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Sample records for 85rb atoms trapped

  1. Frequency Stability of Atomic Clocks Based on Coherent Population Trapping Resonance in 85Rb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lu; GUO Tao; DENG Ke; LIU Xin-Yuan; CHEN Xu-Zong; WANG Zhong

    2007-01-01

    An atomic clock system based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance in 85Rb is reported, while most past works about the CPT clock are in 87Rb. A new modulation method (full-hyperfine-frequency-splitting modulation) is presented to reduce the effect of light shift to improve the frequency stability of the CPT clock in 85Rb. The experimental results show that the short-term frequency stability of the CPT clock in 85Rb is in the order of 10-10/s and the long-term frequency stability can achieve 1.5 × 10-11 /80000s, which performs as well as 87Rb in CPT resonance. This very good frequency stability performance associated with the low-cost and low-power properties of 85Rb indicates that an atomic clock based on CPT in 85 Rb should be a promising candidate for making the chip scale atomic clock.

  2. Investigation of a $^{85}$Rb Dark Magneto-Optical Trap using an Optical Nanofibre

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, L; Tiwari, V B; Chormaic, S Nic

    2013-01-01

    We report here measurements on a dark magneto-optical trap (DMOT) of 85Rb atoms using an optical nanofibre (ONF) with a waist of ∼~1 μm. The DMOT is created using a doughnut-shaped repump beam along with a depump beam for efficient transfer of cold atoms from the bright hyperfine ground state (F=3) into the dark hyperfine ground state (F=2). The fluorescence from the cold 85Rb atoms of the DMOT is detected by coupling it into the fibre-guided modes of the ONF. The measured fractional population of cold atoms in the bright hyperfine ground state (p) is as low as ∼0.04. The dependence of loading rate of DMOT on cooling laser intensity is investigated and also compared with the loading rate of a bright-MOT (BMOT). This work lays the foundation for the use of an ONF for probing of a small number of atoms in an optically-dense cold atomic cloud.

  3. Elastic Scattering between Ultracold 23Na and 85Rb Atoms in the Triplet State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Qiu-Bo; ZHANG Yong-Sheng; SUN Jin-Feng; YU Ke

    2011-01-01

    @@ The elastic scattering Properties between ultracold 23Na and 85Rd atoms for the triplet state(a3∑u+ )are researched.The s-wave scattering lengts of 23Na and 85Rb are calculate by the Numerov ana semtc asstc method with two kinds of interatomic potentials, which are the interpolation potential and Lennard-Jones potential(LJ12,6)by the same phase 4φ Shape resonances appear clearly in the l= 5 partial waves for the a- Lu state.Moreover, the s-wave scattering cross section, total cross section and energy positions of shape resonances are also discussed.%The elastic scattering properties between ultracold 23Na and 85 Rb atoms for the triplet state (a3Σu+ ) are researched. The s-wave scattering lengths of 23Na and 85Rb are calculated by the Numerov and semiclassical method with two kinds of interatomic potentials, which are the interpolation potential and Lennard-Jones potential (LJ12,6) by the same phase φ. Shape resonances appear clearly in the l= 5 partial waves for the a3 Σu+state. Moreover, the s-wave scattering cross section, total cross section and energy positions of shape resonances are also discussed.

  4. 85Rb tunable-interaction Bose-Einstein condensate machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe our experimental setup for creating stable Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of 85Rb with tunable interparticle interactions. We use sympathetic cooling with 87Rb in two stages, initially in a tight Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap and subsequently in a weak, large-volume, crossed optical dipole trap, using the 155 G Feshbach resonance to manipulate the elastic and inelastic scattering properties of the 85Rb atoms. Typical 85Rb condensates contain 4x104 atoms with a scattering length of a=+200a0. Many aspects of the design presented here could be adapted to other dual-species BEC machines, including those involving degenerate Fermi-Bose mixtures. Our minimalist apparatus is well suited to experiments on dual-species and spinor Rb condensates, and has several simplifications over the 85Rb BEC machine at JILA, which we discuss at the end of this article.

  5. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  6. Two-Photon Atomic Coherence Effect of Transition 5S1/2-5P3/2-4D5/2(4D3/2) of 85Rb atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Dong-Sheng; ZHOU Zhi-Yuan; SHI Bao-Sen; ZOU Xu-Bo; GUO Guang-Can

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally observe the counterintuitive absorption peaks in the transition spectra of 5S1/2-5P3/2-4D5/2 and 5S1/2-5.P3/2-4.D3/2 in a hot 85Rb vapor. These spectra are very different from the spectra observed via double resonance optical pumping or electromagnetically induced transparency in the same transitions. These absorption peaks are from electromagnetically induced absorption due to the two-photon atomic coherence effect. We also investigate the relations between these peaks and the powers of the coupling laser and the probe laser experimen tally.%We experimentally observe the counterintuitive absorption peaks in the transition spectra of 5S1/2-5P3/2-4D5/2 and 5S1/2-5P3/2-4D3/2 in a hot 85Rb vapor.These spectra are very different from the spectra observed via double resonance optical pumping or electromagnetically induced transparency in the same transitions.These absorption peaks are from electromagnetically induced absorption due to the two-photon atomic coherence effect.We also investigate the relations between these peaks and the powers of the coupling laser and the probe laser experimentally.

  7. Power and polarization dependences of ultra-narrow electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) spectra of 85 Rb atoms in degenerate two-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Mohsin; Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated ultra-narrow EIA spectral features with respect to variations of polarizations and powers of pump laser beam in a degenerate two-level system of the transition of 85 Rb D2 transition line. Polarizations of the probe laser beam in two separate experiments were fixed at right circular and horizontal linear polarizations, respectively while the polarizations of the pump lasers were varied from initial polarizations same as the probe laser beams to orthogonal to probe polarizations. One homemade laser combined with AOMs was used to the pump and probe laser beams instead of two different lasers to overcome broad linewidths of the homemade lasers. Theoretically, probe absorption coefficients have been calculated from optical Bloch equations of the degenerate two level system prepared by a pump laser beam. In the case of the circular polarization, EIA signal was obtained as expected theoretically although both pump and probe beams have same polarization. The EIA signal become smaller as power increases and polarizations of the pump and probe beams were same. When the polarization of the pump beam was linear polarization, maximum EIA signal was obtained theoretically and experimentally. Experimental EIA spectral shapes with respect to variations of the pump beam polarization shows similar trends as the theoretical results.

  8. Observation of broad p-wave Feshbach resonances in ultracold $^{85}$Rb-$^{87}$Rb mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Shen; Shen, Chuyang; Wu, Yewei; Tey, Meng Khoon; You, Li; Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We observe new Feshbach resonances in ultracold mixtures of $^{85}$Rb and $^{87}$Rb atoms in the $^{85}$Rb$|2, +2\\rangle$+$^{87}$Rb$|1, +1\\rangle$ and $^{85}$Rb$|2, -2\\rangle$+$^{87}$Rb$|1, -1\\rangle$ scattering channels. The positions and properties of the resonances are predicted and characterized using the semi-analytic multichannel quantum-defect theory by Gao. Of particular interest, a number of broad entrance-channel dominated p-wave resonances are identified, implicating exciting opportunities for studying a variety of p-wave interaction dominated physics.

  9. Optical Guiding of Trapped Atoms by a Blue-Detuned Hollow Laser Beam in the Horizontal Direction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Kai-Jun; LI Ke; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Optical guiding of 85 Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) by a blue-detuned horizontal hollow laser beam is demonstrated experimentally. The guiding efficiency and the velocity distribution of the guided atoms are found to have strong dependence on the detuning of the guiding laser. In particular, the optimum guiding occurs when the blue detuning of the hollow laser beam is approximately equal to the hyperfine structure splitting of the 85Rb ground states, in good agreement with the theoretical analysis based on a three-level model.

  10. Calculation of Elastic Scattering Properties in an Ultra-Cold 85Rb-85Rb Vapour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Kemal (O)zt(u)rk; S(u)leyman (O)z(c)elik

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report the calculation of the same-species elastic scattering properties for the ultracold rubidium-rubidium (85Rb-85Rb) system and the results are compared with other theoretical and experimental results in detail. We present an improved potential for triplet ground states of the Rb2 molecule, and calculate the scattering lengths at and the effective range re using WKB and Numerov methods for two rubidium-85 collisions in the triplet state. Also, we investigate the convergence of these scattering properties, i.e. the dependence on core radius and K0 parameter using quantum defect theory and the analytic calculations of scattering length obtained by Szmytkowski. In addition, we present evaporative cooling and other results that include phase shift and cross section at zero energy limit.

  11. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Rushton, Jo; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This "switching-MOT" relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap's beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for $^{85}$Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  12. Sub-natural width of transparency window in 85Rb vapor with D2 transition,

    CERN Document Server

    Iftiquar, S M

    2007-01-01

    We study 85Rb atomic vapor for electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and obtain sub-natural EIT spectra at optical power higher than saturation intensity. It is shown that spectral width of transmission and intensity of EIT signal increases with intensity of optical field, which is one of the desirable features for slow light and quantum information processing. A details analysis has been done on such an atomic system.

  13. Collisional cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Sourav; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01

    The most generic cooling and thermalization pathway at the lowest temperatures is via elastic collisions. In hybrid ion-atom traps, ion cooling to temperatures where low partial wave collisions dominate require the collisional cooling mechanism to be well understood and controlled. There exists great uncertainty on whether cooling of light ions by heavier neutral atoms is possible. Here we experimentally demonstrate the cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms for the first time. We show that trapped 39K+ ions are cooled by localized ultracold neutral 85Rb atoms for an ion-atom mass ratio where most theoretical models predict ion heating. We demonstrate, based on detailed numerical simulation of our ion-cooling model, which is in excellent agreement with experiments, that cooling of ions by localized cold atoms is possible for any mass ratio. Our result opens up the possibility of studying quantum collisions and chemistry in trapped atom-ion systems.

  14. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  15. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  16. Role of Molecular Dissociation in Feshbach-Interacting 85Rb Condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Mackie, M; Javanainen, J; Mackie, Matt; Suominen, Kalle-Antti; Javanainen, Juha

    2002-01-01

    Recent Feshbach-resonance experiments with 85Rb Bose-Einstein condensates have led to a host of unexplained results: dramatic losses of condensate atoms for an across-resonance sweep of the magnetic field, a collapsing condensate with a burst of atoms emanating from the remnant condensate, increased losses for decreasing interaction times--until very short times are reached, and coherent oscillations between remnant and burst atoms. In particular, the amplitude of the remnant-burst oscillations, and the corresponding missing atoms, have prompted speculation as to the formation of a molecular condensate. Using a minimal mean-field model, we find that rogue dissociation, molecular dissociation to noncondensate atom pairs, is qualitatively implicated as the physical mechanism responsible for these observations, although very little molecular condensate is formed. Refining the model provides excellent quantitative agreement with the experimental remnant-burst oscillations, and the fraction of molecular condensate...

  17. Observation of Deeply-Bound 85 Rb2 Vibrational Levels Using Feshbach Optimized Photoassociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzewski, Sean; Akin, Tom; Dizikes, James; Morrison, Michael; Abraham, Eric

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate Feshbach optimized photoassociation (FOPA) into the 0g-(5 S1/2 + 5 P1/2) state in 85 Rb2. FOPA uses the enhancement of the amplitude of the initial atomic scattering wave function due to a Feshbach resonance to increase the molecular formation rate from photoassociation. We observe three vibrational levels, v = 127 , 140, and 150, with previously unmeasured binding energies of 256, 154, and 96 cm-1. We measure the frequency, central magnetic field position, and magnetic field width of each Feshbach resonance. Our findings experimentally confirm that this technique can measure vibrational levels lower than those accessible to traditional photoassociative spectroscopy. We present theory concerning the polarization dependence of FOPA for this system, and discuss implications of using this system to measure the time-variation of the electron/proton mass ratio.

  18. Microchip-Based Trapped-Atom Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Vuletic, Vladan; Schleier-Smith, Monika H

    2011-01-01

    This is a chapter of a recently published book entitled Atom Chips, edited by Jakob Reichel and Vladan Vuletic. The contents of this chapter include: Basic Principles; Atomic-Fountain versus Trapped-Atom Clocks; Optical-Transition Clocks versus Microwave Clocks; Clocks with Magnetically Trapped Atoms--Fundamental Limits and Experimental Demonstrations; Readout in Trapped-Atom Clocks; and Spin Squeezing.

  19. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, C. D. J.; Retter, J. A.; Curtis, E. A.; Hall, B. V.; Llorente Garcia, I.; Eriksson, S.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.

    2005-08-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1~μK allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  20. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, C D J; Curtis, E A; Hall, B V; Garcia, I L; Eriksson, S; Sauer, B E; Hinds, E A

    2005-01-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1 microkelvin allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  1. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; GENG; Tao; YAN; Shubin; LI; Gang; ZHANG; Jing; WANG; Junmin; PENG; Kunchi; ZHANG; Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  2. Spectroscopy of the Double Minimum $3\\,^3 \\Pi_{\\Omega}$ Electronic State of $^{39}$K$^{85}$Rb

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Jayita; Carollo, Ryan; Bellos, Michael; Eyler, Edward E; Gould, Phillip L; Stwalley, William C

    2013-01-01

    We report the observation and analysis of the $3\\,^3\\Pi_{\\Omega}$ double-minimum electronic excited state of $^{39}$K$^{85}$Rb. The spin-orbit components ($0^{+}, 0^{-}, 1$ and 2) of this state are investigated based on potentials developed from the available \\emph{ab initio} potential curves. We have assigned the vibrational levels $v'=2-11$ of the $3\\,^3\\Pi_{1,2}$ potentials and $v'=2-12$ of the $3\\,^3\\Pi_{0^{+/-}}$ potential. We compare our experimental observations of the $3\\,^3\\Pi_{\\Omega}$ state with predictions based on theoretical potentials. The observations are based on resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of ultracold KRb in vibrational levels $v"=14-25$ of the $a\\,^3\\Sigma^+$ state. These \\emph{a}-state ultracold molecules are formed by photoassociation of ultracold $^{39}$K and $^{85}$Rb atoms to the 5(1) state of KRb followed by spontaneous emission to the \\emph{a} state.

  3. Determination of the hyperfine structure constants of the 87Rb and 85Rb 4 D5 /2 state and the isotope hyperfine anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Liu, Huifeng; Yang, Guang; Yang, Baodong; Wang, Junmin

    2014-11-01

    The hyperfine structure (hfs) splittings of the 4 D5 /2 state for two isotopes of 87Rb and 85Rb atoms are measured based on double-resonance optical pumping spectra in a 5 S1 /2-5 P3 /2-4 D5 /2 ladder-type atomic system. The frequency calibration is performed by employing a wideband fiber-pigtailed phase-type electro-optic modulator together with a Fabry-Pérot cavity to cancel the error arising from nonlinear frequency scanning. The hfs magnetic dipole constant A of the 4 D5 /2 state is determined to be -16.801 ± 0.005 MHz for 87Rb and -4.978 ± 0.004 MHz for 85Rb . The hfs electric quadrupole constant B of the 4 D5 /2 state is determined to be 3.645 ± 0.030 MHz for 87Rb and 6.560 ± 0.052 MHz for 85Rb . The values of A and B for the 87Rb4 D5 /2 state are twice as accurate as previous work with thermal atoms using a femtosecond laser comb and the values of A and B for the 85Rb4 D5 /2 state are 3 times and 25 times more accurate than previous work in laser-cooled atoms using Fabry-Pérot interferometer, respectively. According to this high precision of the hfs constants and the previously measured nuclear g factors of the two isotopes, the value of the d -electron hyperfine anomaly 87Δ85(4 D5 /2 ) is derived to be -0.0041 ± 0.0009.

  4. One- and Two-Dimensional Arrays of Double-Well Optical Traps for Cold Atoms or Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Xian-Ming; YIN Jian-Ping

    2004-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel scheme to form one- and two-dimensional arrays of double-well optical dipole traps for cold atoms (or molecules) by using an optical system composed of a binary π-phase grating and a lens illuminated by a plane light wave, and study the relationship between the maximum intensity Imax of each optical well (or the maximum trapping potential Umax for 85Rb atoms) and the relative apertureβ (= a/f) of the lens. We also calculate the intensity gradients of each optical well and their curvatures, and estimate the spontaneous photon-scattering rate of trapped atom in each well, including Rayleigh and Raman scattering rates. Our study shows that the proposed 1D and 2D arrays of double-well traps can be used to prepare 1D and 2D novel optical lattices with cold atoms (or molecules), or form an all-optically integrated atom optical chip, or even to realize an array of all-optical double-well atomic (or molecular) Bose-Einstein condensates by optical-potential evaporative cooling, and so on.

  5. Optical wire trap for cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2014-01-01

    We propose a trap for cold neutral atoms using a fictitious magnetic field induced by a nanofiber-guided light field. In close analogy to magnetic side-guide wire traps realized with current-carrying wires, a trapping potential can be formed when applying a homogeneous magnetic bias field perpendicular to the fiber axis. We discuss this scheme in detail for laser-cooled cesium atoms and find trap depths and trap frequencies comparable to the two-color nanofiber-based trapping scheme but with one order of magnitude lower powers of the trapping laser field. Moreover, the proposed scheme allows one to bring the atoms closer to the nanofiber surface, thereby enabling efficient optical interfacing of the atoms with additional light fields. Specifically, optical depths per atom, $\\sigma_0/A_{\\rm eff}$, of more than 0.4 are predicted, making this system eligible for nanofiber-based nonlinear and quantum optics experiments.

  6. Magnetic Trapping of Cold Bromine Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the milliKelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br$_2$ molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are only lost by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential...

  7. Trapping atoms on a transparent permanent-magnet atom chip

    CERN Document Server

    Shevchenko, A; Jaakkola, A; Kaivola, M; Lindvall, T; Pfau, T; Tittonen, I

    2006-01-01

    We describe experiments on trapping of atoms in microscopic magneto-optical traps on an optically transparent permanent-magnet atom chip. The chip is made of magnetically hard ferrite-garnet material deposited on a dielectric substrate. The confining magnetic fields are produced by miniature magnetized patterns recorded in the film by magneto-optical techniques. We trap Rb atoms on these structures by applying three crossed pairs of counter-propagating laser beams in the conventional magneto-optical trapping (MOT) geometry. We demonstrate the flexibility of the concept in creation and in-situ modification of the trapping geometries through several experiments.

  8. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend Christopher G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed experimental and theoretical investigation of a magneto-optical trap for caesium atoms is presented. Particular emphasis has been placed on achieving high spatial number densities and low temperatures. Optimizing both of these together enables efficient evaporative cooling from a conservative trap, a procedure which has recently led to the first observations of Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute atomic vapour. The behaviour of a magneto-optical trap is nomina...

  9. An Atom Trap Relying on Optical Pumping

    CERN Document Server

    Bouyer, P; Dahan, M B; Michaud, A; Salomon, C; Dalibard, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a $J_{g} \\longrightarrow J_{e} = J_{g} + 1$ atomic transition with $J_{g} \\geq 1/2$. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm $J_{g} = 4 \\longrightarrow J_{e} = 5$ resonance transition. The trap contained up to $3 \\cdot 10^{7}$ atoms in a cloud of $1/\\sqrt{e}$ radius of 330 $\\mu$m.

  10. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, D S; Pisenti, N C; Campbell, G K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  11. Standard Model tests with trapped radioactive atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A; 10.1088/0954-3899/36/3/033101

    2009-01-01

    We review the use of laser cooling and trapping for Standard Model tests, focusing on trapping of radioactive isotopes. Experiments with neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques are testing several basic predictions of electroweak unification. For nuclear $\\beta$ decay, demonstrated trap techniques include neutrino momentum measurements from beta-recoil coincidences, along with methods to produce highly polarized samples. These techniques have set the best general constraints on non-Standard Model scalar interactions in the first generation of particles. They also have the promise to test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, to search for tensor interactions, and to search for new sources of time reversal violation. There are also possibilites for exotic particle searches. Measurements of the strength of the weak neutral current can be assisted by precision atomic experiments using traps of small numbers of radioactive atoms, and sensitivity to possible time-reversal violating elec...

  12. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Daly, Mark; Phelan, Ciarán; Deasy, Kieran; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140 - 200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  13. High efficiency preparation of single trapped atoms using blue detuned light assisted collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, A V; Sompet, P; Hilliard, A J; Walker, T G; Andersen, M F

    2012-01-01

    We report on a procedure by which we obtain a 91% loading efficiency of single 85Rb atoms in an optical microtrap. This can be achieved within a total preparation time of 542 ms. We employ blue detuned light assisted collisions to realize a process in which only one of the collision partners is lost. We explain the mechanism for efficiently loading a single atom and discuss the factors that limit the final efficiency.

  14. Suppression of Dephasing of Optically Trapped Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, M F; Grünzweig, T; Davidson, N

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-cold atoms trapped in an optical dipole trap and prepared in a coherent superposition of their hyperfine ground states, decohere as they interact with their environment. We demonstrate than the loss in coherence in an "echo" experiment, which is caused by mechanisms such as Rayleigh scattering, can be suppressed by the use of a new pulse sequence. We also show that the coherence time is then limited by mixing to other vibrational levels in the trap and by the finite lifetime of the internal quantum states of the atoms.

  15. Laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ye XU; Wen-li WANG; Qing-hong ZHOU; Guo-hui LI; Hai-ling JIANG; Lin-fang CHEN; Jie YE; Zhi-hong ZHOU; Yin CAI; Hai-yao TANG; Min ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    The experiments on the laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms are reported, including the two-dimensional transversal cooling, longitudinal velocity Zeeman deceleration, and a magneto-optical trap with a broadband transition at a wavelength of 399 nm. The magnetic field distributions along the axis of a Zeeman slower were measured and in a good agreement with the calculated results. Cold ytterbium atoms were produced with a number of about 107 and a temperature of a few milli-Kelvin.In addition, using a 556-nm laser, the excitations of cold tterbium atoms at 1S0-3p1 transition were observed. The ytterbium atoms will be further cooled in a 556-nm magneto-optical trap and loaded into a three-dimensional optical lattice to make an ytterbium optical clock.

  16. Collisional trap losses of cold, magnetically-trapped Br atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, J; Softley, T P

    2014-01-01

    Near-threshold photodissociation of Br$_2$ from a supersonic beam produces slow bromine atoms that are trapped in the magnetic field minimum formed between two opposing permanent magnets. Here, we quantify the dominant trap loss rate due to collisions with two sources of residual gas: the background limited by the vacuum chamber base pressure, and the carrier gas during the supersonic gas pulse. The loss rate due to collisions with residual Ar in the background follows pseudo first-order kinetics, and the bimolecular rate coefficient for collisional loss from the trap is determined by measurement of this rate as a function of the background Ar pressure. This rate coefficient is smaller than the total elastic collision rate coefficient, as it only samples those collisions that lead to trap loss, and is determined to be $\\langle\

  17. A trapped atom interferometer with ultracold Sr atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xian; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Poli, Nicola; Tino, Guglielmo M

    2016-01-01

    We report on a trapped atom interferometer based on Bragg diffraction and Bloch oscillations with alkaline-earth-metal atoms. We use a Ramsey-Bord\\'e Bragg interferometer with $^{88}$Sr atoms combined with Bloch oscillations to extend the interferometer time. Thanks to a long coherence time for Bloch oscillations of $^{88}$Sr atoms, we observed interference up to 1 s evolution time in the lattice. A detailed study of decoherence sources during the Bloch phase is also presented. While still limited in sensitivity by lattice lifetime and beam inhomogeneity this result opens the way to high contrast trapped interferometers with extended interrogation time.

  18. Polarizabilities and tune-out wavelengths of the hyperfine ground states of $^{87,85}$Rb

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xia; Xie, Lu-You; Zhang, Deng-Hong; Dong, Chen-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The static and dynamic polarizabilities, and the tune-out wavelengths of the ground state of Rb and the hyperfine ground states of $^{87, 85}$Rb have been calculated by using relativistic configuration interaction plus core polarization(RCICP) approach. It is found that the first primary tune-out wavelengths of the $ 5s_{1/2}, F=1, 2 $ states of $ ^{87}$Rb are 790.018187(193) nm and 790.032602(193) nm severally, where the calculated result for the $ 5s_{1/2}, F=2 $ state is in good agreement with the latest high-precision measurement 790.032388(32) nm [Phys. Rev. A 92, 052501 (2015)]. Similarly, the first primary tune-out wavelengths of the $ 5s_{1/2}, F=2, 3 $ states of $^{85}$Rb are 790.023515(218) nm and 790.029918(218) nm respectively. Furthermore, the tune-out wavelengths for the different magnetic sublevels $ M_{F}$ of each hyperfine level $F$ are also determined by considering the contributions of tensor polarizabilities.

  19. Atomic hydrogen in a magnetic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the construction and application of a static magnetic trap for atomic hydrogen. It is demonstrated that densities of up to 3*1014 cm-3 at temperatures of 80 to 200 mK can be achieved with a technically simple method of filling the trap. Double polarization is shown to occur spontaneously in the trapped gas, and the dipolar relaxation rate and its field dependance are measured confirming theoretical predictions. These results show that atomic hydrogen is a promising material for the achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation, provided that apart from the present method of cooling the gas, which is shown to impose a lower limit on the temperature, another cooling mechanism is supplied to reach lower temperatures. The density reached was two orders of magnitude higher than that of trapping experiments done at MIT where the technique of evaporate cooling was used to reach a temperature lower than 3 mK. (author). 138 refs.; 27 figs

  20. Virial theorems for trapped cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Félix

    2008-01-01

    A few small corrections We present a general virial theorem for quantum particles with arbitrary zero-range or finite-range interactions in an arbitrary external potential. We deduce virial theorems for several situations relevant to trapped cold atoms: zero-range interactions with and without Efimov effect, hard spheres, narrow Feshbach resonances, and finite-range interactions. If the scattering length $a$ is varied adiabatically in the BEC-BCS crossover, we find that the trapping potent...

  1. Formation of ultracold 7Li85Rb molecules in the lowest triplet electronic state by photoassociation and their detection by ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the formation of ultracold 7Li85Rb molecules in the a3Σ+ electronic state by photoassociation (PA) and their detection via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With our dual-species Li and Rb magneto-optical trap apparatus, we detect PA resonances with binding energies up to ∼62 cm−1 below the 7Li 2s 2S1/2 + 85Rb 5p 2P1/2 asymptote. In addition, we use REMPI spectroscopy to probe the a3Σ+ state and excited electronic 33Π and 43Σ+ states and identify a3Σ+ (v″ = 7–13), 33Π (vΠ′ = 0–10), and 43Σ+ (vΣ′ = 0–5) vibrational levels. Our line assignments agree well with ab initio calculations. These preliminary spectroscopic studies on previously unobserved electronic states are crucial to discovering transition pathways for transferring ultracold LiRb molecules created via PA to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state

  2. Formation of ultracold (7)Li(85)Rb molecules in the lowest triplet electronic state by photoassociation and their detection by ionization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf, Adeel; Dutta, Sourav; Lorenz, John; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Chen, Yong P; Elliott, D S

    2015-03-21

    We report the formation of ultracold (7)Li(85)Rb molecules in the a(3)Σ(+) electronic state by photoassociation (PA) and their detection via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With our dual-species Li and Rb magneto-optical trap apparatus, we detect PA resonances with binding energies up to ∼62 cm(-1) below the (7)Li 2s (2)S1/2 + (85)Rb 5p (2)P1/2 asymptote. In addition, we use REMPI spectroscopy to probe the a(3)Σ(+) state and excited electronic 3(3)Π and 4(3)Σ(+) states and identify a(3)Σ(+) (v″ = 7-13), 3(3)Π (vΠ' = 0-10), and 4(3)Σ(+) (vΣ' = 0-5) vibrational levels. Our line assignments agree well with ab initio calculations. These preliminary spectroscopic studies on previously unobserved electronic states are crucial to discovering transition pathways for transferring ultracold LiRb molecules created via PA to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state. PMID:25796252

  3. Introduction to light forces, atom cooling, and atom trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Craig,

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces and reviews light forces, atom cooling and atom trapping. The emphasis is on the physics of the basic processes. In discussing conservative forces the semi-classical dressed states are used rather than the usual quantized field dressed states.

  4. Field theory for trapped atomic gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this course we give a selfcontained introduction to the quantum field theory for trapped atomic gases, using functional methods throughout. We consider both equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena. In the equilibrium case, we first derive the appropriate Hartree—Fock theory for the properties of

  5. Field theory for trapped atomic gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this course we give a selfcontained introduction to the quantum field theory for trapped atomic gases, using functional methods throughout. We consider both equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena. In the equilibrium case, we first derive the appropriate Hartree-Fock theory for the properties of

  6. Suppression of the stellar enhancement factor and the reaction 85Rb(p,n)85Sr

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T; Gyürky, Gy; Simon, A; Fülöp, Z; Somorjai, E

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that a Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor occurs in many endothermic reactions at and far from stability. Contrary to common assumptions, reaction measurements for astrophysics with minimal impact of stellar enhancement should be preferably performed for those reactions instead of their reverses, despite of their negative reaction Q-value. As a demonstration, the cross section of the astrophysically relevant 85Rb(p,n)85Sr reaction has been measured by activation between 2.16<=E_{c.m.}<= 3.96 MeV and the astrophysical reaction rates at p-process temperatures for (p,n) as well as (n,p) are directly inferred from the data. Additionally, our results confirm a previously derived modification of a global optical proton potential. The presented arguments are also relevant for other alpha- and proton-induced reactions in the p-, rp-, and nu-p-processes.

  7. Photoassociation and ionization spectroscopy of ultracold $^{7}$Li$^{85}$Rb molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Altaf, Adeel; Lorenz, John; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Chen, Yong P; Elliott, D S

    2014-01-01

    We report spectroscopic studies of ultracold $^{7}$Li$^{85}$Rb molecules using multiphoton ionization detection. With our dual-species Li and Rb MOT apparatus, we create ultracold LiRb molecules via photoassociation (PA), and explore new PA resonances, with binding energies up to ~62 cm^{-1}. Furthermore, we measure the resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra as a probe of ground and excited state vibrational levels. We identify vibrational levels of the $a^{3}\\Sigma^{+} (v" = 7 - 13)$, $3^{3} \\Pi (v'_{\\Pi} = 0 - 10)$ and $4^{3} \\Sigma^{+} (v'_{\\Sigma} = 0 - 5)$ electronic states. Our line assignments agree well with ab initio calculations. These spectroscopic studies are crucial to discovering transition pathways for transferring ultracold LiRb molecules created via PA to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  8. Quantum state control of trapped Holmium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetter, James; Yip, Christopher; Milner, William; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey; Saffman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Neutral Holmium with its large number of hyperfine ground states provides a promising approach for collective encoding of a multi-qubit register. A prerequisite for collective encoding is the ability to prepare different states in the 128 state hyperfine ground manifold. We report progress towards optical pumping and control of the hyperfine Zeeman state of trapped Ho atoms. Atoms are transferred from a 410.5 nm MOT into a 455 nm optical dipole trap. The atoms can be optically pumped using light driving the ground 6s2 , F = 11 to 6 s 6 p ,F' = 11 transition together with a F = 10 to F' = 11 repumper. Microwave fields are then used to drive transitions to hyperfine levels with 4 <= F <= 11 . Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  9. Boson Josephson Junction with Trapped Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S. R.

    We consider coherent atomic tunneling between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates at T=0 in a double-well trap. The condensate dynamics of the macroscopic amplitudes in the two wells is modeled by two Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPE) coupled by a tunneling matrix element. Analytic elliptic function solutions are obtained for the time evolution of the inter-well fractional population imbalance z(t) (related to the condensate phase difference) of the Boson Josephson junction (BJJ). Surprisingly, the neutral-atom BJJ shows (non-sinusoidal generalizations of) effects seen in charged-electron superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ). The BJJ elliptic-function behavior has a singular dependence on a GPE parameter ratio Λ at a critical ratio Λ=Λc, beyond which a novel 'macroscopic quantum self-trapping' effect sets in with a non-zero time-averaged imbalance ≠0.

  10. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Holmium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, J; Stratis, G; Saffman, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate sub-Doppler laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the rare earth element Holmium. Atoms are loaded from an atomic beam source and captured in six-beam $\\sigma_+ - \\sigma_-$ molasses using a strong $J=15/2 \\leftrightarrow J=17/2$ cycling transition at $\\lambda=410.5~\\rm nm$. Due to the small difference in hyperfine splittings and Land\\'e $g$-factors in the lower and upper levels of the cooling transition the MOT is self-repumped without additional repump light, and deep sub-Doppler cooling is achieved with the magnetic trap turned on. We measure the leakage out of the cycling transition to metastable states and find a branching ratio $\\sim 10^{-5}$ which is adequate for state resolved measurements on hyperfine encoded qubits.

  11. Continuous magnetic trapping of laser cooled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present here initial results of the deceleration of a thermal atomic beam from -- 1000 to -- 100 m/s. The experiment was conducted in the 1.4-m long vertical superconducting solenoid which produced the slowing field. The fluorescence of the slowed atomic beam has been studied as a function of laser frequency. Figure 2 is a 12-GHz scan showing the fluorescence at a position 150 cm from the beginning of the solenoid. The wide peak corresponds to unslowed atoms with generally the initial velocity distribution. The second, narrower, peak corresponds to slowed atoms with a velocity of -- 150 m/s. Similar spectra have been obtained for various positions along the magnetic slower and trap. These data should allow better understanding of the cooling process and will be compared to computer models

  12. Two dipolar atoms in a harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ołdziejewski, Rafał; Górecki, Wojciech; Rzążewski, Kazimierz

    2016-05-01

    Two identical dipolar atoms moving in a harmonic trap without an external magnetic field are investigated. Using the algebra of angular momentum we reduce the problem to a simple numerics. We show that the internal spin-spin interactions between the atoms couple to the orbital angular momentum causing an analogue of the Einstein-de Haas effect. We show a possibility of adiabatically pumping our system from the s-wave to the d-wave relative motion. The effective spin-orbit coupling occurs at anti-crossings of the energy levels.

  13. Quasi-Magic optical traps for Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S; Saffman, M

    2011-01-01

    We propose blue-detuned optical traps that are suitable for trapping of both ground state and Rydberg excited atoms. Addition of a background compensation field or suitable choice of the trap geometry provides a magic trapping condition for ground and Rydberg atoms at the trap center. Deviations from the magic condition at finite temperature are calculated. Designs that achieve less than 200 kHz differential trap shift between Cs ground and 125s Rydberg states for 10 {\\mu}K Cs atoms are presented. Consideration of the trapping potential and photoionization rates

  14. Tunneling of trapped-atom Bose condensates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subodh R Shenoy

    2002-02-01

    We obtain the dynamics in number and phase difference, for Bose condensates that tunnel between two wells of a double-well atomic trap, using the (nonlinear) Gross–Pitaevskii equation. The dynamical equations are of the canonical form for the two conjugate variables, and the Hamiltonian corresponds to that of a momentum-shortened pendulum, supporting a richer set of tunneling oscillation modes than for a superconductor Josephson junction, that has a fixed-length pendulum as a mechanical model. Novel modes include ‘inverted pendulum’ oscillations with an average angle of ; and oscillations about a self-maintained population imbalance that we term ‘macroscopic quantum self-trapping’. Other systems with this phase-number nonlinear dynamics include two-component (interconverting) condensates in a single harmonic trap, and He3B superfluids in two containers connected by micropores.

  15. Anisotropic optical trapping of ultracold erbium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Lepers, Maxence; Dulieu, Olivier; --,

    2013-01-01

    Ultracold atoms confined in a dipole trap are submitted to a potential whose depth is proportional to the real part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. The atoms also experience photon scattering whose rate is proportional to the imaginary part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. In this article we calculate the complex dynamic dipole polarizability of ground-state erbium, a rare-earth atom that was recently Bose-condensed. The polarizability is calculated with the sum-over-state formula inherent to second-order perturbation theory. The summation is performed on transition energies and transition dipole moments from ground-state erbium, which are computed using the Racah-Slater least-square fitting procedure provided by the Cowan codes. This allows us to predict 9 unobserved odd-parity energy levels of total angular momentum J=5, 6 and 7, in the range 25000-31000 cm-1 above the ground state. Regarding the trapping potential, we find that ground-state erbium essentially behaves like a spherically-symme...

  16. Combined ion and atom trap for low temperature ion-atom physics

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, K.; LEE, Seunghyun; Sharma, Arijit; Werth, G.; Rangwala, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    We report an experimental apparatus and technique which simultaneously traps ions and cold atoms with spatial overlap. Such an apparatus is motivated by the study of ion-atom processes at temperatures ranging from hot to ultra-cold. This area is a largely unexplored domain of physics with cold trapped atoms. In this article we discuss the general design considerations for combining these two traps and present our experimental setup. The ion trap and atom traps are characterized independently ...

  17. Cold atom-ion experiments in hybrid traps

    OpenAIRE

    Härter, Arne; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2013-01-01

    In the last 5 years, a novel field of physics and chemistry has developed in which cold trapped ions and ultracold atomic gases are brought into contact with each other. Combining ion traps with traps for neutral atoms yields a variety of new possibilities for research and experiments. These range from studies of cold atom-ion collisions and atom-ion chemistry to applications in quantum information science and condensed matter related research. In this article we give a brief introduction int...

  18. The influence of optical molasses in loading a shallow optical trap

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Mathew S.; Gorges, Anthony R.; Roberts, Jacob L.

    2008-01-01

    We have examined loading of 85Rb atoms into a shallow Far-Off-Resonance Trap (FORT) from an optical molasses and compared it to loading from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). We found that substantially more atoms could be loaded into the FORT via an optical molasses as compared to loading from the MOT alone. To determine why this was the case, we measured the rate of atoms loaded into the FORT and the losses from the FORT during the loading process. For both MOT and molasses loading, we examined...

  19. Doppler cooling of an optically dense cloud of trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, P O; Werner, J; Binhammer, T; Görlitz, A; Pfau, T; Schmidt, Piet O.; Hensler, Sven; Binhammer, Thomas; G\\"{o}rlitz, Axel; Pfau, Tilman

    2002-01-01

    We have studied a general technique for laser cooling a cloud of polarized trapped atoms down to the Doppler temperature. A one-dimensional optical molasses using polarized light cools the axial motional degree of freedom of the atoms in the trap. Cooling of the radial degrees of freedom can be modelled by reabsorption of scattered photons in the optically dense cloud. We present experimental results for a cloud of chromium atoms in a magnetic trap. A simple model based on rate equations shows quantitative agreement with the experimental results. This scheme allows us to readily prepare a dense cloud of atoms in a magnetic trap with ideal starting conditions for evaporative cooling.

  20. Nanofiber-based optical trapping of cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, Eugen; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental techniques and results related to the optimization and characterization of our nanofiber-based atom trap [Vetsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 203603 (2010)]. The atoms are confined in an optical lattice which is created using a two-color evanescent field surrounding the optical nanofiber. For this purpose, the polarization state of the trapping light fields has to be properly adjusted. We demonstrate that this can be accomplished by analyzing the light scattered by the nanofiber. Furthermore, we show that loading the nanofiber trap from a magneto-optical trap leads to sub-Doppler temperatures of the trapped atomic ensemble and yields a sub-Poissonian distribution of the number of trapped atoms per trapping site.

  1. A toroidal trap for the cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms using a rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, A; Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms in a toroidal geometry using a rf-dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong radio frequency (rf) field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has minimum of the potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates the trapping in the toroidal geometry. In the experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in the quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in the rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  2. Analysis of the atom-number correlation function in a few-atom trap

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Youngwoon; Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Woongnae; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic properties of loading and loss mechanism in a few atom trap are analyzed. An approximate formula is derived for the atom-number correlation function for the trapped atoms in the limit of reasonably small two-atom loss rate. Validity of the approximate formula is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  3. Bichromatic State-insensitive Trapping of Caesium Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-01-01

    State-insensitive dipole trapping of multilevel atoms can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the wavelength of the trapping laser, so that the interaction with the different transitions results in equal AC Stark shifts for the ground and excited states of interest. However this approach is severely limited by the availability of coherent sources at the required wavelength and of appropriate power. This work investigates state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms for which the required w...

  4. Trapping of molecular Oxygen together with Lithium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Akerman, Nitzan; Segev, Yair; Bibelnik, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous deceleration and trapping of a cold atomic and molecular mixture. This is the first step towards studies of cold atom-molecule collisions at low temperatures as well as application of sympathetic cooling. Both atoms and molecules are cooled in a supersonic expansion and are loaded into a moving magnetic trap which brings them to rest via the Zeeman interaction from an initial velocity of 375 m/s. We use a beam seeded with molecular Oxygen, and entrain it with Lithium atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading of the mixture into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate $10^9$ trapped O$_2$ molecules and $10^5$ Li atoms with background pressure limited lifetime on the order of 1 second. With further improvements to Lithium entrainment we expect that sympathetic cooling of molecules is within reach.

  5. Production of rovibronic ground-state 85 Rb133 Cs molecules via photoassociation to Ω = 1 states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimasaki, Toshihiko; Kim, Jin Tae; Demille, David

    2016-05-01

    We have extensively investigated short-range photoassociation (PA) to the (2) 3Π1 , (2) 1Π1 , and (3) 3Σ1+ states of 85 Rb133 Cs in the region between 11650 cm-1 and 12100 cm-1, where strong mixing between triplet and singlet states is expected. In contrast to the previously observed two-photon cascade decay from the (2) 3Π0 states, here we observe that the PA excited states can directly decay to the rovibronic ground state X1Σ+(v = 0 , J = 0) by a one-photon transition. We have observed rich hyperfine structures of the PA states, which were unresolved in previous cold beam experiments in the same region. Based on the analysis of vibrational and rotational branching ratios in the decay process to the X1Σ+ state, we will discuss the molecule production rate in comparison with that for PA to the (2) 3Π0 states. We will also report on a similar study of PA to the B1 Π and (2) 3Σ1+ states of 85 Rb133 Cs, which also produce the rovibronic ground state X1Σ+(v = 0 , J = 0) via direct one-photon decay.

