WorldWideScience

Sample records for 84-year-old hispanic man

  1. Rhizina undulatu on stem and roots of 84-year-old Scots pine trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Sierota

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Apothecia of Rhizina undulata Fr. were found on and around 84-year-old Scots pine trees in fire-free managed forest. The trees were weakened: crowns were strongly transparent, needles were yellowish or red MI part of the crown, the 1997 height increment of shoots decreased by about 60. One apothecium developed on the stem of tree. 7 cm above the ground level. The other 8 were associated with the roots. Three weeks after ascocarps had been removed 8 new ones were found. Some details referring to apothecia are given: distances from the root collar, dimensions, fresh weight, moisture and "index of undulativity" (Fw.

  2. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  3. Hispanic Heritage Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    Hispanic heritage month is from September 15 to October 15. One problem that arises when grouping people into categories such as Hispanic or Latino is stereotyping, stereotypes can be promoted or used in this Hispanic month to promote a greater understanding of Latino cultures.

  4. Internet/E-Mail Usage and Well-Being among 65-84 Year Olds in New Zealand: Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman-Boyden, Peggy G.; Reid, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    Research indicates that significant groups of older people are using Internet/e-mail technology. Using data from a 2007 random sample of 1,680 New Zealanders aged 65-84, predictors of Internet/e-mail usage and the impact of usage on well-being were investigated. Gender, age, education, household composition, income, and work were significant…

  5. Hispanic Higher Education and HSIs. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents facts about Hispanic higher education. Facts on the following topics are presented: (1) Hispanic demographics; (2) Hispanic academic attainment; (3) Hispanic higher education; and (4) Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs).

  6. Understanding the Hispanic Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, John M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes cultural differences of Hispanic students in family structure, language, motivation, mysticism, machismo, touching, and time concepts which may lead to problems in the classroom. Suggests strategies teachers may employ to increase opportunities for positive school experiences for Hispanic students through recognition and acknowledgement…

  7. Hispanic American Heritage, Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Mike

    This resource book features the cultural heritage of Hispanics living within the United States and includes ideas, materials, and activities to be used with students in the intermediate grades and middle school. This book explores the definition of the term "Hispanic Americans" and suggests a multilayered population with a variety of cultural…

  8. Hispanic Business Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca-Cola USA, Atlanta, GA.

    This is a corporate policy statement of the Hispanic business agenda of Coca Cola USA, and the results of a community survey conducted to inform that agenda. The statement outlines several areas of company policy as they relate to Hispanic Americans. These areas include regional marketing, promotion, and community relations strategies, a…

  9. Bicultural Advertising and Hispanic Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Hsiu Sunny; Li, Cong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of acculturation modes (assimilated, integrated, and separated) on Hispanic consumers' responses to three advertising targeting strategies (Caucasian targeted, bicultural, and Hispanic targeted). The hypotheses were empirically tested in a 3 x 3 factorial experiment with 155 self-identified Hispanic adult…

  10. Hispanic Health PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  11. Education's Hispanic Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Georges Vernez

    1998-01-01

    Thirty years of increasing immigration from Mexico, Central America, and South America, has led to a rapid increase in the population of Hispanic origin in the United States. Hispanic children and youths will enter an economy that has changes significantly over the past few decades. The number of well-paying manufacturing jobs that have been the backbone of the U.S. economy are stagnating and are projected to provide employment for only 11 percent of the economy by 2005 (U.S. Department of La...

  12. Top Hispanic Degree Producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a list of the top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M.H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy students at the Indiana University Bloomington. For the year 2012, the listings focus on Hispanic students. Data for…

  13. Inventing the Hispanic Psyche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    Many Latin American authors have undertaken cultural criticism designed to explain the psyche of the Hispanic countries. Carlos Fuentes, in "The Buried Mirror: Reflections on Spain and the New World," presents another example of the obsessive need to interpret Latin America to the rest of the world. (SLD)

  14. Joe Zhang, Party Man, Company Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    2014-01-01

    Book review of: Joe Zhang: Party Man, Company Man. Honolulu: Enrich Professional Publishing, 2014. 234 pp.......Book review of: Joe Zhang: Party Man, Company Man. Honolulu: Enrich Professional Publishing, 2014. 234 pp....

  15. Hispanic College Students Library Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Risa; Newman, Eric; Brown, Haakon T.

    2015-01-01

    This study looks at undergraduate Hispanic students' interpretations and current perceptions of the academic library's purpose, usefulness and value. What are the reasons to use the library? What are the barriers to use? This study will examine academic libraries' move toward electronic library materials and what it means for Hispanic students.…

  16. Exposure of Hispanic Youth to Alcohol Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States. This Hispanic population is also younger than the general population: 40% of Hispanics are under 21, versus 30% of the entire population. The number of Hispanics under the age of 21 grew 61% between 1990 and 2000, totaling 17% of the nation's youth under 21 in 2000. The Center on…

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Hispanic Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can go a long way. Doctors and other healthcare professionals can: Work with interpreters to eliminate language barriers, ... to help improve Hispanic health. Doctors and other healthcare professionals can Work with interpreters to eliminate language barriers, ...

  18. Profile: Hispanic/Latino Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. According to the ... are: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV/AIDS, obesity, suicide, and liver disease. Other Health Concerns: Hispanics ...

  19. Self-Harm Experiences among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croyle, Kristin L.

    2007-01-01

    Very little research exists on self-harm in Hispanic populations, although there is a strong literature that addresses suicidality in Hispanics. This study compares self-reported rates of self-harm in 255 non-Hispanic White (NHW) and 187 Hispanic (predominantly Mexican American) undergraduate students. Results indicated that self-harm is…

  20. Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160528.html Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity Differences in 'genetic ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Hispanic American Health Recent Health ...

  1. Educating Hispanic Students: Effective Instructional Practices

    OpenAIRE

    N.Padrón, Yolanda; C.Waxman, Hersh; H.Rivera, Héctor

    2002-01-01

    Effective instructional practices are crucial to addressing the educational crisis facing many Hispanic students in the United States. The number of Hispanic students attending public schools has increased dramatically in recent decades, yet Hispanic students as a group have the lowest levels of education and the highest dropout rate of any student group. Conditions of poverty and health, as well as other social problems have made it difficult for some Hispanics living in the U.S. to improve ...

  2. Teaching Hispanic Linguistics: Strategies to Engage Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouse, Stephanie M.; Gupton, Timothy; Abreau, Laurel

    2015-01-01

    Even though many post-secondary institutions offer a variety of Hispanic linguistics classes (Hualde 2006; Lipski 2006), research on the pedagogy of Hispanic linguistics is an underdeveloped or non-existent area of the discipline. Courses in Hispanic linguistics can present not only linguistic challenges for non-native speakers of Spanish, but…

  3. How Race Counts for Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, John R.

    This report assesses racial differences among Hispanic Americans. Since 1970, the U.S. Census has asked all Americans to identify their race and, separately, whether they are Hispanic. This means Hispanics can be of any race. Data come from the 1980, 1990, and 2000 Censuses and from pre-tabulated summary files from Census 2000. This report…

  4. Hispanic Self-Employment: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiker, Virginia Solis; Katras, Mary Jo; Montalto, Catherine P.; Olson, Patricia D.

    2003-01-01

    Drawing on human capital, social capital, and acculturation theories, gender differences in income were examined among 7,760 self-employed Hispanic Americans in California, using 1990 census data. Hispanic self-employed women earned less than Hispanic self-employed men and were more likely to be in service occupations. Having less than a high…

  5. Education Level of Catholic Hispanic Deacons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed self-reported religiosity, spirituality, faith-related behaviors, leadership styles, and personality dimensions of 156 Hispanic Catholic deacons, based on varied educational degrees assisting in Hispanic (n = 91) or non-Hispanic (n = 65) parishes. Results found no significant differences on any self-reported variables…

  6. Alcohol and the Hispanic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Origin Trends in drinking among Hispanics vary by country of origin. Among men, Puerto Ricans tend to drink the ... drinks per week (beer, wine, and liquor) by country/nation of origin Country/Nation of Origin »» Puerto Rico »» Mexico »» South/ ...

  7. Demographic Changes of Hispanic Populations and Hispanic Student Enrollment in Texas Community Colleges: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jack; Slate, John R.; Joyner, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    In this literature review, Hispanic demographic changes in the United States and in Texas are examined. Hispanics have accounted for large changes in population, population change, and proportion of population. Accordingly, the literature was reviewed regarding Hispanic immigrants, both authorized and non-authorized immigrants. The issue of…

  8. Older Hispanics' explanatory model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadule-Rios, Nohemi; Tappen, Ruth; Williams, Christine L; Rosselli, Monica

    2014-08-01

    Cultural variations in the perception of depression make it difficult to recognize the disorder resulting in older Hispanics not being diagnosed and not receiving appropriate treatment. This study used a mixed-method design to explore older Hispanics' explanatory model of depression. Depression was recognized as the result of life stressors and personal weaknesses. Terms used for depressed people included "crazy, worry, bored, and nerves." These culturally coded terms may confound diagnosis among many Hispanics who find depression a shameful condition. Findings can be used to inform the adaptation of culturally relevant approaches to better serve the Hispanic community in this country.

  9. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17 "chistes" (jokes), 1…

  10. 25 Great Ideas for Hispanic Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructor, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrated September 15th through October 15th, is a great opportunity to kick off a whole year of cultural discovery. This article presents 25 great ideas for Hispanic heritage. These 25 fresh ideas--from Aztec math to Carnaval masks--are easy to put together, and they offer students the chance to celebrate their own…

  11. Hispanic Population Growth and Rural Income Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, Emilio A.; Kandel, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between Hispanic population growth and changes in U.S. rural income inequality from 1990 through 2000. Applying comparative approaches used for urban areas we disentangle Hispanic population growth's contribution to inequality by comparing and statistically modeling changes in the family income Gini coefficient across…

  12. Comparing the T scores from bone sonometer measurements in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droege M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethnicity is an important risk factor for the development of osteoporosis. Non-Hispanic white or Asian women are commonly considered at higher risk than other ethnicities. Hispanics in the U.S. are of Mexican, Caribbean, Central American, or South American descent. Conclusive data on the relative risk of osteoporosis in Hispanic women based upon heritage within the Hispanic population are not available. Objective: To investigate whether Hispanic white women are at a significantly lower risk than non-Hispanic whites for the development of osteoporosis. Methods: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Community health screenings. Participants: Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women. Intervention: Bone density measurements of the non-dominant heel. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics including regression analyses were performed using SPSS 14.0. Main Outcomes Measure: T scores. Results: Overall, measurements were obtained from 352 women (209 Hispanic & 143 non-Hispanic white ranging in age from 55-97 years old. The mean T score obtained for Hispanic women was -1.194 and -1.280 for non-Hispanic white women. The correlation between the obtained T score and age was negative (r = -0.36, p<0.01, reflecting bone loss with increasing age. Regression analysis using age and ethnicity showed that ethnicity was a non-significant contributor to the best-fit regression line (t=0.60, p=0.55. Conclusion: This study indicates that Hispanic white women may be at comparable risk of developing osteoporosis as non-Hispanic white women.

  13. Listening to Hispanic mothers: guidelines for teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A H; Robledo, L

    1999-01-01

    Teaching Hispanic mothers in a culturally sensitive way to care for their children is a challenge to pediatric nurses. Pediatric nurses must be familiar with customs and the folk medicine practiced by Hispanic mothers. It is very important that the pediatric nurse listens to the voices of Hispanic mothers to determine their health practices, and those that may have been used in their children. Familiarity with folk medicine and health practices will facilitate an appropriate treatment plan and will help to determine whether the mothers' practices are dangerous or beneficial for the child. Pediatric nurses should assess for concurrent use of home remedies and conventional medications to determine if there are any known interactive effects. Finally, increasing the number of pediatric nurses who are fluent in Spanish will enable the voices of Hispanic mothers to be better heard, which in turn, will improve the health status of Hispanic children.

  14. The oldest man ever?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilmoth, J; Skytthe, A; Friou, D;

    1996-01-01

    accurate. Based on the available information, it also seems a reasonable conjecture that he may be the oldest man alive today and perhaps the oldest man who has ever lived. This study documents an extreme example of human longevity and records characteristics of the man's life that may provide clues about...

  15. Hispanics in the Labor Force: A Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borjas, George, Ed.; Tienda, Marta, Ed.

    Hispanics in the U.S. labor force are the subject of the studies in this volume. After an introduction by George J. Borjas and Marta Tienda, the first three papers focus on the same issue: the determination of wage rates for Hispanics and comparison of Hispanic and non-Hispanic wage rates. Cordelia Reimers compares the situation for Black, White,…

  16. 76 FR 59499 - National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... opportunities in higher education for our next generation of Hispanic leaders. The hundreds of HSIs across our country are helping Hispanic students gain access to a quality higher education. These institutions play... Hispanics to improve educational outcomes for Hispanic students from pre-school through higher education...

  17. Hispanics/Latinos & Cardiovascular Disease: Statistical Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 7%), non- Hispanic white men (23.9%), and American Indian or Alaska Native men (24.6%). Similarly, Asian women (5.5%) and Hispanic women (9.6%) were less likely to be current smokers than non- Hispanic black women (17.6%), non-Hispanic ... and American Indian or Alaska Native women (20.7%). Physical ...

  18. The Effects of Contact on the Prejudice between Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Whites in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Charles N.

    2007-01-01

    The growing Hispanic population has come into increasing contact with the larger population of non-Hispanic Whites. It is important to understand the effects of this contact on prejudice. The effects of six kinds of contact were examined for their effects on prejudice between Hispanics (n = 156) and non-Hispanic Whites (n = 1,479) who were…

  19. Clinical Characteristics and Awareness of Skin Cancer in Hispanic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Javed, Saba; Javed, Syed A; Mays, Rana M; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer in darker skin is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We sought to assess the clinical characteristics of cutaneous malignancy amongst Hispanic skin cancer patients and compare them to age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasians.  In this retrospective study, 150 Hispanic skin cancer patients were identified from electronic medical records and age-matched to 150 non-Hispanic Caucasian controls with skin cancer.  The incidence of actinic keratoses (AKs) in Hispanic skin c...

  20. One-man band

    OpenAIRE

    Stillman, R.

    2013-01-01

    This website presents practice-based research related to solo simultaneous instrumental performance ('one-man band'). The site was conceived as a creative and widely accessible platform for music and ideas resulting from one-man band activates carried out between 2008 and 2013. Central to this project is an interest in how one-man band technique informs compositional process, including studio production. Through presentation and analysis of the author’s own creative practice, the site exp...

  1. Colonoscopy Screening Information Preferences Among Urban Hispanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Jennie; Jandorf, Lina; DuHamel, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Existing disparities are evident in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We sought to assess preferred sources of colonoscopy screening information among Hispanics in East Harlem, NY. Face-to-face interviews were conducted among average-risk for CRC, non-symptomatic Hispanics in community-based sites and health clinics. SPSS 16 analysis explored the relationships between sociodemographic and health care variables and preferred sources of colonoscopy information for 395 participants. The top fou...

  2. Friendships Influence Hispanic Students' Implicit Attitudes toward White Non-Hispanics Relative to African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberson, Christopher L.; Porter, Michael K.; Gaffney, Amber M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the role of Hispanic students' friendships with White non-Hispanics (n-Hs) and African Americans (AAs) in predicting implicit and explicit prejudices toward these groups. Participants (N = 73) completed implicit and explicit attitude measures and a friendship questionnaire. Friendships were associated with implicit attitudes…

  3. Hispanic Student Experiences at a Hispanic-Serving Institution: Strong Voices, Key Message

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Christina A.; Posadas, Carlos E.

    2012-01-01

    A symposium at New Mexico State University, a Hispanic-Serving Institution, revealed Hispanic students' attitudes about their experiences at the university. Discussions concerned the campus climate, mentors, the experiences of first-time students, cultural challenges, retention, and accountability. Discussion of the resulting data yields policy…

  4. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study. Final Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study examines the perceptions of 22 national Hispanic American leaders about poverty among Hispanics. Eleven of the leaders were Mexican American; five were Puerto Rican; four were Cuban American; one was Central American; and one was South American. Twelve of the leaders were heads of public interest organizations; six were members of…

  5. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study reports twenty-two Hispanic leaders' responses to interviews assessing their perspectives on the nature, prevalence, and causes of poverty among Hispanics. This report contains six parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 presents the methodology used in the study. Part 3 gives the leaders' demographic and educational backgrounds. Part…

  6. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Supporting Hispanics at Critical Transition Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Ann Quiroz; Hug, Sarah; Thiry, Heather; Alo, Richard; Beheshti, Mohsen; Fernandez, John; Rodriguez, Nestor; Adjouadi, Malek

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics have the highest growth rates among all groups in the U.S., yet they remain considerably underrepresented in computing careers and in the numbers who obtain advanced degrees. Hispanics constituted about 7% of undergraduate computer science and computer engineering graduates and 1% of doctoral graduates in 2007-2008. The small number of…

  7. A Pre-Hispanic Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianucci, Raffaella; Jeziorska, Maria; Lallo, Rudy; Mattutino, Grazia; Massimelli, Massimo; Phillips, Genevieve; Appenzeller, Otto

    2008-01-01

    This report on a male head revealed biologic rhythms, as gleaned from hydrogen isotope ratios in hair, consistent with a South-American origin and Atomic Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dating (AMS) compatible with the last pre-Hispanic period (1418–1491 AD, 95.4% probability). Biopsies showed exceptionally well-preserved tissues. The hair contained high levels of toxic elements (lead, arsenic and mercury) incompatible with life. There was no evidence for lead deposition in bone consistent with post-mortem accumulation of this toxic element in the hair. We propose that the high content of metals in hair was the result of metabolic activity of bacteria leading to metal complexation in extra cellular polymeric substances (EPS). This is a recognized protective mechanism for bacteria that thrive in toxic environments. This mechanism may account for the tissues preservation and gives a hint at soil composition where the head was presumably buried. Our results have implications for forensic toxicology which has, hitherto, relied on hair analyses as one means to reconstruct pre-mortem metabolism and for detecting toxic elements accumulated during life. Our finding also has implications for other archaeological specimens where similar circumstances may distort the results of toxicological studies. PMID:18446229

  8. Incidence rates of the major leukemia subtypes among US Hispanics, Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matasar, Matthew J; Ritchie, Ellen K; Consedine, Nathan; Magai, Carol; Neugut, Alfred I

    2006-11-01

    While leukemia rates are thought to be lower in South and Central America, no study has systematically investigated incidence rates of the leukemia subtypes among Hispanics in the U.S. This was a retrospective cohort study, using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute, 1992 - 2001, to compare leukemia incidence rates as a function of race and ethnicity. It was found that in adults, Hispanics had lower incidence rates for each of the major types of leukemia as compared to non-Hispanic Whites: For AML, elderly Whites had an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.61 in comparison to Hispanics (p < 0.001) and 1.27 in comparison to Blacks (p < 0.001); for CML, the IRR among the elderly was 1.42 that of Hispanics (p < 0.001) and 1.22 that of Blacks (p = 0.003); and for CLL, the IRR was 2.31 times that of Hispanics (p < 0.001) and 1.48 times that of Blacks (p < 0.001). In ALL, however, Hispanics aged 0 - 19 had a significantly higher incidence rate than Whites and Blacks, with an IRR of 1.32 compared to Whites (p < 0.001), and 2.62 compared to Blacks (p < 0.001). In AML, CML, and CLL, among people age 65 or older, white non-Hispanics have higher incidence rates than Blacks, and Blacks have higher incidence rates than Hispanics. Childhood ALL incidence rates are highest among Hispanics, and lowest among Blacks.

  9. Promoting Multivitamins to Hispanic Adolescents and Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mackert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs can be reduced by 50% to 70% with sufficient periconceptional intake of folic acid. Hispanic women are up to 3 times more likely than non-Hispanics to have a child affected by NTDs. This disparity is complicated by health literacy, as women impacted by this disparity are also at-risk for low health literacy. The purpose of this project was to pilot advertisements to promote multivitamins, increasing folic acid consumption, among Hispanic adolescents. The advertisements for Hispanic adolescents and their mothers focused on broad benefits of a multivitamin, downplaying folic acid’s role in prenatal health. Participants were Hispanic mothers (n = 25 and adolescents (n = 25 at a clinic in the Southwestern United States. Likert-type survey items and an open-ended question were used to assess attitudes toward multivitamins and advertisements. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS was used to assess participants’ health literacy. Participants’ impressions of the ads were positive. Both groups expressed the intent to start taking a daily multivitamin after viewing the ads—adolescents for themselves and mothers to start their daughters on a daily multivitamin. There was no relationship between participants’ health literacy and perceptions of the advertisements or intentions to begin a multivitamin habit. This research illustrates the potential of messages that rely on peripheral health benefits to overcome communication barriers posed by health literacy and address serious health problems such as NTDs.

  10. HISPANIC ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT OUTREACH PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) in cooperation with the Self Reliance Foundation (SRF) is conducting the Hispanic Environmental and Waste Management Outreach Project (HEWMO) to increase science and environmental literacy, specifically that related to nuclear engineering and waste management in the nuclear industry, among the US Hispanic population. The project will encourage Hispanic youth and young adults to pursue careers through the regular presentation of Spanish-speaking scientists and engineers and other role models, as well as career information on nationally broadcast radio programs reaching youth and parents. This project will encourage making science, mathematics, and technology a conscious part of the everyday life experiences of Hispanic youth and families. The SRF in collaboration with the Hispanic Radio Network (HRN) produces and broadcasts radio programs to address the topics and meet the objectives as outlined in the Environmental Literacy Plan and DOE-EM Communications Plan in this document. The SRF has in place a toll-free ''800'' number Information and Resource Referral (I and RR) service that national radio program listeners can call to obtain information and resource referrals as well as give their reactions to the radio programs that will air. HRN uses this feature to put listeners in touch with local organizations and resources that can provide them with further information and assistance on the related program topics

  11. Hispanic older adult mortality in the United States: new estimates and an assessment of factors shaping the Hispanic paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lariscy, Joseph T; Hummer, Robert A; Hayward, Mark D

    2015-02-01

    Hispanics make up a rapidly growing proportion of the U.S. older adult population, so a firm grasp of their mortality patterns is paramount for identifying racial/ethnic differences in life chances in the population as a whole. Documentation of Hispanic mortality is also essential for assessing whether the Hispanic paradox--the similarity in death rates between Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites despite Hispanics' socioeconomic disadvantage--characterizes all adult Hispanics or just some age, gender, nativity, or national-origin subgroups. We estimate age-/sex- and cause-specific mortality rate ratios and life expectancy for foreign-born and U.S.-born Hispanics, foreign-born and U.S.-born Mexican Americans, non-Hispanic blacks, and non-Hispanic whites ages 65 and older using the 1989-2006 National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality Files. Results affirm that Hispanic mortality estimates are favorable relative to those of blacks and whites, but particularly so for foreign-born Hispanics and smoking-related causes. However, if not for Hispanics' socioeconomic disadvantage, their mortality levels would be even more favorable. PMID:25550142

  12. Science Is "Ciencia": Meeting the Needs of Hispanic American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.; Bermudez, Andrea B.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews some of the factors known to influence the achievement and retention of Hispanic Americans in technologically related fields. Discusses directions in which research should focus to meet the needs of Hispanic-American students. (PR)

  13. Manned systems technology discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretoi, Remus

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on manned systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: crew-systems interfaces and interactions; crew training; on-board systems maintenance and support; habitability and environment; and computational human factors.

  14. Manned Flight Simulator (MFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Simulation Division, home to the Manned Flight Simulator (MFS), provides real-time, high fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop flight simulation capabilities...

  15. Rekordhind Man Ray eest

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Ameerika sürrealistliku fotograafi Man Ray 1926. a. Pariisis pildistatud foto 'Must ja valge, Pariis (positiiv ja negatiiv)', mis kujutab Ray armukese Kiki de Montparnasse'i portreed, maksis New Yorgi fotooksjonil 7, 3 miljonit Eesti krooni

  16. Man & Sound Environment 2010.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Proceedings to the conference "Man and Sound Environment 2010" arranged by The sound Envirnment Center at Lund university. Ulf Landström, Swedish Noise Research Network & Frans Mossberg The Sound Environment Centre at Lund university. CONTENTS: Preface – Symposium “Man and Sound Environment 2010” The prevalence of noise problems. Gunn Marit Aasvang, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Department of Environmental Medicine, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway Effects of ...

  17. Military Enlistment of Hispanic Youth: Obstacles and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Beth J.; Buck, Christopher; Klerman, Jacob Alex; Kleykamp, Meredith; Loughran, David S.

    2009-01-01

    An implicit goal of Congress, the Department of Defense, and the armed services is that diversity in the armed services should approximate diversity in the general population. A key aspect of that diversity is the representation of Hispanics. Although polls of Hispanic youth show a strong propensity to serve in the military, Hispanics are…

  18. Sociocultural Contexts of Time to First Sex among Hispanic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Dawn M.; Aneshensel, Carol S.; Mudgal, Jyoti; McNeely, Clea Sucoff

    2001-01-01

    Examines the sociocultural influences on risk of first sex among Hispanic teens living in Los Angeles County. Hispanic teens living in low-density Hispanic neighborhoods have significantly higher risk of sex than do teens living in neighborhoods with higher levels of ambient hazards. Results highlight the importance of characterizing sociocultural…

  19. CDC Vital Signs-Hispanic Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This podcast is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  20. Origins, consolidation and challenges of African Hispanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vital Tama Bena

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The African continent today takes into consideration a cultural movement which can be called African Hispanism. Born with the beginning of the post-colonial era, this African Hispanism has witnessed a progressive setting up in African countries thanks to the impetus of teachers of the Spanish language. Today that action benefits from a notorious cultural life as observed trough Spanish users of that language on the one hand; on the other hand the birth of a very promising African Spanish literature. Yet some future challenges are to come for a real fruitful future of that cultural movement. Key words: Spanish language; Africa intercultural exchanges.

  1. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Perception and Knowledge: A Comparison of Hispanic and White College Students in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Shari; Cathorall, Michelle; Romero, Devan R.

    2007-01-01

    There are clear health conditions that disproportionately affect the Hispanic population. One hundred twenty-four (45%) Hispanic and 153 (55%) White college students completed a questionnaire on cardiovascular disease (CVD) awareness, knowledge, and perceptions of risk. Results indicated that Hispanic students rated themselves as poorer in health,…

  2. Antisocial Behavior and Psychoactive Substance Involvement among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Caucasian Adolescents in Substance Abuse Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David G.; Brown, Sandra A.; Myers, Mark G.

    1997-01-01

    Compared conduct disorder behaviors and substance involvement of Hispanic (n=34) and non-Hispanic Caucasian (n=34) adolescents so as to determine pre-treatment problem behavior. Results indicate that non-Hispanic Caucasian youth were three times as likely to be diagnosed with conduct disorder prior to substance involvement than were their Hispanic…

  3. Giving voice: incorporating the wisdom of Hispanic RNs into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wros, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This study used Heideggerian phenomenology to: 1) explore professional practice values and ethical concerns of Hispanic nurses practicing in the Pacific Northwest; and 2) describe values conflicts experienced by Hispanic nurses in clinical practice. Twenty-seven Hispanic nurses were interviewed about nursing practice experiences. Themes included: obligation to serve the Hispanic community; correct cultural mistakes; teach about racism and discrimination; protect professional relationships; act as interpreter and cultural broker; balance additional workload; and represent all Hispanic nurses. Recommendations are included for creating an inclusive work environment that values the wisdom of diverse communities of nurses consistent with ICN Code of Ethics. PMID:20069802

  4. Hypertension among rural Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites: the San Luis Valley Diabetes Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Rewers, M.; Shetterly, S M; Hamman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    IN THE SAN LUIS VALLEY DIABETES STUDY (SLVDS) researchers studied hypertension morbidity and risk factors in 1788 Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites (NHW) from the rural San Luis Valley in Colorado. Hypertension was defined by The Fifth Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC-V) criteria. In this population-based study, the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors for hypertension did not differ significantly between non-diabeti...

  5. High School Exit Exams and Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the report, entitled "State High School Exit Exams: A Maturing Reform", that addressed the achievement gaps that exist for minority and English language learner (ELL) populations. In this article, the author shows how Hispanics and ELLs lag behind Caucasians in terms of passing percentage in different subject areas. The…

  6. A Language Challenge to the Hispanic American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino, Miguel A.

    The Hispanic-American, because he or she is bilingual and bicultural, could play an important role in the future economic development of the United States. Declines in steel, automotive, and electronics industries due to foreign competition and market saturation have caused industrial displacement and unemployment. The Maquiladora or Twin Plant…

  7. Brief Counseling with Hispanic American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littrell, John M.; Cruz, Jeannette

    1998-01-01

    Hispanic-American college students (N=16) met with a Puerto-Rican counselor for two brief counseling sessions. Brief counseling was a viable and effective approach in helping the students reach their goals. Examined types of student concerns about, and student perceptions of, brief counseling. (Author)

  8. Gold from the South: Hispanic Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Lucy

    New Hispanic immigrants to the United States bring with them a different world view and a desire to succeed in a new country. They also find resistance to their presence, prejudice against their language, and ignorance of their customs on the part of many older, more settled Americans. In addition, children quickly learn that their old customs are…

  9. The Demographic Wave: Rethinking Hispanic AP Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kelcey; Sawtell, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Presented at the Advanced Placement Annual Conference (APAC) in Las Vegas, NV in July 2013. This presentation reviews new research examining the AP® experience of Hispanic graduates over the past decade. Topics include an in-depth look at the AP Spanish Language and Culture gateway hypothesis and trends in family characteristics such as parent…

  10. Media and Sex: Perspectives from Hispanic Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston Polacek, Georgia N. L.; Rojas, Viviana; Levitt, Steven; Mika, Virginia Seguin

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about Hispanic teens' sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors and their relationship to media influences. Information about this relationship could contribute to an understanding of the early onset of sexual behavior and early teen pregnancy. This paper reports preliminary findings from a pilot project conducted to determine…

  11. Teatro! Hispanic Plays for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Angel

    This collection of 14 folk drama scripts is drawn from the Hispanic culture and traditions of the American Southwest and designed for use in educational settings. The plays are short, simple, and easy to produce. A single play can fill a class period, while several plays grouped together would make a school assembly. Six plays, intended for grades…

  12. Birth Rates Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics and their Representation in Contemporary Obstetric Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Maike K; De La Torre, Rosa; Racusin, Diana A; Suter, Melissa A; Mastrobattista, Joan M; Ramin, Susan M; Clark, Steven L; Dildy, Gary A; Belfort, Michael A; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2016-10-01

    Objective Our study aims were to establish whether subjects enrolled in current obstetric clinical trials proportionately reflects the contemporary representation of Hispanic ethnicities and their birth rates in the United States. Methods Using comprehensive source data over a defined interval (January 2011-September 2015) on birth rates by ethnicity from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we evaluated the proportional rate by ethnicity, then analyzed the observed to expected relative ratio of enrolled subjects. Results Hispanic women comprise a significant contribution to births in the United States (23% of all births). Systematic analysis of 90 published obstetric clinical trials showed a correlation between inclusion of Hispanic gravidae and the corresponding state's birth rates (r = 0.501, p < 0.001). While the mean was strongly correlated, individual clinical trials may have relatively over-enrolled (n = 31, or 34%) or under-enrolled (n = 33, or 37%) relative to their regional population. In 48% of obstetric clinical trials the Hispanic proportion of the study population was not reported. Conclusion Hispanic gravidae represent a significant number of contemporary U.S. births, and are generally adequately represented as obstetric subjects in clinical trials. However, this is trial-dependent, with significant trial-specific under- and over-enrollment of Hispanic subjects relative to the regional birth population.

  13. "万能的"man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓帆

    2002-01-01

    @@ man是一个内涵广而搭配、派生力极强的词,既可以放在词首构成合成词,如man-eater,man-power,man-size,manslaughter等,也可以放在词尾构成合成词,还可以与of等介词连用,构成词组或短语,如man of letters,man of sense,man of the world,man of one's words等.本文拟就man与各类词的"万能"搭配作一简要归纳.

  14. Symbolism in prehistoric man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, F

    2000-12-01

    The aptitude for symbolization, characteristic of man, is revealed not only in artistic representations and funerary practices. It is exhibited by every manifestation of human activity or representation of natural phenomena that assumes or refers to a meaning. We can recognize functional symbolism (tool-making, habitative or food technology), social symbolism, (language and social communication) and spiritual symbolism (funerary practices and artistic expressions). On the basis of these concepts, research into symbolism in prehistoric man allows us to recognize forms of symbolism already in the manifestations of the most ancient humans, starting with Homo habilis (or rudolfensis). Toolmaking, social organization and organization of the territory are oriented toward survival and the life of the family group. They attest to symbolic behaviors and constitute symbolic systems by means of which man expresses himself, lives and transmits his symbolic world. The diverse forms of symbolism are discussed with reference to the different phases of prehistoric humanity. PMID:11216422

  15. Man, energy, society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E.F.

    1976-01-01

    The use of energy is examined considering technical, social, economic, and political factors. From a geographical viewpoint, the history of energy consumption is reviewed, current energy problems are delineated, and possible solutions to the energy dilemma are discussed. The following chapters are included: Energy, Environment, and Evolution; Man and Other Engines; Renewable Energy Resources; Non-Renewable Energy Resources; the Physical Economy of Energy Use; the Conservation of Free Energy; Social Evolution and Energy; Life Styles, Government, and Energy; the Geography of Energy; the Social Economy of Energy Use; Energy and the United States; Decisions About Energy; Depletion of Geologic Resources; Ethical and Moral Aspects of Energy Use; and Alternative Energy Futures. It is concluded that man must ultimately rely on renewable energy forms, but there is no promise that these energy sources can be made available at costs low enough to ensure man's survival. (165 references) (BYB)

  16. Hispanic Medical Organizations' Support for LGBT Health Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, John Paul; Sola, Orlando; Ramallo, Jorge; Sánchez, Nelson Felix; Dominguez, Kenneth; Romero-Leggott, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    Hispanics represent the fastest growing ethnic segment of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States and are disproportionately burdened by LGBT-related health issues and limited political support from Hispanic medical organizations. Recently, the Latino Medical Student Association, the National Hispanic Medical Association, and the Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools, representing over 60,000 Hispanic students and providers and 35 institutions, collaborated to support a resolution opposing discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity and recognizing the obstacles encountered by LGBTQ Hispanics. The resolution provides an important framework for organizational members and leaders to address LGBT health issues and serve to support a more positive sociopolitical climate for the Hispanic LGBT community nationally and internationally. PMID:26789708

  17. Reliability and validity of the DCP among hispanic veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Victoria; Mohler, M Jane; Wendel, Christopher S; Hoffman, Richard M; Murata, Glen H; Shah, Jayendra H; Duckworth, William C

    2005-12-01

    The Diabetes Care Profile (DCP) was designed to measure psychosocial factors related to diabetes and its treatment. This study sought to determine the reliability and validity of the DCP in Hispanic veterans with Type 2 diabetes. Hispanic (n=81) and non-Hispanic White (n=238) patients were recruited at three southwestern VA hospitals. Scale reliabilities calculated by Cronbach's coefficient alpha revealed reliabilities ranging from .54 to .97 in Hispanics and .63 to .95 in non-Hispanic Whites. Only one scale, Monitoring Barriers, differed significantly between the two patient groups. Mean values on the DCP scales were consistent within and across ethnicities lending support for construct validity of the DCP in Hispanics. Convergent validity was also supported for DCP scales within the Hispanic patients as evidenced by correlations in expected directions with external measures.

  18. 6-man chess solved

    OpenAIRE

    Haworth, Guy McCrossan

    2005-01-01

    Eugene Nalimov has completed the computation of a set of endgame tables for 6-man chess, and independently, Marc Bourzutschky has completed tables for 3-3 chess and for 4-2 chess where Black is not just ‘KP’. The ICGA salutes both achievements and looks ahead.

  19. Hunting the Wild Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Scientists and volunteers plan a new Shennongjia exploration for Bigfoot After being shelved for many years, a plan to search for the wild man in the Shennongjia forestry district is once again under way. This time, scientists want to raise as much as 10 million yuan ($1.6 million) to employ advanced technology and recruit staff worldwide for the project.

  20. Reference Man anatomical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  1. Copyrights and Literature: The Hispanic Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Jose, Alan V.

    2011-01-01

    Does the Hispanic tradition offer an alternative perspective to the problem of copyrights and digital piracy? This dissertation examines the narrative that connects copyrights and creativity. It focuses on how prevailing representations of the practice, circulation, and experience of creativity that link it to copyrights are governed by specific epistemological structures and a rhetoric of fear. The dissertation focuses on three competing and overlapping traditions of conceiving and codifying...

  2. Cystic Fibrosis in a Hispanic Adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jenny H.; Collaco, Joseph M.; Paranjape, Shruti M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the presentation of a Hispanic adolescent with chronic respiratory symptoms and poor growth that led to a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) based on an indeterminate sweat chloride result and DNA sequence analysis that revealed a single new frameshift mutation, Nt3878insATCAG, which results in a premature stop codon in exon 20 of the CFTR gene. This case, highlighted by the identification of a deleterious, disease-causing mutation, illustrates the importance of maintaining both a ...

