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Sample records for 7tm receptor signaling

  1. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R;

    2001-01-01

    A number of herpes- and poxviruses encode 7TM G-protein coupled receptors most of which clearly are derived from their host chemokine system as well as induce high expression of certain 7TM receptors in the infected cells. The receptors appear to be exploited by the virus for either immune evasion...... expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomics dissection of 7TM receptor signaling using full and biased agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte Lund; Kelstrup, Christian; Lyngsø, Christina;

    2010-01-01

    performed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis of the AT1R signaling network. We analyzed ligand-stimulated SILAC cells by high-resolution mass spectrometry (LTQ Orbitrap MS) and compared the phosphoproteomes of the AT1R agonist Angiotensin II and the biased agonist SII Angiotensin II, which...... only activates the Gaq protein-independent signaling.e quantified more than ten thousand phosphorylation sites of which 1183 were regulated by Angiotensin II or its analogue SII Angiotensin II. 36% of the AT1R regulated phosphorylations were regulated by SII Angiotensin II. Analysis of phosphorylation...

  3. Family C 7TM receptor dimerization and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Sheikh, Søren P; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2006-01-01

    The family C seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors constitutes a small and especially well characterized subfamily of the large 7TM receptor superfamily. Approximately 50% of current prescription drugs target 7TM receptors, this biologically important family represents the largest class of drug......-targets today. It is well established that family C 7TM receptors form homo- or hetero-dimers on the cell surface of living cells. The large extra-cellular domains (ECD) have been crystallized as a dimer in the presence and absence of agonist. Upon agonist binding, the dimeric ECD undergoes large conformational...... to be fully defined. This review presents the biochemical support for family C 7TM receptor dimerization and discusses its importance for receptor biosynthesis, surface expression, ligand binding and activation, since lessons learnt here may well be applicable to the whole superfamily of 7TM receptors....

  4. Construction of covalently coupled, concatameric dimers of 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terpager, Marie; Scholl, D Jason; Kubale, Valentina;

    2009-01-01

    -Ala repeats flanked by flexible spacers and positively charged residues to ensure correct inside-out orientation plus an extracellular HA-tag to construct covalently coupled dimers of 7TM receptors. Such 15 TM concatameric homo- and heterodimers of the beta(2)-adrenergic and the NK(1) receptors, which...... normally do not dimerize with each other, were expressed surprisingly well at the cell surface, where they bound ligands and activated signal transduction in a manner rather similar to the corresponding wild-type receptors. The concatameric heterodimers internalized upon stimulation with agonists...

  5. The minor binding pocket: a major player in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Frimurer, Thomas M.;

    2010-01-01

    From the deep part of the main ligand-binding crevice, a minor, often shallower pocket extends between the extracellular ends of transmembrane domains (TM)-I, II, III and VII of 7TM receptors. This minor binding pocket is defined by a highly conserved kink in TM-II that is induced by a proline...... residue located in one of two adjacent positions. Here we argue that this minor binding pocket is important for receptor activation. Functional coupling of the receptors seems to be mediated through the hydrogen bond network located between the intracellular segments of these TMs, with the allosteric...... interface between TM-II and TM-VII being of particular significance. Importantly, the minor binding pocket, especially the proline-kink in TM-II, is involved in G protein versus arrestin pathway-biased signaling, for example in the angiotensin AT1 system. Consequently, this pocket could be specifically...

  6. Conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond network between TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Hansen, Louise Valentin; Mokrosinski, Jacek;

    2010-01-01

    Five highly conserved polar residues connected by a number of structural water molecules together with two rotamer micro-switches, TrpVI:13 and TyrVII:20, constitute an extended hydrogen bond network between the intracellular segments of TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII of 7TM receptors. Molecular dynamics...... to apparently function as a catching trap for water molecules. Mutational analysis of the beta2-adrenergic receptor demonstrated that the highly conserved polar residues of the hydrogen bond network were all important for receptor signaling but served different functions, some dampening constitutive activity...... (AsnI:18, AspII:10, and AsnVII:13), whereas others (AsnVII:12 and AsnVII:16) located one helical turn apart and sharing a water molecule were shown to be essential for agonist-induced signaling. It is concluded that the conserved water hydrogen bond network of 7TM receptors constitutes an extended...

  7. Structural motifs of importance for the constitutive activity of the orphan 7TM receptor EBI2: analysis of receptor activation in the absence of an agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2008-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr induced receptor 2 (EBI2) is a lymphocyte-expressed orphan seven transmembrane-spanning (7TM) receptor that signals constitutively through Galphai, as shown, for instance by guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate incorporation. Two regions of importance for the constitutive activity...

  8. The role of transmembrane segment II in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, M M

    2009-01-01

    , accumulating evidence emphasize that this is not the case. In this review, we focus on TM-II with an emphasis on position II:20/2.60, and present data from structure-activity studies on a range of Family A 7TM receptors including chemokine, ghrelin and melanocortin receptors in addition to the orphan EBI2...

  9. Functional enhancement of AT1R potency in the presence of the TPαR is revealed by a comprehensive 7TM receptor co-expression screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Tind Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional cross-talk between seven transmembrane (7TM receptors can dramatically alter their pharmacological properties, both in vitro and in vivo. This represents an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutics that potentially target more specific biological effects while causing fewer adverse events. Although several studies convincingly have established the existence of 7TM receptor cross-talk, little is known about the frequencey and biological significance of this phenomenon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the extent of synergism in 7TM receptor signaling, we took a comprehensive approach and co-expressed 123 different 7TM receptors together with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R and analyzed how each receptor affected the angiotensin II (AngII response. To monitor the effect we used integrative receptor activation/signaling assay called Receptor Selection and Amplification Technology (R-SAT. In this screen the thromboxane A2α receptor (TPαR was the only receptor which significantly enhanced the AngII-mediated response. The TPαR-mediated enhancement of AngII signaling was significantly reduced when a signaling deficient receptor mutant (TPαR R130V was co-expressed instead of the wild-type TPαR, and was completely blocked both by TPαR antagonists and COX inhibitors inhibiting formation of thromboxane A2 (TXA2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found a functional enhancement of AT1R only when co-expressed with TPαR, but not with 122 other 7TM receptors. In addition, the TPαR must be functionally active, indicating the AT1R enhancement is mediated by a paracrine mechanism. Since we only found one receptor enhancing AT1R potency, our results suggest that functional augmentation through 7TM receptor cross-talk is a rare event that may require specific conditions to occur.

  10. The emerging role of promiscuous 7TM receptors as chemosensors for food intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2010-01-01

    (GI) tract, endocrine glands, adipose tissue, and/or kidney. This has led to the hypothesis that these receptors may act as sensors of food intake modulating, for example, release of incretin hormones from the gut, insulin/glucagon from the pancreas, and leptin from adipose tissue. In the present......In recent years, several highly promiscuous seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors have been cloned and characterized of which many are activated broadly by amino acids, proteolytic degradation products, carbohydrates, or free fatty acids (FFAs) and are expressed in taste tissue, the gastrointestinal...... review, we describe the molecular mechanisms of nutrient-sensing of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), the G protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A), and the taste1 receptor T1R1/T1R3-sensing L-a-amino acids; the carbohydrate-sensing T1R2/T1R3 receptor; the proteolytic degradation...

  11. Ago-allosteric modulation and other types of allostery in dimeric 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Birgitte

    2006-01-01

    Conventionally, an allosteric modulator is neutral in respect of efficacy and binds to a receptor site distant from the orthosteric site of the endogenous agonist. However, recently compounds being ago-allosteric modulators have been described i.e., compounds acting both as agonists on their own...... influence the potency of the endogenous agonist. It is of interest that at least some endogenous agonists can only occupy one protomer of a dimeric 7TM receptor complex at a time and thereby they leave the orthosteric binding site in the allosteric protomer free, potentially for binding of exogenous......, allosteric modulators. If the allosteric modulator is an agonist, it is an ago-allosteric modulator; if it is neutral, it is a classical enhancer. Molecular mapping in hetero-dimeric class-C receptors, where the endogenous agonist clearly binds only in one protomer, supports the notion that allosteric...

  12. PheVI:09 (Phe6.44) as a sliding microswitch in seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Louise; Holst, Birgitte; Frimurer, Thomas M;

    2012-01-01

    In seven-transmembrane (7TM), G protein-coupled receptors, highly conserved residues function as microswitches, which alternate between different conformations and interaction partners in an extended allosteric interface between the transmembrane segments performing the large scale conformational...

  13. EBI2, GPR18 and GPR17--three structurally related, but biologically distinct 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Kristine; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2011-01-01

    have been deorphanized, many remain orphan, and these orphan receptors constitute a large pool of potential drug targets. This review focuses on one of these orphan targets, the Epstein-Barr Virus-induced receptor 2, EBI2 (or GPR183), together with two structurally related receptors, GPR17 and GPR18...

  14. Functional enhancement of AT1R potency in the presence of the TPαR is revealed by a comprehensive 7TM receptor co-expression screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas Tind; Lyngsø, Christina; Speerschneider, Tobias;

    2013-01-01

    Functional cross-talk between seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors can dramatically alter their pharmacological properties, both in vitro and in vivo. This represents an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutics that potentially target more specific biological effects while causing few...

  15. Functional interactions between 7TM receptors in the renin-angiotensin system--dimerization or crosstalk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Christina; Erikstrup, Niels; Hansen, Jakob L

    2008-01-01

    The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) is important for the regulation of cardiovascular physiology, where it controls blood pressure, and salt- and water homeostasis. Dysregulation of RAS can lead to severe diseases including hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and cardiac arrhythmia, and -failure....... The importance of the RAS is clearly emphasised by the widespread use of drugs targeting this system in clinical practice. These include, renin inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor type I blockers, and inhibitors of the angiotensin converting enzyme. Some of the important effectors within the system are 7...

  16. Opioid-induced redistribution of 6TM and 7TM μ opioid receptors: A hypothesized mechanistic facilitator model of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Xiaoju; Liu, Yusheng; Xu, Shiqin; Lei, Liming; Shen, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xirong; Xia, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-08-01

    Opioids are still the most popular form of pain treatment, but many unavoidable side effects make opioids a big challenge in effective pain management. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), a paradoxical phenomenon, portrays an increased sensitivity to harmful stimuli caused by opioid exposure. Changes in the neural modulation are considered a major contributor to the development of OIH. Activation of opioid receptors (ORs) and corresponding downstream molecules are the vital composition of functional performance of opioids. Increasing interests were proposed of the interaction between ORs and other neural transmitter systems such as glutamatergic, GABAergic and adrenergic ones to the genesis of OIH. G protein coupled μ-opioid receptor (MOR) was studied comprehensively on its role in the development of OIH. In addition to the relationship between MOR and other neurotransmitter receptors, a new intracellular MOR that has six transmembrane (6TM) domains was identified, and found to perform a pro-nociceptive task in contrast to the counterpart 7TM isoform. A mechanistic model of OIH in which both 6TM and 7TM MORs undergoing membrane redistribution upon opioid exposure is proposed which eventually facilitates the neurons more sensitive to nociceptive stimulation than that of the preceding opioid exposure.

  17. Biased and g protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie;

    2014-01-01

    not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro......-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of "classic" redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where...... a single chemokine may bind to several receptors - in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles...

  18. In vivo characterization of high Basal signaling from the ghrelin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Pia Steen; Woldbye, David P D; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard;

    2009-01-01

    The receptor for the orexigenic peptide, ghrelin, is one of the most constitutively active 7TM receptors known, as demonstrated under in vitro conditions. Change in expression of a constitutively active receptor is associated with change in signaling independent of the endogenous ligand. In the f...

  19. Biased and G protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eSteen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor, different receptors (with the same ligand or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand-receptor pair. Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e. full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of classic redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confer a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor- or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the

  20. Galaxy7TM: flexible GPCR-ligand docking by structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyu Rie; Seok, Chaok

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important physiological roles related to signal transduction and form a major group of drug targets. Prediction of GPCR-ligand complex structures has therefore important implications to drug discovery. With previously available servers, it was only possible to first predict GPCR structures by homology modeling and then perform ligand docking on the model structures. However, model structures generated without explicit consideration of specific ligands of interest can be inaccurate because GPCR structures can be affected by ligand binding. The Galaxy7TM server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/7TM, improves an input GPCR structure by simultaneous ligand docking and flexible structure refinement using GALAXY methods. The server shows better performance in both ligand docking and GPCR structure refinement than commonly used programs AutoDock Vina and Rosetta MPrelax, respectively. PMID:27131365

  1. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  2. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails. Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Søndergaard, Birgitte P; Ersbøll, Bjarne;

    2004-01-01

    Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor sequ...

  3. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails - Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, A.; Sondergaard, B.P.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær;

    2004-01-01

    Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor sequ...

  4. Prostaglandin Receptor Signaling in Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Matsuoka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids, consisting of the prostaglandins (PGs and the thromboxanes (TXs, are a group of lipid mediators formed in response to various stimuli. They include PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2, and TXA2. They are released outside of the cells immediately after synthesis, and exert their actions by binding to a G-protein coupled rhodopsin-type receptor on the surface of target cells. There are eight types of the prostanoid receptors conserved in mammals from mouse to human. They are the PGD receptor (DP, four subtypes of the PGE receptor (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, the PGF receptor (FP, PGI receptor (IP, and TXA receptor (TP. Recently, mice deficient in each of these prostanoid receptors were generated and subjected to various experimental models of disease. These studies have revealed the roles of PG receptor signaling in various pathological conditions, and suggest that selective manipulation of the prostanoid receptors may be beneficial in treatment of the pathological conditions. Here we review these recent findings of roles of prostanoid receptor signaling and their therapeutic implications.

  5. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  6. LPA receptor signaling: pharmacology, physiology, and pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Yung, Yun C.; Stoddard, Nicole C.; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small ubiquitous lipid found in vertebrate and nonvertebrate organisms that mediates diverse biological actions and demonstrates medicinal relevance. LPA’s functional roles are driven by extracellular signaling through at least six 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are named LPA1–6 and signal through numerous effector pathways activated by heterotrimeric G proteins, including Gi/o, G12/13, Gq, and Gs. LPA receptor-mediated effects ha...

  7. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  8. Functional Consequences of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Cross-talk and Trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Wismann, Pernille;

    2015-01-01

    The signaling capacity of seven-transmembrane/G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) can be regulated through ligand-mediated receptor trafficking. Classically, the recycling of internalized receptors is associated with resensitization, whereas receptor degradation terminates signaling. We have......) and glucagon (GCGR) receptors. The interaction and cross-talk between coexpressed receptors is a wide phenomenon of the 7TM/GPCR superfamily. Numerous reports show functional consequences for signaling and trafficking of the involved receptors. On the basis of the high structural similarity and tissue...... coexpression, we here investigated the potential cross-talk between GLP-1R and GIPR or GCGR in both trafficking and signaling pathways. Using a real-time time-resolved FRET-based internalization assay, we show that GLP-1R, GIPR, and GCGR internalize with differential properties. Remarkably, upon coexpression...

  9. Estrogen receptor and aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Jason; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2006-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are ligand activated transcription factors and members of the nuclear receptor and bHLH-PAS superfamilies, respectively. AhR is involved in xenobiotic metabolism and in mediating the toxic effects of dioxin-like compounds. Crosstalk has been observed among AhR and nuclear receptors, but has been most well studied with respect to ER signaling. Activated AhR inhibits ER activity through a number of different mechanisms, whereas ER...

  10. Signal transduction by growth factor receptors: signaling in an instant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Blagoev, Blagoy;

    2007-01-01

    -out by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has allowed exciting views on the very early events in signal transduction. Activation profiles of regulated phosphorylation sites on epidermal growth factor receptor and downstream signal transducers showed different kinetics within the first ten seconds...

  11. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  12. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  13. Molecular mechanism of agonism and inverse agonism in the melanocortin receptors: Zn(2+) as a structural and functional probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    Among the rhodopsin-like 7TM receptors, the MC receptors are functionally unique because their high constitutive signaling activity is regulated not only by endogenous peptide agonists-MSH peptides-but also by endogenous inverse agonists, namely, the proteins agouti and AGRP. Moreover, the metal...

  14. Erythropoietin receptor signaling is membrane raft dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy L McGraw

    Full Text Available Upon erythropoietin (Epo engagement, Epo-receptor (R homodimerizes to activate JAK2 and Lyn, which phosphorylate STAT5. Although recent investigations have identified key negative regulators of Epo-R signaling, little is known about the role of membrane localization in controlling receptor signal fidelity. Here we show a critical role for membrane raft (MR microdomains in creation of discrete signaling platforms essential for Epo-R signaling. Treatment of UT7 cells with Epo induced MR assembly and coalescence. Confocal microscopy showed that raft aggregates significantly increased after Epo stimulation (mean, 4.3±1.4(SE vs. 25.6±3.2 aggregates/cell; p≤0.001, accompanied by a >3-fold increase in cluster size (p≤0.001. Raft fraction immunoblotting showed Epo-R translocation to MR after Epo stimulation and was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy in Epo stimulated UT7 cells and primary erythroid bursts. Receptor recruitment into MR was accompanied by incorporation of JAK2, Lyn, and STAT5 and their activated forms. Raft disruption by cholesterol depletion extinguished Epo induced Jak2, STAT5, Akt and MAPK phosphorylation in UT7 cells and erythroid progenitors. Furthermore, inhibition of the Rho GTPases Rac1 or RhoA blocked receptor recruitment into raft fractions, indicating a role for these GTPases in receptor trafficking. These data establish a critical role for MR in recruitment and assembly of Epo-R and signal intermediates into discrete membrane signaling units.

  15. Chemotaxis receptor complexes: from signaling to assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Endres

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of chemoreceptors in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane allow for the sensing of ligands with remarkable sensitivity. Despite the excellent characterization of the chemotaxis signaling network, very little is known about what controls receptor complex size. Here we use in vitro signaling data to model the distribution of complex sizes. In particular, we model Tar receptors in membranes as an ensemble of different sized oligomer complexes, i.e., receptor dimers, dimers of dimers, and trimers of dimers, where the relative free energies, including receptor modification, ligand binding, and interaction with the kinase CheA determine the size distribution. Our model compares favorably with a variety of signaling data, including dose-response curves of receptor activity and the dependence of activity on receptor density in the membrane. We propose that the kinetics of complex assembly can be measured in vitro from the temporal response to a perturbation of the complex free energies, e.g., by addition of ligand.

  16. GABAB receptors modulate NMDA receptor calcium signals in dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalifoux, Jason R; Carter, Adam G

    2010-04-15

    Metabotropic GABA(B) receptors play a fundamental role in modulating the excitability of neurons and circuits throughout the brain. These receptors influence synaptic transmission by inhibiting presynaptic release or activating postsynaptic potassium channels. However, their ability to directly influence different types of postsynaptic glutamate receptors remains unresolved. Here we examine GABA(B) receptor modulation in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from the mouse prefrontal cortex. We use two-photon laser-scanning microscopy to study synaptic modulation at individual dendritic spines. Using two-photon optical quantal analysis, we first demonstrate robust presynaptic modulation of multivesicular release at single synapses. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging, we then reveal that GABA(B) receptors strongly inhibit NMDA receptor calcium signals. This postsynaptic modulation occurs via the PKA pathway and does not affect synaptic currents mediated by AMPA or NMDA receptors. This form of GABA(B) receptor modulation has widespread implications for the control of calcium-dependent neuronal function.

  17. Muscarinic receptor signaling and colon cancer progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofeng Xie; Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of effective treatments, advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Emerging evidence supports the observation that muscarinic receptor (MR) signaling plays a critical role in growth and progression of CRC. MR activation by acetylcholine and bile acids results in transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and post-EGFR signal transduction that enhances cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, the authors review recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MR-mediated CRC progression and its therapeutic implications.

  18. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S.; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy. PMID:26657998

  19. Complexity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volinsky, Natalia; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of molecular mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling advances with ever-increasing pace. Yet our understanding of how the spatiotemporal dynamics of RTK signaling control specific cellular outcomes has lagged behind. Systems-centered experimental and computational approaches can help reveal how overlapping networks of signal transducers downstream of RTKs orchestrate specific cell-fate decisions. We discuss how RTK network regulatory structures, which involve the immediate posttranslational and delayed transcriptional controls by multiple feed forward and feedback loops together with pathway cross talk, adapt cells to the combinatorial variety of external cues and conditions. This intricate network circuitry endows cells with emerging capabilities for RTK signal processing and decoding. We illustrate how mathematical modeling facilitates our understanding of RTK network behaviors by unraveling specific systems properties, including bistability, oscillations, excitable responses, and generation of intricate landscapes of signaling activities. PMID:23906711

  20. The carboxyl terminus of human cytomegalovirus-encoded 7 transmembrane receptor US28 camouflages agonism by mediating constitutive endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldhoer, Maria; Casarosa, Paola; Rosenkilde, Mette M;

    2003-01-01

    US28 is one of four 7 transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors encoded by human cytomegalovirus and has been shown to both signal and endocytose in a ligand-independent, constitutively active manner. Here we show that the constitutive activity and constitutive endocytosis properties of US28 are se...

  1. Steroid Hormone Receptor Signals as Prognosticators for Urothelial Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ide

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a substantial amount of preclinical or clinical evidence suggesting that steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals play a critical role in urothelial tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These receptors include androgen receptor, estrogen receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, progesterone receptor, vitamin D receptor, retinoid receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, and others including orphan receptors. In particular, studies using urothelial cancer tissue specimens have demonstrated that elevated or reduced expression of these receptors as well as alterations of their upstream or downstream pathways correlates with patient outcomes. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting that steroid hormone receptors and related signals serve as biomarkers for urothelial carcinoma and are able to predict tumor recurrence or progression.

  2. Proliferative signaling initiated in ACTH receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F.P. Lotfi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent results of studies aiming to elucidate modes of integrating signals initiated in ACTH receptors and FGF2 receptors, within the network system of signal transduction found in Y1 adrenocortical cells. These modes of signal integration should be central to the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the G0->G1->S transition in the adrenal cell cycle. FGF2 elicits a strong mitogenic response in G0/G1-arrested Y1 adrenocortical cells, that includes a rapid and transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases-mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK-MAPK (2 to 10 min, b transcription activation of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc genes (10 to 30 min, c induction of c-Fos and c-Myc proteins by 1 h and cyclin D1 protein by 5 h, and d onset of DNA synthesis stimulation within 8 h. ACTH, itself a weak mitogen, interacts with FGF2 in a complex manner, blocking the FGF2 mitogenic response during the early and middle G1 phase, keeping ERK-MAPK activation and c-Fos and cyclin D1 induction at maximal levels, but post-transcriptionally inhibiting c-Myc expression. c-Fos and c-Jun proteins are mediators in both the strong and the weak mitogenic responses respectively triggered by FGF2 and ACTH. Induction of c-Fos and stimulation of DNA synthesis by ACTH are independent of PKA and are inhibited by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X. In addition, ACTH is a poor activator of ERK-MAPK, but c-Fos induction and DNA synthesis stimulation by ACTH are strongly inhibited by the inhibitor of MEK1 PD98059.

  3. Interleukin-7 Receptor Signaling Network: An Integrated Systems Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Megan J. Palmer; Vinay S. Mahajan; Lily C. Trajman; Darrell J. Irvine; Douglas A.Lauffenburger; Jianzhu Chen

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is an essential cytokine for the development and homeostatic maintenance of T and B lymphocytes. Binding of IL-7 to its cognate receptor, the IL-7 receptor (IL-7R), activates multiple pathways that regulate lymphocyte survival, glucose uptake, proliferation and differentiation. There has been much interest in understanding how IL-7 receptor signaling is modulated at multiple interconnected network levels. This review examines how the strength of the signal through the IL-7 receptor is modulated in T and B cells, including the use of shared receptor components, signaling crosstaik, shared interaction domains, feedback loops, integrated gene regulation, muitimerization and ligand competition. We discuss how these network control mechanisms could integrate to govern the properties of IL-7R signaling in lymphocytes in health and disease. Analysis of IL-7receptor signaling at a network level in a systematic manner will allow for a comprehensive approach to understanding the impact of multiple signaling pathways on lymphocyte biology.

  4. Receptor downregulation and desensitization enhance the information processing ability of signalling receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Resat Haluk; Wiley H Steven; Shankaran Harish

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In addition to initiating signaling events, the activation of cell surface receptors also triggers regulatory processes that restrict the duration of signaling. Acute attenuation of signaling can be accomplished either via ligand-induced internalization of receptors (endocytic downregulation) or via ligand-induced receptor desensitization. These phenomena have traditionally been viewed in the context of adaptation wherein the receptor system enters a refractory state in th...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.

  6. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  7. Membrane Trafficking of Death Receptors: Implications on Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulf Schneider-Brachert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Death receptors were initially recognised as potent inducers of apoptotic cell death and soon ambitious attempts were made to exploit selective ignition of controlled cellular suicide as therapeutic strategy in malignant diseases. However, the complexity of death receptor signalling has increased substantially during recent years. Beyond activation of the apoptotic cascade, involvement in a variety of cellular processes including inflammation, proliferation and immune response was recognised. Mechanistically, these findings raised the question how multipurpose receptors can ensure selective activation of a particular pathway. A growing body of evidence points to an elegant spatiotemporal regulation of composition and assembly of the receptor-associated signalling complex. Upon ligand binding, receptor recruitment in specialized membrane compartments, formation of receptor-ligand clusters and internalisation processes constitute key regulatory elements. In this review, we will summarise the current concepts of death receptor trafficking and its implications on receptor-associated signalling events.

  8. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor... Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signa...l transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. Authors

  9. Stress regulates endocannabinoid-CB1 receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, Cecilia J

    2014-10-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor is a G protein coupled receptor that is widely expressed throughout the brain. The endogenous ligands for the CB1 receptor (endocannabinoids) are N-arachidonylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol; together the endocannabinoids and CB1R subserve activity dependent, retrograde inhibition of neurotransmitter release in the brain. Deficiency of CB1 receptor signaling is associated with anhedonia, anxiety, and persistence of negative memories. CB1 receptor-endocannabinoid signaling is activated by stress and functions to buffer or dampen the behavioral and endocrine effects of acute stress. Its role in regulation of neuronal responses is more complex. Chronic variable stress exposure reduces endocannabinoid-CB1 receptor signaling and it is hypothesized that the resultant deficiency in endocannabinoid signaling contributes to the negative consequences of chronic stress. On the other hand, repeated exposure to the same stress can sensitize CB1 receptor signaling, resulting in dampening of the stress response. Data are reviewed that support the hypothesis that CB1 receptor signaling is stress responsive and that maintaining robust endocannabinoid/CB1 receptor signaling provides resilience against the development of stress-related pathologies.