  6. Cold atom interferometers and their applications in precision measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin WANG; Lin ZHO; Run-bing LI; Min LIU; Ming-sheng ZHAN

    2009-01-01

    Experimental realization of cold 85Rb atom interferometers and their applications in precision meademonstrated: Detailed descriptions of the interferometers are given including manipulation of cold atoms, Rabi oscillation, stimulated Raman transitions, and optical pumping. As an example of using atom interferometers in precision measurements, the quadratic Zeeman shift of hyperfine sublevels of 85Rb was determined.

  7. Dynamics of atom trapping in an rf-dressed potential

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, A; Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of atom trapping in a radio-frequency-dressed-state potential formed by static and radio frequency (rf) fields has been studied using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. Using the simulations, a case of formation of a toroidal trap for cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms is investigated for atoms trapped in a static quadrupole magnetic trap and exposed to an rf-field with temporally increasing amplitude and decreasing frequency. We first calculate the adiabatic rf-dressed potential for an atom interacting with these fields and then apply DSMC algorithm to simulate the motion of the atom in this time dependent adiabatic potential. In the simulations the Landau-Zener (LZ) transition probability is calculated to know if the atom is in the trappable or untrappable dressed state. The results show that, initially at lower rf-field strength, the rf-field ejects atoms from the trap and leads to evaporative cooling of the atom cloud. However at higher rf-field strength, the atoms make LZ transition to th...

  8. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof

  9. Optical molasses, laser traps, and ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is dramatic progress in the demonstration of the mechanical effects of light on atoms. The laser cooling and stopping of atoms in an atomic beam were followed by the 3-D cooling and confinement of atoms with laser light. The authors survey the recent major experimental advances and try to point out some interesting physics that can be done in this newly accessible domain of gaseous atoms at low temperatures and possibly high densities

  10. A Novel Gravito-Optical Surface Trap for Neutral Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chun-Xia; WANG Zhengling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel gravito-optical surface trap (GOST) for neutral atoms based on one-dimensional intensity gradient cooling. The surface optical trap is composed of a blue-detuned reduced semi-Gaussian laser beam (SGB), a far-blue-detuned dark hollow beam and the gravity field.

  11. Efficient Direct Evaporative Cooling in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, Daniel M; Du, Shengwang; Anderson, Dana

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate direct evaporative cooling of $^{87}$Rb atoms confined in a dimple trap produced by an atom chip. By changing the two chip currents and two external bias fields, we show theoretically that the trap depth can be lowered in a controlled way with no change in the trap frequencies or the value of the field at the trap center. Experimentally, we maximized the decrease in trap depth by allowing some loosening of the trap. In total, we reduced the trap depth by a factor of 20. The geometric mean of the trap frequencies was reduced by less than a factor of 6. The measured phase space density in the final two stages increased by more than two orders of magnitude, and we estimate an increase of four orders of magnitude over the entire sequence. A subsequent rf evaporative sweep of only a few megahertz produced Bose-Einstein condensates. We also produce condensates in which raising the trap bottom pushes hotter atoms into an rf "knife" operating at a fixed frequency of 5\\,MHz.

  12. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  13. Eliminating light shifts in single-atom optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Hutzler, Nicholas R; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Microscopically controlled neutral atoms in optical tweezers and lattices have led to exciting advances in the study of quantum information and quantum many-body systems. The light shifts of atomic levels from the trapping potential in these systems can result in detrimental effects such as fluctuating dipole force heating, inhomogeneous detunings, and inhibition of laser cooling, which limits the atomic species that can be manipulated. In particular, these light shifts can be large enough to prevent loading into optical tweezers directly from a magneto-optical trap. We present a general solution to these limitations by loading, cooling, and imaging single atoms with temporally alternating beams. Because this technique does not depend on any specific spectral properties, we expect it to enable the optical tweezer method to control nearly any atomic or molecular species that can be laser cooled and optically trapped. Furthermore, we present an analysis of the role of heating and required cooling for single ato...

  14. Studies of Ultracold Strontium Atoms in an Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, A. J.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We survey recent experiments with ultracold strontium performed in our group. Trapping and cooling occurs in three stages: successive magneto-optical traps (MOTs) operating on 461 nm and 689 nm transitions of strontium, respectively, are loaded to cool atoms to a temperature of 1 μK. Finally, atoms are loaded into a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (ODT). We examine the loading characteristics, thermalization, and lifetime of atoms held within the ODT. We also perform spectroscopy of atoms held within the ODT. During laser cooling, we are able to manipulate the energy levels of the atoms and shelve them into metastable states using 707 nm and 3 μm lasers. These experiments reveal interesting physics of ultracold strontium.

  15. In-trap fluorescence detection of atoms in a microscopic dipole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hilliard, A J; Sompet, P; Carpentier, A V; Andersen, M F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate fluorescence detection using a standing wave of blue-detuned light of one or more atoms held in a deep, microscopic dipole trap. The blue-detuned standing wave realizes a Sisyphus laser cooling mechanism so that an atom can scatter many photons while remaining trapped. When imaging more than one atom, the blue detuning limits loss due to inelastic light-assisted collisions. Using this standing wave probe beam, we demonstrate that we can count from one to the order of 100 atoms in the microtrap with sub-poissonian precision.

  16. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting, E-mail: zhaoyt@sxu.edu.cn; Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Kim, Jin-Tae, E-mail: kimjt@Chosun.ac.kr [Department of Photonic Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-14

    We present the formation of ultracold {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecules in the (5)0{sup +} electronic state by photoassociation and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 vibrational and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with rotationally resolved high resolution photoassociation spectra. Precise Dunham coefficients are determined for the (5)0{sup +} state with high accuracy, then the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve is derived. The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5)0{sup +} state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  17. Deep optical trap for cold alkaline-Earth atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luciano S; Sereno, Milena; Cruz, Flavio C

    2008-03-01

    We describe a setup for a deep optical dipole trap or lattice designed for holding atoms at temperatures of a few mK, such as alkaline-Earth atoms which have undergone only regular Doppler cooling. We use an external optical cavity to amplify 3.2 W from a commercial single-frequency laser at 532 nm to 523 W. Powers of a few kW, attainable with low-loss optics or higher input powers, allow larger trap volumes for improved atom transfer from magneto-optical traps. We analyze possibilities for cooling inside the deep trap, the induced Stark shifts for calcium, and a cancellation scheme for the intercombination clock transition using an auxiliary laser. PMID:18542375

  18. Analysis of a single-atom dipole trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple experimental technique which allows us to store a single 87Rb atom in an optical dipole trap. Due to light-induced two-body collisions during the loading stage of the trap the maximum number of captured atoms is locked to one. This collisional blockade effect is confirmed by the observation of photon antibunching in the detected fluorescence light. The spectral properties of single photons emitted by the atom were studied with a narrow-band scanning cavity. We find that the atomic fluorescence spectrum is dominated by the spectral width of the exciting laser light field. In addition we observe a spectral broadening of the atomic fluorescence light due to the Doppler effect. This allows us to determine the mean kinetic energy of the trapped atom corresponding to a temperature of 105 μK. This simple single-atom trap is the key element for the generation of atom-photon entanglement required for future applications in quantum communication and a first loophole-free test of Bell's inequality

  19. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Stas, R. J. W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof-are cooled to a temperature around 1 mK and form the starting point of the presented studies. The studies include an investigation of cold ionizing collisions in the absence of resonant light, an i...

  20. Atom-molecule collisions in an optically trapped gas

    OpenAIRE

    Zahzam, Nassim; Vogt, Thibault; Mudrich, Marcel; Comparat, Daniel; Pillet, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Cold inelastic collisions between confined cesium (Cs) atoms and Cs$\\_2$ molecules are investigated inside a CO$\\_2$ laser dipole trap. Inelastic atom-molecule collisions can be observed and measured with a rate coefficient of $\\sim 2.5 \\times 10^{-11} $cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$, mainly independent of the molecular ro-vibrational state populated. Lifetimes of purely atomic and molecular samples are essentially limited by rest gas collisions. The pure molecular trap lifetime ranges 0,3-1 s, four times s...

  1. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  2. PYRAMIDAL-HOLLOW-BEAM DIPOLE TRAP FOR ALKALI ATOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN JIAN-PING; GAO WEI-JIAN; WANG YU-ZHU; ZHU YI-FU; WANG YI-QIU

    2000-01-01

    We propose a dark gravito-optical dipole trap, for alkali atoms, consisting of a blue-detuned, pyramidal-hollow laser beam propagating upward and the gravity field. When cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap are loaded into the pyramidal-hollow beam and bounce inside the pyramidal-hollow beam, they experience efficient Sisyphus cooling and geometric cooling induced by the pyramidal-hollow beam and the weak repumping beam propagating downward. Our study shows that an ultracold and dense atomic sample with an equilibrium 3D momentum of ~ 3hk and an atomic density above the point of Bose-Einstein condensation may be obtained in this pure optical trap.

  3. Oscillation Frequencies for Simultaneous Trapping of Heteronuclear Alkali Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillation frequencies for simultaneous trapping of more than one type of alkali atoms in a common optical lattice. For this purpose, we present numerical results for magic trapping conditions, where the oscillation frequencies for two different kind of alkali atoms using laser lights in the wavelength range 500-1200 nm are same. These wavelengths will be of immense interest for studying static and dynamic properties of boson-boson, boson-fermion, fermion-fermion, and boson-boson-boson mixtures involving different isotopes of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Fr alkali atoms. In addition to this, we were also able to locate a magic wavelength around 808.1 nm where all the three Li, K, and Rb atoms are found to be suitable for oscillating at the same frequency in a common optical trap.

  4. A quasi-electrostatic trap for neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports on the realization of a ''quasi-electrostatic trap'' (QUEST) for neutral atoms. Cesium (133Cs) and Lithium (7Li) atoms are stored, which represents for the first time a mixture of different species in an optical dipole trap. The trap is formed by the focused Gaussian beam of a 30 W cw CO2-laser. For a beam waist of 108 μm the resulting trap depth is κB x 118 μK for Cesium and κB x 48 μK for Lithium. We transfer up to 2 x 106 Cesium and 105 Lithium atoms from a magneto-optical trap into the QUEST. When simultaneously transferred, the atom number currently is reduced by roughly a factor of 10. Since photon scattering from the trapping light can be neglected, the QUEST represents an almost perfect conservative trapping potential. Atoms in the QUEST populate the electronic ground state sublevels. Arbitrary sublevels can be addressed via optical pumping. Due to the very low background gas pressure of 2 x 10-11 mbar storage times of several minutes are realized. Evaporative cooling of Cesium is observed. In addition, laser cooling is applied to the trapped Cesium sample, which reduces the temperature from 25 μK to a value below 7 μK. If prepared in the upper hyper-fine ground state sublevel, spin changing collisions are observed not only within one single species, but also between the two different species. The corresponding relaxation rates are quantitatively analyzed. (orig.)

  5. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  6. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  7. Collisional properties of trapped cold chromium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovich, Z; Côté, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Pavlovic, Zoran; Roos, Bjoern O.; Côté, Robin

    2004-01-01

    We report on calculations of the elastic cross section and thermalization rate for collision between two maximally spin-polarized chromium atoms in the cold and ultracold regimes, relevant to buffer-gas and magneto-optical cooling of chromium atoms. We calculate ab initio potential energy curves for Cr2 and the van der Waals coefficient C6, and construct interaction potentials between two colliding Cr atoms. We explore the effect of shape resonances on elastic cross section, and find that they dramatically affect the thermalization rate. Our calculated value for the s-wave scattering length is compared in magnitude with a recent measurement at ultracold temperatures.

  8. Trapping cold molecules and atoms: Simultaneous magnetic deceleration and trapping of cold molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelink, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-05-01

    Cooling molecules to the ultra-cold regime remains a major challenge in the growing field of cold molecules. The molecular internal degrees of freedom complicate the effort of direct application of laser cooling. An alternative and general path towards ultra-cold molecules relies on sympathetic cooling via collisions with laser-cooled atoms. Here, we demonstrate the first step towards application of sympathetic cooling by co-trapping of molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms in a magnetic trap at a temperature of 300 mK. Our experiment begins with a pulsed supersonic beam which is a general source for cold high-flux atomic and molecular beams. Although the supersonic expansion efficiently cools the beam to temperatures below 1K, it also accelerates the beam to high mean velocities. We decelerate a beam of O2 in a moving magnetic trap decelerator from 375 m/s to a stop. We entrained the molecular beam with Li atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading the molecules and atoms into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 109 trapped molecules with background limited lifetime of 0.6 Sec. Our achievement enables application of laser cooling on the Li atoms in order to sympathetically cool the O2.

  9. Construction of a single atom trap for quantum information protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Duke Physics Department Team

    2016-05-01

    The field of quantum information science addresses outstanding problems such as achieving fundamentally secure communication and solving computationally hard problems. Great progress has been made in the field, particularly using photons coupled to ions and super conducting qubits. Neutral atoms are also interesting for these applications and though the technology for control of neutrals lags behind that of trapped ions, they offer some key advantages: primarily coupling to optical frequencies closer to the telecom band than trapped ions or superconducting qubits. Here we report progress on constructing a single atom trap for 87 Rb. This system is a promising platform for studying the technical problems facing neutral atom quantum computing. For example, most protocols destroy the trap when reading out the neutral atom's state; we will investigate an alternative non-destructive state detection scheme. We detail the experimental systems involved and the challenges addressed in trapping a single atom. All of our hardware components are off the shelf and relatively inexpensive. Unlike many other systems, we place a high numerical aperture lens inside our vacuum system to increase photon collection efficiency. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the ARO through Grant # W911NF1520047.

  10. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  11. Proposed magneto-electrostatic ring trap for neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, A; Mabuchi, H; Hopkins, Asa; Lev, Benjamin; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    We propose a novel trap for confining cold neutral atoms in a ring using a magneto-electrostatic potential. The trapping potential is derived from a combination of a repulsive magnetic field from a hard drive atom mirror and the attractive potential produced by a charged disk patterned on the hard drive surface. We calculate a trap frequency of [29.8, 42.8, 63.1] kHz and a depth of [16.3, 21.6, 21.6] MHz for [133Cs, 87Rb, 40K], and discuss a simple loading scheme and a method for fabrication. This device provides a one-dimensional potential in a ring geometry that may be of interest to the study of trapped quantum degenerate one-dimensional gases.

  12. Atomic physics experiments with trapped and cooled highly charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Kluge, H.-J.; Quint, W; Winters, D. F. A

    2007-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques have become very important for many fundamental experiments in atomic physics. When applied to highly charged ions confined in Penning traps, these procedures are very effective for testing quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields produced by heavy highly charged ions such as uranium U$^{91+}$. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear ground state properties can be determined with high accuracy in these simple systems. Finally, by studying...

  13. Dark Optical Lattice of Ring Traps for Cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Courtade, E; Houde, O; Verkerk, P; Courtade, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Daniel; Houde, Olivier; Verkerk, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new geometry of optical lattice for cold atoms, namely a lattice made of a 1D stack of dark ring traps. It is obtained through the interference pattern of a standard Gaussian beam with a counter-propagating hollow beam obtained using a setup with two conical lenses. The traps of the resulting lattice are characterized by a high confinement and a filling rate much larger than unity, even if loaded with cold atoms from a MOT. We have implemented this system experimentally, and obtained a lattice of ring traps populated with typically 40 atoms per site with a life time of 30 ms. Applications in statistical physics, quantum computing and Bose-Einstein condensate dynamics are conceivable.

  14. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  15. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom’s stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured1 and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and—by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen—the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state2, 3 of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave...

  16. Bichromatic State-insensitive Trapping of Caesium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Metbulut, M M

    2015-01-01

    State-insensitive dipole trapping of multilevel atoms can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the wavelength of the trapping laser, so that the interaction with the different transitions results in equal AC Stark shifts for the ground and excited states of interest. However this approach is severely limited by the availability of coherent sources at the required wavelength and of appropriate power. This work investigates state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms for which the required wavelength of 935.6 nm is inconvenient in terms of experimental realization. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping is proposed to overcome the lack of suitable laser sources. We first consider pairs of laser wavelengths in the ratio 1:2 and 1:3, as obtained via second- and third- harmonic generation. We found that the wavelength combinations 931.8-1863.6 nm and 927.5-2782.5 nm are suitable for state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms. In addition, we examine bichromatic state-insensitive trapping produced by pairs of l...

  17. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-12-01

    State-insensitive dipole trapping of multilevel atoms can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the wavelength of the trapping laser, so that the interaction with the different transitions results in equal AC Stark shifts for the ground and excited states of interest. However this approach is severely limited by the availability of coherent sources at the required wavelength and of appropriate power. This work investigates state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms for which the required wavelength of 935.6 nm is inconvenient in terms of experimental realization. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping is proposed to overcome the lack of suitable laser sources. We first consider pairs of laser wavelengths in the ratio 1:2 and 1:3, as obtained via second- and third- harmonic generation. We found that the wavelength combinations 931.8-1863.6 nm and 927.5-2782.5 nm are suitable for state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms. In addition, we examine bichromatic state-insensitive trapping produced by pairs of laser wavelengths corresponding to currently available high power lasers. These wavelength pairs were found to be in the range of 585-588 nm and 623-629 for one laser and 1064-1080 nm for the other.

  18. Resonator-Enhanced Optical Dipole Trap for Fermionic Lithium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Mosk, A P; Moritz, H; Elsaesser, T; Weidemüller, M; Grimm, R; Elsaesser, Th.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical dipole trap which is based on the enhancement of the optical power density of a Nd:YAG laser beam in a resonator. The trap is particularly suited for experiments with ultracold gases, as it combines a potential depth of order 1 mK with storage times of several tens of seconds. We study the interactions in a gas of fermionic lithium atoms in our trap and observe the influence of spin-changing collisions and off-resonant photon scattering. A key element in reaching long storage times is an ultra-low noise laser. The dependence of the storage time on laser noise is investigated.

  19. Resonator-Enhanced Optical Dipole Trap for Fermionic Lithium Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Mosk, A.; Jochim, S.; Moritz, H.; Elsaesser, Th.; Weidemueller, M.; Grimm, R

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical dipole trap which is based on the enhancement of the optical power density of a Nd:YAG laser beam in a resonator. The trap is particularly suited for experiments with ultracold gases, as it combines a potential depth of order 1 mK with storage times of several tens of seconds. We study the interactions in a gas of fermionic lithium atoms in our trap and observe the influence of spin-changing collisions and off-resonant photon scattering. A key element in reachin...

  20. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    CERN Document Server

    Schuldt, Thilo; Krutzik, Markus; Bote, Lluis Gesa; Gaaloul, Naceur; Hartwig, Jonas; Ahlers, Holger; Herr, Waldemar; Posso-Trujillo, Katerine; Rudolph, Jan; Seidel, Stephan; Wendrich, Thijs; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Sven; Kubelka-Lange, André; Milke, Alexander; Rievers, Benny; Rocco, Emanuele; Hinton, Andrew; Bongs, Kai; Oswald, Markus; Franz, Matthias; Hauth, Matthias; Peters, Achim; Bawamia, Ahmad; Wicht, Andreas; Battelier, Baptiste; Bertoldi, Andrea; Bouyer, Philippe; Landragin, Arnaud; Massonnet, Didier; Lévèque, Thomas; Wenzlawski, Andre; Hellmig, Ortwin; Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus; von Klitzing, Wolf; Chaloner, Chris; Summers, David; Ireland, Philip; Mateos, Ignacio; Sopuerta, Carlos F; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Tino, Guglielmo M; Williams, Michael; Trenkel, Christian; Gerardi, Domenico; Chwalla, Michael; Burkhardt, Johannes; Johann, Ulrich; Heske, Astrid; Wille, Eric; Gehler, Martin; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Gürlebeck, Norman; Braxmaier, Claus; Rasel, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry...

  1. Atom trap trace analysis of {sup 39}Ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welte, Joachim

    2011-12-14

    Detection of {sup 39}Ar in natural water samples can be employed for radiometric dating on a timescale of 50 to 1000 years before present. This experimental work comprises the setup of an atomic beam and trap apparatus that captures and detects {sup 39}Ar atoms by the laser-cooling technique ''Atom Trap Trace Analysis''. With this approach, the limitations of low-level counting, regarding sample size and measurement time, could be overcome. In the course of this work, the hyperfine structure spectrum of the cooling transition 1s{sub 5}-2p{sub 9} has been experimentally determined. A high intensity, optically collimated beam of slow metastable argon atoms has been set up and fluorescence detection of individual {sup 39}Ar atoms in a magneto-optical trap is realized. {sup 39}Ar count rates of 1 atom in about 4 hours have been achieved for atmospheric argon. Recent improvements further suggest that even higher count rates of 1 atom/hour are within reach.

  2. Cold atoms in microscopic traps from wires to chips

    CERN Document Server

    Cassettari, D

    2000-01-01

    Ioffe-Pritchard trap. In the latter we have achieved the trapping parameters required in the experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates with much reduced power consumption. In a second time we have replaced the free standing wires with an atom chip, which we have used to compress the atomic cloud in potentials with trap frequencies above 100 kHz and ground state sizes below 100 nm. Such potentials are especially interesting for quantum information proposals of performing quantum gate operations with controlled collisions between trapped atoms. Finally, by combining two wire guides we have experimentally realized an innovative kind of beam splitter for guided atoms. We have investigated the splitting potential generated by a Y-shaped wire which has one input, i.e. the central arm of the Y, and two outputs corresponding to the left and right arms of the Y. By tuning the current ratio in the two outputs we have observed atoms switching from left to right as well as symmetric splitting. This and other similar des...

  3. Trapping of Single Atoms with Single Photons in Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Doherty, A C; Hood, C J; Kimble, H J

    2000-01-01

    Two recent experiments have reported the trapping of individual atoms inside optical resonators by the mechanical forces associated with single photons [Hood et al., Science 287, 1447 (2000) and Pinkse et al., Nature 404, 365 (2000)]. Here we analyze the trapping dynamics in these settings, focusing on two points of interest. Firstly, we investigate the extent to which light-induced forces in these experiments are distinct from their free-space counterparts. Secondly, we explore the quantitative features of the resulting atomic motion and how these dynamics are mapped onto variations of the intracavity field. Not surprisingly, qualitatively distinct atomic dynamics arise as the coupling and dissipative rates are varied. For the experiment of Hood et al., we show that atomic motion is largely conservative and is predominantly in radial orbits transverse to the cavity axis. A comparison with the free-space theory demonstrates that the fluctuations of the dipole force are suppressed by an order of magnitude. Thi...

  4. An architecture for quantum computation with magnetically trapped Holmium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffman, Mark; Hostetter, James; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Outstanding challenges for scalable neutral atom quantum computation include correction of atom loss due to collisions with untrapped background gas, reduction of crosstalk during state preparation and measurement due to scattering of near resonant light, and the need to improve quantum gate fidelity. We present a scalable architecture based on loading single Holmium atoms into an array of Ioffe-Pritchard traps. The traps are formed by grids of superconducting wires giving a trap array with 40 μm period, suitable for entanglement via long range Rydberg gates. The states | F = 5 , M = 5 > and | F = 7 , M = 7 > provide a magic trapping condition at a low field of 3.5 G for long coherence time qubit encoding. The F = 11 level will be used for state preparation and measurement. The availability of different states for encoding, gate operations, and measurement, spectroscopically isolates the different operations and will prevent crosstalk to neighboring qubits. Operation in a cryogenic environment with ultra low pressure will increase atom lifetime and Rydberg gate fidelity by reduction of blackbody induced Rydberg decay. We will present a complete description of the architecture including estimates of achievable performance metrics. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  5. Ultratrace determination of tin by hydride generation in-atomizer trapping atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Průša, Libor [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Hlavova 8, Prague 2, CZ 128 43 Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •In-atomizer trapping HG-AAS was optimized for Sn. •A compact quartz trap-and-atomizer device was employed. •Generation, preconcentration and atomization steps were investigated in detail. •Hundred percent preconcentration efficiency for tin was reached. •Routine analytical method was developed for Sn determination (LOD of 0.03 ng mL{sup −1} Sn). -- Abstract: A quartz multiatomizer with its inlet arm modified to serve as a trap (trap-and-atomizer device) was employed to trap tin hydride and subsequently to volatilize collected analyte species with atomic absorption spectrometric detection. Generation, atomization and preconcentration conditions were optimized and analytical figures of merit of both on-line atomization as well as preconcentration modes were quantified. Preconcentration efficiency of 95 ± 5% was found. The detection limits reached were 0.029 and 0.14 ng mL{sup −1} Sn, respectively, for 120 s preconcentration period and on-line atomization mode without any preconcentration. The interference extent of other hydride forming elements (As, Se, Sb and Bi) on tin determination was found negligible in both modes of operation. The applicability of the developed preconcentration method was verified by Sn determination in a certified reference material as well as by analysis of real samples.

  6. Harmonic trap resonance enhanced synthetic atomic spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling-Na; Luo, Xinyu; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Ueda, Masahito; Wang, Ruquan; You, Li

    2016-05-01

    The widely adopted scheme for synthetic atomic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is based on the momentum sensitive Raman coupling, which is easily implemented in one spatial dimension. Recently, schemes based on pulsed or periodically modulating gradient magnetic field (GMF) were proposed and the main characteristic features have subsequently been demonstrated. The present work reports an experimental discovery and the associated theoretical understanding of tuning the SOC strength synthesized with GMF through the motional resonance of atomic center-of-mass in a harmonic trap. In some limits, we observe up to 10 times stronger SOC compared to the momentum impulse from GMF for atoms in free space.

  7. Large amplitude spin oscillations in a collisionless trapped atomic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Piechon, F; Laloë, F

    2009-01-01

    We propose an explanation of the recently observed strong spin segregation in a trapped Fermi gas by Du et al. Numerical and analytical solutions of a spin 1/2 kinetic equation in a collisionless regime explain quantitatively the observation of an "anomalous" large time scale and amplitude of the segregation. The key difference with previous experiment on bosons rests more in the diluteness of the gas than in the quantum statistics of the atoms. When they undergo fast ballistic oscillations in the trap, they average the inhomogeneous external field in an energy dependent way, so that their transverse spin precession frequency becomes proportional to their energy. Interactions between atoms of different energies and different spin directions then involve the identical spin rotation effect (ISRE), which transfers atoms to the up or down spin state in an energy dependent way. Since low energy atoms are closer to the center of the trap than high energy atoms, which can visit its edges, the final outcome is a stro...

  8. Coherence Properties of Nanofiber-Trapped Cesium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, D.; Sayrin, C.; Mitsch, R.; Schneeweiss, P.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2013-06-01

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized ˜200nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time of T2*=0.6ms and an irreversible dephasing time of T2'=3.7ms. By modeling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, T2* and T2' are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  9. Optical dipole trapping of radium atoms for EDM search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, W. L.; Sulai, I. A.; Parker, R. H.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Korsch, W.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Singh, J.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing an EDM search based on laser-cooled and trapped Ra-225 (half-life = 15 d) atoms. Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, Ra-225 is predicted to be 2-3 orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than Hg-199, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. Recently, we have succeeded in transferring Ra-226 atoms from a MOT into an optical dipole trap formed by a fiber laser beam at 1550 nm. For the EDM measurement, the cold atoms will be moved into the neighboring vacuum chamber inside magnetic shields where a pair of electrodes apply a 10 kV cm-1electric field. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  10. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Reitz, D; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time $T_2^\\ast=0.6$ ms and an irreversible dephasing time $T_2^\\prime=3.7$ ms. By theoretically modelling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, $T_2^\\ast$ and $T_2^\\prime$ are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  11. Arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold atoms and their applications in atom optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印建平; 高伟建; 胡建军

    2002-01-01

    A single microscopic magnetic trap for neutral atoms using planar current-carrying wires was proposed and studiedtheoretically by Weinstein et al. In this paper, we propose three structures of composite current-carrying wires to provide1D, 2D and 3D arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold alkali atoms. The spatial distributions of magnetic fieldsgenerated by these structures are calculated and the field gradient and curvature in each single microtrap are analysed.Our study shows that arrays of microscopic magnetic traps can be used to provide 1D, 2D or 3D atomic magneticlattices, and even to realize 1D, 2D and 3D arrays of magneto-optical traps, and so on.

  12. Single atom detection of calcium isotopes by atom trap trace analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, S; Morgenstern, R; Wilschut, H W; Hoekstra, R

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a combination of an isotopically purified atom beam and a magneto-optical trap which enables the single atom detection of all stable isotopes of calcium (40, 42, 43, 44, 46 and 48). These isotopes range in abundance from 96.9 % (40Ca) to 0.004 (46Ca). The trap is loaded from an atomic beam which is decelerated in a Zeeman slower and subsequently deflected over an angle of 30 degrees by optical molasses. The isotope selectivity of the Zeeman slower and the deflection stage is investigated experimentally and compared with Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Atomic physics experiments with trapped and cooled highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H -J; Winters, D F A

    2007-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques have become very important for many fundamental experiments in atomic physics. When applied to highly charged ions confined in Penning traps, these procedures are very effective for testing quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields produced by heavy highly charged ions such as uranium U$^{91+}$. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear ground state properties can be determined with high accuracy in these simple systems. Finally, by studying a single trapped radioactive ion, its nuclear decay can be studied in detail by observing the disappearance of the signal of the mother and the appearance of that of the daughter isotope. Such experiments on highly charged ions at extremely low energy will become possible by the HITRAP facility which is currently being built up at GSI. Also the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will be briefly described which is expected to be operational by 2014.

  14. Extremely nonlocal optical nonlinearities in atoms trapped near a waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Stimming, Hans Peter; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena are typically local. Here we predict the possibility of highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities for light propagating in atomic media trapped near a nano-waveguide, where long-range interactions between the atoms can be tailored. When the atoms are in an electromagnetically-induced transparency configuration, the atomic interactions are translated to long-range interactions between photons and thus to highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities. We derive and analyze the governing nonlinear propagation equation, finding a roton-like excitation spectrum for light and the emergence of long-range order in its output intensity. These predictions open the door to studies of unexplored wave dynamics and many-body physics with highly-nonlocal interactions of optical fields in one dimension.

  15. Highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities in atoms trapped near a waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Grisins, Pjotrs; Stimming, Hans Peter; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena are typically local. Here we predict the possibility of highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities for light propagating in atomic media trapped near a nano-waveguide, where long-range interactions between the atoms can be tailored. When the atoms are in an electromagnetically-induced transparency configuration, the atomic interactions are translated to long-range interactions between photons and thus to highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities. We derive and analyze the governing nonlinear propagation equation, finding a roton-like excitation spectrum for light and the emergence of long-range order in its output intensity. These predictions open the door to studies of unexplored wave dynamics and many-body physics with highly-nonlocal interactions of optical fields in one dimension.

  16. Coherent Population Trapping-Ramsey Interference in Cold Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi; YANG Guo-Qing; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate an experimental observation of coherent population trapping-Ramsey interference in cold 87Rb atoms by employing the time-domain separated oscillatory fields' method. The interference fringe with line width of 80Hz is obtained. We propose a novel method to measure the cold atom number. The measurement is insensitive to the pump beam intensity, the single photon detuning and even the initial state population. We use this method to normalize the interference signal and to improve the signal-to-noise ratio significantly.

  17. High contrast atomic magnetometer based on coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D1 line of 87Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. The experimental results show that a lin ‖ lin transition scheme is a promising alternative to the conventional circular—circular transition scheme for an atomic magnetometer. Compared with the circular light transition scheme, linear light accounts for high-contrast transmission resonances, which makes this excitation scheme promising for high-sensitivity magnetometers. We also use linear light and circular light to detect changes of a standard magnetic field, separately. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  18. Spin diffusion in trapped clouds of strongly interacting cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Bruun, G. M.; Pethick, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that puzzling recent experimental results on spin diffusion in a strongly interacting atomic gas may be understood in terms of the predicted spin diffusion coefficient for a generic strongly interacting system. Three important features play a central role: a) Fick's law for diffusion must be modified to allow for the trapping potential, b) the diffusion coefficient is inhomogeneous, due to the density variations in the cloud and c) the diffusion approximation fails in the outer parts ...

  19. Atom trapping in a bottle beam created by a diffractive optical element

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, V V; Saffman, M; Kemme, S A; Ellis, A R; Brady, G R; Wendt, J R; Biedermann, G W; Samora, S

    2013-01-01

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) has been fabricated for creating blue detuned atomic bottle beam traps. The DOE integrates several diffractive lenses for trap creation and imaging of atomic fluorescence. We characterize the performance of the DOE and demonstrate trapping of cold Cesium atoms inside a bottle beam.

  20. Effects of the Centre-of-Mass Motion on the Population Trapping of Ultracold Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊锦; 张智明

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the atomic centre-of-mass motion on atomic population trapping in a two-mode micromaser injected with ultracold A-type three-level atoms.We find that in the mazer regime(the case in which the atomic kinetic energy is much smaller than the atom-field interaction energy),the interplay between reflection and transmission of the ultracold atom leads to the destruction of the atomic population trapping.

  1. Adjustable microchip ring trap for cold atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Paul M; Squires, Matthew B; Scoville, James A; Carlson, Evan J; Buchwald, Walter R; Miller, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    We describe the design and function of a circular magnetic waveguide for deBroglie waves produced from wires on a microchip. The guide is a two-dimensional magnetic minimum for trapping weak-field seeking states of atoms or molecules with a magnetic dipole moment. The design consists of seven circular wires sharing a common radius. We describe the design, the time-dependent currents of the wires and show that it is possible to form a circular waveguide with adjustable height and gradient while minimizing perturbation resulting from leads or wire crossings. This maximal area geometry is suited for rotation sensing with atom interferometry via the Sagnac effect using either cold atoms, molecules and Bose-condensed systems.

  2. Thermally stable single-atom platinum-on-ceria catalysts via atom trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, John; Xiong, Haifeng; DelaRiva, Andrew; Peterson, Eric J.; Pham, Hien; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Qi, Gongshin; Oh, Se H.; Wiebenga, Michelle H.; Pereira Hernandez, Xavier I.; Wang, Yong; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts based on single atoms of scarce precious metals can lead to more efficient use through enhanced reactivity and selectivity. However, single atoms on catalyst supports can be mobile and aggregate into nanoparticles when heated at elevated temperatures. High temperatures are detrimental to catalyst performance unless these mobile atoms can be trapped. We used ceria powders having similar surface areas but different exposed surface facets. When mixed with a platinum/ aluminum oxide catalyst and aged in air at 800°C, the platinum transferred to the ceria and was trapped. Polyhedral ceria and nanorods were more effective than ceria cubes at anchoring the platinum. Performing synthesis at high temperatures ensures that only the most stable binding sites are occupied, yielding a sinter-resistant, atomically dispersed catalyst.

  3. Thermally stable single-atom platinum-on-ceria catalysts via atom trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John; Xiong, Haifeng; DeLaRiva, Andrew T; Peterson, Eric J; Pham, Hien; Challa, Sivakumar R; Qi, Gongshin; Oh, Se; Wiebenga, Michelle H; Pereira Hernández, Xavier Isidro; Wang, Yong; Datye, Abhaya K

    2016-07-01

    Catalysts based on single atoms of scarce precious metals can lead to more efficient use through enhanced reactivity and selectivity. However, single atoms on catalyst supports can be mobile and aggregate into nanoparticles when heated at elevated temperatures. High temperatures are detrimental to catalyst performance unless these mobile atoms can be trapped. We used ceria powders having similar surface areas but different exposed surface facets. When mixed with a platinum/aluminum oxide catalyst and aged in air at 800°C, the platinum transferred to the ceria and was trapped. Polyhedral ceria and nanorods were more effective than ceria cubes at anchoring the platinum. Performing synthesis at high temperatures ensures that only the most stable binding sites are occupied, yielding a sinter-resistant, atomically dispersed catalyst. PMID:27387946

  4. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  5. Stability of a trapped atom clock on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Szmuk, Ramon; Maineult, Wilfried; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present a compact atomic clock interrogating ultracold 87Rb magnetically trapped on an atom chip. Very long coherence times sustained by spin self-rephasing allow us to interrogate the atomic transition with 85% contrast at 5 s Ramsey time. The clock exhibits a fractional frequency stability of $5.8\\times 10^{-13}$ at 1 s and is likely to integrate into the $1\\times10^{-15}$ range in less than a day. A detailed analysis of 7 noise sources explains the measured frequency stability. Fluctuations in the atom temperature (0.4 nK shot-to-shot) and in the offset magnetic field ($5\\times10^{-6}$ relative fluctuations shot-to-shot) are the main noise sources together with the local oscillator, which is degraded by the 30% duty cycle. The analysis suggests technical improvements to be implemented in a future second generation set-up. The results demonstrate the remarkable degree of technical control that can be reached in an atom chip experiment.

  6. Coherent population trapping in a Raman atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Bing; Merlet, Sébastien; Santos, Franck Pereira dos

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of coherent population trapping (CPT) in an atom inter-ferometer gravimeter based on the use of stimulated Raman transitions. We find that CPT leads to significant phase shifts, of order of a few mrad, which may compromise the accuracy of inertial measurements. We show that this effect is rejected by the k-reversal technique, which consists in averaging inertial measurements performed with two opposite orientations of the Raman wavevector k, provided that internal states at the input of the interferometer are kept identical for both configurations.

  7. Rapid Cooling to Quantum Degeneracy with Dynamically Shaped Atom Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Richard; Bowler, Ryan; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-01-01

    We report on a general method for the rapid production of quantum degenerate gases. Using 174Yb, we achieve an experimental cycle time as low as (1.6-1.8) s for the production of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of (0.5-1) x 10^5 atoms. While laser cooling to 30\\muK proceeds in a standard way, evaporative cooling is highly optimized by performing it in an optical trap that is dynamically shaped by utilizing the time-averaged potential of a single laser beam moving rapidly in one dimension. We also produce large (>10^6) atom number BECs and successfully model the evaporation dynamics over more than three orders of magnitude in phase space density. Our method provides a simple and general approach to solving the problem of long production times of quantum degenerate gases.

  8. Trapping and cooling cesium atoms in a speckle field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of two experiments where cold cesium atoms are trapped in a speckle field. In the first experiment, a YAG laser creates the speckle pattern and induces a far-detuned dipole potential which is a nearly-conservative potential. Localization of atoms near the intensity maxima of the speckle field is observed. In a second experiment we use two counterpropagating laser beams tuned close to a resonance line of cesium and in the lin perpendicular to lin configuration, one of them being modulated by a holographic diffuser that creates the speckle field. Three-dimensional cooling is observed. Variations of the temperature and of the spatial diffusion coefficient with the size of a speckle grain are presented. (orig.)

  9. Magneto-optical trap for neutral mercury atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hong-Li; Yin Shi-Qi; Liu Kang-Kang; Qian Jun; Xu Zhen; Hong Tao; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Due to its low sensitivity to blackbody radiation,neutral mercury is a good candidate for the most accurate optical lattice clock.Here we report the observation of cold mercury atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT).Because of the high vapor pressure at room temperature,the mercury source and the cold pump were cooled down to-40 ℃ and-70 ℃,respectively,to keep the science chamber in an ultra-high vacuum of 6× 10-9 Pa.Limited by the power of the UV cooling laser,the one beam folded MOT configuration was adopted,and 1.5× 105 Hg-202 atoms were observed by fluorescence detection.

  10. Resonance fluorescence of a trapped three-level atom

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, M; Morigi, G; Bienert, Marc; Merkel, Wolfgang; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the spectrum of resonance fluorescence of a harmonically trapped atom, whose internal transitions are $\\Lambda$--shaped and driven at two-photon resonance by a pair of lasers, which cool the center--of--mass motion. For this configuration, photons are scattered only due to the mechanical effects of the quantum interaction between light and atom. We study the spectrum of emission in the final stage of laser--cooling, when the atomic center-of-mass dynamics is quantum mechanical and the size of the wave packet is much smaller than the laser wavelength (Lamb--Dicke limit). We use the spectral decomposition of the Liouville operator of the master equation for the atomic density matrix and apply second order perturbation theory. We find that the spectrum of resonance fluorescence is composed by two narrow sidebands -- the Stokes and anti-Stokes components of the scattered light -- while all other signals are in general orders of magnitude smaller. For very low temperatures, however, th...

  11. Holographic optical traps for atom-based topological Kondo devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccheri, F.; Bruce, G. D.; Trombettoni, A.; Cassettari, D.; Babujian, H.; Korepin, V. E.; Sodano, P.

    2016-07-01

    The topological Kondo (TK) model has been proposed in solid-state quantum devices as a way to realize non-Fermi liquid behaviors in a controllable setting. Another motivation behind the TK model proposal is the demand to demonstrate the quantum dynamical properties of Majorana fermions, which are at the heart of their potential use in topological quantum computation. Here we consider a junction of crossed Tonks-Girardeau gases arranged in a star-geometry (forming a Y-junction), and we perform a theoretical analysis of this system showing that it provides a physical realization of the TK model in the realm of cold atom systems. Using computer-generated holography, we experimentally implement a Y-junction suitable for atom trapping, with controllable and independent parameters. The junction and the transverse size of the atom waveguides are of the order of 5 μm, leading to favorable estimates for the Kondo temperature and for the coupling across the junction. Since our results show that all the required theoretical and experimental ingredients are available, this provides the demonstration of an ultracold atom device that may in principle exhibit the TK effect.

  12. A Compact Microchip-Based Atomic Clock Based on Ultracold Trapped Rb Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, Daniel M; Anderson, Dana Z

    2009-01-01

    We propose a compact atomic clock based on ultracold Rb atoms that are magnetically trapped near the surface of an atom microchip. An interrogation scheme that combines electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) with Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields can achieve atomic shot-noise level performance of 10^{-13}/sqrt(tau) for 10^6 atoms. The EIT signal can be detected with a heterodyne technique that provides noiseless gain; with this technique the optical phase shift of a 100 pW probe beam can be detected at the photon shot-noise level. Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations are used to identify realistic operating parameters at which AC Stark shifts are eliminated. By considering fluctuations in these parameters, we estimate that AC Stark shifts can be canceled to a level better than 2*10^{-14}. An overview of the apparatus is presented with estimates of duty cycle and power consumption.