  3. The Hispanic paradox in cardiovascular disease and total mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Inojosa, Jose; Jean, Nathalie; Cortes-Bergoderi, Mery; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Health statistics and epidemiologic studies have shown that Hispanics live longer than Non Hispanic Whites, despite a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and an average low socioeconomic status, both strong predictors of CVD and mortality. This phenomenon has been dubbed "The Hispanic paradox" and has been demonstrated in old and contemporary cohorts. To date, no factor has been identified that could explain this phenomenon, but socio demographic factors, dietary intake and genetic predisposition have been proposed as possible explanations for the Hispanic paradox. As with the French paradox, where French were found to have a lower rate of coronary heart disease (CHD), helped to identify the role of the Mediterranean diet and wine consumption in the prevention of CHD, the Hispanic paradox could help identify protective factors against CHD. This article describes the current evidence supporting the existence of the Hispanic paradox and provides a brief review on the possible explanations.

  4. Man Is a Paradox

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王茂娟

    2009-01-01

    In the poem "Always", the author Pablo Neruda employs the first person narration to incisively reveal the paradoxical traits in human nature by exploring man in relation to love. "I" play a role shifting from a calm narrator to a furious one, and the last recovering to a mild one, which offers a multiple visual angle to observe humanity. In sum, by means of continuous changes of my inner feelings in the poem, Pablo Neruda reveals the paradoxical humanity .

  5. Symbolism in Prehistoric Man

    OpenAIRE

    Facchini, F.

    2000-01-01

    The aptitude for symbolization, characteristic of man, is revealed not only in artistic representations and funerary practices. It is exhibited by every manifestation of human activity or representation of natural phenomena that assumes or refers to a meaning.We can recognize functional symbolism (tool-making, habitative or food technology), social symbolism, (language and social communication) and spiritual symbolism (funerary practices and artistic expressions). On the basis ...

  6. Typhoon Man-Yi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Typhoon Man-Yi was pummeling the Japanese island of Okinawa with winds between 230 and 295 kilometers per hour (125-160 knots, 144-184 miles per hour) and heavy rain on the morning of July 13, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image. The immense storm covered hundreds of kilometers with spiraling bands of thunderstorms, though it had lost the distinctive cloud-free eye it exhibited the day before. Typhoons are common in Japan, but powerful typhoons usually strike the island nation later in the year. The Japan Meteorological Agency said that Man-Yi is the fourth typhoon of the 2007 season and may be the most powerful ever observed in the northwest Pacific in July, reported Kyodo News. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expected the typhoon to strike Kyushu, a southern Japanese island, on July 14, and then curve northeast along the eastern shore of Japan. By the time the storm reaches Tokyo on July 15, it should be degraded to a tropical storm. As of July 13, Typhoon Man-Yi had injured eight and flooded twenty houses in Okinawa, and forced airlines to cancel hundreds of flights, said Kyodo News. The storm was expected to bring heavy rain to Japan's Pacific coast. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the MODIS Rapid Response team.

  7. Man-machine supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today's complexity of systems where man is involved has led to the development of more and more sophisticated information processing systems where decision making has become more and more difficult. The operator task has moved from operation to supervision and the production tool has become indissociable from its numerical instrumentation and control system. The integration of more and more numerous and sophisticated control indicators in the control room does not necessary fulfill the expectations of the operation team. It is preferable to develop cooperative information systems which are real situation understanding aids. The stake is not the automation of operators' cognitive tasks but the supply of a reasoning help. One of the challenges of interactive information systems is the selection, organisation and dynamical display of information. The efficiency of the whole man-machine system depends on the communication interface efficiency. This article presents the principles and specificities of man-machine supervision systems: 1 - principle: operator's role in control room, operator and automation, monitoring and diagnosis, characteristics of useful models for supervision; 2 - qualitative reasoning: origin, trends, evolutions; 3 - causal reasoning: causality, causal graph representation, causal and diagnostic graph; 4 - multi-points of view reasoning: multi flow modeling method, Sagace method; 5 - approximate reasoning: the symbolic numerical interface, the multi-criteria decision; 6 - example of application: supervision in a spent-fuel reprocessing facility. (J.S.)

  8. SOCIOECONOMIC, CULTURAL, AND BEHAVIORAL FACTORS AFFECTING HISPANIC HEALTH OUTCOMES

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Leo S.; Lara, Marielena; Raynard S. Kington; VALDEZ, ROBERT O.; Escarce, José J.

    2002-01-01

    Evidence suggests that social and economic factors are important determinants of health. Yet, despite higher poverty rates, less education, and worse access to health care, health outcomes of many Hispanics living in the United States today are equal to, or better than, those of non-Hispanic whites. This paradox is described in the literature as the epidemiological paradox or Hispanic health paradox. In this paper, the authors selectively review data and research supporting the existence of t...

  9. Differences between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Families in Social Capital and Child Development: First-Year Findings from an Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamoran, Adam; Turley, Ruth N. Lopez; Turner, Alyn; Fish, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Disadvantages faced by Hispanic children in the U.S., compared to non-Hispanic Whites, have been widely reported. Economic differences account for some of the gaps, but the social isolation of Hispanic families also serves as a barrier to children's success. Whereas Hispanic families tend to have strong kinship networks, their social ties often do…

  10. The Cities for No Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Nevlyutov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary urban concept asserts the need to create spaces for man. However, the idea of a "man" transformed radically from the moment of its appearance. The book by the famous Danish architect and consultant in urban design Jan Gehl, "Cities for people", is a key example to demonstrate the ambiguity of this position. The book focuses on the concept of "man", which was abandoned in modernism. And modernism is criticized by the author. But in reality, it is not about the return to the "man", but about designing "new man". Gehl describes a new urban ideology, in which his understanding of "man" coincides with the postmodernist understanding of its absence. The "man" is multiple functions, actors of the city, and it refers to the bodies that are indistinguishable in their anonymity.

  11. Differences between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Families in Social Capital and Child Development: First-Year Findings from an Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gamoran, Adam; Turley, Ruth N. López; Turner, Alyn; Fish, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Disadvantages faced by Hispanic children in the U.S., compared to non-Hispanic Whites, have been widely reported. Economic differences account for some of the gaps, but the social isolation of Hispanic families also serves as a barrier to children’s success. Whereas Hispanic families tend to have strong kinship networks, their social ties often do not encompass the school and other authority systems. As a result, Hispanic families may have less access to social capital, that is, relations of ...

  12. Spider-man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路遇

    2002-01-01

    Spider-Man was first introduced in the comic(连环画) Amazing Fantasy #15(August 1962).Peter Parker,a Senior at Midtown High School,receives his powers when bitten by a exhibition(转基因) spider in a science demonstration(展览).This bite endowed(赋予) him with the proportional(相应的) strength and agility(敏捷) of a spider along with a keen “spider sense”.

  13. Time and man

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, LRB

    2014-01-01

    Time and Man focuses on the endeavors of humans to probe the mysteries of time and to elucidate its properties. The discussions are both philosophical and factual in nature and encompass science as well as the physical sciences, biology and related disciplines (for example, evolution), and the humanities (for example, religion). Factual information is presented to help the reader gain a better understanding of the concepts associated with time.Comprised of nine chapters, this volume first considers the passage of time and the experiences which humans associate with the concept of time before r

  14. Radiation and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation preservation of food has been receiving attention in South Africa since 1961 when a radioactive cobalt-60 unit was installed in Stellenbosch. In this unit, as in all similar units throughout the world, special attention was given to measures ensuring the safety of workers at the unit as well as that of the public. Man himself, the food he eats and the air he breathes are naturally radioactive and life on earth is impossible without nuclear reactions in the sun. These facts are elucidated so that the irradiation of food can be seen in true perspective

  15. The Coming Black/Hispanic Coalition. A Black View and An Hispanic View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Lillian; Arias, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Two journalists discuss political, economic, and social issues which unite Blacks and Hispanics and consider the problems which impede the formation of a formal political coalition between the two groups. Among the common issues identified are police brutality, voter registration, unemployment, health, housing, and the media. (GC)

  16. Ethnic Identity: Formation and Transmission among Hispanics and Other Minorities. SUNY Series, United States Hispanic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Martha E., Ed.; Knight, George P., Ed.

    This book contains 14 research papers and reviews on the development of ethnic identity in childhood and adolescence and the transmission of ethnic identity within families and across family generations. The research focuses on Hispanic-Americans, particularly Mexican-Americans; some studies include Blacks, American Indians, Asian-Americans, and…

  17. Pathways to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of radionuclide pathways leading to man generally has the goal of allowing us to predict human exposure from measurements of the radionuclide concentration in some segment of the environment. This modelling process provides a valuable tool in both the regulatory and health protection fields. However, most of the models in the regulatory field and in the health physics profession were designed to maximize exposure estimates. It is preferable to have scientifically defensible estimates and to add suitable safety factors at the end. Thus we are still faced with the development and validation of suitable models for many of the radionuclides of interest. The most useful models will include means of assessing variability and uncertainty. In this case variability might be considered as the differences in behavior due to age, sex or other factors in animals or man and those differences among plant species or animal species that determine their uptake factors. The uncertainty, on the other hand, would be the estimate of possible error in the experimental measurements. Model parameters would always have some variability even for site-specific cases and broad averages for population groups would have to include a factor expressing the possible variabilty and uncertainity. Thus any exposure calculation would have to be expressed with some range and valid assessments of this range are required

  18. A Comparison of Acculturation Measures among Hispanic/Latino Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jennifer B.; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Wagner, Karla; Soto, Daniel; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    Acculturation has been associated with numerous health and social outcomes among Hispanic/Latino adolescents. Various self-report scales have been used to measure acculturation, making comparisons of results across studies difficult. This study administered several commonly-used acculturation scales to 221 Hispanic/Latino 9th grade students in Los…

  19. The Impact of Acculturation on Hispanic Students' Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyea, Nathan E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acculturation on the learning styles of 151 Hispanic students enrolled in a Hispanic Serving Institution in South Texas, controlling for age, gender, and country of origin. Acculturation did not significantly predict learning style when controlling for these three variables. These results may be because…

  20. Mapping Hispanic-Serving Institutions: A Typology of Institutional Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Anne-Marie; Crisp, Gloria; Elizondo, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), institutions that enroll at least 25% Hispanic students, are institutionally diverse, including a much wider array of institutional types than other Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). Furthermore, they have distinctive institutional characteristics from those typically emphasized in institutional typologies…

  1. A Rationale for Hispanic Representation in Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, Angela L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for increased and more appropriate Hispanic representation in instructional materials at school to promote understanding of Latin culture. Stereotypes about Hispanics relate to punctuality, machismo, initiative, self-image, skin color, socioeconomic status, intelligence, parents' role in education, language proficiency, and…

  2. Cultural Practices of Hispanics: Implications for the Prevention of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, James K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Among 190 Hispanic Americans in Nevada, condom use as an AIDS prevention measure appeared to be a male prerogative associated with "being the one who buys the condoms" (mostly males) and machismo practices such as protection of women. Adherence to Hispanic cultural traits was related to education and acculturation. (SV)

  3. Overweight, Body Image, and Depression in Asian and Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Unger, Jennifer B.; Gallaher, Peggy; Johnson, C. Anderson; Wu, Qiaobing; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively investigate associations between overweight and depressive symptoms in Asian and Hispanic adolescents. Methods: Data included 780 Hispanic and 375 Asian students. Structural equation model was used to prospectively explore moderation effects of gender, ethnicity, and acculturation on associations of overweight, body…

  4. The "Nuevo" New South: Hispanic Immigration to Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Raymond A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Hispanic migration trends in Alabama, discussing how Alabama's demographic and cultural transformation and recent changes in the global economy are connected. The new Hispanic labor force has become an essential ingredient in Alabama's rural and urban economies. However, anti-immigrant sentiments have surfaced in some areas. Adjustment…

  5. 78 FR 45580 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Cancelling..., the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving...

  6. 78 FR 12107 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling..., the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving...

  7. 78 FR 65010 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Cancelling..., the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving...

  8. Hispanic Women: Where Do We Go from Here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Sasscer, Ruth

    This paper addresses the status of Hispanic women in the United States and the challenges facing Hispanic women in society. The paper is divided into the following sections: (1) Introduction; (2) "From a Melting Pot to a Salad Bowl"; (3) "Adobe Walls and Glass Ceilings"; (4) "Signs of Improvement"; (5) "Diversity is 'In'"; (6) "The Need to Manage…

  9. AIDS prevention among Hispanics: needs, risk behaviors, and cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, G

    1989-01-01

    Data from different sources show that Hispanics are over-represented in reported cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (twice their proportion of the population) and that their rate of infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is three times higher than among non-Hispanic whites. The behavior risk factors most frequently associated with infection in AIDS cases are IV drug use in the Northeast and high-risk sexual behavior in the West. HIV infection prevention strategies for Hispanics need to address high risk behaviors, taking into consideration associated culture-specific characteristics. Strategies need to address as well conditions such as racism and ethnic prejudices that keep many Hispanic homosexuals and bisexuals away from white or non-Hispanic gay organizations and publications, the lack of culturally appropriate drug treatment centers, the level of mis-information among Hispanics, and the possible high incidence among men of sexual intercourse with prostitutes. Prevention campaigns need to include such Hispanic cultural values as simpatia, familialism, personalismo, and power distance, if prevention campaigns are going to be perceived as relevant by Hispanics. Appropriate wording and communication channels need to be identified in order to transmit messages that will be perceived as credible and that will reach the largest possible audience. PMID:2508169

  10. Hispanic AIDS education in South Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J

    1988-04-01

    The Hispanic AIDS Committee for Education and Resources (HACER) was established in 1987 as an AIDS education program targeted at the Mexicano population of South Texas. The word "Mexicano" is used because "Hispanic" refers to a larger, more diversified group. "Mexicano" refers specifically to people of South Texas who are either Mexican-Americans (people of Mexican descent, born and educated in the US) or Mexicans (people born and educated in Mexico). Mexicanos constitute 56% of the population of South Texas and 54% of the population of San Antonio. Mexican-Americans, in general, speak and read English and listen to English-language television and radio. Mexicans are poorer and less educated, Spanish-speaking, and often illiterate. The Mexicanos do not constitute a high risk group for AIDS; at present there are only 64 Mexicano AIDS patients in San Antonio. AIDS education campaigns on television which are directed at the whole Hispanic community may be counter-productive when directed at the Mexicano population because they know that AIDS is not yet a serious problem among them, and scare tactics only cause hysteria. AIDS education is essential, but it must be specifically geared to the Mexicano community, which, in general, is a very conservative community, in which subjects like sex, homosexuality, condoms, or anal intercourse are not discussed in public. But it is also a community of young (median age 23) sexually active people. An AIDS education program directed at them must use simple, elementary language in standard Mexican Spanish for the Mexicans and in English for the young Mexican-Americans. The single most effective way to reach the Mexicano population would be public service announcements aired on television during the time when the telenovelas (soap operas) are on. Not only are the telenovelas widely watched, but their actors are popular heros, who will be listened to by their audience. The use of radio for public service announcements would be useful

  11. Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Brittany; Foli, Karen J; Edwards, Nancy E; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic older adult population's rapid growth calls for an awareness of values that can affect the rendering and receipt of care. Familism, or familismo, a traditional Hispanic value, places importance of family over the self and can potentially affect health care perceptions and practices for Hispanic older adults. The current article discusses familism, which is upheld by some Hispanic older adults, and the potential for underuse of health care services. The traditional feminine role, marianismo, and masculine role, machismo, are considered, as well as implications for how decision making may be made by family members rather than the patient. Clinical implications for the provision of health care to Hispanic older adults are provided, along with the importance of considering acculturation and ethnic heterogeneity. Health care management strategies that reflect recognition and respect of familism, yet emphasize optimization of adherence and self-care, are described.

  12. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Symptoms of Depression in Hispanic Youth: The Roles of Gender, Hispanic Cultural Values, and Family Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The risk for depression increases as Hispanic youth acculturate to U.S. society. This association is stronger for Hispanic girls than boys. To better understand the influence of culture and family on depressive symptoms, we tested a process-oriented model of acculturation, cultural values, and family functioning. The data came from Project RED,…

  13. Rural Community-Dwelling Elders' Reports of Access to Care: Are There Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic White Disparities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Tyrone F.

    2004-01-01

    Consumer reports can provide useful information about the dimensions of access in need of improvement for particular population subgroups. To determine if there are Hispanic versus non- Hispanic white disparities in rural elders' reports of their health care access. A telephone survey was conducted among 2,097 rural community-dwelling elders in…

  14. Recruitment and Retention of Hispanic Nursing Students: Through the Lens of Associate Degree Nursing Program Administrators and Hispanic Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlos DeVoe, Debra Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic population in the United States is changing and will constitute 30% of the population in 2050; however, the Hispanic registered nurse population is less than 3%. Cultural differences between patients and nurses may cause harm and a mistrust that can affect patient outcomes. A mixed methods convergent research study was done by an…

  15. Constructing EuroMan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Marie; Andersen, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    the regional periphery in dynamic state-centred economies. In the course of the 1980s, however, interest has shifted towards regions as motors of growth, thereby making the region an actor in its own right rather than a passive receiver of subsidies. The shift in focus can be regarded a result of so......-called globalisation-processes, particularly the increased international extension of market-forces and a corresponding restructuring of the European nation-state and integration-processes.   In this article, we shed light on 'EuroMan': an actor-type which can be seen as an effect of the new regional policies...... by extensive ethnological field-work conducted by the two authors respectively.  ...

  16. Presence of Alcohol and Drugs in Hispanic Versus Non-Hispanic Youth Suicide Victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Daniel; Kosoy, Jennifer Ellyn; Ayllon, Karla Diaz; Acuna, Juan

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the association between the presence of drugs and alcohol at time of suicide in Hispanic versus non-Hispanic youth suicide victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The Medical Examiner's records of 435 persons aged 24 years or younger classified as suicides in Miami-Dade County, Florida, from 1990 to 2011 were reviewed. Hispanic youth in Miami-Dade County, Florida were 1.62 times more likely than non-Hispanic youth to have used drugs and alcohol at time of suicide (OR 1.62; 95 % CI 1.07-2.04; p = 0.049). Firearm use was significantly associated with drug and alcohol use at time of death. Use of drugs and alcohol at the time of death are important risk factors for suicide in Hispanic youth.

  17. The Hispanic-White Achievement Gap in Math and Reading in the Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Sean F.; Galindo, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the developmental patterns of Hispanic-White math and reading achievement gaps in elementary school, paying attention to variation in these patterns among Hispanic subgroups. Compared to non-Hispanic White students, Hispanic students enter kindergarten with much lower average math and reading skills. The gaps narrow by…

  18. Hispanic immigrants in the USA: social and mental health perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Renato D; Parekh, Amrita; Wainberg, Milton L; Duarte, Cristiane S; Araya, Ricardo; Oquendo, María A

    2016-09-01

    Hispanic immigration in the USA and its effect on many areas of US society are of great relevance to health care, public health, mental health, and medical and social sciences. In this report, we review and discuss pertinent literature on causes, procedures, and eventual outcomes of Hispanic migration waves throughout the last four decades. Hispanic immigrants do not constitute a monolithic group, despite the clear predominance of Mexican and Mexican-American segments. Common features of Hispanic immigrants include a younger average age, higher presence of married households, and lower educational levels than the overall US population. Differences within the Hispanic immigrant population are present in naturalisation figures, English language fluency, occupational and income status, health insurance coverage, and sense of accomplishment in the host society. We examine most of these aspects in the context of the so-called Hispanic paradox, presented as both a cause and a result of a heavily discussed acculturative process. We investigate prevalence and other data on depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and psychotic syndromes, with emphasis on the need to do further neurobiological, epigenetic, and sociocultural research in the Hispanic population. PMID:27568273

  19. Breast Cancer Screening in Black and Hispanic Subpopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary objective was to examine and compare the breast cancer screening adherence rates between black (African American and Afro-Caribbean and Hispanic (foreign born Hispanic and US-born Hispanic subpopulations. Methods: Study data was collected in community settings in New York City between the years of 2011-2012. Participants (N=592 were black and Hispanic individuals who attended a breast cancer screening community outreach program. Breast cancer screening rates as well as demographic data were collected. Results: Results revealed that Afro-Caribbean and foreign-born Hispanics are at a greater risk for non-adherence in breast cancer screening compared with African Americans and US-born Hispanics. Conclusions: The majority of breast screening research and community outreach programs categorize people into broad racial and ethnic groups (e.g., black and Hispanic. The results revealed significant variability within these broader racial/ethnic categories with regard to breast cancer screening. Community outreach programs and future research efforts should target the subpopulations that are at particular risk for breast cancer screening non-adherence.

  20. The relation between stress and alcohol use among Hispanic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbach, Jeremy T; Berger Cardoso, Jodi; Cervantes, Richard C; Duan, Lei

    2015-12-01

    We explored the relation between 8 domains of Hispanic stress and alcohol use and frequency of use in a sample of Hispanic adolescents between 11 and 19 years old (N = 901). Independent t tests were used to compare means of domains of Hispanic stress between adolescents who reported alcohol use and those who reported no use. In addition, multinomial logistic regression was used to examine whether domains of Hispanic stress were related to alcohol use and whether the relation differed by gender and age. Multiple imputation was used to address missing data. In the analytic sample, 75.8% (n = 683) reported no use and 24.2% (n = 218) reported alcohol use during the previous 30 days. Higher mean Hispanic stress scores were observed among youths who reported alcohol use during the previous 30 days in 5 domains: acculturation gap, community and gang violence, family economic, discrimination, and family and drug-related stress. Increased community and gang violence, family and drug, and acculturative gap stress were found to be associated with some alcohol use categories beyond the effect of other domains. Few differences in the association between Hispanic stress and alcohol use by gender and age were observed. Study findings indicate that family and drug-related, community and gang violence, and acculturative gap stress domains are salient factors related to alcohol use among Hispanic adolescents, and their implications for prevention science are discussed. PMID:26551265

  1. Vascular Function, Cerebral Cortical Thickness, and Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Caucasian Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Evan; Kaur, Sonya S.; Gonzales, Mitzi M.; Machin, Daniel R.; Kasischke, Kennon; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Haley, Andreana P.

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics are at increased risk of acquiring cardiovascular risk factors that contribute to cognitive dysfunction. To compare indices of vascular health to measures of cerebral gray matter integrity, 60 middle-aged Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian participants were matched across age, gender, years of education, and mental status. Arterial stiffness was characterized via β-stiffness index and carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity, and magnetic resonance imaging estimated cortical thickness in a priori regions of interest known to be susceptible to vascular risk factors. Measures of arterial stiffness were significantly higher in Hispanics than in non-Hispanic Caucasians. Hispanics exhibited thinner left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) cortical thickness (p=0.04) with concurrently lower language (p=0.02), memory (p=0.03), and attention-executive functioning (p=0.02). These results suggest that compromised vascular health may occur simultaneously with cortical thinning of the LIFG as an early neuropathological alteration in Hispanics. PMID:25720950

  2. Global metabolomic profiling targeting childhood obesity in the Hispanic population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolomics may unravel important biological pathways involved in the pathophysiology of childhood obesity. We aimed to 1) identify metabolites that differ significantly between nonobese and obese Hispanic children; 2) collapse metabolites into principal components (PCs) associated with obesity and...

  3. Young Hispanic Men and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tami L; Stephens, Dionne P; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Higgins, Melinda

    2016-03-01

    This exploratory descriptive study examined perceived vulnerabilities to human papillomavirus (HPV) and the correlation to factors influencing vaccine beliefs and vaccine decision making in young Hispanic males attending a large public urban university. Only 24% of participants believed that the HPV vaccine could prevent future problems, and 53% said they would not be vaccinated. The best predictors of HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men were agreement with doctor recommendations and belief in the vaccine's efficacy. Machismo cultural norms influence young Hispanic men's HPV-related decision making, their perceptions of the vaccine, and how they attitudinally act on what little HPV information they have access to. This study provides culturally relevant information for the development of targeted health education strategies aimed at increasing HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men.

  4. Health Snapshot: Hispanic Adolescents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hispanic families: Stability and change. Annual Review of Sociology, 33, 381-405. 4 Fry, R., & Passel, J.S. ( ... X., and Zhang, J. (2012). The Condition of Education 2012 (NCES 2012-045). U.S. Department of Education, ...

  5. FastStats: Health of Hispanic or Latino Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button NCHS Home Health of Hispanic or Latino Population Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Source: Summary Health Statistics Tables for the U.S. Population: National Health Interview Survey, 2014, Table P-1c [ ...

  6. "Det man hører, er man selv"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    ”Det man hører, er man selv” er Danmarks Radios P3s yderst velkendte slogan. Det dukkede op i begyndelsen af (20)00erne som opfindsom og populær afspejling af en moderne forståelse af den rolle musik og medieforbrug spiller for den voksne dansker. Denne artikel handler ikke om P3 som musikkanal...

  7. Do hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago promote or hinder homeownership opportunities?

    OpenAIRE

    Robin G. Newberger; Maude Toussaint-Comeau

    2004-01-01

    Hispanics are one of the fastest-growing populations in the nation, yet they have one of the lowest rates of homeownership of all racial/ethnic groups. For a large proportion of Hispanic immigrants, particularly those from Mexico and other Latin American countries, housing needs remain critical. Researchers have found that Latino immigrants living in metropolitan areas are much more likely to live in crowded and severely inadequate housing and/or to experience a severe housing cost burden. Wh...

  8. A Pilot Examination of Differences in College Adjustment Stressors and Depression and Anxiety Symptoms between White, Hispanic and White, Non-Hispanic Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Ryan; Anderson, Elizabeth; Williams, Rush; Bird, Jessica; Matlock, Alyse; Ali, Sania; Edmondson, Christine; Morris, E. Ellen; Mullen, Kacy; Surís, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Differences in four adjustment stressors (family, interpersonal, career, and academic), and depression and anxiety symptoms were examined between White, non-Hispanic and White, Hispanic undergraduate college female students. White, Hispanic female college students reported significantly greater academic and family adjustment stressors than White,…

  9. "Como Se Dice HIV?" Adapting Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Messages to Reach Homosexual and Bisexual Hispanic Men: The Importance of Hispanic Cultural and Health Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdy, Matthew A.

    HIV/AIDS prevention messages catered to Anglo homosexual/bisexual men are not effective in teaching preventative behaviors to Hispanic homosexual/bisexual men. Hispanic sociocultural traits associated with homosexuality and bisexuality prevent the effectiveness of these messages. The Hispanic family is also extremely important in influencing…

  10. Dose-to-man studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose-to-Man Studies focused on developing computer data handling and computer modules which permit easy, rapid assessment of the dose to southeastern United States populations from routine or accidental releases of radionuclides to atmospheric and stream systems

  11. Garbage Man from Tulip Kingdom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUCHAO

    2005-01-01

    ON Erfei Hill of Liufang Mountain Range, Jiangxia District, Wuhan City stands a huge garbage dump, manned by an industrious-looking dungaree-clad foreigner. He is 37-year-old Henry Fantven, a Dutch waste disposal engineer.

  12. Manned Mars mission cost estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaker, Joseph; Smith, Keith

    1986-01-01

    The potential costs of several options of a manned Mars mission are examined. A cost estimating methodology based primarily on existing Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) parametric cost models is summarized. These models include the MSFC Space Station Cost Model and the MSFC Launch Vehicle Cost Model as well as other modes and techniques. The ground rules and assumptions of the cost estimating methodology are discussed and cost estimates presented for six potential mission options which were studied. The estimated manned Mars mission costs are compared to the cost of the somewhat analogous Apollo Program cost after normalizing the Apollo cost to the environment and ground rules of the manned Mars missions. It is concluded that a manned Mars mission, as currently defined, could be accomplished for under $30 billion in 1985 dollars excluding launch vehicle development and mission operations.

  13. Breast cancer prevention knowledge, beliefs, and information sources between non-Hispanic and Hispanic college women for risk reduction focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Amatya, Anup; Vilchis, Hugo

    2015-02-01

    Although growing research focuses on breast cancer screenings, little is known about breast cancer prevention with risk reduction awareness for ethnic differences among college-age women. This study examined breast cancer prevention knowledge, beliefs, and information sources between non-Hispanic and Hispanic college women. Using a cross-sectional study, women at a university in the Southwest completed a 51-item survey about breast cancer risk factors, beliefs, and media and interpersonal information sources. The study was guided by McGuire's Input Output Persuasion Model. Of the 546 participants, non-Hispanic college women (n = 277) and Hispanic college women (n = 269) reported similar basic knowledge levels of modifiable breast cancer risk factors for alcohol consumption (52 %), obesity (72 %), childbearing after age 35 (63 %), and menopausal hormone therapy (68 %) using bivariate analyses. Most common information sources were Internet (75 %), magazines (69 %), provider (76 %) and friends (61 %). Least common sources were radio (44 %), newspapers (34 %), and mothers (36 %). Non-Hispanic college women with breast cancer family history were more likely to receive information from providers, friends, and mothers. Hispanic college women with a breast cancer family history were more likely to receive information from their mothers. Breast cancer prevention education for college women is needed to include risk reduction for modifiable health behavior changes as a new focus. Health professionals may target college women with more information sources including the Internet or apps.

  14. Hispanic Subgroups, Acculturation, and Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Karen G; Carmody, Tom; Akhtar, Maleeha; Stebbins, Mary B; Walters, Scott T; Warden, Diane

    2015-12-01

    This study explored Hispanic subgroup differences in substance use treatment outcomes, and the relationship of acculturation characteristics to these outcomes. Data were from a multisite randomized clinical trial of motivational enhancement therapy versus treatment as usual in a sample of Spanish-speaking substance abusers. Participants were Cuban American (n=34), Mexican American (n=209), Puerto Rican (n=78), and other Hispanic American (n=54). Results suggested that Cuban Americans and individuals with more connection to Hispanic culture had lower treatment retention. Hispanics born in the U.S and those who spoke English at home had a lower percentage of days abstinent during weeks 5-16, although Puerto Ricans born in the U.S. and Cuban Americans living more years in the U.S. had a higher percentage of days abstinent in weeks 1-4 and 5-16, respectively. Results may inform future hypothesis-driven studies in larger Hispanic treatment seeking samples of the relationship between acculturation and treatment outcome.

  15. Self-Esteem, Cultural Identity, and Generation Status as Determinants of Hispanic Acculturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Sean

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 110 Hispanic college students found that self-esteem and generation status (generational distance from immigration) were positively related to acculturation, whereas Hispanic cultural identity negatively affected acculturation. Contains 33 references. (Author/SV)

  16. Rich man, poor man: developmental differences in attributions and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, Carol K

    2012-11-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N=88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like older children, perceived the rich man as more competent than the poor man. However, they had difficulty in explaining wealth and poverty, especially poverty, and their trait perceptions were associated primarily with their attributions of wealth to job status, education, and luck. Fifth and ninth graders more clearly attributed wealth and poverty to the equity factors of ability and effort and based their trait perceptions on these attributions. Although the use of structured attribution questions revealed more understanding among young children than previous studies have suggested, the findings suggest a shift with age in the underlying bases for differential evaluation of rich and poor people from a focus on good outcomes associated with wealth (a good education and job) to a focus on personal qualities responsible for wealth (ability and effort).

  17. The rights of man and animal experimentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, J.

    1990-01-01

    Since emotions give contradictory signals about animal experimentation in medical science, man's relationship to animals must be based upon reason. Thomas Aquinas argues that man is essentially different from animals because man's intellectual processes show evidence of an abstract mechanism not possessed by animals. Man's rights arise in association with this essential difference. The consequence is that only man possesses true rights by Aquinas's definition; animals have them only by analog...

  18. Trees Are Useful to Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明

    2005-01-01

    Trees are useful to man in three impor-tant ways. They provide him with wood and other products;they give him shade;they help prevent drought(干旱)and floods. Unfortunately,in many parts of the world, man has not realized that the third one is the most important. Two thousand years ago a rich and pow-erful country cut down its trees to build war-ships, with which to gain itself an empire. It gained the empire,however,without its trees, its soil became hard and poor. When the em-pire fell to pieces, the home c...

  19. The representation of Hispanic masculinity in US cinema 1998-2008: genre, stardom and machismo

    OpenAIRE

    Kearley, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines how the conventions of four distinct genres, the star personas of two key Hispanic male stars and conceptions of Hispanic men as 'macho' intersected in constructing images of Hispanic masculinity in Hollywood between the years 1998 and 2008. The work makes an original contribution to knowledge as the first extensive study of Hispanic masculinity in contemporary Hollywood and affording new insights into the way in which genre conventions and star personas contributed to th...

  20. Multiple Health Behaviors: Patterns and Correlates of Diet and Exercise in a Hispanic College Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Dixie; Taylor, Thom; Blow, Julie; Cooper, Theodore V.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity rates are alarming in various ethnocultural groups, particularly in Hispanics. With Hispanics being the fastest growing group to enter college, the aims of the current study were to examine patterns and correlates of exercise and dietary behaviors in Hispanic college students. Data were collected from 693 Hispanic undergraduates who enrolled online and received course extra credit for participation. Individuals completed questionnaires assessing constructs of the transtheoretical mode...

  1. Smoking as subculture? Influence on Hispanic and non-Hispanic White women's attitudes toward smoking and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Lisa; MacKirnan, David; Spring, Bonnie; Pingitore, Regina; Sommerfeld, Beth Kaplan

    2002-05-01

    Cultural stereotypes might help explain why smoking is less prevalent among Hispanic than non-Hispanic White women, whereas obesity is more prevalent. Hispanic (n = 130) and non-Hispanic White (n = 114) women rated their thoughts and feelings regarding a female smoker and an overweight woman. Ethnicity did not influence evaluations, but attitudes toward smokers were more positive among more acculturated Hispanic women, F(1, 66) = 9.9, p < .01. Less acculturated women evaluated an overweight woman more positively than a smoker, F(1, 28) = 5.65, p < .05; more acculturated women did the opposite, F( 1, 36) = 5.92, p < .05. Smokers evaluated smokers more positively than overweight women, F(1, 86) = 40.8, p < .01; nonsmokers did the opposite, F(l, 138) = 7.7, p < .01. Personal body weight did not influence evaluations. Acculturation and smoking status appear to have a greater influence than ethnicity or weight status on women's attitudes toward smoking and weight.

  2. Coping Styles and Depression Among Undocumented Hispanic Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Cory L; Xie, Dong; Sanders, Gardiner L

    2016-08-01

    This cross-sectional study examined coping strategies and their relationship with depression among undocumented Hispanic immigrants. A community sample of 122 self-identified undocumented Hispanics filled out questionnaires measuring coping and depression. The authors categorized coping strategies as problem-focused, active-emotional, or avoidant-emotional. Findings indicated that coping through "prayer and meditation" (problem-focused), "get comfort from someone" (active-emotional), and "see bad things positively" (active-emotional) were more frequently used by undocumented Hispanics. Contrary to past research and predictions, problem-focused and active-emotional coping were both positively related to depression. What is more, problem-focused coping accounted for additional variance of depression above and beyond active-emotional coping. The insoluble nature of many of the problems faced by undocumented immigrants may explain the counterintuitive finding that as problem-focused and active-emotional coping increased, so too did depression. PMID:26330154

  3. A Systematic Review of Physical Activity Interventions in Hispanic Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda J. Ickes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy People 2020 aims to achieve health equity, eliminate disparities, and improve the health of all groups. Regular physical activity (PA improves overall health and fitness and has the capability to reduce risk for chronic diseases. Identifying barriers which relate to the Hispanic population is important when designing PA interventions. Therefore, the purpose was to review existing PA interventions targeting Hispanic adults published between 1988 and 2011. This paper was limited to interventions which included more than 35% Hispanic adults (n=20. Most of the interventions were community based (n=16, although clinical, family-based, and faith-based settings were also represented. Interventions incorporated theory (n=16, with social cognitive theory and transtheoretical model being used most frequently. Social support was integral, building on the assumption that it is a strong motivator of PA. Each of the interventions reported success related to PA, social support, and/or BMI. Lessons learned should be incorporated into future interventions.

  4. A systematic review of physical activity interventions in Hispanic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Melinda J; Sharma, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Healthy People 2020 aims to achieve health equity, eliminate disparities, and improve the health of all groups. Regular physical activity (PA) improves overall health and fitness and has the capability to reduce risk for chronic diseases. Identifying barriers which relate to the Hispanic population is important when designing PA interventions. Therefore, the purpose was to review existing PA interventions targeting Hispanic adults published between 1988 and 2011. This paper was limited to interventions which included more than 35% Hispanic adults (n = 20). Most of the interventions were community based (n = 16), although clinical, family-based, and faith-based settings were also represented. Interventions incorporated theory (n = 16), with social cognitive theory and transtheoretical model being used most frequently. Social support was integral, building on the assumption that it is a strong motivator of PA. Each of the interventions reported success related to PA, social support, and/or BMI. Lessons learned should be incorporated into future interventions. PMID:22496702

  5. A Systematic Review of Physical Activity Interventions in Hispanic Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healthy People 2020 aims to achieve health equity, eliminate disparities, and improve the health of all groups. Regular physical activity (PA) improves overall health and fitness and has the capability to reduce risk for chronic diseases. Identifying barriers which relate to the Hispanic population is important when designing PA interventions. Therefore, the purpose was to review existing PA interventions targeting Hispanic adults published between 1988 and 2011. This paper was limited to interventions which included more than 35% Hispanic adults (n=20). Most of the interventions were community based (n=16), although clinical, family-based, and faith-based settings were also represented. Interventions incorporated theory (n=16), with social cognitive theory and trans theoretical model being used most frequently. Social support was integral, building on the assumption that it is a strong motivator of PA. Each of the interventions reported success related to PA, social support, and/or BMI. Lessons learned should be incorporated into future interventions.