  10. Dynamic phospholipid signaling by G protein-coupled receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weernink, Paschal A. Oude; Han, Li; Jakobs, Karl H.; Schmidt, Martina

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) control a variety of fundamental cellular processes by regulating phospholipid signaling pathways. Essential for signaling by a large number of receptors is the hydrolysis of the membrane phosphoinositide PIP2 by phospholipase C (PLC) into the second messengers IP

  11. Sweet Taste Receptor Signaling Network: Possible Implication for Cognitive Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menizibeya O. Welcome

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet taste receptors are transmembrane protein network specialized in the transmission of information from special “sweet” molecules into the intracellular domain. These receptors can sense the taste of a range of molecules and transmit the information downstream to several acceptors, modulate cell specific functions and metabolism, and mediate cell-to-cell coupling through paracrine mechanism. Recent reports indicate that sweet taste receptors are widely distributed in the body and serves specific function relative to their localization. Due to their pleiotropic signaling properties and multisubstrate ligand affinity, sweet taste receptors are able to cooperatively bind multiple substances and mediate signaling by other receptors. Based on increasing evidence about the role of these receptors in the initiation and control of absorption and metabolism, and the pivotal role of metabolic (glucose regulation in the central nervous system functioning, we propose a possible implication of sweet taste receptor signaling in modulating cognitive functioning.

  12. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B Becnel

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs, their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org that annotates and integrates diverse 'omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs. These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy "Web 2.0" technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA's Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field.

  13. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becnel, Lauren B.; Darlington, Yolanda F.; Ochsner, Scott A.; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R.; Watkins, Christopher M.; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H.; Wise, Michael W.; DeHart, Michael; Margolis, Ronald N.; McKenna, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs), their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org) that annotates and integrates diverse ‘omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs). These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy “Web 2.0” technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA’s Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:26325041

  14. DMPD: Adaptor usage and Toll-like receptor signaling specificity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15876435 Adaptor usage and Toll-like receptor signaling specificity. Dunne A, O'Nei...sage and Toll-like receptor signaling specificity. PubmedID 15876435 Title Adaptor usage and Toll-like receptor signaling specific

  15. Molecular mechanism of 7TM receptor activation--a global toggle switch model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M; Holst, Birgitte;

    2006-01-01

    the accumulated biophysical data supporting an outward rigid-body movement of the intracellular segments, as well as the recent data derived from activating metal ion sites and tethered ligands, which suggests an opposite, inward movement of the extracellular segments of the transmembrane helices. According...

  16. Ligand binding and micro-switches in 7TM receptor structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Frimurer, Thomas M; Holst, Birgitte;

    2009-01-01

    ' in which extracellular loop 2b, in particular, functions as a gating element. Small-molecule antagonists and inverse agonists bind in very different modes: some very deeply and others more superficially, even reaching out above the transmembranes. Several highly conserved residues seem to function as micro......-switches of which ArgIII:26 (Arg3.50) in its active conformation interacts directly with the G protein. These micro-switches together with a hydrogen-bond network between conserved polar residues and structural water molecules are proposed to constitute an extended allosteric interface between the domains (i...

  17. Phagocytosis: receptors, signal integration, and the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Spencer A; Grinstein, Sergio

    2014-11-01

    Phagocytosis is a remarkably complex and versatile process: it contributes to innate immunity through the ingestion and elimination of pathogens, while also being central to tissue homeostasis and remodeling by clearing effete cells. The ability of phagocytes to perform such diverse functions rests, in large part, on their vast repertoire of receptors. In this review, we address the various receptor types, their mobility in the plane of the membrane, and two modes of receptor crosstalk: priming and synergy. A major section is devoted to the actin cytoskeleton, which not only governs receptor mobility and clustering but also is instrumental in particle engulfment. Four stages of the actin remodeling process are identified and discussed: (i) the 'resting' stage that precedes receptor engagement, (ii) the disruption of the cortical actin prior to formation of the phagocytic cup, (iii) the actin polymerization that propels pseudopod extension, and (iv) the termination of polymerization and removal of preassembled actin that are required for focal delivery of endomembranes and phagosomal sealing. These topics are viewed in the larger context of the differentiation and polarization of the phagocytic cells.

  18. Interdependent epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sylwia; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2014-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signalling regulates diverse cellular functions, promoting cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell growth and survival. EGFR signalling is critical during embryogenesis, in particular in epithelial development, and disruption of the EGFR gene results in epithelial immaturity and perinatal death. EGFR signalling also functions during wound healing responses through accelerating wound re-epithelialisation, inducing cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. Upregulation of EGFR signalling is often observed in carcinomas and has been shown to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore aberrant EGFR signalling is a common target for anticancer therapies. Various reports indicate that EGFR signalling primarily occurs at the plasma membrane and EGFR degradation following endocytosis greatly attenuates signalling. Other studies argue that EGFR internalisation is essential for complete activation of downstream signalling cascades and that endosomes can serve as signalling platforms. The aim of this review is to discuss current understanding of intersection between EGFR signalling and trafficking. PMID:24681003

  19. Dopamine D2-like receptor signaling suppresses human osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanami, Kentaro; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kubo, Satoshi; Kondo, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine, a major neurotransmitter, transmits signals via five different seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors termed D1 to D5. Although the relevance of neuroendocrine system to bone metabolism has been emerging, the precise effects of dopaminergic signaling upon osteoclastogenesis remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human monocyte-derived osteoclast precursor cells express all dopamine-receptor subtypes. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists such as pramipexole and quinpirole reduced the formation of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells, cathepsin K mRNA expression, and pit formation area in vitro. These inhibitory effects were reversed by pre-treatment with a D2-like receptor antagonist haloperidol or a Gαi inhibitor pertussis toxin, but not with the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists, but not a D1-like receptor agonist, suppressed intracellular cAMP concentration as well as RANKL-meditated induction of c-Fos and NFATc1 mRNA expression in human osteoclast precursor cells. Finally, the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation in murine bone marrow culture ex vivo. These findings indicate that dopaminergic signaling plays an important role in bone homeostasis via direct effects upon osteoclast differentiation and further suggest that the clinical use of neuroleptics is likely to affect bone mass. PMID:23631878

  20. Modulation of β-catenin signaling by glucagon receptor activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyuan Ke

    Full Text Available The glucagon receptor (GCGR is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor family. Activation of GCGR by glucagon leads to increased glucose production by the liver. Thus, glucagon is a key component of glucose homeostasis by counteracting the effect of insulin. In this report, we found that in addition to activation of the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA pathway, activation of GCGR also induced β-catenin stabilization and activated β-catenin-mediated transcription. Activation of β-catenin signaling was PKA-dependent, consistent with previous reports on the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTH1R and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1R receptors. Since low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5 is an essential co-receptor required for Wnt protein mediated β-catenin signaling, we examined the role of Lrp5 in glucagon-induced β-catenin signaling. Cotransfection with Lrp5 enhanced the glucagon-induced β-catenin stabilization and TCF promoter-mediated transcription. Inhibiting Lrp5/6 function using Dickkopf-1(DKK1 or by expression of the Lrp5 extracellular domain blocked glucagon-induced β-catenin signaling. Furthermore, we showed that Lrp5 physically interacted with GCGR by immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays. Together, these results reveal an unexpected crosstalk between glucagon and β-catenin signaling, and may help to explain the metabolic phenotypes of Lrp5/6 mutations.

  1. Cocaine inhibits dopamine D2 receptor signaling via sigma-1-D2 receptor heteromers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Navarro

    Full Text Available Under normal conditions the brain maintains a delicate balance between inputs of reward seeking controlled by neurons containing the D1-like family of dopamine receptors and inputs of aversion coming from neurons containing the D2-like family of dopamine receptors. Cocaine is able to subvert these balanced inputs by altering the cell signaling of these two pathways such that D1 reward seeking pathway dominates. Here, we provide an explanation at the cellular and biochemical level how cocaine may achieve this. Exploring the effect of cocaine on dopamine D2 receptors function, we present evidence of σ1 receptor molecular and functional interaction with dopamine D2 receptors. Using biophysical, biochemical, and cell biology approaches, we discovered that D2 receptors (the long isoform of the D2 receptor can complex with σ1 receptors, a result that is specific to D2 receptors, as D3 and D4 receptors did not form heteromers. We demonstrate that the σ1-D2 receptor heteromers consist of higher order oligomers, are found in mouse striatum and that cocaine, by binding to σ1 -D2 receptor heteromers, inhibits downstream signaling in both cultured cells and in mouse striatum. In contrast, in striatum from σ1 knockout animals these complexes are not found and this inhibition is not seen. Taken together, these data illuminate the mechanism by which the initial exposure to cocaine can inhibit signaling via D2 receptor containing neurons, destabilizing the delicate signaling balance influencing drug seeking that emanates from the D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons in the brain.

  2. Signal Transduction and Intracellular Trafficking by the Interleukin 36 Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Siddhartha S.; Singh, Divyendu; Raymond, Ernest L.; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Caviness, Gary; Grimaldi, Christine; Woska, Joseph R.; Mennerich, Detlev; Brown, Su-Ellen; Mbow, M. Lamine; Kao, C. Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Improper signaling of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R), a member of the IL-1 receptor family, has been associated with various inflammation-associated diseases. However, the requirements for IL-36R signal transduction remain poorly characterized. This work seeks to define the requirements for IL-36R signaling and intracellular trafficking. In the absence of cognate agonists, IL-36R was endocytosed and recycled to the plasma membrane. In the presence of IL-36, IL-36R increased accumulation in LAMP1+ lysosomes. Endocytosis predominantly used a clathrin-mediated pathway, and the accumulation of the IL-36R in lysosomes did not result in increased receptor turnover. The ubiquitin-binding Tollip protein contributed to IL-36R signaling and increased the accumulation of both subunits of the IL-36R. PMID:26269592

  3. Cysteinyl-Leukotriene Receptors and Cellular Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Enrico Rovati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysteinyl-LTs exert a range of proinflammatory effects, such as constriction of airways and vascular smooth muscle, increase of endothelial cell permeability leading to plasma exudation and edema, and enhanced mucus secretion. They have proved to be important mediators in asthma, allergic rhinitis, and other inflammatory conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, atopic dermatitis, and urticaria. The classification into subtypes of the cysteinyl-LT receptors (CysLTRs was based initially on binding and functional data, obtained using the natural agonists and a wide range of antagonists. CysLTRs have proved remarkably resistant to cloning. However, in 1999 and 2000, the CysLT1R and CysLT2R were successfully cloned and both shown to be members of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs superfamily. Molecular cloning has confirmed most of the previous pharmacological characterization and identified distinct expression patterns only partially overlapping. Recombinant CysLTRs couple to the Gq/11 pathway that modulates inositol phospholipids hydrolysis and calcium mobilization, whereas in native systems, they often activate a pertussis toxin-insensitive Gi/o-protein, or are coupled promiscuously to both G-proteins. Interestingly, recent data provide evidence for the existence of an additional receptor subtype that seems to respond to both cysteinyl-LTs and uracil nucleosides, and of an intracellular pool of CysLTRs that may have roles different from those of plasma membrane receptors. Finally, a cross-talk between the cysteinyl-LT and the purine systems is being delineated. This review will summarize recent data derived from studies on the molecular and cellular pharmacology of CysLTRs.

  4. The molecular mechanisms behind receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Blain, Katherine Yoshie

    2010-01-01

    Cell membranes are a crucial component to the life of a cell. The membrane defines boundaries, provides structural elements, and contains proteins that serve as sensor receptors to transmit external cues across the phospholipid bilayer, either from the environment to the cell's interior or from the cytosol to a particular sub- cellular compartment. One type of proteins found spanning these lipid bilayers are known as the integral membrane proteins (IMPs). Since the dysfunction of this class o...

  5. Signal transduction through the IL-4 and insulin receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A; Frankel, M; Paul, W E; Pierce, J H

    1995-07-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase-containing receptors and intracellular tyrosine kinases by ligand stimulation is known to be crucial for mediating initial and subsequent events involved in mitogenic signal transduction. Receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) contain cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains that undergo autophosphorylation upon ligand stimulation. Activation of these receptors also leads to pronounced and rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in cells of connective tissue origin. A related substrate, designated 4PS, is similarly phosphorylated by insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in many hematopoietic cell types. IRS-1 and 4PS possess a number of tyrosine phosphorylation sites that are within motifs that bind specific SH2-containing molecules known to be involved in mitogenic signaling such as PI-3 kinase, SHPTP-2 (Syp) and Grb-2. Thus, they appear to act as docking substrates for a variety of signaling molecules. The majority of hematopoietic cytokines bind to receptors that do not possess intrinsic kinase activity, and these receptors have been collectively termed as members of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Despite their lack of tyrosine kinase domains, stimulation of these receptors has been demonstrated to activate intracellular kinases leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple substrates. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of different members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases is involved in mediating tyrosine phosphorylation events by specific cytokines. Stimulation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor, a member of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily, is thought to result in activation of Jak1, Jak3, and/or Fes tyrosine kinases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Insulin glulisine: insulin receptor signaling characteristics in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennige, Anita M; Lehmann, Rainer; Weigert, Cora; Moeschel, Klaus; Schäuble, Myriam; Metzinger, Elisabeth; Lammers, Reiner; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2005-02-01

    In recent years, recombinant DNA technology has been used to design insulin molecules that overcome the limitations of regular insulin in mealtime supplementation. However, safety issues have been raised with these alternatives, as the alteration of the three-dimensional structure may alter the interaction with the insulin and/or IGF-I receptors and therefore lead to the activation of alternate metabolic as well as mitogenic signaling pathways. It is therefore essential to carefully study acute and long-term effects in a preclinical state, as insulin therapy is meant to be a lifelong treatment. In this study, we determined in vivo the insulin receptor signaling characteristics activated by insulin glulisine (Lys(B3), Glu(B29)) at the level of insulin receptor phosphorylation, insulin receptor substrate phosphorylation, and downstream signaling elements such as phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, AKT, and mitogen-activated protein kinase. C57BL/6 mice were injected with insulin glulisine or regular insulin and Western blot analysis was performed for liver and muscle tissue. The extent and time course of insulin receptor phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling elements after insulin glulisine treatment was similar to that of human regular insulin in vivo. Moreover, insulin signaling in hypothalamic tissue determined by PI 3-kinase activity was comparable. Therefore, insulin glulisine may be a useful tool for diabetes treatment. PMID:15677493

  7. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C. [Unite d`Endocrinologie Moleculaire, Jouy en Josas (France)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  8. SOCS proteins in regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazi, Julhash U.; Kabir, Nuzhat N.; Flores Morales, Amilcar;

    2014-01-01

    signaling mediated by RTKs must be tightly regulated by interacting proteins including protein-tyrosine phosphatases and ubiquitin ligases. The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family proteins are well-known negative regulators of cytokine receptors signaling consisting of eight structurally similar...... proteins, SOCS1-7, and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS). A key feature of this family of proteins is the presence of an SH2 domain and a SOCS box. Recent studies suggest that SOCS proteins also play a role in RTK signaling. Activation of RTK results in transcriptional activation of SOCS......-encoding genes. These proteins associate with RTKs through their SH2 domains and subsequently recruit the E3 ubiquitin machinery through the SOCS box, and thereby limit receptor stability by inducing ubiquitination. In a similar fashion, SOCS proteins negatively regulate mitogenic signaling by RTKs. It is also...

  9. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Heppner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway.

  10. Receptor downregulation and desensitization enhance the information processing ability of signaling receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2007-11-09

    The activation of cell surface receptors in addition to initiating signaling events also triggers regulatory processes that restrict the duration of signaling. Acute attenuation of signaling can be accomplished either via ligand-induced internalization of receptors (receptor downregulation) or via ligand-induced receptor desensitization. These phenomena have traditionally been viewed in the context of “adaptation” wherein the receptor system enters a refractory state in the presence of sustained ligand stimuli and thereby prevents the cell from “over-responding” to the ligand. Here we use the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) as model systems to respectively examine the effects of downregulation and desensitization on the ability of signaling receptors to decode time-varying ligand stimuli. We show that downregulation and desensitization mechanisms can lead to tight and efficient input-output coupling thereby ensuring synchronous processing of ligand inputs. Frequency response analysis indicates that upstream elements of the EGFR and GPCR networks behave like low-pass filters. Receptor downregulation and desensitization increase the filter bandwidth thereby enabling the receptor systems to decode inputs in a wider frequency range. Further, system-theoretic analysis reveals that the receptor systems are analogous to classical mechanical over-damped oscillators. This analogy enables us to describe downregulation and desensitization as phenomena that make the systems more resilient in responding to ligand perturbations thereby improving the stability of the system resting state. We hypothesize that, in addition to serving as mechanisms for adaptation, receptor downregulation and desensitization play a critical role in temporal information processing.

  11. Evolution of retinoic acid receptors and retinoic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A-derived morphogen controlling important developmental processes in vertebrates, and more generally in chordates, including axial patterning and tissue formation and differentiation. In the embryo, endogenous RA levels are controlled by RA synthesizing and degrading enzymes and the RA signal is transduced by two retinoid receptors: the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR). Both RAR and RXR are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and mainly act as heterodimers to activate the transcription of target genes in the presence of their ligand, all-trans RA. This signaling pathway was long thought to be a chordate innovation, however, recent findings of gene homologs involved in RA signaling in the genomes of a wide variety of non-chordate animals, including ambulacrarians (sea urchins and acorn worms) and lophotrochozoans (annelids and mollusks), challenged this traditional view and suggested that the RA signaling pathway might have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously thought. In this chapter, we discuss the evolutionary history of the RA signaling pathway, and more particularly of the RARs, which might have experienced independent gene losses and duplications in different animal lineages. In sum, the available data reveal novel insights into the origin of the RA signaling pathway as well as into the evolutionary history of the RARs. PMID:24962881

  12. Cannabinoid receptor 1 signaling in embryo neurodevelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychoyos, Delphine; Vinod, K Yaragudri; Cao, Jin; Xie, Shan; Hyson, Richard L; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; He, Weimin; Cooper, Thomas B; Hungund, Basalingappa L; Finnell, Richard H

    2012-04-01

    In utero exposure to tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of marijuana, is associated with an increased risk for neurodevelopmental defects in the offspring by interfering with the functioning of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system. At the present time, it is not clearly known whether the eCB system is present before neurogenesis. Using an array of biochemical techniques, we analyzed the levels of CB1 receptors, eCBs (AEA and 2-AG), and the enzymes (NAPE-PLD, DAGLα, DAGLβ, MAGL, and FAAH) involved in the metabolism of the eCBs in chick and mouse models during development. The findings demonstrate the presence of eCB system in early embryo before neurogenesis. The eCB system might play a critical role in early embryogenesis and there might be adverse developmental consequences of in utero exposure to marijuana and other drugs of abuse during this period.

  13. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M; Yang, Enjun; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells.

  14. Biased and constitutive signaling in the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 by manipulating the interface between transmembrane helices 6 and 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Thiele, Stefanie; Guo, Dong;

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium state of CCR5 is manipulated here toward either activation or inactivation by introduction of single amino acid substitutions in the transmembrane domains (TMs) 6 and 7. Insertion of a steric hindrance mutation in the center of TM7 (G286F in position VII:09/7.42) resulted in biased...... signaling. Thus, β-arrestin recruitment was eliminated, whereas constitutive activity was observed in Gαi-mediated signaling. Furthermore, the CCR5 antagonist aplaviroc was converted to a full agonist (a so-called efficacy switch). Computational modeling revealed that the position of the 7TM receptor......-conserved Trp in TM6 (Trp-248 in position VI:13/6.48, part of the CWXP motif) was influenced by the G286F mutation, causing Trp-248 to change orientation away from TM7. The essential role of Trp-248 in CCR5 activation was supported by complete inactivity of W248A-CCR5 despite maintaining chemokine binding...

  15. Cocaine-induced changes in NMDA receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ortinski, Pavel I.

    2014-01-01

    Addictive states are often thought to rely on lasting modification of signaling at relevant synapses. A long-standing theory posits that activity at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is a critical component of long-term synaptic plasticity in many brain areas. Indeed, NMDAR signaling has been found to play a role in the etiology of addictive states, in particular following cocaine exposure. However, no consensus is apparent with respect to the specific effects of cocaine exposure on NMD...

  16. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  17. Interfering with interferon receptor sorting and trafficking: impact on signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudinon, Julie; Monier, Marie-Noëlle; Lamaze, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) and their receptors (IFN-Rs) play fundamental roles in a multitude of biological functions. Many articles and reviews emphasize that the JAK/STAT machinery is obligatory for relay of the information transmitted by IFNs after binding to their cognate receptors at the plasma membrane. In contrast, very few studies have addressed the endocytosis and the intracellular trafficking of IFN-Rs, the immediate step following IFN binding. However, recent findings have shed light on the importance of IFN-R sorting and trafficking in the control of IFN signaling. Thus, IFN-Rs can be included in the growing family of signaling receptors for which regulation of biological activity critically involves endocytosis and trafficking. PMID:17493737

  18. Transport of receptors, receptor signaling complexes and ion channels via neuropeptide-secretory vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhao; Hai-Bo Wang; Ying-Jin Lu; Jian-Wen Hu; Lan Bao; Xu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Stimulus-induced exocytosis of large dense-core vesicles(LDCVs)leads to discharge of neuropeptides and fusion of LDCV membranes with the plasma membrane. However, the contribution of LDCVs to the properties of the neuronal membrane remains largely unclear. The present study found that LDCVs were associated with multiple receptors, channels and signaling molecules, suggesting that neuronal sensitivity is modulated by an LDCV-mediated mechanism. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with immunoblotting of subcellular fractions identified 298 proteins in LDCV membranes purified from the dorsal spinal cord, including Gprotein-coupled receptors, Gproteins and other signaling molecules, ion channels and trafficking-related proteins. Morphological assays showed that δ-opioid receptor 1(DORI), β2 adrenergic receptor(AR), Gα12,voltage-gated calcium channel a2δ1subunit and P2X purinoceptor 2 were localized in substance P(SP)-positive LDCVs in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons, whereas β1 AR, Wnt receptor frizzled 8 and dishevelled 1 were present in SP-negative LDCVs.Furthermore, DOR1/α12/Gβ1γ5/phospholipase C β2 complexes were associated with LDCVs. Blockade of the DOR1/Gαi2 interaction largely abolished the LDCV localization of Gαi2 and impaired stimulation-induced surface expression of Gαi2. Thus, LDCVs serve as carriers of receptors, ion channels and preassembled receptor signaling complexes, enabling a rapid, activity-dependent modulation of neuronal sensitivity.

  19. Altered B cell receptor signaling in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Scott A.; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of B cell receptor signaling is essential for the development of specific immunity while retaining tolerance to self. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by a loss of B cell tolerance and the production of anti-self antibodies. Accompanying this break down in tolerance are alterations in B cell receptor signal transduction including elevated induced calcium responses and increased protein phosphorylation. Specific pathways that negatively regulate B cell signaling have been shown to be impaired in some SLE patients. These patients have reduced levels of the kinase Lyn in lipid raft microdomains and this reduction is inversely correlated with increased CD45 in lipid rafts. Function and expression of the inhibitory immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIIB is also reduced in Lupus IgM- CD27+ memory cells. Because the relative contribution of different memory and transitional B cell subsets can be abnormal in SLE patients, we believe studies targeted to well defined B cell subsets will be necessary to further our understanding of signaling abnormalities in SLE. Intracellular flow cytometric analysis of signaling is a useful approach to accomplish this goal. PMID:18723129

  20. Evaluation of Two Passes Cold Pilgering Property for PLUS7TM Guide Thimble and Instrumentation Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Young; Park, Ki Bum; Kim, In Kyu; Lee, Young Hee; Kahng, Jong Yeol [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The thermo-mechanical property of zirconium alloy tube is well known to be influenced by pilgering pass schedule and its tooling; thus the control of its microstructure and mechanical property in the final tube production stage for nuclear fuel applications is a major concern of tube manufacture. To fabricate final tube, the 3 passes pilgering is applied in general by using TREX(Tube Reduced EXtrusion), 63.5mm outer diameter(OD), in KEPCO NF and most of Zr tube manufacturing companies. They are also taking big efforts to reduce pilgering step for the sake of increasing the efficiency of production in the forming stage of tube. The objective of this study is to develop two passes of pilgering schedule from the conventional three passes of pilgering schedule for manufacturing the Guide Thimble and Instrumentation tube conforming to specification, which are newly developing component for the advanced nuclear fuel assembly in KEPCO NF. CSR, hydride orientation, and structural integrity are well conformed to the desired targets so it is expected that both die and mandrel were newly designed for the PLUS7TM guide thimble and instrumentation tube with higher Q factor for two passes of pilgering at 50LC and 25LC pilger machine, instead of three passes of pilgering, are able to be applicable to this design of fuel component. If developed two passes pilgering is applied to current manufacturing process, it would improve not only productivity but also yield rate by reducing 3 steps(pilgering, heat-treatment, pickiling and cleaning) of manufacturing process. But additional tests(including in-pile test) should be performed in order to evaluate integrity in reactor.