  13. Development of a compact cold-atom atomic clock based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanshan, Eric M.

    Field-grade atomic clocks capable of primary standard performance in compact physics packages would be of significant value in a variety of applications ranging from network synchronization and secure communications to GPS hold-over and inertial navigation. A cold-atom coherent population trapping (CACPT) clock featuring laser-cooled atoms and pulsed Ramsey interrogation is a strong candidate for this technology if the principal frequency shifts can be controlled and the performance degradation associated with miniaturization can be overcome. In this thesis, research focused on the development of this type of compact atomic clock is presented. To address the low atom numbers obtained in small cold-atom sources, experiments were performed in which an atomic beam was decelerated with bichromatic stimulated laser forces and loaded into a mm-scale magneto-optical trap, increasing the atom number by a factor of 12.5. A CACPT clock using the high-contrast lin||lin optical interrogation technique was developed and achieved a stability of 7 x 10-13 after one hour of integration. Doppler shifts in the clock are explained using a simple kinematic model and canceled by interrogating the atoms with a counter-propagating CPT configuration. Finally, a thorough characterization of the AC-stark effect in lin||lin CPT was performed. Observed shifts are explained in terms of contributions from coherent CPT-generating couplings and population transfer effects caused by optical pumping from incoherent light. Measurements are compared with existing and new theoretical treatments, and a laser configuration is identified that reduces clock drift from light shifts to less than 10-14 for the current system.

  14. Box traps on an atom chip for one-dimensional quantum gases

    CERN Document Server

    van Es, J J P; van Amerongen, A H; Rétif, C; Whitlock, S; van Druten, N J

    2009-01-01

    We present the implementation of tailored trapping potentials for ultracold gases on an atom chip. We realize highly elongated traps with box-like confinement along the long, axial direction combined with conventional harmonic confinement along the two radial directions. The design, fabrication and characterization of the atom chip and the box traps is described. We load ultracold ($\\lesssim1 \\mu$K) clouds of $^{87}$Rb in a box trap, and demonstrate Bose-gas focusing as a means to characterize these atomic clouds in arbitrarily shaped potentials. Our results show that box-like axial potentials on atom chips are very promising for studies of one-dimensional quantum gases.

  15. Observation of cooperatively enhanced atomic dipole forces from NV centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Juan, M L; Besga, B; Brennen, G; Molina-Terriza, G; Volz, T

    2015-01-01

    Since the early work by Ashkin in 1970, optical trapping has become one of the most powerful tools for manipulating small particles, such as micron sized beads or single atoms. The optical trapping mechanism is based on the interaction energy of a dipole and the electric field of the laser light. In atom trapping, the dominant contribution typically comes from the allowed optical transition closest to the laser wavelength, whereas for mesoscopic particles it is given by the bulk polarizability of the material. These two different regimes of optical trapping have coexisted for decades without any direct link, resulting in two very different contexts of applications: one being the trapping of small objects mainly in biological settings, the other one being dipole traps for individual neutral atoms in the field of quantum optics. Here we show that for nanoscale diamond crystals containing artificial atoms, so-called nitrogen vacancy (NV) color centers, both regimes of optical trapping can be observed at the same...

  16. Cycle Time Reduction in Trapped Mercury Ion Atomic Frequency Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Taghavi, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    The use of the mercury ion isotope (201)Hg(+) was examined for an atomic clock. Taking advantage of the faster optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) reduces both the state preparation and the state readout times, thereby decreasing the overall cycle time of the clock and reducing the impact of medium-term LO noise on the performance of the frequency standard. The spectral overlap between the plasma discharge lamp used for (201)Hg(+) state preparation and readout is much larger than that of the lamp used for the more conventional (199)Hg(+). There has been little study of (201)Hg(+) for clock applications (in fact, all trapped ion clock work in mercury has been with (199)Hg(+); however, recently the optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) has been measured and found to be 0.45 second, or about three times faster than in (199)Hg(+) due largely to the better spectral overlap. This can be used to reduce the overall clock cycle time by over 2 seconds, or up to a factor of 2 improvement. The use of the (201)Hg(+) for an atomic clock is totally new. Most attempts to reduce the impact of LO noise have focused on reducing the interrogation time. In the trapped ion frequency standards built so far at JPL, the optical pumping time is already at its minimum so that no enhancement can be had by shortening it. However, by using (201)Hg(+), this is no longer the case. Furthermore, integrity monitoring, the mechanism that determines whether the clock is functioning normally, cannot happen faster than the clock cycle time. Therefore, a shorter cycle time will enable quicker detection of failure modes and recovery from them.

  17. Accumulation and thermalization of cold atoms in a finite-depth magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chicireanu, R; Gorceix, O; Keller, J C; Laburthe-Tolra, B; Marechal, E; Porto, J V; Pouderous, A; Vernac, L

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically study the continuous accumulation of cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) into a finite depth trap, consisting in a magnetic quadrupole trap dressed by a radiofrequency (RF) field. Chromium atoms (52 isotope) in a MOT are continuously optically pumped by the MOT lasers to metastable dark states. In presence of a RF field, the temperature of the metastable atoms that remain magnetically trapped can be as low as 25 microK, with a density of 10^17 atoms.m-3, resulting in an increase of the phase-space density, still limited to 7.10^-6 by inelastic collisions. To investigate the thermalization issues in the truncated trap, we measure the free evaporation rate in the RF-truncated magnetic trap, and deduce the average elastic cross section for atoms in the 5D4 metastable states, equal to 7.0 10^-16m2.

  18. Integrated Optical Dipole Trap for Cold Neutral Atoms with an Optical Waveguide Coupler

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J; Mittal, S; Dagenais, M; Rolston, S L

    2013-01-01

    An integrated optical dipole trap uses two-color (red and blue-detuned) traveling evanescent wave fields for trapping cold neutral atoms. To achieve longitudinal confinement, we propose using an integrated optical waveguide coupler, which provides a potential gradient along the beam propagation direction sufficient to confine atoms. This integrated optical dipole trap can support an atomic ensemble with a large optical depth due to its small mode area. Its quasi-TE0 waveguide mode has an advantage over the HE11 mode of a nanofiber, with little inhomogeneous Zeeman broadening at the trapping region. The longitudinal confinement eliminates the need for a 1-D optical lattice, reducing collisional blockaded atomic loading, potentially producing larger ensembles. The waveguide trap allows for scalability and integrability with nano-fabrication technology. We analyze the potential performance of such integrated atom traps.

  19. Highly uniform holographic microtrap arrays for single atom trapping using a feedback optimization of in-trap fluorescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Hikaru; Unakami, Tomoyuki; He, Jun; Miyamoto, Yoko; Nakagawa, Ken'ichi

    2016-04-18

    We report on the novel optimization method to realize highly uniform microtrap arrays for single atom trapping with a spatial light modulator (SLM). This method consists of two iterative feedback loops with the measurements of both diffracted light intensities and in-trap fluorescence intensities from each microtrap. By applying this method to the single 87Rb atom trapping, we can reduce the variance of trap depths from 20.8% to 1.7% for 4 × 4 square arrays and less than 4% for various arrays with up to 62 sites. The detection error of individual single atoms is also reduced from 1.7% to 0.0054% on average. PMID:27137252

  20. Fast thermometry for trapped atoms using recoil-induced resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Ting; Su, Dian-Qiang; Ji, Zhong-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Shan; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2015-09-01

    We have employed recoil-induced resonance (RIR) with linewidth on the order of 10 kHz to demonstrate the fast thermometry for ultracold atoms. We theoretically calculate the absorption spectrum of RIR which agrees well with the experimental results. The temperature of the ultracold sample derived from the RIR spectrum is T = 84±4.5 μK, which is close to 85 μK that measured by the method of time-of-flight absorption imaging. To exhibit the fast measurement advantage in applying RIR to the ultracold atom thermometry, we study the dependence of ultracold sample temperature on the trapping beam frequency detuning. This method can be applied to determine the translational temperature of molecules in photoassociation dynamics. Project supported by the National Basic Research Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA010801), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61275209, 11304189, 61378015, and 11434007), and Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in Universities of China (Grant No. IRT13076).

  1. Experimental single-impulse magnetic focusing of launched cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D A; Hughes, I G; Pritchard, M J; Arnold, Aidan S.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Pritchard, Matthew J.; Smith, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic focusing of cold atoms with a single magnetic impulse has been observed for the first time. We load 7x10^7 85-Rb atoms into a magneto-optical trap, precool the atoms with optical molasses, then use moving molasses to launch them vertically through 20.5cm to the apex of flight. In transit the atoms are optically pumped, prior to the single magnetic lens impulse that occurs 16.5cm above the MOT. Fluorescence images at the apex of flight characterise the widths of the focussed cloud. Results were obtained for four different configurations of the baseball lens, which tuned the relationship between the axial and radial frequencies of the lens. Compact focused clouds were seen for all four configurations.

  2. A two-dimensional lattice of blue detuned atom traps using a projected Gaussian beam array

    CERN Document Server

    Piotrowicz, M J; Maller, K; Li, G; Zhang, S; Isenhower, L; Saffman, M

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new type of blue detuned optical lattice for atom trapping which is intrinsically two dimensional, while providing three-dimensional atom localization. The lattice is insensitive to optical phase fluctuations since it does not depend on field interference between distinct optical beams. The array is created using a novel arrangement of weakly overlapping Gaussian beams that creates a two-dimensional array of dark traps which are suitable for magic trapping of ground and Rydberg states. We analyze the spatial localization that can be achieved and demonstrate trapping and detection of single Cs atoms in 6 and 49 site two-dimensional arrays.

  3. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping of cold133Cs-87Rb atomic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of a mixture of two different atomic species, Caesium and Rubidium. The magic wavelengths of the Caesium and Rubidium atoms are different, $935.6$ nm and $789.9$ nm respectively, thus single-frequency simultaneous state-insensitive trapping is not possible. We thus identify bichromatic trapping as a viable approach to tune the two magic wavelengths to a common value. Correspondingly, we present several common magic wavelength combinations appropriate for simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of the two atomic species.

  4. 3D modeling of magnetic atom traps on type-II superconductor chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic traps for cold atoms have become a powerful tool in cold atom physics and condensed matter research. The traps on superconducting chips allow one to increase the trapped atom lifetime and coherence time by decreasing the thermal noise by several orders of magnitude compared to that of the typical normal-metal conductors. A thin superconducting film in the mixed state is, usually, the main element of such a chip. Using a finite element method to analyze thin film magnetization and transport current in type-II superconductivity, we study magnetic traps recently employed in experiments. The proposed approach allows us to predict important characteristics of the magnetic traps (their depth, shape, distance from the chip surface, etc) that are necessary when designing magnetic traps in cold atom experiments. (paper)

  5. Inhomogeneous broadening of optical transitions of 87Rb atoms in an optical nanofiber trap

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J; Hoffman, J E; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate optical trapping of 87Rb atoms using a two-color evanescent field around an optical nanofiber. In our trapping geometry, a blue-detuned traveling wave whose polarization is nearly parallel to the polarization of a red-detuned standing wave produce significant vector light shifts that lead to broadening of the absorption profile of a near-resonant beam at the trapping site. A model that includes scalar, vector, and tensor light shifts of the probe transition $5S_{1/2}$-$5P_{3/2}$ from the trapping beams; weighted by the temperature-dependent position of the atoms in the trap qualitatively describe the observed asymmetric profile, and explained differences with previous experiments that used Cs atoms. The model provides a consistent way to extract the number of atoms in the trap.

  6. Hexapole-compensated magneto-optical trap on a mesoscopic atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jöllenbeck, S.; Mahnke, J.; Randoll, R.;

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps on atom chips are usually restricted to small atomic samples due to a limited capture volume caused primarily by distorted field configurations. Here we present a magneto-optical trap based on a millimeter-sized wire structure which generates a magnetic field with minimized...

  7. Ultracold atomic collisions in tight harmonic traps: Perturbation theory, ionization losses and application to metastable helium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Beams, T J; Whittingham, I B

    2004-01-01

    Collisions between tightly confined atoms can lead to ionization and hence to loss of atoms from the trap. We develop second-order perturbation theory for a tensorial perturbation of a spherically symmetric system and the theory is then applied to processes mediated by the spin-dipole interaction. Redistribution and loss mechanisms are studied for the case of spin-polarized metastable helium atoms and results obtained for the five lowest s states in the trap and trapping frequencies ranging from 1 kHz to 10 MHz.

  8. Bichromatic State-Insensitive Trapping of Cold 133Cs-87Rb Atomic Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of a mixture of two different atomic species, Caesium and Rubidium. The magic wavelengths of the Caesium and Rubidium atoms are different, $935.6$ nm and $789.9$ nm respectively, thus single-frequency simultaneous state-insensitive trapping is not possible. We thus identify bichromatic trapping as a viable approach to tune the two magic wavelengths to a common value. Correspondingly, we present several common magic wavelength combinations...

  9. Comparison of hyperfine anomalies in the 5S_{1/2} and 6S_{1/2} levels of ^{85}Rb and ^{87}Rb

    CERN Document Server

    Galvan, A Perez; Orozco, L A; Gómez, E; Lange, A D; Baumer, F; Sprouse, G D

    2008-01-01

    We observe a hyperfine anomaly in the measurement of the hyperfine splitting of the 6S_{1/2} excited level in rubidium. We perform two step spectroscopy using the 5S_{1/2}->5P_{1/2}->6S_{1/2} excitation sequence. We measure the splitting of the 6S1/2 level and obtain for the magnetic dipole constants of ^{85}Rb and ^{87}Rb A = 239.18(4) MHz and A=807.66(8) MHz, respectively. The hyperfine anomaly difference of_{87}delta_{85}=-0.0036(2) comes from the Bohr Weisskopf effect: a correction to the point interaction between the finite nuclear magnetization and the electrons, and agrees with that obtained in the 5S_{1/2} ground state.

  10. Reconfigurable self-sufficient traps for ultracold atoms based on a superconducting square

    CERN Document Server

    Siercke, M; Zhang, B; Beian, M; Lim, M J; Dumke, R

    2012-01-01

    We report on the trapping of ultracold atoms in the magnetic field formed entirely by persistent supercurrents induced in a thin film type-II superconducting square. The supercurrents are carried by vortices induced in the 2D structure by applying two magnetic field pulses of varying amplitude perpendicular to its surface. This results in a self-sufficient quadrupole trap that does not require any externally applied fields. We investigate the trapping parameters for different supercurrent distributions. Furthermore, to demonstrate possible applications of these types of supercurrent traps we show how a central quadrupole trap can be split into four traps by the use of a bias field.

  11. Recent developments in trapping and manipulation of atoms with adiabatic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraway, Barry M.; Perrin, Hélène

    2016-09-01

    A combination of static and oscillating magnetic fields can be used to ‘dress’ atoms with radio-frequency (RF), or microwave, radiation. The spatial variation of these fields can be used to create an enormous variety of traps for ultra-cold atoms and quantum gases. This article reviews the type and character of these adiabatic traps and the applications which include atom interferometry and the study of low-dimensional quantum systems. We introduce the main concepts of magnetic traps leading to adiabatic dressed traps. The concept of adiabaticity is discussed in the context of the Landau-Zener model. The first bubble trap experiment is reviewed together with the method used for loading it. Experiments based on atom chips show the production of double wells and ring traps. Dressed atom traps can be evaporatively cooled with an additional RF field, and a weak RF field can be used to probe the spectroscopy of the adiabatic potentials. Several approaches to ring traps formed from adiabatic potentials are discussed, including those based on atom chips, time-averaged adiabatic potentials and induction methods. Several proposals for adiabatic lattices with dressed atoms are also reviewed.

  12. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Ytterbium Atoms with a 398.9 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng-Yi; XIONG Zhuan-Xian; LIANG Jie; HE Ling-Xiang; LU Bao-Long

    2008-01-01

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0 - 1P1 transition at 398.9nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower.Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock.

  13. Magneto-optical trapping of ytterbium atoms with a 398.9 nm laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0-1P1 transition at 398.9 nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower. Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock. (authors)

  14. Compact atomic clock prototype based on coherent population trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danet Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toward the next generations of compact atomic clocks, clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT offer a very interesting alternative. Thanks to CPT, a quantum interfering process, this technology has made a decisive step in the miniaturization direction. Fractional frequency stability of 1.5x10-10 at 1 s has been demonstrated in commercial devices of a few cm3. The laboratory prototype presented here intends to explore what could be the ultimate stability of a CPT based device. To do so, an original double-Λ optical scheme and a pulsed interrogation have been implemented in order to get a good compromise between contrast and linewidth. A study of two main sources of noise, the relative intensity and the local oscillator (LO noise, has been performed. By designing simple solutions, it led to a new fractional frequency limitation lower than 4x10-13 at 1 s integration. Such a performance proves that such a technology could rival with classical ones as double resonance clocks.

  15. Nonlinear magneto-optical resonances at D1 excitation of 85Rb and 87Rb in an extremely thin cell

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, M; Gahbauer, F; Jarmola, A; Kalvans, L; Papoyan, A; Sarkisyan, D

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear magneto-optical resonances have been measured in an extremely thin cell (ETC) for the D1 transition of rubidium in an atomic vapor of natural isotopic composition. All hyperfine transitions of both isotopes have been studied for a wide range of laser power densities, laser detunings, and ETC wall separations. Dark resonances in the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) were observed as expected when the ground state total angular momentum F_g was greater than or equal to the excited state total angular momentum F_e. Unlike the case of ordinary cells, the width and contrast of dark resonances formed in the ETC dramatically depended on the detuning of the laser from the exact atomic transition. A theoretical model based on the optical Bloch equations was applied to calculate the shapes of the resonance curves. The model averaged over the contributions from different atomic velocity groups, considered all neighboring hyperfine transitions, took into account the splitting and mixing of magnetic sublevels in ...

  16. Self-organization effects and light amplification of collective atomic recoil motion in a harmonic trap

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, L.; Yang, G. J.; Xia, L. X.

    2005-01-01

    Self-organization effects related to light amplification in the collective atomic recoil laser system with the driven atoms confined in a harmonic trap are investigated further. In the dispersive parametric region, our study reveals that the spontaneously formed structures in the phase space contributes an important role to the light amplification of the probe field under the atomic motion being modified by the trap.

  17. Design, fabrication and characterization of tunable external cavity diode laser and atom trapping chips for atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao

    External cavity diode laser systems (ECDLs) have been well documented for their suitability in the fields of laser cooling and atom trapping, and are now widely used in optical and atomic physics. A particularly simple implementation of this idea uses feedback from a diffraction grating mounted in the Littrow configuration and the typical size of this laser is quite large (120mmx90mmx90mm). For atom optics, the current atom trapping chips are not in a feedthrough configuration, which makes the chips to glass cell assembly process complicated and the wires and solder areas vulnerable, resulting in an unreliable vacuum seal. Recent experimental realizations of atom optical devices such as atomic waveguides, beam splitters, and on-chip Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sources have opened a new field for the development of more complex devices such as, e.g., BEC-based atom transistor. This work focuses on micro/nano fabrication techniques to build three different devices for the miniature BEC system. The research work focuses on the development of new ECDLs, a novel fabrication process of feedthrough atom trapping chips for atomic optics and a fabrication process for atom transistor chips. In the ECDLs part, we describe a new method for constructing a smaller external-cavity diode laser by use of a micromachined silicon flexure and a VHG (Volume Holographic Grating). It is much smaller, inexpensive and easy to build because it is based on simple modifications of a few commercial optical and mechanical components but with a specific silicon flexure design enabled by micro-fabrication technology for the laser frequency tuning. In the feedthrough chips part, we present a novel fabrication process for feedthrough atom trapping chips in atomic condensate optics cells using the copper electroplating to seal the vias. The advantages of using feedthrough atom trapping chips are the simple microfabrication process and reduction of the overall chip area bonded on the glass atom-trapping

  18. Magnetic levitation for effective loading of cold cesium atoms in a crossed dipole trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqing; Feng, Guosheng; Xu, Rundong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Jizhou; Chen, Gang; Dai, Xingcan; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2015-05-01

    We report a detailed study of effective magnetically levitated loading of cold atoms in a crossed dipole trap: an appropriate magnetic field gradient precisely compensates for the destructive gravitational force of the atoms and an additional bias field simultaneously eliminates the antitrapping potential induced by the magnetic field gradient. The magnetic levitation is required for a large-volume crossed dipole trap to form a shallow but very effective loading potential, making it a promising method for loading and trapping more cold atoms. For cold cesium atoms in the F =3 , m F =3 state prepared by three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling, a large number of atoms ˜3.2 ×106 have been loaded into a large-volume crossed dipole trap with the help of the magnetic levitation technique. The dependence of the number of atoms loaded and trapped in the dipole trap on the magnetic field gradient and bias field, respectively, is in good agreement with the theoretical analysis. The optimum magnetic field gradient of 31.13 G/cm matches the theoretical value of 31.3 G/cm well. This method can be used to obtain more cold atoms or a large number of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms for many atomic species in high-field seeking states.

  19. Polarimetric measurement of the motion of trapped atoms around a nanofiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, F. K.; Solano, P.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.

    2016-05-01

    Polarimetry is an important tool for probing the classical and quantum dynamics of a collection of trapped atoms. We observe the birefringence induced by trapped Rb atoms around an optical nanofiber by measuring the polarization change of an off-resonant probe. The signal from the weak, non-destructive probe is amplified using heterodyne detection. We observe the dynamical response of the trapped atoms to a transient modification of the trapping potential. This provides a direct measurement of the trapping frequencies associated with the axial and transverse potentials. The presence of large longitudinal fields in the evanescent field of the fiber complicates polarimetry, presenting significant challenges for the observation of atomic spin dynamics through Faraday rotation measurements. Work supported by NSF.

  20. Magneto-optical trap formed by elliptically polarised light waves for Mg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a magneto-optical trap (MOT) formed by elliptically polarised waves for 24Mg atoms on a closed optical 3P2 → 3D3 (λ = 383.8 nm) transition in the ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration of the field. Compared with a known MOT formed by circularly polarised waves (σ+ - σ- configuration), the suggested configuration of the trap formed by fields of ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration allows deeper sub-Doppler cooling of trapped 24Mg atoms, which cannot be implemented in a conventional trap formed by fields of σ+ - σ- configuration.

  1. Emission spectrum of a harmonically trapped A-type three-level atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hong; Tang Pei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the emission spectrum for a ∧-type three-level atom trapped in the node of a standing wave.We show that the atomic center-of-mass motion not only directly affects the peak number,peak position,and peak height in the atomic emission spectrum,but also influences the effects of the cavity field and the atomic initial state on atomic emission spectrum.

  2. Trapping of Atoms by the Counter-Propagating Stochastic Light Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, Victor I

    2016-01-01

    We show that the field of counter-propagating stochastic light waves, one of which repeats the other, can form an one-dimension trap for atoms. The confinement of an ensemble of atoms in the trap and their simultaneous cooling can be achieved without using auxiliary fields. The temperature of the atomic ensemble depends on the autocorrelation time of the waves, their intensity and the detuning of the carrier frequency of the waves from the atomic transition frequency. The numerical simulation is carried out for sodium atoms.

  3. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, Cris; Geraci, Andrew A; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance in an ensemble of laser-cooled trapped Rb atoms is excited using a micro- cantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is mounted on a multi-layer chip designed to capture, cool, and magnetically transport cold atoms. The coupling is observed by measuring the loss from a magnetic trap as the oscillating cantilever induces Zeeman state transitions in the atoms. Interfacing cold atoms with mechanical devices could enable probing and manipulating atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, leading to new capabilities in quantum computation, quantum simulation, or precision sensing.

  4. A double-well atom trap for fluorescence detection at the Heisenberg limit

    CERN Document Server

    Stroescu, Ion; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an atom number detector capable of simultaneous detection of two mesoscopic ensembles with single atom resolution. Such a sensitivity is a prerequisite for going beyond quantum metrology with spin-squeezed states. Our system is based on fluorescence detection of atoms in a novel hybrid trap in which a dipole barrier divides a magneto-optical trap into two separated wells. We introduce a noise model describing the various sources contributing to the measurement error and report a limit of up to 500 atoms for the exact determination of the atom number difference.

  5. Fiber-pigtailed optical tweezer for single-atom trapping and single-photon generation

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Sébastien; Hohmann, Leander; Reichel, Jakob; Long, Romain

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a miniature, fiber-coupled optical tweezer to trap a single atom. The same fiber is used to trap a single atom and to read out its fluorescence. To obtain a low background level, the tweezer light is chopped, and we measure the influence of the chopping frequency on the atom's lifetime. We use the single atom as a single-photon source at 780 nm and measure the second-order correlation function of the emitted photons. Because of its miniature, robust, fiber-pigtailed design, this tweezer can be implemented in a broad range of experiments where single atoms are used as a resource.

  6. Observation of single neutral atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; He Jun; Qiu Ying; Yang Bao-Dong; Zhao Jiang-Yan; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2008-01-01

    Single caesium atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap have been identified. The trapping of individual atoms is marked by the steps in fluorescence signal corresponding to the capture or loss of single atoms. The typical magnetic gradient is about 29 mT/cm, which evidently reduces the capture rate of magneto-optical trap.

  7. Fast compression of a cold atomic cloud using a blue detuned crossed dipole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Bienaime, Tom; de Lepinay, Laure Mercier; Bellando, Louis; Chabe, Julien; Kaiser, Robin

    2012-01-01

    We present the experimental realization of a compressible blue detuned crossed dipole trap for cold atoms allowing for fast dynamical compression (~ 5 - 10 ms) of 5x10^7 Rubidium atoms up to densities of ~ 10^13 cm^-3. The dipole trap consists of two intersecting tubes of blue-detuned laser light. These tubes are formed using a single, rapidly rotating laser beam which, for sufficiently fast rotation frequencies, can be accurately described by a quasi-static potential. The atomic cloud is compressed by dynamically reducing the trap volume leading to densities close to the Ioffe-Reggel criterion for light localization.

  8. Continuous loading of $^{1}$S$_{0}$ calcium atoms into an optical dipole trap

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, C. Y.; Halder, P.; Appel, O.; Hansen, D.; Hemmerich, A.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate an efficient scheme for continuous trap loading based upon spatially selective optical pumping. We discuss the case of $^{1}$S$_{0}$ calcium atoms in an optical dipole trap (ODT), however, similar strategies should be applicable to a wide range of atomic species. Our starting point is a reservoir of moderately cold ($\\approx 300 \\mu$K) metastable $^{3}$P$_{2}$-atoms prepared by means of a magneto-optic trap (triplet-MOT). A focused 532 nm laser beam produces a strongly elongate...

  9. An ultracold, optically trapped mixture of {87}Rb and metastable {4}He atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Adonis Silva; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of an ultracold (<25~muK) mixture of rubidium ({87}Rb) and metastable triplet helium ({4}He) in an optical dipole trap. Our scheme involves laser cooling in a dual-species magneto-optical trap, simultaneous MW- and RF-induced forced evaporative cooling in a quadrupole magnetic trap, and transfer to a single-beam optical dipole trap. We observe long trapping lifetimes for the doubly spin-stretched spin-state mixture and measure much shorter lifetimes for other spin-state combinations. We discuss prospects for realizing quantum degenerate mixtures of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms.

  10. First principles investigation of cluster consisting of hydrogen–helium atoms interstitially-trapped in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate the binding energies of mixed helium and hydrogen clusters consisted of interstitially trapped atoms in bcc tungsten by first-principles calculations based on density functional theories. It is shown that helium-rich interstitially-trapped clusters have the positive binding energies and the low electron-density region expand as the number of helium in the cluster increase. Thus, the helium-rich interstitially trapped clusters can act as a trapping site for hydrogen, and interstitially trapped helium interrupts or disturbs the hydrogen diffusion in tungsten

  11. Continuous loading of cold atoms into a Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, P O; Werner, J; Binhammer, T; Görlitz, A; Pfau, T; Schmidt, Piet O.; Hensler, Sven; Werner, Joerg; Binhammer, Thomas; Goerlitz, Axel; Pfau, Tilman

    2002-01-01

    We present a robust continuous optical loading scheme for a Ioffe-Pritchard (IP) type magnetic trap. Atoms are cooled and trapped in a modified magneto-optical trap (MOT) consisting of a conventional 2D-MOT in radial direction and an axial molasses. The radial magnetic field gradient needed for the operation of the 2D-MOT is provided by the IP trap. A small axial curvature and offset field provide magnetic confinement and suppress spin-flip losses in the center of the magnetic trap without altering the performance of the 2D-MOT. Continuous loading of atoms into the IP trap is provided by radiative leakage from the MOT to a metastable level which is magnetically trapped and decoupled from the MOT light. We are able to accumulate 30 times more atoms in the magnetic trap than in the MOT. The absolute number of $2\\times 10^8$~atoms is limited by inelastic collisions. A model based on rate equations shows good agreement with our data. Our scheme can also be applied to other atoms with similar level structure like ...

  12. Single-atom trapping in holographic 2D arrays of microtraps with arbitrary geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Nogrette, Florence; Ravets, Sylvain; Barredo, Daniel; Béguin, Lucas; Vernier, Aline; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate single-atom trapping in two-dimensional arrays of microtraps with arbitrary geometries. We generate the arrays using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), with which we imprint an appropriate phase pattern on an optical dipole trap beam prior to focusing. We trap single $^{87}{\\rm Rb}$ atoms in the sites of arrays containing up to $\\sim100$ microtraps separated by distances as small as $3\\;\\mu$m, with complex structures such as triangular, honeycomb or kagome lattices. Using a closed-loop optimization of the uniformity of the trap depths ensures that all trapping sites are equivalent. This versatile system opens appealing applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation, e.g. for simulating frustrated quantum magnetism using Rydberg atoms.

  13. Trapping atoms in the evanescent field of laser written wave guides

    CERN Document Server

    Jukic, Dario; Walther, P; Szameit, A; Pohl, T; Götte, J B

    2016-01-01

    We analyze evanescent fields of laser written waveguides and show that they can be used to trap atoms close to the surface of an integrated optical atom chip. In contrast to subwavelength nanofibres it is generally not possible to create a stable trapping potential using only the fundamental modes. This is why we create a stable trapping potential by using two different laser colors, such that the waveguide supports two modes for the blue detuned laser, while for the red detuned light the waveguide has only a single mode. In particular, we study such a two-color trap for Cesium atoms, and calculate both the potential and losses for the set of parameters that are within experimental reach. We also optimize system parameters in order to minimize trap losses due to photon scattering and tunneling to the surface.

  14. Ultratrace determination of lead by hydride generation in-atomizer trapping atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization of plumbane generation and analyte preconcentration in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz

    2012-05-15

    A compact trap-and-atomizer device and a preconcentration procedure based on hydride trapping in excess of oxygen over hydrogen in the collection step, both constructed and developed previously in our laboratory, were employed to optimize plumbane trapping in this device and to develop a routine method for ultratrace lead determination subsequently. The inherent advantage of this preconcentration approach is that 100% preconcentration efficiency for lead is reached in this device which has never been reported before using quartz or metal traps. Plumbane is completely retained in the trap-and-atomizer device at 290 Degree-Sign C in oxygen-rich atmosphere and trapped species are subsequently volatilized at 830 Degree-Sign C in hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Effect of relevant experimental parameters on plumbane trapping and lead volatilization are discussed, and possible trapping mechanisms are hypothesized. Plumbane trapping in the trap-and-atomizer device can be routinely used for lead determination at ultratrace levels reaching a detection limit of 0.21 ng ml{sup -1} Pb (30 s preconcentration, sample volume 2 ml). Further improvement of the detection limit is feasible by reducing the blank signal and increasing the trapping time. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-atomizer trapping HG-AAS was optimized for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A compact quartz trap-and-atomizer device was employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generation, preconcentration and atomization steps were investigated in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 100% preconcentration efficiency for lead was reached. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Routine analytical method was developed for Pb determination (LOD of 0.2 ng ml{sup -1} Pb).

  15. Velocity selective trapping of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave

    CERN Document Server

    Argonov, V Yu

    2013-01-01

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field may suppress packet splitting for some atoms having specific velocities in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We propose that in a real experiment with cold atomic gas this effect may decrease the velocity distribution of atoms (the field traps the atoms with such specific velocities while all other atoms leave the field)

  16. Magneto-optical trapping of radioactive atoms for test of the fundamental symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are planning test experiments of fundamental symmetries based on the intrinsic properties of francium. It is expected that the laser cooling and trapping of francium will produce precision measurements. The pilot experiment using rubidium was performed with the goal of francium trapping. The ion beam generated with a francium ion source was investigated using a Wien filter. Each piece of equipment still must be studied in more detail, and the equipment should be upgraded in order to trap radioactive atoms

  17. Magneto-optical trapping of radioactive atoms for test of the fundamental symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu, E-mail: hirokazu.kawamura.c2@tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences (Japan); Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T. [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (Japan); Inoue, T. [Tohoku University, Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences (Japan); Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Köhler, L.; Mathis, J.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y. [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    We are planning test experiments of fundamental symmetries based on the intrinsic properties of francium. It is expected that the laser cooling and trapping of francium will produce precision measurements. The pilot experiment using rubidium was performed with the goal of francium trapping. The ion beam generated with a francium ion source was investigated using a Wien filter. Each piece of equipment still must be studied in more detail, and the equipment should be upgraded in order to trap radioactive atoms.

  18. A Novel Atomic Guiding Using a Blue-Detuned TE01 Mode in Hollow Metallic Waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Meng; YIN Jian-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel scheme to guide cold atoms using a blue-detuned TE01 doughnut mode in a hollow metallic waveguide, calculate the electromagnetic field distribution of the TE01 mode in the hollow metallic waveguide,and compare the attenuation characters of the EH11 and TE01 mode in the hollow metallic waveguide. We also calculate the optical potential of the TE01 doughnut mode for two-level 85Rb atoms and estimate the photon scattering rate. It is found that when the detuning δ = 300 GHz, the photon scattering induced heating can be neglected, and the optical potential (Umax ≈ 570 mK) of the TE01 mode is high enough to load cold atoms (120μK) from a standard magneto-optical trap and to guide them in the hollow metallic waveguide, which is a desirable scheme to realize a computer-controlled atom lithography with an arbitrary pattern.

  19. Entanglement and quantum state transfer between two atoms trapped in two indirectly coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Shen, Li-Tuo; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2016-05-01

    We propose a one-step scheme for implementing entanglement generation and the quantum state transfer between two atomic qubits trapped in two different cavities that are not directly coupled to each other. The process is realized through engineering an effective asymmetric X-Y interaction for the two atoms involved in the gate operation and an auxiliary atom trapped in an intermediate cavity, induced by virtually manipulating the atomic excited states and photons. We study the validity of the scheme as well as the influences of the dissipation by numerical simulation and demonstrate that it is robust against decoherence.

  20. Observation of three-level rectified dipole forces acting on trapped atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, T. T.; Duncan, B. C.; Sanchez-Villicana, V.; Gould, P. L.

    1995-06-01

    We have observed rectified dipole forces acting on three-level atoms in the cascade configuration. Laser cooled and trapped rubidium atoms are illuminated with an intense bichromatic standing wave (780 and 776 nm) tuned near resonance with the 5S1/2-->5P3/2-->5D5/2 transitions. The resulting rectified forces produce periodic potential wells (71-μm period), which localize the cold atoms. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions. These forces may be useful in atom optics and laser traps.

  1. Trapping of ultra cold atoms in a 3He/4He dilution refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Jessen, F; Bell, S C; Vergien, P; Hattermann, H; Weiss, P; Rudolph, M; Reinschmidt, M; Meyer, K; Gaber, T; Cano, D; Guenther, A; Bernon, S; Koelle, D; Kleiner, R; Fortagh, J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the preparation of ultra cold atomic clouds in a dilution refrigerator. The closed cycle 3He/4He cryostat was custom made to provide optical access for laser cooling, optical manipulation and detection of atoms. We show that the cryostat meets the requirements for cold atom experiments, specifically in terms of operating a magneto-optical trap, magnetic traps and magnetic transport under ultra high vacuum conditions. The presented system is a step towards the creation of a quantum hybrid system combining ultra cold atoms and solid state quantum devices.

  2. Influence of the atomic-wall collision elasticity on the coherent population trapping resonance shape

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakov, G A; Litvinov, A. N.; Matisov, B. G.; Romanenko, V. I.; Yatsenko, L. P.; Romanenko, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    We studied theoretically a coherent population trapping resonance formation in cylindrical cell without buffer gas irradiated by a narrow laser beam. We take into account non-zero probabilities of elastic ("specular") and inelastic ("sticking") collision between the atom and the cell wall. We have developed a theoretical model based on averaging over the random Ramsey pulse sequences of times that atom spent in and out of the beam. It is shown that the shape of coherent population trapping re...

  3. Strong coupling between a trapped single atom and an all-fiber cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an all-fiber cavity QED system with a trapped single atom in the strong coupling regime. We use a nanofiber Fabry-Perot cavity, that is, an optical nanofiber sandwiched by two fiber-Bragg-grating mirrors. Measurements of the cavity transmission spectrum with a single atom in a state-insensitive nanofiber trap clearly reveal the vacuum Rabi splitting. Our system provides a simple and robust implementation of a large-scale all-fiber quantum network.

  4. Strong Coupling between a Trapped Single Atom and an All-Fiber Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinya; Aoki, Takao

    2015-08-28

    We demonstrate an all-fiber cavity quantum electrodynamics system with a trapped single atom in the strong coupling regime. We use a nanofiber Fabry-Perot cavity, that is, an optical nanofiber sandwiched by two fiber-Bragg-grating mirrors. Measurements of the cavity transmission spectrum with a single atom in a state-insensitive nanofiber trap clearly reveal the vacuum Rabi splitting. PMID:26371652

  5. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Feng, G; Nute, J; Piano, S; Hackermuller, L; Ma, J; Xiao, L; Jia, S

    2015-01-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loading magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load $1.5 \\times 10^7$ atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 $\\mu$K to 1.7 $\\mu$K within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about $1.2 \\times 10^7$. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  6. Effect of Trapping Agent and Polystyrene Chain End Functionality on Radical Trap-Assisted Atom Transfer Radical Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Carnicom

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Coupling reactions were performed to gauge the effect of the inclusion of a radical trap on the success of coupling reactions of monohalogenated polystyrene (PSX chains in atom transfer radical coupling (ATRC type reactions. The effect of both the specific radical trap chosen and the structure of the polymer chain end were evaluated by the extent of dimerization observed in a series of analogous coupling reactions. The commonly used radical trap 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP showed the highest amounts of dimerization for PSX (X = Br, Cl compared to coupling reactions performed in its absence or with a different radical trap. A dinitroxide coupling agent was also studied with the extent of coupling nearly matching the effectiveness of MNP in RTA (Radical trap-assisted-ATRC reactions, while N-nitroso and electron rich nitroso coupling agents were the least effective. (2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl-piperin-l-yloxyl-capped PS (PS-TEMPO, prepared by NMP, was subjected to a coupling sequence conceptually similar to RTA-ATRC, but dimerization was not observed regardless of the choice of radical trap. Kinetic experiments were performed to observe rate changes on the coupling reaction of PSBr as a result of the inclusion of MNP, with substantial rate enhancements found in the RTA-ATRC coupling sequence compared to traditional ATRC.

  7. Simultaneous Magneto-Optical Trapping of Fermionic 40K and Bosonic 87Rb Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Dong; XIONG De-Zhi; CHEN Hai-Xia; WANG Peng-Jun; GUO Lu; ZHANG Jing

    2007-01-01

    We report on simultaneous magneto-optical trapping of fermionic 40K and bosonic 87Rb atoms. This trap is the first step towards quantum degenerate fermi gas 40K. Laser lights for the two-species magneto-optical trap (MOT) are generated from diode lasers and tapered amplifier. The enriched 40K dispenser is utilized in the experimental setup. We obtain up to 107 ~108 40K and 108 ~109 87Rb atoms respectively in the steady-state single-species MOT.

  8. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Hachisu, H.; Miyagishi, K.; Porsev, S. G.; Derevianko, A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.; Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.

    2007-01-01

    We report a vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the ${}^1S_0-{}^3P_1$ intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest non-radioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ``new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than $10^{-18}$. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based ...

  9. Trapping of neutral mercury atoms and prospects for optical lattice clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisu, H; Miyagishi, K; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2008-02-01

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for "new physics" beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10;{-18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant. PMID:18352368

  10. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hachisu, H; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2007-01-01

    We report a vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the ${}^1S_0-{}^3P_1$ intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest non-radioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ``new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than $10^{-18}$. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  11. Multiscale quantum-defect theory for two interacting atoms in a symmetric harmonic trap

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yujun; Gao, Bo

    2007-01-01

    We present a multiscale quantum-defect theory (QDT) for two identical atoms in a symmetric harmonic trap that combines the quantum-defect theory for the van der Waals interaction [B. Gao, Phys. Rev. A \\textbf{64}, 010701(R) (2001)] at short distances with a quantum-defect theory for the harmonic trapping potential at large distances. The theory provides a systematic understanding of two atoms in a trap, from deeply bound molecular states and states of different partial waves, to highly excite...

  12. Lattices of ultracold atom traps over arrays of nano- and mesoscopic superconducting disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovsky, Vladimir; Prigozhin, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    A lattice of traps for ultracold neutral atoms is a promising tool for experimental investigation in quantum physics and quantum information processing. We consider regular arrays of thin film type-II superconducting nanodisks, with only one pinned vortex in each of them, and also arrays of mesoscopic disks, each containing many vortices whose distribution is characterized by the superconducting current density. In both cases we show theoretically that the induced magnetic field can create a 3D lattice of magnetic traps for cold atoms without any additional bias field. Applying a bias DC field parallel to the superconductor surface, one can control the depth and sizes of the traps, their heights above the chip surface, potential barriers between the traps, as well as the structure and dimension of the lattices. In the adiabatic approximation the atom cloud shape is represented by the shape of a closed iso-surface of the magnetic field magnitude chosen in accordance with the atom cloud temperature. The computed trap sizes, heights and the distances between the neighboring traps are typically from tens to hundreds nanometers for nanodisks and of the order of 1 μm for mesoscopic disks. Our calculations show that the depth of magnetic traps on mesoscopic disks is, typically, between 0.3 G and 7.6 G; for the nanodisks the depth is about 0.3 G.