  6. Trends in Hispanic Teen Births: Differences across States. Research Brief. Publication #2007-22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzetta, Kerry; Schelar, Erin; Manlove, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Hispanics represent one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. population, and this rapid growth is projected to be even more dramatic for Hispanic teens. The number of Hispanic teens is projected to increase by 50 percent by 2025, even though the total teen population is expected to increase by only 6 percent in the same time period.…

  7. Pragmatism as a Philosophy of Education in the Hispanic World: A Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Gregario Fernando; Garrison, Jim

    2005-01-01

    We concentrate on four questions among the many posed by this special collection of papers on Pragmatism and the Hispanic world. They are, first, what took pragmatism beyond the borders of the United States and into the Hispanic world? Next, what are the ideas of Dewey (or pragmatism) that have had the greatest impact on Hispanic culture? Third,…

  8. Views and Preferences of Low-Literate Hispanics regarding Diabetes Education: Results of Formative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosal, Milagros C.; Goins, Karin Valentine; Carbone, Elena T.; Cortes, Dharma E.

    2004-01-01

    Hispanics are twice as likely as non-Hispanic Whites to have diabetes and are also at higher risk for diabetes-related complications and poorer outcomes. The prevalence of diabetes is inversely related to educational status. Low literacy is common, especially among older Hispanics. Little literature exists on formative research to create diabetes…

  9. Patterns of Hispanic Students' Math Skill Proficiency in the Early Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Sean F.; Galindo, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we describe patterns of Hispanic students' math skill development during elementary school using data from a nationally representative sample of Hispanic students assessed in math skills from kindergarten through 5th grade. Several robust patterns are evident. First, Hispanic students enter kindergarten with average math skills…

  10. Center Stage: New York's Repertorio Espanol Promotes and Preserves Hispanic Theater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Currently the only Hispanic company that rotates productions daily, New York-based nonprofit Repertorio Espanol performs classical and contemporary Hispanic plays in Spanish with simultaneous English translation. To develop appreciation of Hispanic literature and culture in a new generation of theatergoers, the troupe performs discount matinees…

  11. The Role of Skin Color on Hispanic Women's Perceptions of Attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Dionne P.; Fernandez, Paula

    2012-01-01

    This study relies on qualitative methods to investigate Hispanic women's skin color perceptions. The primary goal is to identify the relevance of these perceptions on their beliefs about their own physical attractiveness. Thirty-four self-identified White-Hispanic women attending a large Hispanic Serving Institution in the southeastern United…

  12. Beyond the Hispanic/Latina/o Label: Counseling Students from Four Representative Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, Terence P.

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians working with students of Hispanic/Latina/o background may tend to categorize these students as Hispanic/Latino/a regardless of their or their ancestors' country of origin. This article challenges the wisdom of using such broad terminology, because it masks considerable differences among Hispanic/Latina/o students, and proposes instead…

  13. 3 CFR 8417 - Proclamation 8417 of September 15, 2009. National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Hispanic Heritage Month, 2009 8417 Proclamation 8417 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8417 of September 15, 2009 Proc. 8417 National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2009By the President of the United... issue annually a proclamation designating September 15 through October 15 as “National Hispanic...

  14. An Evolving Curriculum: The Technical Core of Hispanic-Serving Institutions in the State of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, James; Rincones, Rodolfo Delgado

    2008-01-01

    Although there is extensive research pertaining to Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI), it is primarily framed around the U.S. federal definition of Hispanic Serving Institutions established by Title V of the Higher Education Act of 1965. This law identifies HSI as institutions that have a Hispanic student population of at least 25 percent and "at…

  15. Promotores de Salud: Educating Hispanic Communities on Heart-Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Amanda; Balcazar, Hector; Hollen, Mary Luna; Nkhoma, Ella; Mas, Francisco Soto

    2007-01-01

    Background: Age-adjusted cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates for Hispanics are lower than for non-Hispanics. However, CVD is the leading cause of death among Hispanics, and there is an increasing heart health problem among this population. One strategy for preventing CVD is the use of community health workers (CHWs). A CHW is a member of…

  16. Indicators of Persistence for Hispanic Undergraduate Achievement: Toward an Ecological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Renelinda; Castaneda-Sound, Carrie; Blanchard, Steve; Aguilar, Teresita E.

    2011-01-01

    By examining Hispanic students both currently and formerly enrolled at a private, Hispanic-serving Institution located in the Southwestern region of the United States, this study attempts to understand the factors that lead to Hispanic undergraduate persistence to graduation. Adapting Bronfenbrenner's theoretical approach, this study explores…

  17. Hispanic Student Enrollment and Attainment in Texas Two-Year Colleges: A Multiyear, Statewide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jack; Slate, John R.; Joyner, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined the numbers and percentages of Hispanic college students enrolled in Texas two-year colleges and the numbers and percentages of Hispanic students who obtained associate degrees from Texas two-year colleges for the 2000 through the 2011 academic years. Hispanic student enrollment and educational attainment…

  18. Man and Machines: Three Criticisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Edward F.

    As machines have become a more common part of daily life through the passage of time, the idea that the line separating man and machine is slowly fading has become more popular as well. This paper examines three critics of change through their most famous works. One of the most popular views of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is that it is a…

  19. Man...An Endangered Species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    The general theme of this 1968 yearbook is that man is a threatened species, facing overpopulation and unbridled technology - both self induced. The presentation is broad, relating to many aspects of conservation and natural resources in the United States in a descriptive, non-technical style. The yearbook is divided into major topics: Land…

  20. East Man,Global Winner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wind Blew; Bai Yifeng

    2007-01-01

    @@ "The Global Human Settlement Environment Green Building Materials Award is a special award with a special significance.My staff and I feel so excited with this award.It is a special honor that means our independent brand,East Man Heath Paint,has received recognition in the international community.

  1. Insects Affecting Man. MP-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Fred A.; Spackman, Everett

    The insects discussed in this document are those which have a direct effect upon humans either through a permanent association, as with lice, or a temporary association in the case of flies, bees, wasps, and spiders. In each case, life cycles and identifying characteristics are presented with remarks about the specific effect incurred by man. (CS)

  2. Man, Controller of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowin, R. P.

    2011-06-01

    The Man, Controller of the Universe painted by the renowned Mexican artist Diego Rivera in the gigantic mural of the Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City is overlooked by a telescope. We acknowledge this instrument as the Plaskett Telescope at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory in Victoria, Canada.

  3. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): the association between acculturation, birthplace and alcohol consumption across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaeth, Patrice A C; Caetano, Raul; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2012-09-01

    Acculturation to U.S. society has been associated with an increase in drinking and binge drinking among Hispanics. This paper examines the association between acculturation and three drinking-related outcomes: average number of drinks consumed, binge drinking, and drinking 12 drinks or more in a single day in four major Hispanic national groups. The 2006 Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey used a multistage cluster sample design to interview 5224 adult Hispanics (18+ years) in five selected U.S. metropolitan areas: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. The four national groups interviewed were: Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, and South/Central Americans. The survey response rate was 76%. Data on drinking behavior were collected and the analyses include bivariate and multivariate regression techniques. Multivariate analysis did not show an association between acculturation and volume of drinking, binge drinking, or drinking 12 or more drinks in a single day among men. Acculturation stress, however, was associated with drinking 12 or more in a day among men. Among women, high acculturation was associated with a higher volume of drinking, and it also interacted with national group to increase the likelihood of binge drinking. Acculturation does not have a homogeneous effect on drinking across gender and Hispanic national groups. The results confirm that acculturation has a more consistent association with increased drinking and binge drinking among women than among men. The effect of acculturation is therefore gender-specific. This heterogeneity across Hispanic national groups must be considered in future research, treatment, and prevention efforts.

  4. Attachment, Acculturation, and Psychosomatic Complaints among Hispanic American University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiachih D. C.; Scalise, Dominick A.; Barajas-Munoz, I. Alejandro; Julio, Kathy; Gomez, Ayleen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated adult attachment and acculturation frameworks of reported psychosomatic complaints related to perceived discrimination among a sample of Latino/Hispanic university students (N = 160). The model supported by the data suggests that attachment anxiety, acculturation toward the dominant cultural norms, and adherence to…

  5. Reconsidering Hispanic Gang Membership and Acculturation in a Multivariate Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly Ventura; Barnes, J. C.; Hartley, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous qualitative research has suggested that Hispanic gang membership is linked to the process of acculturation. Specifically, studies have indicated that those who are less assimilated into mainstream American or "Anglo" society are at greater risk for joining gangs. Building on these observations, this study examines the relationship between…

  6. Managerial Concerns and Hispanic Culture in the American Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, Alva V.

    With changing social and economic realities, certain cultural differences in the management of Hispanic workers must be accepted and accommodated in the American workplace, where the scientific approach to management is the general rule. The scientific view of management is hardly accepted by Latin Americans whose management philosophy is more…

  7. Ethical Perceptions among Hispanic Students: Differences by Major and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Raymond, Jr.; Moyes, Glen D.; Cortes, Angelica C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined ethical perceptions of Hispanic students by analyzing differences between (a) accounting and nonaccounting business majors and (b) women and men. The authors used the following five constructs: justice, relativism, egoism, utilitarianism, and deontology. Their study incorporated 12 moral characteristics into…

  8. A Psychoecological Model of Academic Performance among Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Heejung; Dickson, Ginger

    2011-01-01

    Although the number of students who complete high school continues to rise, dramatic differences in school success remain across racial/ethnic groups. The current study addressed Hispanic adolescents' academic performance by investigating the relationships of parental involvement, culturally responsive teaching, sense of school belonging, and…

  9. HPV Knowledge and Vaccine Acceptability among Hispanic Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, Julie; Byrne, Margaret M.; Vanderpool, Robin; Shin, Sarah; Kobetz, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and vaccine acceptability in a convenience sample of immigrant Hispanic men, many of whom are parents of adolescents. Data on 189 male callers were collected from the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service Spanish-language call center. Most participants…

  10. Hispanic Masculinity: Myth or Psychological Schema Meriting Clinical Consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, J. Manuel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examines machismo (strict adherence to traditional masculine gender identity) in terms of Bem's gender schema theory. Uses the example of a Mexican immigrant family facing social and cultural changes to demonstrate the dynamics of machismo and how it might lead to emotional problems and physical symptoms in Hispanic men and their families.…

  11. Does Your Library Reflect the Hispanic Culture? A Mapping Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Lea

    2009-01-01

    Many schools are experiencing substantial growth in the Hispanic student population. These students need books written in Spanish and in English as well as bilingual books. The focus of this article is analyzing the content of the books in the collection, whether in English or Spanish. Standards discuss that the diverse needs, multicultural…

  12. 78 FR 57459 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... prosperity during times of peace. They run successful businesses, teach our next generation of leaders, and... vibrant cultures, each of which enriches communities in valuable ways. Just as America embraces a rich... cultures during National Hispanic Heritage Month, let us also rededicate ourselves to realizing our...

  13. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid in Hispanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Koo Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lily Koo Lin1, Han Lee2, Eli Chang11Department of Oculoplastics, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: Pigmented basal cell carcinoma (PBCC of the eyelid has not been well cited in the literature, and is often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of pigmented eyelid lesions. We aim to describe PBCC of the eyelid in Hispanic patients.Methods: Retrospective review of patients with eyelid skin cancer who presented to the Department of Dermatology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California and the Doheny Eye Institute from January 2002 to November 2005.Results: Sixty-nine of the 79 patients with eyelid skin cancer had basal cell carcinoma. Eight of these patients were Hispanic. Four of the eight Hispanic patients had PBCC.Conclusions: Although eyelid PBCC is regarded as a rare condition, it may occur more commonly in the Hispanic population and should be remembered in the differential diagnosis of pigmented eyelid lesions.Keywords: pigmented basal cell carcinoma, eyelid, skin cancer, lesions

  14. Linkage analysis of circulating levels of adiponectin in hispanic children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiponectin, a hormone produced exclusively by adipose tissue, is inversely associated with insulin resistance and pro-inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to find quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that affect circulating levels of adiponectin in Hispanic children participating in the VVA...

  15. Transitioning Hispanic Seniors from High School to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsico, Melisa; Getch, Yvette Q.

    2009-01-01

    Hispanic seniors who were on track to graduate in May 2006 were invited to participate in a program to help them make a successful transition from high school to college. Data indicated that this group might benefit from direct assistance in the college application process. The goal of the intervention was to work with the identified students…

  16. Hispanic Women: Schooling for Conformity in Public Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Helen A.

    1983-01-01

    Teacher norms for students are specified on three dimensions --behavioral, social, and academic. Teacher expectations for their students' success are analyzed using 1,000 Hispanic and Anglo sixth-grade students and their classroom teachers. Findings indicated that teachers reward assertiveness, leadership, and action when considering success in…

  17. Decisions Hispanic Families Make after the Identification of Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Annie; Bain, Lisa; Li, Yuelin; Delgado, Gilbert; Ruperto, Vivian

    2003-01-01

    A study examined the decision making processes of 29 Hispanic families who have a child with hearing impairments. Results indicate language and cultural barriers often complicate deliberations of parents. The communication method chosen tended to be the one recommended by professionals, usually a combination of spoken English and sign language.…

  18. Eating Disorders: Explanatory Variables in Caucasian and Hispanic College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviña, Vanessa; Day, Susan X.

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored Hispanic and Caucasian college women's (N = 264) behavioral and attitudinal symptoms of eating disorders after controlling for body mass index and internalization of the thinness ideal, as well as the roles of ethnicity and ethnic identity in symptomatology. Correlational analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and…

  19. Hispanics in the 80's: Retrenchment of Self-Renewal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, John

    1981-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of the Hispanic movement and the changes in its orientation as a result of economic, social, and political influences since 1960. Emphasizes self-renewal rather than survival and retrenchment as a strategy for solving current social problems. (JCD)

  20. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53±11 yrs; body mass index (BMI=45±9 kg/m2 with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI 33±30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P=0.006, income level (P<0.001, and employment status (P=0.03 between the groups, these did not influence CPAP adherence. Instead, overall improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P=0.03, P=0.004, and P=0.001, resp., as well as in Hispanics (P=0.02, P=0.02, P=0.03, resp.. Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence.

  1. New Mafia: Black, Hispanic,and Italian Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    1974-01-01

    To research the nature of organized crime in America a major study using anthropological field work techniques was undertaken: although we focused on the patterns of blacks and Hispanic crime activists, previous research on Italian-American patterns was utilized for comparison. (Author/JM)

  2. Pedagogy for Equity: Teaching in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Anne-Marie; Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami; Cuero, Kimberley K.

    2010-01-01

    Three female tenure-track faculty members at a Hispanic-Serving Institution explored how their cultural backgrounds inform their pedagogical approaches toward equity. They drew upon Mills's (1959) and Collins's (1993) frameworks to examine how their personal biographies, local social contexts, and broader systemic institutions affect their…

  3. Allusions to Culture and Religion in Hispanic American Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavell, Judy A.

    2011-01-01

    Allusions to culture and religion frequently appear in Hispanic American children's literature. These allusions resonate with those who share the culture and help those students connect with the book. These same allusions inform those who are not of the culture and broaden their understanding. This paper will provide examples of such allusions…

  4. 77 FR 58299 - National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... postsecondary education offered to these young people will have a significant impact on our country's future... these halls of higher learning, students are pursuing careers in science and engineering, health care... national life, and with these institutions graduating such a significant portion of Hispanic students,...

  5. The Decade of the Hispanic: An Economic Retrospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leticia; Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    The report identifies and describes trends characterizing Hispanics' economic situation in the 1980s. It also analyzes the most significant contributions to these trends, and their public policy implications. The following trends are discussed: (1) stagnating income levels and continued high poverty; (2) high proportions of impoverished children;…

  6. Natural History in Hispanic Journalism in the Late Eighteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo MORGADO GARCÍA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Hispanic world of the late Eighteenth Century there was a certain amount of divulgation of Natural History, aided by the utilitarian nature of the Spanish Enlightenment, and by the fact that Natural History did not contradict Catholic doctrine. This paper approaches the diffusion of news of Natural History through periodicals, focusing on zoological references.

  7. Teleoperators: Man's Machine Partners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R.

    1972-01-01

    This booklet is about teleoperators, a class of machines that augment man rather than replace him. Teleoperators have the ability to add to man's strength, his reach, and his ability to work in hostile environments.

  8. The Role of Machismo and the Hispanic Family in the Etiology and Treatment of Alcoholism in Hispanic American Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Daniel R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses alcohol abuse among Hispanic males of Mexican and Puerto Rican origin and the cultural and familial factors which both enable alocholism and serve as tools in overcoming it. The positive ideals of machismo may be enlisted in family therapy through supportive rather than reconstructive therapies. (Author/JAC)

  9. Developing a Leadership Identity: A Case Study Exploring a Select Group of Hispanic Women at a Hispanic Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Leadership is a socially constructed concept shaped by the context, values and experiences of society (Klenke, 1996); the historical context of gender and ethnicity in society affects views about leadership and who merits a leadership role. Therefore, developing an understanding of Hispanic women students' leadership identity development is…

  10. Voices of Hispanic College Students: A Content Analysis of Qualitative Research within the "Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlie, Cassandra A.; Moreno, Luis S.; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe

    2014-01-01

    As Hispanic students continue to be an underrepresented cultural group in higher education, researchers are called to uncover the challenging and complex experience of this diverse group of students. Using the constant comparative method, these researchers conducted a content analysis of the qualitative research on the experiences of Hispanic…

  11. The Hispanic Women's Social Stressor Scale: Understanding the Multiple Social Stressors of U.S.- and Mexico-Born Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; Gonzales, Melissa; Malcoe, Lorraine H.; Espinosa, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of social stressors among Hispanic women is a growing and important area of study, particularly in terms of understanding explanatory mechanisms for health disparities. This study involved adaptation of the Hispanic Stress Inventory and the Latin American Stress Inventory to create a measure of social stressors specifically for both…

  12. Preliminary Findings of a South Texas Elderly Needs Assessment Survey: A Rural-Urban Comparison of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Elderly Family Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Rumaldo Z.; And Others

    Elderly Hispanic and non-Hispanic rural and urban noninstitutionalized residents of three Texas counties (Hidalgo, Cameron, and Willacy) which border Mexico showed significant differences in educational attainment, income, occupation, and family support. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by mostly bilingual elderly volunteers. Age…

  13. Man-machine interactions 3

    CERN Document Server

    Czachórski, Tadeusz; Kozielski, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Man-Machine Interaction is an interdisciplinary field of research that covers many aspects of science focused on a human and machine in conjunction.  Basic goal of the study is to improve and invent new ways of communication between users and computers, and many different subjects are involved to reach the long-term research objective of an intuitive, natural and multimodal way of interaction with machines.  The rapid evolution of the methods by which humans interact with computers is observed nowadays and new approaches allow using computing technologies to support people on the daily basis, making computers more usable and receptive to the user's needs.   This monograph is the third edition in the series and presents important ideas, current trends and innovations in  the man-machine interactions area.  The aim of this book is to introduce not only hardware and software interfacing concepts, but also to give insights into the related theoretical background. Reader is provided with a compilation of high...

  14. Man's Impact on Groundwater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is an essential component of ecosystems and man's health. As the world population is growing, the need for more food, man's shift to urban areas and the progressive industrialisation all affect water resources in a qualitative and quantitative way. Connected to these general developments the following problems arise: - water exploitation increasingly concentrates on local areas with high water demands at low cost; - urbanisation contributes to the disequilibration of groundwater recharge, either by sealing the surface against infiltration or by leakage processes from the underground water transport system; - the groundwater quality is affected by leakage and accidental spills of liquid and solid wastes gathered in a few places, generally untreated or unconditionedly released, thus presenting serious dangers of pollution; - the excessive use of agrochemicals influences the natural functioning of both the soil and the aquifer, thus hampering the self-attenuation processes; - emissions from fuel and waste combustion are concentrated in few places, in the vicinity of the emission source provoking strong and quasi immediate contamination, also in the more distant surroundings slowly increasing impacts on water resources and ecosystems by dry or wet deposition; - the expansion of man's activities in arid and semi-arid regions often lead to the deterioration of resources, either by overexploitation or by desertification; - deforestation disturbs the water balance and water quality, and enhances erosion. Since water resources react on changes of land and water use with a long delay time, man's activities should be better adapted to basic hydrodynamic conditions in order to better satisfy the needs of a safe drinking water supply, flood protection, and the food and industrial production. Such basic hydrodynamic conditions comprise e.g. resource replenishment, steady state or transient dynamics and chemical stratification, which all may contribute to develop

  15. Developing a center for Hispanic youth violence prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabal-Colón, Brenda

    2003-03-01

    Youth violence is a serious public health problem, described by the Surgeon General's Report on Youth Violence (2001). Homicide is the second cause of death for the 15-24 age population in the USA and Puerto Rico; intentional injuries also result in significant morbidity. Youth are at greater risk of being victims than perpetrators of violence. African American and Hispanic youth are at particular risk. Effective, community-based initiatives to prevent youth violence are necessary to interrupt the cycle of violence. In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the Department of Health and Human Services awarded grants to establish ten Academic Centers of Excellence for Youth Violence Prevention. This article describes the development of the Center for Hispanic Youth Violence Prevention, of the FILIUS Institute of the University of Puerto Rico. PMID:12733449

  16. The Hispanic family and male-female relationships: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Geri-Ann

    2003-07-01

    An overview of the traditional Hispanic family and male-female relationships is presented, with an emphasis on issues relevant to providing health care to Hispanic populations. Aspects of the family presented include visitation, decision making, self-care, and emotional problems. Male-female relationships stem from traditional gender roles. Machismo and patriarchal authority characterize the male role; the roles of a traditional woman are housewife and mother. Women are expected to defer to the authority of their husbands. The negative aspects of machismo can result in heavy drinking and the pursuit of high-risk activities, leading to domestic violence and HIV/AIDS. These health risks are exacerbated by such cultural factors as male dominance, female modesty, and the practice of keeping problems within the family. The importance of personalism in patient-provider encounters is emphasized.

  17. Predictors of body dissatisfaction in a Hispanic college student sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blow, Julie; Cooper, Theodore V

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of demographic, mood, acculturation, weight, and accurate weight feedback on body dissatisfaction and satisfaction. One hundred and sixty Hispanic college students completed measures assessing depressive symptoms, acculturation, affect, and body image. Participants were randomized to receive immediate or delayed weight feedback. Three multiple regression analyses assessed predictors of body dissatisfaction, body weight and fitness happiness, and perceived attractiveness. A hierarchical regression model assessed body dissatisfaction after receiving feedback. Results indicate that greater body dissatisfaction was associated with females, greater depressive symptomatology, and higher weight. Body weight and fitness happiness was associated with males and greater positive affect. Perceived attractiveness was related to smoking, greater positive affect, and greater importance placed on weight. Body dissatisfaction was not impacted by accurate weight feedback. Studies assessing the impact of these predictors in weight loss and/or body acceptance interventions are warranted, particularly in Hispanic college students. PMID:24411740

  18. Psychological Stress of Hispanics Living on the Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Christopher S; Folse, Kimberly A

    2016-08-01

    This paper examines before and after perceived stress scores (PSS) of Hispanic women participating in a brief community health promotion program. Scores declined dramatically and significantly after the intervention, approximating those of Hispanics nationally. Post PSS were significantly correlated with language preference (Spanish), educational level, employment, having gone to jail or been in detention, and income. In the regression model, language preference and income were significant. We suggest emotional fear at the onset of participation in the program may exert an influence on pre-PSS scores, and that increased familiarity/rapport with program staff and having social psychological needs met may ameliorate this fear. Preference for Spanish, the language spoken at home for the majority of participants, may indicate a resistance to acculturating to mainstream culture, and, consequently, create a buffer against perceived stress. PMID:26472548

  19. Self-Reported Cancer Prevalence among Hispanics in the US: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penedo, Frank J; Yanez, Betina; Castañeda, Sheila F; Gallo, Linda; Wortman, Katy; Gouskova, Natalia; Simon, Melissa; Arguelles, William; Llabre, Maria; Sanchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Brintz, Carrie; Gonzalez, Patricia; Van Horn, Linda; Rademaker, Alfred W; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the U.S., yet data on cancer prevalence and risk factors in Hispanics in regard to ancestry remain scarce. This study sought to describe (a) the prevalence of cancer among Hispanics from four major U.S. metropolitan areas, (b) cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry, and (c) identify correlates of self-reported cancer prevalence. Participants were 16,415 individuals from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American. All data were collected at a single time point during the HCHS/SOL baseline clinic visit. The overall self-reported prevalence rate of cancer for the population was 4%. The rates varied by Hispanic ancestry group, with individuals of Cuban and Puerto Rican ancestry reporting the highest cancer prevalence. For the entire population, older age (OR = 1.47, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.26-1.71) and having health insurance (OR = 1.93, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.42-2.62) were all significantly associated with greater prevalence, whereas male sex was associated with lower prevalence (OR = 0.56, p < .01, 95% CI, .40-.79). Associations between study covariates and cancer prevalence also varied by Hispanic ancestry. Findings underscore the importance of sociodemographic factors and health insurance in relation to cancer prevalence for Hispanics and highlight variations in cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry groups. Characterizing differences in cancer prevalence rates and their correlates is critical to the development and implementation of effective prevention strategies across distinct Hispanic ancestry groups. PMID:26808047

  20. Acculturation and smoking patterns among Hispanics - A review

    OpenAIRE

    BETHEL, J. W.; Schenker, Marc B.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a systematic review of published studies investigating the association of acculturation and smoking patterns among Hispanic men and women in the United States. Methods: Online bibliographic databases were searched from 1985 to 2003 using three key search terms. The methodology and findings of all retrieved articles were critically evaluated. Data were extracted from each article regarding study population, study methods, exposure assessment, outcomes measured, acculturat...

  1. A Profile of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, and Other Hispanic STEM Doctorates: 1983 TO 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Baker, Maricel

    This article describes the characteristics of Hispanic U. S. citizens who earned doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) from institutions in the United States between 1983 and 1997. The data on this population •were disaggregated by gender and by Hispanic subgroup (i.e., Mexican American, Puerto Rican and other Hispanic). The profile for this population includes parental education, type of financial assistance during time of study, and level of debt on receipt of doctorate. In addition, this research identified and ranked the doctorate-granting institutions according to the absolute number of STEM doctoral degrees they granted to Hispanics during the 15-year period of the study. The results indicate that there are differences among the Hispanic subgroups in this study. Therefore, it is critical thai future researchers understand that studies that analyze Hispanics as one single homogeneous group produce results that are not truly representative and that research, policy, and programmatic efforts must be targeted accordingly.

  2. Developing responsiveness to the health needs of Hispanic children and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendelman, S

    1983-01-01

    Admission to a tertiary care pediatric hospital is a stressful experience for the Hispanic child and family. The stress partially stems from the institutional barriers that conflict with the psycho-social needs of Hispanic families. This article identifies six psycho-social needs of Hispanics and examines related risks for coping disturbances encountered during the hospitalization process. These risks can be reduced by increasing health providers' understanding of the psycho-social needs of Hispanics and by specifying culturally appropriate interventions. The development of cross-cultural committees, protocols and hospital based Hispanic self-help networks represent distinct modalities for improving responsiveness to the health needs of Hispanic families in a hospital setting. PMID:6623301

  3. Inferential Statistics from Black Hispanic Breast Cancer Survival Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz M. R. Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we test the statistical probability models for breast cancer survival data for race and ethnicity. Data was collected from breast cancer patients diagnosed in United States during the years 1973–2009. We selected a stratified random sample of Black Hispanic female patients from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER database to derive the statistical probability models. We used three common model building criteria which include Akaike Information Criteria (AIC, Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC, and Deviance Information Criteria (DIC to measure the goodness of fit tests and it was found that Black Hispanic female patients survival data better fit the exponentiated exponential probability model. A novel Bayesian method was used to derive the posterior density function for the model parameters as well as to derive the predictive inference for future response. We specifically focused on Black Hispanic race. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method was used for obtaining the summary results of posterior parameters. Additionally, we reported predictive intervals for future survival times. These findings would be of great significance in treatment planning and healthcare resource allocation.

  4. Predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors among gay Hispanic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Joseph P; Layerla, Dennys Martin; Barroso, Susana; Gattamorta, Karina A; Sanchez, Michael; Prado, Guillermo J

    2012-04-01

    Gay men are a vulnerable population at risk for a number of health disparities, but little is known about eating disorders among gay Hispanic men. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of eating attitudes and behaviors with alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors to determine predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors in a community sample of gay Hispanic men. Significant numbers of the participants were at risk for eating disorders (13%), alcohol abuse (18%), body image disturbance (29%), depression (25%), low self-esteem (12%), and high-risk sexual behaviors (34%). Alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors were significant predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors and accounted for 38% of the variance in eating attitudes and behaviors. Nurses providing care to this population of gay men must be aware of this cluster of related mental health conditions that are experienced by these men. Addressing and treating these health conditions as a group of related mental health conditions are necessary. More research is needed to further explore this cluster of health issues among gay Hispanic men. PMID:22449559

  5. The Hispanic View of E-mail, Popup, and Banner Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep K. Korgaonkar; Ronnie Silverblatt; Enrique P. Becerra

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the authors broadly investigate Hispanic consumer attitudes and their sociological behaviors toward online advertising. The study documents the correlation between Hispanic attitudes, behaviors, and three types of online advertising that have an effect on cultural distinctions. Additionally, the study compares the group’s attitudes toward TV advertising vis-Ã -vis the three types of online advertising to compare the two medium’s similarities and differences. Notably, Hispanics ...

  6. Tesla man out of time

    CERN Document Server

    Cheney, Margaret

    1981-01-01

    Called a madman by some, a genius by others, and an enigma by nearly everyone, Nikola Tesla created astonishing, world-transforming devises that were virtually without theoretical precedent. Tesla not only discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating current machinery, but also introduced the fundamentals of robotry, computers, and missile science and helped pave the way for such technologies as satellites, microwaves, beam weapons, and nuclear fusion. Almost supernaturally gifted, Tesla was also unusually erratic, flamboyant, and neurotic. He was J. P. Morgan's client, counted Mark Twain as a friend, and considered Thomas Edison an enemy. But above all, he was the hero and mentor to many of the last century's most famous scientists. In a meticulously researched, engagingly written biography, Margaret Cheney presents the many different dimensions of this extraordinary man, capturing his human qualities and quirks as she chronicles a lifetime of discoveries that continue to alter our ...

  7. Deformation of Man Made Objects

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a framework for 3D object deformation with primary focus on man-made objects. Our framework enables a user to deform a model while preserving its defining characteristics. Moreover, our framework enables a user to set constraints on a model to keep its most significant features intact after the deformation process. Our framework supports a semi-automatic constraint setting environment, where some constraints could be automatically set by the framework while others are left for the user to specify. Our framework has several advantages over some state of the art deformation techniques in that it enables a user to add new features to the deformed model while keeping its general look similar to the input model. In addition, our framework enables the rotation and extrusion of different parts of a model.

  8. Neighborhood Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms among Mexican-descent residents of Texas City, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Alyssa Marie; Peek, M Kristen; Eschbach, Karl

    2013-12-01

    Substantial research shows that increased Hispanic neighborhood concentration is associated with several beneficial health outcomes including lower adult mortality, better self-rated health, and fewer respiratory problems. Literature on the relationship of Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms is more equivocal. In addition, few studies have directly investigated hypothesized mechanisms of this relationship. This study uses data from a probability sample of 1238 Mexican-descent adults living in 48 neighborhoods in Texas City, Texas. Multilevel regression models investigate whether Hispanic neighborhood composition is associated with fewer depressive symptoms. This study also investigates whether social support, perceived discrimination, and perceived stress mediate or moderate the relationship, and whether results differ by primary language used at home. We find that individuals living in high Hispanic composition neighborhoods experience fewer depressive symptoms than individuals in low Hispanic composition neighborhoods. In addition, we find that these beneficial effects only apply to respondents who speak English. Social support, perceived discrimination, and perceived stress mediate the Hispanic composition-depressive symptoms relationship. In addition, discrimination and stress moderate the relationship between Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms. Our findings support theories linking higher neighborhood Hispanic composition and better mental health, and suggest that Spanish language use, social support, discrimination and stress may play important roles in the Hispanic composition-depressive symptoms relationship. PMID:24355471

  9. Becoming and development of man: anthroposophistic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionova E.N.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthroposophistic orientated view of R.Shtayner to development of a man during all life is systematized. Anthroposophistic conception of development of a man is based on such substantive provisions: unity corporal-heartfelt-spiritual life; connection of component parts of psyche with physiological organization of man; an interconditionality of physiological, heartfelt and spiritual development is in the rhythm of seven years. It is rotined that a health, heartfelt rest and happiness, is the result of harmonic development. All three aspects are the legal certificates of constituents life of man.

  10. Tattoo types and frequencies in New Mexican white hispanics and white non-hispanics: autopsy data from homicidal and accidental deaths, 2002-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Debra; Lathrop, Sarah

    2008-12-01

    Tattoos serve as a form of forensic personal identification and providing evidence of possible gang affiliation, incarceration history, and high-risk lifestyle factors such as drug use. Despite their forensic applications, tattoo typology and frequencies in specific ethnic and racial groups are underreported and poorly understood. This study examined autopsy records from the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator from 2002 to 2005. A total of 3430 individuals (1666 white Hispanics; 1764 white non-Hispanics), aged 18 to 100 years, with homicidal or accidental manners of death were included in the study. In addition to demographic information, data were recorded on the presence/absence of tattoos, singular or multiple tattoos, and the language of text tattoos. Tattoos depicting gang or religious symbolism were also recorded. Results indicate statistically significant differences in tattoo frequencies by ethnicity (52% Hispanic vs. 29.5% non-Hispanic), sex (46.8% men vs. 25.9% women) and age cohort. Hispanics were more likely to have multiple tattoos than non-Hispanics (41% and 19%, respectively), and were 4.67 times more likely to have a religious tattoo and 7.13 times more likely to have a gang tattoo than non-Hispanics. Significant patterns in language of text tattoos and correlations with manner of death were also noted. PMID:19259010

  11. HIV Testing Among Black and Hispanic Immigrants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojikutu, Bisola O; Mazzola, Emanuele; Fullem, Andrew; Vega, Rodolfo; Landers, Stewart; Gelman, Rebecca S; Bogart, Laura M

    2016-07-01

    Late presentation is common among black and Hispanic US immigrants living with HIV. Little is known about HIV testing in this population because data are aggregated into racial and ethnic categories without regard to nativity. This study was undertaken to determine HIV testing patterns in these populations. We used data from the National Health Interview Survey (2007-2010), a nationally representative source of HIV testing data disaggregated by nativity. The sample consisted of 10,397 immigrants (83.9% Hispanic white, 13.1% non-Hispanic black, and 3.0% Hispanic black). The majority of participants were from the Caribbean, Central America, and Mexico (81.5%). Hispanic white immigrants were least likely to have undergone testing compared with non-Hispanic and Hispanic black immigrants (46.7% vs. 70.5% and 65.8%). Among immigrants with known risk factors or prior STDs, 59.2% and 74.8% reported previous HIV testing. Immigrants who had not recently talked to a healthcare provider were less likely to report testing: Hispanic white (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.58-0.72), non-Hispanic black (AOR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.85), and Hispanic black (AOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.14-0.48). Only 17.2% of all immigrants intended to undergo HIV testing in the 12 months following participation in the survey. Among all three racial and ethnic groups, immigrants who reported a history of prior STDs were more likely to intend to test for HIV in the future. Many black and Hispanic immigrants to the United States have not undergone HIV testing. Interventions to increase access to HIV testing and awareness of transmission risk should be developed. PMID:27410494

  12. The Hispanic Paradox and Older Adults’ Disabilities: Is There a Healthy Migrant Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrah Raza

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The “Hispanic Paradox” suggests that despite rates of poverty similar to African Americans, Hispanics have far better health and mortality outcomes, more comparable to non-Hispanic White Americans. Three prominent possible explanations for the Hispanic Paradox have emerged. The “Healthy Migrant Effect” suggests a health selection effect due to the demands of migration. The Hispanic lifestyle hypothesis focuses on Hispanics’ strong social ties and better health behaviors. The reverse migration argument suggests that the morbidity profile in the USA is affected when many Hispanic immigrants return to their native countries after developing a serious illness. We analyzed data from respondents aged 55 and over from the nationally representative 2006 American Community Survey including Mexican Americans (13,167 U.S. born; 11,378 immigrants, Cuban Americans (314 U.S. born; 3,730 immigrants, and non-Hispanic White Americans (629,341 U.S. born; 31,164 immigrants. The healthy migrant effect was supported with SES-adjusted disability comparable between Mexican, Cuban and non-Hispanic Whites born in the USA and all immigrants having lower adjusted odds of functional limitations than U.S. born non-Hispanic Whites. The reverse migration hypothesis was partially supported, with citizenship and longer duration in the USA associated with higher rates of SES-adjusted disability for Mexican Americans. The Hispanic healthy life-style explanation had little support in this study. Our findings underline the importance of considering nativity when planning for health interventions to address the needs of the growing Hispanic American older adult population.