  1. Physician Education: The Erythropoietin Receptor and Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura; Arai

    1996-01-01

    receptor gene was cloned by D'Andrea and coworkers in 1989 from murine erythroleukemia cells [1]. It became clear that the EPO receptor belongs to the cytokine receptor family that comprises receptors for the various interleukins, GM-CSF, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), growth hormone and prolactin. The special characteristic of this family of receptors is that they are switched on (i.e., the receptor is activated) and transduce signals to the interior of the cell by the formation of homo- or hetero-oligomers (dimers or trimers). Moreover, hetero-oligomers of these receptors share a common receptor subunit. As shown in Figure 2, the IL-3, IL-5 and GM-CSF receptors have a common &bgr; subunit, and their ligand specificity is determined by the &agr; subunit. In the same manner, the IL-6, LIF and oncostatin M (OSM) receptors all share gp130, which is the &bgr; subunit of the IL-6 receptor. The IL-2, IL-4 and IL-7 receptors all share the &ggr; subunit of the IL-2 receptor. All the above receptors are activated by the formation of hetero-oligomers, but the G-CSF receptor, EPO receptor, and growth hormone receptor are activated by the formation of homodimers of the same types of molecules [2]. We can see that groups of cytokines such as the interleukins that affect a relatively wide range of cells and have redundant biological activity create this redundancy through the common use of a single receptor subunit. On the other hand, EPO and G-CSF act with high specificity on a relatively limited range of cells, so it was probably unnecessary for their receptors to share one of the subunits. EPO RECEPTOR AND JAK2 KINASE: The signal for cellular proliferation and differentiation into erythroblasts is thought to originate at the EPO receptor. The cytoplasmic domain of the EPO receptor can be divided into two major regions. Roughly half of the cytoplasmic domain, the part lying nearest the plasma membrane, is required for generating the signals for proliferation and

  2. DMPD: TGF-beta signaling from receptors to the nucleus. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10611754 TGF-beta signaling from receptors to the nucleus. Roberts AB. Microbes Inf...leus. PubmedID 10611754 Title TGF-beta signaling from receptors to the nucleus. Authors Roberts AB. Publicat

  3. Effect of surface coating of KYb2F7:Tm3+ on optical properties and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Francisco J.; Avalos, Julio C.; Yust, Brian G.; Tsin, Andrew; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2016-09-01

    This project aims to provide an insight on the effects of biocompatible polymers on the optical properties and the nanoparticle-cell interaction of KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals that exhibit strong near infrared (NIR) fluorescence. KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals were synthesized with a diameter of 20-30 nm and surface modified with poly(ethylene glycol), Pluronic® F-127, and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone), due to the associated advantages. Some of these include biocompatibility and biodistribution in the instance of agglomeration and hydrophobicity as well as the addition of a targeting agent and drug loading by further functionalization. Despite the decrease in fluorescence intensity induced by the surface modification, thulium’s emission fingerprint was easily detected. Moreover, surface modified KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals failed to induce a toxic response on endothelial cells following a 24 h uptake period up to concentrations of 100 μg ml-1. In vitro toxicity and confocal imaging have demonstrated the versatility of these NIR fluorescence nanocrystals in biomedical imaging, drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy.

  4. Effect of surface coating of KYb2F7:Tm(3+) on optical properties and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Francisco J; Avalos, Julio C; Yust, Brian G; Tsin, Andrew; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2016-09-23

    This project aims to provide an insight on the effects of biocompatible polymers on the optical properties and the nanoparticle-cell interaction of KYb2F7:Tm(3+) nanocrystals that exhibit strong near infrared (NIR) fluorescence. KYb2F7:Tm(3+) nanocrystals were synthesized with a diameter of 20-30 nm and surface modified with poly(ethylene glycol), Pluronic(®) F-127, and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone), due to the associated advantages. Some of these include biocompatibility and biodistribution in the instance of agglomeration and hydrophobicity as well as the addition of a targeting agent and drug loading by further functionalization. Despite the decrease in fluorescence intensity induced by the surface modification, thulium's emission fingerprint was easily detected. Moreover, surface modified KYb2F7:Tm(3+) nanocrystals failed to induce a toxic response on endothelial cells following a 24 h uptake period up to concentrations of 100 μg ml(-1). In vitro toxicity and confocal imaging have demonstrated the versatility of these NIR fluorescence nanocrystals in biomedical imaging, drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy. PMID:27518385

  5. IgE receptor signaling in food allergy pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettgen, Hans C; Burton, Oliver T

    2015-10-01

    The pathogenesis of food allergy remains poorly understood. Recent advances in the use of murine models have led to discoveries that mast cells and IgE receptor signaling not only drive immediate hypersensitivity reactions but also exert an immunoregulatory function, promoting the development of allergic sensitivity to foods. We review the evidence that IgE, IgE receptors, key signaling kinases and mast cells impair oral tolerance to ingested foods, preventing the induction of regulatory T cells (Treg) and promoting the acquisition of pro-allergic T helper (Th) 2 responses. We discuss innovative strategies that that could be implemented to counteract these immunoregulatory effects of IgE-mediated mast cell activation, and potentially reverse established sensitization, curing food allergy. PMID:26296054

  6. Regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling in innate immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors sense invading pathogens by recognizing a wide variety of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns(PAMPs).The members of the TLR family selectively utilize adaptor proteins MyD88,TRIF,TIRAP and TRAM to activate overlapping but distinct signal transduction pathways which trigger production of different panels of mediators such as proinflammatory cytokines and type I interferon.These mediators not only control innate immunity but also direct subsequently developed adaptive immunity.TLR activation is strictly and finely regulated at multiple levels of the signal transduction pathways.

  7. Phosphorylation site dynamics of early T-cell receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chylek, Lily A; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Dengjel, Jörn;

    2014-01-01

    In adaptive immune responses, T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling impacts multiple cellular processes and results in T-cell differentiation, proliferation, and cytokine production. Although individual protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation events have been studied extensively, we lack...... with central roles in TCR signaling. The model was used to generate predictions suggesting unexpected roles for the phosphatase PTPN6 (SHP-1) and shortcut recruitment of the actin regulator WAS. Predictions were validated experimentally. This integration of proteomics and modeling illustrates a novel...

  8. Human herpesvirus 6 infection impairs Toll-like receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ochi Toshiki; Suemori Koichiro; An Jun; Fujiwara Hiroshi; Tanimoto Kazushi; Murakami Yuichi; Hasegawa Hitoshi; Yasukawa Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) has a tropism for immunocompetent cells, including T lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) suggesting that HHV-6 infection affects the immunosurveillance system. Toll-like receptor (TLR) system plays an important role in innate immunity against various pathogens. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HHV-6 infection on the expression and intracellular signaling of TLRs in DCs. Although expression levels of TLRs were no...

  9. Assembly of Oligomeric Death Domain Complexes during Toll Receptor Signaling*

    OpenAIRE

    Moncrieffe, Martin C.; Grossmann, J. Günter; Gay, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila Toll receptor is activated by the endogenous protein ligand Spätzle in response to microbial stimuli in immunity and spatial cues during embryonic development. Downstream signaling is mediated by the adaptor proteins Tube, the kinase Pelle, and the Drosophila homologue of myeloid differentiation primary response protein (dMyD88). Here we have characterized heterodimeric (dMyD88-Tube) and heterotrimeric (dMyD88-Tube-Pelle) death domain complexes. We show ...

  10. Androgen receptor signaling and mutations in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2010-01-01

    Normal and neoplastic growth of the prostate gland are dependent on androgen receptor (AR) expression and function. Androgenic activation of the AR, in association with its coregulatory factors, is the classical pathway that leads to transcriptional activity of AR target genes. Alternatively, cytoplasmic signaling crosstalk of AR by growth factors, neurotrophic peptides, cytokines or nonandrogenic hormones may have important roles in prostate carcinogenesis and in metastatic or androgen-indep...

  11. Steroid signaling activation and intracellular localization of sex steroid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldi, Tiziana; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2010-01-01

    In addition to stimulating gene transcription, sex steroids trigger rapid, non-genomic responses in the extra-nuclear compartment of target cells. These events take place within seconds or minutes after hormone administration and do not require transcriptional activity of sex steroid receptors. Depending on cell systems, activation of extra-nuclear signaling pathways by sex steroids fosters cell cycle progression, prevents apoptosis, leads to epigenetic modifications and increases cell migrat...

  12. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor and Vitamin D Receptor Signaling Pathways in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Satoru, E-mail: smatsuda@cc.nara-wu.ac.jp; Kitagishi, Yasuko [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Nara Women’s University, Kita-Uoya Nishimachi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan)

    2013-10-21

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, which respond to specific ligands such as polyunsaturated fatty acids by altering gene expression. Three subtypes of this receptor have been discovered, each evolving to achieve different biological functions. Like other nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of PPARs is affected not only by ligand-stimulation, but also by cross-talk with other molecules. For example, both PPARs and the RXRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that coordinately regulate gene expression. In addition, PPARs and vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling pathways regulate a multitude of genes that are of importance for cellular functions including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. Interaction of the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways has been shown at the level of molecular cross-regulation of their transcription factor. A variety of ligands influencing the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways have been shown to reveal chemopreventive potential by mediating tumor suppressive activities in human cancers. Use of these compounds may represent a potential novel strategy to prevent cancers. This review summarizes the roles of the PPARs and the VDR in pathogenesis and progression of cancer.

  13. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor and Vitamin D Receptor Signaling Pathways in Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, which respond to specific ligands such as polyunsaturated fatty acids by altering gene expression. Three subtypes of this receptor have been discovered, each evolving to achieve different biological functions. Like other nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of PPARs is affected not only by ligand-stimulation, but also by cross-talk with other molecules. For example, both PPARs and the RXRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that coordinately regulate gene expression. In addition, PPARs and vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling pathways regulate a multitude of genes that are of importance for cellular functions including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. Interaction of the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways has been shown at the level of molecular cross-regulation of their transcription factor. A variety of ligands influencing the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways have been shown to reveal chemopreventive potential by mediating tumor suppressive activities in human cancers. Use of these compounds may represent a potential novel strategy to prevent cancers. This review summarizes the roles of the PPARs and the VDR in pathogenesis and progression of cancer

  14. DMPD: Lysophospholipid receptors: signaling and biology. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15189145 Lysophospholipid receptors: signaling and biology. Ishii I, Fukushima N, Y...e X, Chun J. Annu Rev Biochem. 2004;73:321-54. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Lysophospholipid receptors: signaling and biology.... PubmedID 15189145 Title Lysophospholipid receptors: signaling and biology. Authors

  15. DMPD: Nuclear receptor signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14698033 Nuclear receptor signaling in macrophages. Valledor AF, Ricote M. Biochem ...Pharmacol. 2004 Jan 15;67(2):201-12. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nuclear receptor signaling in macrop...hages. PubmedID 14698033 Title Nuclear receptor signaling in macrophages. Authors Valledor AF, Ricote M. Pub

  16. DMPD: Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7744810 Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. Ben-Ba...ow Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. PubmedID 7744810 Title Signals and r...eceptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. Authors Ben-Baruch A, Mic

  17. Vitamin D receptor-retinoid X receptor heterodimer signaling regulates oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Alerie Guzman; Errea, Oihana; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Gonzalez, Ginez A; Kerninon, Christophe; Jarjour, Andrew A; Lewis, Hilary J; Jones, Clare A; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim; Zhao, Chao; Huang, Jeffrey K; ffrench-Constant, Charles; Franklin, Robin J M

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms regulating differentiation of oligodendrocyte (OLG) progenitor cells (OPCs) into mature OLGs are key to understanding myelination and remyelination. Signaling via the retinoid X receptor γ (RXR-γ) has been shown to be a positive regulator of OPC differentiation. However, the nuclear receptor (NR) binding partner of RXR-γ has not been established. In this study we show that RXR-γ binds to several NRs in OPCs and OLGs, one of which is vitamin D receptor (VDR). Using pharmacological and knockdown approaches we show that RXR-VDR signaling induces OPC differentiation and that VDR agonist vitamin D enhances OPC differentiation. We also show expression of VDR in OLG lineage cells in multiple sclerosis. Our data reveal a role for vitamin D in the regenerative component of demyelinating disease and identify a new target for remyelination medicines. PMID:26644513

  18. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling: How complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Kolodkin (Alexey); F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); N. Plant (Nick); M.J. Moné (Martijn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara); M.J. Campbell (Moray); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); C. Carlberg (Carsten); J.L. Snoep (Jacky); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of design aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic

  19. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling : how complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodkin, Alexey N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Plant, Nick; Mone, Martijn J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Campbell, Moray J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Carlberg, Carsten; Snoep, Jacky L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2010-01-01

    The topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of 'design' aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic models of

  20. Research Resource: A Reference Transcriptome for Constitutive Androstane Receptor and Pregnane X Receptor Xenobiotic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsner, Scott A; Tsimelzon, Anna; Dong, Jianrong; Coarfa, Cristian; McKenna, Neil J

    2016-08-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) (PXR/NR1I3) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) (CAR/NR1I2) members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors are well-characterized mediators of xenobiotic and endocrine-disrupting chemical signaling. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas maintains a growing library of transcriptomic datasets involving perturbations of NR signaling pathways, many of which involve perturbations relevant to PXR and CAR xenobiotic signaling. Here, we generated a reference transcriptome based on the frequency of differential expression of genes across 159 experiments compiled from 22 datasets involving perturbations of CAR and PXR signaling pathways. In addition to the anticipated overrepresentation in the reference transcriptome of genes encoding components of the xenobiotic stress response, the ranking of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and gonadotropin action sheds mechanistic light on the suspected role of xenobiotics in metabolic syndrome and reproductive disorders. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed that although acetaminophen, chlorpromazine, and phenobarbital impacted many similar gene sets, differences in direction of regulation were evident in a variety of processes. Strikingly, gene sets representing genes linked to Parkinson's, Huntington's, and Alzheimer's diseases were enriched in all 3 transcriptomes. The reference xenobiotic transcriptome will be supplemented with additional future datasets to provide the community with a continually updated reference transcriptomic dataset for CAR- and PXR-mediated xenobiotic signaling. Our study demonstrates how aggregating and annotating transcriptomic datasets, and making them available for routine data mining, facilitates research into the mechanisms by which xenobiotics and endocrine-disrupting chemicals subvert conventional NR signaling modalities. PMID:27409825

  1. Structural Dynamics of Insulin Receptor and Transmembrane Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatulian, Suren A

    2015-09-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a (αβ)2-type transmembrane tyrosine kinase that plays a central role in cell metabolism. Each αβ heterodimer consists of an extracellular ligand-binding α-subunit and a membrane-spanning β-subunit that comprises the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (TK) domain and the phosphorylation sites. The α- and β-subunits are linked via a single disulfide bridge, and the (αβ)2 tetramer is formed by disulfide bonds between the α-chains. Insulin binding induces conformational changes in IR that reach the intracellular β-subunit followed by a protein phosphorylation and activation cascade. Defects in this signaling process, including IR dysfunction caused by mutations, result in type 2 diabetes. Rational drug design aimed at treatment of diabetes relies on knowledge of the detailed structure of IR and the dynamic structural transformations during transmembrane signaling. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies have provided important clues about the mode of binding of insulin to IR, the resulting structural changes and their transmission to the TK domain, but a complete understanding of the structural basis underlying insulin signaling has not been achieved. This review presents a critical analysis of the current status of the structure-function relationship of IR, with a comparative assessment of the other IR family receptors, and discusses potential advancements that may provide insight into the molecular mechanism of insulin signaling.

  2. Disruption of Fas Receptor Signaling by Nitric Oxide in Eosinophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebestreit, Holger; Dibbert, Birgit; Balatti, Ivo; Braun, Doris; Schapowal, Andreas; Blaser, Kurt; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that Fas ligand–Fas receptor interactions are involved in the regulation of eosinophil apoptosis and that dysfunctions in this system could contribute to the accumulation of these cells in allergic and asthmatic diseases. Here, we demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO) specifically prevents Fas receptor–mediated apoptosis in freshly isolated human eosinophils. In contrast, rapid acceleration of eosinophil apoptosis by activation of the Fas receptor occurs in the presence of eosinophil hematopoietins. Analysis of the intracellular mechanisms revealed that NO disrupts Fas receptor–mediated signaling events at the level of, or proximal to, Jun kinase (JNK), but distal to sphingomyelinase (SMase) activation and ceramide generation. In addition, activation of SMase occurs downstream of an interleukin 1 converting enzyme–like (ICE-like) protease(s) that is not blocked by NO. However, NO prevents activation of a protease that targets lamin B1. These findings suggest a role for an additional NO-sensitive apoptotic signaling pathway that amplifies the proteolytic cascade initialized by activation of the Fas receptor. Therefore, NO concentrations within allergic inflammatory sites may be important in determining whether an eosinophil survives or undergoes apoptosis upon Fas ligand stimulation. PMID:9449721

  3. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei; Zeng, Zhao-Jun; Yoshida, Takeshi; Funa, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells.

  4. Transient Suppression of TGFβ Receptor Signaling Facilitates Human Islet Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Fischbach, Shane; Song, Zewen; Gaffar, Iljana; Zimmerman, Ray; Wiersch, John; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Guo, Ping; Ramachandran, Sabarinathan; Witkowski, Piotr; Gittes, George K

    2016-04-01

    Although islet transplantation is an effective treatment for severe diabetes, its broad application is greatly limited due to a shortage of donor islets. Suppression of TGFβ receptor signaling in β-cells has been shown to increase β-cell proliferation in mice, but has not been rigorously examined in humans. Here, treatment of human islets with a TGFβ receptor I inhibitor, SB-431542 (SB), significantly improved C-peptide secretion by β-cells, and significantly increased β-cell number by increasing β-cell proliferation. In addition, SB increased cell-cycle activators and decreased cell-cycle suppressors in human β-cells. Transplantation of SB-treated human islets into diabetic immune-deficient mice resulted in significant improvement in blood glucose control, significantly higher serum and graft insulin content, and significantly greater increases in β-cell proliferation in the graft, compared with controls. Thus, our data suggest that transient suppression of TGFβ receptor signaling may improve the outcome of human islet transplantation, seemingly through increasing β-cell number and function. PMID:26872091

  5. Optodynamic simulation of β-adrenergic receptor signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuda, Edward R.; McCall, Jordan G.; Al-Hasani, Ream; Shin, Gunchul; Il Park, Sung; Schmidt, Martin J.; Anderson, Sonya L.; Planer, William J.; Rogers, John A.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics has provided a revolutionary approach to dissecting biological phenomena. However, the generation and use of optically active GPCRs in these contexts is limited and it is unclear how well an opsin-chimera GPCR might mimic endogenous receptor activity. Here we show that a chimeric rhodopsin/β2 adrenergic receptor (opto-β2AR) is similar in dynamics to endogenous β2AR in terms of: cAMP generation, MAP kinase activation and receptor internalization. In addition, we develop and characterize a novel toolset of optically active, functionally selective GPCRs that can bias intracellular signalling cascades towards either G-protein or arrestin-mediated cAMP and MAP kinase pathways. Finally, we show how photoactivation of opto-β2AR in vivo modulates neuronal activity and induces anxiety-like behavioural states in both fiber-tethered and wireless, freely moving animals when expressed in brain regions known to contain β2ARs. These new GPCR approaches enhance the utility of optogenetics and allow for discrete spatiotemporal control of GPCR signalling in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26412387

  6. Monocyte Signal Transduction Receptors in Active and Latent Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Druszczynska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that promote either resistance or susceptibility to TB disease remain insufficiently understood. Our aim was to compare the expression of cell signaling transduction receptors, CD14, TLR2, CD206, and β2 integrin LFA-1 on monocytes from patients with active TB or nonmycobacterial lung disease and healthy individuals with M.tb latency and uninfected controls to explain the background of the differences between clinical and subclinical forms of M.tb infection. A simultaneous increase in the expression of the membrane bound mCD14 receptor and LFA-1 integrin in patients with active TB may be considered a prodrome of breaking immune control by M.tb bacilli in subjects with the latent TB and absence of clinical symptoms.

  7. Integrating signals from the T-cell receptor and the interleukin-2 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilo Beyer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available T cells orchestrate the adaptive immune response, making them targets for immunotherapy. Although immunosuppressive therapies prevent disease progression, they also leave patients susceptible to opportunistic infections. To identify novel drug targets, we established a logical model describing T-cell receptor (TCR signaling. However, to have a model that is able to predict new therapeutic approaches, the current drug targets must be included. Therefore, as a next step we generated the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R signaling network and developed a tool to merge logical models. For IL-2R signaling, we show that STAT activation is independent of both Src- and PI3-kinases, while ERK activation depends upon both kinases and additionally requires novel PKCs. In addition, our merged model correctly predicted TCR-induced STAT activation. The combined network also allows information transfer from one receptor to add detail to another, thereby predicting that LAT mediates JNK activation in IL-2R signaling. In summary, the merged model not only enables us to unravel potential cross-talk, but it also suggests new experimental designs and provides a critical step towards designing strategies to reprogram T cells.

  8. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression.

  9. Metazoan-like signaling in a unicellular receptor tyrosine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultheiss Kira P

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are crucial components of signal transduction systems in multicellular animals. Surprisingly, numerous RTKs have been identified in the genomes of unicellular choanoflagellates and other protists. Here, we report the first biochemical study of a unicellular RTK, namely RTKB2 from Monosiga brevicollis. Results We cloned, expressed, and purified the RTKB2 kinase, and showed that it is enzymatically active. The activity of RTKB2 is controlled by autophosphorylation, as in metazoan RTKs. RTKB2 possesses six copies of a unique domain (designated RM2 in its C-terminal tail. An isolated RM2 domain (or a synthetic peptide derived from the RM2 sequence served as a substrate for RTKB2 kinase. When phosphorylated, the RM2 domain bound to the Src homology 2 domain of MbSrc1 from M. brevicollis. NMR structural studies of the RM2 domain indicated that it is disordered in solution. Conclusions Our results are consistent with a model in which RTKB2 activation stimulates receptor autophosphorylation within the RM2 domains. This leads to recruitment of Src-like kinases (and potentially other M. brevicollis proteins and further phosphorylation, which may serve to increase or dampen downstream signals. Thus, crucial features of signal transduction circuitry were established prior to the evolution of metazoans from their unicellular ancestors.

  10. Prohibitin: A Novel Molecular Player in KDEL Receptor Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Giannotta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The KDEL receptor (KDELR is a seven-transmembrane-domain protein involved in retrograde transport of protein chaperones from the Golgi complex to the endoplasmic reticulum. Our recent findings have shown that the Golgi-localised KDELR acts as a functional G-protein-coupled receptor by binding to and activating Gs and Gq. These G proteins induce activation of PKA and Src and regulate retrograde and anterograde Golgi trafficking. Here we used an integrated coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry approach to identify prohibitin-1 (PHB as a KDELR interactor. PHB is a multifunctional protein that is involved in signal transduction, cell-cycle control, and stabilisation of mitochondrial proteins. We provide evidence that depletion of PHB induces intense membrane-trafficking activity at the ER–Golgi interface, as revealed by formation of GM130-positive Golgi tubules, and recruitment of p115, β-COP, and GBF1 to the Golgi complex. There is also massive recruitment of SEC31 to endoplasmic-reticulum exit sites. Furthermore, absence of PHB decreases the levels of the Golgi-localised KDELR, thus preventing KDELR-dependent activation of Golgi-Src and inhibiting Golgi-to-plasma-membrane transport of VSVG. We propose a model whereby in analogy to previous findings (e.g., the RAS-RAF signalling pathway, PHB can act as a signalling scaffold protein to assist in KDELR-dependent Src activation.

  11. Activation of the chicken gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor reduces gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Mamiko; Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2010-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a hypothalamic peptide from the RFamide peptide family that has been identified in multiple avian species. Although GnIH has clearly been shown to reduce LH release from the anterior pituitary gland, its mechanism of action remains to be determined. The overall objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R) signaling pathway, (2) to evaluate potential interactions with gonadotropin releasing hormone type III receptor (GnRH-R-III) signaling, and (3) to determine the molecular mechanisms by which GnIH and GnRH regulate pituitary gonadotrope function during a reproductive cycle in the chicken. Using real-time PCR, we showed that in the chicken pituitary gland, GnIH-R mRNA levels fluctuate in an opposite manner to GnRH-R-III, with higher and lower levels observed during inactive and active reproductive stages, respectively. We demonstrated that the chicken GnIH-R signals by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase cAMP production, most likely by coupling to G(alphai). We also showed that this inhibition is sufficient to significantly reduce GnRH-induced cAMP responsive element (CRE) activation in a dose-dependent manner, and that the ratio of GnRH/GnIH receptors is a significant factor. We propose that in avian species, sexual maturation is characterized by a change in GnIH/GnRH receptor ratio, resulting in a switch in pituitary sensitivity from inhibitory (involving GnIH) to stimulatory (involving GnRH). In turn, decreasing GnIH-R signaling, combined with increasing GnRH-R-III signaling, results in significant increases in CRE activation, possibly initiating gonadotropin synthesis. PMID:20350548

  12. S-Nitrosothiols modulate G protein-coupled receptor signaling in a reversible and highly receptor-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mönkkönen Kati S

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling machinery can serve as a direct target of reactive oxygen species, including nitric oxide (NO and S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs. To gain a broader view into the way that receptor-dependent G protein activation – an early step in signal transduction – might be affected by RSNOs, we have studied several receptors coupling to the Gi family of G proteins in their native cellular environment using the powerful functional approach of [35S]GTPγS autoradiography with brain cryostat sections in combination with classical G protein activation assays. Results We demonstrate that RSNOs, like S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO and S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO, can modulate GPCR signaling via reversible, thiol-sensitive mechanisms probably involving S-nitrosylation. RSNOs are capable of very targeted regulation, as they potentiate the signaling of some receptors (exemplified by the M2/M4 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, inhibit others (P2Y12 purinergic, LPA1lysophosphatidic acid, and cannabinoid CB1 receptors, but may only marginally affect signaling of others, such as adenosine A1, μ-opioid, and opiate related receptors. Amplification of M2/M4 muscarinic responses is explained by an accelerated rate of guanine nucleotide exchange, as well as an increased number of high-affinity [35S]GTPγS binding sites available for the agonist-activated receptor. GSNO amplified human M4 receptor signaling also under heterologous expression in CHO cells, but the effect diminished with increasing constitutive receptor activity. RSNOs markedly inhibited P2Y12 receptor signaling in native tissues (rat brain and human platelets, but failed to affect human P2Y12 receptor signaling under heterologous expression in CHO cells, indicating that the native cellular signaling partners, rather than the P2Y12 receptor protein, act as a molecular target for this action. Conclusion These in vitro studies

  13. Novel roles of nuclear angiotensin receptors and signaling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwathmey, TanYa M; Alzayadneh, Ebaa M; Pendergrass, Karl D; Chappell, Mark C

    2012-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) constitutes an important hormonal system in the physiological regulation of blood pressure. The dysregulation of the RAS is considered a major influence in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease and other pathologies. Indeed, experimental and clinical evidence indicates that blockade of this system with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonists is an effective therapy to attenuate hypertension and diabetic renal injury, and to improve heart failure. Originally defined as a circulating system, multiple tissues express a complete RAS, and compelling evidence now favors an intracellular system involved in cell signaling and function. Within the kidney, intracellular expression of the three predominant ANG receptor subtypes is evident in the nuclear compartment. The ANG type 1 receptor (AT1R) is coupled to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the activation of phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and PKC. In contrast, both ANG type 2 (AT2R) and ANG-(1-7) (AT7R) receptors stimulate nitric oxide (NO) formation, which may involve nuclear endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Moreover, blockade of either ACE2-the enzyme that converts ANG II to ANG-(1-7)-or the AT7 receptor exacerbates the ANG II-ROS response on renal nuclei. Finally, in a model of fetal programmed hypertension, the nuclear ROS response to ANG II is enhanced, while both AT2 and AT7 stimulation of NO is attenuated, suggesting that an imbalance in the intracellular RAS may contribute to the development of programming events. We conclude that a functional intracellular or nuclear RAS may have important implications in the therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:22170620

  14. Cytoplasmic truncation of the p55 tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor abolishes signalling, but not induced shedding of the receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brakebusch, C; Nophar, Y; Kemper, O;

    1992-01-01

    The mechanistic relationship between the signalling for the TNF effects by the human p55 TNF receptor (hu-p55-TNF-R) and the formation of a soluble form of the receptor, which is inhibitory to these effects, was explored by examining the function of C-terminally truncated mutants of the receptor,...