  13. Coherence preservation of a single neutral atom qubit transferred between magic-intensity optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jiaheng; Guo, Ruijun; Xu, Peng; Wang, Kunpeng; Sheng, Cheng; Liu, Min; Wang, Jin; Derevianko, Andrei; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the coherence of a single mobile atomic qubit can be well preserved during a transfer process among different optical dipole traps (ODTs). This is a prerequisite step in realizing a large-scale neutral atom quantum information processing platform. A qubit encoded in the hyperfine manifold of $^{87}$Rb atom is dynamically extracted from the static quantum register by an auxiliary moving ODT and reinserted into the static ODT. Previous experiments were limited by decoherences induced by the differential light shifts of qubit states. Here we apply a magic-intensity trapping technique which mitigates the detrimental effects of light shifts and substantially enhances the coherence time to $225 \\pm 21\\,\\mathrm{ms}$. The experimentally demonstrated magic trapping technique relies on the previously neglected hyperpolarizability contribution to the light shifts, which makes the light shift dependence on the trapping laser intensity to be parabolic. Because of the parabolic dependence, at a certain ...

  14. Generation of Three-Dimensional Entangled States for Two Atoms Trapped in Different Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    @@ We propose a scheme for generating three-dimensional entangled states for two atoms trapped in two separate cavities. The scheme is based on the detection of photons leaking from the cavities after the atom-cavity interaction.The scheme is useful for the test of quantum nonlocality and quantum information processing.

  15. The influence of optical molasses in loading a shallow optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Mathew S; Roberts, Jacob L

    2008-01-01

    We have examined loading of 85Rb atoms into a shallow Far-Off-Resonance Trap (FORT) from an optical molasses and compared it to loading from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). We found that substantially more atoms could be loaded into the FORT via an optical molasses as compared to loading from the MOT alone. To determine why this was the case, we measured the rate of atoms loaded into the FORT and the losses from the FORT during the loading process. For both MOT and molasses loading, we examined atom load rate and losses over a range of detunings as well as hyperfine pump powers. We found that the losses induced during MOT loading were essentially the same as the losses induced during molasses loading at the same MOT/molasses detuning. In contrast, load rate of the molasses was higher than that of a MOT at a given detuning. This caused the optical molasses to be able to load more atoms than the MOT. Optimization of FORT loading form an optical molasses improved the number of atoms we could trap by a factor of tw...

  16. Cooling and trapping of three-level atoms in a bichromatic standing wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, H.; Cai, T.; Bigelow, N. P.; Grove, T. T.; Gould, P. L.

    1995-02-01

    We show that a three-level atom in the cascade configuration can be stably trapped and cooled in one dimension by an intense bichromatic standing wave. At the two-photon resonance, rectified dipole forces result in a deep potential well which can be used to localize the atoms in space. In the vicinity of the rectified potential minimum, the spatial dependence of the dressed state energies can lead to a velocity dependence of the force which produces damping of the atomic motion. Consideration of the heating effects of momentum diffusion indicates that cooling and stable trapping at low temperatures is possible in such a bichromatic field.

  17. C60 as an Atom Trap to Capture Co Adatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Peng; Li, Dongzhe; Repain, Vincent;

    2015-01-01

    to efficiently allow the formation of complexes mixing a C60 molecule with Co atoms. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals the robustness of the pi states of C60 that are preserved after Co trapping. Scanning tunneling microscopy images and density functional theory calculations reveal that dissociated Co......C60 molecules were used to trap Co adatoms and clusters on a Au(111) surface using atomic/molecular manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. Two manipulation pathways (successive integration of single Co atoms in one molecule or direct integration of a Co cluster) were found...

  18. Exact spatial density of ideal Bose atoms in a one-dimensional harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ze

    2016-05-01

    We have proposed an exact analytical solution to the problem of Bose–Einstein condensation (BEC) of harmonically trapped, one-dimensional, and ideal atoms. It is found that the number of atoms in vapor is characterized by an analytical function, which involves a q -digamma function in mathematics. We employ the q -digamma function to calculate the spatial density n(z;T, N) of ideal Bose atoms in a one-dimensional harmonic trap. The first main finding in this paper is that when Bose atoms are in the normal state, the density profile exhibits Friedel oscillations. The second main finding is that when Bose atoms are in the BEC state, the density profile exhibits a sharp peak with extremely narrow width. The third main finding is that the central peak of the spatial density is a monotonically increasing function of the number of atoms N but is a monotonically decreasing function of temperature T.

  19. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  20. Laser cooling of rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Stephen Anthony

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes theoretical and experimental work concerning radiation forces on atoms, with particular reference to rubidium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap. After a short history of the field of laser cooling, a review of the semiclassical theory of mechanical interactions between two-level atoms and electromagnetic radiation is given. Different formulations of the semiclassical theory are discussed, including a new formulation in terms of momentum transfer amongst the pl...

  1. Design and fabrication of diffractive atom chips for laser cooling and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Cotter, J P; Griffin, P F; Rabey, I M; Docherty, K; Riis, E; Arnold, A S; Hinds, E A

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been shown that optical reflection gratings fabricated directly into an atom chip provide a simple and effective way to trap and cool substantial clouds of atoms [1,2]. In this article we describe how the gratings are designed and micro-fabricated and we characterise their optical properties, which determine their effectiveness as a cold atom source. We use simple scalar diffraction theory to understand how the morphology of the gratings determines the power in the diffracted beams.

  2. High-resolution laser spectroscopy of the X1Sigma + and (1)3Sigma + states of 23Na85Rb molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Shunji; Ebi, Tsuyoshi; Tanimura, Mari; Ikoma, Heiji; Matsubara, Kensuke; Baba, Masaaki; Katô, Hajime

    1996-07-01

    High-resolution spectra of the B1Π→X1Σ+ transition of 23Na85Rb molecule are measured by the technique of the Doppler-free optical-optical double resonance polarization spectroscopy (OODRPS). The molecular constants of the X1Σ+(v″=5-30) levels are determined, and the potential energy curve is constructed up to v″=30 by the RKR method. The time-resolved fluorescence intensity following the excitation to the B1Π(v'=5,J'= around 20) level is measured, and the lifetime of the B1Π(v'=5) level in collisionless limit is determined to be 17.8 ns. The absolute value of the electric dipole moment of the B1Π-X1Σ+ transition is determined to be 7.0 D in the region of 3.73 Ålines to the (1)3Σ+ state from the B1Π(v'=8,J'=15) level, which is perturbed by the (1)3Π1(v0,N=J=15) level, are measured by the Doppler-free OODRPS. The energy spacing between the F1 and F3 components of the (1)3Σ+(v=4,N=15) level is observed to be smaller than 0.001 cm-1. The hyperfine splittings, which are described by Hund's case (bβS), are observed, and the hyperfine constants ANa and ARb of the (1)3Σ+(v=4) level are determined to be 0.0293 and 0.0336 cm-1, respectively. The hyperfine splittings are identified as originating from the Fermi contact interaction. From the analysis, it is concluded that the electron spins in the (1)3Σ+ state are almost equally populated to the 5sRb and 3sNa orbitals.

  3. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry.

  4. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  5. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  6. Phase Space Diagnostics of Trapped Atoms By Magnetic Ground-State Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, S. B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.; Shim, U.; Sleator, T.

    1997-04-01

    The in-situ measurement of the phase space distribution of atoms in a trap is important in the study of both ordinary and Bose-condensed matter. The current techniques for measuring the density distribution involve imaging the light emitted by atoms in the trap, time-of-flight measurement of the atoms as they fall through a sheet of light(C.D. Wallace, et al, JOSA B,11),703 (1994), resonant absorption imaging of the cloud(J.R. Ensher, et al, PRL 77), 4984 (1996), or off-resonant dispersive imaging. The first two techniques are in general use for imaging magneto-optical traps (MOTs) and the second two for Bose condensates. Velocity information is obtained indirectly by recording the expansion of the trap at different times following shut-off. By exploiting the magnetic field dependence of ground-state magnetic sublevel coherences, we have employed two techniques, MGE and MGFID(B. Dubetsky and P.R. Berman, Appl. Phys. B, 59), 147 (1994), to obtain atomic spatial information. This variant of atomic beam magnetic imaging(J.E. Thomas and L.J. Wang, Physics Reports 262), 311-366 (1995) also yields correlated position-velocity information by appropriate orientation of the applied magnetic field, as the detuning of the atom depends on both its position and velocity. Initial studies have given the velocity distribution and size of the MOT, and future experiments to measure correlations are proposed.

  7. Influence of trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Mazzarella, G.; De Siena, S.

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of external trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices. We introduce a generalized Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that includes the structure of the energy levels of the trapping potential, and show that these levels are in general populated both at finite and zero temperature. We characterize the properties of the superfluid transition for this situation and compare them with those of the standard Bose-Hubbard description. We briefly discuss s...

  8. A model of optical trapping cold atoms using a metallic nano wire with surface plasmon effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi Phuong Lan, Nguyen; Thi Nga, Do; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we construct a new model of optical trapping cold atoms with a metallic nano wire by using surface plasmon effect generated by strong field of laser beams. Using the skin effect, we send a strong oscillated electromagnetic filed through the surface of a metallic nano wire. The local field generated by evanescent effect creates an effective attractive potential near the surface of metallic nano wires. The consideration of some possible boundary and frequency conditions might lead to non-trivial bound state solution for a cold atom. We discus also the case of the laser reflection optical trap with shell-core design, and compare our model with another recent schemes of cold atom optical traps using optical fibers and carbon nanotubes.

  9. Quantum information entropies of ultracold atomic gases in a harmonic trap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tutul Biswas; Tarun Kanti Ghosh

    2011-10-01

    The position and momentum space information entropies of weakly interacting trapped atomic Bose–Einstein condensates and spin-polarized trapped atomic Fermi gases at absolute zero temperature are evaluated. We find that sum of the position and momentum space information entropies of these quantum systems containing atoms confined in a $D(≤ 3)$-dimensional harmonic trap has a universal form as $S^{(D)}_t = N(a D − b ln N)$, where ∼ 2.332 and = 2 for interacting bosonic systems and a ∼ 1.982 and = 1 for ideal fermionic systems. These results obey the entropic uncertainty relation given by Beckner, Bialynicki-Birula and Myceilski.

  10. State-dependent potentials in a nanofiber-based two-color trap for cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kien, Fam Le; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the ac Stark shift of a cesium atom interacting with far-off-resonance guided light fields in the nanofiber-based two-color optical dipole trap realized by Vetsch \\textit{et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{104}, 203603, (2010)]. Particular emphasis is given to the fictitious magnetic field produced by the vector polarizability of the atom in conjunction with the ellipticity of the polarization of the trapping fields. Taking into account the ac Stark shift, the atomic hyperfine interaction, and a magnetic interaction, we solve the stationary Schr\\"odinger equation at a fixed point in space and find Zeeman-state-dependent trapping potentials. In analogy to the dynamics in magnetic traps, a local degeneracy of these state-dependent trapping potentials can cause spin flips and should thus be avoided. We show that this is possible using an external magnetic field. Depending on the direction of this external magnetic field, the resulting trapping configuration can still exhibit state-dependent displacemen...

  11. Fluorescence spectra of atomic ensembles in a magneto-optical trap as an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Wook-Rae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as an optical lattice. Fluorescence spectra of atoms trapped in a MOT with a passively phase-stabilized beam configuration have been measured by means of the photon-counting heterodyne spectroscopy. We observe a narrow Rayleigh peak and well-resolved Raman sidebands in the fluorescence spectra which clearly show that the MOT itself behaves as a three-dimensional optical lattice. Optical-lattice-like properties of the phase-stabilized MOT such as vibrational frequencies and lineshapes of Rayleigh peak and Raman sidebands are investigated systematically for various trap conditions.

  12. Measurement of the trapping lifetime close to a cold metallic surface on a cryogenic atom-chip

    CERN Document Server

    Emmert, Andreas; Nogues, Gilles; Brune, Michel; Raimond, Jean-Michel; Haroche, Serge

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the trapping lifetime of magnetically trapped atoms in a cryogenic atom-chip experiment. An ultracold atomic cloud is kept at a fixed distance from a thin gold layer deposited on top of a superconducting trapping wire. The lifetime is studied as a function of the distances to the surface and to the wire. Different regimes are observed, where loss rate is determined either by the technical current noise in the wire or the Johnson-Nyquist noise in the metallic gold layer, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Far from the surface, we observe exceptionally long trapping times for an atom-chip, in the 10-minutes range.

  13. Observation of Entanglement of a Single Photon with a Trapped Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the observation of entanglement between a single trapped atom and a single photon at a wavelength suitable for low-loss communication over large distances, thereby achieving a crucial step towards long range quantum networks. To verify the entanglement, we introduce a single atom state analysis. This technique is used for full state tomography of the atom-photon qubit pair. The detection efficiency and the entanglement fidelity are high enough to allow in a next step the generation of entangled atoms at large distances, ready for a final loophole-free Bell experiment

  14. Investigation of ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Rong; Ji Zhong-Hua; Yuan Jin-Peng; Yang Yan; Zhao Yan-Ting; Ma Jie; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap (MOT) are studied via depumping the cesium cold atoms into the dark hyperfine ground state.The collision rate is reduced to 0.45 s-1 and the density of the atoms is increased to 5.6 × 1011 cm-3 when the fractional population of the atoms in the bright hyperfine ground state is as low as 0.15.The vibrational spectra of the ultracold cesium molecules are also studied in a standard MOT and in a dark MOT separately.The experimental results are analyzed by using the perturbative quantum approach.

  15. Entangled Radiation through an Atomic Reservoir Controlled by Coherent Population Trapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qian; ZHONG Wen-Xue; HU Xiang-Ming

    2008-01-01

    We show that it is possible to generate Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entangled radiation using an atomic reservoir controlled by coherent population trapping. A beam of three-level atoms is initially prepared in nearcoherent population trapping (CPT) state and acts as a long-lived coherence-controlled reservoir. Four-wave mixing leads to amplification of cavity modes resonant with Rabi sidebands of the atomic dipole transitions. The cavity modes evolve into an EPR state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensities and the frequencies of the driving fields. This scheme uses the long-lived CPT coherence and is robust against spontaneous emission of the atomic beam. At the same time, this scheme is implemented in a one-step procedure, not in a two-step procedure as was required in Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 240401.

  16. Search for Electric dipole moment (EDM) in laser cooled and trapped 225Ra atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Mukut; Bailey, Kevin; Dietrich, Matthew; Green, John; Holt, Roy; Korsch, Wolfgang; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Lemke, Nathan; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Tom; Parker, Richard; Singh, Jaideep; Trimble, Will; Argonne National Laboratory Collaboration; University Of Chicago Collabration; University Of Kentucky Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We are searching for an EDM of the diamagnetic 225Ra atom. 225Ra has nuclear spin I =1/2. Experimental sensitivity to its EDM is enhanced due to its heavy mass and the increased Schiff moment of its octupole deformed nucleus. Our experiment involves collecting laser cooled Ra atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), transporting them 1 meter with a far off-resonant optical dipole trap (ODT) and then transferring the atoms to a second standing-wave ODT in our experimental chamber. We will report our recent experiences in polarizing and observing Larmor precession of 225Ra atoms in parallel electric and magnetic fields in a magnetically shielded region and progress towards a first measurement of the EDM of 225Ra. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and contract No. DE-FG02-99ER41101.

  17. A compact microchip atomic clock based on all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold trapped Rb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D. M.; Zozulya, A.; Anderson, D. Z.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a compact atomic clock that uses all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold Rb atoms that are magnetically trapped near the surface of an atom microchip. The interrogation scheme, which combines electromagnetically induced transparency with Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields, can achieve an atomic shot-noise-level performance better than 10^{-13}/sqrt{tau} for 106 atoms. A two-color Mach-Zehnder interferometer can detect a 100-pW probe beam at the optical shot-noise level using conventional photodetectors. This measurement scheme is nondestructive and therefore can be used to increase the operational duty cycle by reusing the trapped atoms for multiple clock cycles. Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations are used to identify realistic operating parameters at which AC Stark shifts are eliminated. By considering fluctuations in these parameters, we estimate that AC Stark shifts can be canceled to a level better than 2×10-14. An overview of the apparatus is presented with estimates of cycle time and power consumption.

  18. Laser cooling of single trapped atoms to the ground state: a dark state in position space

    OpenAIRE

    Morigi, Giovanna; Cirac Sasturáin, Juan Ignacio,; Ellinger, K; Zoller, P.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a scheme that allows us to laser cool trapped atoms to the ground state of a one-dimensional confining potential. The scheme is based on the creation of a dark state by designing the laser profile, so that the hottest atoms are coherently pumped to another internal level, and then repumped back. The scheme works beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit. We present results of a full quantum treatment for a one-dimensional model.

  19. Direct Observation of Coherent Population Trapping in a Superconducting Artificial Atom

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, William R.; Dutton, Zachary; Schlafer, John; Mookerji, Bhaskar; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kline, Jeffrey S.; Pappas, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) of an atom (or solid state "artificial atom"), and the associated effect of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT), are clear demonstrations of quantum interference due to coherence in multi-level quantum systems. We report observation of CPT in a superconducting phase qubit by simultaneously driving two coherent transitions in a $\\Lambda$-type configuration, utilizing the three lowest lying levels of a local minimum of a phase qubi...

  20. Atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy of individual electron trap states using force detected dynamic tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first atomic scale imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electron trap states in completely non-conducting surfaces by dynamic tunnelling force microscopy/spectroscopy. Single electrons are dynamically shuttled to/from individual states in thick films of hafnium silicate and silicon dioxide. The new method opens up surfaces that are inaccessible to the scanning tunnelling microscope for imaging and spectroscopy on an atomic scale.

  1. Preparation of Bose Einstein condensates in realistc trapping potentials for precision atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posso Trujillo, Katerine; Rasel, Ernst M.; Gaaloul, Naceur; Quantus Team

    Preparation of Bose Einstein condensates in realistc trapping potentials for precision atom interferometry Theoretical studies of the ground state and the dynamical properties of Bose Einstein condensates (BECs) are typically realized by considering the ensemble as being initiaally trapped by a harmonic potential. Dramatic discrepancies were found by comparing numerical results of the long-time expansion of BECs after being released from the harmonic trap, and measurements of the free evolution and delta-kick cooling (DKC) of a 87Rb BEC on large timescales of up to 2 s in micro-gravity (micro-g) environment such as those performed in the QUANTUS project from our group. The modification in the dynamics of a 87Rb BEC with the application of DKC by using experimentally implemented trapping geometries and the effect of gravity have been studied. Three different configurations have been considered: atom chip-based potential, dipole trap and the time-averaged orbiting potential. Such discrepancies may be crucial in high precision atom interferometry experiments in micro-g and zero-g platforms in which the implementation of DKC is mandatory to achieve the long-expansion times required

  2. Optimizing the production of metastable calcium atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Gruenert, J; Gruenert, Jan; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the production of long lived metastable (3P2, n=4) calcium atoms in a magneto-optical trap operating on the 1S0 to 1P1 transition at 423 nm. For excited 1P1-atoms a weak decay channel into the triplet states 3P2 and 3P1 exists via the singlet 1D2 (n=3) state. The undesired 3P1-atoms decay back to the ground state within 0.4 ms and can be fully recaptured if the illuminated trap volume is sufficiently large. We obtain a flux of above 10^10 atoms/s into the 3P2-state. We find that our MOT life time of 23 ms is mainly limited by this loss channel and thus the 3P2-production is not hampered by inelasic collisions. If we close the loss channel by repumping the 1D2-atoms with a 671 nm laser back into the MOT cycling transition, a non-exponential 72 ms trap decay is observed indicating the presence of inelastic two-body collisions between 1S0 and 1P1 atoms.

  3. Coherence of a qubit stored in Zeeman levels of a single optically trapped atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Weinfurter, Harald [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80799 Muenchen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Volz, Juergen; Weber, Markus [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80799 Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    We experimentally investigate the coherence properties of a qubit stored in the Zeeman substates of the 5{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}, F=1 hyperfine ground level of a single optically trapped {sup 87}Rb atom. Larmor precession of a single atomic spin-1 system is observed by preparing the atom in a defined initial spin state and then measuring the resulting state after a programmable period of free evolution. Additionally, by performing quantum-state tomography, maximum knowledge about the spin coherence is gathered. By using an active magnetic field stabilization and without application of a magnetic guiding field, we achieve transverse and longitudinal dephasing times of T{sub 2}{sup *}=75-150 {mu}s and T{sub 1}>0.5 ms, respectively. We derive the light-shift distribution of a single atom in the approximately harmonic potential of a dipole trap and show that the measured atomic spin coherence is limited mainly by residual position- and state-dependent effects in the optical trapping potential. The improved understanding enables longer coherence times, an important prerequisite for future applications in long-distance quantum communication and computation with atoms in optical lattices, or for a loophole-free test of Bell's inequality.

  4. Hydride generation – in-atomizer collection of Pb in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device for atomic absorption spectrometry – an interference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotný, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); High School in Hořice, Husova 1414, 508 01 Hořice (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Interferences of selected hydride forming elements (As, Sb, Bi, Se and Sn) on lead determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were extensively studied in both on-line atomization and preconcentration (collection) modes. The commonly used on-line atomization mode was found free of significant interferences, whereas strong interference from Bi was observed when employing the preconcentration mode with plumbane collection in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device. Interference of Bi seems to take place in the preconcentration step. Interference of Bi in the collection mode cannot be reduced by increased hydrogen radical amount in the trap and/or the atomizer. - Highlights: ► Interference study on Pb determination by in-atomizer trapping was performed for the first time. ► Bi was found as a severe interferent in the preconcentration mode (Pb:Bi ratio 1:100). ► No interference was found in the on-line atomization (no preconcentration). ► Bi interference occurs during preconcentration.

  5. Production of antihydrogen at reduced magnetic field for anti-atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated production of antihydrogen in a 1$,$T solenoidal magnetic field. This field strength is significantly smaller than that used in the first generation experiments ATHENA (3$,$T) and ATRAP (5$,$T). The motivation for using a smaller magnetic field is to facilitate trapping of antihydrogen atoms in a neutral atom trap surrounding the production region. We report the results of measurements with the ALPHA (Antihydrogen Laser PHysics Apparatus) device, which can capture and cool antiprotons at 3$,$T, and then mix the antiprotons with positrons at 1$,$T. We infer antihydrogen production from the time structure of antiproton annihilations during mixing, using mixing with heated positrons as the null experiment, as demonstrated in ATHENA. Implications for antihydrogen trapping are discussed.

  6. Breakdown of Atomic Hyperfine Coupling in a Deep Optical-Dipole Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Neuzner, Andreas; Dürr, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the breakdown of hyperfine coupling for an atom in a deep optical-dipole trap. One-color laser spectroscopy is performed at the resonance lines of a single $^{87}$Rb atom for a trap wavelength of 1064 nm. Evidence of hyperfine breakdown comes from three observations, namely a nonlinear dependence of the transition frequencies on the trap intensity, a splitting of lines which are degenerate for small intensities, and the ability to drive transitions which would be forbidden by selection rules in the absence of hyperfine breakdown. From the data, we infer the hyperfine interval of the $5P_{1/2}$ state and the scalar and tensor polarizabilities for the $5P_{3/2}$ state.

  7. Quantum phases and dynamics of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Mueller, Erich

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by experiments performed by R. Landig et al. (arXiv:1511.00007), we theoretically explore the behavior of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity in the presence of a two-dimensional optical lattice. As explained by arXiv:1511.00007, Rayleigh scattering of light from the lattice-inducing beams into the cavity produces infinite-range cavity-mediated interactions between the atoms, leading to competition between superfluid, supersolid, Mott insulating and charge density wave phases. We calculate the phase diagram for a uniform trap using a variation of the Gutzwiller Ansatz. We also calculate the spatial distribution of the different phases in the gas in the presence of a harmonic trap. We explore hysteretic behavior when parameters of the system are changed.

  8. Trapping and cooling of sodium atoms for assembly of dipolar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yichao; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Liu, Lee R.; Zhang, Jessie T.; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-05-01

    In order to create a diatomic molecule with a large electric dipole moment, it is generally necessary to use atoms with very different electronegativities. In the context of bi-alkali molecules, this means combining a light alkali atom with a heavy one. This is the reason why we use NaCs in our molecule assembler experiment; NaCs has the largest induced dipole moment in few kV/cm lab fields. However, the use of sodium atoms also poses challenges. The higher Doppler temperature and lack of efficient D2 polarization gradient cooling increases the necessary depth of our optical dipole (tweezer) traps. The lack of a convenient magic wavelength for the dipole trap creates a large AC stark shift on the optical transition as well as additional heating mechanisms. The light mass of the sodium, and therefore larger Lamb-Dicke parameter and higher recoil temperature, makes it more difficult to perform efficient Raman sideband cooling on the atom in the trap. I will discuss the techniques we use to overcome these challenges, in particular a method to eliminate the light shifts and associated heating mechanisms in tight optical traps.

  9. Measuring isospin mixing in sup 3 sup 6 Ar using a polarized, neutral atom trap

    CERN Document Server

    Melconian, D; Ball, G; Behr, J A; Bricault, P G; Brown, B A; Dombsky, M; Jackson, K P; Fostner, S; Gorelov, A; Groves, M N; Gu, S; Pearson, M R; Towner, I S; Trinczek, M; Vollrath, I

    2003-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps provide a cold, compact cloud of radioactive atoms and therefore are an ideal source for use in precision nuclear beta decay studies. Optical pumping techniques can add a new dimension to such experiments by efficiently polarizing these samples to 0 sup + decays.

  10. Intrinsic electron traps in atomic-layer deposited HfO2 insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbu, F.; Madia, O.; Andreev, D. V.; Fadida, S.; Eizenberg, M.; Breuil, L.; Lisoni, J. G.; Kittl, J. A.; Strand, J.; Shluger, A. L.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Houssa, M.; Stesmans, A.

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of photodepopulation of electron traps in HfO2 films grown by atomic layer deposition is shown to provide the trap energy distribution across the entire oxide bandgap. The presence is revealed of two kinds of deep electron traps energetically distributed at around Et ≈ 2.0 eV and Et ≈ 3.0 eV below the oxide conduction band. Comparison of the trapped electron energy distributions in HfO2 layers prepared using different precursors or subjected to thermal treatment suggests that these centers are intrinsic in origin. However, the common assumption that these would implicate O vacancies cannot explain the charging behavior of HfO2, suggesting that alternative defect models should be considered.

  11. Trapping of Weak Signal Pulses by Soliton and Trajectory Control in a Coherent Atomic Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for trapping weak signal pulses by soliton and realizing its trajectory control via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The system we consider is a cold, coherent atomic gas with a tripod or multipod level configuration. We show that, due to the giant enhancement of Kerr nonlinearity contributed by EIT, several weak signal pulses can be effectively trapped by a soliton and cotravel stably with ultraslow propagating velocity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the trajectories of the soliton and the trapped signal pulses can be manipulated by using a Stern-Gerlach gradient magnetic field. As a result, the soliton and the trapped signal pulses display a Stern-Gerlach deflection and both of them can bypass an obstacle together. The results predicted here may be used to design all-optical switching at very low light level.

  12. Planar Atom Trap and Magnetic Resonance 'Lens' Designs

    CERN Document Server

    Barbic, M; Emery, T H; Scherer, A

    2007-01-01

    We present various planar magnetic designs that create points above the plane where the magnitude of the static magnetic field is a local minimum. Structures with these properties are of interest in the disciplines of neutral atom confinement, magnetic levitation, and magnetic resonance imaging. Each planar permanent magnet design is accompanied by the equivalent planar single non-crossing conductor design. Presented designs fall into three categories producing: a) zero value magnetic field magnitude point minima, b) non-zero magnetic field magnitude point minima requiring external bias magnetic field, and c) self-biased non-zero magnetic field magnitude point minima. We also introduce the Principle of Amperean Current Doubling in planar perpendicularly magnetized thin films that can be used to improve the performance of each permanent magnet design we present. Single conductor current-carrying designs are suitable for single layer lithographic fabrication, as we experimentally demonstrate. Finally, we presen...

  13. Temperature and phase-space density of a cold atom cloud in a quadrupole magnetic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, S. P.; Mishra, S. R.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore (India)

    2014-08-15

    We present studies on modifications in the temperature, number density and phase-space density when a laser-cooled atom cloud from optical molasses is trapped in a quadrupole magnetic trap. Theoretically, for a given temperature and size of the cloud from the molasses, the phase-space density in the magnetic trap is shown first to increase with increasing magnetic field gradient and then to decrease with it after attaining a maximum value at an optimum value of the magnetic-field gradient. The experimentally-measured variation in the phase-space density in the magnetic trap with changing magnetic field gradient is shown to exhibit a similar trend. However, the experimentally-measured values of the number density and the phase-space density are much lower than the theoretically-predicted values. This is attributed to the experimentally-observed temperature in the magnetic trap being higher than the theoretically-predicted temperature. Nevertheless, these studies can be useful for setting a higher phase-space density in the trap by establishing an optimal value of the field gradient for a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  14. Entanglement Preparation and Quantum Information Processing with Atoms Trapped in Separated Cavities Through a Single Resonant Atom-Field Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Hua

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a scheme is presented for generation of W-type entangled states for n atoms trapped in separated cavities connected by optical fibers. The scheme only requires a single atom-cavity-fiber interaction and no classical field is needed. Due to these features, the scheme is simpler and more robust against decoherence than the previous ones. The scheme can also be used to realize quantum state transfer and controlled phase gates between qubits located at distant nodes of a quantum network.

  15. Azimuthal Sisyphus effect for atoms in a toroidal all-optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembessis, V. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ellinas, D. [Technical University of Crete, Department of Sciences M PHI Q Research Unit GR-731 00 Chania, Crete (Greece); Babiker, M. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, England (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    It is shown that an optical arrangement in which two identical counterpropagating Laguerre-Gaussian doughnut beams LG(l,0) and LG(-l,0) with orthogonal linear polarizations e {sub x} and e {sub y} can lead to azimuthal polarization gradients and an as yet undiscovered azimuthal Sisyphus effect. It is demonstrated that this effect can be utilized in the creation and control of a persistent current of superfluid atoms circulating in a toroidal trap. Such a physical system has recently been highlighted as the basis for an atomic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and ultimately for the realization of atom circuits.

  16. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  17. Coherence of a qubit stored in Zeeman levels of a single optically trapped atom

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Weber, Markus; Weinfurter, Harald

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the coherence properties of a qubit stored in the Zeeman substates of the 5S1/2, F=1 hyperfine ground level of a single optically trapped Rb-87 atom. Larmor precession of a single atomic spin-1 system is observed by preparing the atom in a defined initial spin-state and then measuring the resulting state after a programmable period of free evolution. Additionally, by performing quantum state tomography, maximum knowledge about the spin coherence is gathered. By using an active magnetic field stabilization and without application of a magnetic guiding field we achieve transverse and longitudinal dephasing times of T2*=75..150 \\mus and T1>0.5 ms respectively. We derive the light-shift distribution of a single atom in the approximately harmonic potential of a dipole trap and show that the measured atomic spin coherence is limited mainly by residual position- and state-dependent effects in the optical trapping potential. The improved understanding enables longer coherence times, an i...

  18. Transport of ultracold atoms between concentric traps via spatial adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Polo, Joan; Busch, Thomas; Ahufinger, Verònica; Mompart, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage processes for ultracold atoms trapped in tunnel-coupled cylindrically symmetric concentric potentials are investigated. Specifically, we discuss the matter-wave analogue of the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) technique for a high fidelity and robust loading of a single atom into a harmonic ring potential from a harmonic trap, and for its transport between two concentric rings. We also consider a system of three concentric rings and investigate the transport of a single atom between the innermost and the outermost rings making use of the matter-wave analogue of the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique. We describe the RAP-like and STIRAP-like dynamics by means of a two- and a three-state models, respectively, obtaining good agreement with the numerical simulations of the corresponding two-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation.

  19. Electrostatic trapping and in situ detection of Rydberg atoms above chip-based transmission lines

    CERN Document Server

    Lancuba, P

    2016-01-01

    Beams of helium atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number $n=48$ and electric dipole moments of 4600~D have been decelerated from a mean initial longitudinal speed of 2000~m/s to zero velocity in the laboratory-fixed frame-of-reference in the continuously moving electric traps of a transmission-line decelerator. In this process accelerations up to $-1.3\\times10^{7}$~m/s$^2$ were applied, and changes in kinetic energy of $\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}=1.3\\times10^{-20}$~J ($\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}/e = 83$~meV) per atom were achieved. Guided and decelerated atoms, and those confined in stationary electrostatic traps, were detected in situ by pulsed electric field ionisation. The results of numerical calculations of particle trajectories within the decelerator have been used to characterise the observed deceleration efficiencies, and aid in the interpretation of the experimental data.

  20. Surpassing the mass restriction of buffer gas cooling: Cooling of low mass ions by localized heavier atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Cooling of trapped ions has resulted in fascinating science including the realization of some of the most accurate atomic clocks. It has also found widespread application, for example, in mass spectrometry and cold chemistry. Among the different methods for cooling ions, cooling by elastic collisions with ultracold neutral atoms is arguably the most generic. However, in spite of its widespread application, there is confusion with regards the collisional heating/cooling of light ions by heavier neutral atoms. We address the question experimentally and demonstrate, for the first time, cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms. We show that trapped 39 K+ ions are cooled by localized ultracold neutral 85 Rb atoms. The atom-ion mass ratio (= 2.18) is well beyond any theoretical predictions so far. We further argue that cooling of ions by localized cold atoms is possible for any mass ratio. The result opens up the possibility of reaching the elusive s-wave collision regime in atom-ion collisions. S.D. is supported by DST-INSPIRE Faculty Fellowship, India.

  1. Improved atom number with a dual color magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Qiang; Luo Xin-Yu; Gao Kui-Yi; Wang Xiao-Rui; Chen Dong-Min; Wang Ru-Quan

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel dual color magneto-optical trap (MOT),which uses two sets of overlapping laser beams to cool and trap 87Rb atoms.The volume of cold cloud in the dual color MOT is strongly dependent on the frequency difference of the laser beams and can be significantly larger than that in the normal MOT with single frequency MOT beams.Our experiment shows that the dual color MOT has the same loading rate as the normal MOT,but much longer loading time,leading to threefold increase in the number of trapped atoms.This indicates that the larger number is caused by reduced light induced loss.The dual color MOT is very useful in experiments where both high vacuum level and large atom number are required,such as single chamber quantum memory and Bose Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments.Compared to the popular dark spontaneous-force optical trap (dark SPOT) technique,our approach is technically simpler and more suitable to low power laser systems.

  2. Absorption spectroscopy of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Liu Tao; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Peng Kun-Chi; Wang Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    Absorption spectra of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap are measured around D2 line at 852nm with a weak probe beam. Absorption reduction dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)effect induced by the cooling/trapping field in a V-type three-level system and a gain peak near the cycling transition are clearly observed. Several mechanisms mixed with EIT effect in a normal V-type three-level system are briefly discussed. A simple theoretical analysis based on a dressed-state model is presented for interpretation of the absorption spectra.

  3. Influence of trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the effect of external trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices. We introduce a generalized Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that includes the structure of the energy levels of the trapping potential, and show that these levels are in general populated both at finite and zero temperature. We characterize the properties of the superfluid transition for this situation and compare them with those of the standard Bose-Hubbard description. We briefly discuss similar behaviors for fermionic systems

  4. Temperature and phase-space density of cold atom cloud in a quadrupole magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2014-01-01

    We present studies on the modifications in temperature, number density and phase-space density when a laser cooled atom cloud from the optical molasses is trapped in a quadrupole magnetic trap. Theoretically it is shown that for a given temperature and size of the cloud from the molasses, the phase-space density in the magnetic trap first increases with magnetic field gradient and then decreases with it, after attaining a maximum value at an optimum value of magnetic field gradient. The experimentally measured variation in phase-space density in the magnetic trap with the magnetic field gradient has shown the similar trend. However, the experimentally measured values of number density and phase-space density are much lower than their theoretically predicted values. This is attributed to the higher experimentally observed temperature in the magnetic trap than the theoretically predicted temperature. Nevertheless, these studies can be useful to set a higher phase-space density in the trap by setting the optimum...

  5. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO2+ with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H2 densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH+, CH2+, and CH4+ have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  6. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  7. Trapping of atomic hydrogen in octasilsesquioxane cages by glow discharge treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen atoms are trapped in octasilsesquioxane ((RSiO3/2)8, R = H, CH3, i-butyl, etc.) cages by electric discharge treatment. The yield of the trapped hydrogen was evaluated to be 1.3 x 10-4 of cage unit by using ESR spectroscopy for (CH3SiO3/2)8 discharged for 4 minutes at room temperature. To obtain a comparable yield of the trapped hydrogen by γ-rays (60Co) irradiation, an absorbed dose of ca. 300 kGy is required, taking two days or more in general. The discharge technique is simple and extremely efficient compared to the conventional method of γ-ray radiolysis. (author)

  8. Magneto-Optical Trapping of 88Sr atoms with 689 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; LIN Bai-Ke; ZHAO Yang; LI Ye; WANG Shao-Kai; WANG Min-Ming; ZANG Er-Jun; LI Tian-Chu; FANG Zhan-Jun

    2011-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of strontium magneto-optical trap(MOT) operating on the intercombination transition lSo-3 P1 at 689nm, namely red MOT. A 689nm laser used for cooling and trapping is injection locked to a master laser, whose linewidth is narrowed to 150 Hz by locking to a high finesse optical reference cavity.88 Sr atoms pre-cooled and trapped by the broad 1SO-1 Pl transition at 461 nm are transferred to the red MOT with the help of a time sequence controller. The transfer ratio is about 20% and the red MOT's temperature is estimated to be less than 20 μK by the time-of-flight(TOF) image analysis.

  9. Optical trapping of cold neutral atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We suggest a new schema of trapping cold atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube. The two light fields circularly polarized sending through a carbon nanotube generates an evanescent wave around this nanotube. By evanescent effect, the wave decays away from the nanotube producing a set of trapping minima of the total potential in the transverse plane as a ring around the nanotube. This schema allows capture of atoms to a cylindrical shell around the nanotube. We consider some possible boundary conditions leading to the non-trivial bound state solution. Our result will be compared to some recent trapping models and our previous trapping models.

  10. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  11. Narrow-line magneto-optical cooling and trapping of strongly magnetic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Berglund, Andrew J; McClelland, Jabez J

    2008-01-01

    Laser cooling on weak transitions is a useful technique for reaching ultracold temperatures in atoms with multiple valence electrons. However, for strongly magnetic atoms a conventional narrow-line magneto-optical trap (MOT) is destabilized by competition between optical and magnetic forces. We overcome this difficulty in Er by developing an unusual narrow-line MOT that balances optical and magnetic forces using laser light tuned to the blue side of a narrow (8 kHz) transition. The trap population is spin-polarized with temperatures reaching below 2 microkelvin. Our results constitute an alternative method for laser cooling on weak transitions, applicable to rare-earth-metal and metastable alkaline earth elements.

  12. Microfabricated cells for chip-scale atomic clock based on coherent population trapping: Fabrication and investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Ermak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A universal method for fabrication of miniature cells for frequency standards and quantum magnetometers containing 87Rb atoms in the atmosphere of inert gas neon based on integrated technologies is considered. The results of experimental studies of coherent population trapping signals observed for a series of cells which provided recovery of vapors of an alkali metal from the rubidium dichromate salt with the help of laser radiation are presented. The coherent population trapping signals with a typical linewidth of 2–3 kHz and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in the 1-Hz bandwidth were observed, which allows one to provide a relative frequency stability of atomic clock of 10−11 at 100 s.

  13. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  14. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  15. High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Evan A; Pfeiffer, Jonathan B; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

  16. Highly collimated source of cold Rubidium atoms from a two dimensional magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Carrat, Vincent; Jacquey, Marion; Tabosa, José W; de Lesegno, Bruno Viaris; Pruvost, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Using a blue detuned laser shaped in a Laguerre-Gaussian donut mode we highly collimate the output of a two dimensional magneto-optical trap. The resulting atomic beam has a 1 mm diameter, its divergence is reduced from 40 down to 3 mrad and the atomic density is increased by a factor of 200. The collimation effect has been studied versus the order of the Laguerre-Gaussian mode (up to 10) and the laser atom frequency detuning (2 to 120 GHz). The 2D-colli-MOT study allows us to determine the best conditions which minimize the atom heating due to residual light absorption and optimize the collimation effect. The 2D-colli MOT could provide a new tool to fill a 3D-MOT using lasers with millimeter range diameters and thus sparing the laser power.

  17. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Anderson, Sarah E; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-20

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes the multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is not often employed. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. Here we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants underlying physics. The spatial resolution of ponderomotive spectroscopy is orders of magnitude better than the transition frequency would suggest, promising single-site addressability in dense particle arrays for quantum computing applications.

  18. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Raithel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes a multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is often neglected. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. For the first time, we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light at a microwave frequency, and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This new ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants un...

  19. Nanofiber-Based Double-Helix Dipole Trap for Cold Neutral Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Reitz, D

    2012-01-01

    A double-helix optical trapping potential for cold atoms can be straightforwardly created inside the evanescent field of an optical nanofiber. It suffices to send three circularly polarized light fields through the nanofiber; two counterpropagating and far red-detuned with respect to the atomic transition and the third far blue-detuned. Assuming realistic experimental parameters, the transverse confinement of the resulting potential allows one to reach the one-dimensional regime with cesium atoms for temperatures of several \\muK. Moreover, by locally varying the nanofiber diameter, the radius and pitch of the double-helix can be modulated, thereby opening a realm of applications in cold-atom physics.