  13. The man and the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejska, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    The universe has always aroused people's curiosity. It fascinates and at the same time scares in its vastness. Encourages us to reflect of the meaning of human life. This begs the questions: whether there is a life beyond Earth? Whether is it possible that the man is alone in such a large space? These questions still remain unanswered, and topics concerning "the cosmos" constantly evoke many emotions. It is especially fascinating for the youngest students. Quite often, preschoolers can flawlessly name the planets according to their order of appearance in relation to the sun. They are happy to take the fun inspired by journeys into space. Teaching through action is extremely important for the development of the child-man* (Piaget, 2006). The thinking originates primarily from the action. Therefore, students should undertake independent research activities, perform experiments and conduct observations and thus raise questions about the world, looking for meanings and solutions. Adults (a teacher, a person with a passion) are to be the support in the search for knowledge, its processing and cleaning. Its role is to ensure a proper development of environment that is conducive to research activity. The answer to these requirements was to create in the oldest technical school in Poland (Railway Technical College, now Technical College No. 7) the astronomical observatory, which can be used by pupils of Warsaw's kindergartens and schools. There are organized activities for children and youth in this school, as well as trainings for teachers. Younger students during such an interdisciplinary courses are, among others, the opportunity to get acquainted with the construction of the telescope, they can build their own rockets and organize their racing or create your own star constellations. Older students as a result of observations and experiments may confirm or refute the hypothesis that the universe is within each of us. The classes are enriched using applications on

  14. Human factors and man-machine-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Definitions of the man-machine-interface concept are given. The importance of ergonomics in planning, construction, start-up and operation of a nuclear power plant is highlighted. A comprehensive task analysis is the basis of man-machine-interaction. Personnel performance, work shaping and security are discussed

  15. Marihuana in Man: Three Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Leo E.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews three years of research on the effects of marihuana in man. Previously known clinical mental and physical effects have been confirmed. Causes and mechanisms of these effects generally remain undetermined in man and animals. Social implications and long term effects require additional study, although usage appears detrimental. (JM)

  16. Structure for man-machine interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that an opportunity exists to achieve a substantially simpler and more reliable Man Machine Interface design than exists in current Light Water Reactor plants. This simplicity should focus on attaining a recognizable improvement in the ease of operation and a reduction of the potential for human errors. Adopting a term from computer technology, the Man Machine Interface should be User Friendly

  17. Estimating Manning's n for steep slopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, R.; Jetten, V.G.; Zhang, G.H.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrological and soil erosion models require calculations of flow velocity, for which either the Darcy-Weisbach or the Manning equation is generally used. A series of field experiments was carried out in a small catchment on the Chinese Loess Plateau to obtain reliable values of Manning's n. The soi

  18. Alternative Frameworks for the Study of Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Ivana

    1979-01-01

    Two frameworks for the study of man are discussed. The Cartesian model views man as a physical object. A dialectic framework, with the emphasis on the self, grew out of nineteenth century romanticism and reflects the theories of Hegel. Both models have had an effect on social psychology and the study of interpersonal communication. (BH)

  19. Revisiting the Hispanic health paradox: the relative contributions of nativity, country of origin, and race/ethnicity to childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Rivera, Marlene; Kawachi, Ichiro; Bennett, Gary G; Subramanian, S V

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between race and Hispanic ethnicity, maternal and child nativity, country of origin and asthma among 2,558 non-Hispanic white and Hispanic children across 65 Los Angeles neighborhoods. A series of two-level multilevel models were estimated to examine the independent effects of race, ethnicity, and country of origin on childhood asthma. Lifetime asthma prevalence was reported among 9% of children, with no significant differences between Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites overall. However, in fully adjusted models, Hispanic children of non-Mexican origin reported higher odds of asthma compared to non-Hispanic white children. A protective nativity effect was also observed among children of foreign born mothers compared to US born mothers. Our study provides evidence in support of the heterogeneity of childhood asthma by Hispanic ethnicity and maternal nativity. These findings suggest moving beyond solely considering racial/ethnic classifications which could mask subgroups at increased risk of childhood asthma.

  20. The Pursuit of Identity in Invisible Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭佳

    2013-01-01

    Invisible Man is a representative work of black literature in America. In this novel, the writer Ralph Ellison depicts the hero’s growth experience in the white dominated society with his unique narrative techniques. As an individual in a society, the hero in this novel gradually realizes that he is an invisible man in the white dominated society and he doesn ’t have the social sta-tus which can be recognized by the white at all. To change this situation, the hero in this novel suffers many difficulties and hard-ships with an attempt to prove his existence in front of the white and the numerous black fellows and obtain his own identity as a black man which will be recognized by others. This paper tries to explore African American ’s pursuit of identity in Invisible Man by interpreting Ellison’s Invisible Man.

  1. Human capabilities in space. [man machine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Man's ability to live and perform useful work in space was demonstrated throughout the history of manned space flight. Current planning envisions a multi-functional space station. Man's unique abilities to respond to the unforeseen and to operate at a level of complexity exceeding any reasonable amount of previous planning distinguish him from present day machines. His limitations, however, include his inherent inability to survive without protection, his limited strength, and his propensity to make mistakes when performing repetitive and monotonous tasks. By contrast, an automated system does routine and delicate tasks, exerts force smoothly and precisely, stores, and recalls large amounts of data, and performs deductive reasoning while maintaining a relative insensitivity to the environment. The establishment of a permanent presence of man in space demands that man and machines be appropriately combined in spaceborne systems. To achieve this optimal combination, research is needed in such diverse fields as artificial intelligence, robotics, behavioral psychology, economics, and human factors engineering.

  2. Cosmic evolution, life and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the most basic problems confronting science are those regarding the origin of the universe, the origin of life and the origin of man. This general overview starts (1) with a brief introduction addressed primarily to the Cyril Ponnamperuma Memorial. Then, the thesis is presented that the appearance of life and intelligence on our planet can be understood as the result of a number of cosmic and biological evolutionary processes, including (2) the stellar thermonuclear synthesis of the biogenic elements other than hydrogen (C, N, O, P and S), their dispersal into space, and their combination into circumstellar and interstellar molecules. (3) The formation of the Solar System and the Earth-Moon System. (4) The role of comets and carbonaceous chondrites in contributing organic matter to the primitive Earth. (5) The prebiotics synthesis of amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, fatty acids, and other biochemical monomers. (6) The prebiotic condensation reactions leading to the synthesis of oligomers such as oligonucleotides and oligopeptides, with replicative and catalytic activities. (7) The synthesis of amphiphilic lipids, and their self-assembly into liposomes with bi-layered membranes. (8) The formation of protocellular structures. (9) The activation of protocells into a functioning Darwin's ancestral cell. (10) Early evolution of life. (11) The K-T boundary event and the disappearance of dinosaurs. (12) Evolution of hominids leading to Homo sapiens. (13) The rapid development of civilization. (14) The exploration of the Solar System. (15) Life beyond our planetary system. (16) Epilogue. Peace from cosmic evolution? (Abstract only)

  3. Bone health in immigrant Hispanic women living in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Joyce E; Cooper, Cheryl M; Bone, Mary A; Saade, Guillermo; Holiday, David B

    2010-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious national public health problem, and is expected to increase significantly over the next few decades, especially in women. A limitation of bone health research exists since few studies have involved Hispanic women, and even fewer, Hispanic immigrant women. For this study we examined the effects of anthropometric, behavioral, and health history variables on bone mineral density (BMD) in 84 immigrant Hispanic women, age 40 and above. BMD was assessed at the spine, femur, and forearm using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Demographic information, health histories, and behavioral risk factors were obtained from a questionnaire. In the younger group (mean age = 44.1 years) 61% had spinal osteopenia, and in the postmenopausal group (mean age = 53.0 years) 59% had osteopenia and 13% had osteoporosis. Femur sites were free of osteoporosis. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 31.8 ± 6.1 and mean waist girth was 95.6 ± 12.5 cm, indicating overall and abdominal obesity. Partial correlations indicated a significant positive relationship between body fat variables and total femur BMD values. ANOVAs revealed no differences in BMD values at any bone site across tertile levels for calcium intake or for physical activity. However, supplemental and dietary calcium intakes were very low and few participants engaged in regular physical activity outside of work and activities of daily living (ADL). In light of the expected increase in osteoporosis in this population and the prevalence of spinal osteopenia in the younger participants, education about the health risks of osteoporosis should be made available to this group. PMID:20012477

  4. Acculturation-Related Stress and Mental Health Outcomes among Three Generations of Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Richard C.; Padilla, Amado M.; Napper, Lucy E.; Goldbach, Jeremy T.

    2013-01-01

    Stress associated with acculturation and minority status among Hispanic youth is understudied. Using survey data from the Hispanic Stress Inventory-Adolescent Version (HSI-A), we examined psychosocial stress across eight domains including family economic stress and acculturation-gap stress in a national sample of three generations (first, second,…

  5. Acculturation and drug use disorders among Hispanics in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Carlos; Morcillo, Carmen; Alegría, Margarita; Dedios, María Cecilia; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Regincos, Rosa; Wang, Shuai

    2013-02-01

    The authors' objective was to examine the relationship between degree of acculturation across five different dimensions of acculturation and risk of drug use disorders (DUD) among US Hispanics. Data were derived from a large national sample of the US adult population, the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, collected using face-to-face interviews. The sample included civilian non-institutionalized U.S. population aged 18 years and older, with oversampling of Hispanics, Blacks and those aged 18-24 years. Interviews of more than 34,000 adults were conducted during 2004-2005 using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule - DSM-IV Version. A total of 6359 subjects who identified themselves as Hispanics were included in this study. Acculturation measures used in this study assessed:, time spent in the U.S., age at immigration, language preference, social network composition, and ethnic identification. Among Hispanics, there was an inverse relationship between five complementary dimensions of acculturation and DUD. Moreover, this relationship showed a significant gradient across all acculturation dimensions and DUD. The prevalence of DUD increases with acculturation in Hispanics, across several measures of acculturation in a dose-response relationship. Hispanic cultural features and values exert a protective effect on risk of DUD. Preservation and promotion of Hispanic values may be an important component of preventive interventions for Hispanics.

  6. Developmental Trajectories of Acculturation in Hispanic Adolescents: Associations with Family Functioning and Adolescent Risk Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Seth J.; Des Rosiers, Sabrina; Huang, Shi; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Knight, George P.; Pantin, Hilda; Szapocznik, Jose

    2013-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal acculturation patterns, and their associations with family functioning and adolescent risk behaviors, in Hispanic immigrant families. A sample of 266 Hispanic adolescents (M[subscript age] = 13.4) and their primary parents completed measures of acculturation, family functioning, and adolescent conduct problems,…

  7. Acculturation and Substance Use: Social Influence as a Mediator among Hispanic Alternative High School Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Raquel; Chou, Chih-Ping; Sussman, Steve; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Pachon, Harry; Valente, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that acculturation increases the risk of substance use among Hispanic youth. However, this process is not well understood. This study examined associations between acculturation and several substance use indicators among a sample of 714 Hispanic youth attending alternative high schools in southern California. Peer social…

  8. A Pilot Study of Culturally Adapted Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Hispanics with Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interian, Alejandro; Allen, Lesley A.; Gara, Michael A.; Escobar, Javier I.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for major depression among Hispanics in primary care. Cultural adaptations were applied based on a range of cultural considerations described in the literature. Fifteen Hispanic primary care patients with major depression were enrolled. All…

  9. Prenatal Care Initiation in Low-Income Hispanic Women: Risk and Protective Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecken, Linda J.; Purdom, Catherine L.; Howe, Rose

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the psychosocial risk (distress, stress, unintended pregnancy) and protective factors (social support, mastery, familism) associated with entry into prenatal care among low-income Hispanic women. Methods: Between April and September 2005, 483 postpartum Medicaid-eligible Hispanic women completed a survey at the hospital.…

  10. Significant contributing causes of cancer deaths among Hispanics in Colorado, USA, 1983-1992

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley Sweitzer

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer deaths in the state of Colorado, U.S.A., totaled 53,921 between 1983 and 1992. Death certificates for this period were used to evaluate Hispanic cancer deaths by contributing causes of death and primary occupation of the decedent. The relative risks for diabetes and liver disease as contributing causes of death were significantly higher among Hispanics when compared to non-Hispanics who had also died of cancer (RR for diabetes = 1.90; 95% C.I. (1.64,2.19 and RR for liver disease = 1.44; 95% C.I. (1.23,1.68. Hispanics who had died of cancer were significantly less likely to have drug abuse as a contributing cause of death when compared to non-Hispanics (RR for drug abuse = 0.69; 95% C.I. (0.52,0.91. Laborers, service workers, and clerical workers who were Hispanic, were significantly more likely to die of cancer with either diabetes or liver disease as a contributing cause of death than were non-Hispanics in the same occupational category (p<0.05. Chronic diseases, such as diabetes and liver disease, may be reducing the survivability of cancer among Hispanics.

  11. Childbearing characteristics of U.S.- and foreign-born Hispanic mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, S J; Taffel, S M

    1985-01-01

    This study compares maternal and infant health and sociodemographic characteristics of U.S.-born and foreign- or Puerto Rican-born Hispanic mothers and their babies, using data from the national vital statistics system and the 1980 National Natality Survey. While nearly half of all Hispanic mothers and Mexican and Puerto Rican mothers were born in the United States, less than 10 percent of Cuban and other Hispanic mothers were U.S. born. Compared with foreign- or Puerto Rican-born Hispanic mothers, U.S.-born mothers tended to be younger, to have had fewer high-order births, to be less likely to receive delayed or no prenatal care, to have higher educational attainment, and to be more likely to be unmarried. The incidence of low birth weight among infants born to Hispanic mothers, particularly Mexican and Cuban women, was relatively low. When the proportions of low birth weight were examined by nativity status, infants born to foreign- or Puerto Rican-born women were consistently less likely to be of low birth weight. In an effort to account for these findings, the mother's smoking status before and during pregnancy is examined. Compared with non-Hispanic mothers, Hispanic mothers were much less likely to have smoked before or during pregnancy. These data are examined to see if they account for the better outcome as measured by birth weight for Hispanic births, especially those to foreign- or Puerto Rican-born women.

  12. The Cultural Values of Ten Hispanic Women in Eastern New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsch, Constance M.; Herrera, Monica

    The Hispanic woman in New Mexico has lived in a changing rural environment that has urbanized only recently. This paper examines the comments of modern Hispanic women in eastern New Mexico to document their beliefs about change and stability in their lives. Ten women, ranging in age from 23 to 93 and spanning 4 generations, answered questions…

  13. Assessing dietary intake of drug abusing Hispanic adults with and without HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug abuse is an important risk factor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Hispanics in the Northeastern United States and both drug abuse and HIV are associated with nutritional deficiencies. The selection of a dietary assessment method most appropriate for Hispanic adults with/without HIV...

  14. The Influence of Social Capital Factors on African-American and Hispanic High School Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jacqueline L.

    2009-01-01

    The underachievement of African American and Hispanic students has been an ongoing problem for schools in the United States. The purpose of this investigation was to add to the existing body of knowledge concerning social capital of African American and Hispanic high school students' academic achievement. Using a nationally representative sample…

  15. Enhancing the Quality of Life for Hispanic Individuals Through Career Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Wash A.; Larke, Jr., Alvin

    2005-01-01

    With the rapid population increase of Hispanic (Spanish, Latin American, or Spanish Indian heritage) individuals in the United States, ensuring economic prosperity and stability of this group is critical. This should include increasing their dwindling participation in agriculture-related fields. Hispanic youths often overlook an…

  16. Cancer Facts and Figures for Hispanics/Latinos 2012-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linguistic factors, as well as discrimination and provider bias. 169-172 In the US, health care access is closely related to insurance coverage. Hispan- ics are the least likely to have health insurance of any racial or ethnic group. 32 Within the Hispanic population, ...

  17. 75 FR 65415 - White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ..., employees, or agents, or any other person. (Presidential Sig.) THE WHITE HOUSE, October 19, 2010. [FR Doc... Executive Order 13555--White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics #0; #0; #0... White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics By the authority vested in me...

  18. Separate and Unequal: The Neighborhood Gap for Blacks and Hispanics in Metropolitan America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, John R.

    This study used data from the Census of Population 1990 and 2000 to investigate economic inequalities between racial and ethnic groups, particularly blacks and Hispanics. It examined people's household incomes and the quality of their neighborhoods. Non-Hispanic Blacks remained the lowest-income minority group, with household incomes only 63.7…

  19. 77 FR 16542 - President's Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    .... Pacific Daylight Time. ADDRESSES: Loker Student Union Ballroom, California State University, Dominguez... Hispanics (the Commission) is established by Executive Order 13555 (Oct. 19, 2010). The Commission is... Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. The notice also describes the functions of the...

  20. Hispanics, incarceration, and TB/HIV screening: a missed opportunity for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Dora M; Gjelsvik, Annie; Chen, Nadine; Rich, Josiah D

    2013-08-01

    Disparities in incarceration rates and in prison-based TB/HIV testing may contribute to health disparities in the communities most affected by incarceration. We analyzed Bureau of Justice Statistics surveys of federal and state prison inmates to assess TB and HIV screening rates for US-born Hispanics, foreign-born Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks, and non-Hispanic whites. Screening rates were high overall but foreign-born Hispanic inmates had significantly lower odds of being tested for TB in both state (AOR 0.55) and federal prisons (AOR 0.31) compared to white inmates. Foreign-born Hispanics also had lower odds of being tested for HIV in state prisons and Hispanics had lower odds of being tested for HIV in federal prisons compared to white inmates. Screening for infectious diseases in state and federal prisons is high but Hispanics have higher odds of going untested; this has important consequences for prevention of further transmission in the communities to which they return.

  1. Novel genetic loci identified for the pathophysiology of childhood obesity in the Hispanic population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variants responsible for susceptibility to obesity and its comorbidities among Hispanic children have not been identified. The VIVA LA FAMILIA Study was designed to genetically map childhood obesity and associated biological processes in the Hispanic population. A genome-wide association stu...

  2. El Embarazo Precoz: Childbearing among Hispanic Teenagers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, Katherine

    Adolescent pregnancy in the Hispanic community warrants attention both because it has been underresearched and because its consequences may be particularly dramatic. In addition to economic disadvantage, Hispanic adolescents in the United States must contend with conflicting messages from two cultures regarding standards of sexuality, timing of…

  3. Vivir O Morir? The Effects of Radio on Health Education for Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G.; And Others

    Because of the higher-than-average risk of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes among Hispanics, researchers selected these three health problems as the focus of a "radio novela" intended to increase the health knowledge and awareness of a Hispanic target audience and to stimulate their response to the problems. The replicable health communication…

  4. Quantitative and Qualitative Results: Cooperative Learning Implementation with Hispanic Community College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Bobbette M.; Keitz, Ruth A.; Wells, Lori

    2013-01-01

    Five classes of Art Appreciation first semester undergraduate Hispanic students assigned to one professor were selected to experience cooperative learning over a full semester. Pre-semester surveys and post-semester surveys were completed by 104 Hispanic freshmen college students. Strategies used in the classes included Think-Pair-Share, Ticket…

  5. Public Policy and Hispanic-Serving Institutions: From Invention to Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental premise for creating the Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) designation assumes that a critical mass of students motivates an institution to change how it operates to better serve these students to degree attainment. Increasing Hispanic degree attainment is in the national interest, and programs created by public policy to support…

  6. What Is the Impact of Full Access to Technology on the Achievement of the Hispanic Student?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, John E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The problem studied in this research was whether the impact of full access to technology both at home and in school would affect the achievement of Hispanic students. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the access to technology and the achievement of the Hispanic students at a suburban middle school. What are the…

  7. Trends in the Residential Segregation of Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians: 1970-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Douglas S.; Denton, Nancy A.

    1987-01-01

    Examines trends in residential segregation for Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians in 60 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs) between 1970 and 1980. Black-Anglo segregation remained high in the North, but decreased in some smaller Southern and Western SMSAs. Hispanic segregation was markedly below that of Blacks, but has increased. Asian…

  8. Is There Disparity in Physician Service Use? A Comparison of Hispanic and White Medicare Beneficiaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Mei

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates general physician service use by a national sample of non-Hispanic white and Hispanic Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older. Using the health behavior model as the conceptual framework, Oaxaca decomposition multivariate analyses were conducted to examine predictors for contact with a physician and the number of…

  9. Developmental Assets and Ethnic Identity as Predictors of Thriving in Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Melissa; Ricard, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the confluence of developmental assets, ethnic identity, and acculturative stress in the prediction of thriving among Hispanic adolescents. Thriving is used to encompass youth who are not only doing well now but who are also on the trajectory toward overall success. Study participants included 130 self-reported Hispanic middle…

  10. A Study of Prevention and Retention Strategies for Successful Urban Secondary High School Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Roberto Ibarra

    2013-01-01

    Hispanic high school students have a dropout rate that ranges from 35 percent to 55 percent depending on what type of report you may be referencing. Add rates for all high school students. Hispanic youth endure the challenges of language barriers, single parent households, working to help their family, or fighting off gang involvement in their…

  11. Ambitions in Action: Investigating College Enrollment Among Hispanic Youth Who Expect to Complete a Bachelor's Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the "Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002" and structural equation modeling techniques, this study focuses on the unique experiences of Hispanic adolescents who maintain bachelor's degree expectations through the end of high school. Results indicate that the degree to which Hispanic students' college expectations are…

  12. Using Qualitative Methods for Revising Items in the Hispanic Stress Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Richard C.; Goldbach, Jeremy T.; Padilla, Amado M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite progress in the development of measures to assess psychosocial stress experiences in the general population, a lack of culturally informed assessment instruments exist to enable clinicians and researchers to detect and accurately diagnosis mental health concerns among Hispanics. The Hispanic Stress Inventory (HSI) was developed…

  13. A Model of Academic Self-Concept for High School Hispanic Students in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Flor R.; Dalley, Christopher; Fernandez, Nicole; Davenport-Dalley, Tania Marie; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Tatum, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how Hispanic students' academic self-concept influences the independent variables of family academic expectations, peer relationships, schoolwork, and student-teacher relationships. A survey was administered to 222 ninth-grade students in Long Island, New York, 99 of whom self-identified as Hispanic. A structural equation…

  14. The Relationship between Type of Attorney and Bail Amount Set for Hispanic Defendants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. B.; Johnson, James B.

    2007-01-01

    This research empirically examines the difference that type of counsel, public or private, makes in the bail amount set for Hispanic defendants. Data were collected on all felony defendants assigned to the district court in a midwestern county. Specifically, the authors hypothesized that Hispanic defendants who retain the assistance of private…

  15. Hispanic Families. Critical Issues for Policy and Programs in Human Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Miguel, Ed.

    Historical processes, cultural values and socioeconomic conditions that contribute to the current status of Hispanic families are examined in this book. The eight papers in the collection focus on selected aspects of the diverse roles and impacts of the family in Hispanic communities and explore the implications of these roles and impact for…

  16. Family and Work Predictors of Psychological Well-Being among Hispanic Women Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Hortensia; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined contributions of job- and gender-related variables to Hispanic women professionals' mental health. Income, Hispanic group, discrimination, job stress, and peer support related to mental health. Spouse support and spouse ethnicity were associated with stress in balancing roles and psychological distress. Married women reported greater…

  17. Folic Acid Promotion for Hispanic Women in Florida: A Vitamin Diary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kamilah B.; Hauser, Kimberlea; Rodriguez, Nydia Y.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the barriers and benefits of taking multivitamins among Hispanic women exposed to a folic acid social marketing campaign in Florida, USA. Design and setting: Evaluation of non-pregnant women aged 18-35 from multiple Hispanic subgroups. Method: For 6 months, participants exposed to social marketing campaign educational…

  18. Certain Cancers Seem Less Likely for Kids of Hispanic Moms Born Outside U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Likely for Kids of Hispanic Moms Born Outside U.S. Analyzing immigrant population can help identify tumor causes, ... 2012. The analysis was limited to children of U.S.-born white, U.S.-born Hispanic, or non-U.S.- ...

  19. Risky Sexual Behaviors in First and Second Generation Hispanic Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejos-Castillo, Elizabeth; Vazsonyi, Alexander T.

    2009-01-01

    Though official data document that Hispanic youth are at a great risk for early sexual intercourse, STDs, and teen pregnancy, only few etiological studies have been conducted on Hispanic youth; almost no work has examined potential generational differences in these behaviors, and thus, these behaviors may have been mistakenly attributed to…

  20. Bridging the High School and College Achievement Gap for Hispanics--It All Begins at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    According to a Pew Hispanic Center study, "Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America, Educational Expectations and Attainment," that surveyed Hispanics 16 years old and older, the high school dropout rate among Latino youths is nearly three times higher than that among white youths and nearly double the rate among blacks. Nearly…

  1. Skin-Tone Preferences and Self-Representation in Hispanic Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Erin A.; Wiese, Deborah L.

    2012-01-01

    Skin-tone preferences and colourism within Hispanic children have been largely unexamined in the psychological literature. The objectives of the current study were to investigate Hispanic children's skin-tone preferences and the effect of assessor race and ethnicity on those preferences. To carry out the study, Clark and Clark's colouring task was…

  2. Attitudes about Partner Communication Regarding Contraceptive Use among Hispanic Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Koreena M.; Wiley, David C.; Housman, Jeff; Martinez-Ramos, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine cultural factors that influence Hispanic male college students' intention to communicate with partners about contraception use. Participants: A sample of 239 self-identified Hispanic participants enrolled in at least 1 college course participated in this study in the spring 2014…

  3. Hispanics: A Diverse Population of Students to Influence the Landscape of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Hispanic students are a growing and pervasive population within higher education. This position paper examines population characteristics and educational patterns of Hispanic students that underscore failures of the higher education system in serving these students, in addition to institutional issues and cultural values that further complicate…

  4. Los Ancianos: The Aging of the Hispanic Community. A Preliminary Demographic Profile. Project Anciano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Herminia L.

    A demographic profile of the aged Hispanic community, a growing population, is provided. Such socioeconomic data on the Hispanic elderly are needed for developing public policies and programs to meet their growing needs. The following topics are presented: (1) changes in the population; (2) living arrangements; (3) education; (4) employment; (5)…

  5. Prodigal daughters: portraying lesbians in Hispanic Caribbean cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Reyes, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    During the last twenty years, Hispanic Caribbean cinema has slowly developed roles to represent lesbians. In order to draw a conceptual map and to examine the un/successfulness of this new lesbian "public image," I analyze both independent films that challenge the status quo by portraying openly lesbian characters and mainstream films that insist on denying autonomy to same-sex love. Whereas commercial markets may deem an openly lesbian role transgressive, queer female roles can be considered "appropriate." Gender-queering functions as a symbolically transitional stage toward lesbian visibility and inclusion.

  6. Hispanic Youth in Boston: In Search of Opportunities and Accountability. A Report by the Boston Latino Youth Policy Analysis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hispanic Office of Planning and Evaluation, Inc., Boston, MA.

    This report discusses the school-to-work transition process of Hispanic youth in Boston. The report was prepared in response to the high rates of unemployment and participation in low-paying service sector jobs by Hispanics and was funded by a grant from the Hispanic Policy Development Project as part of a national effort to identify key public…

  7. SunSmart: Evaluation of a Pilot School-Based Sun Protection Intervention in Hispanic Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. A.; Langholz, B. M.; Ly, T.; Harris, S. C.; Richardson, J. L.; Peng, D. H.; Cockburn, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma is rising among Hispanic populations in the United States. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot sun safety educational intervention conducted from 2006 to 2012 on Hispanic early adolescents in a high ultraviolet environment. Nineteen schools with high Hispanic enrollment were recruited from urban…

  8. A New Chapter. The Fresh Voices of Hispanic Fiction Writers Are Being Heard by a Growing Mainstream Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase-Blunt, Martha

    1992-01-01

    Highlights numerous Hispanic fiction writers who are beginning to experience popularity. Describes Hispanic genre such as "magic realism" in which real action is tinged with dreamlike surrealism. Discusses Hispanic writers' experiences with small independent presses as well as major publishers. Expresses such concerns as patronization and the lack…

  9. Risk and protection for HIV/AIDS in African-American, Hispanic, and White adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Robin; Buck, Raymond; Shattell, Mona M

    2008-07-01

    African-Americans and Hispanics are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS in the United States. HIV infection is often acquired during adolescence, a time when risky sexual behaviors are at their peak. This study explored relationships among selected risk factors, protective factors, and risky sexual behaviors among African-American, Hispanic, and White adolescents, from a sample of adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. African-Americans and Hispanics were more likely to have sexual intercourse without the use of birth control than were Whites. African-Americans were more likely to have sexual behavior with multiple sexual partners than either Hispanics or Whites were, and African-Americans had higher self-esteem than did Hispanics and Whites. In order to develop culturally sensitive, effective interventions to prevent HIV/AIDS in adolescents, racial differences in risk and protective factors must be examined. PMID:18807775

  10. La Esperanza del Valle: alcohol prevention novelas for Hispanic youth and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, B; Rabinowitz, P; Shefsky, M L; Washienko, K

    1997-10-01

    With extensive Hispanic community involvement, a television, radio, and storybook novela were developed to improve Hispanic parent-youth communications and youth attitudes regarding alcohol. Focus groups with the target audiences determined the novelas' concentration on alcohol, their medium and language of choice for Hispanic youth versus parents, and the health messages and cultural values to be portrayed. Reactions to the novelas were obtained via self-report surveys, random street interviews, radio listener call-ins, and community group meetings. Favorable reactions were obtained regarding the novelas' cultural sensitivity and appropriateness, and their potential to affect future behavior change. The affect of the television novela on Hispanic youth was evaluated by a pre-post self-report survey administered to middle and high school students. Survey results indicated the television novela may have had some positive impact on Hispanic youth attitudes and behavioral intentions regarding alcohol. The evaluation time line was limiting, however, and further evaluation is required.

  11. Testing the suffixoidization of German -mann '-man'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Lightfoot

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Throughout its history in Old High German (OHG, Middle High German, Early New High German, and Modern German (ModG, the word Mann "man" has exhibited a high degree of productivity and linguistic flexibility. It has ranged morphosyntactically from a full noun (OHG man "man", compounded noun (OHG werolt.man "human, mortal", affixoid (ModG Sports.mann "athlete", indefinite pronoun (ModG man "one", to something approaching zero (undergoing demorphologization in the OHG compound gom.man "husband, man". The affixoid notion and its usefulness in morphology have been controversial in the literature (e.g., Schmidt 1987. Relatively recently, Stevens (2005 proposed criteria for the category affixoid, and a number of standard German grammatical and etymological references (e.g., Duden 1995 have been utilizing this term. This study involves examining modern usage of the form -mann as found in the online Spiegel newsmagazine's database, as well as the collection of historical data primarily on the forms of German -mann from the robust Titus database in Frankfurt. Stevens' (2005 criteria are evaluated and used to measure the validity of German -mann's membership in the category of suffixoid.

  12. man lege på biblioteket?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    2009-01-01

    De fleste mennesker - børn såvel som voksne - har en ganske klar opfattelse af hvordan man bør opføre sig og hvad man kan forvente på et bibliotek. Den primære aktivitet handler om at finde og låne bøger, til nøds lidt musik eller et computerspil. Og så skal man være stille. Der skal være fred og...

  13. The sacramental nature of man and creation

    OpenAIRE

    STOIAN Mihai Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    God made Himself a man for man to reach the likeness of God – this is the essential idea of the oikonomia of our salvation, dear to all the Church Fathers, from Saint Irenaeus to Saint Athanasius the Great and the essence of Christ, mystery and original and fundamental sacrament of our meeting with God and of our salvation, of all of us, in Christ, and of the acquisition by each man of the fruits of salvation and deification through Christ, in the Holy Spirit, in His Church. Christ’s mystery ...

  14. Hispanic mothers' beliefs and practices regarding selected children's health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, B I

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the Hispanic mothers' initial sources of advice and help with children's illnesses; beliefs about the etiology and seriousness of certain children's illnesses, namely, fever, cough, diarrhea, vomiting, conjunctivitis, skin rash, minor wounds, and burns; practices for the management of these children's health problems, including the use of home remedies, if any. Interviews were conducted with 100 women of Hispanic origin who had at least one child age 5 years or less and who were attending a community clinic in a rural area of central California. Mothers' beliefs about problem etiologies varied widely and revealed several misconceptions, folk beliefs, and lack of knowledge. The findings also revealed that only 32% of the mothers used or would use health professionals as the initial source of advice or help with children's problems. The majority of the subjects (81%) admitted to using home remedies to manage children's problems; 17% sought the help of a folk healer (mainly for the treatment of empacho). The various types of home remedies used by mothers were described and included the ingestion or application of certain foods, fluids, herbal teas, or other materials as well as methods to eliminate the perceived causes of the problems. It is important to note that 11% of the mothers had used azarcon or greta (substances containing lead) for treating empacho and other stomach problems in children. The need for culturally responsive and sensitive health care is discussed.

  15. Seronegative Neuromyelitis Optica: A Case Report of a Hispanic Male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Nabeel; Teleb, Mohamed; Syed, Saad; Wardi, Miraie; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare disease, common in white females and rarely reported in Hispanic males. It is usually associated with recurrent demyelinating spectrum that is autoimmune in nature. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by antibody biomarkers; however, they can be negative and lead to more dilemma in diagnosis. Furthermore, the course of disease and prognosis are different in seronegative as compared to seropositive NMO. Treatment is similar in both subgroups with new approaches under investigation for seronegative NMO patients. We present an interesting case of a 37-year-old Hispanic male who presented with sudden onset of lower extremity weakness, numbness, blurry vision, and urinary retention. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed multiphasic demyelinating process involving the thoracic spinal cord. His brain MRI also revealed changes suggesting optic neuritis. The patient met the criteria for diagnosis of NMO by having optic neuritis and myelitis by imaging studies despite having negative aquaporin-4 antibodies (AQP4-Ab). His condition improved after plasma exchange. NMO can be difficult to distinguish from acute multiple sclerosis in the early stages of the disease. Having AQP4-Ab testing is important for diagnosis with imaging studies; however, negative antibody results cannot exclude the diagnosis, but rather group it in seronegative subtype. Ongoing studies and research suggest that seronegative NMO might have a different pathophysiology, manifestation, and prognosis.

  16. Seronegative Neuromyelitis Optica: A Case Report of a Hispanic Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel Badri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is a rare disease, common in white females and rarely reported in Hispanic males. It is usually associated with recurrent demyelinating spectrum that is autoimmune in nature. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by antibody biomarkers; however, they can be negative and lead to more dilemma in diagnosis. Furthermore, the course of disease and prognosis are different in seronegative as compared to seropositive NMO. Treatment is similar in both subgroups with new approaches under investigation for seronegative NMO patients. We present an interesting case of a 37-year-old Hispanic male who presented with sudden onset of lower extremity weakness, numbness, blurry vision, and urinary retention. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the thoracic spine showed multiphasic demyelinating process involving the thoracic spinal cord. His brain MRI also revealed changes suggesting optic neuritis. The patient met the criteria for diagnosis of NMO by having optic neuritis and myelitis by imaging studies despite having negative aquaporin-4 antibodies (AQP4-Ab. His condition improved after plasma exchange. NMO can be difficult to distinguish from acute multiple sclerosis in the early stages of the disease. Having AQP4-Ab testing is important for diagnosis with imaging studies; however, negative antibody results cannot exclude the diagnosis, but rather group it in seronegative subtype. Ongoing studies and research suggest that seronegative NMO might have a different pathophysiology, manifestation, and prognosis.

  17. New Take on Man's Friendship with Fido

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Man's Friendship With Fido Surprising findings emerge about domestication To use the sharing features on this page, ... dog DNA samples, to learn more about dog domestication. SOURCE: Texas A&M University, news release HealthDay ...

  18. A young man with nonhealing venous ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vloedbeld, M. G.; Venema, A. W.; Smit, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with nonhealing ulcers at an atypical location on his left foot, caused by a combination of venous insufficiency (after deep venous thrombosis) and arterial insufficiency. The underlying cause was Buerger's disease.