  15. Distinct Phosphorylation Clusters Determine the Signaling Outcome of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4/G Protein-Coupled Receptor 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Hudson, Brian D;

    2016-01-01

    of these phosphoacceptor sites to alanine completely prevented phosphorylation of mFFA4 but did not limit receptor coupling to extracellular signal regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation. Rather, an inhibitor of Gq/11proteins completely prevented receptor signaling to ERK1/2. By contrast, the recruitment...

  16. Chemosensory signals and their receptors in the olfactory neural system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, S; Yoshikawa, K; Touhara, K

    2013-12-19

    Chemical communication is widely used among various organisms to obtain essential information from their environment required for life. Although a large variety of molecules have been shown to act as chemical cues, the molecular and neural basis underlying the behaviors elicited by these molecules has been revealed for only a limited number of molecules. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the signaling molecules whose flow from receptor to specific behavior has been characterized. Discussing the molecules utilized by mice, insects, and the worm, we focus on how each organism has optimized its reception system to suit its living style. We also highlight how the production of these signaling molecules is regulated, an area in which considerable progress has been recently made.

  17. Non-ionotropic signaling by the NMDA receptor: controversy and opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John A; Zito, Karen; Hell, Johannes W

    2016-01-01

    Provocative emerging evidence suggests that the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor can signal in the absence of ion flux through the receptor. This non-ionotropic signaling is thought to be due to agonist-induced conformational changes in the receptor, independently of channel opening. Non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling has been proposed to be sufficient to induce synaptic long-term depression (LTD), directly challenging the decades-old model that prolonged low-level calcium influx is required to induce LTD. Here, we briefly review these recent findings, focusing primarily on the potential role of non-ionotropic signaling in NMDA receptor-mediated LTD. Further reports concerning additional roles of non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling are also discussed. If validated, this new view of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling will usher in an exciting new era of exploring synapse function and dysfunction.

  18. Non-ionotropic signaling by the NMDA receptor: controversy and opportunity [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Gray

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Provocative emerging evidence suggests that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor can signal in the absence of ion flux through the receptor. This non-ionotropic signaling is thought to be due to agonist-induced conformational changes in the receptor, independently of channel opening. Non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling has been proposed to be sufficient to induce synaptic long-term depression (LTD, directly challenging the decades-old model that prolonged low-level calcium influx is required to induce LTD. Here, we briefly review these recent findings, focusing primarily on the potential role of non-ionotropic signaling in NMDA receptor-mediated LTD. Further reports concerning additional roles of non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling are also discussed. If validated, this new view of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling will usher in an exciting new era of exploring synapse function and dysfunction.

  19. Strigolactone and karrikin signal perception: receptors, enzymes, or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Jan Janssen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The signaling molecules strigolactone (SL and karrikin are involved in seed germination, development of axillary meristems, senescence of leaves and interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The signal transduction pathways for both SLs and karrikins require the same F-box protein (MAX2 and closely related α/β hydrolase fold proteins (DAD2 and KAI2. The crystal structure of DAD2 has been solved revealing an α/β hydrolase fold protein with an internal cavity capable of accommodating SLs. DAD2 responds to the SL analog GR24 by changing conformation and binding to MAX2 in a GR24 concentration-dependent manner. DAD2 can also catalyse hydrolysis of GR24. Structure activity relationships of analogs indicate that the butenolide ring common to both SLs and karrikins is essential for biological activity, but the remainder of the molecules can be significantly modified without loss of activity. The combination of data from the study of DAD2, KAI2 and chemical analogs of SLs and karrikins suggests a model for binding that requires nucleophilic attack by the active site serine of the hydrolase at the carbonyl atom of the butenolide ring. A conformational change occurs in the hydrolase that results in interaction with the F-box protein MAX2. Downstream signal transduction is then likely to occur via SCF complex-mediated ubiquitination of target proteins and their subsequent degradation. The role of the catalytic activity of the hydrolase is unclear but it may be integral in binding as well as possibly allowing the signal to be cleared from the receptor. The α/β hydrolase fold family consists mostly of active enzymes, with a few notable exceptions. We suggest that the DAD2 and KAI2 represent an intermediate where some catalytic activity is retained at the same time as a receptor role has evolved.

  20. Glutamate Delta-1 Receptor Regulates Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Signaling in the Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryavanshi, Pratyush S; Gupta, Subhash C; Yadav, Roopali; Kesherwani, Varun; Liu, Jinxu; Dravid, Shashank M

    2016-08-01

    The delta family of ionotropic glutamate receptors consists of glutamate delta-1 (GluD1) and glutamate delta-2 receptors. We have previously shown that GluD1 knockout mice exhibit features of developmental delay, including impaired spine pruning and switch in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit, which are relevant to autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we identified a novel role of GluD1 in regulating metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) signaling in the hippocampus. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated colocalization of mGlu5 with GluD1 punctas in the hippocampus. Additionally, GluD1 protein coimmunoprecipitated with mGlu5 in the hippocampal membrane fraction, as well as when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, demonstrating that GluD1 and mGlu5 may cooperate in a signaling complex. The interaction of mGlu5 with scaffold protein effector Homer, which regulates mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, was abnormal both under basal conditions and in response to mGlu1/5 agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) in GluD1 knockout mice. The basal levels of phosphorylated mTOR and protein kinase B, the signaling proteins downstream of mGlu5 activation, were higher in GluD1 knockout mice, and no further increase was induced by DHPG. We also observed higher basal protein translation and an absence of DHPG-induced increase in GluD1 knockout mice. In accordance with a role of mGlu5-mediated mTOR signaling in synaptic plasticity, DHPG-induced internalization of surface α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor subunits was impaired in the GluD1 knockout mice. These results demonstrate that GluD1 interacts with mGlu5, and loss of GluD1 impairs normal mGlu5 signaling potentially by dysregulating coupling to its effector. These studies identify a novel role of the enigmatic GluD1 subunit in hippocampal function. PMID:27231330

  1. DMPD: Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15662540 Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling. Li X, Qin J....iated signaling. PubmedID 15662540 Title Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor media... J Mol Med. 2005 Apr;83(4):258-66. Epub 2005 Jan 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor med

  2. DMPD: Signalling adaptors used by Toll-like receptors: an update. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18706831 Signalling adaptors used by Toll-like receptors: an update. Kenny EF, O'Ne...tors used by Toll-like receptors: an update. PubmedID 18706831 Title Signalling adaptors used by Toll-like receptors: an update

  3. Insulin receptor substrate 4 couples the leptin receptor to multiple signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauman, Joris; De Smet, Anne-Sophie; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Belsham, Denise; Tavernier, Jan

    2008-04-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates food intake and energy expenditure by activating its hypothalamic leptin receptor (LR). Members of the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) family serve as adaptor proteins in the signaling pathways of several cytokines and hormones and a role for IRS2 in central leptin physiology is well established. Using mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT), a cytokine receptor-based two-hybrid method, in the N38 hypothalamic cell line, we here demonstrate that also IRS4 interacts with the LR. This recruitment is leptin dependent and requires phosphorylation of the Y1077 motif of the LR. Domain mapping of IRS4 revealed the critical role of the pleckstrin homology domain for full interaction. In line with its function as an adaptor protein, IRS4 interacted with the regulatory p85 subunit of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase Cgamma, and the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members SOCS2, SOCS6, and SOCS7 and thus can modulate LR signaling. PMID:18165436

  4. SPATA2 links CYLD to the TNF-α receptor signaling complex and modulates the receptor signaling outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Satpathy, Shankha; Beli, Petra; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2016-09-01

    TNF-α is a key regulator of innate immune and proinflammatory responses. However, the composition of the TNF-α receptor-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC) and the architecture of the downstream signaling networks are incompletely understood. We employed quantitative mass spectrometry to demonstrate that TNF-α stimulation induces widespread protein phosphorylation and that the scope of phosphorylation expands in a temporal manner. TNF-α stimulation also induces rapid ubiquitylation of components of the TNF-RSC Temporal analysis of the TNF-RSC composition identified SPATA2 as a novel component of the TNF-RSC The predicted PUB domain in the N-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with the USP domain of CYLD, whereas the C-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with HOIP SPATA2 is required for recruitment of CYLD to the TNF-RSC Downregulation of SPATA2 augments transcriptional activation of NF-κB and inhibits TNF-α-induced necroptosis, pointing to an important function of SPATA2 in modulating the outcomes of TNF-α signaling. Taken together, our study draws a detailed map of TNF-α signaling, identifies SPATA2 as a novel component of TNF-α signaling, and provides a rich resource for further functional investigations.

  5. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orfali, Nina [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); McKenna, Sharon L. [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Cahill, Mary R. [Department of Hematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork (Ireland); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); Mongan, Nigel P., E-mail: nigel.mongan@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects.

  6. Erythropoietin regulates Treg cells in asthma through TGFβ receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Guoshi; Wei, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, the development of which is suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). Erythropoietin (EPO) is originally defined as a hematopoietic growth factor. Recently, the anti-inflammatory effects of EPO in asthma have been acknowledged. However, the underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Here, we showed that EPO treatment significantly reduced the severity of an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in mice, seemingly through promoting Foxp3-mediated activation of Treg cells in OVA-treated mouse lung. The activation of Treg cells resulted from increases in transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), which were mainly produced by M2 macrophages (M2M). In vitro, Co-culture with M2M increased Foxp3 levels in Treg cells and the Treg cell number, in a TGFβ receptor signaling dependent manner. Moreover, elimination of macrophages abolished the therapeutic effects of EPO in vivo. Together, our data suggest that EPO may increase M2M, which activate Treg cells through TGFβ receptor signaling to mitigate the severity of asthma. PMID:26807178

  7. Neurokinin-1 receptor signalling impacts bone marrow repopulation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Berger

    Full Text Available Tachykinins are a large group of neuropeptides with both central and peripheral activity. Despite the increasing number of studies reporting a growth supportive effect of tachykinin peptides in various in vitro stem cell systems, it remains unclear whether these findings are applicable in vivo. To determine how neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R deficient hematopoietic stem cells would behave in a normal in vivo environment, we tested their reconstitution efficiency using competitive bone marrow repopulation assays. We show here that bone marrow taken from NK-1R deficient mice (Tacr1(-/- showed lineage specific B and T cell engraftment deficits compared to wild-type competitor bone marrow cells, providing evidence for an involvement of NK-1R signalling in adult hematopoiesis. Tachykinin knockout mice lacking the peptides SP and/or HK-1 (Tac1 (-/-, Tac4 (-/- and Tac1 (-/-/Tac4 (-/- mice repopulated a lethally irradiated wild-type host with similar efficiency as competing wild-type bone marrow. The difference between peptide and receptor deficient mice indicates a paracrine and/or endocrine mechanism of action rather than autocrine signalling, as tachykinin peptides are supplied by the host environment.

  8. Regulation of C3a Receptor Signaling in Human Mast Cells by G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Guo; Hariharan Subramanian; Kshitij Gupta; Hydar Ali

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The complement component C3a activates human mast cells via its cell surface G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) C3aR. For most GPCRs, agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation leads to receptor desensitization, internalization as well as activation of downstream signaling pathways such as ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Previous studies in transfected COS cells overexpressing G protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) demonstrated that GRK2, GRK3, GRK5 and GRK6 participate in agonist-induced...

  9. Exponential signaling gain at the receptor level enhances signal-to-noise ratio in bacterial chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Neumann

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling systems show astonishing precision in their response to external stimuli despite strong fluctuations in the molecular components that determine pathway activity. To control the effects of noise on signaling most efficiently, living cells employ compensatory mechanisms that reach from simple negative feedback loops to robustly designed signaling architectures. Here, we report on a novel control mechanism that allows living cells to keep precision in their signaling characteristics - stationary pathway output, response amplitude, and relaxation time - in the presence of strong intracellular perturbations. The concept relies on the surprising fact that for systems showing perfect adaptation an exponential signal amplification at the receptor level suffices to eliminate slowly varying multiplicative noise. To show this mechanism at work in living systems, we quantified the response dynamics of the E. coli chemotaxis network after genetically perturbing the information flux between upstream and downstream signaling components. We give strong evidence that this signaling system results in dynamic invariance of the activated response regulator against multiplicative intracellular noise. We further demonstrate that for environmental conditions, for which precision in chemosensing is crucial, the invariant response behavior results in highest chemotactic efficiency. Our results resolve several puzzling features of the chemotaxis pathway that are widely conserved across prokaryotes but so far could not be attributed any functional role.

  10. The role of GPCR dimerisation/oligomerisation in receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, G; Canals, M; Pediani, J D; Ellis, J; Lopez-Gimenez, J F

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of techniques have been employed to examine the quaternary structure of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although it is well established that homo-dimerisation is common, recent studies have sought to explore the physical basis of these interactions and the role of dimerisation in signal transduction. Growing evidence hints at the existence of higher-order organisation of individual GPCRs and the potential for hetero-dimerisation between pairs of co-expressed GPCRs. Here we consider how both homo-dimerisation/oligomerisation and hetero-dimerisation can regulate signal transduction through GPCRs and the potential consequences of this for function of therapeutic medicines that target GPCRs. Hetero-dimerisation is not the sole means by which co-expressed GPCRs may regulate the function of one another. Heterologous desensitisation may be at least as important and we also consider if this can be the basis for physiological antagonism between pairs of co-expressed GPCRs. Although there may be exceptions (Meyer et al. 2006), a great deal of recent evidence has indicated that most G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) do not exist as monomers but rather as dimers or, potentially, within higher-order oligomers (Milligan 2004b; Park et al. 2004). Support for such models has been provided by a range of studies employing different approaches, including co-immunoprecipitation of differentially epitope-tagged but co-expressed forms of the same GPCR, co-operativity in ligand binding and a variety of resonance energy transfer techniques (Milligan and Bouvier 2005). Only for the photon receptor rhodopsin has the organisational structure of a GPCR been studied in situ. The application of atomic force microscopy to murine rod outer segment discs indicated that rhodopsin is organised in a series of parallel arrays of dimers (Liang et al. 2003) and based on this, molecular models were constructed to try to define and interpret regions of contact between the monomers

  11. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Orfali, Nina

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies.

  12. Ectodysplasin A (EDA) - EDA receptor signalling and its pharmacological modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Schneider, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    The TNF family ligand ectodysplasin A (EDA) regulates the induction, morphogenesis and/or maintenance of skin-derived structures such as teeth, hair, sweat glands and several other glands. Deficiencies in the EDA - EDA receptor (EDAR) signalling pathway cause hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED). This syndrome is characterized by the absence or malformation of several skin-derived appendages resulting in hypotrychosis, hypodontia, heat-intolerance, dry skin and dry eyes, susceptibility to airways infections and crusting of various secretions. The EDA-EDAR system is an important effector of canonical Wnt signalling in developing skin appendages. It functions by stimulating NF-κB-mediated transcription of effectors or inhibitors of the Wnt, Sonic hedgehog (SHH), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathways that regulate interactions within or between epithelial and mesenchymal cells and tissues. In animal models of Eda-deficiency, soluble EDAR agonists can precisely correct clinically relevant symptoms with low side effects even at high agonist doses, indicating that efficient negative feedback signals occur in treated tissues. Hijacking of the placental antibody transport system can help deliver active molecules to developing foetuses in a timely manner. EDAR agonists may serve to treat certain forms of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:24508088

  13. Novel method for the study of receptor Ca2+ signalling exemplified by the NK1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heding, A; Elling, C E; Schwartz, T W

    2002-01-01

    Screening (MTS). Using the NovoStar we have found the molecular pharmacology of the NK1 receptor to be comparable to that observed in classical signal transduction assays. Thus, we have observed an EC50 value of 3 nM for substance P induced Ca2+ response. This value corresponds well with previously...... published values for substance P induced IP and cAMP turnover. [1] Using the NovoStar technology we have studied the pharmacological profile of the well known non-peptide NKI receptor antagonists CP96,345 and SR140,333 [2,3] in respect of inhibition of the Ca2+ response induced by substance P. Interestingly......, the antagonistic potency of the antagonists depended greatly on the experimental design, e.g., a dependency of timing in the addition of antagonists vs. agonist was noted. Also, metal-ion site engineered NK1 receptors [2] were tested for the ability of metal-ions to inhibit signalling. It is concluded...

  14. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist Losartan binds and activates bradykinin B2 receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Olsen, Kristine Boisen; Erikstrup, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker (ARB) Losartan has cardioprotective effects during ischemia-reperfusion injury and inhibits reperfusion arrhythmias -effects that go beyond the benefits of lowering blood pressure. The renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems are intricately...... connected and some of the cardioprotective effects of Losartan are abolished by blocking the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) signaling. In this study, we investigated the ability of six clinically available ARBs to specifically bind and activate the B2R. First, we investigated their ability to activate...... phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in COS-7 cells transiently expressing the B2R. We found that only Losartan activated the B2R, working as a partial agonist compared to the endogenous ligand bradykinin. This effect was blocked by the B2R antagonist HOE 140. A competitive binding analysis revealed that Losartan does...

  15. Current Views of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yamamoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On microbial invasion, the host immediately evokes innate immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that Toll-like receptors (TLRs play crucial roles in innate responses that lead not only to the clearance of pathogens but also to the efficient establishment of acquired immunity by directly detecting molecules from microbes. In terms of intracellular TLR-mediated signaling pathways, cytoplasmic adaptor molecules containing Toll/IL-1R (TIR domains play important roles in inflammatory immune responses through the production of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and type I interferon, and upregulation of costimulatory molecules. In this paper, we will describe our current understanding of the relationship between TLRs and their ligands derived from pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Moreover, we will review the historical and current literature to describe the mechanisms behind TLR-mediated activation of innate immune responses.

  16. The transcriptomics of glucocorticoid receptor signaling in developing zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinushan Nesan

    Full Text Available Cortisol is the primary corticosteroid in teleosts that is released in response to stressor activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis. The target tissue action of this hormone is primarily mediated by the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR, a ligand-bound transcription factor. In developing zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos, GR transcripts and cortisol are maternally deposited into the oocyte prior to fertilization and influence early embryogenesis. To better understand of the molecular mechanisms involved, we investigated changes in the developmental transcriptome prior to hatch, in response to morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of GR using the Agilent zebrafish microarray platform. A total of 1313 and 836 mRNA transcripts were significantly changed at 24 and 36 hours post fertilization (hpf, respectively. Functional analysis revealed numerous developmental processes under GR regulation, including neurogenesis, eye development, skeletal and cardiac muscle formation. Together, this study underscores a critical role for glucocorticoid signaling in programming molecular events essential for zebrafish development.

  17. Identification of key residues involved in the activation and signaling properties of dopamine D3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Kokila; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Afrasiabi, Milad; Lacy, Brett; Kontoyianni, Maria; Crider, A Michael; Song, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor exhibits agonist-dependent tolerance and slow response termination (SRT) signaling properties that distinguish it from the closely-related D2 receptors. While amino acid residues important for D3 receptor ligand binding have been identified, the residues involved in activation of D3 receptor signaling and induction of signaling properties have not been determined. In this paper, we used cis and trans isomers of a novel D3 receptor agonist, 8-OH-PBZI, and site-directed mutagenesis to identify key residues involved in D3 receptor signaling function. Our results show that trans-8-OH-PBZI, but not cis-8-OH-PBZI, elicit the D3 receptor tolerance and SRT properties. We show that while both agonists require a subset of residues in the orthosteric binding site of D3 receptors for activation of the receptor, the ability of the two isomers to differentially induce tolerance and SRT is mediated by interactions with specific residues in the sixth transmembrane helix and third extracellular loop of the D3 receptor. We also show that unlike cis-8-OH-PBZI, which is a partial agonist at the dopamine D2S receptor and full agonist at dopamine D2L receptor, trans-8-OH-PBZI is a full agonist at both D2S and D2L receptors. The different effect of the two isomers on D3 receptor signaling properties and D2S receptor activation correlated with differential effects of the isomers on agonist-induced mouse locomotor activity. The two isomers of 8-OH-PBZI represent novel pharmacological tools for in silico D3 and D2 receptor homology modeling and for determining the role of D3 receptor tolerance and SRT properties in signaling and behavior. PMID:26116441

  18. Progesterone in pregnancy; receptor-ligand interaction and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres-Bartho, Julia; Halasz, Melinda; Palkovics, Tamas

    2009-12-01

    Progesterone is indispensable in creating a suitable endometrial environment for implantation, and also for the maintenance of pregnancy. Successful pregnancy depends on an appropriate maternal immune response to the fetus. Along with its endocrine effects, progesterone also acts as an "immunosteroid", by contributing to the establishment of a pregnancy protective immune milieu. Progesterone plays a role in uterine homing of NK cells and upregulates HLA-G gene expression, the ligand for NK inhibitory and activating receptors. At high concentrations, progesterone is a potent inducer of Th2-type cytokines as well as of LIF and M-CSF production by T cells. A protein called progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), by inducing a Th2-dominant cytokine production mediates the immunological effects of progesterone. PIBF binds to a novel type of the IL-4 receptor and signals via the Jak/STAT pathway, to induce a number of genes, that not only affect the immune response, but might also play a role in trophoblast invasiveness. PMID:19880194

  19. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have...... to their closest endogenous homologs, are interactions with a wider range of chemokines, which can act as agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, and the exploitation of many signal transduction pathways. High constitutive activity is another key property of some--but not all--of these receptors. The chemokine...... receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as novel antiviral strategies...

  20. Human herpesvirus 6 infection impairs Toll-like receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochi Toshiki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 has a tropism for immunocompetent cells, including T lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs suggesting that HHV-6 infection affects the immunosurveillance system. Toll-like receptor (TLR system plays an important role in innate immunity against various pathogens. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HHV-6 infection on the expression and intracellular signaling of TLRs in DCs. Although expression levels of TLRs were not decreased or slightly elevated following HHV-6 infection, the amounts of cytokines produced following stimulation with ligands for TLRs appeared to be dramatically decreased in HHV-6-infected DCs as compared to mock-infected DCs. Similarly, phosphorylation levels of TAK-1, IκB kinase, and IκB-α following stimulation of HHV-6-infected DCs with lipopolysaccharide, which is the ligand for TLR4, appeared to be decreased. These data show that HHV-6 impairs intracellular signaling through TLRs indicating the novel mechanism of HHV-6-mediated immunomodulation.

  1. Comparative studies of Toll-like receptor signalling using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwal, Zakia; Wiegertjes, Geert F; Veneman, Wouter J; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2014-09-01

    Zebrafish model systems for infectious disease are increasingly used for the functional analysis of molecular pattern recognition processes. These studies benefit from the high conservation level of all innate immune factors in vertebrates. Zebrafish studies are strategically well positioned for this because of the ease of comparisons with studies in other fish species of which the immune system also has been intensively studied, but that are currently still less amendable to detailed genetic or microscopic studies. In this paper we focus on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling factors, which currently are the best characterized in mammalian systems. We review the knowledge on TLR signalling in the context of recent advances in zebrafish studies and discuss possibilities for future approaches that can complement studies in cell cultures and rodent models. A focus in these comparisons is the role of negative control mechanisms in immune responses that appear very important in a whole organism to keep adverse systemic responses in check. We also pay much attention to comparisons with studies in common carp that is highly related to zebrafish and that because of its large body mass can complement immune studies in zebrafish.

  2. Recruitment of SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase and signalling by a chimeric T-cell receptor-killer inhibitory receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M D; Geisler, C

    2000-01-01

    Receptors expressing the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in their cytoplasmic tail play an important role in the negative regulation of natural killer and B-cell activation. A subpopulation of T cells expresses the ITIM containing killer cell inhibitory receptor (KIR), which...... recognize MHC class I molecules. Following coligation of KIR with an activating receptor, the tyrosine in the ITIM is phosphorylated and the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is recruited to the ITIM via its SH2 domains. It is still not clear how SHP-1 affects T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling....... In this study, we constructed a chimeric TCR-KIR receptor. We demonstrated that SHP-1 is recruited to the chimeric TCR-KIR receptor following T-cell stimulation with either anti-TCR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) or superantigen. However, in spite of this we could not detect any effect of SHP-1 on TCR signalling...

  3. Allosteric and orthosteric sites in CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), a chimeric receptor approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Steen, Anne; Jensen, Pia C;

    2011-01-01

    molecules often act more deeply in an allosteric mode. However, opposed to the well described molecular interaction of allosteric modulators in class C 7-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors, the interaction in class A, to which the chemokine receptors belong, is more sparsely described. Using the CCR5...... chemokine receptor as a model system, we studied the molecular interaction and conformational interchange required for proper action of various orthosteric chemokines and allosteric small molecules, including the well known CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, SCH-C, and aplaviroc, and four novel CCR5 ago......-allosteric molecules. A chimera was successfully constructed between CCR5 and the closely related CCR2 by transferring all extracellular regions of CCR2 to CCR5, i.e. a Trojan horse that resembles CCR2 extracellularly but signals through a CCR5 transmembrane unit. The chimera bound CCR2 (CCL2 and CCL7), but not CCR5...

  4. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S; Jonathan M Green; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation...

  5. Medial nucleus tractus solitarius oxytocin receptor signaling and food intake control: the role of gastrointestinal satiation signal processing

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Zhi Yi; Alhadeff, Amber L; Grill, Harvey J.

