. Aufgabe saemtlicher Verfahren war es, die Guelle von Naehrstoffen, organischen Inhaltsstoffen und Geruchsstoffen zu befreien, die Naehrstoffe in Form transportwuerdiger Produkte zurueckzugewinnen und die Guelle durch Erzeugung von Biogas energetisch zu nutzen. (orig.)

  13. Suitability of Guam from an environmental aspect as a potential site for ocean thermal energy conversion plants. Final report, 1 Jul 1974--1 Jan 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corey, R.R. Jr.

    1975-04-01

    The bottom drops off rapidly around Guam and depths suitable for ocean thermal energy systems are obtained reasonably close to shore, which increases the possibility that cold water discharge would have an environmental effect. Discharge of cold water into the open sea could have two results: Cool water could drift away at or near the surface, simulating natural upwelling with the same beneficial effects; or it could plunge to an intermediate depth with minimal environmental effects. Discharge of cool water, on the other hand, into near-shore environments would probably kill or injure many benthic forms and coral reefs. Prevailing currents in this area are from east to west; therefore, siting on the west side of the island would appear to be preferable. First, cold water would be carried out to sea rather than into shallow water near shore. Secondly, greater depths are available closer to shore on the western as opposed to the eastern side of the island. Most of the places which have been identified as potential fishing grounds are on the north or south of the island, so situated that discharges from eastern but not western plant sites could affect them.

  14. Allocation of petroleum feedstock: Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, Sollers Point SNG Plant, Sollers Point, Baltimore County, Maryland. Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1978-04-01

    An allocation of naphtha feedstock up to 2,186,000 barrels per year to Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG and E) to operate its synthetic natural gas (SNG) facility is being considered. The allocation would enable BG and E to produce 10,800,000 mcf of SNG during a 180 day period. Operation of the plant at design capacity is expected to result in annual pollution emissions as follows: 626.4 tons of sulfur oxides, 168.5 tons of nitrogen oxides and 21.6 tons of particulate matter. Incremental emissions due to plant operations relative to existing emissions in Baltimore County are less than 1%. All Federal and State air quality standards should be met. Treated effluent is to be discharged into the Patapasco River where the environmental impacts are not expected to be significant. The SNG facility has been designed to be in compliance with all applicable Federal, State and local effluent standards. Water consumption requirements of 335,000 gallons per day are not expected to significantly tax the area's water resources. Sound generated by the SNG facility will be inaudible or imperceptible. All other operational impacts on land use, population, visual quality, roadways, community facilities and services and ecological systems were judged to be minimal. Environmental impacts resulting from various alternatives ranging from full allocation through denial of an allocation are discussed.

  15. Study of the {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 7}Li(n,{gamma}){sup 8}Li capture reactions using the shell model embedded in the continuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennaceur, K.; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Nowacki, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)]|[Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique; Okolowicz, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)]|[Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    1999-02-01

    The realistic shell model which includes the coupling between many-particle (quasi-)bound states and the continuum of one-particle scattering states is applied to the spectroscopy of mirror nuclei: {sup 8}B and {sup 8}Li, as well as to the description of low energy cross sections (the astrophysical S factors) in the capture reactions: {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 7}Li(n,{gamma}){sup 8}Li. (author) 49 refs.

  16. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-06-30

    The DOE proposes to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a TRU Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with five alternatives--No Action, the Low-Temperature Drying Alternative (Preferred Alternative), the Vitrification Alternative, the Cementation Alternative, and the Treatment and Waste Storage at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Alternative.

  17. Environmental modulation of somatic mutations: nature of interactions. Final report, 1 June 1974--31 May 1977. [Effects of diurnal temperature changes in Tradescantia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mericle, L.W.

    1977-05-01

    Research on this project has had as a major goal a combined ecologic-genetic investigation of somatic mutations in order to evaluate the impacts of certain changing environmental parameters. The ultimate aim, to better understand how such environmental-mutation interactions operate and to assure the information obtained be extrapolatable to conditions and events in nature. Higher plants delineate reproductive tissues late in development from meristematic, somatic tissues. Moreover, the prevailing method of reproduction may be without sexual fusion of gametes and/or wholly asexual (vegetative). Therefore, somatic mutations can have as far-reaching genetic significance for a plant population as when germ cells, themselves, are directly affected. Our data show diurnal temperature differences (DTD) of greater than or equal to 22.2 C-degrees to be very effective mutagenic agents in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system. Further, these ranges of DTD were found to occur often in important seed production areas. A DTD of 22.2 in magnitude can increase mutations 10-fold. And, durations short as 1-day can induce significant increases in mutation rate. Whether interaction of 22.2 DTD with low-level radiation (800 mR/day) is synergistic or attenuative is still debatable. We believe, however, that spontaneous, and 22.2 DTD induced, mutations occur mainly via the genetic mechanism of somatic crossing-over; mutations from acute ionizing radiation (e.g., 30-60 R ..gamma..) via chromosome breakage, producing micronuclei. Requirements for maximizing the Discriminatory Response Capability (DRC) in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system are set forth.