  19. Man-made climate change: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holopainen, E. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Meteorology

    1995-12-31

    The first major man-made environmental problem was the soil acidification, caused primarily by the massive industrial emissions of sulphur dioxide. Then came the problem of ozone depletion, caused by the emissions of man-made halocarbons. More recently, the possibility of man-made climate change has received a lot of attention. These three man-made problems are interconnected in fundamental ways and require for their solution interdisciplinary and international approach. Narrowing of the scientific uncertainties connected with the problems mentioned above can be expected through international `Global Change` programmes such as the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). Periodic assessments of the type produced by the IPCC will clearly be needed. Also in the future such assessments should form the scientific basis for international negotiations and conventions on the climate change issue

  20. The future of oil and hydrocarbon man

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Colin

    1999-01-01

    Man appeared on the planet about four million years ago, and by 1850 numbered about one billion Ten came Hydrocarbon man. World population has since increased six-fold. After the oil price shocks of the 1970s, people asked "when will production peak?". It is not easy to answer this question because of the very poor database. Reserves and the many different hydrocarbon categories are poorly defined, reporting practices are ambiguous, revisions are not backdated...

  1. China's first deep manned submersible,JIAOLONG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng; CUI WeiCheng; LI XiangYang

    2010-01-01

    @@ A deep manned submersible is indispensable to deep ocean exploration.No other equipment can bring scientists to extreme sea floor depths to do research in situ.Marine geology, seafloor geophysics, marine biology, and oceanic chemistry are the fields that scientists are particularly eager to study [1-6].Chinese scientists have long dreamed of using their own submersible to probe the deep sea.China's recent fast development of a deep manned submersible has realized that dream.

  2. Redes En Acción. Increasing Hispanic participation in cancer research, training, and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Talavera, Gregory A; Marti, Jose; Penedo, Frank J; Medrano, Martha A; Giachello, Aida L; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2006-10-15

    Hispanics are affected by many health care disparities. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through its Special Populations Branch, is supporting networking and capacity-building activities designed to increase Hispanic participation and leadership in cancer research. Redes En Acción established a national network of cancer research centers, community-based organizations, and federal partners to facilitate opportunities for junior Hispanic scientists to participate in training and research projects on cancer control. Since 2000, Redes En Acción has established a network of more than 1800 Hispanic leaders involved in cancer research and education. The project has sustained 131 training positions and submitted 29 pilot projects to NCI for review, with 16 awards for a total of $800,000, plus an additional $8.8 million in competing grant funding based on pilot study results to date. Independent research has leveraged an additional $32 million in non-Redes funding, and together the national and regional network sites have participated in more than 1400 community and professional awareness events. In addition, the program conducted extensive national survey research that provided the basis for the Redes En Acción Latino Cancer Report, a national agenda on Hispanic cancer issues. Redes En Acción has increased participation in cancer control research, training, and awareness among Hispanic scientists and within Hispanic communities. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society. PMID:16958026

  3. Redes En Acción. Increasing Hispanic participation in cancer research, training, and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Talavera, Gregory A; Marti, Jose; Penedo, Frank J; Medrano, Martha A; Giachello, Aida L; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2006-10-15

    Hispanics are affected by many health care disparities. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through its Special Populations Branch, is supporting networking and capacity-building activities designed to increase Hispanic participation and leadership in cancer research. Redes En Acción established a national network of cancer research centers, community-based organizations, and federal partners to facilitate opportunities for junior Hispanic scientists to participate in training and research projects on cancer control. Since 2000, Redes En Acción has established a network of more than 1800 Hispanic leaders involved in cancer research and education. The project has sustained 131 training positions and submitted 29 pilot projects to NCI for review, with 16 awards for a total of $800,000, plus an additional $8.8 million in competing grant funding based on pilot study results to date. Independent research has leveraged an additional $32 million in non-Redes funding, and together the national and regional network sites have participated in more than 1400 community and professional awareness events. In addition, the program conducted extensive national survey research that provided the basis for the Redes En Acción Latino Cancer Report, a national agenda on Hispanic cancer issues. Redes En Acción has increased participation in cancer control research, training, and awareness among Hispanic scientists and within Hispanic communities. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  4. Predictors of hospital re-admissions among Hispanics with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atla, Pradeep R.; Sheikh, Muhammad Y.; Gill, Firdose; Kundu, Rabindra; Choudhury, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospital re-admissions in decompensated cirrhosis are associated with worse patient outcomes. Hispanics have a disproportionately high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related morbidity and mortality. The goal of this study was to evaluate the factors affecting re-admission rates among Hispanics with HCV-related cirrhosis. Methods A total of 292 consecutive HCV-related cirrhosis admissions (Hispanics 189, non-Hispanics 103) from January 2009 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed; 132 were cirrhosis-related re-admissions. The statistical analysis was performed using STATA version 11.1. Chi-square/Fisher’s exact and Student’s t-tests were used to compare categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors for hospital readmissions. Results Among the 132 cirrhosis-related readmissions, 71% were Hispanics while 29% were non-Hispanics (P=0.035). Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and esophageal variceal hemorrhage were the most frequent causes of the first and subsequent readmissions. Hispanics with readmissions had a higher Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class (B and C) and higher model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores (≥15), as well as a higher incidence of alcohol use, HE, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and varices (P<0.05). The majority of the study patients (81%) had MELD scores <15. Multivariate regression analysis identified alcohol use (OR 2.63; 95%CI 1.1-6.4), HE (OR 5.5; 95%CI 2-15.3), varices (OR 3.2; 95%CI 1.3-8.2), and CTP class (OR 3.3; 95%CI 1.4–8.1) as predictors for readmissions among Hispanics. Conclusion CTP classes B and C, among other factors, were the major predictors for hospital readmissions in Hispanics with HCV-related cirrhosis. The majority of these readmissions were due to HE and variceal hemorrhage.

  5. Significant contributing causes of cancer deaths among Hispanics in Colorado, USA, 1983-1992

    OpenAIRE

    Sweitzer Kimberley; Stallones Lorann

    1998-01-01

    Cancer deaths in the state of Colorado, U.S.A., totaled 53,921 between 1983 and 1992. Death certificates for this period were used to evaluate Hispanic cancer deaths by contributing causes of death and primary occupation of the decedent. The relative risks for diabetes and liver disease as contributing causes of death were significantly higher among Hispanics when compared to non-Hispanics who had also died of cancer (RR for diabetes = 1.90; 95% C.I. (1.64,2.19) and RR for liver disease = 1.4...

  6. Cultural values associated with substance use among Hispanic adolescents in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Claradina; Unger, Jennifer B; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel W; Black, David Scott; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Cultural values can shape people's attitudes toward substance use and influence their risk of experimentation with drugs. This article examines the relationships between cultural values (familism, respeto, and machismo), fatalism (a culturally encouraged personality disposition), and substance use among Hispanic adolescents. In 2005, cross-sectional data were collected from 1,616 Hispanic ninth grade students in Los Angeles. Each cultural value was associated with lifetime substance use; however, these relationships depended on the type of substance and gender. Our findings suggest that it might be useful to incorporate the cultural values and address the personality trait of fatalism in prevention programs for Hispanic adolescents. The study's limitations are noted.

  7. Perceptions of Body Habitus and Cultural Health Among Hispanic Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen-Castle, Lisa; Aguirre, Trina

    2015-08-01

    To investigate whether perceptions of health and health outcomes are impacted by acculturation level, nativity, and years in the United States (US) for Hispanic adults in the Nebraska Panhandle. Focus groups (n = 10), surveys (demographics, body image silhouettes, and acculturation), and anthropometric measurements were conducted. US-born (n = 36) had higher household incomes, education level, and acculturation scores compared to foreign-born (n = 23). Years in the US was positively correlated with acculturation and anthropometrics. No significant differences were detected between groups for rating infant and adolescent health, indicating mid-sized infants were considered healthy and heavier adolescents had increased health risks. However, qualitative data revealed misconceptions regarding obesity and chronic disease and a cultural preference for heavier infants. Despite differences between groups, qualitative data indicated cultural perceptions of health still persist. Data indicates a need for behavioral modification using culturally appropriate methods and for collecting quantitative and qualitative data.

  8. Hispanic adults' beliefs, attitudes, and intentions regarding the female condom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, L M; Cecil, H; Pinkerton, S D

    2000-04-01

    The present study used the theory of planned behavior (TPB) (Ajzen, 1985) augmented by AIDS knowledge to investigate factors influencing intentions of Hispanic adults to use the female condom. A total of 146 persons (75 women and 71 men; mean age, 27 years) recruited from community-based organizations completed an anonymous survey regarding intentions to use the female condom with their main sex partner. The TPB model had greater predictive utility for women's, than for men's, female condom use intentions. For men, attitudes and norms did not predict female condom use intentions, but greater AIDS knowledge was related to lower intentions to use the female condom, above and beyond the TPB constructs. Perceived behavioral control, operationalized as self-efficacy, significantly increased the predictive utility of the TPB model for women's female condom use intentions but not for men's. Behavior change strategies to increase female condom use are discussed in light of these findings. PMID:10833679

  9. Segmented assimilation, neighborhood disadvantage, and Hispanic immigrant health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akresh, Ilana Redstone; Do, D Phuong; Frank, Reanne

    2016-01-01

    We use a subset of Hispanics from the New Immigrant Survey, a nationally representative data set on immigrants recently granted legal permanent residency (n = 2245), to examine whether the relationship between assimilation and health is modified by neighborhood disadvantage and, in doing so, carry out an empirical test of the segmented assimilation hypothesis. Results indicate that assimilation in the least disadvantaged neighborhoods can be protective against poor health. Specifically, more assimilated men and women in the lowest disadvantage neighborhoods have a lower likelihood of self-reported poorer health and being overweight, respectively; no link was found in higher disadvantage neighborhoods. Assimilation was not found to be associated with self-reported health for women or BMI for men, regardless of neighborhood disadvantage level. Overall, we find some evidence supporting the hypothesis that the effects of assimilation on health depend on the context in which immigrants experience it. PMID:26708247

  10. A qualitative investigation of cancer survivorship experiences among rural Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livaudais, Jennifer C; Thompson, Beti; Godina, Ruby; Islas, Ilda; Ibarra, Genoveva; Coronado, Gloria D

    2010-01-01

    Cancer survivorship experiences were explored among Hispanic men and women with cancer and family members of cancer survivors, recruited from two rural Washington communities in the Lower Yakima Valley. Five focus groups were conducted from February 2006 to October 2007 with 31 women and 10 men. Disbelief, fear, sadness, strength, courage, faith, and hope were common reactions to diagnosis. Concerns about family/children, losing medical coupons, and feelings of depression/isolation were identified as challenges faced after diagnosis. Participants identified smoking and environmental exposures as causes of cancer, but many believed operating on tumors caused cancer to spread. Participants used conventional treatments but identified herbal/natural remedies as cures. Most participants reported negative experiences with physicians and believed their community would benefit from language-appropriate information regarding prevention and treatment. The importance of linking survivors through support groups was emphasized and information elicited from sessions has been used to organize survivor support groups in these two communities. PMID:20623413

  11. Mythical Images and Demystification: Salome in Hispanic Modernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Sánchez Martínez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article will focus on the analysis of the Salome myth in Hispanic Modernism through the poems of Francisco Villaespesa, Rubén Darío and Delmira Agustini. Thus, we will examine the transformation of this femme fatale, from the construction of this literary archetype to the final demystification in Agustini’s poetry. Following the intertextuality in this myth and the debts to literature and other arts of Fin de Siècle in Europe, we will study the causes and the determinant of the perverse images of Salome, both aesthetically and ideologically. Ultimately, despite all the changes and transformations, due to its essence of subversion, this myth is and always will be poetized and rewritten. In its different versions, the myth of Salome will always be an instrument which the fin-de- siècle artist use in order to produce an alternative to the utilitarian bourgeois society

  12. Three Presentations of Takayasu’s Arteritis in Hispanic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Magdy Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu’s arteritis (TA is a medium and large vessel vasculitis, defined as a nonspecific aortitis that usually involves the aorta and its branches Kobayashi and Numano (2002. Its etiology remains unclear, and its complications are diverse and severe, including stenosis of the thoracic and abdominal aorta, aortic valve damage and regurgitation, and stenosis of the branches of the aorta. Carotid stenosis, coronary artery aneurysms, and renal artery stenosis resulting in renovascular hypertension are also reported sequellae of TA Kobayashi and Numano (2002. The disease was first described in Japan, but has also been diagnosed in India and Mexico Johnston (2002. Its incidence in the United States has been quoted as 2.6 patients per 1,000,000 people/year Johnston (2002. In Japan, its incidence is 3.6 patients per 1,000,000 patients/year and prevalence is 7.85 patients per 100,000 per year Morita et al. (1996. The natural history of this disease, which is commonly present in Asian populations, has only recently been studied in Hispanic patients despite the notable incidence and prevalence of TA in Mexican, South American, and Indian populations (Johnston 2002, Gamarra et al. 2010 . We present three cases of Hispanic patients who presented with TA at Olive-View-UCLA Medical Center (OVMC. We review their clinical and radiographic presentations. Finally, we review the literature to compare the clinical features of our three patients with data regarding the presentation of TA in more traditional Asian populations.

  13. Validation of the Framingham Heart Study and CHARGE-AF Risk Scores for Atrial Fibrillation in Hispanics, African-Americans, and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Eric; Kargoli, Faraj; Aagaard, Philip; Hoch, Ethan; Di Biase, Luigi; Fisher, John; Gross, Jay; Kim, Soo; Krumerman, Andrew; Ferrick, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    A risk score for atrial fibrillation (AF) has been developed by the Framingham Heart Study and Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE)-AF consortium. However, validation of these risk scores in an inner-city population is uncertain. Thus, a validation model was built using the Framingham Risk Score for AF and CHARGE-AF covariates. An in and outpatient electrocardiographic database was interrogated from 2000 to 2013 for the development of AF. Patients were included if their age was >45 and original risk equations: non-Hispanic white AUC = 0.712 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.694 to 0.731), African-American AUC = 0.733 (95% CI 0.716 to 0.751), and Hispanic AUC = 0.740 (95% CI 0.723 to 0.757). For the CHARGE-AF, 45,571 patients met inclusion criteria, of which 4,512 developed AF. Non-Hispanic white AUC = 0.673 (95% CI 0.652 to 0.694), African-American AUC = 0.706 (95% CI 0.685 to 0.727), and Hispanic AUC = 0.711 (95% CI 0.691 to 0.732). Calibration analysis showed qualitative similarities between cohorts. In conclusion, this is the first study to validate both the Framingham Heart Study and CHARGE-AF risk scores in both a Hispanic and African-American cohort. All models predicted AF well across all race and ethnic cohorts. PMID:26589820

  14. Campuses Get Advice on How to Teach Blacks and Hispanics About the Threat of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemiller, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    A discussion at the Third International Conference on AIDS on ways to cross the cultural barriers that have prevented many black and Hispanic people from learning about the disease is described. (MLW)

  15. Experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egues, Aida L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the meaning of the experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses (RNs). Focus group methodology was employed in the New York City metropolitan area with monolingual English or bilingual English/Spanish RNs (N = 20) who perceived themselves to be at all levels of practice. The findings offer a summary of the experiences of mentoring for the 20 Hispanic RNs that includes little advancement support; hesitancy to being mentored; dependency on the self for personal and professional growth; and educational, practice, and socioeconomic barriers. This study suggests that mentoring of Hispanic nurses needs to be reexamined to improve and sustain a culture of mentoring that may enhance the education, recruitment, and retention of Hispanic RNs.

  16. America's Prosperity: The Academic Success of Hispanics. Tomás Rivera Lecture Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donado, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    In the 2014 Tomás Rivera lecture, Yvette Donado, Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer of Educational Testing Service, discusses the need to create educational opportunities for Hispanic Americans in order to create prosperity for all Americans.

  17. Promoting folic acid to Spanish-speaking Hispanic women: evaluating existing campaigns to guide new development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Michael; Kahlor, Leeann; Silva, Kristi; Padilla, Yolanda

    2010-06-01

    Hispanic women are 1.5-3 times as likely as non-Hispanic white women to have a child affected by neural tube defects. This disparity exists in spite of varied interventions designed to address the problem. The purpose of this research was to investigate Hispanic women's knowledge of folic acid, perceptions of existing education campaigns, and provide guidance for future promotion efforts. Three focus groups with Hispanic mothers (N = 18) were conducted to garner insights on these issues. Results suggested that these women understood the benefits of folic acid, did not see major cultural barriers to consuming folic acid-rich foods, and did not perceive insurmountable challenges to consuming a multivitamin with folic acid. For many women, an initial pregnancy served as their initial cue to action, suggesting a need for the continued development of education strategies that communicate the benefits of folic acid supplementation prior to pregnancy. Such strategies may necessitate targeting younger audiences, including teenagers.

  18. Salud de Corazon: Cultural Resources for Cardiovascular Health among Older Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Adriana; Fleury, Julie; Shearer, Nelma

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors in Hispanic women has been substantiated across studies. While many studies have focused on the impact of these risk factors, few qualitative studies have addressed cultural and contextual meanings of cardiovascular health promotion in this population. This research explored cultural resources for cardiovascular health promotion among older Hispanic women. A qualitative descriptive methodological design using focus groups with 7 Hispanic women was used. Culture provided an overarching perspective, guiding identification and choice of resources and supports in order to promote cardiovascular health. Themes included Living Tradition, Caring for Family, Connecting with Friends, Having Faith, and Moving as Life. Data provide an initial step toward generating a more complete understanding of perceived cultural resources for cardiovascular health in older Hispanic women. Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing that individuals, families and communities uniquely define cultural and contextual meaning of cardiovascular health promotion.

  19. Residential segregation and obesity among a national sample of Hispanic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Irma; Landrine, Hope; Zhao, Luhua

    2014-04-01

    We explored the role of residential segregation in obesity among a national sample of Hispanics for the first time. Data on the 8785 Hispanic adults in the 2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were linked to 2000 census data on the segregation of 290 metropolitan statistical areas. Multilevel modeling revealed that after controlling for individual-level variables, the odds of being obese for Hispanics residing in high-segregated metropolitan statistical areas were 26.4 percent higher than for those residing in low-segregated metropolitan statistical areas. This segregation effect might be mediated by the obesogenic features (e.g. paucity of recreational facilities and abundance of fast-food outlets) of segregated Hispanic neighborhoods. PMID:23460679

  20. Anguish, Yearning, and Identity: Toward a Better Understanding of the Pregnant Hispanic Woman's Prenatal Care Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Moran; Cronin, Sherill Nones; Boccella, Sarah Hess

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to seek a better understanding of needs and access issues among pregnant, low-income Hispanic women. Hispanic women who attended a community prenatal education program participated in follow-up focus groups to explore their experiences regarding prenatal education, pregnancy resources, access to, and satisfaction with, the care available to them. Focus groups were facilitated by a leader, bilingual in English and Spanish, with knowledge of the Hispanic culture. Sessions were audiotaped, then translated into English for transcription. Data were analyzed according to guidelines by Colaizzi and three themes emerged: pregnant Hispanic women experienced a sense of anguish (la angustia) from questions and unknowns rampant during pregnancy, leading to a yearning (el anhelo) to learn and understand more, but with a desire to do so without sacrificing native identity (la identidad). Implications of these themes for improving prenatal care for this population are explored.

  1. Experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egues, Aida L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the meaning of the experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses (RNs). Focus group methodology was employed in the New York City metropolitan area with monolingual English or bilingual English/Spanish RNs (N = 20) who perceived themselves to be at all levels of practice. The findings offer a summary of the experiences of mentoring for the 20 Hispanic RNs that includes little advancement support; hesitancy to being mentored; dependency on the self for personal and professional growth; and educational, practice, and socioeconomic barriers. This study suggests that mentoring of Hispanic nurses needs to be reexamined to improve and sustain a culture of mentoring that may enhance the education, recruitment, and retention of Hispanic RNs. PMID:24831071

  2. Anguish, Yearning, and Identity: Toward a Better Understanding of the Pregnant Hispanic Woman's Prenatal Care Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Moran; Cronin, Sherill Nones; Boccella, Sarah Hess

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to seek a better understanding of needs and access issues among pregnant, low-income Hispanic women. Hispanic women who attended a community prenatal education program participated in follow-up focus groups to explore their experiences regarding prenatal education, pregnancy resources, access to, and satisfaction with, the care available to them. Focus groups were facilitated by a leader, bilingual in English and Spanish, with knowledge of the Hispanic culture. Sessions were audiotaped, then translated into English for transcription. Data were analyzed according to guidelines by Colaizzi and three themes emerged: pregnant Hispanic women experienced a sense of anguish (la angustia) from questions and unknowns rampant during pregnancy, leading to a yearning (el anhelo) to learn and understand more, but with a desire to do so without sacrificing native identity (la identidad). Implications of these themes for improving prenatal care for this population are explored. PMID:25838327

  3. FastStats: Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Source: Summary Health Statistics Tables for the U.S. Population: National Health Interview Survey, 2014, Table P-1c [ ...

  4. Man and technology in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences has set up a committee known as The Committee of Man, Technology and Society. The members of this committee form an interdisciplinary group for the study of the interaction between scientific and technological advances and the way in which society evolves. Most of the committees activities have focused on the present relationship between man, technology and society. Attempts have been made to assess the future influence on society of key developments in biotechnology, electronic communication and systems analysis. In order to pursue this path still further, the committee decided to arrange an international symposium on the topic Man and Technology in the Future at the village of Forsmark on the Baltic coast of Sweden. The proceedings consists of 13 lectures centered on energy systems - and the connected waste problems, biotechnology, and telecommunications. Separate abstracts were prepared for 5 of the lectures in this volume

  5. Factors Influencing Health Care Utilization in Older Hispanics with Diabetes along the Texas-Mexico Border

    OpenAIRE

    Mier, Nelda; Wang, Xiaohui; Smith, Matthew Lee; Irizarry, David; Treviño, Laura; Alen, Maria; Marcia G. Ory

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about predictors of health care utilization for older Hispanics with chronic conditions. This study aimed to determine: (1) the level of health care access for older Hispanics with type 2 diabetes living in a US–Mexico border area; and (2) personal and health correlates to health care utilization (ie, physician visits, eye care, emergency room [ER] use). This was a cross-sectional study based on a community assessment conducted at a clinic, senior centers, and colonias. Coloni...

  6. We Don’t Feel Welcome Here: African Americans and Hispanics in Metro Boston

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, Josephine

    2005-01-01

    Racial discrimination is an ongoing reality in the lives of African Americans and Hispanics in Metro Boston. Although the region has experienced significant growth in racial and ethnic diversity over the past several decades, racial minority groups continue to struggle for full acceptance and equal opportunity. African Americans and Hispanics report persistent discrimination in the workplace, in seeking housing, and in their day-to-day encounters with other metro area residents. Also...

  7. Revisiting the Hispanic mortality advantage in the United States: the role of smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenelon, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    More than three decades of health disparities research in the United States has consistently found lower adult mortality risks among Hispanics than their non-Hispanic white counterparts, despite lower socioeconomic status among Hispanics. Explanations for the "Hispanic Paradox" include selective migration and cultural factors, though neither has received convincing support. This paper uses a large nationally representative survey of health and smoking behavior to examine whether smoking can explain life expectancy advantage of Hispanics over US-born non-Hispanics whites, with special attention to individuals of Mexican origin. It tests the selective migration hypothesis using data on smoking among Mexico-to-US migrants in Mexico and the United States. Both US-born and foreign-born Mexican-Americans exhibit a life expectancy advantage vis-à-vis whites. All other Hispanics only show a longevity advantage among the foreign-born, while those born in the United States are disadvantaged relative to whites. Smoking-attributable mortality explains the majority of the advantage for Mexican-Americans, with more than 60% of the gap deriving from lower rates of smoking among Mexican-Americans. There is no evidence of selective migration with respect to smoking; Mexicans who migrate to the US smoke at similar rates to Mexicans who remain in Mexico, with both groups smoking substantially less than non-Hispanic whites in the US. The results suggest that more research is needed to effectively explain the low burden of smoking among Mexican-Americans in the United States. PMID:23453311

  8. WIC AND THE DEMAND FOR FOOD BY THE HISPANIC COMMUNITY IN THE UNITED STATES

    OpenAIRE

    Lanfranco, Bruno A.; Glenn C. W. AMES; Huang, Chung L.; Stegelin, Forrest E.

    2001-01-01

    Income elasticities of demand were estimated for nine aggregate food categories for a sample of Hispanic consumers. In general, the demand for food appears to be relatively inelastic with respect to income, although the situation may be quite different when more disaggregated food categories are considered. Government subsidies received by households may also impact the demand for specific food groups. Although not conclusive, the results of this study indicate that Hispanic households partic...

  9. The Role of Hispanic Acculturation on Media Exposure, Coupon Use, and Brand Loyalty

    OpenAIRE

    Petroshius, Susan M; Stephen J. Newell; Ross, Steven J

    1995-01-01

    The Hispanic population in the United States is rapidly increasing and is expected to be the largest minority group within the next decade. Consequently, a better understanding of this group of consumers is of great importance to marketers. This study investigates the role that acculturation plays on a number of consumer-related attitudes and behaviors. The results indicate that as acculturation increases, Hispanic consumers are more frequently exposed to English language media, use coupons w...

  10. Mismatch repair protein expression and colorectal cancer in Hispanics from Puerto Rico

    OpenAIRE

    De Jesus-Monge, Wilfredo E.; Gonzalez-Keelan, Carmen; Zhao, Ronghua; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and alterations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, leading to absent protein (negative) expression, are responsible for approximately 20% of CRC cases. Immunohistochemistry is a tool for prescreening of MMR protein expression in CRC but the literature on its use on Hispanics is scarce. However, Hispanics represent the second leading ethnicity in the United States (US) and CRC is a public health burden in this group. Our object...

  11. Impact of Hispanic Ethnic Concentration and Socioeconomic Status on Obesity Prevalence in Texas Counties

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Sexton; Jennifer Gay; Salinas, Jennifer J.; Bassent E. Abdelbary; Elizabeth Rocha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hispanic ethnic concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of obesity and, if this relationship exists, whether it is affected by the socioeconomic environment. The study uses the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) linked to 2000 census data to access the relationship between prevalence of obesity, Hispanic ethnic concentration, poverty and level of education at a county-level. The findings suggest that the asso...

  12. Recreation Patterns and Decision Drivers for Hispanics/Latinos in Cache Valley, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Jodie J.

    2011-01-01

    As the Hispanic/Latino population grows in the United States, increased attention is being given to how and why Hispanic/Latino recreation differs from Anglo recreation. Concerns over equal access to natural resources and recreation have led researchers to question the causes for the differences in recreation choices. The discussion has largely focused on the restrictive effects of ethnicity and the marginal position of minorities in society creating recreation patterns in which minorities ar...

  13. Radiation protection for manned space activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    The Earth's natural radiation environment poses a hazard to manned space activities directly through biological effects and indirectly through effects on materials and electronics. The following standard practices are indicated that address: (1) environment models for all radiation species including uncertainties and temporal variations; (2) upper bound and nominal quality factors for biological radiation effects that include dose, dose rate, critical organ, and linear energy transfer variations; (3) particle transport and shielding methodology including system and man modeling and uncertainty analysis; (4) mission planning that includes active dosimetry, minimizes exposure during extravehicular activities, subjects every mission to a radiation review, and specifies operational procedures for forecasting, recognizing, and dealing with large solar flaes.

  14. Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's Life in Science

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    It took a man who was willing to break all the rules to tame a theory that breaks all the rules. This talk will be based on my new book Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's life in science. I will try and present a scientific overview of the contributions of Richard Feynman, as seen through the arc of his fascinating life. From Quantum Mechanics to Antiparticles, from Rio de Janeiro to Los Alamos, a whirlwind tour will provide insights into the character, life and accomplishments of one of the 20th centuries most important scientists, and provide an object lesson in scientific integrity.

  15. A Man With Two Burned Ears

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范图雨

    2001-01-01

    Mr Smith was in troublethose days. He drove a car forMr Black, a rich business-man. He worked hard and theshopkeeper liked him. But hecouldn't work when he dranktoo much. And once he al-most fell into the river whenhe drove along the bridge. MrBlack became angry and wasgoing to send him away. Hehad a big family and wasafraid of that and promisedhe would stop drinking atonce. The man told him towait to be dealt with. OneMonday morning, Mr Smithcame into the office, with twobadly burned ears. “Whathappened to your ears?”asked Mr Black.

  16. Experiences with Dating Violence and Help Seeking Among Hispanic Females in Their Late Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; Ferranti, Dina; Halstead, Valerie; Ilias, Vanessa M

    2016-04-01

    Hispanic females in their late adolescence appear to be disproportionately affected by dating violence, yet the majority of victims never seek out formal services. The purpose of this study was to explore the dating violence and help-seeking experiences of Hispanic females in their late adolescence. Participants were recruited from a social service agency providing wrap-around services to individuals and families affected by abuse in South Florida. Eleven in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with Hispanic female victims of dating violence in their late adolescence (18 to 24 years of age) in English or Spanish. A thematic analysis of transcripts identified four major themes: (a) conflict, culture, and context influences Hispanic couples; (b) missed opportunities to accessing help; (c) pivotal moments are needed to access formal services; and (d) family matters. Participants of this study believed that dating violence was more normative in Hispanic relationships than "American" relationships. Although participants had opportunities to seek formal services early in their relationships, formal services were only sought after pivotal moments. Families played an important role in supporting or further victimizing the participants. Findings from this study can be used to inform interventions addressing both informal and formal sources of support for Hispanic female victims of dating violence in their late adolescence. PMID:27077507

  17. The challenges of choosing and explaining a phenomenon in epidemiological research on the "Hispanic Paradox".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, Sean A

    2016-04-01

    According to public health data, the US Hispanic population is far healthier than would be expected for a population with low socioeconomic status. Ever since Kyriakos Markides and Jeannine Coreil highlighted this in a seminal 1986 article, public health researchers have sought to explain the so-called "Hispanic paradox." Several candidate explanations have been offered over the years, but the debate goes on. This article offers a philosophical analysis that clarifies how two sets of obstacles make it particularly difficult to explain the Hispanic paradox. First, different research projects define the Hispanic paradox phenomenon in substantially different ways. Moreover, using Bas van Fraassen's pragmatic theory of explanation and Sean Valles's extension of it with the concept of "phenomenon choice," it also becomes clear that there are also multiple ways of explaining each individual definition of the phenomenon. A second set of philosophical and methodological challenges arises during any attempt to study "Hispanic" phenomena, with one key challenge being that the "Hispanic" panethnic concept was intentionally made vague as it was developed and popularized during the 1960s-1970s. After comparing this case with similar cases in the philosophical literature, the article concludes with observations on what makes this problem unique, particularly its ethical features.

  18. Identification of Barriers to Stroke Awareness and Risk Factor Management Unique to Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Marina; Prabhakar, Nitin; Drake, Kendra; Coull, Bruce; Chong, Jenny; Ritter, Leslie; Kidwell, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    Barriers to risk factor control may differ by race/ethnicity. The goal of this study was to identify barriers to stroke awareness and risk factor management unique to Hispanics as compared to non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). We performed a prospective study of stroke patients from an academic Stroke Center in Arizona and surveyed members of the general community. Questionnaires included: the Duke Social Support Index (DSSI), the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) Scale, a stroke barriers questionnaire, and a Stroke Awareness Test. Of 145 stroke patients surveyed (72 Hispanic; 73 NHW), Hispanics scored lower on the Stroke Awareness Test compared to NHWs (72.5% vs. 79.1%, p = 0.029). Hispanic stroke patients also reported greater barriers related to medical knowledge, medication adherence, and healthcare access (p barriers, and demonstrate lower rates of stroke literacy. Interventions for stroke prevention and education in Hispanics should address these racial/ethnic differences in stroke awareness and barriers to risk factor control.

  19. Factors That Influence HIV Risk among Hispanic Female Immigrants and Their Implications for HIV Prevention Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Hernandez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in North Carolina with increasing incidence of HIV infection. Gender roles, cultural expectations, and acculturation of women may explain some of Hispanic women’s risks. The perspectives of Hispanic female immigrants and community-based providers were sought to identify services they offer, understand HIV risk factors, and support the adaptation of a best-evidence HIV behavioural intervention for Hispanic women. Two sets of focus groups were conducted to explicate risks and the opportunities to reach women or couples and the feasibility to conduct HIV prevention in an acceptable manner. Salient findings were that Hispanic female immigrants lacked accurate HIV/AIDS and STI knowledge and that traditional gender roles shaped issues surrounding sexual behaviour and HIV risks, as well as condom use, partner communication, and multiple sexual partnerships. Intervention implications are discussed such as developing and adapting culturally appropriate HIV prevention interventions for Hispanics that address gender roles and partner communication.

  20. The challenges of choosing and explaining a phenomenon in epidemiological research on the "Hispanic Paradox".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, Sean A

    2016-04-01

    According to public health data, the US Hispanic population is far healthier than would be expected for a population with low socioeconomic status. Ever since Kyriakos Markides and Jeannine Coreil highlighted this in a seminal 1986 article, public health researchers have sought to explain the so-called "Hispanic paradox." Several candidate explanations have been offered over the years, but the debate goes on. This article offers a philosophical analysis that clarifies how two sets of obstacles make it particularly difficult to explain the Hispanic paradox. First, different research projects define the Hispanic paradox phenomenon in substantially different ways. Moreover, using Bas van Fraassen's pragmatic theory of explanation and Sean Valles's extension of it with the concept of "phenomenon choice," it also becomes clear that there are also multiple ways of explaining each individual definition of the phenomenon. A second set of philosophical and methodological challenges arises during any attempt to study "Hispanic" phenomena, with one key challenge being that the "Hispanic" panethnic concept was intentionally made vague as it was developed and popularized during the 1960s-1970s. After comparing this case with similar cases in the philosophical literature, the article concludes with observations on what makes this problem unique, particularly its ethical features. PMID:26754488

  1. Nonadherence to Oral Mercaptopurine and Risk of Relapse in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy; Shangguan, Muyun; Hageman, Lindsey; Schaible, Alexandra N.; Carter, Andrea R.; Hanby, Cara L.; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Kornegay, Nancy M.; Mascarenhas, Leo; Ritchey, A. Kim; Casillas, Jacqueline N.; Dickens, David S.; Meza, Jane; Carroll, William L.; Relling, Mary V.; Wong, F. Lennie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Systemic exposure to mercaptopurine (MP) is critical for durable remissions in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Nonadherence to oral MP could increase relapse risk and also contribute to inferior outcome in Hispanics. This study identified determinants of adherence and described impact of adherence on relapse, both overall and by ethnicity. Patients and Methods A total of 327 children with ALL (169 Hispanic; 158 non-Hispanic white) participated. Medication event-monitoring system caps recorded date and time of MP bottle openings. Adherence rate, calculated monthly, was defined as ratio of days of MP bottle opening to days when MP was prescribed. Results After 53,394 person-days of monitoring, adherence declined from 94.7% (month 1) to 90.2% (month 6; P < .001). Mean adherence over 6 months was significantly lower among Hispanics (88.4% v 94.8%; P < .001), patients age ≥ 12 years (85.8% v 93.1%; P < .001), and patients from single-mother households (80.6% v 93.1%; P = .001). A progressive increase in relapse was observed with decreasing adherence (reference: adherence ≥ 95%; 94.9% to 90%: hazard ratio [HR], 4.1; 95% CI,1.2 to 13.5; P = .02; 89.9% to 85%: HR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 15.5; P = .04; < 85%: HR. 5.7; 95% CI, 1.9 to 16.8; P = .002). Cumulative incidence of relapse (± standard deviation) was higher among Hispanics (16.5% ± 4.0% v 6.3% ± 2.2%; P = .02). Association between Hispanic ethnicity and relapse (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 6.1; P = .02) became nonsignificant (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6 to 5.2; P = .26) after adjusting for adherence and socioeconomic status. At adherence rates ≥ 90%, Hispanics continued to demonstrate higher relapse, whereas at rates < 90%, relapse risk was comparable to that of non-Hispanic whites. Conclusion Lower adherence to oral MP increases relapse risk. Ethnic difference in relapse risk differs by level of adherence—an observation currently under investigation. PMID:22564992

  2. A case study of the Scaffolding Clinical Practicum Model: is it culturally competent for Hispanic nursing students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Josefina; Vasquez, Rebecca

    2010-07-01

    The Institute of Medicine, Office of Minority Health, and the Health Resources and Services Administration have called for culturally competent teaching methods to promote the success of Hispanic nursing students. The article responds to this call by analyzing an innovative clinical practicum teaching method, the Scaffolding Clinical Model, in relation to the cultural competence needs of Hispanic nursing students. The analysis is presented through a case study of a cohort of predominantly (90%) Hispanic baccalaureate nursing students at a university on the United States-Mexico border. The cultural competence of the Scaffolding Clinical Model is analyzed by identifying how well it acknowledges and fosters the application of the four metaparadigms of Hispanic culture--conquest, collectivism, familism, and personalism--for Hispanic students. The metaparadigms are described and specific examples are offered about how the Model promotes application of the metaparadigms to accomplish cultural competence for Hispanic students. Recommendations for educators are also presented.

  3. Estimator's electrical man-hour manual

    CERN Document Server

    Page, John S

    1999-01-01

    This manual's latest edition continues to be the best source available for making accurate, reliable man-hour estimates for electrical installation. This new edition is revised and expanded to include installation of electrical instrumentation, which is used in monitoring various process systems.