    2015-01-01

    Central oxytocin (OT) administration reduces food intake and its effects are mediated, in part, by hindbrain oxytocin receptor (OT-R) signaling. The neural substrate and mechanisms mediating the intake inhibitory effects of hindbrain OT-R signaling are undefined. We examined the hypothesis that hindbrain OT-R-mediated feeding inhibition results from an interaction between medial nucleus tractus solitarius (mNTS) OT-R signaling and the processing of gastrointestinal (GI) satiation signals by n...

  6. TGF-β-induced profibrotic signaling is regulated in part by the WNT receptor Frizzled-8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjer, Anita I R; Baarsma, Hoeke A; Oostenbrink, Lisette M; Jansen, Sepp R; Kuipers, Christine C; Lindner, Michael; Postma, Dirkje S; Meurs, Herman; Heijink, Irene H; Gosens, Reinoud; Königshoff, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β is important in lung injury and remodeling processes. TGF-β and Wingless/integrase-1 (WNT) signaling are interconnected; however, the WNT ligand-receptor complexes involved are unknown. Thus, we aimed to identify Frizzled (FZD) receptors that mediate TGF-β-induced profibrotic signaling. MRC-5

  7. Exercise modulates postreceptor insulin signaling and glucose transport in muscle-specific insulin receptor knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.; Higaki, Yasuki; Hirshman, Michael F.; Michael, M. Dodson; Dufresne, Scott D.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    1999-01-01

    Physical exercise promotes glucose uptake into skeletal muscle and makes the working muscles more sensitive to insulin. To understand the role of insulin receptor (IR) signaling in these responses, we studied the effects of exercise and insulin on skeletal muscle glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in mice lacking insulin receptors specifically in muscle. Muscle-specific insulin receptor knockout (MIRKO) mice had normal resting 2-deoxy-glucose (2DG) uptake in soleus muscles but had no si...

  8. Analysis of C-type lectin receptor induced NF-kappaB signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Straßer, Andreas Dominikus

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) that signal via Syk and the central Card9-Bcl10-Malt1 (CBM) complex induce the transcription of NF-κB-regulated genes. Activation of those receptors mediates inflammatory reactions and the defense against various pathogens. Despite the non-redundant role of CLRs for the induction of innate immune responses, particularly receptor-proximal events that transduce ligand binding to downstream signaling remain to be defined. This dissertation identifies PKCδ a...

  9. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  10. Cocaine Disrupts Histamine H3 Receptor Modulation of Dopamine D1 Receptor Signaling: σ1-D1-H3 Receptor Complexes as Key Targets for Reducing Cocaine's Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Moreno-Delgado, David; Navarro, Gemma; Hoffmann, Hanne M.; Fuentes, Silvia; Rosell-Vilar, Santi; Gasperini, Paola; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Mar; Medrano, Mireia; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The general effects of cocaine are not well understood at the molecular level. What is known is that the dopamine D1 receptor plays an important role. Here we show that a key mechanism may be cocaine's blockade of the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of D1 receptor function. This blockade requires the σ1 receptor and occurs upon cocaine binding to σ1-D1-H3 receptor complexes. The cocaine-mediated disruption leaves an uninhibited D1 receptor that activates Gs, freely recruits β-arrestin, increases p-ERK 1/2 levels, and induces cell death when over activated. Using in vitro assays with transfected cells and in ex vivo experiments using both rats acutely treated or self-administered with cocaine along with mice depleted of σ1 receptor, we show that blockade of σ1 receptor by an antagonist restores the protective H3 receptor-mediated brake on D1 receptor signaling and prevents the cell death from elevated D1 receptor signaling. These findings suggest that a combination therapy of σ1R antagonists with H3 receptor agonists could serve to reduce some effects of cocaine. PMID:24599455

  11. Downregulation of kinin B1 receptor function by B2 receptor heterodimerization and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianming; Brovkovych, Viktor; Zhang, Yongkang; Tan, Fulong; Skidgel, Randal A

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the G protein-coupled kinin receptors B1 (kB1R) and B2 (kB2R) plays a critical role in inflammatory responses mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. The kB2R is constitutively expressed and rapidly desensitized in response to agonist whereas kB1R expression is upregulated by inflammatory stimuli and it is resistant to internalization and desensitization. Here we show that the kB1R heterodimerizes with kB2Rs in co-transfected HEK293 cells and natively expressing endothelial cells, resulting in significant internalization and desensitization of the kB1R response in cells pre-treated with kB2R agonist. However, pre-treatment of cells with kB1R agonist did not affect subsequent kB2R responses. Agonists of other G protein-coupled receptors (thrombin, lysophosphatidic acid) had no effect on a subsequent kB1R response. The loss of kB1R response after pretreatment with kB2R agonist was partially reversed with kB2R mutant Y129S, which blocks kB2R signaling without affecting endocytosis, or T342A, which signals like wild type but is not endocytosed. Co-endocytosis of the kB1R with kB2R was dependent on β-arrestin and clathrin-coated pits but not caveolae. The sorting pathway of kB1R and kB2R after endocytosis differed as recycling of kB1R to the cell surface was much slower than that of kB2R. In cytokine-treated human lung microvascular endothelial cells, pre-treatment with kB2R agonist inhibited kB1R-mediated increase in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) caused by kB1R stimulation (to generate nitric oxide) and blocked the profound drop in TER caused by kB1R activation in the presence of pyrogallol (a superoxide generator). Thus, kB1R function can be downregulated by kB2R co-endocytosis and signaling, suggesting new approaches to control kB1R signaling in pathological conditions. PMID:25289859

  12. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers

  13. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Department of Gastroenterology, The Tenth People’s Hospital of Shanghai, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yyang@houstonmethodist.org [Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers.

  14. Biased signaling through G-protein-coupled PROKR2 receptors harboring missense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbai, Oualid; Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Various missense mutations in the gene coding for prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome. However, the functional consequences of these mutations on the different signaling pathways of this receptor have not been studied. We first showed that the wild-type PROKR2 can activate different G-protein subtypes (Gq, Gs, and Gi/o) and recruit β-arrestins in transfected HEK-293 cells. We then examined, for each of these signaling pathways, the effects of 9 mutations that did not significantly impair cell surface targeting or ligand binding of the receptor. Four mutant receptors showing defective Gq signaling (R85C, R85H, R164Q, and V331M) could still recruit β-arrestins on ligand activation, which may cause biased signaling in vivo. Conversely, the R80C receptor could activate the 3 types of G proteins but could not recruit β-arrestins. Finally, the R268C receptor could recruit β-arrestins and activate the Gq and Gs signaling pathways but could not activate the Gi/o signaling pathway. Our results validate the concept that mutations in the genes encoding membrane receptors can bias downstream signaling in various ways, possibly leading to pathogenic and, perhaps in some cases, protective (e.g., R268C) effects. PMID:24830383

  15. NK1 receptor fused to beta-arrestin displays a single-component, high-affinity molecular phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martini, Lene; Hastrup, Hanne; Holst, Birgitte;

    2002-01-01

    with low affinity against antagonists. In contrast, in the NK1-beta-arrestin1 fusion protein, all ligands bound with similar affinity independent of the choice of radioligand and with Hill coefficients near unity. We conclude that the NK1 receptor in complex with arrestin is in a high-affinity, stable......Arrestins are cytosolic proteins that, upon stimulation of seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors, terminate signaling by binding to the receptor, displacing the G protein and targeting the receptor to clathrin-coated pits. Fusion of beta-arrestin1 to the C-terminal end of the neurokinin NK1 receptor...... Gq/G11 and Gs pathways. The NK1-beta-arrestin1 fusion construct bound nonpeptide antagonists with increased affinity but surprisingly also bound two types of agonists, substance P and neurokinin A, with high, normal affinity. In the wild-type NK1 receptor, neurokinin A (NKA) competes for binding...

  16. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to the large family of 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are targeted and activated by a variety of different ligands, indicating that activation is a result of similar molecular mechanisms but not necessarily similar modes of ligand bin...

  17. Cell surface receptors for signal transduction and ligand transport: a design principles study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Shankaran

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Receptors constitute the interface of cells to their external environment. These molecules bind specific ligands involved in multiple processes, such as signal transduction and nutrient transport. Although a variety of cell surface receptors undergo endocytosis, the systems-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor trafficking dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model of receptor-ligand binding and internalization to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. A given signaling or transport receptor system represents a particular implementation of this module with a specific set of kinetic parameters. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptor systems can be characterized as being: i avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracellular ligand capture efficiency, ii consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than merely serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulation.

  18. Ric-8A, a Gα protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor potentiates taste receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire J Fenech

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Taste receptors for sweet, bitter and umami tastants are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. While much effort has been devoted to understanding G-protein-receptor interactions and identifying the components of the signalling cascade downstream of these receptors, at the level of the G-protein the modulation of receptor signal transduction remains relatively unexplored. In this regard a taste-specific regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS, RGS21, has recently been identified. To study whether guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs are involved in the transduction of the signal downstream of the taste GPCRs we investigated the expression of Ric-8A and Ric-8B in mouse taste cells and their interaction with G-protein subunits found in taste buds. Mammalian Ric-8 proteins were initially identified as potent GEFs for a range of Gα subunits and Ric-8B has recently been shown to amplify olfactory signal transduction. We find that both Ric-8A and Ric-8B are expressed in a large portion of taste bud cells and that most of these cells contain IP3R-3 a marker for sweet, umami and bitter taste receptor cells. Ric-8A interacts with Gα-gustducin and Gαi2 through which it amplifies the signal transduction of hTas2R16, a receptor for bitter compounds. Overall, these findings are consistent with a role for Ric-8 in mammalian taste signal transduction.

  19. Cell surface receptors for signal transduction and ligand transport - a design principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankaran, Harish; Resat, Haluk; Wiley, H. S.

    2007-06-01

    Although many different receptors undergo endocytosis, the system-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptors can be categorized a being: i) avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracelluar ligand capture efficiency, ii) consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii) dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled and epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to anhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulations.

  20. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly......The human chemokine system comprises 19 seven-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors and 45 endogenous chemokines that often interact with each other in a promiscuous manner. Due to the chemokine system's primary function in leukocyte migration, it has a central role in immune homeostasis...... and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity...

  1. Inflammatory PAF Receptor Signaling Initiates Hedgehog Signaling and Kidney Fibrogenesis During Ethanol Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Hanouneh, Mohamad; Nagy, Laura E; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation either resolves or proceeds to fibrotic repair that replaces functional tissue. Pro-fibrotic hedgehog signaling and induction of its Gli transcription factor in pericytes induces fibrosis in kidney, but molecular instructions connecting inflammation to fibrosis are opaque. We show acute kidney inflammation resulting from chronic ingestion of the common xenobiotic ethanol initiates Gli1 transcription and hedgehog synthesis in kidney pericytes, and promotes renal fibrosis. Ethanol ingestion stimulated transcription of TGF-ß, collagens I and IV, and alpha-smooth muscle actin with accumulation of these proteins. This was accompanied by deposition of extracellular fibrils. Ethanol catabolism by CYP2E1 in kidney generates local reactive oxygen species that oxidize cellular phospholipids to phospholipid products that activate the Platelet-activating Factor receptor (PTAFR) for inflammatory phospholipids. Genetically deleting this ptafr locus abolished accumulation of mRNA for TGF-ß, collagen IV, and α-smooth muscle actin. Loss of PTAFR also abolished ethanol-stimulated Sonic (Shh) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) expression, and abolished transcription and accumulation of Gli1. Shh induced in pericytes and Ihh in tubules escaped to urine of ethanol-fed mice. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) is required for ethanol-induced kidney inflammation, and Shh was not present in kidney or urine of mpo-/- mice. Shh also was present in urine of patients with acute kidney injury, but not in normal individuals or those with fibrotic liver cirrhosis We conclude neither endogenous PTAFR signaling nor CYP2E1-generated radicals alone are sufficient to initiate hedgehog signaling, but instead PTAFR-dependent neutrophil infiltration with myeloperoxidase activation is necessary to initiate ethanol-induced fibrosis in kidney. We also show fibrogenic mediators escape to urine, defining a new class of urinary mechanistic biomarkers of fibrogenesis for an organ not commonly

  2. Inflammatory PAF Receptor Signaling Initiates Hedgehog Signaling and Kidney Fibrogenesis During Ethanol Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calivarathan Latchoumycandane

    Full Text Available Acute inflammation either resolves or proceeds to fibrotic repair that replaces functional tissue. Pro-fibrotic hedgehog signaling and induction of its Gli transcription factor in pericytes induces fibrosis in kidney, but molecular instructions connecting inflammation to fibrosis are opaque. We show acute kidney inflammation resulting from chronic ingestion of the common xenobiotic ethanol initiates Gli1 transcription and hedgehog synthesis in kidney pericytes, and promotes renal fibrosis. Ethanol ingestion stimulated transcription of TGF-ß, collagens I and IV, and alpha-smooth muscle actin with accumulation of these proteins. This was accompanied by deposition of extracellular fibrils. Ethanol catabolism by CYP2E1 in kidney generates local reactive oxygen species that oxidize cellular phospholipids to phospholipid products that activate the Platelet-activating Factor receptor (PTAFR for inflammatory phospholipids. Genetically deleting this ptafr locus abolished accumulation of mRNA for TGF-ß, collagen IV, and α-smooth muscle actin. Loss of PTAFR also abolished ethanol-stimulated Sonic (Shh and Indian hedgehog (Ihh expression, and abolished transcription and accumulation of Gli1. Shh induced in pericytes and Ihh in tubules escaped to urine of ethanol-fed mice. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO is required for ethanol-induced kidney inflammation, and Shh was not present in kidney or urine of mpo-/- mice. Shh also was present in urine of patients with acute kidney injury, but not in normal individuals or those with fibrotic liver cirrhosis We conclude neither endogenous PTAFR signaling nor CYP2E1-generated radicals alone are sufficient to initiate hedgehog signaling, but instead PTAFR-dependent neutrophil infiltration with myeloperoxidase activation is necessary to initiate ethanol-induced fibrosis in kidney. We also show fibrogenic mediators escape to urine, defining a new class of urinary mechanistic biomarkers of fibrogenesis for an organ not

  3. E3 ubiquitin ligases Pellinos as regulators of pattern recognition receptor signaling and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Andrei E; Murphy, Michael; Zhou, Hao; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-07-01

    Pellinos are a family of E3 ubiquitin ligases discovered for their role in catalyzing K63-linked polyubiquitination of Pelle, an interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase homolog in the Drosophila Toll pathway. Subsequent studies have revealed the central and non-redundant roles of mammalian Pellino-1, Pellino-2, and Pelino-3 in signaling pathways emanating from IL-1 receptors, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, T- and B-cell receptors. While Pellinos ability to interact with many signaling intermediates suggested their scaffolding roles, recent findings in mice expressing ligase-inactive Pellinos demonstrated the importance of Pellino ubiquitin ligase activity. Cell-specific functions of Pellinos have emerged, e.g. Pellino-1 being a negative regulator in T lymphocytes and a positive regulator in myeloid cells, and details of molecular regulation of receptor signaling by various members of the Pellino family have been revealed. In this review, we summarize current information about Pellino-mediated regulation of signaling by pattern recognition receptors, T-cell and B-cell receptors and tumor necrosis factor receptors, and discuss Pellinos roles in sepsis and infectious diseases, as well as in autoimmune, inflammatory, and allergic disorders. We also provide our perspective on the potential of targeting Pellinos with peptide- or small molecule-based drug compounds as a new therapeutic approach for septic shock and autoimmune pathologies.

  4. Symmetric signaling by an asymmetric 1 erythropoietin: 2 erythropoietin receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingxin L; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Tidor, Bruce; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-01-30

    Via sites 1 and 2, erythropoietin binds asymmetrically to two identical receptor monomers, although it is unclear how asymmetry affects receptor activation and signaling. Here we report the design and validation of two mutant erythropoietin receptors that probe the role of individual members of the receptor dimer by selectively binding either site 1 or site 2 on erythropoietin. Ba/F3 cells expressing either mutant receptor do not respond to erythropoietin, but cells co-expressing both receptors respond to erythropoietin by proliferation and activation of the JAK2-Stat5 pathway. A truncated receptor with only one cytosolic tyrosine (Y343) is sufficient for signaling in response to erythropoietin, regardless of the monomer on which it is located. Similarly, only one receptor in the dimer needs a juxtamembrane hydrophobic L253 or W258 residue, essential for JAK2 activation. We conclude that despite asymmetry in the ligand-receptor interaction, both sides are competent for signaling, and appear to signal equally.

  5. High Cell Surface Death Receptor Expression Determines Type I Versus Type II Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xue Wei; Peterson, Kevin L.; Dai, Haiming; Schneider, Paula; Lee, Sun-Hee; Zhang, Jin-San; Koenig, Alexander; Bronk, Steve; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Gores, Gregory J.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there are two signaling pathways leading from ligation of the Fas receptor to induction of apoptosis. Type I signaling involves Fas ligand-induced recruitment of large amounts of FADD (FAS-associated death domain protein) and procaspase 8, leading to direct activation of caspase 3, whereas type II signaling involves Bid-mediated mitochondrial perturbation to amplify a more modest death receptor-initiated signal. The biochemical basis for this dichotomy has previously been unclear. Here we show that type I cells have a longer half-life for Fas message and express higher amounts of cell surface Fas, explaining the increased recruitment of FADD and subsequent signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that cells with type II Fas signaling (Jurkat or HCT-15) can signal through a type I pathway upon forced receptor overexpression and that shRNA-mediated Fas down-regulation converts cells with type I signaling (A498) to type II signaling. Importantly, the same cells can exhibit type I signaling for Fas and type II signaling for TRAIL (TNF-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), indicating that the choice of signaling pathway is related to the specific receptor, not some other cellular feature. Additional experiments revealed that up-regulation of cell surface death receptor 5 levels by treatment with 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin converted TRAIL signaling in HCT116 cells from type II to type I. Collectively, these results suggest that the type I/type II dichotomy reflects differences in cell surface death receptor expression. PMID:21865165

  6. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. → The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. → Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. → Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. → Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  7. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magno, Aaron L. [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Ingley, Evan [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Brown, Suzanne J. [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Conigrave, Arthur D. [School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2000 (Australia); Ratajczak, Thomas [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Ward, Bryan K., E-mail: bryanw@cyllene.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. {yields} The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. {yields} Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. {yields} Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. {yields} Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  8. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  9. Signalling properties and pharmacology of a 5-HT7 -type serotonin receptor from Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleugels, R; Lenaerts, C; Vanden Broeck, J; Verlinden, H

    2014-04-01

    In the last decade, genome sequence data and gene structure information on invertebrate receptors has been greatly expanded by large sequencing projects and cloning studies. This information is of great value for the identification of receptors; however, functional and pharmacological data are necessary for an accurate receptor classification and for practical applications. In insects, an important group of neurotransmitter and neurohormone receptors, for which ample sequence information is available but pharmacological information is missing, are the biogenic amine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the present study, we investigated the sequence information, pharmacology and signalling properties of a 5-HT7 -type serotonin receptor from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Trica5-HT7 ). The receptor encoding cDNA shows considerable sequence similarity with cognate 5-HT7 receptors and phylogenetic analysis also clusters the receptor within this 5-HT receptor group. Real-time reverse transcription PCR demonstrated high expression levels in the brain, indicating the possible importance of this receptor in neural processes. Trica5-HT7 was dose-dependently activated by 5-HT, which induced elevated intracellular cyclic AMP levels but had no effect on calcium signalling. The synthetic agonists, α-methyl 5-HT, 5-methoxytryptamine, 5-carboxamidotryptamine and 8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide, showed a response, although with a much lower potency and efficacy than 5-HT. Ketanserin and methiothepin were the most potent antagonists. Both showed characteristics of competitive inhibition on Trica5-HT7 . The signalling pathway and pharmacological profile offer important information that will facilitate functional and comparative studies of 5-HT receptors in insects and other invertebrates. The pharmacology of invertebrate 5-HT receptors differs considerably from that of vertebrates. The present study may therefore contribute to establishing a more

  10. An Oligomeric Signaling Platform Formed by the Toll-like Receptor Signal Transducers MyD88 and IRAK-4*

    OpenAIRE

    Motshwene, Precious G.; Moncrieffe, Martin C.; Grossmann, J. Günter; KAO, CHENG; Ayaluru, Murali; Sandercock, Alan M.; Carol V Robinson; Latz, Eicke; Gay, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate responses to pathogen-associated molecules as part of the vertebrate innate immune response to infection. Receptor dimerization is coupled to downstream signal transduction by the recruitment of a post-receptor complex containing the adaptor protein MyD88 and the IRAK protein kinases. In this work, we show that the death domains of human MyD88 and IRAK-4 assemble into closed complexes having unusual stoichiometries of 7:4 and 8:4, the Myddosome. Formation of...

  11. Analysis of receptor signaling pathways by mass spectrometry: identification of vav-2 as a substrate of the epidermal and platelet-derived growth factor receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A; Podtelejnikov, A V; Blagoev, B;

    2000-01-01

    Oligomerization of receptor protein tyrosine kinases such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by their cognate ligands leads to activation of the receptor. Transphosphorylation of the receptor subunits is followed by the recruitment of signaling molecules containing src homology 2 (SH2...

  12. SIGNALLING THROUGH RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS IN CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT: DOING THE RIGHT THINGS AT THE RIGHT TIMES

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier-Neto, José; Costa, Ângela M. Sousa; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; do Amaral, Fabio Neves; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R.; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from Vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinic and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signalling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of thes...

  13. Melanocortin-1 receptor-mediated signalling pathways activated by NDP-MSH and HBD3 ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Beaumont, Kimberley A.; Smit, Darren J.; Liu, Yan Yan; Chai, Eric; Patel, Mira P.; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Alewood, Paul F.; Sturm, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Binding of melanocortin peptide agonists to the melanocortin-1 receptor of melanocytes results in eumelanin production, whereas binding of the agouti signalling protein inverse agonist results in pheomelanin synthesis. Recently, a novel melanocortin-1 receptor ligand was reported. A β-defensin gene mutation was found to beresponsible for black coat colour in domestic dogs. Notably, the human equivalent, β-defensin 3, was found to bind with high affinity to the melanocortin-1 receptor; however...

  14. GLYCINE AND GLYCINE RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN IMMUNE CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Eynden, Jimmy

    2010-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an integration center for signal processing, receiving signals from the different sensory systems and transmitting signals to the motor system. The main cells conducting signals are neurons, and for the largest part of the 20th century most attention of neuroscientist was focused on neurons. A role of glial cells, for a long time considered as passive connective tissue elements, in normal physiology and pathophysiology is now becoming increasingly appreciat...

  15. Real-time trafficking and signaling of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Wismann, Pernille; Underwood, Christina Rye;

    2014-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 incretin receptor (GLP-1R) of family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a major drug target in type-2-diabetes due to its regulatory effect on post-prandial blood-glucose levels. The mechanism(s) controlling GLP-1R mediated signaling are far from fully understood...

  16. The role of P2Y1 receptor signaling in central respiratory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajani, V; Zhang, Y; Revill, A L; Funk, G D

    2016-06-01

    The profile of P2 receptor signaling in respiratory control has increased substantially since the first suggestions more than 15 years ago of roles in central chemoreception and modulating inspiratory motor outflow. Part of this reflects the paradigm shift that glia participate in information processing and that ATP is a major gliotransmitter. P2 receptors are a diverse family. Here, we review ATP signaling in respiratory control, highlighting G-protein coupled P2Y1 receptors that have been a focus of recent work. Despite strong evidence of a role for glia and P2 receptor signaling in the central chemosensitivity mediated by the retotrapezoid nucleus, P2Y1 receptors do not appear to be directly involved. Evidence that central P2 receptors and glia contribute to the hypoxic ventilatory response is compelling and P2Y1 receptors are the strongest candidate. However, functional significance in vivo, details of the signaling pathways and involvement of other receptor subtypes remain important questions. PMID:26476057

  17. An Integrated Model of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Trafficking and Signal Transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resat, Haluk; Ewald, Jonathan A.; Dixon, David A.; Wiley, H. S.

    2003-08-01

    Endocytic trafficking of many types of receptors can have profound effects on subsequent signaling events. Quantitative models of these processes, however, have usually considered trafficking and signaling independently. Here, we present an integrated model of both the trafficking and signaling pathway of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) using a probability weighted-dynamic Monte Carlo simulation. Our model consists of hundreds of distinct endocytic compartments and about 13,000 reactions/events that occur over a broad spatio-temporal range. By using a realistic multi-compartment model, we can investigate the distribution of the receptors among cellular compartments as well as their potential signal transduction characteristics. Our new model also allows the incorporation of physio-chemical aspects of ligand-receptor interactions, such as pH-dependent binding in different endosomal compartments. To determine the utility of this approach, we simulated the differential activation of the EGFR by two of its ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor- alpha (TGF-a). Our simulations predict that when EGFR is activated with TGF-a, receptor activation is biased toward the cell surface whereas EGF produces a signaling bias towards the endosomal compartment. Experiments confirm these predictions from our model and simulations. Our model accurately predicts the kinetics and extent of receptor down-regulation induced by either EGF or TGF-a. Our results suggest that receptor trafficking controls the compartmental bias of signal transduction, rather than simply modulating signal magnitude. Our model provides a new approach to evaluating the complex effect of receptor trafficking on signal transduction. Importantly, the stochastic and compartmental nature of the simulation allows these models to be directly tested by high-throughput approaches, such as quantitative image analysis.

  18. Non-Ligand-Induced Dimerization is Sufficient to Initiate the Signalling and Endocytosis of EGF Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Kourouniotis, George; Wang, Yi; Pennock, Steven; Chen, Xinmei; Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    The binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to EGF receptor (EGFR) stimulates cell mitogenesis and survival through various signalling cascades. EGF also stimulates rapid EGFR endocytosis and its eventual degradation in lysosomes. The immediate events induced by ligand binding include receptor dimerization, activation of intrinsic tyrosine kinase and autophosphorylation. However, in spite of intensified efforts, the results regarding the roles of these events in EGFR signalling and internali...