  18. Methodologies for Assessing the Cumulative Environmental Effects of Hydroelectric Development of Fish and Wildlife in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1, Recommendations, 1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stull, Elizabeth Ann

    1987-07-01

    This volume is the first of a two-part set addressing methods for assessing the cumulative effects of hydropower development on fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Species and habitats potentially affected by cumulative impacts are identified for the basin, and the most significant effects of hydropower development are presented. Then, current methods for measuring and assessing single-project effects are reviewed, followed by a review of methodologies with potential for use in assessing the cumulative effects associated with multiple projects. Finally, two new approaches for cumulative effects assessment are discussed in detail. Overall, this report identifies and reviews the concepts, factors, and methods necessary for understanding and conducting a cumulative effects assessment in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 will present a detailed procedural handbook for performing a cumulative assessment using the integrated tabular methodology introduced in this volume. 308 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Microstructural characterization and amorphous phase formation in Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} powders produced by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghvaei, Amir Hossein, E-mail: amirtaghvaei@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Stoica, Mihai [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Vaughan, Gavin [ESRF, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Ghaffari, Mohammad [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Maleksaeedi, Saeed [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Janghorban, Kamal [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanical alloying developed the amorphous phase in Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The powders had 96 wt% amorphous phase after 200 h milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 200 h milled powders showed the huge relaxation hump in the DSC plot. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean volume lattice strain was calculated based on the Miracle's model. - Abstract: In this work, microstructural evolution and amorphous phase formation in Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} alloy produced by mechanical alloying (MA) of the elemental powder mixture under argon gas atmosphere was investigated. Milling time had a profound effect on the phase transformation, microstructure, morphological evolution and thermal behavior of the powders. These effects were studied by the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) in reflection mode using Cu K{alpha} and in transmission configuration using synchrotron radiation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results showed that at the early stage of the milling, microstructure consisted of nanocrystalline bcc-(Fe, Co) phases and unreacted tantalum. Further milling, produced an amorphous phase, which became a dominant phase with a fraction of 96 wt% after 200 h milling. The DSC profile of 200 h milled powders demonstrated a huge and broad exothermic hump due to the structural relaxation, followed by a single exothermic peak, indicating the crystallization of the amorphous phase. Further XRD studies in transmission mode by synchrotron radiation revealed that the crystalline products were (Co, Fe){sub 20.82}Ta{sub 2.18}B{sub 6}, (Co, Fe){sub 21} Ta{sub 2} B{sub 6}, and (Co, Fe){sub 3}B{sub 2}. The amorphization mechanisms were discussed in terms of severe grain refinement, atomic size effect, the concept of local topological instability and the heat of mixing of the reactants.

  20. Environmental Assessment for Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1997-10-07

    As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the incorporated County of Los Alamos (the County) as an Atomic Energy Community, while simultaneously fulfilling its obligations to enhance the self-sufficiency of the County under authority of the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 and the Defense Authorization Act, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease undeveloped land in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. The Proposed Action is intended to accelerate economic development activities within the County by creating regional employment opportunities through offering federal land for private sector lease and use. As a result of the proposed land lease, any government expenditures for providing infrastructure to the property would be somewhat supplemented by tenant purchase of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) expertise in research and development activities. The presence of a research park within LANL boundaries is expected to allow private sector tenants of the park to be able to quickly and efficiently call upon LANL scientific expertise and facility and equipment capabilities as part of their own research operations and LANL research personnel, in turn, would be challenged in areas complementary to their federally funded research. In this way a symbiotic relationship would be enjoyed by both parties while simultaneously promoting economic development for the County through new job opportunities at the Research Park and at LANL, new indirect support opportunities for the community at large, and through payment of the basic building space leases. A ''sliding-scale'' approach (DOE 1993) is the basis for the analysis of effects in this Environmental Assessment (EA). That is, certain aspects of the Proposed Action have a greater potential for creating adverse environmental effects than others; therefore, they are discussed in greater detail in this EA