  4. Teaching Rousseau: Natural Man and Present Existence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Daryl H.

    1989-01-01

    Offers an interpretation of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "Discourse on the Origin and Foundations of Inequality" and provides examples of classroom exercises designed to make Rousseau's ideas and writings accessible to undergraduates. Stresses Rousseau's philosophy on natural man, language, ethics, and society. Includes interpretive references to…

  5. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross

    The man-in-the-middle defence is all about rehabilitating Charlie. For 20 years we’ve worried about this guy in the middle, Charlie, who’s forever intercalating himself into the communications between Alice and Bob, and people have been very judgemental about poor Charlie, saying that Charlie is a wicked person. Well, we’re not entirely convinced.

  6. Theory of load carriage by man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PL Kapur

    1949-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrying of load by man has been a necessity since pre-historic times. It was the sole means of transportation prior to the domestication of animals like ox, ass, horse, etc. Today with the advancement of mechanical transport, the art has disappeared except where Mechanical transport is beyond reach, impracticable or uneconomical

  7. The ancestry and affiliations of Kennewick Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Sikora, Martin; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon dated to 8,340-9,200 calibrated years before present (BP). His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate...

  8. Chairman Mao's Cigar Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    FAN Guorong, aged 84,is known in his hometown as “the Old CigarMan.” The moniker isa fitting one as he has spent most of his life making cigars. In his early teens, Fan served a three-year apprenticeship and became the youngest cigar maker of his time when he started his career in the late 1940s.

  9. Man's Search: English, Mythology. 5112.22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersheimer, Lenore C.

    A course which is an exploration of man's eternal search to understand himself and his world through the study of the mythology of the world is presented. Performance objectives include: (1) Students will recognize the content of the myths studied; (2) Students will identify the specific characteristics of the civilization studied; (3) Students…

  10. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of neurotensin in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J H; Andersen, H O; Olsen, P S;

    1989-01-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics, arteriovenous extraction, and degradation sites of neurotensin (NT) in man during iv infusions of synthetic intact NT [NT-(1-13)] and the NH2-terminal metabolite NT-(1-8) during lipid ingestion and by catheterization of various vascular beds in normal subjects...

  11. Genetic Engineering: The Modification of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes somatic and genetic manipulations of individual genotypes, using diabetes control as an example of the first mode that is potentially realizable be derepression or viral transduction of genes. Advocates the use of genetic engineering of the second mode to remove man from his biological limitations, but offers maxims to ensure the…

  12. The sacramental nature of man and creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Sebastian STOIAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available God made Himself a man for man to reach the likeness of God – this is the essential idea of the oikonomia of our salvation, dear to all the Church Fathers, from Saint Irenaeus to Saint Athanasius the Great and the essence of Christ, mystery and original and fundamental sacrament of our meeting with God and of our salvation, of all of us, in Christ, and of the acquisition by each man of the fruits of salvation and deification through Christ, in the Holy Spirit, in His Church. Christ’s mystery and sacrament begins by the Embodiment of the Father’s Logos. The Passions, the cross, the tomb and the resurrection are its continuation. And all these translate the mystery of the reason why God created everything and the very mystery of man - participating to the original mystery, namely Christ, and the Church, as sacrament. Therefore, Christ is the Mystery and the sacrament by excellence - original and general -, spring and content of all the mysteries and sacraments, condition and explanation of all these.

  13. Are You a Man or a Mouse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Janne Rothmar

    2008-01-01

    Are you a man or a mouse? This expression is used to encourage someone to be brave when they are frightened of doing something. It is also an expression which bears associations to John Steinbeck's novella Of Mice and Men, the title of which is taken from Robert Burns' poem To a Mouse, which is o...

  14. Nipple leiomyoma in man: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrazzo, A; Taormina, P; Noto, A; Cardinale, G; Casa, L; Lo Gerfo, D

    2004-04-01

    We describe a rare case of a man, 38 year old, with a nipple leiomyoma, and report the presentation as a small nodule of the areola spreading the nipple, the symptoms, the clinical signs, the treatment that includes a complete excision; free margins should be histologically established to prevent recurrence. PMID:15283404

  15. Manned Spaceflight Ancient Dream, Modern Attempt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    China was first in the world to invent rockets, and the first "astronaut" was also Chinese. In the late 14th century a man named Wanhu had himself tied to a special chair, the back of which was fitted with 47 prototype rockets, while he

  16. Arms and the man - or child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After almost half a century of remote technology research the telerobotic arm is still less dexterous than the nuclear industry might wish. The authors review R and D in this area of man-machine interfacing, and take a look down the road ahead. (author)

  17. A Young Gene Specific to Man Identified

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ ACAS-Max Planck Junior Research Group headed by WANG Wen, vice director of the CAS Kunming Institute of Zoology (KIZ), recently identified a young gene specific to man clorf37-dup. Their work was published on the June 1 issue of Human Molecular Genetics.

  18. Elementary particles in the service of man

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    This article was prepared by the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, and the Rutherford Laboratory in the U.K., for a Physics Exhibition in March of this year and is reproduced here with acknowledgement. It is an account of how some of the knowledge gained in the previous generation of our research has already been applied 'in the service of man'.

  19. Perspectives on Efforts to Address HIV/AIDS of Religious Clergy Serving African American and Hispanic Communities in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Alder, Stephen C.; Simonsen, Sara Ellis; Duncan, Megan; Shaver, John; DeWitt, Jan; Crookston, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The HIV/AIDS epidemic in America is rapidly progressing in certain subpopulations, including African-American and Hispanic communities. Churches may provide a means for reaching high-risk minority populations with effective HIV/AIDS prevention. We report on a series of focus group interviews conducted with Utah clergy who primarily serve African American and Hispanic congregations. Methods A total of three focus groups (two with Catholic clergy serving Hispanic congregations and ...

  20. Health Education Research and Practice Literature on Hispanic Health Issues: Have We Lost Sight of the Largest Minority Population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics constitute the largest racial/ethnic minority population in the United States and are the fastest growing segment of the population. Knowledge about health needs and practices, effective health promotion programs, and health policy making for Hispanics has the potential to improve population health outcomes for this group. Continued research and practice literature will aid in accomplishing these objectives. However, little is known about the extent of health education-related literature available on Hispanic health issues. In this review, we analyzed research and practice publications in all health education-related journals to assess the volume of articles published on Hispanic health issues. We found that the portion of journal articles devoted to Hispanic health issues varied widely among the journals and that there was a very limited emphasis on Hispanic health-related issues. Journal editors and editorial board members may need to be more proactive in soliciting manuscripts on Hispanic health, and our practitioners may have to improve their professional skills and cultural competence in order to work with Hispanic populations to produce research and practice literature that is of adequate quantity and quality to help improve Hispanics' health. PMID:26802445

  1. Pre-Hispanic ceramics analyzed using PIXE and radiographic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, S.C., E-mail: sclima@mae.usp.br [Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rizzutto, M.A., E-mail: rizzutto@if.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Added, N.; Barbosa, M.D.L.; Trindade, G.F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fleming, M.I.D.A. [Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    Ceramics objects are the most common artifacts found during excavation of archaeological sites and often depicts cultural habits and manufacturing technologies of the culture. The determination of macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the ceramic objects such as the ceramic porosity, addition of tempers in the clay, main chemical components and the trace elements present in the ceramic can reveal many aspects about the manufacturing processes used by the culture, its degree of development, the provenance of the raw materials and the exchange networks. Also the radiography can help to investigate the manufactured processes, the size of the tempers used and the conservation status of the artifacts. In this present work two non-destructive techniques, radiography and PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) were used to characterize one set of thirty-six pre-Hispanic ceramic pieces from the Chimu Culture conserved in the Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia (MAE/USP). The PIXE analyses performed in the external beam setup at LAMFI (Laboratorio de Analise de Materiais por Feixes Ionicos) allowed measure the principal chemical elements such as Al, Si, K, Ti, Fe and Ca, present in this group of pieces. X-ray imagings allowed identify the manufacture processes, the granularity of the tempers used, as well as the similarity and the differences between the pieces studied.

  2. Pre-Hispanic Sanctuaries in the Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    Cultural astronomy studies in the Canarian archipelago now have a tradition spanning two decades. The statistical relevance of astronomical implications for a certain number of sites and the spectacular character of some of the astronomical hierophanies discovered - with low probability of having been produced by chance in most cases - clearly points to an intentionality in the astronomical relationships discovered so far. All these arguments strongly suggest that tracking the movement of the celestial bodies was an important consideration in the erection and purpose of many pre-Hispanic sanctuaries. The alignment of footprint engravings at Montaña Tindaya, and the major lunistice moonrise at Roque Nublo and the summer solstice sunset at Teide, as observed from the sacred sites of Bentaiga and Gamona, respectively, may also be catalogued as outstanding examples of the strong relationship between astronomy and landscape in ancient Canary Islands culture. The recently discovered light-and-shadow effects at Risco Caído will also be briefly discussed.

  3. Pre-Hispanic ceramics analyzed using PIXE and radiographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics objects are the most common artifacts found during excavation of archaeological sites and often depicts cultural habits and manufacturing technologies of the culture. The determination of macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the ceramic objects such as the ceramic porosity, addition of tempers in the clay, main chemical components and the trace elements present in the ceramic can reveal many aspects about the manufacturing processes used by the culture, its degree of development, the provenance of the raw materials and the exchange networks. Also the radiography can help to investigate the manufactured processes, the size of the tempers used and the conservation status of the artifacts. In this present work two non-destructive techniques, radiography and PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) were used to characterize one set of thirty-six pre-Hispanic ceramic pieces from the Chimu Culture conserved in the Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia (MAE/USP). The PIXE analyses performed in the external beam setup at LAMFI (Laboratório de Análise de Materiais por Feixes Iônicos) allowed measure the principal chemical elements such as Al, Si, K, Ti, Fe and Ca, present in this group of pieces. X-ray imagings allowed identify the manufacture processes, the granularity of the tempers used, as well as the similarity and the differences between the pieces studied.

  4. Assessing a Historically Hispanic Serving Institution Internationalization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Iuspa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a qualitative study conducted at a Historically Hispanic Serving Institution (HHSI to further the understanding of its internationalization decision-making process. The study uses the Internationalization Cube model to review the institution’s internal processes and policies toward internationalization and assess how its international activities align with its internationalization efforts. The Internationalization Cube, an eight-cell model, permits the positioning of Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs based on the analysis of its three dimensions and respective subcategories: policy, support, and implementation. The International Dimension Index (IDI and the Item Relevancy Index (IRI were also used to determine the level of alignment between the HHSI position on the Internationalization Cube and its international activities. The study finds that the HHSI is on Position 6 on the Internationalization Cube (priority policy, one-sided support, and systematic/structure implementation, and exhibits all the international activities considered indicators of internationalization but attention is needed to foreign language, international students, study abroad, faculty movement and involvement in international projects. The study concludes that an association exists between the institution’s position on the Internationalization Cube and its international activities, and adjustments in the institution’s policy, support, and implementation dimensions will be required to advance its position on the Internationalization Cube making its internationalization process more sustainable. This study makes a contribution to addressing the need to assess an IHE by presenting a holistic organizational framework instead of a fragmented international activities organizational analysis.

  5. Hispanic College Students' Learning Styles, Personality Types, and Gender Differences: A Collective Case Study of Ten Hispanic College Students Exposed to the Myers Briggs Type Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rachelle D.

    2014-01-01

    The research body regarding learning styles has been abundant; however, research related to Separate and Connected learning styles has not been as copious. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the association between learning styles, personality types, and gender differences for Hispanic college students between the ages of 18-24…

  6. Advances in Hispanic Linguistics: Papers from the Hispanic Linguistics Symposium (2nd, Columbus, OH, October 9-11, 1998). Volumes 1-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Rexach, Javier, Ed.; Martinez-Gil, Fernando, Ed.

    Papers from the 1998 Hispanic Linguistics Symposium include: "Patterns of Gender Agreement in the Speech of Second Language Learners"; "'Nomas' in Mexican American Dialect"; "Parsing Spanish 'solo'"; "On Levels of Processing and Levels of Comprehension"; "The Role of Attention in Second/Foreign Language Classroom Research: Methodological Issues";…

  7. The residential segregation of detailed Hispanic and Asian groups in the United States: 1980-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Iceland

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Racial and ethnic diversity continues to grow in communities across the United States,raising questions about the extent to which different ethnic groups will become residentially integrated. Objective: While a number of studies have examined the residential patterns of pan-ethnic groups, our goal is to examine the segregation of several Asian and Hispanic ethnic groups - Cubans, Dominicans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Salvadorans, Asian Indians, Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese. We gauge the segregation of each group from several alternative reference groups using two measures over the 1980 to 2010 period. Results: We find that the dissimilarity of Hispanics and Asians from other groups generally held steady or declined, though, because most Hispanic and Asian groups are growing, interaction with Whites also often declined. Our analyses also indicate that pan-ethnic segregation indexes do not always capture the experience of specific groups. Among Hispanics, Mexicans are typically less residentially segregated (as measured using the dissimilarity index from Whites, Blacks, Asians, and other Hispanics than are other Hispanic-origin groups. Among Asian ethnic groups, Japanese and Filipinos tend to have lower levels of dissimilarity from Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics than other Asian groups. Examining different dimensions of segregation also indicates that dissimilarity scores alone often do not capture to what extent various ethnic groups are actually sharing neighborhoods with each other. Finally, color lines vary across groups in some important ways, even as the dominant trend has been toward reduced racial and ethnic residential segregation over time. Conclusions: The overarching trend is that ethnic groups are becoming more residentially integrated,suggestive of assimilation, though there is significant variation across ethnic groups.

  8. Cultural Norms in Conflict: Breastfeeding Among Hispanic Immigrants in Rural Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Sarah; Thompson, Beti; Escareño, Monica; Duggan, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To examine perceptions, experiences, and attitudes towards breastfeeding among Hispanic women living in rural Washington State. Methods Twenty parous Hispanic women of low acculturation, aged 25-48 years and residents in rural Washington State participated in an exploratory, face-to-face interview. Interviews were audio-recorded, translated and transcribed, and analyzed using a thematic content analysis approach. Results Nine emergent themes were grouped into three overarching categories: (1) Breast is best; (2) Hispanic cultural and familial expectations to breastfeed; and (3) Adapting to life in the United States: cultural norms in conflict. Women said they were motivated to breastfeed because of their knowledge and observations of its health benefits for mother and child. They said breastfeeding is ingrained in their Hispanic cultural heritage, and infant feeding choices of female family members were particularly influential in women's own decision to breastfeed. Women said they experienced embarrassment about breastfeeding in the United States and as a result, often chose to initiate formula feeding as a complement so as to avoid feelings of shame. Additionally, they faced economic pressure to work, key barriers for continued breastfeeding among Hispanics in the United States. Conclusions for Practice Knowledge of the benefits of breastfeeding for mother and child and longstanding cultural practices of breastfeeding are not enough to encourage exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months among this rural Hispanic population. Continued support through family-level interventions as well as work place policies that encourage breastfeeding are needed for rural Hispanics to reach optimal breastfeeding rates. PMID:27021068

  9. From the rights of man to the human rights: Man - nation - humanity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaharijević Adriana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The insistence on the fact that human rights and the rights of man (codified in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, respectively are not one and the same, which could be deduced from the notion of man common to both terms, is the key thesis of this text. By developing this motive, I try to determine the following: that the notion of man, by definition inclusive and abstractly non-discriminative term, is in fact established on tacit exclusions in the time of its inception (Enlightenment revolutinary era, and it was only upon these exclusions that the term man could have signified "the free and equal". Although the parallel or simultaneous evolution and implementation of the rights of man and national rights might seem contradictory, I seek to demonstrate that this paradox is only ostensible, arguing that the notion of man is itself limited and exclusionary, and is therefore compatible with the exclusivity which is the conditio sine qua non of nation. The consequences of nationalism - World Wars, primarily - proved that the conception of liberty and equality, based on the conception of fraternity of men (white European males, and of partial democracy pretending to be universal, cannot be maintained any further. Codification of universal human rights represents a reaction to this internal discrepancy inasmuch as it is a reaction to the destructiveness of all kinds of nationalisms. The notion of life, developed in this text, corresponds to the fundamental requirement for the right to life (as the first and the most basic of all human rights, which no longer belongs to "man", but to everyone.

  10. Colorado IDDM Registry: lower incidence of IDDM in Hispanics. Comparison of disease characteristics and care patterns in biethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, E C; Hamman, R F; Carosone-Link, P J; Lezotte, D C; Cook, M; Stroheker, R; Klingensmith, G; Chase, H P

    1989-01-01

    The Colorado IDDM Registry identifies newly diagnosed cases of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) throughout the state. Hispanics in Colorado are a racial mixture of American Indian and White populations. Because American Indians have a low risk of IDDM, and differing frequencies of HLA antigens and haplotypes are reported for Hispanics and non-Hispanics, we compared incidence rates and disease characteristics. Eligible participants were less than 18 yr of age and Colorado residents at time of diagnosis, diagnosed between 1 January 1978 and 31 December 1983, and on insulin within 2 wk of diagnosis. Subjects were reported by their physicians, and statewide validation of reporting was conducted through review of hospital discharge indexes. Incidence rates for Hispanics (n = 76) were significantly lower than those for non-Hispanics (n = 628), although 95% confidence intervals overlapped for children aged 10-17 yr. Age-adjusted rates were significantly lower in Hispanic than non-Hispanic males, whereas age-adjusted rates for females did not differ. The cumulative risk of IDDM was less for Hispanic males aged 0-17 yr than for non-Hispanic males (P less than .001); cumulative risk among females was males (P less than .001); cumulative risk among females was not different (P = .10). Clinical onset characteristics and medical care at diagnosis were similar. After diagnosis, hospitalizations per 100 person-yr appeared higher in Hispanics, but ketoacidosis and insulin reactions per 100 person-yr were similar. Difference in rate of hospitalizations may have been due to lower response rates among older non-Hispanics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2612305

  11. Understanding and modelling man-machine interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art in man-machine system interaction studies, focusing on the problems derived from highly automated working environments and the role of humans in the control loop. In particular, it is argued that there is a need for sound approaches to the design and analysis of man-machine interaction (MMI), which stem from the contribution of three expertises in interfacing domains, namely engineering, computer science and psychology: engineering for understanding and modelling plants and their material and energy conservation principles; psychology for understanding and modelling humans an their cognitive behaviours; computer science for converting models in sound simulations running in appropriate computer architectures. (orig.)

  12. Understanding and modelling Man-Machine Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art in man machine systems interaction studies, focusing on the problems derived from highly automated working environments and the role of humans in the control loop. In particular, it is argued that there is a need for sound approaches to design and analysis of Man-Machine Interaction (MMI), which stem from the contribution of three expertises in interfacing domains, namely engineering, computer science and psychology: engineering for understanding and modelling plants and their material and energy conservation principles; psychology for understanding and modelling humans and their cognitive behaviours; computer science for converting models in sound simulations running in appropriate computer architectures. (author)

  13. Man-machine collaboration using facial expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Katahera, S.; Cai, D.

    2002-09-01

    For realizing the flexible man-machine collaboration, understanding of facial expressions and gestures is not negligible. In our method, we proposed a hierarchical recognition approach, for the understanding of human emotions. According to this method, the facial AFs (action features) were firstly extracted and recognized by using histograms of optical flow. Then, based on the facial AFs, facial expressions were classified into two calsses, one of which presents the positive emotions, and the other of which does the negative ones. Accordingly, the facial expressions belonged to the positive class, or the ones belonged to the negative class, were classified into more complex emotions, which were revealed by the corresponding facial expressions. Finally, the system architecture how to coordinate in recognizing facil action features and facial expressions for man-machine collaboration was proposed.

  14. The Somerton Man: An Unsolved History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Balint

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The case of the unknown man who died mysteriously at Somerton Beach in South Australia in 1948 remains an open police investigation, although the trail today has grown fairly cold. Revisiting the case, and the responses the mystery of his person have elicited, enables a special historical insight into Australia’s postwar society, and the ways in which the past is continually reshaped by the subjectivities of the present. Further, an unsolved case such as this provides for a unique kind of historical project. The limitations of a history without a coherent centre are myriad, yet so are the possibilities.  In this article, I explore the possibilities of an ‘unsolved history’, a history of dead ends, and argue that it is the very unknowable-ness of the Somerton Man that allows for a perception of history as multi-dimensional and complex.

  15. [Man's place and anthropology in bioethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar Romero, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    From the analysis of its epistemological status, the article focuses on the philosophical fundament of bioethics, stressing the need for an authentic anthropology as a reference or starting point. Being an applied ethics, the first fundament of bioethics is in ethics. It shows how only personalistic ethics, which takes as reference the nature or essence of man, can offer objective and universal criteria. Philosophical anthropology studies man as a whole, in an integral manner, from the perspective of its nature or fundamental aspects of his being. It analyzes the distinction and relationship between the philosophical anthropology and the positive anthropologies, as well as with the physical, human and social sciences. Finally, it reflects on the current anthropological crisis and its ethical consequences.

  16. los servicios en redes E-MAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de la Cruz Gámez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethernet, al evolucionar a través del tiempo, ha presentado la necesidad de un mejor desempeño en el tráfico de datos; propuestas como la implementación del protocolo 802.1p ofrecen hasta cierta medida un control de la calidad de los servicios (QoS, pero al crecer la red Ethernet a ambientes metropolitanos (e-man, surgen nuevos retos. Este trabajo evalúa los parámetros de desempeño necesarios para caracterizar la red e-man, y analiza un nuevo procedimiento para abordar los problemas de la calidad de los servicios; este trabajo también analiza el comportamiento del desempeño de un modelo de simulación basado en el núcleo de backbone de una red metropolitana rpr.

  17. The shipping man adventures in ship finance

    CERN Document Server

    McCleery, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    When restless New York City hedge fund manager Robert Fairchild watches the Baltic Dry Cargo Index plunge 97%, registering an all-time high and a 25-year low within the span of just six months, he decides to buy a ship. Immediately fantasizing about naming a vessel after his wife, carrying a string of worry beads and being able to introduce himself as a "shipowner" at his upcoming college reunion, Fairchild immediately embarks on an odyssey into the most exclusive, glamorous and high stakes business in the world. From pirates off the coast of Somalia and on Wall Street to Greek and Norwegian shipping magnates, the education of Robert Fairchild is an expensive one. In the end, he loses his hedge fund, but he gains a life - as a Shipping Man. Part fast paced financial thriller, part ship finance text book, The Shipping Man is 310 pages of required reading for anyone with an interest in capital formation for shipping.

  18. Design and Construction of Manned Lunar Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijie

    2016-07-01

    Building manned lunar base is one of the core aims of human lunar exploration project, which is also an important way to carry out the exploitation and utilization of lunar in situ resources. The most important part of manned lunar base is the design and construction of living habitation and many factors should be considered including science objective and site selection. Through investigating and research, the scientific goals of manned lunar base should be status and characteristics ascertainment of lunar available in situ resources, then developing necessary scientific experiments and utilization of lunar in situ resources by using special environment conditions of lunar surface. The site selection strategy of manned lunar base should rely on scientific goals according to special lunar surface environment and engineering capacity constraints, meanwhile, consulting the landing sites of foreign unmanned and manned lunar exploration, and choosing different typical regions of lunar surface and analyzing the landform and physiognomy, reachability, thermal environment, sunlight condition, micro meteoroids protection and utilization of in situ resources, after these steps, a logical lunar living habitation site should be confirmed. This paper brings out and compares three kinds of configurations with fabricating processes of manned lunar base, including rigid module, flexible and construction module manned lunar base. 1.The rigid habitation module is usually made by metal materials. The design and fabrication may consult the experience of space station, hence with mature technique. Because this configuration cannot be folded or deployed, which not only afford limit working and living room for astronauts, but also needs repetitious cargo transit between earth and moon for lunar base extending. 2. The flexible module habitation can be folded in fairing while launching. When deploying on moon, the configuration can be inflatable or mechanically-deployed, which means under

  19. Portuguese man-of-war envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M B

    1992-02-01

    Portuguese man-of-war and jellyfish stings are common occurrence in the coastal waters of the southern United States. Signs and symptoms of Portuguese man-of-war envenomation usually appear immediately following a sting but may be delayed for several hours. Reactions are commonly localized and comprise pain, paresthesia, and intense burning with a linear, red, papular eruption or urticaria at the contact site. Systemic signs may include nausea, myalgia, headache, chills, or pallor. Cardiovascular collapse and death have been reported. Venom can be inactivated with dilute acetic acid (vinegar), proteolytic meat tenderizer, or baking soda. Tentacle debris should be removed. Resolution of symptoms usually occurs within 72 hours, without sequelae. PMID:1351283

  20. Establishment of reference man in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the physical standards of the Reference Korean, research has been initiated in Korea within the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme ''Compilation of Anatomical, Physiological and Metabolic Characteristics for a Reference Asian Man''. The physical data of 21,406 Koreans, corresponding to 0.05% of the total Korean population, were compiled. All the data were divided into small groups according to age and sex. Data on the mass of internal organs from 1,921 Koreans (1,344 male and 577 female) were collected. All the data are given in a tabulated form. It was shown that the anatomical parameters of Reference Korean were, as usual, similar to those of Reference Japanese but different from those of ICRP Reference Man from Publication 23. However, the weights of several internal organs (liver, pancreas) were different from those of Japanese. 11 refs, 4 figs, 24 tabs

  1. Esquistossomose mansônica cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andyr Nazareth Andrade

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se um caso de neuroesquistossomose (NE mansônica cerebral forma granulomatosa pseudotumoral de localização no córtex do lobo parietal esquerdo determinando, hemiparesia direita e síndrome de hipertensão intracraniana, diagnosticado por biópsia cirúrgica. Fatores vasculares e imunológicos são considerados na fisiopatogenia da NE. Enfatiza-se a necessidade de melhor se estudar, diagnosticar e divulgar as várias formas de envolvimento do SN na esquistossomose mansônica, que parece ser mais freqüente do que se julga atualmente. O comprometimento cerebral com repercussão clínica nesta doença é raro, sendo a forma pseudotumoral limitada a poucos casos descritos na literatura.

  2. The impact of familism on physical and mental health among Hispanics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiria Perez, Giselle; Cruess, Dean

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly expanding number of Hispanics living in USA has increased the need for their inclusion in research on physical and mental health. Current studies that have explored health outcomes among Hispanics have often noted an 'epidemiological paradox', in which there is a discrepancy between their minority status and positive health outcomes when compared with other racial/ethnic groups. Certain socio-cultural variables, in particular the value placed on family, have been largely implicated in these findings. This review will provide a summary of the literature exploring familism within the structure of the Hispanic family and its potential impact on health. We will focus on research exploring the plausible impact that family and familism values may have on the physical health (particularly within the HIV, diabetes, and breast cancer literature) and also on health behaviours of Hispanics, as well as its effect on mental health (particularly related to acculturative stress and caregiver stress). Throughout the review, we highlight some of the potential mechanisms by which familism may impact on the health status of Hispanics. We conclude the review by noting some of the clinical and ethical implications of this research, and by offering suggestions for future work in this area. PMID:25053010

  3. A Review of Teen Dating Violence Prevention Research: What About Hispanic Youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Krithika; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; Mitchell, Emma M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a critical review of the literature on evidence-based teen dating violence (TDV) prevention programs with a particular focus on highlighting gaps in the literature with regard to prevention efforts targeting Hispanic teens. The target populations, characteristics, designs, and results of TDV prevention studies reported in the scientific literature for the last 20 years were reviewed and analyzed according to cultural and contextual factors associated with TDV among Hispanic teens. To date, three studies have focused on a predominantly Hispanic population with only one study looking at the long-term effects of a TDV intervention. There is a growing need to develop and evaluate immediate and long-term effects of TDV prevention programs that address ethnic pride, acculturation and acculturative stress, familism, and gender norms within the context of Hispanic communities (e.g., machismo and marianismo). The authors discuss the implications for research, prevention practice, and policy regarding TDV prevention for Hispanic teens.

  4. Examining the impact of acculturative stress on body image disturbance among Hispanic college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Chloe V; Harter, Stephanie L

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the impact of acculturative stress on psychological well-being and body image disturbance in a sample of female and male Hispanic individuals. The unique protective effects of differing social support sources, including family and peer support, were examined against acculturative stress and body image disturbance. A total of 399 participants of Hispanic origin were recruited from Texas Tech University in West Texas. Students completed a battery of measures of acculturative stress and internalization of the thin ideal, as well as perceived social support. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that acculturative stress is a significant positive predictor of body image disturbance among Hispanic college students. Thin ideal internalization was found to mediate this relationship such that acculturative stress was associated with heightened body image disturbance through its impact on thin ideal internalization. Social support significantly reduced acculturative stress as well as body image disturbance but did not moderate the relation between these 2 factors. Results highlight the importance of considering acculturative stress as a strong predictor of body image disturbance among college students of Hispanic origin. The mechanisms of influence of acculturative stress on body image disturbance are discussed in relation to thin ideal internalization. The protective role of social support on these negative psychological outcomes is also clarified. This study is the first to examine these issues in a sample of female and male Hispanic college students and provides avenues for clinical interventions and future trials with diverse populations.

  5. Feasibility study to objectively assess activity and location of Hispanic preschoolers: a short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresia M. O’Connor

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Both physical and social environmental factors influence young children’s physical activity, yet little is known about where Hispanic children are more likely to be active. We assessed the feasibility of simultaneously measuring, then processing objective measures of location and physical activity among Hispanic preschool children. Preschool-aged Hispanic children (n = 15 simultaneously wore QStarz BT100X global positioning system (GPS data loggers and Actigraph GT3X accelerometers for a 24- to 36-hour period, during which time their parents completed a location and travel diary. Data were aggregated to the minute and processed using the personal activity location measurement system (PALMS. Children successfully wore the GPS data loggers and accelerometers simultaneously, 12 of which yielded data that met quality standards. The average percent correspondence between GPS- and diary-based estimates of types of location was high and Kappa statistics were moderate to excellent, ranging from 0.49-0.99. The between-method (GPS monitor, parent-reported diary correlations of estimated participant-aggregated minutes spent on vehicle-based trips were strong. The simultaneous use of GPS and accelerometers to assess Hispanic preschool children’s location and physical activity is feasible. This methodology has the potential to provide more precise findings to inform environmental interventions and policy changes to promote physical activity among Hispanic preschool children.

  6. Religion, Acculturation, and Incarceration: Determinants of Substance Use among Hispanic Adults in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Becerra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The influence of religion, acculturation, and incarceration on substance abuse has been studied, though predominantly among adolescents. Little research exists on how such factors influence substance use among Hispanic adults. The objective of this study was to assess key determinants of substance use among Hispanic adults. Methods. Public access 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health was utilized. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted while accounting for complex survey design to obtain population-weighted estimates. Receiver operator curve analysis was used to evaluate the relative contribution of each variable. Results. Importance of religious influence in life and Spanish language interview were associated with lower odds of substance use, while history of incarceration increased the likelihood of substance use among Hispanic adults. Other factors associated with lower odds were increasing age, being female, and currently married. Other factors associated with increased odds were high school graduate and some college in addition to living above the 200% federal poverty level. Discussion. Results from this study add to the limited body of the literature on determinants of substance use among Hispanic adults. Health education measures should target acculturated Hispanic adults and those with incarceration history to reduce substance use.

  7. Hispanic Women’s Experiences With Substance Abuse, Intimate Partner Violence, and Risk for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa Maria; Vasquez, Elias P.; Urrutia, Maria T.; Villarruel, Antonia M.; Peragallo, Nilda

    2011-01-01

    Hispanic females are disproportionately affected by substance abuse, intimate partner violence, and HIV. Despite these disparities, research describing the cultural and gender-specific experiences of Hispanic women with regard to these conditions is lacking. The purpose of this study is to describe the experiences that Hispanic community-dwelling women have with regard to substance abuse, violence, and risky sexual behaviors. Eight focus groups with 81 women were conducted. A bilingual, bicultural moderator asked women open-ended questions regarding the experiences that Hispanic women have with these conditions. Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed, translated, verified, and then analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Participants discussed substance abuse, violence, and risky sexual behaviors interchangeably, often identifying common risk factors associated with these. Nevertheless, intimate partner violence was the most salient of conditions discussed. Three major themes emerged from the analysis: Transplantadas en otro mundo (Uprooted in another world), El criador de abuso (The breeding ground of abuse), and Rompiendo el silencio (Breaking the silence). This study supports the importance of addressing substance abuse, violence, and risk for HIV in an integrated manner and stresses the importance of addressing associated cultural factors (e.g., acculturation, machismo) in interventions targeting Hispanics. PMID:21191036

  8. Geographic variation in organ availability is responsible for disparities in liver transplantation between Hispanics and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, M L; Choi, H; Warren, G J W; Sonnenday, C J; Marrero, J A; Heisler, M

    2009-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether disparities in waiting list outcomes exist for Hispanics and African Americans during the post-MELD era, and to investigate interactions between disparities and geography. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data were used to compare Hispanics and African Americans to Caucasians listed between 2003 and 2008. Endpoints included (i) receipt of a liver transplant and (ii) death or removal from the waiting list for being too sick or medically unsuitable. Adjustment for possible confounders was performed using multivariate Cox regression, with adjustment for geographic variation using a fixed-effects multilevel model. In multivariate analysis, African Americans have similar hazard of transplantation and death/removal as Caucasians during the post-MELD era. However, Hispanics are less likely to receive a transplant than Caucasians despite adjustment for potential confounders (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.77-0.83), while having a similar hazard of death/removal. This effect disappeared after adjusting for unequal regional distribution of Hispanics, who represent 8% of patients in donation service areas (DSAs) having median waiting times of 155 days. In conclusion, disparities in liver transplantation exist for Hispanics during the post-MELD era, caused by geographic variation in organ availability. PMID:19624565

  9. Distributed beamforming in man portable communication networks

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Chun Man

    2007-01-01

    The advancement in communication and networking technologies lead to the emergence of network centric systems adopted by military forces. Many military forces around the world are equipping their ground soldiers with "man portable" or "mobile" wireless communication devices to form a local communication network as part of the overarching communication network for information warfare. In a non-line of sight environment, the devices' communication range to the base station degrades signific...

  10. Sepä man : [luuletused] / Pent Nurmekund

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nurmekund, Pent, 1906-1996

    2002-01-01

    Sisu: Sepä man ; Vihtsekülä ; Laul rüäakkest ; "Pihläpmar'r'a om küds'ä ..." ; Kun mia elä ; Kõllanõmme ; Üits perätü kip'ev pill ; Üts küsümüs. Eluloolisi andmeid autori kohta lk. 371

  11. Malaysia : the lucky man of Asia?

    OpenAIRE

    Kind, Hans Jarle; Ismail, Mohd Nazari

    2001-01-01

    Malaysia has been labelled the Lucky Man of Asia due to its wealth of natural resources, such as tin, rubber, palm oil, pepper, tropical timber, petroleum and a very fertile soil. There is no doubt that this richness has helped Malaysia to achieve impressive growth rates over the last decades, but history has taught us that large endowments of natural resources by far are sufficient to generate development. Since the early 1970s Malaysia has led a relatively successful racial integration poli...

  12. A Young Man with Multiple Pulmonary Cysts

    OpenAIRE

    W H, Ibrahim; A, Al-Muzrkchi; M, Al-Maslamani

    2008-01-01

    Several diseases cause cystic or cyst-like parenchymal lung abnormalities including adult pulmonary Langerhan’s cell histiocytosis (PLCH), lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), emphysema, end-stage interstitial lung disease, and cystic bronchiectasis. Many of these diseases can now be diagnosed with high accuracy by the use of high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT). In fact, HRCT of chest has proved a major breakthrough in the diagnosis of these diseases. We are presenting a young man with ...

  13. 2.1 Man: subject of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This second chapter 'Man and environment' of the 7th state of the environment report of Austria describes the current situation of the protection of human health in terms of the European environmental policy and the main subjects of high relevance to it, such as air pollutants, water pollution, noise pollution, dangerous chemicals, food contamination, radiation protection, effects of climate change, plants, animal and habitats. (nevyjel)

  14. Ant-Man and the quantum realm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalakis, Spiros

    2015-11-01

    I was in Los Angeles airport, stuffing French fries into my mouth and waiting for a flight to Charlotte, North Carolina, when my phone buzzed. The e-mail was from the Science and Entertainment Exchange, a non-profit organization working to elevate the level of science in the movies, and it told me to report to Atlanta to consult on a new superhero movie: Ant-Man.

  15. First multiphoton tomography of brain in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Kantelhardt, Sven R.; Kalasauskas, Darius; Kim, Ella; Giese, Alf

    2016-03-01

    We report on the first two-photon in vivo brain tissue imaging study in man. High resolution in vivo histology by multiphoton tomography (MPT) including two-photon FLIM was performed in the operation theatre during neurosurgery to evaluate the feasibility to detect label-free tumor borders with subcellular resolution. This feasibility study demonstrates, that MPT has the potential to identify tumor borders on a cellular level in nearly real-time.