  19. Visualization of BRI1 and BAK1(SERK3) membrane receptor heterooligomers during brassinosteroid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücherl, Christoph A; van Esse, G Wilma; Kruis, Alex; Luchtenberg, Jeroen; Westphal, Adrie H; Aker, José; van Hoek, Arie; Albrecht, Catherine; Borst, Jan Willem; de Vries, Sacco C

    2013-08-01

    The leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) is the main ligand-perceiving receptor for brassinosteroids (BRs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Binding of BRs to the ectodomain of plasma membrane (PM)-located BRI1 receptors initiates an intracellular signal transduction cascade that influences various aspects of plant growth and development. Even though the major components of BR signaling have been revealed and the PM was identified as the main site of BRI1 signaling activity, the very first steps of signal transmission are still elusive. Recently, it was shown that the initiation of BR signal transduction requires the interaction of BRI1 with its SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (SERK) coreceptors. In addition, the resolved structure of the BRI1 ectodomain suggested that BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 [BAK1](SERK3) may constitute a component of the ligand-perceiving receptor complex. Therefore, we investigated the spatial correlation between BRI1 and BAK1(SERK3) in the natural habitat of both leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases using comparative colocalization analysis and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. We show that activation of BR signaling by exogenous ligand application resulted in both elevated colocalization between BRI1 and BAK1(SERK3) and an about 50% increase of receptor heterooligomerization in the PM of live Arabidopsis root epidermal cells. However, large populations of BRI1 and BAK1(SERK3) colocalized independently of BRs. Moreover, we could visualize that approximately 7% of the BRI1 PM pool constitutively heterooligomerizes with BAK1(SERK3) in live root cells. We propose that only small populations of PM-located BRI1 and BAK1(SERK3) receptors participate in active BR signaling and that the initiation of downstream signal transduction involves preassembled BRI1-BAK1(SERK3) heterooligomers.

  20. A comprehensive map of the toll-like receptor signaling network

    OpenAIRE

    Oda, Kanae; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular signatures is critically important in proper activation of the immune system. The toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling network is responsible for innate immune response. In mammalians, there are 11 TLRs that recognize a variety of ligands from pathogens to trigger immunological responses. In this paper, we present a comprehensive map of TLRs and interleukin 1 receptor signaling networks based on papers published so far. The map illustrates the possib...

  1. An integrated model of epidermal growth factor receptor trafficking and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resat, Haluk; Ewald, Jonathan A; Dixon, David A; Wiley, H Steven

    2003-08-01

    Endocytic trafficking of many types of receptors can have profound effects on subsequent signaling events. Quantitative models of these processes, however, have usually considered trafficking and signaling independently. Here, we present an integrated model of both the trafficking and signaling pathway of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) using a probability weighted-dynamic Monte Carlo simulation. Our model consists of hundreds of distinct endocytic compartments and approximately 13,000 reactions/events that occur over a broad spatio-temporal range. By using a realistic multicompartment model, we can investigate the distribution of the receptors among cellular compartments as well as their potential signal transduction characteristics. Our new model also allows the incorporation of physiochemical aspects of ligand-receptor interactions, such as pH-dependent binding in different endosomal compartments. To determine the utility of this approach, we simulated the differential activation of the EGFR by two of its ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha). Our simulations predict that when EGFR is activated with TGF-alpha, receptor activation is biased toward the cell surface whereas EGF produces a signaling bias toward the endosomal compartment. Experiments confirm these predictions from our model and simulations. Our model accurately predicts the kinetics and extent of receptor downregulation induced by either EGF or TGF-alpha. Our results suggest that receptor trafficking controls the compartmental bias of signal transduction, rather than simply modulating signal magnitude. Our model provides a new approach to evaluating the complex effect of receptor trafficking on signal transduction. Importantly, the stochastic and compartmental nature of the simulation allows these models to be directly tested by high-throughput approaches, such as quantitative image analysis. PMID:12885624

  2. Analysis of corkscrew signaling in the Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor pathway during myogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Hamlet, M R; Perkins, L A

    2001-01-01

    The Drosophila nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, Corkscrew (Csw), functions positively in multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways, including signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Detailed phenotypic analyses of csw mutations have revealed that Csw activity is required in many of the same developmental processes that require EGFR function. However, it is still unclear where in the signaling hierarchy Csw functions relative to other proteins whose activities...

  3. The Origins of Diversity and Specificity in G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen; Luttrell, Louis M

    2005-01-01

    The modulation of transmembrane signaling by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitutes the single most important therapeutic target in medicine. Drugs acting on GPCRs have traditionally been classified as agonists, partial agonists, or antagonists based on a two-state model of receptor function embodied in the ternary complex model. Over the past decade, however, many lines of investigation have shown that GPCR signaling exhibits greater diversity and “texture” than previously appreciat...

  4. Production of thermoluminescent dosemeters based on MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7}: Dy and MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7}: Tm; Producao de dosimetros termoluminescentes a base de MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7}: Dy e MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7}: Tm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Luiza Freire de; Souza, Divanizia N., E-mail: luizaf25@hotmail.com, E-mail: divanizi@ufs.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Fisica

    2013-07-01

    The thermoluminescent dosimetry (TL) is a well-established technique for the detection of ionizing radiation in hospitals, clinics, and industrial establishments where there is the need to quantify the radiation. For this practice is require the use phosphors which are sensitive to radiation. Some phosphors are already commonly used in this practice, for example, TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti), CaSO{sub 4}:Tm and CaSO{sub 4}:Dy. A compound that was most recently introduced in dosimetry and has many advantageous features to detect neutrons, electrons and gamma is the magnesium tetraborate (MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7}), but the undoped material is not good for dosimetry, since signal does not show satisfactory thermoluminescence. The present work presents the analysis of the compound MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7} when doped with rare earth elements, thulium (Tm) and dysprosium (Dy). The production of MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7}: Dy and MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7}: Tm occurred under acidic conditions. Following the process of crystal growth, several tests were made on phosphors produced to verify the quality of materials as TL dosimeter. Initially, was made the identification of the crystalline phases found in the material, using the technique of X-ray diffractometry, and then were evaluated and compared the TL emission curves of the crystals with two different types of dopants, to this, the samples were irradiated with different radiation sources: {sup 137}Cs (0,66 MeV), {sup 60}Co (1.25 MeV) and X-rays (0.41 MeV) and based on the results was evaluated the energy dependence of phosphors. Another characteristic analyzed, was the decay of TL signal for the material (fading). The results show that the material can be an excellent TL dosimeter when doped with rare earth elements Dy and Tm. (author)

  5. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function

    OpenAIRE

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2009-01-01

    The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administrati...

  6. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:27491650

  7. ITAM-coupled receptors inhibit IFNAR signaling and alter macrophage responses to TLR4 and Listeria monocytogenes1

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh, Linda; WANG, LU; Shi, Chao; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.

    2012-01-01

    Immunoreceptor tyrosine based activation motif (ITAM)-coupled receptors play an essential role in regulating macrophage activation and function by cross-regulating signaling from heterologous receptors. We investigated mechanisms by which ITAM-associated receptors inhibit type I interferon (IFN-α/β) signaling in primary human macrophages and tested the effects of simultaneous ligation of ITAM-associated receptors and TLR4 on TLR4-induced Jak-STAT signaling that is mediated by autocrine IFN-β....

  8. P2X receptor-mediated ATP purinergic signaling in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lin-Hua JiangSchool of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United KingdomAbstract: Purinergic P2X receptors are plasma membrane proteins present in a wide range of mammalian cells where they act as a cellular sensor, enabling cells to detect and respond to extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP, an important signaling molecule. P2X receptors function as ligand-gated Ca2+-permeable cationic channels that open upon ATP binding to elevate intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and cause membrane depolarization. In response to sustained activation, P2X receptors induce formation of a pore permeable to large molecules. P2X receptors also interact with distinct functional proteins and membrane lipids to form specialized signaling complexes. Studies have provided compelling evidence to show that such P2X receptor-mediated ATP-signaling mechanisms determine and regulate a growing number and diversity of important physiological processes, including neurotransmission, muscle contraction, and cytokine release. There is accumulating evidence to support strong causative relationships of altered receptor expression and function with chronic pain, inflammatory diseases, cancers, and other pathologies or diseases. Numerous high throughput screening drug discovery programs and preclinical studies have thus far demonstrated the proof of concepts that the P2X receptors are druggable targets and selective receptor antagonism is a promising therapeutics approach. This review will discuss the recent progress in understanding the mammalian P2X receptors with respect to the ATP-signaling mechanisms, physiological and pathophysiological roles, and development and preclinical studies of receptor antagonists.Keywords: extracellular ATP, ion channel, large pore, signaling complex, chronic pain, inflammatory diseases

  9. Application of computational approaches to study signalling networks of nuclear and Tyrosine kinase receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebaï Ahmed

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear receptors (NRs and Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are essential proteins in many cellular processes and sequence variations in their genes have been reported to be involved in many diseases including cancer. Although crosstalk between RTK and NR signalling and their contribution to the development of endocrine regulated cancers have been areas of intense investigation, the direct coupling of their signalling pathways remains elusive. In our understanding of the role and function of nuclear receptors on the cell membrane the interactions between nuclear receptors and tyrosine kinase receptors deserve further attention. Results We constructed a human signalling network containing nuclear receptors and tyrosine kinase receptors that identified a network topology involving eleven highly connected hubs. We further developed an integrated knowledge database, denominated NR-RTK database dedicated to human RTKs and NRs and their vertebrate orthologs and their interactions. These interactions were inferred using computational tools and those supported by literature evidence are indicated. NR-RTK database contains links to other relevant resources and includes data on receptor ligands. It aims to provide a comprehensive interaction map that identifies complex dynamics and potential crosstalk involved. Availability: NR-RTK database is accessible at http://www.bioinfo-cbs.org/NR-RTK/ Conclusions We infer that the NR-RTK interaction network is scale-free topology. We also uncovered the key receptors mediating the signal transduction between these two types of receptors. Furthermore, NR-RTK database is expected to be useful for researchers working on various aspects of the molecular basis of signal transduction by RTKs and NRs. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Professor Paul Harrison (nominated by Dr. Mark Gerstein, Dr. Arcady Mushegian and Dr. Anthony Almudevar.

  10. Signaling through retinoic acid receptors in cardiac development: Doing the right things at the right times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier-Neto, José; Sousa Costa, Ângela M; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; Amaral, Fabio Neves do; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinical and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signaling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signaling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signaling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signaling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signaling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development. PMID:25134739

  11. BMP signaling requires retromer-dependent recycling of the type I receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Gleason, Ryan J; Akintobi, Adenrele M.; Barth D Grant; Padgett, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that mediate bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor recycling, and the importance of such recycling for signaling in vivo, have remained poorly understood. We find that the retromer complex functions as a linchpin in the recycling of the BMP type I receptor SMA-6 (small-6). In the absence of retromer-dependent recycling, retromer mutants result in the missorting of SMA-6 to lysosomes and a loss of BMP-mediated signaling. Surprisingly, we find that the BMP type II receptor, D...

  12. Cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1a modulates CB1 receptor signaling and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tricia H; Blume, Lawrence C; Straiker, Alex; Cox, Jordan O; David, Bethany G; McVoy, Julie R Secor; Sayers, Katherine W; Poklis, Justin L; Abdullah, Rehab A; Egertová, Michaela; Chen, Ching-Kang; Mackie, Ken; Elphick, Maurice R; Howlett, Allyn C; Selley, Dana E

    2015-04-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) mediate the presynaptic effects of endocannabinoids in the central nervous system (CNS) and most behavioral effects of exogenous cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a) binds to the CB1R C-terminus and can attenuate constitutive CB1R-mediated inhibition of Ca(2+) channel activity. We now demonstrate cellular colocalization of CRIP1a at neuronal elements in the CNS and show that CRIP1a inhibits both constitutive and agonist-stimulated CB1R-mediated guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G-protein) activity. Stable overexpression of CRIP1a in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stably expressing CB1Rs (CB1-HEK), or in N18TG2 cells endogenously expressing CB1Rs, decreased CB1R-mediated G-protein activation (measured by agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS (guanylyl-5'-[O-thio]-triphosphate) binding) in both cell lines and attenuated inverse agonism by rimonabant in CB1-HEK cells. Conversely, small-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CRIP1a in N18TG2 cells enhanced CB1R-mediated G-protein activation. These effects were not attributable to differences in CB1R expression or endocannabinoid tone because CB1R levels did not differ between cell lines varying in CRIP1a expression, and endocannabinoid levels were undetectable (CB1-HEK) or unchanged (N18TG2) by CRIP1a overexpression. In CB1-HEK cells, 4-hour pretreatment with cannabinoid agonists downregulated CB1Rs and desensitized agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding. CRIP1a overexpression attenuated CB1R downregulation without altering CB1R desensitization. Finally, in cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons, CRIP1a overexpression attenuated both depolarization-induced suppression of excitation and inhibition of excitatory synaptic activity induced by exogenous application of cannabinoid but not by adenosine A1 agonists. These results confirm that CRIP1a inhibits constitutive CB1R activity and demonstrate that CRIP1a can also inhibit agonist

  13. Receptor clustering affects signal transduction at the membrane level in the reaction-limited regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caré, Bertrand R.; Soula, Hédi A.

    2013-01-01

    Many types of membrane receptors are found to be organized as clusters on the cell surface. We investigate the potential effect of such receptor clustering on the intracellular signal transduction stage. We consider a canonical pathway with a membrane receptor (R) activating a membrane-bound intracellular relay protein (G). We use Monte Carlo simulations to recreate biochemical reactions using different receptor spatial distributions and explore the dynamics of the signal transduction. Results show that activation of G by R is severely impaired by R clustering, leading to an apparent blunted biological effect compared to control. Paradoxically, this clustering decreases the half maximal effective dose (ED50) of the transduction stage, increasing the apparent affinity. We study an example of inter-receptor interaction in order to account for possible compensatory effects of clustering and observe the parameter range in which such interactions slightly counterbalance the loss of activation of G. The membrane receptors’ spatial distribution affects the internal stages of signal amplification, suggesting a functional role for membrane domains and receptor clustering independently of proximity-induced receptor-receptor interactions.

  14. Dopamine D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of prefrontal signals in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahnt, Thorsten; Weber, Susanna C; Haker, Helene; Robbins, Trevor W; Tobler, Philippe N

    2015-03-01

    The prefrontal cortex houses representations critical for ongoing and future behavior expressed in the form of patterns of neural activity. Dopamine has long been suggested to play a key role in the integrity of such representations, with D2-receptor activation rendering them flexible but weak. However, it is currently unknown whether and how D2-receptor activation affects prefrontal representations in humans. In the current study, we use dopamine receptor-specific pharmacology and multivoxel pattern-based functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the hypothesis that blocking D2-receptor activation enhances prefrontal representations. Human subjects performed a simple reward prediction task after double-blind and placebo controlled administration of the D2-receptor antagonist amisulpride. Using a whole-brain searchlight decoding approach we show that D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of reward signals in the medial orbitofrontal cortex. Examination of activity patterns suggests that amisulpride increases the separation of activity patterns related to reward versus no reward. Moreover, consistent with the cortical distribution of D2 receptors, post hoc analyses showed enhanced decoding of motor signals in motor cortex, but not of visual signals in visual cortex. These results suggest that D2-receptor blockade enhances content-specific representations in frontal cortex, presumably by a dopamine-mediated increase in pattern separation. These findings are in line with a dual-state model of prefrontal dopamine, and provide new insights into the potential mechanism of action of dopaminergic drugs. PMID:25740537

  15. Mechanistic pathways and biological roles for receptor-independent activators of G-protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Joe B; Smrcka, Alan V; Lanier, Stephen M

    2007-03-01

    Signal processing via heterotrimeric G-proteins in response to cell surface receptors is a central and much investigated aspect of how cells integrate cellular stimuli to produce coordinated biological responses. The system is a target of numerous therapeutic agents and plays an important role in adaptive processes of organs; aberrant processing of signals through these transducing systems is a component of various disease states. In addition to G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated activation of G-protein signaling, nature has evolved creative ways to manipulate and utilize the Galphabetagamma heterotrimer or Galpha and Gbetagamma subunits independent of the cell surface receptor stimuli. In such situations, the G-protein subunits (Galpha and Gbetagamma) may actually be complexed with alternative binding partners independent of the typical heterotrimeric Galphabetagamma. Such regulatory accessory proteins include the family of regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins that accelerate the GTPase activity of Galpha and various entities that influence nucleotide binding properties and/or subunit interaction. The latter group of proteins includes receptor-independent activators of G-protein signaling (AGS) proteins that play surprising roles in signal processing. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge regarding AGS proteins. AGS proteins are indicative of a growing number of accessory proteins that influence signal propagation, facilitate cross talk between various types of signaling pathways, and provide a platform for diverse functions of both the heterotrimeric Galphabetagamma and the individual Galpha and Gbetagamma subunits.

  16. Evolution of NMDA receptor cytoplasmic interaction domains: implications for organisation of synaptic signalling complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emes Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate gated postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system (CNS are essential for environmentally stimulated behaviours including learning and memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Though their genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and role in behaviour have been intensely studied in vitro and in vivo, their molecular evolution and structural aspects remain poorly understood. To understand how these receptors have evolved different physiological requirements we have investigated the molecular evolution of glutamate gated receptors and ion channels, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, which is essential for higher cognitive function. Studies of rodent NMDA receptors show that the C-terminal intracellular domain forms a signalling complex with enzymes and scaffold proteins, which is important for neuronal and behavioural plasticity Results The vertebrate NMDA receptor was found to have subunits with C-terminal domains up to 500 amino acids longer than invertebrates. This extension was specific to the NR2 subunit and occurred before the duplication and subsequent divergence of NR2 in the vertebrate lineage. The shorter invertebrate C-terminus lacked vertebrate protein interaction motifs involved with forming a signaling complex although the terminal PDZ interaction domain was conserved. The vertebrate NR2 C-terminal domain was predicted to be intrinsically disordered but with a conserved secondary structure. Conclusion We highlight an evolutionary adaptation specific to vertebrate NMDA receptor NR2 subunits. Using in silico methods we find that evolution has shaped the NMDA receptor C-terminus into an unstructured but modular intracellular domain that parallels the expansion in complexity of an NMDA receptor signalling complex in the vertebrate lineage. We propose the NR2 C-terminus has evolved to be a natively unstructured yet flexible hub organising postsynaptic signalling. The evolution of

  17. Signal transduction in human pancreatic cancer: roles of transforming growth factor beta, somatostatin receptors, and other signal intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Becnel, Lauren S; Li, Wei; Fisher, William E; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease because of the lack of early detection markers and effective treatments. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in western countries, including the United States. The mechanisms of pancreatic cancer progression remain unknown. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional cytokine, regulates cell growth and differentiation in healthy tissues, yet fails to do so in pancreatic cancer. Alterations of the TGF-beta and TGF-beta receptor/Smad signal transduction pathway have been implicated in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, both the TGF-beta receptor and Smad proteins interact with a variety of cellular signal pathways, such as the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), ERK1/2, and Wnt signal transduction cascades. This suggests that pancreatic cancer is a multi-gene-controlled malignancy and that effective treatments for pancreatic cancer should be aimed at multiple targets. In this review, we summarized the major signal intermediates involved in pancreatic cancer signal transduction pathways and specifically discussed how alterations in the regulatory functions of TGF-beta and Smad proteins allow for pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:16314822

  18. Pharmacological and signalling properties of a D2-like dopamine receptor (Dop3) in Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, Heleen; Vleugels, Rut; Verdonck, Rik; Urlacher, Elodie; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Mercer, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine is an important neurotransmitter in the central nervous system of vertebrates and invertebrates. Despite their evolutionary distance, striking parallels exist between deuterostomian and protostomian dopaminergic systems. In both, signalling is achieved via a complement of functionally distinct dopamine receptors. In this study, we investigated the sequence, pharmacology and tissue distribution of a D2-like dopamine receptor from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (TricaDop3) and compared it with related G protein-coupled receptors in other invertebrate species. The TricaDop3 receptor-encoding cDNA shows considerable sequence similarity with members of the Dop3 receptor class. Real time qRT-PCR showed high expression in both the central brain and the optic lobes, consistent with the role of dopamine as neurotransmitter. Activation of TricaDop3 expressed in mammalian cells increased intracellular Ca(2+) signalling and decreased NKH-477 (a forskolin analogue)-stimulated cyclic AMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. We studied the pharmacological profile of the TricaDop3 receptor and demonstrated that the synthetic vertebrate dopamine receptor agonists, 2 - amino- 6,7 - dihydroxy - 1,2,3,4 - tetrahydronaphthalene hydrobromide (6,7-ADTN) and bromocriptine acted as agonists. Methysergide was the most potent of the antagonists tested and showed competitive inhibition in the presence of dopamine. This study offers important information on the Dop3 receptor from Tribolium castaneum that will facilitate functional analyses of dopamine receptors in insects and other invertebrates.

  19. DMPD: G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17456803 G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macropha...2007 Apr 24. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signali...ng in macrophages. PubmedID 17456803 Title G-protein-coupled receptor expression,

  20. Purinergic receptors have different effects in rat exocrine pancreas. Calcium signals monitored by fura-2 using confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Nitschke, Roland; Amstrup, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic ducts have several types of purinergic P2 receptors, however, nothing is known about P2 receptors in acini. The aim was to establish whether acini express functional P2 receptors coupled to intracellular Ca2+ signals and to measure the signals ratiometrically in a confocal laser scanni...

  1. PROKR2 missense mutations associated with Kallmann syndrome impair receptor signalling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Fabre, Ludovic; Teixeira, Luis; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) combines hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency, and anosmia or hyposmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis. In a large series of KS patients, ten different missense mutations (p.R85C, p.R85H, p.R164Q, p.L173R, p.W178S, p.Q210R, p.R268C, p.P290S, p.M323I, p.V331M) have been identified in the gene encoding the G protein-coupled receptor prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2), most often in the heterozygous state. Many of these mutations were, however, also found in clinically unaffected individuals, thus raising the question of their actual implication in the KS phenotype. We reproduced each of the ten mutations in a recombinant murine Prokr2, and tested their effects on the signalling activity in transfected HEK-293 cells, by measuring intracellular calcium release upon ligand-activation of the receptor. We found that all mutated receptors except one (M323I) had decreased signalling activities. These could be explained by different defective mechanisms. Three mutations (L173R, W178S, P290S) impaired cell surface-targeting of the receptor. One mutation (Q210R) abolished ligand-binding. Finally, five mutations (R85C, R85H, R164Q, R268C, V331M) presumably impaired G protein-coupling of the receptor. In addition, when wild-type and mutant receptors were coexpressed in HEK-293 cells, none of the mutant receptors that were retained within the cells did affect cell surface-targeting of the wild-type receptor, and none of the mutant receptors properly addressed at the plasma membrane did affect wild-type receptor signalling activity. This argues against a dominant negative effect of the mutations in vivo. PMID:18826963

  2. Quantitative impedimetric NPY-receptor activation monitoring and signal pathway profiling in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Kamp, Verena; Lindner, Ricco; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg; Krinke, Dana; Kostelnik, Katja B; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Robitzki, Andrea A

    2015-05-15

    Label-free and non-invasive monitoring of receptor activation and identification of the involved signal pathways in living cells is an ongoing analytic challenge and a great opportunity for biosensoric systems. In this context, we developed an impedance spectroscopy-based system for the activation monitoring of NPY-receptors in living cells. Using an optimized interdigital electrode array for sensitive detection of cellular alterations, we were able for the first time to quantitatively detect the NPY-receptor activation directly without a secondary or enhancer reaction like cAMP-stimulation by forskolin. More strikingly, we could show that the impedimetric based NPY-receptor activation monitoring is not restricted to the Y1-receptor but also possible for the Y2- and Y5-receptor. Furthermore, we could monitor the NPY-receptor activation in different cell lines that natively express NPY-receptors and proof the specificity of the observed impedimetric effect by agonist/antagonist studies in recombinant NPY-receptor expressing cell lines. To clarify the nature of the observed impedimetric effect we performed an equivalent circuit analysis as well as analyzed the role of cell morphology and receptor internalization. Finally, an antagonist based extensive molecular signal pathway analysis revealed small alterations of the actin cytoskeleton as well as the inhibition of at least L-type calcium channels as major reasons for the observed NPY-induced impedance increase. Taken together, our novel impedance spectroscopy based NPY-receptor activation monitoring system offers the opportunity to identify signal pathways as well as for novel versatile agonist/antagonist screening systems for identification of novel therapeutics in the field of obesity and cancer.

  3. Signal processing in the TGF-beta superfamily ligand-receptor network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M G Vilar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The TGF-beta pathway plays a central role in tissue homeostasis and morphogenesis. It transduces a variety of extracellular signals into intracellular transcriptional responses that control a plethora of cellular processes, including cell growth, apoptosis, and differentiation. We use computational modeling to show that coupling of signaling with receptor trafficking results in a highly versatile signal-processing unit, able to sense by itself absolute levels of ligand, temporal changes in ligand concentration, and ratios of multiple ligands. This coupling controls whether the response of the receptor module is transient or permanent and whether or not different signaling channels behave independently of each other. Our computational approach unifies seemingly disparate experimental observations and suggests specific changes in receptor trafficking patterns that can lead to phenotypes that favor tumor progression.

  4. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billestrup, N.; Allevato, G.; Moldrup, A. [Hagedorn Research Lab., Gentofte (Denmark)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to medite GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH-stimulated metabolic effects such as protein synthesis and lipolysis. Furthermore, this mutant GH receptor internalized rapidly following GH binding. Another truncated GH receptor lacking all but five amino acids of the cytoplasmic domain could not mediate any effects of GH nor did it internalize. Deletion of the proline-rich region or changing the four prolines to alanines also resulted in a GH receptor deficient in signaling. Mutation of phenylalanine 346 to alanine resulted in a GH receptor which did not internalize rapidly; however, this mutant GH receptor was capable of mediating GH-stimulated transcription as well as metabolic effects. These results indicate that the intracellular part of the GH receptor can be divided into at least three functional domains: (1) for transcriptional activity, two domains are involved, one located in the C-terminal 184 amino acids and the other in the proline-rich domain; (2) for metabolic effects, a domain located in or near the proline-rich region is of importance; and (3) for internalization, phenylalanine 346 is necessary. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  5. SIGNALLING THROUGH RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS IN CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT: DOING THE RIGHT THINGS AT THE RIGHT TIMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier-Neto, José; Costa, Ângela M. Sousa; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; do Amaral, Fabio Neves; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R.; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from Vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinic and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signalling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signalling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signalling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signalling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signalling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. PMID:25134739

  6. Signal transmission through the CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) transmembrane helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescott, Melanie P; Kufareva, Irina; Paes, Cheryl; Goodman, Jason R; Thaker, Yana; Puffer, Bridget A; Berdougo, Eli; Rucker, Joseph B; Handel, Tracy M; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2016-08-30

    The atomic-level mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular ligand binding events through their transmembrane helices to activate intracellular G proteins remain unclear. Using a comprehensive library of mutations covering all 352 residues of the GPCR CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), we identified 41 amino acids that are required for signaling induced by the chemokine ligand CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1). CXCR4 variants with each of these mutations do not signal properly but remain folded, based on receptor surface trafficking, reactivity to conformationally sensitive monoclonal antibodies, and ligand binding. When visualized on the structure of CXCR4, the majority of these residues form a continuous intramolecular signaling chain through the transmembrane helices; this chain connects chemokine binding residues on the extracellular side of CXCR4 to G protein-coupling residues on its intracellular side. Integrated into a cohesive model of signal transmission, these CXCR4 residues cluster into five functional groups that mediate (i) chemokine engagement, (ii) signal initiation, (iii) signal propagation, (iv) microswitch activation, and (v) G protein coupling. Propagation of the signal passes through a "hydrophobic bridge" on helix VI that coordinates with nearly every known GPCR signaling motif. Our results agree with known conserved mechanisms of GPCR activation and significantly expand on understanding the structural principles of CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27543332

  7. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Karlsson

    Full Text Available CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs.