  20. Core-Shell Magneto-Optical Trap for Alkaline-Earth-Metal-Like Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jeongwon; Noh, Jiho; Mun, Jongchul

    2014-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new magneto-optical trap (MOT) for alkaline-earth-metal-like (AEML) atoms where the narrow $^{1}S_{0}\\rightarrow$$^{3}P_{1}$ transition and the broad $^{1}S_{0}\\rightarrow$$^{1}P_{1}$ transition are spatially arranged into a core-shell configuration. Our scheme resolves the main limitations of previously adopted MOT schemes, leading to a significant increase in both the loading rate and the steady state atom number. We apply this scheme to $^{174}$Yb MOT, where we show about a hundred-fold improvement in the loading rate and ten-fold improvement in the steady state atom number compared to reported cases that we know of to date. This technique could be readily extended to other AEML atoms to increase the statistical sensitivity of many different types of precision experiments.

  1. Control of light trapping in a large atomic system by a static magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Skipetrov, S E; Havey, M D

    2016-01-01

    We propose to control light trapping in a large ensemble of cold atoms by an external, static magnetic field. For an appropriate choice of frequency and polarization of the exciting pulse, the field is expected to speed up the fluorescence of a dilute atomic system but can significantly slow it down in a dense ensemble. The slowing down of fluorescence is due to the excitation of spatially localized collective atomic states that appear only under a strong magnetic field and have exponentially long lifetimes. The control of fluorescence by the magnetic field may be of interest for use in future quantum-information processing devices. It also paves a way towards the experimental observation of the disorder-induced localization of light in cold atomic systems.

  2. Discerning and selectively manipulating laser-trapped atoms using non-paraxial light

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsch, R; Albrecht, B; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that the non-paraxial character of a strongly confined light field can be used to spectrally discern and selectively manipulate two initially equivalent atomic ensembles of the same species. The technique is implemented with two symmetric linear arrays of cesium atoms, trapped on opposite sides of an optical nanofiber and separated by less than a micron. The nanofiber provides an evanescent field interface between the atoms and the guided light, where the latter exhibits a strongly position-dependent polarization. In the case of resonant interaction, this allows us to optically pump the ensembles into two distinct Zeeman states. In the case of dispersive interaction, the strong gradient of the light-induced fictitious magnetic field permits us to selectively address the ensembles with microwave radiation, thereby preparing them in distinct hyperfine states. This results in a composite fiber-coupled atomic medium with high potential for nonlinear optics at ultra-low light levels.

  3. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Y b+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11/τ1/2.

  4. Loading a vapor cell magneto-optic trap using light-induced atom desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, B P

    2000-01-01

    Low intensity white light was used to increase the loading rate of $^{87}$Rb atoms into a vapor cell magneto-optic trap by inducing non-thermal desorption of Rb atoms from the stainless steel walls of the vapor cell. An increased Rb partial pressure reached a new equilibrium value in less than 10 seconds after switching on the broadband light source. After the source was turned off, the partial pressure returned to its previous value in $1/e$ times as short as 10 seconds.

  5. Incomplete optical shielding in cold atom traps: three-dimensional Landau-Zener theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultracold atom collisions in the presence of a linearly polarized blueshifted laser field are studied theoretically. An analytical solution is presented within the framework of the Landau-Zener approximation. The effect of incomplete shielding is mostly accounted for by incorporating the three-dimensional character of the collisions, using a partial-wave analysis with space degeneracy. A model of two electronic states, including effects of indistinguishability of the colliding atoms, is used. The model associates the incomplete shielding with a process involving two crossing points. The theory is applied to the case of metastable xenon traps, obtaining a fair agreement with the experimental data. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. Evanescent-wave trapping and evaporative cooling of an atomic gas near two-dimensionality

    CERN Document Server

    Hammes, M; Engeser, B; Nägerl, H C; Grimm, R

    2003-01-01

    A dense gas of cesium atoms at the crossover to two-dimensionality is prepared in a highly anisotropic surface trap that is realized with two evanescent light waves. Temperatures as low as 100nK are reached with 20.000 atoms at a phase-space density close to 0.1. The lowest quantum state in the tightly confined direction is populated by more than 60%. The system offers intriguing prospects for future experiments on degenerate quantum gases in two dimensions.

  7. Optical and evaporative cooling of cesium atoms in the gravito-optical surface trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hammes, M; Druzhinina, V; Moslener, U; Manek-Hönninger, I; Grimm, R

    2000-01-01

    We report on cooling of an atomic cesium gas closely above an evanescent-wave atom mirror. At high densitities, optical cooling based on inelastic reflections is found to be limited by a density-dependent excess temperature and trap loss due to ultracold collisions involving repulsive molecular states. Nevertheless, very good starting conditions for subsequent evaporative cooling are obtained. Our first evaporation experiments show a temperature reduction from 10muK down to 300nK along with a gain in phase-space density of almost two orders of magnitude.

  8. Cavity cooling of a trapped atom using Electromagnetically-Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, Marc

    2011-01-01

    A cooling scheme for trapped atoms is proposed, which combines cavity-enhanced scattering and electromagnetically induced transparency. The cooling dynamics exploits a three-photon resonance, which combines laser and cavity excitations. It is shown that relatively fast ground-state cooling can be achieved in the Lamb-Dicke regime and for large cooperativity. Efficient ground-state cooling is found for parameters of ongoing experiments.

  9. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Jr, Humberto Da; Raoult, Maurice; Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$, Ba$^+$) and Yb$^+$, and between Li and Yb$^+$, are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radia...

  10. Detecting atoms trapped in an optical lattice using a tapered optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, T

    2014-01-01

    Optical detection of structures with dimensions smaller than an optical wavelength requires devices that work on scales beyond the diffraction limit. Here we present the possibility of using a tapered optical nanofiber as a detector to resolve individual atoms trapped in an optical lattice in the Mott Insulator phase. We show that the small size of the fiber combined with an enhanced photon collection rate can allow for the attainment of large and reliable measurement signals.

  11. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI\\muP facility

    OpenAIRE

    Traykov, E.; Dammalapati, U.; De, S.; Dermois, O. C.; Huisman, L.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W.; Mol, A. J.; Onderwater, C.J.G.(Van Swinderen Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands); Rogachevskiy, A.; Silva, M. da Silva e; Sohani, M.; Versolato, O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    The structures for the TRI$\\mu$P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides are produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atoms in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample for precision measurements. In the TRI$\\mu$P facility a production target is followed by a magnetic separator, where radioactive isotopes are produced in inverse reaction kinematics. Separation ...

  12. A=225 implantation for $^{221}$Fr source for TRIUMF atom trap

    CERN Multimedia

    The FrPNC Collaboration is mounting an atom trap for parity violation experiments and precision spectroscopy on francium atoms at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We would like to use ISOLDE's capability of simultaneously implanting A=225 (while another experiment runs online) to make a long-lived source feeding $^{221}$Fr for tests of the trap. $^{225}$Ra $\\beta$-decays to $^{225}$Ac, which then $\\alpha$-decays, producing 100 keV $^{221}$Fr t$_{1/2}$= 4.8 minute recoils. The implanted A=225 source would be shipped to TRIUMF, where it would be held for several minutes at a time a few mm from the same yttrium foil that normally receives the ISAC beam. SRIM calculations imply that 20% of the $^{221}$Fr will be implanted in a 1 cm diameter spot on the yttrium. Then the yttrium foil is moved to the trap and heated to release the Fr atoms, just as in normal ISAC online operation. A test implantation will be done at 10$^{7}$/sec production for 1 day, testing whether carbon cracking on the implantation foil in the mass separ...

  13. Towards hybrid quantum systems: Trapping a single atom near a nanoscale solid-state structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiecke T.G.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe and demonstrate a method to deterministically trap single atoms near nanoscale solid-state objects. The trap is formed by the interference of an optical tweezer and its reflection from the nano object, creating a one-dimensional optical lattice where the first lattice site is at z0 ∼ λ/4 from the surface. Using a tapered optical fiber as the nanoscopic object, we characterize the loading into different lattice sites by means of the AC-Stark shift induced by a guided fiber mode. We demonstrate a loading efficiency of 94(6% into the first lattice site, and measure the cooperativity for the emission of the atom into the guided mode of the nanofiber. We show that by tailoring the dimensions of the nanofiber the distance of the trap to the surface can be adjusted. This method is applicable to a large variety of nanostructures and represents a promising starting point for interfacing single atoms with arbitrary nanoscale solid-state systems.

  14. Optical resonator for a standing wave dipole trap for fermionic lithium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports on the the construction of an optical resonator for a new resonator dipole trap to store the fermionic 6Li-isotope and to investigate its scattering properties. It was demonstrated that the resonator enhances the energy density of a (1064 nm and 40 mW) laser beam by a factor of more than 100. A fused silica vacuum cell is positioned inside the resonator under Brewster's angle. The losses of the resonator depend mainly on the optical quality of the cell. The expected trap depth of the dipole trap is 200 μK and the photon scattering rate is expected to be about 0.4 s-1. The resonator is stabilized by means of a polarization spectroscopy method. Due to high trap frequencies, which are produced by the tight enclosure of the standing wave in the resonator, the axial motion must be quantized. A simple model to describe this quantization has been developed. A magneto-optical trap, which serves as a source of cold lithium atoms, was put in operation. (orig.)

  15. Measurement of Absolute Atomic Collision Cross Section with Helium Using 87Rb Atoms Confined in Magneto-Optic and Magnetic Traps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-Cheng; ZHOU Ke-Ya; WANG Yue-Yuan; LIAO Qing-Hong; LIU Shu-Tian

    2011-01-01

    We present the measurements and calculations of the absolute total collision cross sections for a room-temperature gas of helium using 87 Rb atoms confined in either a magneto-optic or a magnetic quadrupole trap. The loss rates from the magneto-optic trap and the pure magnetic trap are compared and show significant differences. The collision cross sections as a function of trap depth for helium gas are obtained. These findings are significant for extracting the information about the different cross sections when the trap depth is changed.%@@ We present the measurements and calculations of the absolute total collision cross sections for a room-temperature gas of helium using 87Rb atoms confined in either a magneto-optic or a magnetic quadrupole trap.The loss rates from the magneto-optic trap and the pure magnetic trap are compared and show significant differences.The collision cross sections as a function of trap depth for helium gas are obtained.These findings are significant for extracting the information about the different cross sections when the trap depth is changed.

  16. Large Bragg Reflection from One-Dimensional Chains of Trapped Atoms Near a Nanoscale Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo, Neil V.; Gouraud, Baptiste; Chandra, Aveek; Goban, Akihisa; Sheremet, Alexandra S.; Kupriyanov, Dmitriy V.; Laurat, Julien

    2016-09-01

    We report experimental observations of a large Bragg reflection from arrays of cold atoms trapped near a one-dimensional nanoscale waveguide. By using an optical lattice in the evanescent field surrounding a nanofiber with a period nearly commensurate with the resonant wavelength, we observe a reflectance of up to 75% for the guided mode. Each atom behaves as a partially reflecting mirror and an ordered chain of about 2000 atoms is sufficient to realize an efficient Bragg mirror. Measurements of the reflection spectra as a function of the lattice period and the probe polarization are reported. The latter shows the effect of the chiral character of nanoscale waveguides on this reflection. The ability to control photon transport in 1D waveguides coupled to spin systems would enable novel quantum network capabilities and the study of many-body effects emerging from long-range interactions.

  17. Atom trapping and guiding with a subwavelength-diameter optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Balykin, V I; Le Kien, F; Liang, J Q; Morinaga, M; Kien, Fam Le

    2004-01-01

    We suggest using an evanescent wave around a thin fiber to trap atoms. We show that the gradient force of a red-detuned evanescent-wave field in the fundamental mode of a silica fiber can balance the centrifugal force when the fiber diameter is about two times smaller than the wavelength of the light and the component of the angular momentum of the atoms along the fiber axis is in an appropriate range. As an example, the system should be realizable for Cesium atoms at a temperature of less than 0.29 mK using a silica fiber with a radius of 0.2 $\\mu$m and a 1.3-$\\mu$m-wavelength light with a power of about 27 mW.

  18. Precision spectroscopy of Mg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A N; Brazhnikov, D V; Shilov, A M; Bagayev, S N [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bonert, A E [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    We report the results of experimental investigations aimed at creation of the optical frequency standard based on magnesium atoms cooled and localised in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). An experimentally realised MOT for magnesium made it possible to obtain a cloud comprising ∼10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7} atoms at a temperature of 3 – 5 mK. The results of ultra-high resolution spectroscopy of intercombination {sup 1}S{sub 0} – {sup 3}P{sub 1} transition for Mg atom are presented, the resonances in time-domain separated optical fields with the half-width of Γ = 500 Hz are recorded, which corresponds to the Q-factor of the reference line Q = ν/Δν ∼ 1.3 × 10{sup 12}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  19. Large Bragg Reflection from One-Dimensional Chains of Trapped Atoms Near a Nanoscale Waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Corzo, N V; Chandra, A; Goban, A; Sheremet, A S; Kupriyanov, D V; Laurat, J

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental observations of large Bragg reflection from arrays of cold atoms trapped near a one-dimensional nanoscale waveguide. By using an optical lattice in the evanescent field surrounding a nanofiber with a period close to commensurate with the resonant wavelength, we observe a reflectance up to 75% for the guided mode. Each atom behaves as a partially-reflecting mirror and an ordered chain of about 2000 atoms is sufficient to realize an efficient Bragg mirror. Measurements of the reflection spectra as a function of the lattice period and the probe polarization are reported. The latter shows the effect of the chiral character of nanoscale waveguides on this reflection. The ability to control photon transport in 1D waveguides coupled to spin systems would allow for novel quantum network capabilities and many-body effects emerging from long-range interactions.

  20. In situ atom trapping of Bi on W-coated slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry and interference studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılınç, Ersin, E-mail: kilincersin@gmail.com [Medical Laboratory Techniques, Vocational Higher School of Healthcare Studies, Mardin Artuklu University, 47200 Mardin (Turkey); Bakırdere, Sezgin [Yıldız Technical University, Art and Science Faculy, Department of Chemistry, Esenler, TR 34220 İstanbul (Turkey); Aydın, Fırat [Dicle University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, TR 21280 Diyarbakır (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz [Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-11-01

    Analytical performances of metal coated slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-FAAS) and slotted quartz tube in situ atom trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-AT-FAAS) systems were evaluated for determination of Bi. Non-volatile elements such as Mo, Zr, W and Ta were tried as coating materials. It was observed that W-coated SQT gave the best sensitivity for the determination of Bi for SQT-FAAS and SQT-AT-FAAS. The parameters for W-coated SQT-FAAS and W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS were optimized. Sensitivity of FAAS for Bi was improved as 4.0 fold by W-coated SQT-FAAS while 613 fold enhancement in sensitivity was achieved by W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS using 5.0 min trapping with respect to conventional FAAS. MIBK was selected as organic solvent for the re-atomization of Bi from the trapping surface. Limit of detection values for W-coated SQT-FAAS and W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS was obtained as 0.14 μg mL{sup −1} and 0.51 ng mL{sup −1}, respectively. Linear calibration plot was obtained in the range of 2.5–25.0 ng mL{sup −1} for W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. Accuracy of the W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS system was checked by analyzing a standard reference material, NIST 1643e. - Highlights: • Further increasing in sensitivity of SQT-AT-FAAS was obtained by using a W coated SQT. • 613 fold sensitivity enhancement was achieved by W coated SQT-AT-FAAS versus FAAS. • A sensitive, rapid and simple technique for Bi was developed with an LOD of 0.51 ng mL{sup −1}. • The technique is suggested for laboratories equipped with only a flame AA spectrometer.

  1. Magneto optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy: application to ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    87Rb atoms have been cooled, trapped and prepared as targets for collision studies with 2 and 5 keV Na+ projectiles. The physics studied deals with charge exchange processes. The active electron, which is generally the most peripheral electron of the atomic target, is transferred from the target onto the ionic projectile. The ionized target is called recoil ion. The technique used to study this physics is the MOTRIMS (Magneto Optical Trap Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) technique, which combines a magneto optical trap and a recoil ion momentum spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for the measurement of the recoil ions momentum, which gives access to all the information of the collision: the Q-value (which is the potential energy difference of the active electron on each particle) and the scattering angle of the projectile. The trap provides extremely cold targets to optimize the measurement of the momentum, and to release the latter from thermal motion. Through cinematically complete experiments, the MOTRIMS technique gives access to better resolutions on momentum measurements. Measurements of differential cross sections in initial and final capture states and in scattering angle have been done. Results obtained for differential cross sections in initial and final states show globally a good agreement with theory and an other experiment. Nevertheless, discrepancies with theory and this other experiment are shown for the measurements of doubly differential cross sections. These discrepancies are not understood yet. The particularity of the experimental setup designed and tested in this work, namely a low background noise, allows a great sensitivity to weak capture channels, and brings a technical and scientific gain compared with previous works. (author)

  2. Spin Diffusion in Trapped Clouds of Cold Atoms with Resonant Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg Morten; Pethick, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that puzzling recent experimental results on spin diffusion in a strongly interacting atomic gas may be understood in terms of the predicted spin diffusion coefficient for a generic strongly interacting system. Three important features play a central role: (a) Fick’s law for diffusion mus...... be modified to allow for the trapping potential; (b) the diffusion coefficient is inhomogeneous, due to the density variations in the cloud; and (c) the diffusion approximation fails in the outer parts of the cloud, where the mean free path is long....

  3. Progress towards precision measurements of beta-decay correlation parameters using atom and ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Melconian, D; Fenker, B; Mehlman, M; Shidling, P D; Anholm, M; Ashery, D; Behr, J A; Gorelov, A; Gwinner, G; Olchankski, K; Smale, S

    2014-01-01

    The correlations of the decay products following the beta decay of nuclei have a long history of providing a low-energy probe of the fundamental symmetries of our universe. Over half a century ago, the correlation of the electrons following the decay of polarized 60Co demonstrated that parity is not conserved in weak interactions. Today, the same basic idea continues to be applied to search for physics beyond the standard model: make precision measurements of correlation parameters and look for deviations compared to their standard model predictions. Efforts to measure these parameters to the 0.1% level utilizing atom and ion trapping techniques are described.

  4. Quantum Degenerate Fermi-Bose Mixtures of 40K and 87Rb Atoms in a Quadrupole-Ioffe Configuration Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG De-Zhi; CHEN Hai-Xia; WANG Peng-Jun; YU Xu-Dong; GAO Feng; ZHANG Jing

    2008-01-01

    @@ We report on the attainment of quantum degeneracy of 40K by means of efficient thermal collisions with the evaporatively cooled 87Rb atoms.In a quadrupole-Ioffe configuration trap,potassium atoms are cooled to 0.5 times the Fermi temperature.We obtain up to 7.59 × 105 degenerate fermions 40K.

  5. Trace analyses at the single particle level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis for 39Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom optics has found many applications in different fields of physics. In the context of environmental physics the method of Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) has opened a new level of dating of water in the regime of very old water (millions of years) with 81Kr and recent water of the last 1000 years with 39Ar. The latter is the topic of this seminar revealing the challenges and experimental solutions to work with 39Ar concentrations in Ar as small as 1:1016. After the detailed discussion of the experimental techniques I will present the first results on dating of water with this method [1] and discuss the potential for samples as small as 1 liter. Being able to date such small samples we will open up a route for detecting the age distribution of the oceans. (author)

  6. Sub-Doppler Laser Cooling of Thulium Atoms in a Magneto-optical Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Sukachev, D; Chebakov, K; Akimov, A; Kanorsky, S; Kolachevsky, N; Sorokin, V

    2010-01-01

    We have experimentally studied sub-Doppler laser cooling in a magneto-optical trap for thulium atoms working at the wavelength of 410.6\\,nm. Without any dedicated molasses period of sub-Doppler cooling, the cloud of $3\\times 10^6$ atoms at the temperature of 25(5)\\,$\\mu$K was observed. The measured temperature is significantly lower than the Doppler limit of 240$\\mu$K for the cooling transition at 410.6\\,nm. High efficiency of the sub-Doppler cooling process is due to a near-degeneracy of the Land\\'e-$g$ factors of the lower $4f^{13}6s^{2}\\, (J\\,=\\,{7}/{2})$ and the upper $4f^{12}5d_{3/2}6s^{2}\\, (J\\,=\\,{9}/{2})$ cooling levels.}

  7. Sub-Doppler Cooling of Neutral Atoms in a Grating Magneto-Optical Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2013-01-01

    The grating magneto-optical trap (GMOT) requires only one beam and three planar diffraction gratings to form a cloud of cold atoms above the plane of the diffractors. Despite the complicated polarization arrangement, we demonstrate sub-Doppler cooling of 87Rb atoms to a temperature of 7.6(0.6) uK through a multi-stage, far-detuned GMOT in conjunction with optical molasses. A decomposition of the electric ?field into polarization components for this geometry does not yield a mapping onto standard sub-Doppler laser-cooling configurations. With numerical simulations, we find that the polarization composition of the GMOT optical field, which includes sigma?- and pi?-polarized light, does produce sub-Doppler temperatures.

  8. Direct Observation of Coherent Population Trapping in a Superconducting Artificial Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, William R; Ohki, Thomas A; Schlafer, John; Mookerji, Bashkar; Kline, Jeffrey S; Pappas, David P

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) of an atom (or solid state "artificial atom"), and the associated effect of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT), are clear demonstrations of quantum interference due to coherence in multi-level quantum systems. We report observation of CPT in a superconducting phase qubit by simultaneously driving two coherent transitions in a $\\Lambda$-type configuration, utilizing the three lowest lying levels of a local minimum of a phase qubit. We observe 58% suppression of excited state population under conditions of CPT resonance. We present data and matching theoretical simulations showing the development of CPT in time. Finally, we used the observed time dependence of the excited state population to characterize quantum dephasing times of the system.

  9. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI\\muP facility

    CERN Document Server

    Traykov, E; De, S; Dermois, O C; Huisman, L; Jungmann, K; Kruithof, W; Mol, A J; Onderwater, C J G; Rogachevskiy, A; Silva, M da Silva e; Sohani, M; Versolato, O; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2007-01-01

    The structures for the TRI$\\mu$P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides will be produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atom in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample that will allow precision measurements. The TRI$\\mu$P facility consists of a chain of several separate units: A production target followed by a magnetic separator produces fast radioactive isotopes. The separator is commissioned and is operating. Various modes to produce radioactive particles have been tested for optimal production. A thermal ionizer stops the fast products and transports the nuclides as low energy singly charged ions into a radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher. This allows one to collect and transport the ions via a drift tube and a low energy beam line into a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The ions are neutralized in the MOT chamber and will be transported to a second trap for $\\beta$...

  10. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI{mu}P facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traykov, E. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: traykov@kvi.nl; Dammalapati, U.; De, S.; Dermois, O.C.; Huisman, L.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W.; Mol, A.J.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Silva e Silva, M. da; Sohani, M.; Versolato, O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-10-15

    The structures for the TRI{mu}P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides are produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atoms in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample for precision measurements. In the TRI{mu}P facility a production target is followed by a magnetic separator, where radioactive isotopes are produced in inverse reaction kinematics. Separation up to 99.95% could be achieved for {sup 21}Na. A novel transmitting thermal ionizing device was developed to stop the energetic isotopes. Some 50% of stopped {sup 21}Na could be extracted and transported as low energy singly charged ions into a radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher with 35% transmission efficiency. The ions are transported lossless via a drift tube and a low energy electrostatic beam line into the experimental setup. Such ions can be neutralized on hot metal foils and the resulting atoms can be stored in a magneto-optical trap. The functioning of that principle was demonstrated with stable Na extracted from the thermal ionizer, radioactive beams will follow next.

  11. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRIμP facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traykov, E.; Dammalapati, U.; De, S.; Dermois, O. C.; Huisman, L.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W.; Mol, A. J.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Rogachevskiy, A.; da Silva e Silva, M.; Sohani, M.; Versolato, O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2008-10-01

    The structures for the TRIμP facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides are produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atoms in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample for precision measurements. In the TRIμP facility a production target is followed by a magnetic separator, where radioactive isotopes are produced in inverse reaction kinematics. Separation up to 99.95% could be achieved for 21Na. A novel transmitting thermal ionizing device was developed to stop the energetic isotopes. Some 50% of stopped 21Na could be extracted and transported as low energy singly charged ions into a radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher with 35% transmission efficiency. The ions are transported lossless via a drift tube and a low energy electrostatic beam line into the experimental setup. Such ions can be neutralized on hot metal foils and the resulting atoms can be stored in a magneto-optical trap. The functioning of that principle was demonstrated with stable Na extracted from the thermal ionizer, radioactive beams will follow next.

  12. Optical cooling and trapping highly magnetic atoms: The benefits of a spontaneous spin polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Dreon, Davide; Bouazza, Chayma; Maineult, Wilfried; Dalibard, Jean; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    From the study of long-range-interacting systems to the simulation of gauge fields, open-shell Lanthanide atoms with their large magnetic moment and narrow optical transitions open novel directions in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As for other atomic species, the magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the working horse of experiments but its operation is challenging, due to the large electronic spin of the atoms. Here we present an experimental study of narrow-line Dysprosium MOTs. We show that the combination of radiation pressure and gravitational forces leads to a spontaneous polarization of the electronic spin. The spin composition is measured using a Stern-Gerlach separation of spin levels, revealing that the gas becomes almost fully spin-polarized for large laser frequency detunings. In this regime, we reach the optimal operation of the MOT, with samples of typically $3\\times 10^8$ atoms at a temperature of 20$\\,\\mu$K. The spin polarization reduces the complexity of the radiative cooling description, whi...

  13. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  14. Radiative and collisional processes in translationally cold samples of hydrogen Rydberg atoms studied in an electrostatic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Ch; Agner, J. A.; Pillet, P.; Merkt, F.

    2016-05-01

    Supersonic beams of hydrogen atoms, prepared selectively in Rydberg–Stark states of principal quantum number n in the range between 25 and 35, have been deflected by {90}\\circ , decelerated and loaded into off-axis electric traps at initial densities of ≈ {10}6 atoms cm‑3 and translational temperatures of 150 mK. The ability to confine the atoms spatially was exploited to study their decay by radiative and collisional processes. The evolution of the population of trapped atoms was measured for several milliseconds in dependence of the principal quantum number of the initially prepared states, the initial Rydberg-atom density in the trap, and the temperature of the environment of the trap, which could be varied between 7.5 and 300 K using a cryorefrigerator. At room temperature, the population of trapped Rydberg atoms was found to decay faster than expected on the basis of their natural lifetimes, primarily because of absorption and emission stimulated by the thermal radiation field. At the lowest temperatures investigated experimentally, the decay was found to be multiexponential, with an initial rate scaling as {n}-4 and corresponding closely to the natural lifetimes of the initially prepared Rydberg–Stark states. The decay rate was found to continually decrease over time and to reach an almost n-independent rate of more than (1 ms)‑1 after 3 ms. To analyze the experimentally observed decay of the populations of trapped atoms, numerical simulations were performed which included all radiative processes, i.e., spontaneous emission as well as absorption and emission stimulated by the thermal radiation. These simulations, however, systematically underestimated the population of trapped atoms observed after several milliseconds by almost two orders of magnitude, although they reliably predicted the decay rates of the remaining atoms in the trap. The calculations revealed that the atoms that remain in the trap for the longest times have larger absolute values

  15. Optical trapping of ultracold dysprosium atoms: transition probabilities, dynamic dipole polarizabilities and van der Waals $C_6$ coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Dulieu, Olivier; Nascimbene, Sylvain; Lepers, Maxence

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of optical trapping of ultracold atoms depend on the atomic dynamic dipole polarizability governing the atom-field interaction. In this article, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the dynamic dipole polarizability of dysprosium in the ground and first excited level. Due to the high electronic angular momentum of those two states, the polarizabilities possess scalar, vector and tensor contributions that we have computed, on a wide range of trapping wavelengths, using the sum-over-state formula. Using the same formalism, we have also calculated the $C_6$ coefficients characterizing the van der Waals interaction between two dysprosium atoms in the two lowest levels. We have computed the energies of excited states and the transition probabilities appearing in the sums, using a combination of \\textit{ab initio} and least-square-fitting techniques provided by the Cowan codes and extended in our group. Regarding the real part of the polarizability, for field frequencies far from atomic...

  16. Solder self-assembled, surface micromachined MEMS for micromirror applications and atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Brian

    Solder self-assembly can be used to expand the versatility of a commercial foundry, like MEMSCAP's PolyMUMPs process. These foundries are attractive for prototyping MEMS as they can offer consistent, low cost fabrication runs by sticking to a single process and integrating multiple customers on each wafer. However, this standardization limits the utility of the process for a given application. Solder self-assembly gives back some of this versatility and expands the envelope of surface micromachining capability in the form of a simple post-process step. Here it is used to create novel micromirrors and micromirror arrays as well as to delve into the field of ultracold atom optics where the utility of MEMS as an enabling technology for atom control is explored. Two types of torsional, electrostatic micromirrors are demonstrated, both of which can achieve +/-10° of rotation. The first is a novel out-of-plane micromirror that can be rotated to a desired angle from the substrate. This integrated, on-chip assembly allows much simpler packaging technology to be used for devices that require a laser beam to be steered off-chip. Planar micromirror arrays that use solder self-assembly to tailor the electrode gap height are also demonstrated. With these designs, no special fabrication techniques are required to achieve large gap heights, and micromirrors with a variety of gap heights can even be fabricated on the same chip. Finally, solder self-assembly is used to explore how complex micro-scale structures can be used to control ultracold atoms. For this study, a MEMS version of a magneto-optical trap, the basis for most ultracold atomic systems, is used to control Rb atoms. In doing so, it provides a path for the successful integration of a number of MEMS devices in these types of systems.

  17. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  18. Coherent population trapping resonances at lower atomic levels of Doppler broadened optical lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Şahin, E; Hamid, R; Çelik, M [National Metrology Institute of Turkey, Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Özen, G [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Engineering Physics Department Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Izmailov, A Ch [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, H. Javid av. 33, Baku, Az-1143 (Azerbaijan)

    2014-11-30

    We have detected and analysed narrow high-contrast coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances, which are induced in absorption of a weak monochromatic probe light beam by counterpropagating two-frequency pump radiation in a cell with rarefied caesium vapour. The experimental investigations have been performed by the example of nonclosed three level Λ-systems formed by spectral components of the D{sub 2} line of caesium atoms. The applied method allows one to analyse features of the CPT phenomenon directly at a given low long-lived level of the selected Λ-system even in sufficiently complicated spectra of atomic gases with large Doppler broadening. We have established that CPT resonances in transmission of the probe beam exhibit not only a higher contrast but also a much lesser width in comparison with well- known CPT resonances in transmission of the corresponding two-frequency pump radiation. The results obtained can be used in selective photophysics, photochemistry and ultra-high resolution atomic (molecular) spectroscopy. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Dispersive response of atoms trapped near the surface of an optical nanofiber with applications to QND measurement and spin squeezing

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Xiaodong; Jessen, Poul S; Deutsch, Ivan H

    2015-01-01

    We study the strong coupling between photons and atoms that can be achieved in an optical nanofiber geometry when the interaction is dispersive. While the Purcell enhancement factor for spontaneous emission into the guided mode does not reach the strong-coupling regime for individual atoms, one can obtain high cooperativity for ensembles of a few thousand atoms due to the tight confinement of the guided modes and constructive interference over the entire chain of trapped atoms. We calculate the dyadic Green's function, which determines the scattering of light by atoms in the presence of the fiber, and thus the phase shift and polarization rotation induced on the guided light by the trapped atoms. The Green's function is related to a full Heisenberg-Langevin treatment of the dispersive response of the quantized field to tensor polarizable atoms. We apply our formalism to quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement of the atoms via polarimetry. We study shot-noise-limited detection of atom number for atoms in a com...

  20. First observation of the strongly forbidden transition 1S0 - 3P0 in Strontium, for an atomic clock with trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports the first results towards the realization of an optical clock using trapped strontium atoms. This set up would combine advantages of the different approaches commonly used to develop an atomic frequency standard. The first part describes the cold atoms source which is implemented. A magneto-optical trap operating on the 1S0-1P1 transition at 461 nm is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower. The 461 nm laser is obtained by sum-frequency mixing in a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal. The second part is devoted to the different stages developed to achieve the direct excitation of the 1S0-3P0 clock transition in 87Sr. This line has a theoretical natural width of 10-3 Hz. Before this detection, we obtained an estimate of the resonance frequency by measuring absolute frequencies of several allowed optical transitions. (author)

  1. Scheme for generating the singlet state of three atoms trapped in distant cavities coupled by optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dong-Yang [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Wen, Jing-Ji [College of Foundation Science, Harbin University of Commerce, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150028 (China); Bai, Cheng-Hua; Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Wang, Hong-Fu, E-mail: hfwang@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Zhu, Ai-Dong [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Zhang, Shou, E-mail: szhang@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China)

    2015-09-15

    An effective scheme is proposed to generate the singlet state with three four-level atoms trapped in three distant cavities connected with each other by three optical fibers, respectively. After a series of appropriate atom–cavity interactions, which can be arbitrarily controlled via the selective pairing of Raman transitions and corresponding optical switches, a three-atom singlet state can be successfully generated. The influence of atomic spontaneous decay, photon leakage of cavities and optical fibers on the fidelity of the state is numerically simulated showing that the three-atom singlet state can be generated with high fidelity by choosing the experimental parameters appropriately.

  2. Competition between Spin Echo and Spin Self-Rephasing in a Trapped Atom Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Solaro, Cyrille; Combes, Frédéric; Lopez, Matthias; Alauze, Xavier; Fuchs, Jean-Noël; Piéchon, Frédéric; Santos, Franck Pereira dos

    2016-01-01

    We perform Ramsey interferometry on an ultracold 87Rb ensemble confined in an optical dipole trap. We use a $\\pi$-pulse set at the middle of the interferometer to restore the coherence of the spin ensemble by canceling out phase inhomogeneities and creating a spin echo in the contrast. However, for high atomic densities, we observe the opposite behavior: the $\\pi$-pulse accelerates the dephasing of the spin ensemble leading to a faster contrast decay of the interferometer. We understand this phenomenon as a competition between the spin-echo technique and an exchange-interaction driven spin self-rephasing mechanism based on the identical spin rotation effect (ISRE). Our experimental data is well reproduced by a numerical model.

  3. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulieu, Olivier; da Silva, Humberto, Jr.; Aymar, Mireille; Raoult, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca+ , Sr+ , Ba+) and Yb+ are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions show that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level. Supported by the Marie-Curie ITN ``COMIQ: Cold Molecular Ions at the Quantum limit'' of the EU (#607491).

  4. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Humberto Da; Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca + , Sr + , Ba +) and Yb + are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions are also calculated, showing that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level.

  5. Shaping the evanescent field of optical nanofibers for cold atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Phelan, C F; Busch, Th

    2013-01-01

    We investigate trapping geometries for cold, neutral atoms that can be created in the evanescent field of a tapered optical fibre by combining the fundamental mode with one of the next lowest possible modes, namely the HE21 mode. Counter propagating red-detuned HE21 modes are combined with a blue-detuned HE11 fundamental mode to form a potential in the shape of four intertwined spirals. By changing the polar- ization from circular to linear in each of the two counter-propagating HE21 modes simultaneously the 4-helix configuration can be transformed into a lattice configuration. The modification to the 4-helix configuration due to unwanted excitation of the the T E01 and T M01 modes is also discussed.

  6. Spectral narrowing of coherent population trapping resonance in laser-cooled and room-temperature atomic gas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pradhan; S Mishra; R Behera; N Kawade; A K Das

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated coherent population trapping (CPT) in laser-cooled as well as room-temperature (with and without buffer gas) rubidium atoms. The characteristic broad signal profile emerging from the two-photon Raman resonance for room-temperature atomic vapour is consistent with the theoretical calculation incorporating associated thermal averaging. The spectral width of the dark resonance obtained with cold atoms is found to be broadened, compared to roomtemperature vapour cell, due to the feeble role played by thermal averaging, although the cold atomic sample significantly overcomes the limitation of the transit time broadening. An alternative way to improve transit time is to use a buffer gas, with which we demonstrate that the coherent population trapping signal width is reduced to < 540 Hz.

  7. Coherent injecting, extracting, and velocity filtering of neutral atoms in a ring trap via spatial adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Loiko, Yurii; Menchon-Enrich, Ricard; Birkl, Gerhard; Mompart, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    We introduce here a coherent technique to inject, extract, and velocity filter neutral atoms in a ring trap coupled via tunneling to two additional waveguides. By adiabatically following the transverse spatial dark state, the proposed technique allows for an efficient and robust velocity dependent atomic population transfer between the ring and the input/output waveguides. We have derived explicit conditions for the spatial adiabatic passage that depend on the atomic velocity along the input waveguide as well as on the initial population distribution among the transverse vibrational states. The validity of our proposal has been checked by numerical integration of the corresponding two dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation with state-of-the-art parameter values for $^{87}$Rb atoms and an optical dipole ring trap.

  8. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO2, H2 and H2O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L-1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L-1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  9. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Prof.S. Chu presents "the manipulation of atoms and bio-molecules by laser light" : a brief history of the laser cooling and trapping of atoms developed over the past 15 years will be presented. The cooling and trapping technology is already being applied in numerous areas of science and engineering. Applications to be discussed include atomic clocks, atom interferometers, as well as studies in polymer dynamics and protein motion.

  10. The Trapping and Cooling of Alkalis Metal Atoms%碱金属原子的囚禁与冷却

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓海明; 李璋

    2012-01-01

      描述了如何利用激光以及磁场构建光学粘胶、激光阱、磁阱、磁光阱等实现对碱金属的囚禁与冷却,旨在明晰的呈现BEC实验实现的关键技术、物理原理以及各种装置的优缺点。%  This essay describes how to use laser and magnetic field to construct optical molasses ,laser trap ,mag-netic trap and magneto -optical trap to trap and cool alkali-metal atoms .It presents clearly the key experimental technologies of Bose-Einstein condensate ,the physical principle and the relative advantages and disadvantages of different equipments .

  11. Modified oscillator approach to ultracold collisions in tight harmonic traps General model and application to metastable helium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Peach, G; Beams, T J; Peach, Gillian; Whittingham, Ian B; Beams, Timothy J

    2002-01-01

    A novel modified oscillator method of calculating energy eigenvalues for colliding ultracold atoms tightly confined in harmonic potentials is presented and applied to trapped spin-polarized metastable helium atoms. The perturbed harmonic oscillator problem is characterized by a long asymptotic region beyond the effective range of the interatomic potential, and a very efficient method for integrating inwards through this outer region is developed. The calculated eigenvalues for states with $l=0$ agree closely with those computed directly from the radial Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for the trapped atoms using a discrete variable method, and with those computed self-consistently from an energy-dependent effective scattering length. Finally, the self-consistent method is generalized to collisions with $l \

  12. Ramsey fringes in a Bose-Einstein condensate between atoms and molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkelmans, SJJMF Servaas; Holland, MJ

    2002-01-01

    In a recent experiment, a Feshbach scattering resonance was exploited to observe Ramsey fringes in a $^{85}$Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. The oscillation frequency corresponded to the binding energy of the molecular state. We show that the observations are remarkably consistent with predictions of a resonance field theory in which the fringes arise from oscillations between atoms and molecules.

  13. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as an Adsorbent for Preconcentration and Determination of Trace Amount of Nickel in Environmental Samples by Atom Trap Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhanloo, H.; Falahnejad, M.; Zavvar Mousavi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A rapid enrichment method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been established for preconcentration and separation of trace Ni(II) ions in water samples prior to their determination by atom trap flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A column filled with bulky NH2-UVM7 was used as the novel adsorbent. Under optimal conditions, the linear range, limit of detection (LOD), and preconcentration factor (PF) were 3-92 μg/L, 0.8 μg/L, and 100, respectively. The validity of the method was checked by the standard reference material.

  14. The dynamics of triple-well trapped Bose-Einstein condensates with atoms feeding and loss effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Ai-Xia; Zhou Xiao-Yan; Xue Ju-Kui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the macroscopic quantum tunnelling and self-trapping phenomena of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with three-body recombination losses and atoms feeding from thermal cloud in triple-well potential.Using the three-mode approximation, three coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs), which describe the dynamics of the system, are obtained. The corresponding numerical results reveal some interesting characteristics of BECs for different scattering lengths. The self-trapping and quantum tunnelling both are found in zero-phase and π-pbaso modes.Furthermore, we observe the quantum beating phenomenon and the resonance character during the self-trapping and quantum tunnelling. It is also shown that the initial phase has a significant effect on the dynamics of the system.

  15. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Yu, Ping; Balslev, Søren;

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5 x 10(6) atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  16. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, D. N; Yu, P.; Balslev, S.;

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5×106 atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  17. Under-coordinated atoms induced local strain, quantum trap depression and valence charge polarization at W stepped surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have explored the effects of atoms under-coordination on surface structure relaxation, binding energy shift of W stepped surfaces and valence charge polarization by the method of incorporating bond order-length-strength (BOLS) correlation mechanism into high-resolution X-ray photoluminescence spectra (XPS) measurements as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Results show that the 4f7/2 energy levels of bulk, surface skin and step edge W atoms shift deeper from 2.17 to 2.69 eV with respect to that of the isolated W (28.91±0.01 eV) atoms, while the valence charge energy shift upper from inner to outer layer and from bulk to stepped edge. The surface bond contraction occurs around under-coordinated atoms after geometry relaxation calculation. Consistency among BOLS calculations, DFT calculation and experimental measurements clarifies that the surface bond contraction and consolidation due to the effects of under-coordination atoms induce potential trap depression, which provides perturbation to the Hamiltonian and hence contributes to the surface core level shift deeper, and that the surface valence charge are polarized by the densely trapped core-level electrons to upper energy.

  18. Chaotic atomic population oscillations between two coupled Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent asymmetric trap potential

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chaohong; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Xiwen; Gao, Kelin; Hai, Wenhua; Duan, Yiwu; Liu, Wing-Ki

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the chaotic atomic population oscillations between two coupled Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) with time-dependent asymmetric trap potential. In the perturbative regime, the population oscillations can be described by the Duffing equation, and the chaotic oscillations near the separatrix solution are analyzed. The sufficient-necessary conditions for stable oscillations depend on the physical parameters and initial conditions sensitively. The first-order necessary conditio...