  16. An Ecological Man-Machine Interface for Temporal Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter; Koch, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper concerns design of man-machine systems, especially the interface between man and machine (MMI). Three different models of human information processing are used to extract theoretical guidelines for designing MMI's to support human mental activity.....

  17. Man in the middle attacks on SSL/TLS

    OpenAIRE

    Caro Alonso-Rodríguez, Antonio Jesús

    2013-01-01

    El proyecto estudia un tipo concreto de ataque sobre el protocolo SSL/TLS llamado "Man in the middle". El projecte estudia un tipus concret d'atac sobre el protocol SSL/TLS anomenat "Man in the middle".

  18. Man-machine interface for the MFTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speckert, G.C.

    1979-11-09

    In any complex system, the interesting problems occur at the interface of dissimilar subsystems. Control of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) begins with the US Congress, which controls the dollars, which control the people, who control the nine top-level minicomputers, which control the 65 microprocessors, which control the hardware that controls the physics experiment. There are many interesting boundaries across which control must pass, and the one that this paper addresses is the man-machine one. For the MFTF, the man-machine interface consists of a system of seven control consoles, each allowing one operator to communicate with one minicomputer. These consoles are arranged in a hierarchical manner, and both hardware and software were designed in a top-down fashion. This paper describes the requirements and the design of the console system as a whole, as well as the design and operation of the hardware and software of each console, and examines the possible form of a future man-machine interface.

  19. Manned spaceflight log II—2006–2012

    CERN Document Server

    Shayler, David J

    2013-01-01

    April 12, 1961 "Attention! This is Radio Moscow speaking...The world's first satellite spaceship, Vostock, with a man aboard, was put into orbit round the Earth." Soviet Union cosmonaut Yuri A. Gagarin becomes the first person to fly in space, completing one orbit in 108 minutes. April 5, 2001 As NASA prepares to fly the final Shuttle missions to the International Space Station, Russia launches Soyuz TMA 21 (code-named 'Yuri Gagarin') with the 28th ISS Expedition crew aboard, celebrating 50 years of manned spaceflight. Meanwhile, in China, preparations continue for launching the nation's first Space Station (called Tiangong 1 - or Heavenly Palace 1) later in the year. The sixth decade of manned spaceflight orbital operations has truly began. At this point in the history of human space exploration, it is timely to review the first five decades of adventure and look forward to the next decade and what it might bring. Several notable anniversaries celebrated in 2011 make it the right time to reflect and pay homa...

  20. Effects of Paroxetine CR on Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms: In a Community Sample of Adult Hispanic Women with Major Depression or Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Paul K.; Nourse, Rosemary; Wasser, Thomas E.; Krulewicz, Stan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Previous research reports higher rates of depression in Hispanic women than Caucasian or African American women. The effectiveness and tolerability of paroxetine CR (controlled release) was examined in women of Hispanic heritage with depression or anxiety.

  1. Nonjudging facet of mindfulness predicts enhanced smoking cessation in Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Claire Adams; Houchins, Sean C; Stewart, Diana W; Chen, Minxing; Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Cano, Miguel Ángel; Heppner, Whitney L; Vidrine, Jennifer I; Wetter, David W

    2015-12-01

    Although most smokers express interest in quitting, actual quit rates are low. Identifying strategies to enhance smoking cessation is critical, particularly among underserved populations, including Hispanics, for whom many of the leading causes of death are related to smoking. Mindfulness (purposeful, nonjudgmental attention to the present moment) has been linked to increased likelihood of cessation. Given that mindfulness is multifaceted, determining which aspects of mindfulness predict cessation could help to inform interventions. This study examined whether facets of mindfulness predict cessation in 199 Spanish-speaking smokers of Mexican heritage (63.3% male, mean age of 39 years, 77.9% with a high school education or less) receiving smoking cessation treatment. Primary outcomes were 7-day abstinence at weeks 3 and 26 postquit (biochemically confirmed and determined using an intent-to-treat approach). Logistic random coefficient regression models were utilized to examine the relationship between mindfulness facets and abstinence over time. Independent variables were subscales of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (Observing, Describing, Acting With Awareness, Nonjudging, and Nonreactivity). The Nonjudging subscale (i.e., accepting thoughts and feelings without evaluating them) uniquely predicted better odds of abstinence up to 26 weeks postquit. This is the first known study to examine whether specific facets of mindfulness predict smoking cessation. The ability to experience thoughts, emotions, and withdrawal symptoms without judging them may be critical in the process of quitting smoking. Results indicate potential benefits of mindfulness among smokers of Mexican heritage and suggest that smoking cessation interventions might be enhanced by central focus on the Nonjudging aspect of mindfulness.

  2. Profile of HIV-Infected Hispanics with Pancytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo J. Santiago-Rodríguez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancytopenia is seen in late HIV infection; it is associated with medical complications and with decreased survival. We determined the prevalence of pancytopenia at baseline in a cohort of HIV-positive Hispanics living in Puerto Rico, and compared their socio-demographic, immunological and clinical characteristics. A total of 1202 patients enrolled between 2000 and 2010 were included. They were grouped according to pancytopenia status, defined by having: platelets <150,000 μL, white cell count <4000 μL, and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (women or <13 g/dL (men. Differences were evaluated using Student’s t-test, Chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier method. The prevalence of pancytopenia was 8.7%. Patients with pancytopenia had lower BMI and lower CD4 count, as well as higher HIV viral load and higher proportions of unemployment, clinical AIDS and antiretroviral treatment (ART use (p < 0.05. One-year mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with pancytopenia (18.1% vs. 5.1%, p < 0.001. When stratifying for ART this association persisted for patients who did not receive ART (41.4% vs. 5.2%, p < 0.001, but it was not seen in patients who received treatment (9.2% vs. 5.6%, p = 0.196. Pancytopenia was associated with elements of advanced stages of HIV. ART could reduce the mortality of HIV-patients with pancytopenia to levels comparable to patients without the disorders.

  3. TaxMan: a taxonomic database manager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaxter Mark

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic analysis of large, multiple-gene datasets, assembled from public sequence databases, is rapidly becoming a popular way to approach difficult phylogenetic problems. Supermatrices (concatenated multiple sequence alignments of multiple genes can yield more phylogenetic signal than individual genes. However, manually assembling such datasets for a large taxonomic group is time-consuming and error-prone. Additionally, sequence curation, alignment and assessment of the results of phylogenetic analysis are made particularly difficult by the potential for a given gene in a given species to be unrepresented, or to be represented by multiple or partial sequences. We have developed a software package, TaxMan, that largely automates the processes of sequence acquisition, consensus building, alignment and taxon selection to facilitate this type of phylogenetic study. Results TaxMan uses freely available tools to allow rapid assembly, storage and analysis of large, aligned DNA and protein sequence datasets for user-defined sets of species and genes. The user provides GenBank format files and a list of gene names and synonyms for the loci to analyse. Sequences are extracted from the GenBank files on the basis of annotation and sequence similarity. Consensus sequences are built automatically. Alignment is carried out (where possible, at the protein level and aligned sequences are stored in a database. TaxMan can automatically determine the best subset of taxa to examine phylogeny at a given taxonomic level. By using the stored aligned sequences, large concatenated multiple sequence alignments can be generated rapidly for a subset and output in analysis-ready file formats. Trees resulting from phylogenetic analysis can be stored and compared with a reference taxonomy. Conclusion TaxMan allows rapid automated assembly of a multigene datasets of aligned sequences for large taxonomic groups. By extracting sequences on the basis of

  4. The Ideal Man and Woman According to University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Laverghetta, Antonio V.; Peterson, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study determined if the ideal man has changed over the years and who and what the ideal woman is. We asked students at Cameron University to rate the importance of character traits that define the ideal man and woman. Subjects also provided examples of famous people exemplifying the ideal, good, average, and inferior man and woman. We…

  5. Acculturation, Gender, Depression, and Cigarette Smoking among U.S. Hispanic Youth: The Mediating Role of Perceived Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Hispanic youth are at risk for experiencing depressive symptoms and smoking cigarettes, and risk for depressive symptoms and cigarette use increase as Hispanic youth acculturate to U.S. culture. The mechanism by which acculturation leads to symptoms of depression and cigarette smoking is not well understood. The present study examined whether…

  6. Family, Personality, and Social Risk Factors Impacting the Retention Rates of First-Year Hispanic and Anglo College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidcock, Boyd W.; Fischer, Judith L.; Munsch, Joyce

    2001-01-01

    Investigates potential ethnic differences between Hispanic and Angelo-American college freshman that may increase their risk of drinking and problem behaviors in an attempt to understand Hispanic's low college retention rate. Findings identified key family, social, personality, and problem behaviors associated with students' retention rates and…

  7. The Recruitment and Retention of Hispanic Undergraduate Students in Public Universities in the United States, 2000-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo, Edris J.

    2013-01-01

    In many public U.S. universities, Hispanic undergraduates are underrepresented in terms of enrollment and graduation. This mixed-method geographical study investigated whether some public universities outperform others in recruiting and retaining Hispanic undergraduates. The quantitative findings showed that the effect of financial aid and…

  8. Hispanic/Latino Adolescents' Alcohol Use: Influence of Family Structure, Perceived Peer Norms, and Family Members' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Wura; Barry, Adam E.; Xu, Lei; Valente, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Family structure and value system among Hispanic/Latino population are changing. However, very few studies have examined the combination of the influence of family structure, parental and sibling alcohol use, perceived peer norms about drinking, and alcohol use among Hispanic/Latino adolescents. Purpose: This study examined the…

  9. Coping Self-Efficacy and Academic Stress among Hispanic First-Year College Students: The Moderating Role of Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.; Watson, April A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the role that emotional intelligence plays in moderating the relationship between academic stress and coping self-efficacy among a sample of 125 Hispanic 1st-year college students enrolled at a medium-size, southern Hispanic-serving institution. Results of a 2-stage hierarchical multiple regression analysis…

  10. Acculturation and Substance Use among Hispanic Early Adolescents: Investigating the Mediating Roles of Acculturative Stress and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboanga, Byron L.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Jarvis, Lorna Hernandez; Van Tyne, Kathryne

    2009-01-01

    We examined the extent to which Hispanic orientation and American orientation are associated with substance use (cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana) both directly and indirectly through acculturative stress and self-esteem. Participants were 347 Hispanic early adolescents (50.7% male; mean age = 12.57, SD = 0.92, range 11-15) from two middle…

  11. Differences in Childhood Sexual Abuse Experience between Adult Hispanic and Anglo Women in a Primary Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerndahl, David A.; Burge, Sandra K.; Kellogg, Nancy; Parra, Juan M.

    2005-01-01

    The literature on racial and ethnic factors in childhood sexual abuse is limited. The purpose of this exploratory study was to document Hispanic-Anglo differences in childhood sexual abuse experiences and assess whether these differences may be explained by socio-demographic and family environmental differences. Adult Hispanic (n = 69) and Anglo…

  12. Hispanic Teen Pregnancy and Birth Rates: Looking Behind the Numbers. Child Trends Research Brief. Publication #2005-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry; Manlove, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This research brief focuses on the birth, pregnancy, contraceptive, and relationship behaviors of Hispanic teens because they represent an important risk group. Teen pregnancy and birth rates for U.S. teens have declined dramatically in recent years. Yet for Hispanic teens, reductions in teen pregnancy and childbearing have lagged behind that of…

  13. Hispanic Student Enrollment and Educational Attainment in Texas 2-Year Colleges: A Multi-Year Statewide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine the numbers and percentages of Hispanic college students enrolled in Texas 2-year colleges from the 2000 through the 2011 academic years and to examine the numbers and percentages of Hispanic students obtaining associate degrees from Texas 2-year colleges for the 2000 through the 2011 academic…

  14. The Relationship among Aerobic Capacity, Body Composition, and Academic Achievement of Fourth and Fifth Grade Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Jose A.; Roper, Emily A.; Disch, James G.; Morales, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown positive relationships between academic achievement and both physical activity and physical fitness. However, none of this research has focused on students from Hispanic backgrounds. Therefore, it is important to investigate the contributions of health-related fitness measures on Hispanic students' academic performance. The…

  15. Distribution of smoking relapse prevention materials in the Hispanic community: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Anamaría; Litvin, Erika B; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Brandon, Thomas H; Simmons, Vani Nath

    2013-03-01

    There is a dearth of Spanish language, culturally relevant tobacco-related information available to Hispanics in the USA. The primary aim of this study was to examine the distribution process of Libres para Siempre (Forever Free), a Spanish language smoking relapse prevention booklet series, by health care and social service agencies serving Hispanic individuals in Florida. Representatives (N = 16) from ten agencies that requested copies of the booklets completed a semi-structured interview to assess strategies used to distribute the booklets to their Hispanic clients. As a secondary aim, we obtained feedback regarding the booklets' quality and utility from the representatives. Results revealed that many agencies used both active and passive approaches to distribute the booklets. Issues related to distribution included language barriers between staff and clients and confusion regarding identification of the target population. Results indicated that the booklets were received favorably, and providers would recommend them to future clients.

  16. Expressions of machismo in colorectal cancer screening among New Mexico Hispanic subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getrich, Christina M; Sussman, Andrew L; Helitzer, Deborah L; Hoffman, Richard M; Warner, Teddy D; Sánchez, Victoria; Solares, Angélica; Rhyne, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    Although national colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates have steadily decreased, the rate for New Mexico Hispanics has been increasing, and screening rates are low. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to determine barriers to CRC screening for New Mexico Hispanics. We found that machismo served as a dynamic influence on men's health-seeking behaviors; however, it was conceptualized differently by two distinct Hispanic subpopulations, and therefore appeared to play a different role in shaping their screening attitudes and behaviors. Machismo emerged as more of an influence for Mexican men, who expressed concern over colonoscopies being potentially transformative and/or stigmatizing, but was not as salient for Hispanos, who viewed the colonoscopy as "strictly medical," and were more concerned with discomfort and pain. Findings from the study highlight the importance of identifying varying characteristics among subpopulations to better understand screening barriers and provide optimal CRC screening counseling in primary care settings.

  17. Next-generation sequencing-based molecular diagnosis of 35 Hispanic retinitis pigmentosa probands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xu, Mingchu; Verriotto, Jennifer D.; Li, Yumei; Wang, Hui; Gan, Lin; Lam, Byron L.; Chen, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases. The prevalence of RP and the mutation spectrum vary across populations. Hispanic people account for approximately 17% of the United States population, and the genetic etiologies of RP of this ethnic group still remain not well defined. Utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS), we screened mutations in known retinal disease-causing genes in an RP cohort of 35 unrelated Hispanic probands from the Miami area. We achieved a solving rate of 66% and identified 15 novel putative pathogenic mutations, including a frequent founder mutation disrupting PRPF31 splicing. Our data show that the mutation spectrum of Hispanic RP receives a significant impact from disease-causing alleles of Spanish origin and may also contain population-specific alleles.

  18. Overcoming cultural barriers to diabetes control: a qualitative study of southwestern New Mexico Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Joanne; Flenniken, Donna

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the impact of cultural barriers on self-management of diabetes among Hispanic participants in LA VIDA (Lifestyle and Values Impact Diabetes Awareness), a diabetes intervention program in southwestern New Mexico. As part of the LA VIDA program evaluation, in depth interviews were conducted with 50 Hispanics who had participated in one or more activities, including diabetes education classes, grocery store tours, and support groups, and who had interacted with promotores (community health workers). LA VIDA participants reported that a sense of empowerment and increased self-efficacy enabled them to overcome cultural barriers related to the traditional Hispanic diet, lack of social support, and denial about having diabetes. PMID:20860336

  19. A case of probable non-familial early onset Alzheimer dementia in a Hispanic male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Ephrussi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early onset Alzheimer's type dementia (EOAD is usually familial and associated with mutations in the Presenilin-1 (PSEN1, Presenilin-2 (PSEN2 or amyloid precursor protein (APP genes. It is rarely reported in patients of Hispanic descent. Case report: A 49-year-old Hispanic male developed significant cognitive impairment over a 4-year period. PET scan showed diminished metabolic activity in the posterior parietal/temporal lobes. Genetic testing revealed the presence of a PSEN1 gene mutation. Conclusion: Disparities in health care may account for an under-recognition of EOAD in the Hispanic population. Clinicians should test for EOAD in all patients with appropriate symptomatology, regardless of ethnicity. Early recognition and enrollment in clinical trials is vital to enhancing our understanding of the natural history and treatment of this condition.

  20. Next-generation sequencing-based molecular diagnosis of 35 Hispanic retinitis pigmentosa probands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xu, Mingchu; Verriotto, Jennifer D.; Li, Yumei; Wang, Hui; Gan, Lin; Lam, Byron L.; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases. The prevalence of RP and the mutation spectrum vary across populations. Hispanic people account for approximately 17% of the United States population, and the genetic etiologies of RP of this ethnic group still remain not well defined. Utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS), we screened mutations in known retinal disease-causing genes in an RP cohort of 35 unrelated Hispanic probands from the Miami area. We achieved a solving rate of 66% and identified 15 novel putative pathogenic mutations, including a frequent founder mutation disrupting PRPF31 splicing. Our data show that the mutation spectrum of Hispanic RP receives a significant impact from disease-causing alleles of Spanish origin and may also contain population-specific alleles. PMID:27596865

  1. Understanding access to care and health needs of Hispanic women from an urban community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie; Dunphy Suplee, Patricia; Gardner, Marcia R

    2014-01-01

    As a first step in a proposed program of community-based participatory research, this study investigated access to care and specific health needs in a population of Hispanic women from a medically underserved, urban community. There were 66 Hispanic women recruited at a local church to complete a 94-item researcher-developed survey. Thirty-two percent of women in the study were not U.S. citizens. Being insured, being a citizen, and having a medical diagnosis were significant in satisfaction with care. The most prevalent health issue for this population was being overweight or obese. This study demonstrates the use of the community needs assessment process in the development of interventions to improve a community's health and health care. This is especially true in the Hispanic community in which large variations based on culture and country of origin will impact the success of planned interventions.

  2. Hispanic-Asian Immigrant Inequality in Perceived Medical Need and Access to Regular Physician Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe Hasanali, Stephanie; De Jong, Gordon F; Roempke Graefe, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    In the face of continuing large immigrant streams, Hispanic and Asian immigrants' human and social capital inequalities will heighten U.S. race/ethnic health and health care disparities. Using data from the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this study assessed Hispanic-Asian immigrant disparity in access to health care, measured by perceived medical need and regular access to a physician. Logistic regression results indicated that Hispanics had lower perceived met medical need and were less likely to see a doctor regularly. These disparities were significantly attenuated by education and health insurance. Assimilation-related characteristics were significantly associated with a regular doctor visit and were not fully mediated by socioeconomic variables. Findings indicate the importance of education above and beyond insurance coverage for access to health care and suggest the potential for public health efforts to improve preventive care among immigrants. PMID:25420782

  3. Next-generation sequencing-based molecular diagnosis of 35 Hispanic retinitis pigmentosa probands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xu, Mingchu; Verriotto, Jennifer D; Li, Yumei; Wang, Hui; Gan, Lin; Lam, Byron L; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases. The prevalence of RP and the mutation spectrum vary across populations. Hispanic people account for approximately 17% of the United States population, and the genetic etiologies of RP of this ethnic group still remain not well defined. Utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS), we screened mutations in known retinal disease-causing genes in an RP cohort of 35 unrelated Hispanic probands from the Miami area. We achieved a solving rate of 66% and identified 15 novel putative pathogenic mutations, including a frequent founder mutation disrupting PRPF31 splicing. Our data show that the mutation spectrum of Hispanic RP receives a significant impact from disease-causing alleles of Spanish origin and may also contain population-specific alleles. PMID:27596865

  4. Mismatch repair protein expression and colorectal cancer in Hispanics from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus-Monge, Wilfredo E; Gonzalez-Keelan, Carmen; Zhao, Ronghua; Hamilton, Stanley R; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2010-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and alterations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, leading to absent protein (negative) expression, are responsible for approximately 20% of CRC cases. Immunohistochemistry is a tool for prescreening of MMR protein expression in CRC but the literature on its use on Hispanics is scarce. However, Hispanics represent the second leading ethnicity in the United States (US) and CRC is a public health burden in this group. Our objectives were to determine the frequency of MMR protein-negative CRC and to evaluate its association with clinical and pathological characteristics among Hispanics from Puerto Rico, for the first time to our knowledge. A retrospective observational study of unselected CRC patients from the Puerto Rico Medical Center from 2001 to 2005 was done. MLH1 and MSH2, the most commonly altered MMR genes, protein expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, with microsatellite instability (MSI) and BRAF gene analyses in the absence of MLH1 protein expression. One-hundred sixty-four CRC patients were evaluated: the overall MMR protein-negative frequency was 4.3%, with 0.6% frequency of co-occurrence of MLH1-protein negative expression, MSI-high, and normal BRAF gene. MMR protein-negative expression was associated with proximal colon location (P = 0.02) and poor histological tumor differentiation (P = 0.001), but not with other characteristics. The frequency of MMR protein-negative CRC in Hispanics from Puerto Rico was lower than reported in other populations. This finding may explain the lower CRC incidence rate among US Hispanics as compared to US non-Hispanic whites and blacks.

  5. Cirrhosis and Advanced Fibrosis in Hispanics in Texas: The Dominant Contribution of Central Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jingjing; Watt, Gordon P; Lee, MinJae; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Vatcheva, Kristina P; Pan, Jen-Jung; McCormick, Joseph B; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; Fallon, Michael B; Beretta, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a leading cause of death in Hispanics and Hispanics who live in South Texas have the highest incidence of liver cancer in the United States. We aimed at determining the prevalence and associated risk factors of cirrhosis in this population. Clinical and demographic variables were extracted for 2466 participants in the community-based Cameron County Hispanic Cohort in South Texas. Aspartate transaminase to Platelet Ratio Index (APRI) was used to predict cirrhosis in Cameron County Hispanic Cohort. The prevalence of cirrhosis using APRI≥2 was 0.94%, which is nearly 4-fold higher than the national prevalence. Using APRI≥1, the overall prevalence of cirrhosis/advanced fibrosis was 3.54%. In both analyses, highest prevalence was observed in males, specifically in the 25-34 age group. Risk factors independently associated with APRI≥2 and APRI≥1 included hepatitis C, diabetes and central obesity with a remarkable population attributable fraction of 52.5% and 65.3% from central obesity, respectively. Excess alcohol consumption was also independently associated with APRI≥2. The presence of patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing-3 gene variants was independently associated with APRI≥1 in participants >50 years old. Males with both central obesity and excess alcohol consumption presented with cirrhosis/advanced fibrosis at a young age. Alarmingly high prevalence of cirrhosis and advanced fibrosis was identified in Hispanics in South Texas, affecting young males in particular. Central obesity was identified as the major risk factor. Public health efforts are urgently needed to increase awareness and diagnosis of advanced liver fibrosis in Hispanics. PMID:26950933

  6. Do Lung Cancer Eligibility Criteria Align with Risk among Blacks and Hispanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fiscella

    Full Text Available Black patients have higher lung cancer risk despite lower pack years of smoking. We assessed lung cancer risk by race, ethnicity, and sex among a nationally representative population eligible for lung cancer screening based on Medicare criteria.We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2012 to assess lung cancer risk by sex, race and ethnicity among persons satisfying Medicare age and pack-year smoking eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening. We assessed Medicare eligibility based on age (55-77 years and pack-years (≥ 30. We assessed 6-year lung cancer risk using a risk prediction model from Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening trial that was modified in 2012 (PLCOm2012. We compared the proportions of eligible persons by sex, race and ethnicity using Medicare criteria with a risk cut-point that was adjusted to achieve comparable total number of persons eligible for screening.Among the 29.7 million persons aged 55-77 years who ever smoked, we found that 7.3 million (24.5% were eligible for lung cancer screening under Medicare criteria. Among those eligible, Blacks had statistically significant higher (4.4% and Hispanics lower lung cancer risk (1.2% than non-Hispanic Whites (3.2%. At a cut-point of 2.12% risk for lung screening eligibility, the percentage of Blacks and Hispanics showed statistically significant changes. Blacks eligible rose by 48% and Hispanics eligible declined by 63%. Black men and Hispanic women were affected the most. There was little change in eligibility among Whites.Medicare eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening do not align with estimated risk for lung cancer among Blacks and Hispanics. Data are urgently needed to determine whether use of risk-based eligibility screening improves lung cancer outcomes among minority patients.

  7. Comparison of reflux esophagitis and its complications between African Americans and non-Hispanic whites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth J Vega; Sian Chisholm; M Mazen Jamal

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of ethnicity on the severity of reflux esophagitis (RE) and its complications. METHODS: A retrospective search of the endoscopy database at the University of Florida Health Science Center/Jacksonville for all cases of reflux esophagitis and its complications from January 1 to March 31, 2001 was performed. Inclusion criteria were endoscopic evidence of esophagitis using the LA classification, reflux related complications and self-reported ethnicity. The data obtained included esophagitis grade, presence of a hiatal hernia, esophageal ulcer, stricture and Barrett's esophagus, and endoscopy indication. RESULTS: The search identified 259 patients with RE or its complications, of which 171 were non-Hispanic whites and 88 were African Americans. The mean ages and male/female ratios were similar in the two groups. RE grade, esophageal ulcer, stricture and hiatal hernia frequency were likewise similar in the groups. Barrett's esophagus was present more often in non-Hispanic whites than in African Americans (15.8% vs 4.5%; P < 0.01). Heartburn was a more frequent indication for endoscopy in non-Hispanic whites with erosive esophagitis than in African Americans (28.1% vs 7.9%; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Distribution of RE grade and frequency of reflux-related esophageal ulcer, stricture and reflux-related esophageal ulcer, stricture and hiatal hernia are similar in non-Hispanic whites and African Americans. Heartburn was more frequently and nausea/vomiting less frequently reported as the primary endoscopic indication in non-Hispanic whites compared with African Americans with erosive esophagitis or its complications. African Americans have a decreased prevalence of Barrett's esophagus compared with non-Hispanic whites.

  8. El Estado de la Educacion para los Hispanos en los Estados Unidos (The Condition of Education for Hispanics in the United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, George H.; And Others

    Organized into 4 chapters, the report provides tabular data portraying the educational condition for about 12 million Hispanic Americans in the United States, and shows how Hispanics compare with the majority population on various measures of educational participation and achievement. Providing an overview of Hispanic Americans in the U.S.,…

  9. The Prevalence and Comorbidity between Delinquency, Drug Abuse, Suicide Attempts, Physical and Sexual Abuse, and Self-Mutilation among Delinquent Hispanic Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Jeanette; Curry, Theodore R.

    2007-01-01

    Representative data show that drug abuse, delinquency, and suicide attempts are major concerns among adolescent Hispanic females. Although comorbidity research indicates that such problems tend to be related to each other, this research largely neglects Hispanic females. Using data from presentence investigations on 141 Hispanic girls sentenced to…

  10. Outcome differences in participating and nonparticipating Hispanic students in supplemental instruction classes supporting Organic Chemistry I and II at New Mexico State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaher, Nina

    Lack of academic success by Hispanic students in higher education has caused university administrators to seek alternative programs to improve rates of retention and their academic success. Hispanic students are less likely than White students to complete advanced science classes, including chemistry (National Center for Education Statistics, 2006). With the shortage of an educated workforce, the nation is dependent on educating the fastest-growing ethnic/racial population. Of the 17,200 students enrolled in New Mexico State University (NMSU) in fall 2008, 40% were Hispanics, which makes the university a Hispanic-serving institution. Many programs at the university support Hispanic students, including Supplemental Instruction (SI). This study investigated whether participation in the SI program was associated with retention and better course performance among Hispanic students in Organic Chemistry courses at NMSU from 2001 through 2005. The study also examined gender differences among Hispanic students with respect to SI. The results revealed that participation in SI was, statistically, associated with retention of Hispanic students in both Organic Chemistry I and II classes and with fewer grades of D's and F's in Organic Chemistry I classes at NMSU during the mentioned semesters. The examination of gender differences revealed no significant difference; however, it was apparent that there were more female Hispanics enrolled in life sciences at NMSU compare to male Hispanics during the semesters of fall 2001 through spring 2005.This study was significant because it examined a method to retain Hispanic students in a Hispanic-serving Institution.

  11. Comparison of bone lead in pre-Hispanic, 18th century and modern population of Tenerife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnay-De-La-Rosa, M; Gonzalez-Reimers, E; Velasco-Vazquez, J; Galindo-Martin, L; Delgado-Ureta, E; Santolaria-Fernandez, F; Barros-Lopez, N

    1998-01-19

    The present study has been performed in order to determine concentrations of lead in the bone of 14 individuals who were interred towards the beginning of the 18th century at the church 'La Concepción' (Santa Cruz de Tenerife) of 15 Pre-Hispanic individuals of Tenerife and a modern sample for Tenerife, composed of 25 individuals. We have observed higher bone lead values in the modern population than in the ancient one (P = 0.0022), although Pre-Hispanic individuals and those of the 18th century showed similar bone lead values.

  12. "That word, cancer": breast care behavior of Hispanic women in new Mexico background and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar; De Vargas, Felicia; Sanchez, Christina; Oetzel, John

    2010-01-01

    Despite international efforts, national and ethnic disparities in utilization of breast cancer (BC) screenings prevail. In the United States, Hispanic women have one of the lowest BC screening rates. The purpose of our study was to examine how Hispanic women in New Mexico described their breast care behavior (BCB; BC screening practices, motivation to act, and breast care information behavior). Analysis of focus groups revealed five types of approaches to BCB. These findings have global implications for health care practitioners in directing attention toward the complexity of BC preventive behavior. Implications for other ethnic groups are discussed.

  13. A Cultural Perspective on Sexual Health: HIV Positive and Negative Monolingual Hispanic Women in South Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Loubet, Olga M; Vamos, Szonja; Jones, Deborah L; Lopez, Eliot; Weiss, Stephen M

    2011-06-01

    This study explored feelings and attitudes with regard to HIV and sexual health among 82 monolingual Spanish-speaking, HIV-positive (n = 30) and at-risk women (n = 52), participating in the NOW en Español Project-a cognitive behavioral sexual risk-reduction intervention in Miami, Florida. Hispanic cultural values and beliefs, such as machismo, marianismo, and sexual silence, emerged throughout the intervention as important determinants of sexual behavior. Recommendations for integrating these culture-specific issues in sexual health interventions for Hispanic women are provided.

  14. Apian, VI, 31: A didactic introduction of topoi about Hispanic peoples in the historic narration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hernández Prieto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this excerpt from his book, Appian relates the hypothetical facts occurred between Lucius Marcius, and a contingent of Hispanic mercenaries under orders of the Carthaginians during the Second Punic War. The author uses the historical background to introduce, with usual demands in a Roman military negotiation, a range of topics about the nature of indigenous and, in general, of the barbarian world. We believe that Appian could have advance typical events of the Celtiberian and Lusitanian wars. Besides decorating the story, its purpose would have been indoctrinate their readers, thoroughly Hellenized audience, on the nature of the Hispanic peoples, particularly the Celtiberian.

  15. Birthplace, culture, self-esteem, and intimate partner violence among community-dwelling Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; Vermeesch, Amber L; Florom-Smith, Aubrey L; McCabe, Brian E; Peragallo, Nilda P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore variations in demographics, culture, self-esteem, and intimate partner violence among Hispanic women according to birthplace, and to identify factors associated with these differences in intimate partner violence (IPV). Baseline data from a randomized control trial testing the efficacy of an HIV prevention program were used. Path analyses identified differences in IPV between Colombian women and women from other Central/South American countries. Self-esteem was the only factor associated with these differences. Interventions addressing the unique needs of Hispanic women from different subgroups are needed.

  16. Remission from pathological gambling among Hispanics and Native American/span>s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeyer, Joseph; Canive, Jose; Thuras, Paul; Kim, Suk W; Crosby, Ross; Thompson, James; Garrard, Judith

    2006-12-01

    This community survey studied remission from pathological gambling (PG) among American Indian (AI) and Hispanic American (HA) veterans. Remission was defined as having a lifetime diagnosis of PG, but no gambling symptoms in the last year. Sample consisted of 1624 AI and Hispanic veterans. Instruments included demographic data, the computer-based algorithmic Quick Diagnostic Interview Schedule Symptom, and three symptom checklists, one each for substance related problems (MAST/AD), anxiety and depressive symptoms (BSI-57), and combat-related post-trauma symptoms (PCL/M). Remission was associated with absence of a current Axis 1 diagnosis, especially absence of a current post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:16897410

  17. The new V8 diesel engine from MAN; Der neue V8-Dieselmotor von MAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehler, Georg; Vogel, Werner; Moeller, Inge; Tuerk, Jens [MAN Nutzfahrzeuge Motorenwerk Nuernberg AG, Nuernberg (Germany); Raup, Markus [MAN Nutzfahrzeuge, Steyr (Austria)

    2008-09-15

    MAN has developed a new V8 engine for the 16-l class with an output of 500 kW and 3,000 Nm of torque for its TGX and TGS ranges of heavy trucks. To reduce NO{sub x}, MAN has applied an SCR system with AdBlue injection. This article describes the engine concept, the design of the main components, the development of vehicle-specific add-on parts and the work carried out to optimise the combustion system and exhaust aftertreatment. (orig.)

  18. "A Is A": Spider-Man, Ayn Rand, and What Man Ought to Be

    OpenAIRE

    Brühwiler, Claudia Franziska

    2014-01-01

    In 1979, writer Tom DeFalco was paired with artist and cocreator of Spider-Man, Steve Ditko, to work on an issue of Machine Man, one of the many superheroes populating the universe of Marvel Comics. Instead of the usual introduction and business chatter, Ditko challenged DeFalco during a first conversation: "Are you Tom? What gives you the right to write about heroes?" (Tucker 2012). By the time of this exchange, Ditko had not only (co-) created and continued numerous superhero stories, rangi...

  19. Pantex Falling Man - Independent Review Panel Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brannon, Nathan Gregory; L. Bertolini, N. Brannon, J. Olsen, B. Price, M. Steinzig, R. Wardle, & M. Winfield

    2014-11-01

    Consolidated Nuclear Security (CNS) Pantex took the initiative to organize a Review Panel of subject matter experts to independently assess the adequacy of the Pantex Tripping Man Analysis methodology. The purpose of this report is to capture the details of the assessment including the scope, approach, results, and detailed Appendices. Along with the assessment of the analysis methodology, the panel evaluated the adequacy with which the methodology was applied as well as congruence with Department of Energy (DOE) standards 3009 and 3016. The approach included the review of relevant documentation, interactive discussion with Pantex staff, and the iterative process of evaluating critical lines of inquiry.

  20. A young man with a heavy heart

    OpenAIRE

    Davey, P.; Benson, M

    1999-01-01

    A 34 year old man presented with acute chest pain. His ECG was very abnormal but stable and he was treated with opiate analgesia. When his condition did not improve, chest radiography and cardiac ultrasound were performed. Both revealed metal dense deposits in the heart. On questioning, the patient revealed that he had self injected with mercury 15 years before. Self injection of elemental mercury is rare but well described and normally used by those who are suicidally depressed or who seek t...

  1. The man-machine-organisation interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reliable and safety-centred action of man is one crucial factor for safe operation of nuclear power plants, apart from the technical systems and the organisational aspects. Essential factors influencing human performance are: Qualification and competence of the operating personnel, technical conditions and status of systems, including the level of automation, information technology in the control room, and plant organisation. Analyses of documentation of notifiable events in power plant operation or other incidents yield information on available potentials for safety enhancements or reduction of human errors. (orig./CB)

  2. Design and Construction of Manned Lunar Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijie

    2016-07-01

    Building manned lunar base is one of the core aims of human lunar exploration project, which is also an important way to carry out the exploitation and utilization of lunar in situ resources. The most important part of manned lunar base is the design and construction of living habitation and many factors should be considered including science objective and site selection. Through investigating and research, the scientific goals of manned lunar base should be status and characteristics ascertainment of lunar available in situ resources, then developing necessary scientific experiments and utilization of lunar in situ resources by using special environment conditions of lunar surface. The site selection strategy of manned lunar base should rely on scientific goals according to special lunar surface environment and engineering capacity constraints, meanwhile, consulting the landing sites of foreign unmanned and manned lunar exploration, and choosing different typical regions of lunar surface and analyzing the landform and physiognomy, reachability, thermal environment, sunlight condition, micro meteoroids protection and utilization of in situ resources, after these steps, a logical lunar living habitation site should be confirmed. This paper brings out and compares three kinds of configurations with fabricating processes of manned lunar base, including rigid module, flexible and construction module manned lunar base. 1.The rigid habitation module is usually made by metal materials. The design and fabrication may consult the experience of space station, hence with mature technique. Because this configuration cannot be folded or deployed, which not only afford limit working and living room for astronauts, but also needs repetitious cargo transit between earth and moon for lunar base extending. 2. The flexible module habitation can be folded in fairing while launching. When deploying on moon, the configuration can be inflatable or mechanically-deployed, which means under

  3. Compartment models of radioiodine in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differential equations governing the flow of iodine through a three-compartment model of iodine metabolism in man have been solved and the solutions compared to those obtained from two-compartment models. The boundary conditions used were those appropriate for a single acute exposure to radioiodine. The urinary excretion equation derived from the solutions to the three-compartment model exhibits a minimum at four days after the exposure time. This minimum can be used to calculate a maximum value for thyroid burden using a single urinary excretion rate measurement, and in conjunction with this value, an optimum urinary sampling frequency for the different radioiodines can be calculated. (author)

  4. Gastrointestinal absorption of uranium in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been established for determining the fractional absorption of uranium directly in man. Measurements are made of the urinary excretion rates of uranium for individuals whose drinking water has a high 234U to 238U activity ratio and is the primary source of 234U in their diets. For two individuals, the values obtained for the fractional absorption of 234U were 0.004 and 0.006. The values obtained for the fractional absorption of 238U, using a literature value for the 238U intake from food, were 0.008 and 0.015. The present ICRP value is 0.20. 7 references, 1 table

  5. A young man with multiple pulmonary cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim W H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Several diseases cause cystic or cyst-like parenchymal lung abnormalities including adult pulmonary Langerhan’s cell histiocytosis (PLCH, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM, emphysema, end-stage interstitial lung disease, and cystic bronchiectasis. Many of these diseases can now be diagnosed with high accuracy by the use of high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT. In fact, HRCT of chest has proved a major breakthrough in the diagnosis of these diseases. We are presenting a young man with a cystic lung disease in which, the HRCT findings were virtually diagnostic of that disease. The clinical and HRCT findings of this disease along with its differential diagnosis are discussed in this paper.