  8. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling dampens the HPA axis response to restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanson, Nathan K; Herman, James P

    2015-10-15

    Glutamate is an important neurotransmitter in the regulation of the neural portion of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, and signals through ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. In the current studies we investigated the role of hypothalamic paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in the regulation of the HPA axis response to restraint stress in rats. Direct injection of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) into the PVN prior to restraint leads to blunting of the HPA axis response in awake animals. Consistent with this result, infusion of the group I receptor antagonist hexyl-homoibotenic acid (HIBO) potentiates the HPA axis response to restraint. The excitatory effect of blocking paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate signaling is blocked by co-administration of dexamethasone into the PVN. However, the inhibitory effect of DHPG is not affected by co-administration of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM-251 into the PVN. Together, these results suggest that paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling acts to dampen HPA axis reactivity. This effect appears to be similar to the rapid inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids at the PVN, but is not mediated by endocannabinoid signaling.

  9. Delineation of the GPRC6A Receptor Signaling Pathways Using a Mammalian Cell Line Stably Expressing the Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie;

    2013-01-01

    receptor has been suggested to couple to multiple G protein classes albeit via indirect methods. Thus, the exact ligand preferences and signaling pathways are yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we generated a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line that stably expresses mouse GPRC6A. In an effort...... of the stable CHO cell line with robust receptor responsiveness and optimization of the highly sensitive homogeneous time resolved fluorescence technology allow fast assessment of Gq activation without previous manipulations like cotransfection of mutated G proteins. This cell-based assay system for GPRC6A...

  10. Review: Novel roles of nuclear angiotensin receptors and signaling mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Gwathmey, TanYa M.; Alzayadneh, Ebaa M.; Karl D. Pendergrass; Chappell, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) constitutes an important hormonal system in the physiological regulation of blood pressure. The dysregulation of the RAS is considered a major influence in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease and other pathologies. Indeed, experimental and clinical evidence indicates that blockade of this system with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonists is an effective therapy to attenuate hype...

  11. Signaling of human frizzled receptors to the mating pathway in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Dirnberger

    Full Text Available Frizzled receptors have seven membrane-spanning helices and are considered as atypical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. The mating response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by a GPCR signaling system and this model organism has been used extensively in the past to study mammalian GPCR function. We show here that human Frizzled receptors (Fz1 and Fz2 can be properly targeted to the yeast plasma membrane, and that they stimulate the yeast mating pathway in the absence of added Wnt ligands, as evidenced by cell cycle arrest in G1 and reporter gene expression dependent on the mating pathway-activated FUS1 gene. Introducing intracellular portions of Frizzled receptors into the Ste2p backbone resulted in the generation of constitutively active receptor chimeras that retained mating factor responsiveness. Introducing intracellular portions of Ste2p into the Frizzled receptor backbone was found to strongly enhance mating pathway activation as compared to the native Frizzleds, likely by facilitating interaction with the yeast Galpha protein Gpa1p. Furthermore, we show reversibility of the highly penetrant G1-phase arrests exerted by the receptor chimeras by deletion of the mating pathway effector FAR1. Our data demonstrate that Frizzled receptors can functionally replace mating factor receptors in yeast and offer an experimental system to study modulators of Frizzled receptors.

  12. Signaling of human frizzled receptors to the mating pathway in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirnberger, Dietmar; Seuwen, Klaus

    2007-09-26

    Frizzled receptors have seven membrane-spanning helices and are considered as atypical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The mating response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by a GPCR signaling system and this model organism has been used extensively in the past to study mammalian GPCR function. We show here that human Frizzled receptors (Fz1 and Fz2) can be properly targeted to the yeast plasma membrane, and that they stimulate the yeast mating pathway in the absence of added Wnt ligands, as evidenced by cell cycle arrest in G1 and reporter gene expression dependent on the mating pathway-activated FUS1 gene. Introducing intracellular portions of Frizzled receptors into the Ste2p backbone resulted in the generation of constitutively active receptor chimeras that retained mating factor responsiveness. Introducing intracellular portions of Ste2p into the Frizzled receptor backbone was found to strongly enhance mating pathway activation as compared to the native Frizzleds, likely by facilitating interaction with the yeast Galpha protein Gpa1p. Furthermore, we show reversibility of the highly penetrant G1-phase arrests exerted by the receptor chimeras by deletion of the mating pathway effector FAR1. Our data demonstrate that Frizzled receptors can functionally replace mating factor receptors in yeast and offer an experimental system to study modulators of Frizzled receptors.

  13. Signaling Mechanism of Cannabinoid Receptor-2 Activation-Induced β-Endorphin Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fang; Zhang, Ling-Hong; Su, Tang-Feng; Li, Lin; Zhou, Rui; Peng, Miao; Wu, Cai-Hua; Yuan, Xiao-Cui; Sun, Ning; Meng, Xian-Fang; Tian, Bo; Shi, Jing; Pan, Hui-Lin; Li, Man

    2016-08-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) results in β-endorphin release from keratinocytes, which then acts on primary afferent neurons to inhibit nociception. However, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The CB2 receptor is generally thought to couple to Gi/o to inhibit cAMP production, which cannot explain the peripheral stimulatory effects of CB2 receptor activation. In this study, we found that in a keratinocyte cell line, the Gβγ subunits from Gi/o, but not Gαs, were involved in CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Inhibition of MAPK kinase, but not PLC, abolished CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Also, CB2 receptor activation significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+). Treatment with BAPTA-AM or thapsigargin blocked CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Using a rat model of inflammatory pain, we showed that the MAPK kinase inhibitor PD98059 abolished the peripheral effect of the CB2 receptor agonist on nociception. We thus present a novel mechanism of CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release through Gi/o-Gβγ-MAPK-Ca(2+) signaling pathway. Our data also suggest that stimulation of MAPK contributes to the peripheral analgesic effect of CB2 receptor agonists. PMID:26108183

  14. Insulin signaling inhibits the 5-HT2C receptor in choroid plexus via MAP kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Kunliang

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs interact with heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins to modulate acute changes in intracellular messenger levels and ion channel activity. In contrast, long-term changes in cellular growth, proliferation and differentiation are often mediated by tyrosine kinase receptors and certain GPCRs by activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases. Complex interactions occur between these signaling pathways, but the specific mechanisms of such regulatory events are not well-understood. In particular it is not clear whether GPCRs are modulated by tyrosine kinase receptor-MAP kinase pathways. Results Here we describe tyrosine kinase receptor regulation of a GPCR via MAP kinase. Insulin reduced the activity of the 5-HT2C receptor in choroid plexus cells which was blocked by the MAP kinase kinase (MEK inhibitor, PD 098059. We demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1 on the 5-HT2C receptor is dependent on tyrosine kinase, RAS and MAP kinase. The effect may be receptor-specific: insulin had no effect on another GPCR that shares the same G protein signaling pathway as the 5-HT2C receptor. This effect is also direct: activated MAP kinase mimicked the effect of insulin, and removing a putative MAP kinase site from the 5-HT2C receptor abolished the effect of insulin. Conclusion These results show that insulin signaling can inhibit 5-HT2C receptor activity and suggest that MAP kinase may play a direct role in regulating the function of a specific GPCR.

  15. Ring Finger Protein 11 Inhibits Melanocortin 3 and 4 Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Anne; Niederstadt, Lars; Jonas, Wenke; Yi, Chun-Xia; Meyer, Franziska; Wiedmer, Petra; Fischer, Jana; Grötzinger, Carsten; Schürmann, Annette; Tschöp, Matthias; Kleinau, Gunnar; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko; Biebermann, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Intact melanocortin signaling via the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R), and melanocortin receptor 3 (MC3R) is crucial for body weight maintenance. So far, no connection between melanocortin signaling and hypothalamic inflammation has been reported. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation library screen, we identified a new interaction partner for these receptors, ring finger protein 11 (RNF11). RNF11 participates in the constitution of the A20 complex that is involved in reduction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced NFκB signaling, an important pathway in hypothalamic inflammation. Mice treated with high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 days demonstrated a trend toward an increase in hypothalamic Rnf11 expression, as shown for other inflammatory markers under HFD. Furthermore, Gs-mediated signaling of MC3/4R was demonstrated to be strongly reduced to 20-40% by co-expression of RNF11 despite unchanged total receptor expression. Cell surface expression was not affected for MC3R but resulted in a significant reduction of MC4R to 61% by co-expression with RNF11. Mechanisms linking HFD, inflammation, and metabolism remain partially understood. In this study, a new axis between signaling of specific body weight regulating GPCRs and factors involved in hypothalamic inflammation is suggested. PMID:27551276

  16. Nanoconjugation prolongs endosomal signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor and enhances apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Xu, F.; Reinhard, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF mediated apoptosis at effective concentrations that do not induce apoptosis in the case of free EGF. Overall, these findings indicate nanoconjugation as a rational strategy for modifying signaling that acts by modulating the temporo-spatial distribution of the activated EGF-EGFR ligand-receptor complex.It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF

  17. DMPD: Toll-like receptors. II. Distribution and pathways involved in TLR signalling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16419614 Toll-like receptors. II. Distribution and pathways involved in TLR signall...ceptors. II. Distribution and pathways involved in TLR signalling. PubmedID 16419614 Title Toll-like recepto...rs. II. Distribution and pathways involved in TLR signalling. Authors Sandor F, B

  18. A model for the biosynthesis and transport of plasma membrane-associated signaling receptors to the cell surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Claudia Popescu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular protein transport is emerging as critical in determining the outcome of receptor-activated signal transduction pathways. In plants, relatively little is known about the nature of the molecular components and mechanisms involved in coordinating receptor synthesis and transport to the cell surface. Recent advances in this field indicate that signaling pathways and intracellular transport machinery converge and coordinate to render receptors competent for signaling at their plasma membrane activity sites. The biogenesis and transport to the cell surface of signaling receptors appears to require both general trafficking and receptor-specific factors. Several molecular determinants, residing or associated with compartments of the secretory pathway and known to influence aspects in receptor biogenesis, are discussed and integrated into a predictive cooperative model for the functional expression of signaling receptors at the plasma membrane.

  19. Chronic Cocaine Dampens Dopamine Signaling during Cocaine Intoxication and Unbalances D1 over D2 Receptor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kicheon; Pan, Yingtian

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine increases triggered by cocaine and consequent stimulation of dopamine receptors (including D1 and D2) are associated with its rewarding effects. However, while facilitation of D1 receptor (D1R) signaling enhances the rewarding effects of cocaine, facilitation of D2R signaling decreases it, which indicates that for cocaine to be rewarding it must result in a predominance of D1R over D2R signaling. Moreover, the transition to compulsive cocaine intake might result from an imbalance between D1R and D2R signaling. To test the hypothesis that chronic cocaine use unbalances D1R over D2R signaling during cocaine intoxication, we used microprobe optical imaging to compare dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i, marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in striatal D1R-EGFP and D2R-EGFP-expressing neurons between control and chronically treated mice. Chronic cocaine attenuated responses to acute cocaine in D1R (blunting Ca2+ increases by 67 ± 16%) and D2R (blunting Ca2+ decrease by 72 ± 17%) neurons in most D1R and D2R neurons (∼75%). However, the dynamics of this attenuation during cocaine intoxication was longer lasting for D2R than for D1R. Thus, whereas control mice showed a fast but short-lasting predominance of D1R over D2R signaling (peaking at ∼8 min) during acute cocaine intoxication, in chronically treated mice D1R predominance was sustained for >30 min (throughout the measurement period). Thus, chronic cocaine use dramatically reduced cocaine-induced DA signaling, shifting the balance between D1R and D2R signaling during intoxication to a predominance of D1R (stimulatory) over D2R (inhibitory) signaling, which might facilitate compulsive intake in addiction. PMID:24089490

  20. Association of cannabis use during adolescence, prefrontal CB1 receptor signaling and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eCaballero

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R is the G-protein coupled receptor responsible for the majority of the endocannabinoid signaling in the human brain. It is widely distributed in the limbic system, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, which are areas responsible for cognition, memory, and motor control. Because of this widespread distribution, it is not surprising that drugs that co-opt CB1R have expected behavioral outcomes consistent with dysregulated signaling from these areas (e.g. memory loss, cognitive deficits, etc. In the context of this review, we present evidence for the role of CB1R signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC, an area involved in executive functions, with emphasis on the developmental regulation of CB1R signaling in the acquisition of mature PFC function. We further hypothesize how alterations of CB1R signaling specifically during adolescent maturation might confer liability to psychiatric disorders.

  1. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E;

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have...... kinase activation, gene induction and cell growth. From these data, we conclude that Shc represents a crucial point of convergence between signaling pathways activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors....

  2. ATAR, a novel tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, signals through TRAF2 and TRAF5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H; Solovyev, I; Colombero, A; Elliott, R; Kelley, M; Boyle, W J

    1997-05-23

    Members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family signal largely through interactions with death domain proteins and TRAF proteins. Here we report the identification of a novel TNFR family member ATAR. Human and mouse ATAR contain 283 and 276 amino acids, respectively, making them the shortest known members of the TNFR superfamily. The receptor is expressed mainly in spleen, thymus, bone marrow, lung, and small intestine. The intracellular domains of human and mouse ATAR share only 25% identity, yet both interact with TRAF5 and TRAF2. This TRAF interaction domain resides at the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Like most other TRAF-interacting receptors, overexpression of ATAR activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Co-expression of ATAR with TRAF5, but not TRAF2, results in synergistic activation of NF-kappaB, suggesting potentially different roles for TRAF2 and TRAF5 in post-receptor signaling. PMID:9153189

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor and cancer: control of oncogenic signalling by endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandal, Michael Vibo; Madshus, I.H.

    2008-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other members of the EGFR/ErbB receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are important regulators of proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Overexpression, mutations, deletions and production of autocrine...... prevents its down-regulation, underscoring the importance of the cellular background for EGFR effects. Signalling from ErbB proteins can either be terminated by dissociation of ligand resulting in dephosphorylation, or blunted by degradation of the receptors. Although proteasomal targeting of ErbB proteins...... ligands contribute to aberrant activation of the ErbB proteins. The signalling output from EGFR is complicated given that other ErbB proteins are often additionally expressed and activated in the same cell, resulting in formation of homo-and/or heterodimers. In particular, association of EGFR with ErbB2...

  4. Conversion of agonist site to metal-ion chelator site in the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, C E; Thirstrup, K; Holst, Birgitte;

    1999-01-01

    in the mutant receptors not by normal catecholamine ligands but instead either by free zinc ions or by zinc or copper ions in complex with small hydrophobic metal-ion chelators. Chelation of the metal ions by small hydrophobic chelators such as phenanthroline or bipyridine protected the cells from the toxic...... effect of, for example Cu(2+), and in several cases increased the affinity of the ions for the agonistic site. Wash-out experiments and structure-activity analysis indicated, that the high-affinity chelators and the metal ions bind and activate the mutant receptor as metal ion guided ligand complexes....... Because of the well-understood binding geometry of the small metal ions, an important distance constraint has here been imposed between TM-III and -VII in the active, signaling conformation of 7TM receptors. It is suggested that atoxic metal-ion chelator complexes could possibly in the future be used...

  5. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of signalling by adhesion and growth factor receptors in mammary epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and communication are essential for tissue morphogenesis and repair in healthy multicellular organisms. However, dysregulation of these processes can drive disease progression in conditions such as cancer. Selective cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix is mediated by integrins, a family of transmembrane receptors that compartmentalise signalling and organise the cytoskeleton. Adhesion receptors provide spatial cues to cells to allow them to respond to growth factor and cyto...

  6. Morbilliviruses Use Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecules (CD150) as Cellular Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Tatsuo, Hironobu; Ono, Nobuyuki; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2001-01-01

    Morbilliviruses comprise measles virus, canine distemper virus, rinderpest virus, and several other viruses that cause devastating human and animal diseases accompanied by severe immunosuppression and lymphopenia. Recently, we have shown that human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a cellular receptor for measles virus. In this study, we examined whether canine distemper and rinderpest viruses also use canine and bovine SLAMs, respectively, as cellular receptors. The Onderste...

  7. Advances of Targeted Therapy Based on Estrogen Receptor Signaling Pathway 
in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Liqiang; Liao, Yongde; Hexiao TANG; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Zhaoguo

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that estrogen promotes tumor growth in both estrogen target organs and non-target organs. Estrogen regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via two different receptors, estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ). In recent decades, with the clarification of the ERα-mediated signaling pathways in breast cancer, targeted therapy through these pathways have successfully been used in clinical application. Tamoxifen, the classic representative, is a selective es...

  8. Eph Receptor and Ephrin Signaling in Developing and Adult Brain of the Honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    OpenAIRE

    Vidovic, Maria; Nighorn, Alan; Koblar, Simon; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    Roles for Eph receptor tyrosine kinase and ephrin signaling in vertebrate brain development are well established. Their involvement in the modulation of mammalian synaptic structure and physiology is also emerging. However, less is known of their effects on brain development and their function in adult invertebrate nervous systems. Here, we report on the characterization of Eph receptor and ephrin orthologs in the honeybee, Apis mellifera (Am), and their role in learning and memory. In situ h...

  9. Inhibition of Nuclear Receptor Signalling by Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto, Takahide; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Mammalian poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a nuclear chromatin-associated protein with a molecular mass of 114 kDa that catalyzes the transfer of ADP-ribose units from NAD+ to nuclear proteins that are located within chromatin. We report here the identification of a novel property of PARP as a modulator of nuclear receptor signalling. PARP bound directly to retinoid X receptors (RXR) and repressed ligand-dependent transcriptional activities mediated by heterodimers of RXR and thyroid hor...

  10. Signal Transduction of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate G Protein—Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Young

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive lipid capable of eliciting dramatic effects in a variety of cell types. Signaling by this molecule is by a family of five G protein—coupled receptors named S1P1–5 that signal through a variety of pathways to regulate cell proliferation, migration, cytoskeletal organization, and differentiation. These receptors are expressed in a wide variety of tissues and cell types, and their cellular effects contribute to important biological and pathological functions of S1P in many processes, including angiogenesis, vascular development, lymphocyte trafficking, and cancer. This review will focus on the current progress in the field of S1P receptor signaling and biology.

  11. Bacterial and Fungal Pattern Recognition Receptors in Homologous Innate Signaling Pathways of Insects and Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A Stokes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to bacterial and fungal infections in insects and mammals, distinct families of innate immune pattern recognition receptors initiate highly complex intracellular signaling cascades. Those cascades induce a variety of immune functions that restrain the spread of microbes in the host. Insect and mammalian innate immune receptors include molecules that recognize conserved microbial molecular patterns. Innate immune recognition leads to the recruitment of adaptor molecules forming multi-protein complexes that include kinases, transcription factors and other regulatory molecules. Innate immune signaling cascades induce the expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and other key factors that mount and regulate the immune response against microbial challenge. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the bacterial and fungal pattern recognition receptors for homologous innate signaling pathways of insects and mammals in an effort to provide a framework for future studies.

  12. Non-genomic actions of aldosterone: From receptors and signals to membrane targets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2011-07-26

    In tissues which express the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), aldosterone modulates the expression of membrane targets such as the subunits of the epithelial Na(+) channel, in combination with important signalling intermediates such as serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1. In addition, the rapid \\'non-genomic\\' activation of protein kinases and secondary messenger signalling cascades has also been detected in aldosterone-sensitive tissues of the nephron, distal colon and cardiovascular system. These rapid actions are variously described as being coupled to MR or to an as yet unidentified, membrane-associated aldosterone receptor. The rapidly activated signalling cascades add a level of fine-tuning to the activity of aldosterone-responsive membrane transporters and also modulate the aldosterone-induced changes in gene expression through receptor and transcription factor phosphorylation.

  13. Non-genomic actions of aldosterone: From receptors and signals to membrane targets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    In tissues which express the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), aldosterone modulates the expression of membrane targets such as the subunits of the epithelial Na(+) channel, in combination with important signalling intermediates such as serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1. In addition, the rapid \\'non-genomic\\' activation of protein kinases and secondary messenger signalling cascades has also been detected in aldosterone-sensitive tissues of the nephron, distal colon and cardiovascular system. These rapid actions are variously described as being coupled to MR or to an as yet unidentified, membrane-associated aldosterone receptor. The rapidly activated signalling cascades add a level of fine-tuning to the activity of aldosterone-responsive membrane transporters and also modulate the aldosterone-induced changes in gene expression through receptor and transcription factor phosphorylation.

  14. Activation of GABA(B) receptors inhibits protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Frances Fangjia; Su, Ping; Liu, Fang; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2012-11-28

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that potentiation of cortical GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission may be a key mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the downstream molecular mechanisms related to GABA potentiation remain unexplored. Recent studies have suggested that dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, which are used in the clinical treatment of schizophrenia, modulate protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 signaling. Here we report that activation of GABA(B) receptors significantly inhibits Akt/GSK-3 signaling in a β-arrestin-dependent pathway. Agonist stimulation of GABA(B) receptors enhances the phosphorylation of Akt (Thr-308) and enhances the phosphorylation of GSK-3α (Ser-21)/β (Ser-9) in both HEK-293T cells expressing GABA(B) receptors and rat hippocampal slices. Furthermore, knocking down the expression of β-arrestin2 using siRNA abolishes the GABA(B) receptor-mediated modulation of GSK-3 signaling. Our data may help to identify potentially novel targets through which GABA(B) receptor agents may exert therapeutic effects in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  15. Growth factor receptors and related signalling pathways as targets for novel treatment strategies of hepatocellular cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Hopfner; Detlef Schuppan; Hans Scherübl

    2008-01-01

    Growth factors and their corresponding receptors are commonly overexpressed and/or dysregulated in many cancers including hepatocellular cancer (HCC). Clinical trials indicate that growth factor receptors and their related signalling pathways play important roles in HCC cancer etiology and progression, thus providing rational targets for innovative cancer therapies. A number of strategies including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors ("small molecule inhibitors") and antisense oligonucleotides have already been evaluated for their potency to inhibit the activity and downstream signalling cascades of these receptors in HCC. First clinical trials have also shown that multi-kinase inhibition is an effective novel treatment strategy in HCC. In this respect sorafenib, an inhibitor of Raf-, VEGF- and PDGF-signalling, is the first multi-kinase inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of advanced HCC. Moreover, the serine-threonine kinase of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) upon which the signalling of several growth factor receptors converge plays a central role in cancer cell proliferation, mTOR inhibition of HCC is currently also being studied in preclinical trials. As HCCs represent hypervascularized neoplasms, inhibition of tumour vessel formation via interfering with the VEGF/VEGFR system is another promising approach in HCC treatment. This review will summarize the current status of the various growth factor receptor-based treatment strategies and in view of the multitude of novel targeted approaches, the rationale for combination therapies for advanced HCC treatment will also be taken into account.

  16. Astroglial CB1 cannabinoid receptors regulate leptin signaling in mouse brain astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosier, Barbara; Bellocchio, Luigi; Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Matias, Isabelle; Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Cannich, Astrid; Maitre, Marlène; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Cardinal, Pierre; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Canduela, Miren Josune; Reguero, Leire; Hermans, Emmanuel; Grandes, Pedro; Cota, Daniela; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Type-1 cannabinoid (CB1) and leptin (ObR) receptors regulate metabolic and astroglial functions, but the potential links between the two systems in astrocytes were not investigated so far. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of CB1 receptor expression and activity in cultured cortical and hypothalamic astrocytes demonstrated that cannabinoid signaling controls the levels of ObR expression. Lack of CB1 receptors also markedly impaired leptin-mediated activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 and 5 (STAT3 and STAT5) in astrocytes. In particular, CB1 deletion determined a basal overactivation of STAT5, thereby leading to the downregulation of ObR expression, and leptin failed to regulate STAT5-dependent glycogen storage in the absence of CB1 receptors. These results show that CB1 receptors directly interfere with leptin signaling and its ability to regulate glycogen storage, thereby representing a novel mechanism linking endocannabinoid and leptin signaling in the regulation of brain energy storage and neuronal functions.

  17. Negative Regulation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK Signaling: A Developing Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ledda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ophic factors control cellular physiology by activating specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. While the over activation of RTK signaling pathways is associated with cell growth and cancer, recent findings support the concept that impaired down-regulation or deactivation of RTKs may also be a mechanism involved in tumor formation. Under this perspective, the molecular determinants of RTK signaling inhibition may act as tumor-suppressor genes and have a potential role as tumor markers to monitor and predict disease progression. Here, we review the current understanding of the physiological mechanisms that attenuate RTK signaling and discuss evidence that implicates deregulation of these events in cancer.Abbreviations: BDP1: Brain-derived phosphatase 1; Cbl: Casitas B-lineage lymphoma; CIN-85: Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa; DER: Drosophila EGFR; EGFR: Epidermal growth factor receptor; ERK 1/2: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2; Grb2: Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2; HER2: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2; LRIG: Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domain 1; MAPK: Mitogen-activated protein kinase; Mig 6: Mitogen-inducible gene 6; PTEN: Phosphatase and tensin homologue; RET: Rearranged in transformation; RTK: Receptor tyrosine kinase. SH2 domain: Src-homology 2 domain; SH3 domain: Src-homology 3 domain; Spry: Sprouty.