  19. Wide range and highly sensitive atomic magnetometry with Rb vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Iftiquar, S M

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a technique in which Rb atomic response to weak magnetic field is high and an efficient rotation of linearly polarized laser beam results in efficient magnetometry. 85Rb isotope has been used for the magnetometry in an ordinary vapor cell without any paraffin coating to its inner wall. A linear regime of Faraday rotation of about 25 microT has been observed with atomic number density within the vapor cell of about 10^9 cm-3.

  20. Suppression of single cesium atom heating in a microscopic optical dipole trap for demonstration of an 852nm triggered single-photon source

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Bei; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate single cesium (Cs) atom heating owing to the momentum accumulation process induced by the resonant pulsed excitation in a microscopic optical dipole trap formed by a strongly focused 1064 nm laser beam. The heating depends on the trap frequency which restricts the maximum repetition rate of pulsed excitation. We experimentally verify the heating of a single atom and then demonstrate how to suppress it with an optimized pulsed excitation/cooling method. The typical trap lifetime of single Cs atom is extended from 108 +/- 6 us to 2536 +/- 31 ms, and the corresponding number of excitation increases from ~ 108 to ~ 360000. In applying this faster cooling method, we use the trapped single Cs atom as a triggered single-photon source at an excitation repetition rate of 10 MHz. The second-order intensity correlations of the emitted single photons are characterized by implementing Hanbury Brown and Twiss setup, and clear anti-bunching effect has been observed.

  1. Quantum phase gate through the dispersive atom–field interaction with atoms trapped in optical cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Dong; Zhang, Yan-Lei; Zou, Chang-Ling, E-mail: clzou321@ustc.edu.cn; Zou, Xu-Bo, E-mail: xbz@ustc.edu.cn; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-10-09

    We propose an experimental feasible scheme for implementing two-qubit quantum phase gate with atoms trapped in an optical cavity. The scheme is based on the dispersive interaction between the optical cavity mode and the three-level atoms in Λ configuration, which has been demonstrated in recent cavity-induced spin squeezing experiment (Leroux et al., 2010) [26]. We also discuss the influence of the cavity decay on the gate fidelity. It is shown that the fidelity of the phase gate is robust to the cavity decay and the high-fidelity quantum phase gate can be implemented with the current experimental technology. - Highlights: • A experimental feasible scheme for implementing two-qubit quantum phase gate. • Based on the dispersive interaction between the optical cavity mode and the symmetrically configurated three-level atoms. • Influence of the cavity decay on the gate fidelity is discussed.

  2. An atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) system for measuring ultra-low contamination by krypton in xenon dark matter detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae Hyun

    The XENON dark matter experiment aims to detect hypothetical weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) scattering off nuclei within its liquid xenon (LXe) target. The trace 85Kr in the xenon target undergoes beta-decay with a 687 keV end point and 10.8 year halflife, which contributes background events and limits the sensitivity of the experiment. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity, the contamination by krypton is reduced to the part per trillion (ppt) level by cryogenic distillation. The conventional methods are not well suited for measuring the krypton contamination at such a low level. In this work, we have developed an atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) device to detect the ultra-low krypton concentration in the xenon target. This project was proposed to the National Science Foundation (NSF) as a Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) development [Aprile and Zelevinsky, 2009] and is funded by NSF and Columbia University. The ATTA method, originally developed at Argonne National Laboratory, uses standard laser cooling and trapping techniques, and counts single trapped atoms. Since the isotopic abundance of 85Kr in nature is 1.5 x 10-11, the 85Kr/Xe level is expected to be ˜10-23, which is beyond the capability of our method. Thus we detect the most abundant (57%) isotope 84Kr, and infer the 85Kr contamination from their known abundances. To avoid contamination by krypton, the setup is tested and optimized with 40 Ar which has a similar cooling wavelength to 84Kr. Two main challenges in this experiment are to obtain a trapping efficiency high enough to detect krypton impurities at the ppt level, and to achieve the resolution to discriminate single atoms. The device is specially designed and adjusted to meet these challenges. After achieving these criteria with argon gas, we precisely characterize the efficiency of the system using Kr-Xe mixtures with known ratios, and find that ˜90 minutes are required to trap one 84Kr atom at the 1-ppt Kr

  3. Magnetic transport apparatus for the production of ultracold atomic gases in the vicinity of a dielectric surface

    CERN Document Server

    Haendel, S; Wiles, T P; Hopkins, S A; Cornish, S L

    2011-01-01

    We present an apparatus designed for studies of atom-surface interactions using quantum degenerate gases of $^{85}$Rb and $^{87}$Rb in the vicinity of a room temperature dielectric surface. The surface to be investigated is a super-polished face of a glass Dove prism mounted in a glass cell under ultra-high vacuum (UHV). To maintain excellent optical access to the region surrounding the surface magnetic transport is used to deliver ultracold atoms from a separate vacuum chamber housing the magneto-optical trap (MOT). We present a detailed description of the vacuum apparatus highlighting the novel design features; a low profile MOT chamber and the inclusion of an obstacle in the transport path. We report the characterization and optimization of the magnetic transport around the obstacle, achieving transport efficiencies of 70% with negligible heating. Finally we demonstrate the loading of a hybrid optical-magnetic trap with $^{87}$Rb and the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates via forced evaporative cooling ...

  4. The architecture of neutrophil extracellular traps investigated by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ricardo H.; Felix, Stephan B.; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    Neutrophils are immune cells that engage in a suicidal pathway leading to the release of partially decondensed chromatin, or neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs behave as a double edged sword; they can bind to pathogens thereby ensnaring them and limiting their spread during infection; however, they may bind to host circulating materials and trigger thrombotic events, and are associated with autoimmune disorders. Despite the fundamental role of NETs as part of an immune system response, there is currently a very poor understanding of how their nanoscale properties are reflected in their macroscopic impact. In this work, using a combination of fluorescence and atomic force microscopy, we show that NETs appear as a branching filament network that results in a substantially organized porous structure with openings with 0.03 +/- 0.04 μm2 on average and thus in the size range of small pathogens. Topological profiles typically up to 3 +/- 1 nm in height are compatible with a ``beads on a string'' model of nucleosome chromatin. Typical branch lengths of 153 +/- 103 nm appearing as rigid rods and height profiles of naked DNA in NETs of 1.2 +/- 0.5 nm are indicative of extensive DNA supercoiling throughout NETs. The presence of DNA duplexes could also be inferred from force spectroscopy and the occurrence of force plateaus that ranged from ~65 pN to 300 pN. Proteolytic digestion of NETs resulted in widespread disassembly of the network structure and considerable loss of mechanical properties. Our results suggest that the underlying structure of NETs is considerably organized and that part of its protein content plays an important role in maintaining its mesh architecture. We anticipate that NETs may work as microscopic mechanical sieves with elastic properties that stem from their DNA-protein composition, which is able to segregate particles also as a result of their size. Such a behavior may explain their participation in capturing pathogens and their association

  5. Effect of concurrent joule heat and charge trapping on RESET for NbAlO fabricated by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Ye, Li; Sun, Qing Qing; Wang, Peng Fei; Jiang, An Quan; Ding, Shi Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2013-01-01

    The RESET process of NbAlO-based resistive switching memory devices fabricated by atomic layer deposition is investigated at low temperatures from 80 to 200 K. We observed that the conduction mechanism of high resistance state changed from hopping conduction to Frenkel-Poole conduction with elevated temperature. It is found that the conductive filament rupture in RRAM RESET process can be attributed not only to the Joule heat generated by internal current flow through a filament but also to the charge trap/detrapping effect. The RESET current decreases upon heating. Meanwhile, the energy consumption also decreases exponentially. This phenomenon indicates the temperature-related charge trap/detrapping process which contributes to the RESET besides direct Joule heat. PMID:23421401

  6. Chaotic atomic population oscillations between two coupled Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent asymmetric trap potential

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, C; Zhu, X; Gao, K; Hai, W; Duan Yi Shi; Liu, W K; Lee, Chaohong; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Xiwen; Gao, Kelin; Hai, Wenhua; Duan, Yiwu; Liu, Wing-Ki

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the chaotic atomic population oscillations between two coupled Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) with time-dependent asymmetric trap potential. In the perturbative regime, the population oscillations can be described by the Duffing equation, and the chaotic oscillations near the separatrix solution are analyzed. The sufficient-necessary conditions for stable oscillations depend on the physical parameters and initial conditions sensitively. The first-order necessary condition indicates that the Melnikov function is equal to zero, so the stable oscillations are Melnikov chaotic. For the ordinary parameters and initial conditions, the chaotic dynamics is simulated with numerical calculation. If the damping is absent, with the increasing of the trap asymmetry, the regular oscillations become chaotic gradually, the corresponding stroboscopic Poincare sections (SPS) vary from a single island to more islands, and then the chaotic sea. For the completely chaotic oscillations, the long-term localiza...

  7. Inelastic scattering of light by a cold trapped atom: Effects of the quantum center-of-mass motion

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, M; Morigi, G; Bienert, Marc; Merkel, Wolfgang; Morigi, Giovanna

    2005-01-01

    The light scattered by a cold trapped ion, which is in the stationary state of laser cooling, presents features due to the mechanical effects of atom-photon interaction. These features appear as additional peaks (sidebands) in the spectrum of resonance fluorescence. Among these sidebands the literature has discussed the Stokes and anti-Stokes components, namely the sidebands of the elastic peak. In this manuscript we show that the motion also gives rise to sidebands of the inelastic peaks. These are not always visible, but, as we show, can be measured in parameter regimes which are experimentally accessible.

  8. Blue-detuned evanescent field surface traps for neutral atoms based on mode interference in ultra-thin optical fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Sague, G.; Baade, A.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2008-01-01

    We present and analyze a novel concept for blue-detuned evanescent field surface traps for cold neutral atoms based on two-mode interference in ultra-thin optical fibres. When two or more transverse modes with the same frequency co-propagate in the fibre, their different phase velocities cause a stationary interference pattern to establish. Intensity minima of the evanescent field at any distance from the fibre surface can be created and an array of optical microtraps can thus be obtained in ...

  9. Compact FPGA-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned

    2015-01-01

    We present a compact FPGA-based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 TTL channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube (PMT). There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers (DDS) RF sources with fast (rise-time of ~60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz.

  10. Fast Non-destructive temperature measurement of two-electrons atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiani, Matteo; Valenzuela, Tristan; Gothe, Hannes; Eschner, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    We extend the technique originally proposed by Honda et al.to measure the temperature of Ytterbium and alkine-earth atoms confined in a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). The method is based on the analysis of excitation spectra obtained by probing the 1S0->3P1 inter-combination line. Thanks to a careful analysis and modeling of the effects caused by the MOT light on the probe transition we overcome the resolution and precision limits encountered in previous works. Ground state light shift and Rabi ...

  11. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned, E-mail: thaned.pruttivarasin@riken.jp [Quantum Metrology Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Katori, Hidetoshi [Quantum Metrology Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovative Space-Time Project, ERATO, JST, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ∼60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz.

  12. Investigations of the ground-state hyperfine atomic structure and beta decay measurement prospects of {sup 21}Na with improved laser trapping techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Mary A.

    1999-05-24

    This thesis describes an experiment in which a neutral atom laser trap loaded with radioactive {sup 21}Na was improved and then used for measurements. The sodium isotope (half-life=22 sec) is produced on line at the 88in cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The author developed an effective magnesium oxide target system which is crucial to deliver a substantive beam of {sup 21}Na to the experiment. Efficient manipulation of the {sup 21}Na beam with lasers allowed 30,000 atoms to be contained in a magneto-optical trap. Using the cold trapped atoms, the author measured to high precision the hyperfine splitting of the atomic ground state of {sup 21}Na. She measured the 3S{sub 1/2}(F=1,m=0)-3S{sub 1/2}(F=2,m=0) atomic level splitting of {sup 21}Na to be 1,906,471,870{+-}200 Hz. Additionally, she achieved initial detection of beta decay from the trap and evaluated the prospects of precision beta decay correlation studies with trapped atoms.

  13. Fast Non-destructive temperature measurement of two-electrons atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Cristiani, Matteo; Gothe, Hannes; Eschner, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    We extend the technique originally proposed by Honda et al.to measure the temperature of Ytterbium and alkine-earth atoms confined in a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). The method is based on the analysis of excitation spectra obtained by probing the 1S0->3P1 inter-combination line. Thanks to a careful analysis and modeling of the effects caused by the MOT light on the probe transition we overcome the resolution and precision limits encountered in previous works. Ground state light shift and Rabi broadening are measured and successfully compared with calculated values. This knowledge allows us to properly extract the Doppler contribution to the linewidth, thus obtaining a reliable measurement of the cloud temperature. We finally show how spectroscopy on free-falling atoms provides an alternative method to determine the sample temperature which resembles the standard time-of-flight technique.

  14. Simple Theoretical Models for Resonant Cold Atom Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Julienne, Paul S.; Gao, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Magnetically tunable scattering resonances have been used with great success for precise control of s-wave scattering lengths in ultracold atomic collisions. We describe relatively simple yet quite powerful analytic treatments of such resonances based on the analytic properties of the van der Waals long range potential. This theory can be used to characterize a number of properties of specific resonances that have been used successfully in various experiments with $^{87}$Rb, $^{85}$Rb, $^{40}...

  15. TRI mu P - A new facility to investigate fundamental interactions with optically trapped radioactive atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, K

    2002-01-01

    At the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) in Groningen, NL, a new facility (TRImuP) is under development. It aims for producing, slowing down and trapping of radioactive isotopes in order to perform accurate measurements on fundamental symmetries and interactions. A spectrum of radioactive nucli

  16. Born-Oppenheimer description of two atoms in a combined oscillator and lattice trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Søe; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the quantum states of two identical bosons in a combined harmonic oscillator and periodic lattice trap in one spatial dimension. In the case of tight-binding and only nearest-neighbor tunneling, the equations of motion are conveniently represented in the momentum representation. We show...

  17. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.;

    2012-01-01

    We report on a directional atomic beam created using an alkali metal dispenser and a nozzle. By applying a high current (15 A) pulse to the dispenser at room temperature we can rapidly heat it to a temperature at which it starts dispensing, avoiding the need for preheating. The atomic beam produced...

  18. Trapping a single atom with a fraction of a photon using a photonic crystal nanocavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, D.; Kuipers, L.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a single rubidium atom and a photonic crystal nanocavity. Because of the ultrasmall mode volume of the nanocavity, an extremely strong coupling regime can be achieved in which the atom can shift the cavity resonance by many cavity linewidths. We show that this shi

  19. Atomic parity violation in heavy alkalis: detection by stimulated emission for cesium and traps for cold francium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work deals with the recent advances of atomic spectroscopy experiments on cesium and francium, which aim at precise parity violation (PV) measurements in these atoms. Within the framework of a 'double-badged thesis', the candidate devoted himself on the one hand to the preliminary PV measurement (8% accuracy) of the present Cs experiment at the Kastler-Brossel laboratory in Paris and on the other hand to the preparation of a Fr radioactive atomic sample (production and trapping) at the LNL (INFN) in Italy. The two experiments are at very different stages. The measurements reported for cesium were actually made possible thanks to the work initiated in 1991, for the PV detection by stimulated emission. The Italian experiment is instead in a beginning stage: in order to probe the properties of francium, which is unstable, a number of atoms large enough has to be first produced and collected. The PV schemes which proved to be well suited for cesium are a solid starting point for the case of francium. (author)

  20. Atomic parity violation in heavy alkalis: detection by stimulated emission for cesium and traps for cold francium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguinetti, St

    2004-07-01

    The present work deals with the recent advances of atomic spectroscopy experiments on cesium and francium, which aim at precise parity violation (PV) measurements in these atoms. Within the framework of a 'double-badged thesis', the candidate devoted himself on the one hand to the preliminary PV measurement (8% accuracy) of the present Cs experiment at the Kastler-Brossel laboratory in Paris and on the other hand to the preparation of a Fr radioactive atomic sample (production and trapping) at the LNL (INFN) in Italy. The two experiments are at very different stages. The measurements reported for cesium were actually made possible thanks to the work initiated in 1991, for the PV detection by stimulated emission. The Italian experiment is instead in a beginning stage: in order to probe the properties of francium, which is unstable, a number of atoms large enough has to be first produced and collected. The PV schemes which proved to be well suited for cesium are a solid starting point for the case of francium. (author)

  1. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    Audiovideo service

    1998-01-01

    Prof. C. Cohen-Tannoudji presents "manipulating atoms with light" . By using quasi-resonant exchanges of energy, linear and angular momentum between atoms and photons, it is possible to polarize atoms, to displace their energy levels and to control their position and their velocity. A few physical mechanisms allowing one to trap atoms and to cool them in the microKelvin, and even in the nanoKelvin range, will be described. Various possible applications of such ultracold atoms will be also reviewed.

  2. Dispersive response of atoms trapped near the surface of an optical nanofiber with applications to quantum nondemolition measurement and spin squeezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaodong; Baragiola, Ben Q.; Jessen, Poul S.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2016-02-01

    We study the strong coupling between photons and atoms that can be achieved in an optical nanofiber geometry when the interaction is dispersive. While the Purcell enhancement factor for spontaneous emission into the guided mode does not reach the strong-coupling regime for individual atoms, one can obtain high cooperativity for ensembles of a few thousand atoms due to the tight confinement of the guided modes and constructive interference over the entire chain of trapped atoms. We calculate the dyadic Green's function, which determines the scattering of light by atoms in the presence of the fiber, and thus the phase shift and polarization rotation induced on the guided light by the trapped atoms. The Green's function is related to a full Heisenberg-Langevin treatment of the dispersive response of the quantized field to tensor polarizable atoms. We apply our formalism to quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement of the atoms via polarimetry. We study shot-noise-limited detection of atom number for atoms in a completely mixed spin state and the squeezing of projection noise for atoms in clock states. Compared with squeezing of atomic ensembles in free space, we capitalize on unique features that arise in the nanofiber geometry including anisotropy of both the intensity and polarization of the guided modes. We use a first-principles stochastic master equation to model the squeezing as a function of time in the presence of decoherence due to optical pumping. We find a peak metrological squeezing of ˜5 dB is achievable with current technology for ˜2500 atoms trapped 180 nm from the surface of a nanofiber with radius a =225 nm.

  3. Critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation in trapped atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the shift in the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation for a dilute Bose-Fermi mixture confined by a harmonic potential, to lowest order in both the Bose-Bose and Bose-Fermi coupling constants. The relative importance of the effect on the critical temperature of the boson-boson and boson-fermion interactions is investigated as a function of the parameters of the mixture. The possible relevance of the shift of the transition temperature in current experiments on trapped Bose-Fermi mixtures is discussed. (letter to the editor)

  4. Critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation in trapped atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albus, A P [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Potsdam, D-14469 Potsdam (Germany); Giorgini, S [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Illuminati, F [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy); Viverit, L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, I-38050 Povo (Italy)

    2002-12-14

    We calculate the shift in the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation for a dilute Bose-Fermi mixture confined by a harmonic potential, to lowest order in both the Bose-Bose and Bose-Fermi coupling constants. The relative importance of the effect on the critical temperature of the boson-boson and boson-fermion interactions is investigated as a function of the parameters of the mixture. The possible relevance of the shift of the transition temperature in current experiments on trapped Bose-Fermi mixtures is discussed. (letter to the editor)

  5. Coherent Population Trapping Resonances in Cs Atomic Vapor Layers of Micrometric Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krasteva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel behavior of the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA resonance observed on the D2 line of Cs for atoms confined in cells with micrometric thickness. With the enhancement of light intensity, the EIA resonance amplitude suffers from fast reduction, and even at very low intensity (W < 1 mW/cm2, resonance sign reversal takes place and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT resonance is observed. Similar EIA resonance transformation to EIT one is not observed in conventional cm-size cells. A theoretical model is proposed to analyze the physical processes behind the EIA resonance sign reversal with light intensity. The model involves elastic interactions between Cs atoms as well as elastic interaction of atom micrometric-cell windows, both resulting in depolarization of excited state which can lead to the new observations. The effect of excited state depolarization is confirmed also by the fluorescence (absorption spectra measurement in micrometric cells with different thicknesses.

  6. Decay of a superfluid current of ultracold atoms in a toroidal trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Amy C.; Clark, Charles W.; Mathey, L.

    2014-08-01

    Using a numerical implementation of the truncated Wigner approximation, we simulate the experiment reported by Ramanathan et al. in Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 130401 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.130401, in which a Bose-Einstein condensate is created in a toroidal trap and set into rotation via a phase imprinting technique. A potential barrier is then placed in the trap to study the decay of the superflow. We find that the current decays via thermally activated phase slips, which can also be visualized as vortices crossing the barrier region in the radial direction. Adopting the notion of critical velocity used in the experiment, we determine it to be lower than the local speed of sound at the barrier, in contradiction to the predictions of the zero-temperature Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We map out the superfluid decay rate and critical velocity as a function of temperature and observe a strong dependence. Thermal fluctuations offer a partial explanation of the experimentally observed reduction of the critical velocity from the phonon velocity.

  7. Spectroscopy of ^1S0 -- ^3P1^88Sr Atomic Transition in a 1.06 μm Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Traverso, A. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effects of laser light near-resonant with the ^1S0-- ^3P1^88Sr transition in an optical dipole trap (ODT). We observe laser cooling of our ODT atomic sample as the atoms collide in the presence of red-detuned 689 nm light. Heating of the atoms was also observed at a different range of frequency detunings while performing spectroscopy. Both processes were accompanied with atom loss, but the increase of phase space density observed during 689 nm laser cooling could aid pursuits of quantum degeneracy with Sr.

  8. Ion-neutral chemistry at ultralow energies: Dynamics of reactive collisions between laser-cooled Ca^+ ions and Rb atoms in an ion-atom hybrid trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Felix H J; Hegi, Gregor; Raoult, Maurice; Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier; Willitsch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cold chemical reactions between laser-cooled Ca^+ ions and Rb atoms were studied in an ion-atom hybrid trap. Reaction rate constants were determined in the range of collision energies /k_B = 20 mK-20 K. The lowest energies were achieved in experiments using single localized Ca^+ ions. Product branching ratios were studied using resonant-excitation mass spectrometry. The dynamics of the reactive processes in this system (non-radiative and radiative charge transfer as well as radiative association leading to the formation of CaRb^+ molecular ions) have been analyzed using high-level quantum-chemical calculations of the potential energy curves of CaRb^+ and quantum-scattering calculations for the radiative channels. For the present low-energy scattering experiments, it is shown that the energy dependence of the reaction rate constants is governed by long-range interactions in line with the classical Langevin model, but their magnitude is determined by short-range non-adiabatic and radiative couplings which only ...

  9. Evaporative cooling of cesium atoms in the gravito-optical surface trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hammes, M; Grimm, R

    2000-01-01

    We report on cooling of an atomic cesium gas closely above an evanescent-wave. Our first evaporation experiments show a temperature reduction from 10muK down to 300nK along with a gain in phase-space density of almost two orders of magnitude. In a series of measurements of heating and spin depolarization an incoherent background of resonant photons in the evanescent-wave diode laser light was found to be the limiting factor at this stage.

  10. Internal Josephson-like tunnelling in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates affected by sign of the atomic interaction and external trapping potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Bo; Liu Xun-Xu

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the Josephson-like tunnelling in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates coupled with microwave field, which is in respond to various attractive and repulsive atomic interaction under the various aspect ratio of trapping potential. It is very interesting to find that the dynamic of Josephson-like tunnelling can be controlled from fast damped oscillations to nondamped oscillation, and relative number of atoms changes from asymmetric occupation to symmetric occupation correspondingly.

  11. Interplay of Coexisting Odd-Order Wave Mixings in a Five-Level Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yue; HUO Shu-Li; LI Pei-Ying; SANG Su-Ling; WANG Zhi-Guo; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2011-01-01

    @@ We experimentally investigate the interplay between two coexisting six-wave mixing (SWM) signals and the interference between coexisting four-wave mixing (FWM) and SWM signals in a five-level atomic system of85 Rb.When two electromagnetically induced transparency windows gradually overlap in frequency, the competition between these two SWM signals arises.Moreover, we report the experimental result which shows that the temporal interference with femtosecond time scales between FWM and SWM signals.%We experimentally investigate the interplay between two coexisting six-wave mixing (SWM) signals and the interference between coexisting four-wave mixing (FWM) and SWM signals in a five-level atomic system of 85 Rb.When two electromagnetically induced transparency windows gradually overlap in frequency, the competition between these two SWM signals arises.Moreover, we report the experimental result which shows that the temporal interference with femtosecond time scales between FWM and SWM signals.

  12. Laser frequency locking with 46 GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Harada, K; Ezure, S; Kato, K; Hayamizu, T; Kawamura, H; Inoue, T; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Aoki, T; Uchiyama, A; Sakamoto, K; Ito, S; Itoh, M; Ando, S; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Shimizu, Y; Sato, T; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated a frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I2. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  13. Application of potential harmonic expansion method to BEC: Thermodynamic properties of trapped 23Na atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anasuya Kundu; Barnali Chakrabarti; Tapan Kumar Das

    2005-07-01

    We adopt the potential harmonics expansion method for an ab initio solution of the many-body system in a Bose condensate containing interacting bosons. Unlike commonly adopted mean-field theories, our method is capable of handling two-body correlation properly. We disregard three- and higher-body correlations. This simplification is ideally suited to dilute Bose Einstein condensates, whose number density is required to be so small that the interparticle separation is much larger than the range of two-body interaction to avoid three- and higher-body collisions, leading to the formation of molecules and consequent instability of the condensate. In our method we can incorporate realistic finite range interactions. We calculate energies of low-lying states of a condensate containing 23Na atoms and some thermodynamical properties of the condensate.

  14. Rydberg-induced optical nonlinearities from a cold atomic ensemble trapped inside a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddeda, R.; Usmani, I.; Bimbard, E.; Grankin, A.; Ourjoumtsev, A.; Brion, E.; Grangier, P.

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally characterize the optical nonlinear response of a cold atomic medium placed inside an optical cavity, and excited to Rydberg states. The excitation to S and D Rydberg levels is carried out via a two-photon transition in an electromagnetically induced transparency configuration, with a weak (red) probe beam on the lower transition, and a strong (blue) coupling beam on the upper transition. The observed optical nonlinearities induced by S states for the probe beam can be explained using a semi-classical model with van der Waals’ interactions. For the D states, it appears necessary to take into account a dynamical decay of Rydberg excitations into a long-lived dark state. We show that the measured nonlinearities can be explained by using a Rydberg bubble model with a dynamical decay.

  15. Rydberg-induced optical nonlinearities from a cold atomic ensemble trapped inside a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Boddeda, Rajiv; Bimbard, Erwan; Grankin, Andrey; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Brion, Etienne; Grangier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally characterize the optical nonlinear response of a cold atomic medium placed inside an optical cavity, and excited to Rydberg states. The excitation to S and D Rydberg levels is carried out via a two-photon transition in an EIT (electromagnetically induced transparency) configuration, with a weak (red) probe beam on the lower transition, and a strong (blue) coupling beam on the upper transition. The observed optical nonlinearities induced by S states for the probe beam can be explained using a semi-classical model with van der Waals' interactions. For the D states, it appears necessary to take into account a dynamical decay of Rydberg excitations into a long-lived dark state. We show that the measured nonlinearities can be explained by using a Rydberg bubble model with a dynamical decay.

  16. Precision Gravity Tests with Atom Interferometry in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tino, G. M.; Sorrentino, F.; Aguilera, D.; Battelier, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Bodart, Q.; Bongs, K.; Bouyer, P.; Braxmaier, C.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Gaaloul, N.; Gürlebeck, N.; Hauth, M.; Herrmann, S.; Krutzik, M.; Kubelka, A.; Landragin, A.; Milke, A.; Peters, A.; Rasel, E. M.; Rocco, E.; Schubert, C.; Schuldt, T.; Sengstock, K.; Wicht, A.

    2013-10-01

    Atom interferometry provides extremely sensitive and accurate tools for the measurement of inertial forces. Operation of atom interferometers in microgravity is expected to enhance the performance of such sensors. This paper presents two possible implementations of a dual 85Rb-87Rb atom interferometer to perform differential gravity measurements in space, with the primary goal to test the Weak Equivalence Principle. The proposed scheme is in the framework of two projects of the European Space Agency, namely Q-WEP and STE-QUEST. The paper describes the baseline experimental configuration, and discusses the technology readiness, noise and error budget for the two proposed experiments.

  17. Precision Gravity Tests with Atom Interferometry in Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tino, G.M.; Sorrentino, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Università di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Aguilera, D. [Institute of Space Systems, German Aerospace Center, Robert-Hooke-Strasse 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Battelier, B.; Bertoldi, A. [Laboratoire Photonique, Numérique et Nanosciences, LP2N - UMR5298 - IOGS - CNRS Université Bordeaux 1, Bâtiment A30 351 cours de la Libération F-33405 TALENCE Cedex France (France); Bodart, Q. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Università di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bongs, K. [Midlands Ultracold Atom Research Centre School of Physics and Astronomy University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bouyer, P. [Laboratoire Photonique, Numérique et Nanosciences, LP2N - UMR5298 - IOGS - CNRS Université Bordeaux 1, Bâtiment A30 351 cours de la Libération F-33405 TALENCE Cedex France (France); Braxmaier, C. [Institute of Space Systems, German Aerospace Center, Robert-Hooke-Strasse 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Cacciapuoti, L. [European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Gaaloul, N. [Institute of Quantum Optics, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D 30167 Hannover (Germany); Gürlebeck, N. [University of Bremen, Centre of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), Am Fallturm, D - 29359 Bremen (Germany); Hauth, M. [Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2013-10-15

    Atom interferometry provides extremely sensitive and accurate tools for the measurement of inertial forces. Operation of atom interferometers in microgravity is expected to enhance the performance of such sensors. This paper presents two possible implementations of a dual {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb atom interferometer to perform differential gravity measurements in space, with the primary goal to test the Weak Equivalence Principle. The proposed scheme is in the framework of two projects of the European Space Agency, namely Q-WEP and STE-QUEST. The paper describes the baseline experimental configuration, and discusses the technology readiness, noise and error budget for the two proposed experiments.

  18. Generalized gradient expansion for inhomogeneous dynamical mean-field theory: Application to ultracold atoms in a harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freericks, J. K.; Han, Shuyang; Mikelsons, Karlis; Krishnamurthy, H. R.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a generalized gradient expansion of the inhomogeneous dynamical mean-field theory method for determining properties of ultracold atoms in a trap. This approach goes beyond the well-known local density approximation and at higher temperatures, in the normal phase, it shows why the local density approximation works so well, since the local density and generalized gradient approximations are essentially indistinguishable from each other (and from the exact solution within full inhomogeneous dynamical mean-field theory). But because the generalized gradient expansion only involves nearest-neighbor corrections, it does not work as well at low temperatures, when the systems enter into ordered phases. This is primarily due to the problem that ordered phases often satisfy some global constraints, which determine the spatial ordering pattern, and the local density and generalized gradient approximations are not able to impose those kinds of constraints; they also overestimate the tendency to order. The theory is applied to phase separation of different mass fermionic mixtures represented by the Falicov-Kimball model and to determining the entropy per particle of a fermionic system represented by the Hubbard model. The generalized gradient approximation is a useful diagnostic for the accuracy of the local density approximation—when both methods agree, they are likely accurate, when they disagree, neither is likely to be correct.

  19. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  20. Intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional magneto–optical trap with independent axial cooling and pushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia-Qiang, Huang; Xue-Shu, Yan; Chen-Fei, Wu; Jian-Wei, Zhang; Li-Jun, Wang

    2016-06-01

    We report our studies on an intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional (2D) magneto–optical trap (MOT) with independent axial cooling and pushing. The new-designed source, proposed as 2D-HP MOT, uses hollow laser beams for axial cooling and a thin pushing laser beam to extract a cold atomic beam. With the independent pushing beam, the atomic flux can be substantially optimized. The total atomic flux maximum obtained in the 2D-HP MOT is 4.02 × 1010 atoms/s, increased by 60 percent compared to the traditional 2D+ MOT in our experiment. Moreover, with the pushing power 10 μW and detuning 0Γ, the 2D-HP MOT can generate a rather intense atomic beam with the concomitant light shift suppressed by a factor of 20. The axial velocity distribution of the cold cesium beams centers at 6.8 m/s with an FMHW of about 2.8 m/s. The dependences of the atomic flux on the pushing power and detuning are studied in detail. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical model. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304177).

  1. Intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap with independent axial cooling and pushing

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, J Q; Wu, C F; Zhang, J W; Feng, Y Y; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01

    We report our studies on an intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap with independent axial cooling and pushing. The new-designed source, proposed as 2D-HP MOT, uses hollow laser beams for axial cooling and a thin pushing laser beam for cold atomic beam extraction. Regulated independently by the pushing beam, the atomic flux can be substantially optimized. The atomic flux maximum obtained in the 2D-HP MOT is $4.02\\times 10^{10}$ atoms/s, increased by 60 percent compared to the traditional 2D$^+$ MOT in our experiment. Moreover, with the pushing power 10 $\\mu$W and detuning $0\\Gamma$, the 2D-HP MOT can generate a rather intense cold cesium atomic beam with the concomitant light shift suppressed by 20 times in magnitude. The axial velocity distribution of the cold cesium beams centers at 6.8 m/s with a FMHW of about 2.8 m/s. The dependences of the atomic flux on the pushing power and detuning are studied. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoreti...

  2. Ambient-Temperature Trap/Release of Arsenic by Dielectric Barrier Discharge and Its Application to Ultratrace Arsenic Determination in Surface Water Followed by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuefei; Qi, Yuehan; Huang, Junwei; Liu, Jixin; Chen, Guoying; Na, Xing; Wang, Min; Qian, Yongzhong

    2016-04-01

    A novel dielectric barrier discharge reactor (DBDR) was utilized to trap/release arsenic coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). On the DBD principle, the precise and accurate control of trap/release procedures was fulfilled at ambient temperature, and an analytical method was established for ultratrace arsenic in real samples. Moreover, the effects of voltage, oxygen, hydrogen, and water vapor on trapping and releasing arsenic by DBDR were investigated. For trapping, arsenic could be completely trapped in DBDR at 40 mL/min of O2 input mixed with 600 mL/min Ar carrier gas and 9.2 kV discharge potential; prior to release, the Ar carrier gas input should be changed from the upstream gas liquid separator (GLS) to the downstream GLS and kept for 180 s to eliminate possible water vapor interference; for arsenic release, O2 was replaced by 200 mL/min H2 and discharge potential was adjusted to 9.5 kV. Under optimized conditions, arsenic could be detected as low as 1.0 ng/L with an 8-fold enrichment factor; the linearity of calibration reached R(2) > 0.995 in the 0.05 μg/L-5 μg/L range. The mean spiked recoveries for tap, river, lake, and seawater samples were 98% to 103%; and the measured values of the CRMs including GSB-Z50004-200431, GBW08605, and GBW(E)080390 were in good agreement with the certified values. These findings proved the feasibility of DBDR as an arsenic preconcentration tool for atomic spectrometric instrumentation and arsenic recycling in industrial waste gas discharge. PMID:26976077

  3. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  4. Two-stage magneto-optical trapping and narrow-line cooling of $^6$Li atoms to high phase-space density

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Jimmy; Li, Ke; Gan, Huat Chai Jaren; Li, Wenhui; Dieckmann, Kai

    2014-01-01

    We report an experimental study of peak and phase-space density of a two-stage magneto-optical trap (MOT) of 6-Li atoms, which exploits the narrower $2S_{1/2}\\rightarrow 3P_{3/2}$ ultra-violet (UV) transition at 323 nm following trapping and cooling on the more common D2 transition at 671 nm. The UV MOT is loaded from a red MOT and is compressed to give a high phase-space density up to $3\\times 10^{-4}$. Temperatures as low as 33 $\\mu$K are achieved on the UV transition. We study the density limiting factors and in particular find a value for the light-assisted collisional loss coefficient of $1.3 \\pm0.4\\times10^{-10}\\,\\textrm{cm}^3/\\textrm{s}$ for low repumping intensity.

  5. Simple Theoretical Models for Resonant Cold Atom Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Julienne, P S; Julienne, Paul S.; Gao, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Magnetically tunable scattering resonances have been used with great success for precise control of s-wave scattering lengths in ultracold atomic collisions. We describe relatively simple yet quite powerful analytic treatments of such resonances based on the analytic properties of the van der Waals long range potential. This theory can be used to characterize a number of properties of specific resonances that have been used successfully in various experiments with $^{87}$Rb, $^{85}$Rb, $^{40}$K, and $^{6}$Li. Optical Feshbach resonances are also possible and may be practical with narrow intercombination line photoassociative transitions in species like Sr and Yb.

  6. Analytic Solutions of Three-Level Dressed-Atom Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng-Ling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of the dressed-atom model, the general analytic expressions for the eigenenergies, eigenstates and their optical potentials of the A-configuration three-level atom system are derived and analysed. From the calculation of dipole matrix element of different dressed states, we obtain the spontaneous-emission rates in the dressed-atom picture. We find that our general expressions of optical potentials for the three-level dressed atom can be reduced to the same as ones in previous references under the approximation of a small saturation parameter. We also analyse the dependences of the optical potentials of a three-level 85Rb atom on the laser detuning and the dependences of spontaneous-emission rates on the radial position in the dark hollow beam, and discuss the probability (population) evolutions of dressed-atomic eigenstates in three levels in the hollow beam.

  7. Collisional properties of cold spin-polarized nitrogen gas: theory, experiment, and prospects as a sympathetic coolant for trapped atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tscherbul, T V; Dalgarno, A; Zygelman, B; Pavlovic, Z; Hummon, M T; Lu, H-I; Tsikata, E; Doyle, J M

    2010-01-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of collision-induced dipolar relaxation in a cold spin-polarized gas of atomic nitrogen (N). We use buffer gas cooling to create trapped samples of 14N and 15N atoms with densities 5+/-2 x 10^{12} cm-3 and measure their magnetic relaxation rates at milli-Kelvin temperatures. Rigorous quantum scattering calculations based on accurate ab initio interaction potentials for the 7Sigma_u electronic state of N2 demonstrate that dipolar relaxation in N + N collisions occurs at a slow rate of ~10^{-13} cm3/s over a wide range of temperatures (1 mK to 1 K) and magnetic fields (10 mT to 2 T). The calculated dipolar relaxation rates are insensitive to small variations of the interaction potential and to the magnitude of the spin-exchange interaction, enabling the accurate calibration of the measured N atom density. We find consistency between the calculated and experimentally determined rates. Our results suggest that N atoms are promising candidates for future expe...

  8. The temperature of optical molasses for two different atomic angular momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the temperature of laser-cooled Rb atoms in optical molasses as a function of laser intensity and detuning. For both 85Rb and 87Rb, cooled on the F=3→F'=4 and F=2→F'=3 transitions, respectively, the temperatures are proportional to the ratio of laser power and detuning for a wide range of these parameters. We observe a small but significant difference betwee the two isotopes. We also show the results of three-dimensional semi-classical numerical calculations. Our results favor a model which includes atomic localization in optical standing waves. (orig.)

  9. Bright solitons and self-trapping with a BEC of cold atoms in driven tilted optical lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Kolovsky, Andrey R.

    2010-01-01

    We suggest a method for creating bright matter solitons by loading a BEC of atoms in a driven tilted optical lattice. It is shown that one can realize the self-focussing regime for the wave-packet dynamics by properly adjusting the phase of the driving field with respect to the phase of Bloch oscillations. If atom-atom interactions are larger than some critical value $g_{min}$, this self-focussing regime is followed by the formation of bright solitons. Increasing the interactions above anothe...

  10. Quantum Wigner molecules in semiconductor quantum dots and cold-atom optical traps and their mathematical symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Yannouleas, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    Strong repelling interactions between a few fermions or bosons confined in two-dimensional circular traps lead to particle localization and formation of quantum Wigner molecules (QWMs) possessing definite point-group space symmetries. These point-group symmetries are "hidden" (or emergent), namely they cannot be traced in the circular single-particle densities (SPDs) associated with the exact many-body wave functions, but they are manifested as characteristic signatures in the ro-vibrational spectra. An example, among many, are the few-body QWM states under a high magnetic field or at fast rotation, which are precursor states for the fractional quantum Hall effect. The hidden geometric symmetries can be directly revealed by using spin-resolved conditional probability distributions, which are extracted from configuration-interaction (CI), exact-diagonalization wave functions. The hidden symmetries can also be revealed in the CI SPDs by reducing the symmetry of the trap (from circular to elliptic to quasi-linea...

  11. Atom Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Folman, R; Cassettari, D; Hessmo, B; Maier, T; Schmiedmayer, J; Folman, Ron; Krüger, Peter; Cassettari, Donatella; Hessmo, Björn; Maier, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Atoms can be trapped and guided using nano-fabricated wires on surfaces, achieving the scales required by quantum information proposals. These Atom Chips form the basis for robust and widespread applications of cold atoms ranging from atom optics to fundamental questions in mesoscopic physics, and possibly quantum information systems.

  12. Atomic clocks based on extened-cavity diode laser in multimode operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Sin; Cho, D.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrated the possibilities to develope an atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) without using a local oscillator and a modulator. Instead of using a modulator, we use two modes from a single extended-cavity diode laser in multimode operation. Two different types of feedback system are applied to stabilize a difference frequency between the two modes and eliminate the need for an extra frequency modulation. In the first type, we employ an electronic feedback using dispersion of the CPT resonance as an error signal. The two modes are phase locked with reference to a dispersion signal from a CPT resonance of 85Rb at 3.036 GHz ground hyperfine splitting. We use D1 transition at 794.8 nm with lin ⊥lin polarizations to obtain large-contrast CPT signal. Allan deviation of the beat frequency between the two modes is 1 ×10-10 at 200-s integration time. In the second type, we employ optoelectronic feedback to construct an opto-electronic oscillator (OEO). In an OEO, the beating signal between two modes is recovered by a fast photodiode, and its output is amplified and fed back to the laser diode by using a direct modulation of an injection current. When the OEO loop is closed, oscillation frequency depends on variations of the loop length. In order to stabilize an OEO loop length and thereby its oscillation frequency, CPT cell is inserted to play a role of microwave band pass filter. Allan deviation of the CPT-stabilized OEO is 2 ×10-10 at 100-s integration time.