  6. Dihydralazine induces marked cerebral vasodilation in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H

    1987-01-01

    Dihydralazine is widely used for acute control of hypertension. In experimental studies it seems to dilate cerebral resistance vessels and increase intracranial pressure. However, the effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in man has been little studied. Measurements of CBF were performed with the i...... the period of study, in median 16, 27 and 23% at the three periods of measurements, respectively. The arterial blood pressure remained unchanged, whereas heart rate increased significantly. During CO2 inhalation, CBF increased on average 29%. Thus, the cerebral vasodilation exerted by a small i.v. dose...

  7. The inescapable tale of tomahawk man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Ribeiro Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the contemporary literary criticism The Man that was Used Up (1982, [1839] represents one of the most significant satires of Edgar Allan Poe. This burlesque suggests many references to the effects of magazine context upon literature in the first half of the nineteenth century. The aim of this study is to briefly describe the influence of Poe’s magazinist career in the field of fiction, precisely in this short story, based on the studies of J. Gerald Kennedy, Jonathan Auerbach, Leonard Cassuto and Stacey Margolis among others.

  8. First exposure in man: toxicological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Per; Sjöberg, P; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2000-01-01

    The safety of a volunteer/patient who participate in the very first human trial relies on data from animal experimentation and on the design of the trial. Recommendations on the type and extent of preclinical safety studies that should be conducted prior to first dose in man have been developed...... for preclinical testing have had an important impact on the documented impressive safety record of phase I clinical trials. In this spirit we extend our warmest and sincerest thanks to Professor Jens S. Schou for his long and deep engagement in European and International harmonisation of preclinical test...

  9. Analysis of evoked lumbosacral potentials in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbeke, J; McComas, A J; Kopec, S J

    1978-04-01

    Surface electrodes have been used to record potentials evoked in the lumbosacral region of 15 healthy volunteers after tibial nerve stimulation. By monitoring the M waves and H reflexes in the triceps surae muslces and by comparing the responses recorded over the roots with those over the lower cord, it was possible to identify the neural substrates responsible for several of the components in the responses. The findings are compared with those of previous studies in man and in other mammalian preparations. PMID:650237

  10. Monitoring man's impact in the coastal zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper examines the monitoring of man's impact in the coastal zone. Color infrared photography shows destroyed or degraded wetlands or beaches, and makes possible relevant linear or aerial measurements with aerial photography. It can also categorize the environmental impacts which have accrued as the result of completion of water development projects. Aerial photography of the Texas coastal zone illustrates the nature and degree of damage likely to occur as a result of construction or maintenance projects. It is concluded that the method of assigning realistic values to unit areas of wetlands and beaches will make it feasible to incorporate the cost of estuarine damages into the cost estimates of water development schemes

  11. The man who calculated models and synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Machado

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The essays joined in this book are an attempt to comprehend how information processes are given to the world. According to Flusser, immaterial culture and fenomena like information result from codes. It seems to him that the codified condition of the world emerge as images onthe electronic screens, data stored in hard disk drive, cartridges film, holograms and programs which could be only decodable and which should not be apprehended. The man from the codified world does not concern about things, but about the signs interpreted by the codes.

  12. Accelerometer-measured sedentary time among Hispanic adults: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Merchant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive sedentary behavior is associated with negative health outcomes independent of physical activity. Objective estimates of time spent in sedentary behaviors are lacking among adults from diverse Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. The objective of this study was to describe accelerometer-assessed sedentary time in a large, representative sample of Hispanic/Latino adults living in the United States, and compare sedentary estimates by Hispanic/Latino background, sociodemographic characteristics and weight categories. This study utilized baseline data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL that included adults aged 18–74 years from four metropolitan areas (N = 16,415. Measured with the Actical accelerometer over 6 days, 76.9% (n = 12,631 of participants had >10 h/day and >3 days of data. Participants spent 11.9 h/day (SD 3.0, or 74% of their monitored time in sedentary behaviors. Adjusting for differences in wear time, adults of Mexican background were the least (11.6 h/day, whereas adults of Dominican background were the most (12.3 h/day, sedentary. Women were more sedentary than men, and older adults were more sedentary than younger adults. Household income was positively associated, whereas employment was negatively associated, with sedentary time. There were no differences in sedentary time by weight categories, marital status, or proxies of acculturation. To reduce sedentariness among these populations, future research should examine how the accumulation of various sedentary behaviors differs by background and region, and which sedentary behaviors are amenable to intervention.

  13. Association of diabetes with tooth loss in Hispanic/Latino adults: findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, Ariel P; Salazar, Christian R; Northridge, Mary E; Kaplan, Robert C; Taylor, George W; Finlayson, Tracy L; Qi, Qibin; Badner, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between diabetes mellitus and missing teeth in Hispanic/Latino adults from diverse heritage groups who reside in the USA. Research design and methods The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) is a multicenter, population-based study of 18–74 years old who underwent a physical and oral examination (n=15 945). Glycemic status was categorized as diabetes, impaired, or normal, based on medication use, and American Diabetes Association criteria for fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). HbA1c7% indicated uncontrolled diabetes. We estimated ORs and 95% CIs for missing >9 teeth and being edentulous (missing all natural teeth), after adjustment for age, income, education, Hispanic background, study site/center, nativity, last dental visit, health insurance, diet quality, cigarette smoking, obesity, periodontitis, and C reactive protein. Results Persons with uncontrolled diabetes had a significant increased likelihood of missing >9 teeth and being edentulous as compared with persons with normal glycemic status (adjusted OR=1.92, 95% CI 1.44 to 2.55 and adjusted OR=1.73, 95% CI 1.22 to 2.46, respectively). The association appeared to be stronger at younger ages (18–44 years old; p for interaction <0.0001). However, we found no associations of either impaired glycemia or controlled diabetes with tooth loss in adjusted models. Conclusions Dentists should be aware of their Hispanic patients' diabetes status and whether or not they are well controlled, because these may affect tooth loss and impair oral function, which can lead to poor nutrition and complications of diabetes. PMID:27239319

  14. Local Ancestry Inference in a Large US-Based Hispanic/Latino Study: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Sharon R; Grinde, Kelsey; Plantinga, Anna; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Stilp, Adrienne M; Kaplan, Robert C; Avilés-Santa, M Larissa; Browning, Brian L; Laurie, Cathy C

    2016-01-01

    We estimated local ancestry on the autosomes and X chromosome in a large US-based study of 12,793 Hispanic/Latino individuals using the RFMix method, and we compared different reference panels and approaches to local ancestry estimation on the X chromosome by means of Mendelian inconsistency rates as a proxy for accuracy. We developed a novel and straightforward approach to performing ancestry-specific PCA after finding artifactual behavior in the results from an existing approach. Using the ancestry-specific PCA, we found significant population structure within African, European, and Amerindian ancestries in the Hispanic/Latino individuals in our study. In the African ancestral component of the admixed individuals, individuals whose grandparents were from Central America clustered separately from individuals whose grandparents were from the Caribbean, and also from reference Yoruba and Mandenka West African individuals. In the European component, individuals whose grandparents were from Puerto Rico diverged partially from other background groups. In the Amerindian ancestral component, individuals clustered into multiple different groups depending on the grandparental country of origin. Therefore, local ancestry estimation provides further insight into the complex genetic structure of US Hispanic/Latino populations, which must be properly accounted for in genotype-phenotype association studies. It also provides a basis for admixture mapping and ancestry-specific allele frequency estimation, which are useful in the identification of risk factors for disease. PMID:27172203

  15. Appealing Features of Vocational Support Services for Hispanic and non-Hispanic Transition Age Youth and Young Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Rosalie A Torres; Delman, Jonathan; McKay, Colleen E; Smith, Lisa M

    2015-10-01

    Transition age youth and young adults (TAYYAs) diagnosed with serious mental health conditions (SMHCs) are at greater risk of being unemployed compared to their peers without SMHCs. Job counseling and job placement services are the greatest predictor of competitive employment, yet we have limited knowledge about what TAYYAs believe they need to obtain gainful employment. In person, qualitative interviews were conducted with 57 non-Hispanic and Hispanic TAYYAs with SMHCs enrolled in three vocational support programs in MA (Vocational Rehabilitation, Individual Placement and Support; the Clubhouse Model as described by the International Center for Clubhouse Development). Six themes emerged from the data: three themes were identified as social capital (supportive relationships, readily available workplace supports, and vocational preparation), two themes related to human capital (effective educational supports and work experience), and one theme related to cultural capital (social skills training). Unique features (Spanish-speaking staff and/or familiar in Latino culture, familial-like staff support) were frequently noted by Hispanic TAYYAs. PMID:24647622

  16. So Man-yee’s Design Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    SO Man-yee started to learn Western painting in1971. In 1973 she graduated from the Linhai ArtSchool in Hong Kong after spending three yearsstudying commercial design. After leaving the schoolshe started work with advertisement agencies. Thatexperience prepared her for further development inthe design field. So founded her own design company in 1976 withher friend Han Binhua. Apart from this project, So isalso involved in art education. So is a member of theboard of the Hong Kong Zhengxing Design School,executive member of the Association of Designers inHong Kong, member of the board of Hong KongArtists, chief director of the board of Hong Kong’sKinggraphic Co. Ltd., and also chairperson of theHong Kong Women Painters Association. A famous watercolorist in Hong Kong, So has heldseveral eye-catching exhibitions there. Her exhibitionsinclude the one-woman show entitled "So Man-yee’sRhythm of Watercolors" held in 1987 at the HongKong Art Center. In 1996 a grand exhibition of HongKong artists hosted by the

  17. Adaptive myelination from fish to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraban, Marion; Mensch, Sigrid; Lyons, David A

    2016-06-15

    Myelinated axons with nodes of Ranvier are an evolutionary elaboration common to essentially all jawed vertebrates. Myelin made by Schwann cells in our peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in our central nervous system has been long known to facilitate rapid energy efficient nerve impulse propagation. However, it is now also clear, particularly in the central nervous system, that myelin is not a simple static insulator but that it is dynamically regulated throughout development and life. New myelin sheaths can be made by newly differentiating oligodendrocytes, and mature myelin sheaths can be stimulated to grow again in the adult. Furthermore, numerous studies in models from fish to man indicate that neuronal activity can affect distinct stages of oligodendrocyte development and the process of myelination itself. This begs questions as to how these effects of activity are mediated at a cellular and molecular level and whether activity-driven adaptive myelination is a feature common to all myelinated axons, or indeed all oligodendrocytes, or is specific to cells or circuits with particular functions. Here we review the recent literature on this topic, elaborate on the key outstanding questions in the field, and look forward to future studies that incorporate investigations in systems from fish to man that will provide further insight into this fundamental aspect of nervous system plasticity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26498877

  18. [Genodermatosis in man and animal. Comparative overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, W; Happle, R

    1983-11-01

    Fourteen monogenic cutaneous disorders of man are compared to similar gene defects in animals. The traits are classified into two groups. In the first group, an identity (homology) of the underlying gene defects is likely. This group includes oculo-cutaneous albinism, Chédiak-Higashi syndrome, aplasia cutis congenita, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (type I), hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia of the Christ-Siemens-Touraine type, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, ichthyosis congenita gravis, Menkes syndrome, erythropoetic porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda, and acrodermatitis enteropathica. In the second group, the traits are similar but the question of their homology cannot be settled. It includes alopecia congenita, hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia of the Clouston type, and hereditary lymphedema. The existence of identical mutations in man and animals provides evidence for the close relationship between the various mammalian species. Homologous traits affecting the skin are of practical importance since the use of these animal models may help to answer those questions which cannot be answered by performing research in human patients. PMID:6358130

  19. Abstraction of man-made shapes

    KAUST Repository

    Mehra, Ravish

    2009-01-01

    Man-made objects are ubiquitous in the real world and in virtual environments. While such objects can be very detailed, capturing every small feature, they are often identified and characterized by a small set of defining curves. Compact, abstracted shape descriptions based on such curves are often visually more appealing than the original models, which can appear to be visually cluttered. We introduce a novel algorithm for abstracting three-dimensional geometric models using characteristic curves or contours as building blocks for the abstraction. Our method robustly handles models with poor connectivity, including the extreme cases of polygon soups, common in models of man-made objects taken from online repositories. In our algorithm, we use a two-step procedure that first approximates the input model using a manifold, closed envelope surface and then extracts from it a hierarchical abstraction curve network along with suitable normal information. The constructed curve networks form a compact, yet powerful, representation for the input shapes, retaining their key shape characteristics while discarding minor details and irregularities. © 2009 ACM.

  20. Proposal for a remotely manned space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsky, Marvin

    1990-01-01

    The United States is in trouble in space. The costs of the proposed Space Station Freedom have grown beyond reach, and the present design is obsolete. The trouble has come from imagining that there are only two alternatives: manned vs. unmanned. Both choices have led us into designs that do not appear to be practical. On one side, the United States simply does not possess the robotic technology needed to operate or assemble a sophisticated unmanned space station. On the other side, the manned designs that are now under way seem far too costly and dangerous, with all of its thousands of extravehicular activity (EVA) hours. More would be accomplished at far less cost by proceeding in a different way. The design of a space station made of modular, Erector Set-like parts is proposed which is to be assembled using earth-based remotely-controlled binary-tree telerobots. Earth-based workers could be trained to build the station in space using simulators. A small preassembled spacecraft would be launched with a few telerobots, and then, telerobots could be ferried into orbit along with stocks of additional parts. Trained terrestrial workers would remotely assemble a larger station, and materials for additional power and life support systems could be launched. Finally, human scientists and explorers could be sent to the space station. Other aspects of such a space station program are discussed.

  1. Acculturation Stress, Drinking, and Intimate Partner Violence among Hispanic Couples in the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Caetano Vaeth, Patrice A.; Harris, T. Robert

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the cross-sectional association between acculturation, acculturation stress, drinking, and intimate partner violence (IPV) among Hispanic couples in the U.S. The data being analyzed come from a multi-cluster random household sample of couples interviewed as part of the second wave of a 5-year national longitudinal study. The…

  2. The Validity of a Proxy Acculturation Scale among U.S. Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Theresa H.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Bowling, J. Michael; Villaveces, Andres

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the validity of a proxy acculturation scale composed of four acculturation-related variables. The authors use data from a nationally representative sample of 1,437 U.S. Hispanics. Results indicate good internal scale reliability, a high degree of correlation between the proxy scale and the full acculturation measure, and…

  3. Project Exchange, Proyecto Intercambio: A Guide to Exploring Hispanic and North American Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maria L.; Zanger, Virginia Vogel

    Based on a successful high school student exchange program, a curriculum was designed to bring together Hispanic students learning English and Anglo students learning Spanish for intercultural experiences. The flexible curriculum includes over 40 activities that students can participate in while meeting together once a week for either a brief…

  4. File list: His.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: His.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. Transformative Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Realizing Equity Praxis through Community Connections and Local Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Marisol; Valverde, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Schools serve as antidemocratic spaces where teacher, parent, community member, and student voices are typically disregarded. Instead, philanthropists and businesses are allowed to drive school and district agendas. An exploration of 3 local efforts that connect a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) with prekindergarten to Grade 12 students and…

  7. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: His.Pan.20.AllAg.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. Preventing Smoking among Hispanic Preadolescents: Program Orientation, Participant Individualism-Collectivism, and Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Stella G.; Garza, Raymond T.; Gonzalez-Blanks, Ana G.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the role of individualism-collectivism (IC) and acculturation in smoking prevention programs for Hispanic preadolescents. The sixth graders received a collectivist or individualist curriculum. Both programs contained knowledge-based facts about smoking. The collectivist condition included an interdependent…

  13. Ready or Not, Here We Come: Retaining Hispanic and First-Generation Students in Postsecondary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Forney, William Scott

    2003-01-01

    Examines period between start of high school and first years of undergraduate coursework as it pertains to Hispanic and first-generation student enrollment and retention in college. Reports that among the indicators of college success are mathematics education in high school, parents' education levels, and family income. (Contains seven figures…

  14. Cuentos Hispanos de los Estados Unidos (Hispanic Stories of the United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Julian, Ed.

    This anthology of 21 short stories is intended for Spanish-speaking students of Spanish, other students in intermediate and advanced Spanish-language courses, and students commencing study of the Hispanic literature of the United States. Twelve of the 15 authors are, by birth or descent, of Mexican, Cuban, or Puerto Rican origin. Eight were born…

  15. Changes in Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) Lists: 2009-10 and 2010-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, D.

    2012-01-01

    As the Latino population continues to grow, so will the number of Latino college students, and the concentration of these students at Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs). In federal legislation the definition of an HSI is predicated on enrollment, institution type and control, and degree-granting status. As any of these characteristics of an…

  16. Rising to the Challenge: Hispanic College Graduation Rates as a National Priority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Andrew P.; Schneider, Mark; Carey, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama has called for the United States to reclaim its position as the nation with the highest concentration of adults with postsecondary degrees in the world. Given the changing demographics of the United States, this target cannot be achieved without increasing the rate at which Hispanic students obtain a college degree. In this…

  17. The Educational Experience of Hispanic Immigrants in the United States: Integration through Marginalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromquist, Nelly P.

    2012-01-01

    This article calls attention to the educational situation of Latino immigrants in the United States. Through an extensive review of the literature, it examines the nature of contemporary Hispanic immigration and the school response to the linguistic and cultural attributes of the students--particularly those of Mexican origin, who represent the…

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis.

  19. Physiological, psychological, social, and cultural influences on the use of menthol cigarettes among Blacks and Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Felipe González

    2004-02-01

    Patterns of menthol cigarette consumption among Blacks and Hispanics are likely a product of the interactive effects of several factors: the physiological and pharmacological sensory effects of menthol, the "cool" psychological identity of being menthol smokers, the promotional marketing of menthol cigarettes, and the cultural effects of health-related beliefs and subjective culture norms. This article presents two conceptual frameworks--a moderation logic model and a mediation logic model--for organizing the disparate literature on factors affecting the consumption of menthol cigarettes among Blacks and Hispanics. Three factor domains are examined as direct effect predictors of menthol cigarette smoking: (a) physiological and pharmacological, (b) psychological, and (c) social and environmental. In addition, a fourth domain of cultural variables is presented as a class of moderator or mediator variables that can interact with these physiological, psychological, and social factors as determinants of menthol cigarette use. These cultural variables are examined as mediating or moderating factors that influence the use of menthol cigarettes by Black and Hispanic consumers. Recommendations are offered for future research to further understand the influence of cultural and other factors as determinants of menthol cigarette smoking among Blacks and Hispanics.

  20. From "Hell No!" to "Que Paso?": Interrogating a Hispanic-Serving Institution Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Dulcinea; Lara, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Some Hispanic students are making it through the Eurocentric, United Statesian education pipeline, but exponentially more are failing. Meanwhile, poor Chican@ communities are disproportionately suffering from unemployment, low levels of education, chronic illness, pollution, and myriad social ills. At this historical crossroads, it behooves…

  1. Approaches to Learning and Hispanic Children's Math Scores: The Moderating Role of English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgarner, Erin; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that children's approaches to learning (ATL) at kindergarten entry predict their academic achievement years later. However, the gains associated with ATL may be diminished for Hispanic immigrant children, many of whom are English language learners (ELLs). We tested whether ATL predicted math scores in a sample of…

  2. Hispanic Students' Perception of White Teachers' Mastery Goal Orientation Influences Sense of School Belonging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Tara; Hamman, Doug; Olivarez, Arturo, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This study postulated a structural model to investigate the degree of influence that White middle-level teachers who employ mastery goal orientation and academic pressure may have on Hispanic students' sense of school belongingness. Participants were 434 5th and 6th grade students and 21 teachers. Initial proposed model estimates fit the data…

  3. Working with Hispanic Women Who Are Deaf: Recommendations from the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Amber M.; Saladin, Shawn P.; Hansmann, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The authors used the hermeneutics approach within social cognitive career theory to explore employment trends and issues over the past 20 years relevant to Hispanic women who are deaf. Barriers to employment were discovered including discrepancies due to gender, race/ethnicity, and severity of hearing loss. Recommendations for policymakers and…

  4. The impact of Hispanic and white group cues on attitudes towards the violation of generic norms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Cranmer

    Full Text Available While much work in political science has examined the impact of racial cues on individual perceptions, we know little about how individuals evaluate members of minority outgroups on issues that are not linked to stereotypes. We measure the impacts of Hispanic and White cues on individual assessments related to a stereotype-independent norm violation: alcoholism. We test three competing theories--cognition, intergroup emotions, and social identity--using a population-based vignette experiment included in the General Social Survey. Our results contradict much of the literature, but keep with social identity theory's predictions. Hispanic alcoholics, when Hispanics constitute the outgroup, are assessed less negatively than White alcoholics in the ingroup, the latter experiencing what is called the black sheep effect. The black sheep effect occurs when ingroup members are more punitive towards members of the ingroup than the outgroup. However, the black sheep effect does not extend to measures that are more consistent with outgroup stereotypes, such as violence or money mismanagement; Hispanic alcoholics are evaluated more negatively than Whites on these measures. The implication is that the effect of racial cues depends strongly on issue linkages to group stereotypes.

  5. Reliability of third molar development for age estimation in a Texas Hispanic population: a comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Kathleen A; Austin, Dana; Kvanli, Alan H; Rios, Tara R; Senn, David R

    2009-05-01

    Evaluating third molars from 950 Hispanic individuals aged 12-22 years using Demirjian's schematic for crown and root formation found that Hispanic third molar development was 8-18 months faster than American Caucasians as reported by Mincer, Harris and Berryman in 1993. This represents a statistically significant increase. Earlier development was more apparent in the later stages F through H. Hispanic males reach developmental stages faster than Hispanic females and maxillary third molars reach developmental stages faster than mandibular third molars in both sexes. The earliest age observed for stages B-H (e.g., Stage H first observed at age 13.92 years in females) and the oldest age observed for Stages B-G were developed to facilitate age prediction of unknown individuals. Prediction tables for minimum and maximum age for an observed stage (e.g., if a female maxillary third molar is stage F it means she is older than 13 years) for each sex-jaw group were calculated.

  6. Real Incomes of Rural Black and Hispanic Workers Fell Further behind in the 1980's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyson, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    Compares rural and urban income levels of Whites, Blacks, and Hispanic workers by region for the years 1979 and 1987. Presents information on geographic concentrations of minorities. Suggests the economic status of rural minorities failed to improve because of the nonskilled or semiskilled job opportunities in areas where minority populations are…

  7. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis. PMID:27021143

  8. Bilingualism (Ancestral Language Maintenance) among Native American, Vietnamese American, and Hispanic American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharry, Cheryl

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 21 Hispanic, 22 Native American, and 10 Vietnamese American college students found that adoption or maintenance of ancestral language was related to attitudes toward ancestral language, beliefs about parental attitudes, and integrative motivation (toward family and ancestral ethnic group). There were significant differences by gender…

  9. Perceptions about Parental Engagement among Hispanic Immigrant Mothers of First Graders from Low-Income Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samantha Berkule; Arevalo, Jenny; Cates, Carolyn Brockmeyer; Weisleder, Adriana; Dreyer, Benard P.; Mendelsohn, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Parental engagement is critical to children's educational achievement. Before and during elementary school, it is crucial for parents to be involved in their children's education in order to foster development and achievement. Hispanic parents' immigrant status, coupled with a lack of English proficiency, means that they often find themselves of…

  10. Personality Correlates of Alcohol Consumption and Aggression in a Hispanic College Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Grange, Linda; Hojnowski, Natalya; Nesterova, Svitlana

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the association between alcohol consumption and aggression from a personality trait perspective with 92 self-identified Hispanic college students. They partially replicated a study by Quigley, Corbett, and Tedeshi, which examined the relationships between desired image of power, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol-related…

  11. Longitudinal Relationships between Family Functioning and Identity Development in Hispanic Adolescents: Continuity and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Seth J.; Mason, Craig A.; Pantin, Hilda; Szapocznik, Jose

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate trajectories of identity development and their relationship to family functioning in a sample of Hispanic adolescents and their primary caregivers. Two hundred fifty adolescents completed measures of identity coherence and confusion and of family functioning, and parents completed measures of family…

  12. Latino Faculty Development in U.S. Medical Schools: A Hispanic Center of Excellence Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Greene, Maria L.; Sanchez, Jorge; Churrango, Jose; Salas-Lopez, Debbie

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, faculty development programs and fellowships have been shown to successfully address the developmental needs of individual faculty members. Despite positive results, there are very few programs targeted specifically toward career development for Latino and other minority faculty. The Hispanic Center of Excellence, as a Bureau of…

  13. Cervical cancer screening among immigrant Hispanics: an analysis by country of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Rachel C; Jandorf, Lina; King, Sheba; Thelemaque, Linda; Erwin, Deborah O

    2012-08-01

    As the largest and most diverse ethnic minority population in the U.S., it is important to examine differences in and correlates of Pap test adherence among Hispanics by country of origin. The data for these analyses are baseline responses from a Randomized Controlled Trial. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression models were conducted among Hispanic immigrant women who identified as Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, or Central/South American (n = 1,305). There were significant differences in Pap test adherence: Dominicans (81.6%), Mexicans (77.5%), Central/South Americans (71.2%), and Puerto Ricans (69.3%). In multivariable analyses, there were different correlates of Pap test adherence for each country of origin. For example, marriage status (P = .0001) and younger age (P = .006) were positively associated with adherence among Mexican women. This research provides insight into the variability that exists among Hispanics and can help improve understanding of important determinants that may influence Pap test screening among diverse Hispanics.

  14. Breast Cancer Screening among Older Hispanic Women: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Germain, Michelle A.; Longman, Alice J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from 409 Hispanic-American and 138 Anglo older women in Tucson identified few differences in their use of breast cancer screening and low levels of risk knowledge. Both groups fell well below recommended frequency of screening. Clinical examination and self-examination were used more than mammography. (SK)

  15. Evaluation of 3 Behavioral Theories for Application in Health Promotion Strategies for Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Daisy S

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic/Latina women often fare poorly when attempting to access the health care that they need in the United States. Using an established criterion, this article analyzes the application of the health belief model (HBM), social cognitive theory (SCT), and health promotion model (HPM) in the context of Hispanic women's limited access to, and use of, health resources to promote their health. An individual's perceptions and the likelihood of taking action are the focus of HBM. SCT is regarded as important sociostructural and personal determinants in the regulation of human behavior. Finally, HPM centers on the unique characteristics and experiences of an individual that motivate him or her toward positive health behavior. The analysis suggests that HPM is a better fit to explore the relationship among sociocultural factors, lifestyle practices, and the positive perceived affect of Hispanic women engaging in healthy behaviors and utilizing health care in the United States. HPM can guide the design of both health-enhancing and disease-prevention strategies that specifically address Hispanic women's unique health needs.

  16. Gender Differences in Physical Activity and Related Beliefs among Hispanic College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoc, Dejan; Tomaka, Joe; Shamaley, Angelee Gigi; Bridges, Amber

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated gender differences in physical activity (PA) and social-cognitive theory (SCT) variables among Hispanics. Students (N = 298) completed measures assessing levels of PA and variables derived from SCT. Men reported greater PA than women. Men also reported having greater self-efficacy for PA, greater perceived ability to set…

  17. Focus-Group Evaluation of Nutrition Education Displays by Hispanic Adults Who Live in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Delores H.; Munoz, Alejandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the acceptability and effectiveness of visual displays of nutrition educational information for low-income Hispanic adults in the USA and to determine whether this population have different perceptions of the same nutrition education displays or express different needs than low-income Caucasian…

  18. School, Family, and Peer Factors and Their Association with Substance Use in Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Barbara; Wang, Wei; Schwartz, Seth J.; Prado, Guillermo; Huang, Shi; Brown, C. Hendricks; Pantin, Hilda; Szapocznik, Jose

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how relationships among family, school, and peer factors relate to likelihood of substance use in Hispanic adolescents. Results indicated that only perceived peer substance use was directly related to adolescents' own substance use. A significant interaction was found between parental monitoring and…

  19. Extracurricular Activity Participation of Hispanic Students: Implications for Social Capital Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Gonzalez, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated whether participation in school-based extracurricular activities would predict social and behavioral outcomes (school membership, peer prosocial orientation, and prosocial behavior) associated with school social capital in a group of Hispanic middle school students from the United States of America. Results of hierarchical…

  20. Attitudes of Teachers of Spanish as a Foreign Language towards Teaching Spanish to Hispanic Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Rossana R.

    This study explored the attitudes of high school teachers of Spanish as a foreign language regarding the following: the use of Spanish, teaching Spanish as a heritage language to Hispanic students, the role of English in the United States, and the use of English at school or home. Participants were teachers of Spanish in three Louisiana school…

  1. Hispanic Heritage Language Speakers in the United States: Linguistic Exclusion in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreffler, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    The Hispanic population of the United States is quite diverse and with each passing year, due to (im)migration patterns, more and more students are entering language classrooms with some degree of familiarity with the language. However, because of the tendency toward intergenerational loss of Spanish, the linguistic proficiency covers the…

  2. Interdependent Relationship Theory: A Model for Reducing Discipline Issues with Latino/Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lorraine S.

    2011-01-01

    Studies continue to reveal major concerns with discipline issues, such as referrals, detentions, and suspensions, involving Latino/Hispanic students. This problem particularly affects immigrant students in urban neighborhoods that may be characterized by high poverty and crime rates. The purpose of this study was to explore the intersection of…

  3. The Supervision Experiences of Non-Hispanic Bilingual Therapists Who Worked with Spanish-Speaking Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzate, Nancy Ascencio

    2014-01-01

    This study utilized a qualitative approach to explore the supervision experiences of nine participants (seven females and two males) or non-Hispanic bilingual therapists who worked with Spanish-speaking clients and were under the supervision of a monolingual English-speaking supervisor. Their interviews data were audio recorded, transcribed and…

  4. Strategies for Disseminating Information on Biomedical Research on Autism to Hispanic Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajonchere, Clara M.; Wheeler, Barbara Y.; Valente, Thomas W.; Kreutzer, Cary; Munson, Aron; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Kazemzadeh, Abe; Cruz, Roxana; Martinez, Irene; Schrager, Sheree M.; Schweitzer, Lisa; Chklovski, Tara; Hwang, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Low income Hispanic families experience multiple barriers to accessing evidence-based information on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This study utilized a mixed-strategy intervention to create access to information in published bio-medical research articles on ASD by distilling the content into parent-friendly English- and Spanish-language ASD…

  5. Hispanic Orientation to Life in America. Project HOLA, 1987-88. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Tomi D.; Mohagdam, Val

    In its fifth year, the Hispanic Orientation to Life in America Project (Project HOLA) served 472 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency. The aim of the program was to help students develop English language skills, enter mainstream classes, and understand Spanish and American culture. The program provided instruction in English as…

  6. Organ Donor Registration Preferences among Hispanic Populations: Which Modes of Registration Have the Greatest Promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jason T.; Alvaro, Eusebio M.; Jones, Sara Pace

    2005-01-01

    There is little debate over Hispanics' need for viable organs. Although organ donor registries can potentially assist in alleviating this need, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has called on researchers to investigate methods to maximize such potential. This research effort answers the aforementioned call by surveying…

  7. Factorial Structure and Invariance of the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory across Hispanic and Chinese Adolescent Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Rebecca P.; Huan, Vivien S.; Braman, O. Randall

    2007-01-01

    Using confirmatory factor analysis, the current study provided further evidence for the two-factor structure of the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory [AESI; Ang RP, Huan VS (2006) Educ Psych Meas 66:522-539] using a sample of 191 US Hispanic adolescents and a sample of 211 Singapore Chinese adolescents. This study also examined the…

  8. Neighborhood Residential Segregation and Physical Health among Hispanic Americans: Good, Bad, or Benign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Ah; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

    2007-01-01

    Although considerable evidence shows that residential segregation is deleterious to the health of African Americans, findings regarding segregation and health for Hispanic Americans are inconsistent. Competing hypotheses regarding the effects of neighborhood segregation on health are tested with data from Puerto Rican and Mexican American…

  9. Effects of Non-Traditional Teaching on Retention among Predominantly Hispanic Engineering Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, John; And Others

    This study examined the effects of non-traditional instructional methods on student learning in an engineering course at the University of Texas at El Paso. The summer 1993 material selection course enrolled 33 students, the majority of whom were Hispanic Americans. Instead of the traditional lecture method, the course employed student project…

  10. Parental Suicidality as a Risk Factor for Delinquency among Hispanic Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Wesley G.; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Piquero, Alex R.; Canino, Glorisa

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have examined the factors associated with juvenile delinquency, but this literature remains limited largely because it has not moved beyond traditional factors generally and because of the lack of research conducted on minority--especially Hispanic--youth. This study seeks to overcome these two limitations by using data from a…

  11. The HABP2 G534E polymorphism does not increase nonmedullary thyroid cancer risk in Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohórquez, Mabel E; Estrada, Ana P; Stultz, Jacob; Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Williamson, John; Lott, Paul; Duque, Carlos S; Donado, Jorge; Mateus, Gilbert; Bolaños, Fernando; Vélez, Alejandro; Echeverry, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer (NMTC) has not been clearly linked to causal germline variants, despite the large role that genetic factors play in risk. Recently, HABP2 G534E (rs7080536A) has been implicated as a causal variant in NMTC. We have previously shown that the HABP2 G534E variant is not associated with TC risk in patients from the British Isles. Hispanics are the largest and the youngest minority in the United States and NMTC is now the second most common malignancy in women from this population. In order to determine if the HABP2 G534E variant played a role in NMTC risk among Hispanic populations, we analyzed 281 cases and 1105 population-matched controls from a multicenter study in Colombia, evaluating the association through logistic regression. We found that the HABP2 G534E variant was not significantly associated with NMTC risk (P=0.843) in this Hispanic group. We also stratified available clinical data by multiple available clinicopathological variables and further analyzed the effect of HABP2 on NMTC presentation. However, we failed to detect associations between HABP2 G534E and NMTC risk, regardless of disease presentation (P≥0.273 for all cases). Therefore, without any significant associations between the HABP2 G534E variant and NMTC risk, we conclude that the variant is not causal of NMTC in this Hispanic population. PMID:27097599

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  19. Accion/Action: A Coast-to-Coast Sampling of Innovative Hispanic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Karla

    1983-01-01

    Some innovative programs designed to draw more Hispanics into higher education are described: Pan American University's Talent Search project, guaranteed admission for students with associate's degrees to Florida state universities, the College Assistance Migrant Program, the Border College Consortium, outreach program for junior and senior high…

  20. Health Status and Cancer Screening in Hispanic Women: A Sample from Cumberland County, North Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Griffiths

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study examines self-reported breast and cervical cancer screening history among women aged 18 years and above in Cumberland County, NC. Cumberland County is a multi-ethnic, semi-urban, racially diverse community with a large Hispanic population. Cross-sectional, mixed methodology data collection took place in local Tiendas. The sample consists of women belonging to a variety of ethnic groups generally classified as “Hispanic.” The questionnaire and interview guide used in the study developed from the Center for Disease Control’s National Health Interview Survey, and measured breast examination, mammogram, Pap Smear, family cancer, and health insurance history, as well as self reported health status, socio-demographic, and cultural features of the respondents. We found that despite demographics from the 2010 Census showing a high incidence of breast and cervical cancers in the North Carolina Hispanic population, fewer Hispanic women in Cumberland County screened themselves for the presence of this cancer as compared to women at the national level. Education positively impacted both self rated health status as well as cancer screening behavior. Interview data suggested the lack of screening behavior in this population was due to a perceived lack of cultural sensitivity and a dearth of translators.