  13. A HBAR-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Daugey, Thomas; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source. A 2.298~GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally-controlled two-port AlN-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24000 at 68$^{\\circ}$C, is frequency multiplied by 2 to 4.596~GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the HBAR is measured to be $-23$~ppm/$^{\\circ}$C at 2.298~GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596~GHz source is $-105$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 1~kHz offset and $-150$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 100~kHz offset. The 4.596~GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator (LO) in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter (VCPS) implemented in the 2.298~GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming...

  14. Retraction notice to "Measurements of total absolute collision cross section of ultracold Rb atom using magneto-optic and pure magnetic traps" [Chinese Optics Letters 9, 060201 (2011)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jicheng Wang; Yueyuan Wang; Yueke Wang; Guangyu Fang; Shutian Liu

    2011-01-01

    This article "Measurements of total absolute collision cross section of ultracold Rb atom using magneto-optic and pure magnetic traps",which was published on Chinese Optics Letters (9,060201 (2011)) has been retracted at the request of the authors.Reason:The first author,Jicheng Wang,participated in a related research in Professor Kirk Madison's group in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of British Columbia,Canada from September 2008 to February 2010.Some of the experimental data have not been authorized for publication,even though they have been consented to be used by Jicheng Wang in his own research.The authors apologize to Professor K.Madison for misunderstanding,and to Chinese Optics Letters and the readers of Chinese Optics Letters for any inconvenience this mistake may have caused.

  15. Guest Editor’s Notes on the “Atoms” Special Issue on “Perspectives of Atomic Physics with Trapped Highly Charged Ions”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Träbert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of highly charged ions (HCI was pursued first at Uppsala (Sweden, by Edlén and Tyrén in the 1930s. Their work led to the recognition that the solar corona is populated by such ions, an insight which forced massive paradigm changes in solar physics. Plasmas aiming at controlled fusion in the laboratory, laser-produced plasmas, foil-excited swift ion beams, and electron beam ion traps have all pushed the envelope in the production of HCI. However, while there are competitive aspects in the race for higher ion charge states, the real interest lies in the very many physics topics that can be studied in these ions. Out of this rich field, the Special Issue concentrates on atomic physics studies that investigate highly charged ions produced, maintained, and/or manipulated in ion traps. There have been excellent achievements in the field in the past, and including fairly recent work, they have been described by their authors at conferences and in the appropriate journals. The present article attempts an overview over current lines of development, some of which are expanded upon in this Special Issue.

  16. An Improved Antihydrogen Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Rita Rani

    2015-01-01

    The recent demonstration of trapped atomic antihydrogen for 15 to 1000 seconds is a milestone towards precise spectroscopy for tests of CPT invariance. The confinement of a total of 105±21 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap was made possible by several improved methods. Improved accumulation techniques give us the largest numbers of constituent particles yet: up to 10 million antiprotons and several billion positrons. A novel cooling protocol leads to 3.5 K antiprotons, the coldest ever obse...

  17. Contrast and phase-shift of a trapped atom interferometer using a thermal ensemble with internal state labelling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont-Nivet, M; Schwartz, S

    2016-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of a double-well Ramsey interferometer using internal state labelling. We consider the use of a thermal ensemble of cold atoms rather than a Bose-Einstein condensate to minimize the effects of atomic interactions. To maintain a satisfactory level of coherence in this case, a high degree of symmetry is required between the two arms of the interferometer. Assuming that the splitting and recombination processes are adiabatic, we theoretically derive the phase-shift and the contrast of such an interferometer in the presence of gravity or an acceleration field. We also consider using a "shortcut to adiabaticity" protocol to speed up the splitting process and discuss how such a procedure affects the phase shift and contrast. We find that the two procedures lead to phase-shifts of the same form.

  18. Atomic structure of Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 reveals that Hsp90 traps and stabilizes an unfolded kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verba, Kliment A; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Arakawa, Akihiko; Liu, Yanxin; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Agard, David A

    2016-06-24

    The Hsp90 molecular chaperone and its Cdc37 cochaperone help stabilize and activate more than half of the human kinome. However, both the mechanism by which these chaperones assist their "client" kinases and the reason why some kinases are addicted to Hsp90 while closely related family members are independent are unknown. Our structural understanding of these interactions is lacking, as no full-length structures of human Hsp90, Cdc37, or either of these proteins with a kinase have been elucidated. Here we report a 3.9 angstrom cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 kinase complex. Surprisingly, the two lobes of Cdk4 are completely separated with the β4-β5 sheet unfolded. Cdc37 mimics part of the kinase N lobe, stabilizing an open kinase conformation by wedging itself between the two lobes. Finally, Hsp90 clamps around the unfolded kinase β5 strand and interacts with exposed N- and C-lobe interfaces, protecting the kinase in a trapped unfolded state. On the basis of this structure and an extensive amount of previously collected data, we propose unifying conceptual and mechanistic models of chaperone-kinase interactions. PMID:27339980

  19. Trapping and diffusion of noble gas atoms in some off-stoichiometric ceramics studied by thermal desorption spectrometry. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoondert, W.H.B.

    1993-01-01

    The thesis deals with the mobility of small noble gas atoms, mainly helium, in ceramic materials with high defect concentrations. Hence, two subjects are covered: diffusion and defect physics. The experimental technique employed is Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS). An introductory outline of TDS is given. The present study was initiated for various reasons. First of all, research on helium retention and mobility behavior, such as bubble nucleation and subsequent bubble migration, in potential fusion reactor wall materials (which some of the ceramics are) is of practical interest. Secondly, because the ceramic materials investigated in the present work have defect concentrations on the order of percents, and because they are binary compounds where in principle more defect types can be present than in pure materials, the defect physics is more complicated and diverse than e.g., in simple metals. Finally, high defective materials can serve as a model system for thin films produced by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD). TDS as an analytical tool is of key importance to be able to control the IBAD process, and for the understanding of the atomic-scale phenomena involved.

  20. Amplified light storage with high fidelity based on electromagnetically induced transparency in rubidium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Gang; Tang, Guoyu; Xue, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using slow and stored light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we theoretically realize the storage of optical pulses with enhanced efficiency and high fidelity in ensembles of warm atoms in 85Rb vapor cells. The enhancement of storage efficiency is achieved by introducing a pump field beyond three-level configuration to form a N-type scheme, which simultaneously inhibits the undesirable four-wave mixing effect while preserves its fidelity. It is shown that the typical storage efficiency can be improved from 29% to 53% with the application of pump field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this efficiency decreases with storage time and increases over unity with optical depth.

  1. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, UFC, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe 25030 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  2. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10−9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10−11 τ−1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance

  3. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24,000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2-4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be -23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is -105 dB rad(2)/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -150 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10(-9) at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10(-11) τ(-1/2) up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  4. Interface Trap Density Reduction for Al2O3/GaN (0001) Interfaces by Oxidizing Surface Preparation prior to Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernokletov, Dmitry M; Negara, Muhammad A; Long, Rathnait D; Aloni, Shaul; Nordlund, Dennis; McIntyre, Paul C

    2015-06-17

    We correlate interfacial defect state densities with the chemical composition of the Al2O3/GaN interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures using synchrotron photoelectron emission spectroscopy (PES), cathodoluminescence and high-temperature capacitance-voltage measurements. The influence of the wet chemical pretreatments involving (1) HCl+HF etching or (2) NH4OH(aq) exposure prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 were investigated on n-type GaN (0001) substrates. Prior to ALD, PES analysis of the NH4OH(aq) treated surface shows a greater Ga2O3 component compared to either HCl+HF treated or as-received surfaces. The lowest surface concentration of oxygen species is detected on the acid etched surface, whereas the NH4OH treated sample reveals the lowest carbon surface concentration. Both surface pretreatments improve electrical characteristics of MOS capacitors compared to untreated samples by reducing the Al2O3/GaN interface state density. The lowest interfacial trap density at energies in the upper band gap is detected for samples pretreated with NH4OH. These results are consistent with cathodoluminescence data indicating that the NH4OH treated samples show the strongest band edge emission compared to as-received and acid etched samples. PES results indicate that the combination of reduced carbon contamination while maintaining a Ga2O3 interfacial layer by NH4OH(aq) exposure prior to ALD results in fewer interface traps after Al2O3 deposition on the GaN substrate.

  5. Fiber laser system for cesium and rubidium atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Diboune, Clément; Bidel, Yannick; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative fiber laser system for both cesium and rubidium manipulation. The architecture is based on frequency conversion of two lasers at 1560 nm and 1878 nm. By taking advantage of existing fiber components at these wavelengths, we demonstrate an all fiber laser system delivering 350 mW at 780 nm for rubidium and 210 mW at 852 nm for cesium. This result highlights the promising nature of such laser system especially for Cs manipulation for which no fiber laser system has been reported. It offers new perspectives for the development of atomic instruments dedicated to onboard applications and opens the way to a new generation of atom interferometers involving three atomic species $^{85}$Rb, $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs for which we propose an original laser architecture.

  6. First observation of the strongly forbidden transition {sup 1}S{sub 0} - {sup 3}P{sub 0} in Strontium, for an atomic clock with trapped atoms; Premiere observation de la transition fortement interdite {sup 1}S{sub 0} - {sup 3}P{sub 0} du strontium, pour une horloge optique a atomes pieges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtillot, I

    2003-11-01

    This thesis reports the first results towards the realization of an optical clock using trapped strontium atoms. This set up would combine advantages of the different approaches commonly used to develop an atomic frequency standard. The first part describes the cold atoms source which is implemented. A magneto-optical trap operating on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 461 nm is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower. The 461 nm laser is obtained by sum-frequency mixing in a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal. The second part is devoted to the different stages developed to achieve the direct excitation of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition in {sup 87}Sr. This line has a theoretical natural width of 10{sup -3} Hz. Before this detection, we obtained an estimate of the resonance frequency by measuring absolute frequencies of several allowed optical transitions. (author)

  7. Low interfacial trap density and high-temperature thermal stability in atomic layer deposited single crystal Y2O3/n-GaAs(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Hsun; Fu, Chien-Hua; Lin, Keng-Yung; Chen, Kuan-Hsiung; Chang, Tsong-Wen; Raynien Kwo, J.; Hong, Minghwei

    2016-08-01

    A low interfacial trap density (D it) of 2.2 × 1011 eV‑1 cm‑2 has been achieved with an atomic layer deposited (ALD) single crystal Y2O3 epitaxially on n-GaAs(001), along with a small frequency dispersion of 10.3% (2.6%/decade) at the accumulation region in the capacitance–voltage (C–V) curves. The D it and frequency dispersion in the C–V curves in this work are the lowest among all of the reported ALD-oxides on n-type GaAs(001). The D it was measured using the conductance–voltage (G–V) and quasi-static C–V (QSCV) methods. Moreover, the heterostructure was thermally stable with rapid annealing at 900 °C under various durations in He and N2, which has not been achieved in the heterostructures of ALD-Al2O3 or HfO2 on GaAs.

  8. Cold and trapped metastable noble gases

    CERN Document Server

    Vassen, Wim; Leduc, Michèle; Boiron, Denis; Westbrook, Christoph I; Truscott, Andrew; Baldwin, Ken; Birkl, Gerhard; Cancio, Pablo; Trippenbach, Marek

    2011-01-01

    We review experimental and theoretical work on cold, trapped metastable noble gases. We emphasize the aspects which distinguish work with these atoms from the large body of work on cold, trapped atoms in general. These aspects include detection techniques and collision processes unique to metastable atoms. We describe several experiments exploiting these unique features in fields including atom optics and statistical physics. We also discuss precision measurements on these atoms including fine structure splittings, isotope shifts, and atomic lifetimes.

  9. Novel Atomic Mirror with a Blue-Detuned Semi-Gaussian Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑萍; 高伟建; 印建平

    2003-01-01

    A novel and simple atomic mirror composed of a blue-detuned semi-Gaussian beam is proposed. From the Fresnel diffraction theory, the intensity distributions of a collimated GaUssian laser beam diffracted by the straight edge of a semi-infinite opaque plate are studied. The optical potential of the semi-Gaussian beam for 85 Rb atoms and its spontaneous emission probability are calculated and compared with the performance of the evanescent-wave mirror. Our study shows that the blue-detuned semi-Gaussian beam, as a novel atomic mirror, can be used to reflect atomic beam efliciently, and under the same beam parameters and lower normal atomic velocity, the performance of the semi-Gaussian-beam mirror is better than that of the evanescent-wave mirror.

  10. Generation of non-classical correlated photon pairs via a ladder-type atomic configuration: theory and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally generate a non-classical correlated two-color photon pair at 780 and 1529.4 nm in a ladder-type configuration using a hot 85Rb atomic vapor with the production rate of ~107/s. The non-classical correlation between these two photons is demonstrated by strong violation of Cauchy-Schwarz inequality by the factor R=48+-12. Besides, we experimentally investigate the relations between the correlation and some important experimental parameters such as the single-photon detuning, th...

  11. Coherence in Microchip Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Treutlein, P; Steinmetz, T; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J; Treutlein, Philipp; Hommelhoff, Peter; Steinmetz, Tilo; H\\"ansch, Theodor W.; Reichel, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    We report the coherent manipulation of internal states of neutral atoms in a magnetic microchip trap. Coherence lifetimes exceeding 1 s are observed with atoms at distances of $4-130 \\mu$m from the microchip surface. The coherence lifetime in the microtrap is independent of atom-surface distance and agrees well with the results of similar measurements in macroscopic magnetic traps. Due to the absence of surface-induced decoherence, a miniaturized atomic clock with a relative stability in the $10^{-13}$ range can be realized. For applications in quantum information processing, we propose to use microwave near-fields in the proximity of chip wires to create potentials that depend on the internal state of the atoms.

  12. Phosphorous trapped within buckminsterfullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, J. A.; Greer, J. C.; Harneit, W.; Weidinger, A.

    2002-05-01

    Under normal circumstances, when covalent molecules form, electrons are exchanged between atoms to form bonds. However, experiment and theoretical computations reveal exactly the opposite effect for the formation of group V elements nitrogen and phosphorous encapsulated within a buckminsterfullerene molecule. The C60 carbon cage remains intact upon encapsulation of the atom, whereas the electronic charge cloud of the N or P atom contracts. We have studied the chemical, spin, and thermodynamic properties of endohedral phosphorous (P@C60) and have compared our results with earlier findings for N@C60. From a combined experimental and theoretical vantage, we are able to elucidate a model for the interaction between the trapped group V atom and the fullerene cage. A picture emerges for the electronic structure of these complexes, whereby an atom is trapped within a fullerene, and interacts weakly with the molecular orbitals of the C60 cage.

  13. An Atomic Lens Using a Focusing Hollow Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏勇; 印建平; 王育竹

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to generate a focused hollow laser beam by using an azimuthally distributed 2π-phase plate and a convergent thin lens, and calculate the intensity distribution of the focused hollow beam in free propagation space. The relationship between the waist w0 of the incident collimated Gaussian beam and the dark spot size of the focused hollow beam at the focal point, and the relationship between the focal length f of the thin lens and the dark spot size are studied respectively. The optical potential of the blue-detuned focused hollow beam for 85Rb atoms is calculated. Our study shows that when the larger waist w of the incident Gaussian beam and the shorter focal length f of the lens are chosen, we can obtain an extremely small dark spot size of the focused hollow beam, which can be used to form an atomic lens with a resolution of several angstroms.

  14. Cold and trapped metastable noble gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassen, W.; Cohen-Tannoudji, C.; Leduc, M.; Boiron, D.; Westbrook, C.I.; Truscott, A.; Baldwin, K.; Birkl, G.; Cancio, P.; Trippenbach, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental work on cold, trapped metastable noble gases is reviewed. The aspects which distinguish work with these atoms from the large body of work on cold, trapped atoms in general is emphasized. These aspects include detection techniques and collision processes unique to metastable atoms. Sever

  15. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  16. Generation of One-Dimensional Array of Focused Hollow-Beam Pipes and Its Surface Microscopic Waveguide for Cold Atoms or Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Xian-Ming; XIA Yong; YIN Jian-Ping

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new scheme to guide cold atoms (or molecules) by using a one-dimensional (1D) array of focused hollow-beam pipes generated by the combination of a binary phase grating and a 1D array of micro-cylindrical lenses on the substrate surface. We also calculate the intensity distribution of the focused hollow-beam pipe array and its optical potential for 85Rb atoms. The result shows that when the blue detuning of the incident beam and its intensity are 10 GHz and 7.0 × 103 W/m2 respectively, the horizontal dark spot size of each focused hollow-beam pipe and the efficient optical potential are 4.4μm and ~ 0.23mK, which is high enough to guide cold 85Rb atoms (~ 20 μK) from a standard optical molasses and then to realize the 1D array of surface atomic waveguides on an atom chip.

  17. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  18. Temporal Windowing of Trapped States

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, L M

    2001-01-01

    Trapped state definition for 3-level atoms in Lambda configuration, is a very restrictive one, and for the case of unpolarized beams, this definition no longer holds.We introduce a more general definition by using a reference frame rotating with the frequency of the control field, obtaining a temporal windowing for the trapped population.This amounts to a time quantization of the coherent population transfer, making possible to study the phase coherence in trapped light.

  19. Atoms Talking to SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Kim, Z; Wood, A K; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Hafezi, M; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Taylor, J M; Vlahacos, C P; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to couple trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms to a superconducting flux qubit through a magnetic dipole transition. We plan to trap atoms on the evanescent wave outside an ultrathin fiber to bring the atoms to less than 10 $\\mu$m above the surface of the superconductor. This hybrid setup lends itself to probing sources of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Our current plan has the intermediate goal of coupling the atoms to a superconducting LC resonator.

  20. Atom cooling with an atom-optical diode on a ring

    OpenAIRE

    Ruschhaupt, A.; Muga, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a method to cool atoms on a ring by combining an atom diode -a laser valve for one-way atomic motion which induces robust internal state excitation- and a trap. We demonstrate numerically that the atom is efficiently slowed down at each diode crossing, and it is finally trapped when its velocity is below the trap threshold.

  1. 全光学冷却与囚禁133Cs原子玻色-爱因斯坦凝聚的可能性%POSSIBILITY OF ALL OPTICALLY-COOLED AND TRAPPED 133Cs ATOMIC BEC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印建平; 高伟建; 刘南春; 王义遒

    2001-01-01

    The experimental progress on rf evaporative cooling of 133Cs atomic sample in recent year is reviewed, and the difficulty of magnetically trapped 133Cs atomic Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is analyzed. In this paper, we propose an all-optically-cooled and -trapped 133Cs BEC scheme, which is composed of a pyramidal-hollow-beam gravito-optical trap (PHB GOT) from a diode laser (λ=0.852 μm) and a conical-hollow-beam (CHB) GOT from an Ar+ laser (=0.5013 μm). In the PHB GOT, the cold atoms experience an efficient hollow-beam induced Sisyphus cooling (i.e., intensity gradient cooling) and repumpimg-beam induced geometric cooling, and they will be cooled to a few photon-recoil limits (~2 μK) from MOT's temperature (~60 μK). Whereas in the Ar+ hollow-laser-beam trap, cold atoms will be further cooled by Raman cooling (or velocity-selection coherent population trapping) and compressed by a blue-detuned covering beam. We have performed Monte-Carlo simulations for PHB cooling process, calculated the optical potential for 133Cs atoms in Ar+ hollow laser beam, and estimated total collision loss and atomic density. Our study shows that the realization of an optically-cooled and -trapped BEC of 133Cs atoms may be possible in our all-optical dipole trap.%综述了近年来有关蒸发冷却133Cs原子样品的实验进展,分析了磁囚禁133Cs原子玻色-爱因斯坦凝聚(BEC)的困难,并在此基础上提出了一个全光型冷却与囚禁133Cs原子BEC的新方案.该方案主要由一个来自半导体激光(λ=0.852 μm)的倒金字塔形中空光束重力光学囚禁(pyramidal-hollow-beam gravito-optical trap,缩写为PHB GOT)和一个来自Ar+激光(=0.5013 μm)的圆锥形中空光束重力光学囚禁(conical-hollow-beam gravito-optical trap,缩写为CHB GOT)组成.在PHB GOT中,冷原子经历了一个有效的中空光束感应的Sisyphus冷却(也即强度梯度冷却)和抽运光感应的几何冷却,原子温度将被从

  2. Moving Single Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Dustin

    2016-05-01

    Single neutral atoms are promising candidates for qubits, the fundamental unit of quantum information. We have built a set of optical tweezers for trapping and moving single Rubidium atoms. The tweezers are based on a far off-resonant dipole trapping laser focussed to a 1 μm spot with a single aspheric lens. We use a digital micromirror device (DMD) to generate dynamic holograms of the desired arrangement of traps. The DMD has a frame rate of 20 kHz which, when combined with fast algorithms, allows for rapid reconfiguration of the traps. We demonstrate trapping of up to 20 atoms in arbitrary arrangements, and the transport of a single-atom over a distance of 14 μm with continuous laser cooling, and 5 μm without. In the meantime, we are developing high-finesse fibre-tip cavities, which we plan to use to couple pairs of single atoms to form a quantum network.

  3. Trap split with Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kazemi, Seyedeh Hamideh; Mahmoud, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The optical trapping techniques have been extensively used in physics, biophysics, micro-chemistry, and micro-mechanics to allow trapping and manipulation of materials ranging from particles, cells, biological substances, and polymers to DNA and RNA molecules. In this Letter, we present a convenient and effective way to generate a novel phenomenon of trapping, named trap split, in a conventional four-level double-$\\Lambda$ atomic system driven by four femtosecond Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses. We find that trap split can be always achieved when atoms are trapped by such laser pulses, as compared to Gaussian ones. This work would greatly facilitate the trapping and manipulating the particles and generation of trap split. It may also suggest the possibility of extension into new research fields, such as micro-machining and biophysics.

  4. Optical and Magnetic Trapping of Potassium 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensher, Jason; Cornell, Eric; Cataliotti, Francesco; Fort, Chiara; Marin, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Ricci, Leonardo; Tino, Guglielmo

    1998-05-01

    We present measurments of optical trapping and cooling and magnetic trapping of ^39K in a double-MOT apparatus. (Optics Lett. 21, 290(1996)) We have measured light-assisted collisional loss rates from our second MOT over a range of trap light intensities. At an intensity of 10 mW/cm^2 we find a loss rate parameter β of 2 x 10-11 cc/s. β increases with trap light intensity and is consistent with the values measured by Williamson and Walker (JOSA B 12, 1393 (1995)). We also present studies of the temperature of atoms in a MOT of ^39K. Under certain conditions of repump light intensity and trap light detuning we measure temperatures nearly as low as the Doppler Limit. Finally, we report on prelimiary results of magnetic trapping in which we have trapped several 10^7 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  5. Ion trap in a semiconductor chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stick, D.; Hensinger, W. K.; Olmschenk, S.; Madsen, M. J.; Schwab, K.; Monroe, C.

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ions. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometre scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with `chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass-spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks and, most notably, large-scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometre-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium-arsenide heterostructure.

  6. Ion Trap in a Semiconductor Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Stick, D; Olmschenk, S; Madsen, M J; Schwab, K; Monroe, C

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ion. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometer scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with 'chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks, and most notably, large scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometer-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool, and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium...

  7. Decoherence via induced dipole collisions in an ultracold gas

    CERN Document Server

    Gorges, Anthony R; Roberts, Jacob L

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the effects of loading $^{87}$Rb into a far off resonant trap (FORT) in the presence of an ultracold cloud of $^{85}$Rb. The presence of the $^{85}$Rb resulted in a marked decrease of the $^{87}$Rb load rate. This decrease is consistent with a decrease in the laser cooling efficiency needed for effective loading. While many dynamics which disrupt loading efficency arise when cooling in a dense cloud of atoms (reabsorption, adverse optical pumping, etc.), the large detuning between the transitions of $^{85}$Rb and $^{87}$Rb should isolate the isotopes from these effects. For our optical molasses conditions we calculate that our cooling efficiencies require induced ground-state coherences. We present data and estimates which are consistent with heteronuclear long-ranged induced dipole-dipole collisions disrupting these ground state coherences, leading to a loss of optical trap loading efficiency.

  8. Millimeter Wave Detection via Autler-Townes Splitting in Rubidium Rydberg Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Joshua A; Schwarzkopf, Andrew; Anderson, Dave A; Miller, Stephanie; Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee; Raithel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the detection of millimeter waves via Autler-Townes splitting in 85Rb Rydberg atoms. This method may provide an independent, atom-based, SI-traceable method for measuring mm-wave electric fields, which addresses a gap in current calibration techniques in the mm-wave regime. The electric- field amplitude within a rubidium vapor cell in the WR-10 waveguide band is measured for frequencies of 93 GHz, and 104 GHz. Relevant aspects of Autler-Townes splitting originating from a four-level electromagnetically induced transparency scheme are discussed. We measure the E-field generated by an open-ended waveguide using this technique. Experimental results are compared to a full-wave finite element simulation.

  9. Detection of Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Hydomako, Richard Allan

    The ALPHA experiment is an international effort to produce, trap, and perform precision spectroscopic measurements on antihydrogen (the bound state of a positron and an antiproton). Based at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility at CERN, the ALPHA experiment has recently magnetically confined antihydrogen atoms for the first time. A crucial element in the observation of trapped antihydrogen is ALPHA’s silicon vertexing detector. This detector contains sixty silicon modules arranged in three concentric layers, and is able to determine the three-dimensional location of the annihilation of an antihydrogen atom by reconstructing the trajectories of the produced annihilation products. This dissertation focuses mainly on the methods used to reconstruct the annihilation location. Specifically, the software algorithms used to identify and extrapolate charged particle tracks are presented along with the routines used to estimate the annihilation location from the convergence of the identified tracks. It is shown...

  10. Characterization of a magnetic trap by polarization dependent Zeeman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Vandel; Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian; Thorseth, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a detailed experimental study of our cloverleaf magnetic trap for sodium atoms. By using polarization dependent Zeeman spectroscopy of our atomic beam, passing the magnetic trap region, we have determined important trap parameters such as gradients, their curvatures and...

  11. 亚微米局域空心光束的产生及其在单原子囚禁与冷却中的应用理论研究∗%Theoretical research on the generation of a submicron lo calized hollow b eam and its applications in the trapping and co oling of a single atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任瑞敏; 尹亚玲; 王志章; 郭超修; 印建平

    2016-01-01

    In order to generate a submicron localized hollow laser beam and realize the more efficient laser cooling and trapping of a single atom, a simple and promising scheme with using the system of a single mode fiber a circle binary phase plate and a microlens is proposed in this paper. From Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory, the intensity distribution of the generated localized hollow laser beam near the focal plane and its propagating properties in free space are calculated. Also, the dependences of the dark-spot size of the localized hollow beam on the mode radius of single mode fiber and the focal length of the mocrolens are studied. The calculated results show that the intensity distribution of the localized hollow beam presents approximately symmstrical distribution near the focal plane. In the center of the focal plane, the light intensity is 0 and increases gradually around it. So a closed spherical light field (i.e., localized hollow laser beam) with a radius of 0.4 µm is generated. The calculated results also show that the dark-spot size of the localized hollow laser beam decreases with the increasing of the microlens focal length and the decreasing of the single mode fiber mode radius. So proper parameters of this optical system can be chosen to generate localized hollow laser beams with different sizes for various applications. When the localized hollow laser beam is blue detuned, atoms will be trapped in the minimum light filed. If a repumping laser beam is applied, the trapped atoms will be also cooled by the intensity-gradient Sisyphus cooling. In this paper, we build a device for trapping and cooling a single atom by using the generated blue detuned submicron localized hollow laser beam. We study the dynamical process of intensity-gradient cooling of a single 87Rb atom trapped in the localized hollow beam by Monte-Carlo method. Our study shows that a single 87Rb atom with a temperature of 120 µK (the corresponding momentum is 30~k) from a magneto

  12. Atomic laser-beam finder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viering, Kirsten; Medellin, David; Mo, Jianyong; Raizen, Mark G

    2012-11-01

    We report on an experimental method to align a laser beam to a cloud of atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We show how balanced lock-in detection leads to a very sensitive method to align the laser beam to the atoms in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction. This provides a very reliable and fast way of aligning laser beams to atoms trapped in a MOT.

  13. Integrated magneto-optical traps on a chip

    OpenAIRE

    Pollock, S.; Cotter, J. P.; Laliotis, A.; Hinds, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    We have integrated magneto-optical traps (MOTs) into an atom chip by etching pyramids into a silicon wafer. These have been used to trap atoms on the chip, directly from a room temperature vapor of rubidium. This new atom trapping method provides a simple way to integrate several atom sources on the same chip. It represents a substantial advance in atom chip technology and offers new possibilities for atom chip applications such as integrated single atom or photon sources and molecules on a c...

  14. Active Stabilization of Ion Trap Radiofrequency Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, K G; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Monroe, C

    2016-01-01

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a rf Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to better than 10 Hz, or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  15. Antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiproton discrimination: Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    OpenAIRE

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; S. Chapman; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected s...

  16. Direct frequency comb laser cooling and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Jayich, A M; Campbell, W C

    2016-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) lasers are the enabling technology for producing ultracold atoms and molecules through laser cooling and trapping. The resulting pristine samples of slow moving particles are the de facto starting point for both fundamental and applied science when a highly-controlled quantum system is required. Laser cooled atoms have recently led to major advances in quantum information, the search to understand dark energy, quantum chemistry, and quantum sensors. However, CW laser technology currently limits laser cooling and trapping to special types of elements that do not include highly abundant and chemically relevant atoms such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Here, we demonstrate that Doppler cooling and trapping by optical frequency combs may provide a route to trapped, ultracold atoms whose spectra are not amenable to CW lasers. We laser cool a gas of atoms by driving a two-photon transition with an optical frequency comb, an efficient process to which every comb tooth coherently cont...

  17. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  18. Enhancing the Effect of Lorentz Invariance and Einstein's Equivalence Principle Violation in Nuclei and Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flambaum, V V

    2016-08-12

    Local Lorentz invariance violating (LLIV) and Einstein equivalence principle violating (EEPV) effects in atomic experiments are discussed. The EEPV effects are strongly enhanced in the narrow 7.8 eV transition in the _{90}^{229}Th nucleus. The nuclear LLIV tensors describing the anisotropy in the maximal attainable speed for massive particles (analog of the Michelson-Morley experiment for light) are expressed in terms of the experimental values of the nuclear quadrupole moments. Calculations for nuclei of experimental interest _{55}^{133}Cs, _{37}^{85}Rb, _{37}^{87}Rb, _{80}^{201}Hg, _{54}^{131}Xe, and _{10}^{21}Ne are performed. The results for _{10}^{21}Ne are used to improve the limits on the proton LLIV interaction constants by 4 orders of magnitude. PMID:27563955

  19. Dichroic atomic vapor laser lock with multi-gigahertz stabilization range

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S; Sholtes, T; Budker, D

    2015-01-01

    A dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) system exploiting buffer-gas-filled millimeter-scale vapor cells is presented. This system offers similar stability as achievable with bulk vapor cells, but has several important advantages. In addition to its compactness, it may provide continuous stabilization in a multi-gigahertz range around the optical transition. This range may be controlled either by changing the temperature of the vapor or by application of a buffer gas under an appropriate pressure. In particular, we show that the DAVLL system with a buffer-gas cell enables locking the laser frequency between two hyperfine components of the $^{85}$Rb ground state or as far as 16 GHz away from the closest optical transition.

  20. Experimental investigation of planar ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, C E; Brown, K R; Chuang, I L; Leibrandt, D R; Mallard, W J

    2005-01-01

    Chiaverini et al. [Quant. Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005)] recently suggested a linear Paul trap geometry for ion trap quantum computation that places all of the electrodes in a plane. Such planar ion traps are compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and can be scaled to make compact, many zone traps. In this paper we present an experimental realization of planar ion traps using electrodes on a printed circuit board to trap linear chains of tens of 0.44 micron diameter charged particles in a vacuum of 15 Pa (0.1 torr). With these traps we address concerns about the low trap depth of planar ion traps and develop control electrode layouts for moving ions between trap zones without facing some of the technical difficulties involved in an atomic ion trap experiment. Specifically, we use a trap with 36 zones (77 electrodes) arranged in a cross to demonstrate loading from a traditional four rod linear Paul trap, linear ion movement, splitting and joining of ion chains, and movement of ions through in...

  1. A state-insensitive, compensated nanofiber trap

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroûte, C; Goban, A; Alton, D J; Ding, D; Stern, N P; Kimble, H J

    2011-01-01

    Laser trapping and interfacing of laser-cooled atoms in an optical fiber network is an important capability for quantum information science. Following the pioneering work of Balykin et al. and Vetsch et al., we propose a robust method of trapping single Cesium atoms with a two-color state-insensitive evanescent wave around a dielectric nanofiber. Specifically, we show that vector light shifts (i.e., effective inhomogeneous Zeeman broadening of the ground states) induced by the inherent ellipticity of the forward-propagating evanescent wave can be effectively canceled by a backward-propagating evanescent wave. Furthermore, by operating the trapping lasers at the magic wavelengths, we remove the differential scalar light shift between ground and excited states, thereby allowing for resonant driving of the optical D2 transition. This scheme provides a promising approach to trap and probe neutral atoms with long trap and coherence lifetimes with realistic experimental parameters.

  2. Efficient, Tightly-Confined Trapping of 226Ra

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, R H; Bailey, K; Greene, J P; Holt, R J; Kalita, M R; Korsch, W; Lu, Z -T; Mueller, P; O'Connor, T P; Singh, J; Sulai, I A; Trimble, W L

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for transferring $^{226}$Ra atoms from a 3-dimensional magneto-optical-trap (MOT) into a standing wave optical dipole trap (ODT) in an adjacent chamber. The resulting small trapping volume (120 $\\mu$m in diameter) allows for high control of the electric and magnetic fields applied to the atoms. The atoms are first transferred to a traveling-wave optical dipole trap, which is then translated 46 cm to a science chamber. The atoms are subsequently transferred into an orthogonal standing-wave ODT by application of a 1-dimensional MOT along the traveling-wave axis. For each stage, transfer efficiencies exceeding 60% are demonstrated.

  3. Development, Fabrication and Characterisation of Atom Chips

    OpenAIRE

    Groth, Sönke

    2006-01-01

    Atom chips are robust and extremely powerful toolboxes for quantum optical experiments, since they make it possible to create exceedingly precise magnetic traps for neutral atoms with minimal field modulations. Accurate manipulation of trapped atoms is feasible with magnetic and electric fields created on the atom chip. Therefore atom chips with high quality surfaces and extremely well defined wires were build (roughness < 20nm). Furthermore new generations of atom chips were developed, like ...

  4. An Optical Trap for Collisional Studies on Cold Fermionic Potassium

    CERN Document Server

    Roati, G; Simoni, A; Modugno, G; Inguscio, M

    2000-01-01

    We report on trapping of fermionic 40K atoms in a red-detuned standing-wave optical trap, loaded from a magneto-optical trap. Typically, 10^6 atoms are loaded at a density of 10^12 cm^-3 and a temperature of 65 microK, and trapped for more than 1 s. The optical trap appears to be the proper environment for performing collisional measurements on the cold atomic sample. In particular we measure the elastic collisional rate by detecting the rethermalization following an intentional parametric heating of the atomic sample. We also measure the inelastic two-body collisional rates for unpolarized atoms in the ground hyperfine states, through detection of trap losses.

  5. A cold 87Rb atomic beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Jia; Feng Yan-Ying; Xue Hong-Bo; Zhou Zhao-Ying; Zhang Wen-Dong

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an experimental setup for the production of a beam source of cold 87Rb atoms.The atoms are extracted from a trapped cold atomic cloud in an unbalanced three-dimensional magneto-optical trap.Via a radiation pressure difference generated by a specially designed leak tunnel along one trapping laser beam,the atoms are pushed out continuously with low velocities and a high flux.The most-probable velocity in the beam is varied from 9 m/s to 19 m/s by varying the detuning of the trapping laser beams in the magneto-optical trap and the flux can be tuned up to 4× 109 s-1 by increasing the intensity of the trapping beams.We also present a simple model for describing the dependence of the beam performance on the magneto-optical trap trapping laser intensity and the detuning.

  6. EIT resonance features in strong magnetic fields in rubidium atomic columns with length varying by 4 orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, R.; Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Wojciechowski, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Gawlik, W.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonances are investigated with the 85Rb D 1 line (795 nm) in strong magnetic fields (up to 2 kG) with three different types of spectroscopic vapor cells: the nano-cell with a thickness along the direction of laser light L ≈ 795 nm, the micro-cell with L = 30 μm with the addition of a neon buffer gas, and the centimeter-long glass cell. These cells allowed us to observe systematic changes of the EIT spectra when the increasing magnetic field systematically decoupled the total atomic electron and nuclear angular moments (the Paschen-Back/Back-Goudsmit effects). The observations agree well with a theoretical model. The advantages and disadvantages of a particular type of cell are discussed along with the possible practical applications.

  7. Test of Equivalence Principle at $10^{-8}$ Level by a Dual-species Double-diffraction Raman Atom Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Lin; Tang, Biao; Chen, Xi; Gao, Fen; Peng, Wencui; Duan, Weitao; Zhong, Jiaqi; Xiong, Zongyuan; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Yuanzhong; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved test of the weak equivalence principle by using a simultaneous $^{85}$Rb-$^{87}$Rb dual-species atom interferometer. We propose and implement a four-wave double-diffraction Raman transition scheme for the interferometer, and demonstrate its ability in suppressing common-mode phase noise of Raman lasers after their frequencies and intensity ratios are optimized. The statistical uncertainty of the experimental data for E\\"{o}tv\\"{o}s parameter $\\eta$ is $0.8\\times10^{-8}$ at 3200 s. With various systematic errors corrected the final value is $\\eta=(2.8\\pm3.0)\\times10^{-8}$. The major uncertainty is attributed to the Coriolis effect.

  8. Test of Equivalence Principle at 10(-8) Level by a Dual-Species Double-Diffraction Raman Atom Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Long, Shitong; Tang, Biao; Chen, Xi; Gao, Fen; Peng, Wencui; Duan, Weitao; Zhong, Jiaqi; Xiong, Zongyuan; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Yuanzhong; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-07-01

    We report an improved test of the weak equivalence principle by using a simultaneous 85Rb-87Rb dual-species atom interferometer. We propose and implement a four-wave double-diffraction Raman transition scheme for the interferometer, and demonstrate its ability in suppressing common-mode phase noise of Raman lasers after their frequencies and intensity ratios are optimized. The statistical uncertainty of the experimental data for Eötvös parameter η is 0.8×10(-8) at 3200 s. With various systematic errors corrected, the final value is η=(2.8±3.0)×10(-8). The major uncertainty is attributed to the Coriolis effect.

  9. Generation of non-classical correlated photon pairs via a ladder-type atomic configuration: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2012-05-01

    We experimentally generate a non-classical correlated two-color photon pair at 780 and 1529.4 nm in a ladder-type configuration using a hot 85Rb atomic vapor with the production rate of ~10(7)/s. The non-classical correlation between these two photons is demonstrated by strong violation of Cauchy-Schwarz inequality by the factor R = 48 ± 12. Besides, we experimentally investigate the relations between the correlation and some important experimental parameters such as the single-photon detuning, the powers of pumps. We also make a theoretical analysis in detail and the theoretical predictions are in reasonable agreement with our experimental results. PMID:22565763

  10. Doppler cooling and trapping on forbidden transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Binnewies, T; Sterr, U; Riehle, F; Helmcke, J; Mehlstäubler, T E; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2001-01-01

    Ultracold atoms at temperatures close to the recoil limit have been achieved by extending Doppler cooling to forbidden transitions. A cloud of ^40Ca atoms has been cooled and trapped to a temperature as low as 6 \\mu K by operating a magneto-optical trap on the spin-forbidden intercombination transition. Quenching the long-lived excited state with an additional laser enhanced the scattering rate by a factor of 15, while a high selectivity in velocity was preserved. With this method more than 10% of pre-cooled atoms from a standard magneto-optical trap have been transferred to the ultracold trap. Monte-Carlo simulations of the cooling process are in good agreement with the experiments.

  11. Doppler cooling and trapping on forbidden transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnewies, T; Wilpers, G; Sterr, U; Riehle, F; Helmcke, J; Mehlstäubler, T E; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2001-09-17

    Ultracold atoms at temperatures close to the recoil limit have been achieved by extending Doppler cooling to forbidden transitions. A cloud of (40)Ca atoms has been cooled and trapped to a temperature as low as 6 microK by operating a magnetooptical trap on the spin-forbidden intercombination transition. Quenching the long-lived excited state with an additional laser enhanced the scattering rate by a factor of 15, while a high selectivity in velocity was preserved. With this method, more than 10% of precooled atoms from a standard magnetooptical trap have been transferred to the ultracold trap. Monte Carlo simulations of the cooling process are in good agreement with the experiments. PMID:11580503

  12. Doppler cooling and trapping on forbidden transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnewies, T; Wilpers, G; Sterr, U; Riehle, F; Helmcke, J; Mehlstäubler, T E; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2001-09-17

    Ultracold atoms at temperatures close to the recoil limit have been achieved by extending Doppler cooling to forbidden transitions. A cloud of (40)Ca atoms has been cooled and trapped to a temperature as low as 6 microK by operating a magnetooptical trap on the spin-forbidden intercombination transition. Quenching the long-lived excited state with an additional laser enhanced the scattering rate by a factor of 15, while a high selectivity in velocity was preserved. With this method, more than 10% of precooled atoms from a standard magnetooptical trap have been transferred to the ultracold trap. Monte Carlo simulations of the cooling process are in good agreement with the experiments.

  13. Bright Solitons in an Atomic Tunnel Array with Either Attractive or Repulsive Atom-Atom Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-Xue; YOU Jun; WU Ying

    2004-01-01

    @@ Taking a coherent state representation, we derive the nonlinear Schrodinger-type differential-difference equations from the quantized model of an array of traps containing Bose-Einstein condensates and linked by the tunnelling process among the adjacent traps. It is shown that no matter whether two-body interactions among atoms are repulsive or attractive, a nearly uniform atom distribution can evolve into a bright soliton-type localized ensemble of atoms and a lump of atom distribution can also be smeared out by redistributing atoms among traps under appropriate initial phase differences of atoms in adjacent traps. These two important features originate from the tailoring effect of the initial phase conditions in coherent tunnelling processes, which differs crucially from the previous tailoring effect coming mainly from the periodicity of optical lattices.

  14. Precision measurement of a trapping potential for an ultracold gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parametric excitation of ultracold atomic gases in optical dipole traps strongly depends on the trap anharmonicity. For non-interacting gases, the anharmonicity prevents energy input beyond certain level. We use this as a basis for precision measurement of trap parameters. The frequencies and depth are derived from comparison of the excitation spectrum to models, where the anharmonicity is treated non-perturbatively. Measurements are done for both quantum and classical motion of trapped atoms. For the classical motion, the validity of the model is crosschecked in an independent experiment. - Highlights: • Parametric excitation of ultracold atoms in optical dipole traps is strongly dependent on the trap anharmonicity. • The anharmonicity prevents energy input beyond certain level. • This energy-input saturation is used for precision measurement of trap parameters

  15. Electro-Optical Nanotraps for Neutral Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Brian; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new class of nanoscale electro-optical traps for neutral atoms. A prototype is the toroidal trap created by a suspended, charged carbon nanotube decorated with a silver nanosphere dimer. An illuminating laser field, blue detuned from an atomic resonance frequency, is strongly focused by plasmons induced in the dimer and generates both a repulsive potential barrier near the nanostructure surface and a large viscous damping force that facilitates trap loading. Atoms with velocities...

  16. Efficient Fiber Optic Detection of Trapped Ion Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    VanDevender, A. P.; Colombe, Y.; J. Amini; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Integration of fiber optics may play a critical role in the development of quantum information processors based on trapped ions and atoms by enabling scalable collection and delivery of light and coupling trapped ions to optical microcavities. We trap 24Mg+ ions in a surface-electrode Paul trap that includes an integrated optical fiber for detecting 280-nm fluorescence photons. The collection numerical aperture is 0.37 and total collection efficiency is 2.1 %. The ion can be positioned betwee...

  17. Cold Matter Assembled Atom-by-Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Manuel; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-01-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a novel platform for the deterministic preparation of regular arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of over 50 atoms in less than 400 ms. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach enables controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  18. Experiments in cold atom optics towards precision atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David C.

    Atom optics has been a highly active field of research with many scientific breakthroughs over the past two decades, largely due to successful advances in laser technology, microfabrication techniques, and the development of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. This dissertation details several atom optics experiments with the motivation to develop tools and techniques for precision atom wave interferometry. It provides background information about atom optics and the fundamentals behind laser cooling and trapping, including basic techniques for cold gas thermometry and absorptive detection of atoms. A brief overview of magnetic trapping and guiding in tight wire-based traps is also provided before the experimental details are presented. We developed a novel laser source of 780 nm light using frequency-doubled 1560 nm fiber amplifier. This laser system provided up to a Watt of tunable frequency stabilized light for two Rb laser cooling and trapping experiments. One system generates Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical trap while the second is based on atom chip magnetic traps. The atom chip system, detailed in this thesis, was designed and built to develop the tools necessary for transport and loading large numbers of cold atoms and explore the potential for guided atom interferometry. Techniques and results from this experiment are presented, including an efficient magnetic transport and loading method to deliver cold atom to atom chip traps. We also developed a modeling tool for the magnetic fields formed by coiled wire geometries, as well as planar wire patterns. These models helped us design traps and determine adiabatic transportation of cold atoms between macro-scale traps and micro-traps formed on atom chips. Having achieved near unity transfer efficiency, we demonstrated that this approach promises to be a consistent method for loading large numbers of atoms into micro-traps. Furthermore, we discuss an in situ imaging technique to investigate

  19. Commissioning of the Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF

    CERN Document Server

    Tandecki, M; Collister, R; Aubin, S; Behr, J A; Gomez, E; Gwinner, G; Orozco, L A; Pearson, M R

    2013-01-01

    We report on the successful commissioning of the Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF. Large laser-cooled samples of francium are produced from a francium ion beam delivered by the ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. The ion beam is neutralized on an yttrium foil, which is subsequently heated to transfer the atoms into the magneto-optical trapping region. We have successfully trapped $^{207}$Fr, $^{209}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr, with a maximum of $2.5 \\times 10^5$ $^{209}$Fr atoms. The neutral cold atoms will be used in studies of the weak interaction through measurements of atomic parity non-conservation.

  20. Annual Trapping Proposal 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1984-1985 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver and muskrat on the...

  1. Evanescent field trapping of nanoparticles using nanostructured ultrathin optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Mark; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-06-27

    While conventional optical trapping techniques can trap objects with submicron dimensions, the underlying limits imposed by the diffraction of light generally restrict their use to larger or higher refractive index particles. As the index and diameter decrease, the trapping difficulty rapidly increases; hence, the power requirements for stable trapping become so large as to quickly denature the trapped objects in such diffraction-limited systems. Here, we present an evanescent field-based device capable of confining low index nanoscale particles using modest optical powers as low as 1.2 mW, with additional applications in the field of cold atom trapping. Our experiment uses a nanostructured optical micro-nanofiber to trap 200 nm, low index contrast, fluorescent particles within the structured region, thereby overcoming diffraction limitations. We analyze the trapping potential of this device both experimentally and theoretically, and show how strong optical traps are achieved with low input powers. PMID:27410600

  2. Bose-Einstein condensation in a tightly confining dc magnetic trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.O. Mewes; M.R. Andrews; N.J. van Druten; D.M. Kurn; D.S. Durfee; W. Ketterle

    1996-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of sodium atoms has been observed in a novel "cloverleaf" trap. This trap combines tight confinement with excellent optical access, using only dc electromagnets. Evaporative cooling in this trap produced condensates of 5 x 10/6 atoms, a tenfold improvement over previous re

  3. AC electric trapping of neutral atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Schlunk, S.

    2008-01-01

    Several types of diamond layers have been deposited on molybdenum tiles by chemical vapour deposition techniques, and exposed under erosion-dominated conditions in the SOL of TEXTOR in order to assess them as a suitable candidate for plasma-facing material. Post-exposure characterisation of physical properties and surface modification induced by the plasma was performed by SEM imaging, investigation of diamond surface by micro-Raman spectroscopy and deuterium retention measurements by NRA. Th...

  4. zTrap: zebrafish gene trap and enhancer trap database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muto Akira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed genetic methods in zebrafish by using the Tol2 transposable element; namely, transgenesis, gene trapping, enhancer trapping and the Gal4FF-UAS system. Gene trap constructs contain a splice acceptor and the GFP or Gal4FF (a modified version of the yeast Gal4 transcription activator gene, and enhancer trap constructs contain the zebrafish hsp70l promoter and the GFP or Gal4FF gene. By performing genetic screens using these constructs, we have generated transgenic zebrafish that express GFP and Gal4FF in specific cells, tissues and organs. Gal4FF expression is visualized by creating double transgenic fish carrying a Gal4FF transgene and the GFP reporter gene placed downstream of the Gal4-recognition sequence (UAS. Further, the Gal4FF-expressing cells can be manipulated by mating with UAS effector fish. For instance, when fish expressing Gal4FF in specific neurons are crossed with the UAS:TeTxLC fish carrying the tetanus neurotoxin gene downstream of UAS, the neuronal activities are inhibited in the double transgenic fish. Thus, these transgenic fish are useful to study developmental biology and neurobiology. Description To increase the usefulness of the transgenic fish resource, we developed a web-based database named zTrap http://kawakami.lab.nig.ac.jp/ztrap/. The zTrap database contains images of GFP and Gal4FF expression patterns, and genomic DNA sequences surrounding the integration sites of the gene trap and enhancer trap constructs. The integration sites are mapped onto the Ensembl zebrafish genome by in-house Blat analysis and can be viewed on the zTrap and Ensembl genome browsers. Furthermore, zTrap is equipped with the functionality to search these data for expression patterns and genomic loci of interest. zTrap contains the information about transgenic fish including UAS reporter and effector fish. Conclusion zTrap is a useful resource to find gene trap and enhancer trap fish lines that express GFP

  5. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with highenergy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature’s fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 1014 for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational be...

  6. Charged nanodiamonds in a Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streed, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal nanodiamonds were ionized with atmospheric electrospray and loaded into a Paul trap. Fluorescence from atom-like NV0 and NV- colour centres has been observed. The very low intrinsic absorption of bulk diamond is favourable for reducing the heating of cooled, trapped, nanodiamond ions from the surrounding blackbody radiation of the trapping apparatus. The isolated environment of the ion trap is also favourable for in-situ modification of nanodiamond to reduce absorption inducing defects through either physical or chemical processes. The presence or intentional introduction of high luminescence atom-like colour centre defects such as NV or SiV offer the prospect of direct laser cooling in nanodiamonds with low emissivity. Such laser cooled nano-ions are of interest for sympathetically cooling ions of similar charge/mass ratios that lack closed optical transitions, such as large biomolecules. ARC Future Fellow.

  7. Long lifetimes in optical ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Lambrecht, Alexander; Weckesser, Pascal; Debatin, Markus; Karpa, Leon; Schaetz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We report on single Barium ions confined in a near-infrared optical dipole trap for up to three seconds in absence of any radio-frequency fields. Additionally, the lifetime in a visible optical dipole trap is increased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the state-of-the-art using an efficient repumping method. We characterize the state-dependent potentials and measure an upper bound for the heating rate in the near-infrared trap. These findings are beneficial for entering the regime of ultracold interaction in atom-ion ensembles exploiting bichromatic optical dipole traps. Long lifetimes and low scattering rates are essential to reach long coherence times for quantum simulations in optical lattices employing many ions, or ions and atoms.

  8. Test of Equivalence Principle at 1 0-8 Level by a Dual-Species Double-Diffraction Raman Atom Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Long, Shitong; Tang, Biao; Chen, Xi; Gao, Fen; Peng, Wencui; Duan, Weitao; Zhong, Jiaqi; Xiong, Zongyuan; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Yuanzhong; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-07-01

    We report an improved test of the weak equivalence principle by using a simultaneous 85Rb-87Rb dual-species atom interferometer. We propose and implement a four-wave double-diffraction Raman transition scheme for the interferometer, and demonstrate its ability in suppressing common-mode phase noise of Raman lasers after their frequencies and intensity ratios are optimized. The statistical uncertainty of the experimental data for Eötvös parameter η is 0.8 ×1 0-8 at 3200 s. With various systematic errors corrected, the final value is η =(2.8 ±3.0 )×1 0-8. The major uncertainty is attributed to the Coriolis effect.

  9. Ex Vacuo Atom Chip Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC)

    CERN Document Server

    Squires, Matthew B; Kasch, Brian; Stickney, James A; Erickson, Christopher J; Crow, Jonathan A R; Carlson, Evan J; Burke, John H

    2016-01-01

    Ex vacuo atom chips, used in conjunction with a custom thin walled vacuum chamber, have enabled the rapid replacement of atom chips for magnetically trapped cold atom experiments. Atoms were trapped in $>2$ kHz magnetic traps created using high power atom chips. The thin walled vacuum chamber allowed the atoms to be trapped $\\lesssim1$ mm from the atom chip conductors which were located outside of the vacuum system. Placing the atom chip outside of the vacuum simplified the electrical connections and improved thermal management. Using a multi-lead Z-wire chip design, a Bose-Einstein condensate was produced with an external atom chip. Vacuum and optical conditions were maintained while replacing the Z-wire chip with a newly designed cross-wire chip. The atom chips were exchanged and an initial magnetic trap was achieved in less than three hours.

  10. Collective excitation of trapped degenerate Fermi gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damski, Bogdan; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub [Instytut Fizyki Imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Crakow (Poland)

    2002-04-14

    We show that the slow driving of a focused laser beam through a cloud of trapped cold fermions allows creation of a collective excitation in the system. The method, proposed originally by us for bosons, seems to be quite feasible experimentally - it requires only an appropriate change in time of the potential in the atomic traps, as realized in laboratories already. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  11. STE-QUEST—test of the universality of free fall using cold atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, D. N.; Ahlers, H.; Battelier, B.; Bawamia, A.; Bertoldi, A.; Bondarescu, R.; Bongs, K.; Bouyer, P.; Braxmaier, C.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Chaloner, C.; Chwalla, M.; Ertmer, W.; Franz, M.; Gaaloul, N.; Gehler, M.; Gerardi, D.; Gesa, L.; Gürlebeck, N.; Hartwig, J.; Hauth, M.; Hellmig, O.; Herr, W.; Herrmann, S.; Heske, A.; Hinton, A.; Ireland, P.; Jetzer, P.; Johann, U.; Krutzik, M.; Kubelka, A.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Landragin, A.; Lloro, I.; Massonnet, D.; Mateos, I.; Milke, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Oswald, M.; Peters, A.; Posso-Trujillo, K.; Rasel, E.; Rocco, E.; Roura, A.; Rudolph, J.; Schleich, W.; Schubert, C.; Schuldt, T.; Seidel, S.; Sengstock, K.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sorrentino, F.; Summers, D.; Tino, G. M.; Trenkel, C.; Uzunoglu, N.; von Klitzing, W.; Walser, R.; Wendrich, T.; Wenzlawski, A.; Weßels, P.; Wicht, A.; Wille, E.; Williams, M.; Windpassinger, P.; Zahzam, N.

    2014-06-01

    The theory of general relativity describes macroscopic phenomena driven by the influence of gravity while quantum mechanics brilliantly accounts for microscopic effects. Despite their tremendous individual success, a complete unification of fundamental interactions is missing and remains one of the most challenging and important quests in modern theoretical physics. The spacetime explorer and quantum equivalence principle space test satellite mission, proposed as a medium-size mission within the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency (ESA), aims for testing general relativity with high precision in two experiments by performing a measurement of the gravitational redshift of the Sun and the Moon by comparing terrestrial clocks, and by performing a test of the universality of free fall of matter waves in the gravitational field of Earth comparing the trajectory of two Bose-Einstein condensates of 85Rb and 87Rb. The two ultracold atom clouds are monitored very precisely thanks to techniques of atom interferometry. This allows to reach down to an uncertainty in the Eötvös parameter of at least 2 × 10-15. In this paper, we report about the results of the phase A mission study of the atom interferometer instrument covering the description of the main payload elements, the atomic source concept, and the systematic error sources.

  12. Diffracted field distribution from a knife-edge truncated semi- Gaussian beam as an atomic (molecular) mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Ping; Gao Wei-Jian; Yin Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the diffraction characteristics of an incident Gaussian beam cut by a straight edge bounding a semi-infinite opaque plane using Kirchhoff scalar wave theory in the Fresnel limit, and propose a new and simple mirror scheme to reflect atoms by using the intensity gradient induced by a blue-detuned semi-Gaussian laser beam. The optical potential of the diffracted light of the knife-cut semi-Gaussian beam for 85Rb atom and its spontaneous emission probability are calculated and compared with the performance of the evanescent-wave mirror. Our study shows that the optical potential of the diffracted light of the semi-Gaussian beam is far higher than that of the evanescent light wave, and the maximum normal velocity of the incident atoms can be far greater than that of the evanescent light wave under the same parameters, so the blue-detuned semi-Gaussian beam, as a novel atomic mirror, can be used to efficiently reflect cold atoms with a normal velocity of greater than 1 m/s. However, the intensity gradient (force) of the diffracted light of the semi-Gaussian-beam is much smaller than that of the evanescent light wave, so its spontaneous emission probability is greater than that from the evanescent-wave when the normal velocity of incident atoms is greater.

  13. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap-ni...

  14. Doppler cooling and trapping on forbidden transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Binnewies, T.; Wilpers, G.; Sterr, U.; Riehle, F.; Helmcke, J.; Mehlstäubler, T. E.; Rasel, E. M.; Ertmer, W.

    2001-01-01

    Ultracold atoms at temperatures close to the recoil limit have been achieved by extending Doppler cooling to forbidden transitions. A cloud of ^40Ca atoms has been cooled and trapped to a temperature as low as 6 \\mu K by operating a magneto-optical trap on the spin-forbidden intercombination transition. Quenching the long-lived excited state with an additional laser enhanced the scattering rate by a factor of 15, while a high selectivity in velocity was preserved. With this method more than 1...

  15. Tests of fundamental symmetries with trapped antihydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Chris Ørum

    2016-01-01

    questions in modern physics. Since 2010, it has been possible to perform such tests on magnetically trapped antihydrogen, and this work reports on several recent studies. Analysing the temporal and spatial distribution of annihilations as antihydrogen atoms are released from the magnetic trap, we set limits...... any putatively charged antihydrogen atoms. From the lack of response to these potentials, we can set a limit for the charge of antihydrogen at |Q| < 7.1 E-10 e. From this measurement, the limit on the positron charge anomaly can also be improved. As the main focus of this work, we consider the...

  16. Single beam atom sorting machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We create two overlapping one-dimensional optical lattices using a single laser beam, a spatial light modulator and a high numerical aperture lens. These lattices have the potential to trap single atoms, and using the dynamic capabilities of the spatial light modulator may shift and sort atoms to a minimum atom-atom separation of 1.52 μm. We show how a simple feedback circuit can compensate for the spatial light modulator's intensity modulation

  17. Interferometry with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optics and interferometry with matter waves is the art of coherently manipulating the translational motion of particles like neutrons, atoms and molecules. Coherent atom optics is an extension of techniques that were developed for manipulating internal quantum states. Applying these ideas to translational motion required the development of techniques to localize atoms and transfer population coherently between distant localities. In this view position and momentum are (continuous) quantum mechanical degrees of freedom analogous to discrete internal quantum states. In our contribution we start with an introduction into matter wave optics in sect. 1, discuss coherent atom optics and atom interferometry techniques for molecular beams in sect. 2 and for trapped atoms in sect. 3. In sect. 4 we then describe tools and experiments that allow to probe the evolution of quantum states of many-body systems by atom interference.

  18. High data-rate atom interferometers through high recapture efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; Rakholia, Akash Vrijal; McGuinness, Hayden

    2015-01-27

    An inertial sensing system includes a magneto-optical trap (MOT) that traps atoms within a specified trapping region. The system also includes a cooling laser that cools the trapped atoms so that the atoms remain within the specified region for a specified amount of time. The system further includes a light-pulse atom interferometer (LPAI) that performs an interferometric interrogation of the atoms to determine phase changes in the atoms. The system includes a controller that controls the timing of MOT and cooling laser operations, and controls the timing of interferometric operations to substantially recapture the atoms in the specified trapping region. The system includes a processor that determines the amount inertial movement of the inertial sensing system based on the determined phase changes in the atoms. Also, a method of inertial sensing using this inertial sensing system includes recapture of atoms within the MOT following interferometric interrogation by the LPAI.

  19. AC Zeeman potentials for atom chip-based ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancher, Charles; Pyle, Andrew; Ziltz, Austin; Aubin, Seth

    2015-05-01

    We present experimental and theoretical progress on using the AC Zeeman force produced by microwave magnetic near-fields from an atom chip to manipulate and eventually trap ultracold atoms. These AC Zeeman potentials are inherently spin-dependent and can be used to apply qualitatively different potentials to different spin states simultaneously. Furthermore, AC Zeeman traps are compatible with the large DC magnetic fields necessary for accessing Feshbach resonances. Applications include spin-dependent trapped atom interferometry and experiments in 1D many-body physics. Initial experiments and results are geared towards observing the bipolar detuning-dependent nature of the AC Zeeman force at 6.8 GHz with ultracold 87Rb atoms trapped in the vicinity of an atom chip. Experimental work is also underway towards working with potassium isotopes at frequencies of 1 GHz and below. Theoretical work is focused on atom chip designs for AC Zeeman traps produced by magnetic near-fields, while also incorporating the effect of the related electric near-fields. Electromagnetic simulations of atom chip circuits are used for mapping microwave propagation in on-chip transmission line structures, accounting for the skin effect, and guiding impedance matching.

  20. Apparatus for fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry and quantum pumping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, M. K.; Ziltz, A.; Field, J.; Aubin, S.

    2010-03-01

    We present the current state of an apparatus designed to create and manipulate ultracold bosonic and fermionic Rb and K isotopes for a fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry, microwave trapping, and quantum pumping experiments. Quantum pumping is a phenomenon which can precisely control bias-less flow of single electrons in a circuit. Using ultracold atoms on atom chips, we can test theoretical predictions which have not yet been verified due to experimental difficulties in solid state systems. The apparatus design consists of a magneto-optical trap, magnetic transport system, atom chip, and optical dipole trap. We have demonstrated basic laser cooling and trapping and are working towards transport of the collected atoms to the atom chip for cooling to quantum degeneracy. Once quantum degeneracy is achieved at the chip, micro-magnetic reservoirs of ultracold atoms connected by a 1D ``wire'' create a circuit for various quantum pumping schemes. These schemes are also more broadly applicable to atomtronics experiments.

  1. Guided Quasicontinuous Atom Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Guerin, William; Riou, Jean-Félix; Gaebler, John,; Josse, Vincent; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain

    2006-01-01

    version published in Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 200402 (2006) International audience We report the first realization of a guided quasicontinuous atom laser by rf outcoupling a Bose-Einstein condensate from a hybrid optomagnetic trap into a horizontal atomic waveguide. This configuration allows us to cancel the acceleration due to gravity and keep the de Broglie wavelength constant at 0.5 µm during 0.1 s of propagation. We also show that our configuration, equivalent to pigtailing an optical f...

  2. Laser-induced Rotation of a Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Marzlin, Karl-Peter; Zhang, Weiping

    1997-01-01

    In this letter, atom optic techniques are proposed to control the excitation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in an atomic trap. We show that by employing the dipole potential induced by four highly detuned travelling-wave laser beams with appropriate phases and frequencies, one can coherently excite a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate composed of ultracold alkali atoms into a state rotating around the trap center. The connection to vortex states is discussed.

  3. Atom interferometric techniques for measuring gravitational acceleration and constant magnetic field gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, B

    2011-01-01

    We discuss two techniques for probing the effects of a homogeneous force acting on cold atoms, such as that due to gravity or a constant magnetic field gradient, using grating echo-type atom interferometers. A comprehensive theoretical description of signals generated by both two-pulse and three-pulse interferometers, accounting for magnetic sub-levels in the atomic ground state, is shown to agree with experimental results. Laser-cooled samples of $^{85}$Rb with temperatures as low as 2.4 $\\mu$K have been achieved in a relatively large glass cell with well-suppressed magnetic fields. Using transit time limited interferometer signals, we demonstrate sensitivity to externally applied magnetic gradients as small as $\\sim 4$ mG/cm. With these timescales we estimate that precision measurements of the gravitational acceleration, $g$, are possible with both the two-pulse and three-pulse echo interferometers. Whereas the two-pulse signal is a position-sensitive technique to measure the absolute value of $g$, the thre...

  4. An atom-by-atom assembler of defect-free arbitrary 2d atomic arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Barredo, Daniel; Lienhard, Vincent; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of individually controlled atoms trapped in optical tweezers are a very promising platform for quantum engineering applications. However, to date, only disordered arrays have been demonstrated, due to the non-deterministic loading of the traps. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of fully loaded, two-dimensional arrays of up to 50 microtraps each containing a single atom, and arranged in arbitrary geometries. Starting from initially larger, half-filled matrices of randomly loaded traps, we obtain user-defined target arrays at unit filling. This is achieved with a real-time control system and a moving optical tweezers that performs a sequence of rapid atom moves depending on the initial distribution of the atoms in the arrays. These results open exciting prospects for quantum engineering with neutral atoms in tunable geometries.

  5. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 1012 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 1018. While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen

  6. Micromotion Compensation and Photoionization of Ions in a Linear Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi; ZHOU Fei; CHEN Liang; WAN Wei; FENG Mang

    2011-01-01

    @@ e confinement of ions in an electromagnetic trap is a prerequisite of sideband cooling and quantum information processing.For a string of ions in a linear ion trap,we report our recent efforts of compensating for micromotion of the ions by three methods,which yields narrower fluorescence spectra and lower temperature.We also achieve a photoionization scheme that loads the ions deterministically into the linear trap from an atomic beam.%The stable confinement of ions in an electromagnetic trap is a prerequisite of sideband cooling and quantum information processing. For a string of ions in a linear ion trap, we report our recent efforts of compensating for micromotion of the ions by three methods, which yields narrower fluorescence spectra and lower temperature. We also achieve a photoionization scheme that loads the ions deterministically into the linear trap from an atomic beam.

  7. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-01-23

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed, and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  8. Small Mammal Trapping 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Small mammal traps were placed in the Baring division and in the Edmunds division of Moosehom National Wildlife Refuge. There were a total of 98 traps set for up to...

  9. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  10. Radiation trapping inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Jen, H H; Lee, Kevin C J; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Yu, Ite A

    2014-01-01

    We report the radiation trapping effect inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). An optical dipole trap was used to load and confine the atoms in the PCF without contacting the wall of the fiber. The transmission of a probe light propagating through the PCF was studied experimentally and theoretically. With the experimental results and theoretical predictions, we conclude that the radiation trapping can play a significant role and should be taken into account in the spectroscopic measurements inside the PCF.

  11. Corrections to our results for optical nanofiber traps in Cesium

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, D; Choi, K S; Kimble, H J

    2012-01-01

    Several errors in Refs. [1, 2] are corrected related to the optical trapping potentials for a state-insensitive, compensated nanofiber trap for the D2 transition of atomic Cesium. Section I corrects our basic formalism in Ref. [1] for calculating dipole-force potentials. Section II corrects erroneous values for a partial lifetime and a transition wavelength in Ref. [1]. Sections III and IV present corrected figures for various trapping configurations considered in Refs. [1] and [2], respectively.

  12. Excitons in Electrostatic Traps

    OpenAIRE

    Hammack, A. T.; Gippius, N. A.; Andreev, G. O.; Butov, L. V.; Hanson, M.; Gossard, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    We consider in-plane electrostatic traps for indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells, where the traps are formed by a laterally modulated gate voltage. An intrinsic obstacle for exciton confinement in electrostatic traps is an in-plane electric field that can lead to exciton dissociation. We propose a design to suppress the in-plane electric field and, at the same time, to effectively confine excitons in the electrostatic traps. We present calculations for various classes of electrostatic ...

  13. Duponchelia water-trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deventer, van P.

    2008-01-01

    How can the harmful Duponchelia insect best be trapped for optimum detection? A water trap was found to be most effective in a field test by Plant Research International. Another advantage is the low maintenance required by this trap. The composition of the Duponchelia sex pheromone was identified j

  14. Do poverty traps exist ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kraay, Aart; McKenzie, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical evidence on the existence of poverty traps, understood as self-reinforcing mechanisms through which poor individuals or countries remain poor. Poverty traps have captured the interest of many development policy makers, because poverty traps provide a theoretically coherent explanation for persistent poverty. They also suggest that temporary policy intervent...

  15. Ion trap simulation tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  16. Bose-Einstein condensation in a gas of sodium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Davis; M.O. Mewes; M.R. Andrews; N.J. van Druten; D.S. Durfee; D.M. Kurn; W. Ketterle

    1995-01-01

    We have observed Bose-Einstein condensation of sodium atoms. The atoms were trapped in a novel trap that employed both magnetic and optical forces. Evaporative cooling increased the phase-space density by 6 orders of magnitude within seven seconds. Condensates contained up to 5 x 105 atoms at densit

  17. Entanglement of two ground state neutral atoms using Rydberg blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Browaeys, Antoine; Evellin, Charles;

    2011-01-01

    We report on our recent progress in trapping and manipulation of internal states of single neutral rubidium atoms in optical tweezers. We demonstrate the creation of an entangled state between two ground state atoms trapped in separate tweezers using the effect of Rydberg blockade. The quality...... of the entanglement is measured using global rotations of the internal states of both atoms....

  18. Thermalization of magnetically trapped metastable helium

    CERN Document Server

    Browaeys, A; Sirjean, O; Poupard, J; Nowak, S; Boiron, D; Westbrook, C I; Aspect, Alain

    2001-01-01

    We have observed thermalization by elastic collisions of magnetically trapped metastable helium atoms. Our method directly samples the reconstruction of a thermal energy distribution after the application of an RF knife. The relaxation time of our sample towards equilibrium gives an elastic collision rate constant close to the unitarity limit.

  19. Coherent polulation trapping in quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coherent popualation trapping is a recently developed tool for high resolution spectroscopy. This method if based on a linear coherent interaction betwen the atomic system and the electromagnetic radiaiton falling upon and a registration of medium responses for a subsequent analysis of their fine structure which contains information about spectral characteristics of a quantum system

  20. Realization of High Optical Density Rb Magneto-optical Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yan-Xu; LIU Yong-Hong; ZHANG Chun-Hong; LI Shu-Jing; WANG Hai

    2009-01-01

    We report experimental demonstration of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of Rb atoms with a high optical density. With 2.2-cm-diameter cooling laser beams, we achieve an optical density of nearly 11 for about 2.6 × 1010 trapped Rb atoms with the beam intensity of about 6.6 mW/cm2 per beam. The temperature of the cold atoms is about 250 μK. Furthermore, by ramping the magnetic field gradient from 8 G/cm to about 20 G/cm, the atomic cloud in the MOT is compressed and the optical density is up to 16.

  1. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  2. Density of Trap States and Auger-mediated Electron Trapping in CdTe Quantum-Dot Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Simon C; Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Aulin, Yaroslav V; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Infante, Ivan; Houtepen, Arjan J

    2015-05-13

    Charge trapping is an ubiquitous process in colloidal quantum-dot solids and a major limitation to the efficiency of quantum dot based devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and thermoelectrics. Although empirical approaches led to a reduction of trapping and thereby efficiency enhancements, the exact chemical nature of the trapping mechanism remains largely unidentified. In this study, we determine the density of trap states in CdTe quantum-dot solids both experimentally, using a combination of electrochemical control of the Fermi level with ultrafast transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, and theoretically, via density functional theory calculations. We find a high density of very efficient electron traps centered ∼0.42 eV above the valence band. Electrochemical filling of these traps increases the electron lifetime and the photoluminescence quantum yield by more than an order of magnitude. The trapping rate constant for holes is an order of magnitude lower that for electrons. These observations can be explained by Auger-mediated electron trapping. From density functional theory calculations we infer that the traps are formed by dicoordinated Te atoms at the quantum dot surface. The combination of our unique experimental determination of the density of trap states with the theoretical modeling of the quantum dot surface allows us to identify the trapping mechanism and chemical reaction at play during charge trapping in these quantum dots. PMID:25853555

  3. Interfacing ultracold atoms and mechanical oscillators on an atom chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treutlein, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped and coherently manipulated close to a chip surface using atom chip technology. This opens the exciting possibility of studying interactions between atoms and on-chip solid-state systems such as micro- and nanostructured mechanical oscillators. One goal is to form hybrid quantum systems, in which atoms are used to read out, cool, and coherently manipulate the oscillators' state. In our work, we investigate different coupling mechanisms between ultracold atoms and mechanical oscillators. In a first experiment, we use atom-surface forces to couple the vibrations of a mechanical cantilever to the motion of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a magnetic microtrap on an atom chip. The atoms are trapped at about one micrometer distance from the cantilever surface. We make use of the coupling to read out the cantilever vibrations with the atoms and observe resonant coupling to several well-resolved mechanical modes of the condensate. In a second experiment, we investigate coupling via a 1D optical lattice that is formed by a laser beam retroreflected from a SiN membrane oscillator. The optical lattice serves as a `transfer rod' that couples vibrations of the membrane to the atoms and vice versa. We point out that the strong coupling regime can be reached in coupled atom-oscillator systems by placing both the atoms and the oscillator in a high-finesse optical cavity.

  4. A tunable low-drift laser stabilized to an atomic reference

    CERN Document Server

    Leopold, Tobias; Feuchtenbeiner, Stefanie; Grebing, Christian; Micke, Peter; Scharnhorst, Nils; Leroux, Ian D; López-Urrutia, José R Crespo; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-01-01

    We present a laser system with a linewidth and long-term frequency stability at the 50 kHz level. It is based on a Ti:Sapphire laser emitting radiation at 882 nm which is referenced to an atomic transition. For this, the length of an evacuated transfer cavity is stabilized to a reference laser at 780 nm locked to the $^{85}$Rb D$_2$-line via modulation transfer spectroscopy. Full tunability of the spectroscopy laser is realized using the sideband locking technique to the transfer cavity. In this configuration, the linewidth of the spectroscopy laser is derived from the transfer cavity, while the long-term stability is derived from the atomic resonance. The frequency stability and linewidth of both lasers are characterized by comparison against an active hydrogen maser frequency standard and an ultra-narrow linewidth laser, respectively. The spectral gaps are bridged with an optical frequency comb. The laser system presented here will be used for spectroscopy of the $1s^{2}2s^{2}2p\\ ^{2}P_{1/2} -\\ ^{2}P_{3/2}$...

  5. Microfabrication of gold wires for atom guides

    OpenAIRE

    Kukharenka, Elena; Moktadir, Zak; Kraft, Michael; Abdelsalam, M. E.; Bagnall, Darren; Vale, C.; Jones, M.P.A.; Hinds, E. A.

    2004-01-01

    Miniaturised atom optics is a new field allowing the control of cold atoms in microscopic magnetic traps and waveguides. Using microstructures (hereafter referred to as atom chips), the control of cold atoms on the micrometer scale becomes possible. Applications range from integrated atom interferometers to the realisation of quantum gates. The implementation of such structures requires high magnetic field gradients. The motivation of this work was to develop a suitable ...

  6. Experiments with a laser cooled cloud of atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Vasant; Banerjee, Ayan; Rapol, Umakant

    1999-01-01

    We discuss two experiments that can be performed using a cloud of laser-cooled and trapped atoms, namely Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and search for a permanent Electric Dipole Moment (EDM). BEC can be observed in Rb atoms in a magnetic trap by using forced evaporative cooling to continuously lower the temperature below the condensation limit. The cloud is cooled by preferentially ejecting the hottest atoms from a magnetic trap. The magnetic trap is loaded with laser-cooled atoms from a m...

  7. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  8. Pumped helium system for cooling positron and electron traps to 1.2 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrubel, J.; Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Larochelle, P.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zielinski, M.; Borbely, J. S.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Müllers, A.; Walz, J.; Speck, A.

    2011-06-01

    Extremely precise tests of fundamental particle symmetries should be possible via laser spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen ( H¯) atoms. H¯ atoms that can be trapped must have an energy in temperature units that is below 0.5 K—the energy depth of the deepest magnetic traps that can currently be constructed with high currents and superconducting technology. The number of atoms in a Boltzmann distribution with energies lower than this trap depth depends sharply upon the temperature of the thermal distribution. For example, ten times more atoms with energies low enough to be trapped are in a thermal distribution at a temperature of 1.2 K than for a temperature of 4.2 K. To date, H¯ atoms have only been produced within traps whose electrode temperature is 4.2 K or higher. A lower temperature apparatus is desirable if usable numbers of atoms that can be trapped are to eventually be produced. This report is about the pumped helium apparatus that cooled the trap electrodes of an H¯ apparatus to 1.2 K for the first time. Significant apparatus challenges include the need to cool a 0.8 m stack of 37 trap electrodes separated by only a mm from the substantial mass of a 4.2 K Ioffe trap and the substantial mass of a 4.2 K solenoid. Access to the interior of the cold electrodes must be maintained for antiprotons, positrons, electrons and lasers.

  9. Chapter 12: Trapped Electrons as Electrical (Quantum) Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú, José

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a detailed model of the equivalent electric circuit of a single trapped particle in a coplanar-waveguide (CPW) Penning trap. The CPW-trap, which is essentially a section of coplanar-waveguide transmission-line, is designed to make it compatible with circuit-quantum electrodynamic architectures. This will enable a single trapped electron, or geonium atom, as a potential building block of microwave quantum circuits. The model of the trapped electron as an electric circuit was first introduced by Hans Dehmelt in the 1960s. It is essential for the description of the electronic detection using resonant tank circuits. It is also the basis for the description of the interaction of a geonium atom with other distant quantum systems through electrical (microwave) signals.

  10. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  11. Characterization of a Simultaneous Dual-Species Atom Interferometer for a Quantum Test of the Weak Equivalence Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnin, A; Bidel, Y; Bresson, A

    2015-01-01

    We present here the performance of a simultaneous dual-species matter-wave accelerometer for measuring the differential acceleration between two different atomic species ($^{87}$Rb and $^{85}$Rb). We study the expression and the extraction of the differential phase from the interferometer output. The differential accelerometer reaches a short-term sensitivity of $1.23\\times10^{-7}g/\\sqrt{Hz}$ limited by the detection noise and a resolution of $2\\times10^{-9}g$ after 11000 s, the highest reported thus far with a dual-species atom interferometer to our knowledge. Thanks to the simultaneous measurement, such resolution levels can still be achieved even with vibration levels up to $3\\times10^{-3}g$, corresponding to a common-mode vibration noise rejection ratio of 94 dB (rejection factor of 50 000). These results prove the ability of such atom sensors for realizing a quantum based test of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) at a level of $\\eta\\sim10^{-9}$ even with high vibration levels and a compact sensor.

  12. Duponchelia water-trap

    OpenAIRE

    Deventer, van, S.J.H.

    2008-01-01

    How can the harmful Duponchelia insect best be trapped for optimum detection? A water trap was found to be most effective in a field test by Plant Research International. Another advantage is the low maintenance required by this trap. The composition of the Duponchelia sex pheromone was identified just over a year ago and now growers are using pheromone traps on a large scale for a timely detection of this difficult pest insect. The caterpillars of this moth cause damage in all sorts of crops...

  13. Versatile compact atomic source for high resolution dual atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, T; Gilowski, M; Jentsch, C; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2007-01-01

    We present a compact $^{87}$Rb atomic source for high precision dual atom interferometers. The source is based on a double-stage magneto-optical trap (MOT) design, consisting of a 2-dimensional (2D)-MOT for efficient loading of a 3D-MOT. The accumulated atoms are precisely launched in a horizontal moving molasses. Our setup generates a high atomic flux ($>10^{10}$ atoms/s) with precise and flexibly tunable atomic trajectories as required for high resolution Sagnac atom interferometry. We characterize the performance of the source with respect to the relevant parameters of the launched atoms, i.e. temperature, absolute velocity and pointing, by utilizing time-of-flight techniques and velocity selective Raman transitions.

  14. Optimization of the Loading Process of the QUIC Magnetic Trap for the Experiment of Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuai; ZHOU Xiao-Ji; YANG Fan; XIA Lin; WANG Yi-Qiu; CHEN Xu-Zong

    2004-01-01

    @@ The magnetic quadrupole-Ioffe configuration (QUIC) trap in our Bose-Einstein condensation experiment is introduced. The magnetic trap loading process after laser cooling is analysed and the optimization of the loading process is studied experimentally. Calculation of the magnetic field explains the loss of the atoms during the loading process of the QUIC trap. The number of atoms loaded in the QUIC trap is increased by 40%o after optimization in comparison with the normal loading process.

  15. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  16. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy

  17. Cylindrical Penning traps with dynamic orthogonalized anharmonicity compensation for precision experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Fei Xiang

    1999-01-01

    Harmonic potentials can be produced in cylindrical ion traps by means of dynamic orthogonalized anharmonicity compensation with use of two (or multiple) sets of compensation electrodes. One special example is for traps with multiple identical electrodes which are not only easy to construct and allow access to the center region of the trap for particle loading and releasing, laser beams, and microwaves, but also flexible in forming harmonic potential wells in many locations. The nested trap configuration and the side-by-side trap configuration are readily available in this special scheme. Analytical solutions for cylindrical traps with multiple sets of compensation potentials are presented. This work will be useful for studies involving Penning trap diagnostics, atomic and molecular interactions (including the production of antihydrogen atoms), accurate mass measurements of exotic particles, and precision measurements of the spin precession frequencies of trapped particles.

  18. Dynamic Trap Formation and Elimination in Colloidal Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, O.

    2013-03-21

    Using first-principles simulations on PbS and CdSe colloidal quantum dots, we find that surface defects form in response to electronic doping and charging of the nanoparticles. We show that electronic trap states in nanocrystals are dynamic entities, in contrast with the conventional picture wherein traps are viewed as stable electronic states that can be filled or emptied, but not created or destroyed. These traps arise from the formation or breaking of atomic dimers at the nanoparticle surface. The dimers\\' energy levels can reside within the bandgap, in which case a trap is formed. Fortunately, we are also able to identify a number of shallow-electron-affinity cations that stabilize the surface, working to counter dynamic trap formation and allowing for trap-free doping. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Tightly Confining dc Magnetic Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewes, M.; Andrews, M.R.; van Druten, N.J.; Kurn, D.M.; Durfee, D.S.; Ketterle, W. [Department of Physics and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of sodium atoms has been observed in a novel {open_quote}{open_quote}cloverleaf{close_quote}{close_quote} trap. This trap combines tight confinement with excellent optical access, using only dc electromagnets. Evaporative cooling in this trap produced condensates of 5{times}10{sup 6} atoms, a tenfold improvement over previous results. We measured the condensate fraction and the repulsive mean-field energy, finding agreement with theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Operation of a planar-electrode ion trap array with adjustable RF electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kumph, Muir; Langer, Kirsten; Niedermayr, Michael; Brownnutt, Michael; Blatt, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    One path to scaling-up trapped atomic ions for large-scale quantum computing and simulation is to create a two-dimensional array of ion traps in close proximity to each other. A method to control the interactions between nearest neighboring ions is demonstrated and characterized here, using an adjustable radio-frequency (RF) electrode between trapping sites. A printed circuit board planar-electrode ion trap is demonstrated, trapping laser-cooled $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions. RF shuttling and secular-frequency adjustment are shown as a function of the power applied to the addressed RF electrode. The trapped ion's heating rate is measured via a fluorescence recooling method.