  18. Toll-like receptor-2 mediates mycobacteria-induced proinflammatory signaling in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Underhill, David M; Ozinsky, Adrian; Smith, Kelly D.; Aderem, Alan

    1999-01-01

    The recognition of mycobacterial cell wall components causes macrophages to secrete tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and other cytokines that are essential for the development of a protective inflammatory response. We show that toll-like receptors are required for the induction of TNF-α in macrophages by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Expression of a dominant negative form of MyD88 (a signaling component required for toll-like receptor signaling) in a mouse macrophage cell line blocks TNF-α produ...

  19. Medial nucleus tractus solitarius oxytocin receptor signaling and food intake control: the role of gastrointestinal satiation signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhi Yi; Alhadeff, Amber L; Grill, Harvey J

    2015-05-01

    Central oxytocin (OT) administration reduces food intake and its effects are mediated, in part, by hindbrain oxytocin receptor (OT-R) signaling. The neural substrate and mechanisms mediating the intake inhibitory effects of hindbrain OT-R signaling are undefined. We examined the hypothesis that hindbrain OT-R-mediated feeding inhibition results from an interaction between medial nucleus tractus solitarius (mNTS) OT-R signaling and the processing of gastrointestinal (GI) satiation signals by neurons of the mNTS. Here, we demonstrated that mNTS or fourth ventricle (4V) microinjections of OT in rats reduced chow intake in a dose-dependent manner. To examine whether the intake suppressive effects of mNTS OT-R signaling is mediated by GI signal processing, rats were injected with OT to the 4V (1 μg) or mNTS (0.3 μg), followed by self-ingestion of a nutrient preload, where either treatment was designed to be without effect on chow intake. Results showed that the combination of mNTS OT-R signaling and GI signaling processing by preload ingestion reduced chow intake significantly and to a greater extent than either stimulus alone. Using enzyme immunoassay, endogenous OT content in mNTS-enriched dorsal vagal complex (DVC) in response to ingestion of nutrient preload was measured. Results revealed that preload ingestion significantly elevated endogenous DVC OT content. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that mNTS neurons are a site of action for hindbrain OT-R signaling in food intake control and that the intake inhibitory effects of hindbrain mNTS OT-R signaling are mediated by interactions with GI satiation signal processing by mNTS neurons.

  20. CXC Chemokine Receptor 3 Alternative Splice Variants Selectively Activate Different Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchiche, Yamina A; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2016-10-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) C-X-C chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is a potential drug target that mediates signaling involved in cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. The CXCR3 primary transcript has three potential alternative splice variants and cell-type specific expression results in receptor variants that are believed to have different functional characteristics. However, the molecular pharmacology of ligand binding to CXCR3 alternative splice variants and their downstream signaling pathways remain poorly explored. To better understand the role of the functional consequences of alternative splicing of CXCR3, we measured signaling in response to four different chemokine ligands (CXCL4, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11) with agonist activity at CXCR3. Both CXCL10 and CXCL11 activated splice variant CXCR3A. Whereas CXCL10 displayed full agonistic activity for Gαi activation and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and partial agonist activity for β-arrestin recruitment, CXCL9 triggered only modest ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CXCL11 induced CXCR3B-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and little ERK phosphorylation. CXCR3Alt signaling was limited to modest ligand-induced receptor internalization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to chemokines CXCL11, CXCL10, and CXCL9. These results show that CXCR3 splice variants activate different signaling pathways and that CXCR3 variant function is not redundant, suggesting a mechanism for tissue specific biased agonism. Our data show an additional layer of complexity for chemokine receptor signaling that might be exploited to target specific CXCR3 splice variants. PMID:27512119

  1. GABA-A receptor inhibition of local calcium signaling in spines and dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlin, Joseph J; Carter, Adam G

    2014-11-26

    Cortical interneurons activate GABA-A receptors to rapidly control electrical and biochemical signaling at pyramidal neurons. Different populations of interneurons are known to uniquely target the soma and dendrites of pyramidal neurons. However, the ability of these interneurons to inhibit Ca(2+) signaling at spines and dendrites is largely unexplored. Here we use whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, GABA uncaging and optogenetics to study dendritic inhibition at layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons in slices of mouse PFC. We first show that GABA-A receptors strongly inhibit action potential (AP)-evoked Ca(2+) signals at both spines and dendrites. We find robust inhibition over tens of milliseconds that spreads along the dendritic branch. However, we observe no difference in the amount of inhibition at neighboring spines and dendrites. We then examine the influence of interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), or 5HT3a receptors. We determine that these populations of interneurons make unique contacts onto the apical and basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons. We also show that SOM and 5HT3a but not PV interneurons potently inhibit AP Ca(2+) signals via GABA-A receptors at both spines and dendrites. These findings reveal how multiple interneurons regulate local Ca(2+) signaling in pyramidal neurons, with implications for cortical function and disease.

  2. Persistent cAMP-signals triggered by internalized G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Calebiro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are generally thought to signal to second messengers like cyclic AMP (cAMP from the cell surface and to become internalized upon repeated or prolonged stimulation. Once internalized, they are supposed to stop signaling to second messengers but may trigger nonclassical signals such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation. Here, we show that a GPCR continues to stimulate cAMP production in a sustained manner after internalization. We generated transgenic mice with ubiquitous expression of a fluorescent sensor for cAMP and studied cAMP responses to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH in native, 3-D thyroid follicles isolated from these mice. TSH stimulation caused internalization of the TSH receptors into a pre-Golgi compartment in close association with G-protein alpha(s-subunits and adenylyl cyclase III. Receptors internalized together with TSH and produced downstream cellular responses that were distinct from those triggered by cell surface receptors. These data suggest that classical paradigms of GPCR signaling may need revision, as they indicate that cAMP signaling by GPCRs may occur both at the cell surface and from intracellular sites, but with different consequences for the cell.

  3. ABA receptors: The START of a new paradigm in phytohormone signalling

    KAUST Repository

    Klingler, John

    2010-06-03

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a central role in plant development and in plant adaptation to both biotic and abiotic stressors. In recent years, knowledge of ABA metabolism and signal transduction has advanced rapidly to provide detailed glimpses of the hormone\\'s activities at the molecular level. Despite this progress, many gaps in understanding have remained, particularly at the early stages of ABA perception by the plant cell. The search for an ABA receptor protein has produced multiple candidates, including GCR2, GTG1, and GTG2, and CHLH. In addition to these candidates, in 2009 several research groups converged on a novel family of Arabidopsis proteins that bind ABA, and thereby interact directly with a class of protein phosphatases that are well known as critical players in ABA signal transduction. The PYR/PYL/RCAR receptor family is homologous to the Bet v 1-fold and START domain proteins. It consists of 14 members, nearly all of which appear capable of participating in an ABA receptor-signal complex that responds to the hormone by activating the transcription of ABA-responsive genes. Evidence is provided here that PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors can also drive the phosphorylation of the slow anion channel SLAC1 to provide a fast and timely response to the ABA signal. Crystallographic studies have vividly shown the mechanics of ABA binding to PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors, presenting a model that bears some resemblance to the binding of gibberellins to GID1 receptors. Since this ABA receptor family is highly conserved in crop species, its discovery is likely to usher a new wave of progress in the elucidation and manipulation of plant stress responses in agricultural settings. © 2010 The Author(s).

  4. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  5. Caldendrin-Jacob: a protein liaison that couples NMDA receptor signalling to the nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela C Dieterich

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and calcium can exert multiple and very divergent effects within neuronal cells, thereby impacting opposing occurrences such as synaptic plasticity and neuronal degeneration. The neuronal Ca2+ sensor Caldendrin is a postsynaptic density component with high similarity to calmodulin. Jacob, a recently identified Caldendrin binding partner, is a novel protein abundantly expressed in limbic brain and cerebral cortex. Strictly depending upon activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors, Jacob is recruited to neuronal nuclei, resulting in a rapid stripping of synaptic contacts and in a drastically altered morphology of the dendritic tree. Jacob's nuclear trafficking from distal dendrites crucially requires the classical Importin pathway. Caldendrin binds to Jacob's nuclear localization signal in a Ca2+-dependent manner, thereby controlling Jacob's extranuclear localization by competing with the binding of Importin-alpha to Jacob's nuclear localization signal. This competition requires sustained synapto-dendritic Ca2+ levels, which presumably cannot be achieved by activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, but are confined to Ca2+ microdomains such as postsynaptic spines. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, as opposed to their synaptic counterparts, trigger the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB shut-off pathway, and cell death. We found that nuclear knockdown of Jacob prevents CREB shut-off after extrasynaptic NMDA receptor activation, whereas its nuclear overexpression induces CREB shut-off without NMDA receptor stimulation. Importantly, nuclear knockdown of Jacob attenuates NMDA-induced loss of synaptic contacts, and neuronal degeneration. This defines a novel mechanism of synapse-to-nucleus communication via a synaptic Ca2+-sensor protein, which links the activity of NMDA receptors to nuclear signalling events involved in modelling synapto-dendritic input and NMDA receptor-induced cellular degeneration.

  6. Phylogeny of Toll-like receptor signaling: adapting the innate response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Roach

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptors represent a largely evolutionarily conserved pathogen recognition machinery responsible for recognition of bacterial, fungal, protozoan, and viral pathogen associated microbial patterns and initiation of inflammatory response. Structurally the Toll-like receptors are comprised of an extracellular leucine rich repeat domain and a cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor domain. Recognition takes place in the extracellular domain where as the cytoplasmic domain triggers a complex signal network required to sustain appropriate immune response. Signal transduction is regulated by the recruitment of different intracellular adaptors. The Toll-like receptors can be grouped depending on the usage of the adaptor, MyD88, into MyD88-dependent and MyD88 independent subsets. Herein, we present a unique phylogenetic analysis of domain regions of these receptors and their cognate signaling adaptor molecules. Although previously unclear from the phylogeny of full length receptors, these analyses indicate a separate evolutionary origin for the MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signaling pathway and provide evidence of a common ancestor for the vertebrate and invertebrate orthologs of the adaptor molecule MyD88. Together these observations suggest a very ancient origin of the MyD88-dependent pathway Additionally we show that early duplications gave rise to several adaptor molecule families. In some cases there is also strong pattern of parallel duplication between adaptor molecules and their corresponding TLR. Our results further support the hypothesis that phylogeny of specific domains involved in signaling pathway can shed light on key processes that link innate to adaptive immune response.

  7. Regulation of T cell receptor signaling by the actin cytoskeleton and poroelastic cytoplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays essential roles in modulating T-cell activation. Most models of T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering, signalosome assembl, y and immune synapse formation invoke actin-dependent mechanisms. As T cells are constitutively motile cells, TCR triggering and signaling occur against a cytoskeletal backdrop that is constantly remodeling. While the interplay between actin dynamics and TCR signaling have been the focus of research for many years, much of the work in T cells has ...

  8. Alcohol,nutrition and liver cancer:Role of Toll-like receptor signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel; W; French; Joan; Oliva; Barbara; A; French; Fawzia; Bardag-Gorce

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence that ties the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to the natural immune pro-inflammatory response to chronic liver disease, with a focus on the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling as the mechanism of liver stem cell/progenitor transformation to HCC. Two exemplary models of this phenomenon are reviewed in detail. One model applies chronic ethanol/lipopolysaccharide feeding to the activated TLR4 signaling pathway. The other applies chronic feeding of a carcin...

  9. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Oligodendrocytes Regulates Myelin Sheath Thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Furusho, M.; Dupree, J. L.; Nave, K-A; Bansal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Formation of the central nervous system (CNS) white matter is developmentally tightly regulated, but the molecules and mechanisms of myelination control in the postnatal CNS are poorly understood. Here, we show that myelin growth is controlled by Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) signaling, originally identified as a proliferative signal for oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) in vitro. We created two lines of mice lacking both FGF-receptor 1 (Fgfr1) and Fgfr2 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells ...

  10. Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling regulates replication of the peste des petits ruminants virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, K; Chaubey, K K; Singh, S V; Kumar, N

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we found out that blocking the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling in Vero cells by tryphostin AG879 impairs the in vitro replication of the peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). A reduced virus replication in Trk1-knockdown (siRNA) Vero cells confirmed the essential role of RTK in the virus replication, in particular a specific regulation of viral RNA synthesis. These data represent the first evidence that the RTK signaling regulates replication of a morbillivirus. PMID:25790054

  11. G-protein-coupled receptor controls steroid hormone signaling in cell membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Di; Zhao, Wen-Li; Cai, Mei-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in animal steroid hormone signaling, but their mechanism is unclear. In this research, we report that a GPCR called ErGPCR-2 controls steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) signaling in the cell membrane of the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. ErGPCR-2 was highly expressed during molting and metamorphosis. 20E, via ErGPCR-2, regulated rapid intracellular calcium increase, protein phosphorylation, gene transcription, and insect metamo...

  12. 14-3-3 Proteins Buffer Intracellular Calcium Sensing Receptors to Constrain Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Grant

    Full Text Available Calcium sensing receptors (CaSR interact with 14-3-3 binding proteins at a carboxyl terminal arginine-rich motif. Mutations identified in patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, pancreatitis or idiopathic epilepsy support the functional importance of this motif. We combined total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches to determine the mechanism of 14-3-3 protein regulation of CaSR signaling. Loss of 14-3-3 binding caused increased basal CaSR signaling and plasma membrane levels, and a significantly larger signaling-evoked increase in plasma membrane receptors. Block of core glycosylation with tunicamycin demonstrated that changes in plasma membrane CaSR levels were due to differences in exocytic rate. Western blotting to quantify time-dependent changes in maturation of expressed wt CaSR and a 14-3-3 protein binding-defective mutant demonstrated that signaling increases synthesis to maintain constant levels of the immaturely and maturely glycosylated forms. CaSR thus operates by a feed-forward mechanism, whereby signaling not only induces anterograde trafficking of nascent receptors but also increases biosynthesis to maintain steady state levels of net cellular CaSR. Overall, these studies suggest that 14-3-3 binding at the carboxyl terminus provides an important buffering mechanism to increase the intracellular pool of CaSR available for signaling-evoked trafficking, but attenuates trafficking to control the dynamic range of responses to extracellular calcium.

  13. Non-Ligand-Induced Dimerization is Sufficient to Initiate the Signalling and Endocytosis of EGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourouniotis, George; Wang, Yi; Pennock, Steven; Chen, Xinmei; Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    The binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to EGF receptor (EGFR) stimulates cell mitogenesis and survival through various signalling cascades. EGF also stimulates rapid EGFR endocytosis and its eventual degradation in lysosomes. The immediate events induced by ligand binding include receptor dimerization, activation of intrinsic tyrosine kinase and autophosphorylation. However, in spite of intensified efforts, the results regarding the roles of these events in EGFR signalling and internalization is still very controversial. In this study, we constructed a chimeric EGFR by replacing its extracellular domain with leucine zipper (LZ) and tagged a green fluorescent protein (GFP) at its C-terminus. We showed that the chimeric LZ-EGFR-GFP was constitutively dimerized. The LZ-EGFR-GFP dimer autophosphorylated each of its five well-defined C-terminal tyrosine residues as the ligand-induced EGFR dimer does. Phosphorylated LZ-EGFR-GFP was localized to both the plasma membrane and endosomes, suggesting it is capable of endocytosis. We also showed that LZ-EGFR-GFP activated major signalling proteins including Src homology collagen-like (Shc), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt. Moreover, LZ-EGFR-GFP was able to stimulate cell proliferation. These results indicate that non-ligand induced dimerization is sufficient to activate EGFR and initiate cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis. We conclude that receptor dimerization is a critical event in EGF-induced cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis. PMID:27463710

  14. Non-Ligand-Induced Dimerization is Sufficient to Initiate the Signalling and Endocytosis of EGF Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kourouniotis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF to EGF receptor (EGFR stimulates cell mitogenesis and survival through various signalling cascades. EGF also stimulates rapid EGFR endocytosis and its eventual degradation in lysosomes. The immediate events induced by ligand binding include receptor dimerization, activation of intrinsic tyrosine kinase and autophosphorylation. However, in spite of intensified efforts, the results regarding the roles of these events in EGFR signalling and internalization is still very controversial. In this study, we constructed a chimeric EGFR by replacing its extracellular domain with leucine zipper (LZ and tagged a green fluorescent protein (GFP at its C-terminus. We showed that the chimeric LZ-EGFR-GFP was constitutively dimerized. The LZ-EGFR-GFP dimer autophosphorylated each of its five well-defined C-terminal tyrosine residues as the ligand-induced EGFR dimer does. Phosphorylated LZ-EGFR-GFP was localized to both the plasma membrane and endosomes, suggesting it is capable of endocytosis. We also showed that LZ-EGFR-GFP activated major signalling proteins including Src homology collagen-like (Shc, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and Akt. Moreover, LZ-EGFR-GFP was able to stimulate cell proliferation. These results indicate that non-ligand induced dimerization is sufficient to activate EGFR and initiate cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis. We conclude that receptor dimerization is a critical event in EGF-induced cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis.

  15. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor signaling dichotomously modulates inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in rat inner retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Han; Wu, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Miao, Yanying; Zhang, Chuan-Qiang; Dong, Ling-Dan; Yang, Xiong-Li; Wang, Zhongfeng

    2016-01-01

    In the inner retina, ganglion cells (RGCs) integrate and process excitatory signal from bipolar cells (BCs) and inhibitory signal from amacrine cells (ACs). Using multiple labeling immunohistochemistry, we first revealed the expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) at the terminals of ACs and BCs in rat retina. By patch-clamp techniques, we then showed how the activation of this receptor dichotomously regulated miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), mediated by GABAA receptors and glycine receptors, and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), mediated by AMPA receptors, of RGCs in rat retinal slices. WIN55212-2 (WIN), a CB1R agonist, reduced the mIPSC frequency due to an inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels no matter whether AMPA receptors were blocked. In contrast, WIN reduced the mEPSC frequency by suppressing T-type Ca(2+) channels only when inhibitory inputs to RGCs were present, which could be in part due to less T-type Ca(2+) channels of cone BCs, presynaptic to RGCs, being in an inactivation state under such condition. This unique feature of CB1R-mediated retrograde regulation provides a novel mechanism for modulating excitatory synaptic transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, depolarization of RGCs suppressed mIPSCs of these cells, an effect that was eliminated by the CB1R antagonist SR141716, suggesting that endocannabinoid is indeed released from RGCs.

  16. Ligand Perception, Activation, and Early Signaling of Plant Steroid Receptor Brassinosteroid Insensitive 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Jiang; Chi Zhang; Xuelu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs) belong to a large group of cell surface proteins involved in many aspects of plant development and environmental responses in both monocots and dicots. Brassinosteroid insensitive 1 (BRI1), a member of the LRR X subfamily, was first identified through several forward genetic screenings for mutants insensitive to brassinosteroids (BRs), which are a class of plant-specific steroid hormones. Since its identification, BRI1 and its homologs had been proved as receptors perceiving BRs and initiating BR signaling. The co-receptor BRI1-associated kinase 1 and its homologs, and other BRI1 interacting proteins such as its inhibitor BRI1 kinase inhibitor 1 (BKI1) were identified by genetic and biochemical approaches. The detailed mechanisms of BR perception by BRI1 and the activation of BRI1 receptor complex have also been elucidated. Moreover, several mechanisms for termination of the activated BRI1 signaling were also discovered. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances on the mechanism of BRI1 phosphorylation and activation, the regulation of its receptor complex, the structure basis of BRI1 ectodomain and BR recognition, its direct substrates, and the termination of the activated BRI1 receptor complex.

  17. The composition and signaling of the IL-35 receptor are unconventional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Lauren W; Delgoffe, Greg M; Guy, Clifford S; Vignali, Kate M; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Fairweather, DeLisa; Satoskar, Abhay R; Garcia, K Christopher; Hunter, Christopher A; Drake, Charles G; Murray, Peter J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2012-02-05

    Interleukin 35 (IL-35) belongs to the IL-12 family of heterodimeric cytokines but has a distinct functional profile. IL-35 suppresses T cell proliferation and converts naive T cells into IL-35-producing induced regulatory T cells (iTr35 cells). Here we found that IL-35 signaled through a unique heterodimer of receptor chains IL-12Rβ2 and gp130 or homodimers of each chain. Conventional T cells were sensitive to IL-35-mediated suppression in the absence of one receptor chain but not both receptor chains, whereas signaling through both chains was required for IL-35 expression and conversion into iTr35 cells. Signaling through the IL-35 receptor required the transcription factors STAT1 and STAT4, which formed a unique heterodimer that bound to distinct sites in the promoters of the genes encoding the IL-12 subunits p35 and Ebi3. This unconventional mode of signaling, distinct from that of other members of the IL-12 family, may broaden the spectrum and specificity of IL-35-mediated suppression.

  18. Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling in Ventilator-induced Diaphragm Atrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, W.J.M.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Vaneker, M.; Linkels, M.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Scheffer, G.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Heunks, L.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Mechanical ventilation induces diaphragm muscle atrophy, which plays a key role in difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. The signaling pathways involved in ventilator-induced diaphragm atrophy are poorly understood. The current study investigated the role of Toll-like receptor

  19. "Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha enhances rheumatoid synovial fibroblast signaling and promotes arthritis in mice"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanford, Stephanie M; Svensson, Mattias N D; Sacchetti, Cristiano; Pilo, Caila A; Wu, Dennis J; Kiosses, William B; Hellvard, Annelie; Bergum, Brith; Aleman Muench, German R; Elly, Christian; Liu, Yun-Cai; den Hertog, Jeroen; Elson, Ari; Sap, Jan; Mydel, Piotr; Boyle, David L; Corr, Maripat; Firestein, Gary S; Bottini, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: During rheumatoid arthritis (RA), fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) critically promote disease pathogenesis by aggressively invading the joint extracellular matrix. The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway is emerging as a contributor to RA FLS anomalous behavior. The receptor p

  20. Signalling properties and pharmacological analysis of two sulfakinin receptors from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfakinin is an insect neuropeptide that constitutes an important component of the complex network of hormonal and neural factors that regulate feeding and digestion. The key modulating functions of sulfakinin are mediated by binding and signaling via G-protein coupled receptors. Although a subst...

  1. Evolutionary patterns of Toll-like receptor signaling pathway genes in the Suidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darfour-Oduro, K.A.; Megens, Hendrik Jan; Roca, A.L.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Schook, L.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway constitutes an essential component of the innate immune system. Highly conserved proteins, indicative of their critical roles in host survival, characterize this pathway. Selective constraints could vary depending on the gene's position w

  2. Growth Hormone Receptor Signaling Pathways and its Negative Regulation by SOCS2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández Pérez, Leandro; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Guerra, Borja;

    Growth hormone (GH) is a critical regulator of linear body growth during childhood but continues to have important metabolic actions throughout life. The GH receptor (GHR) is ubiquitously expressed, and deficiency of GHR signaling causes a dramatic impact on normal physiology during somatic devel...

  3. Estrogen-related receptor α regulates osteoblast differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Kathryn L; Berasi, Stephen P; Liu, Yan; Cain, Michael; Zhang, Ying; Huard, Christine; Fukayama, Shoichi; Zhang, Jing; Choe, Sung; Zhong, Wenyan; Bhat, Bheem M; Bhat, Ramesh A; Brown, Eugene L; Martinez, Robert V

    2012-04-01

    Based on its homology to the estrogen receptor and its roles in osteoblast and chondrocyte differentiation, the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα (ESRRA)) is an intriguing therapeutic target for osteoporosis and other bone diseases. The objective of this study was to better characterize the molecular mechanisms by which ERRα modulates osteoblastogenesis. Experiments from multiple systems demonstrated that ERRα modulates Wnt signaling, a crucial pathway for proper regulation of bone development. This was validated using a Wnt-luciferase reporter, where ERRα showed co-activator-dependent (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α, PGC-1α) stimulatory effects. Interestingly, knockdown of ERRα expression also enhanced WNT signaling. In combination, these data indicated that ERRα could serve to either activate or repress Wnt signaling depending on the presence or absence of its co-activator PGC-1α. The observed Wnt pathway modulation was cell intrinsic and did not alter β-catenin nuclear translocation but was dependent on DNA binding of ERRα. We also found that expression of active ERRα correlated with Wnt pathway effects on osteoblastic differentiation in two cell types, consistent with a role for ERRα in modulating the Wnt pathway. In conclusion, this work identifies ERRα, in conjunction with co-activators such as PGC-1α, as a new regulator of the Wnt-signaling pathway during osteoblast differentiation, through a cell-intrinsic mechanism not affecting β-catenin nuclear translocation.

  4. GPR55 regulates cannabinoid 2 receptor-mediated responses in human neutrophils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nariman A B Balenga; Maria Waldhoer; Elma Aflaki; Julia Kargl; Wolfgang Platzer; Ralf Schr(o)der; Stefanie Bl(a)ttermann; Evi Kostenis; Andrew J Brown; Akos Heinemann

    2011-01-01

    The directional migration of neutrophils towards inflammatory mediators,such as chemokines and cannabinoids,occurs via the activation of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) and is a highly organized process.A crucial role for controlling neutrophil migration has been ascribed to the cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R),but additional modulatory sites distinct from CB2R have recently been suggested to impact CB2R-mediated effector functions in neutrophils.Here,we provide evidence that the recently de-orphanized 7TM/GPCR GPR55potently modulates CB2R-mediated responses.We show that GPR55 is expressed in human blood neutrophils and its activation augments the migratory response towards the CB2R agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG),while inhibiting neutrophil degranulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.Using HEK293 and HL60 cell lines,along with primary neutrophils,we show that GPR55 and CB2R interfere with each other's signaling pathways at the level of small GTPases,such as Rac2 and Cdc42.This ultimately leads to cellular polarization and efficient migration as well as abrogation of degranulation and ROS formation in neutrophils.Therefore,GPR55 limits the tissueinjuring inflammatory responses mediated by CB2R,while it synergizes with CB2R in recruiting neutrophils to sites of inflammation.

  5. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1. PMID:27235398

  6. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  7. Advances of Targeted Therapy Based on Estrogen Receptor Signaling Pathway 
in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang XU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that estrogen promotes tumor growth in both estrogen target organs and non-target organs. Estrogen regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via two different receptors, estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ. In recent decades, with the clarification of the ERα-mediated signaling pathways in breast cancer, targeted therapy through these pathways have successfully been used in clinical application. Tamoxifen, the classic representative, is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM. Along with the elucidation of the role of estrogen in the pathophysiology of lung cancer, targeted lung cancer treatment based on the ER signaling pathways is also gradually being applied and it could become an important part of the comprehensive treatment for lung cancer.

  8. Role of Cbl-associated protein/ponsin in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Tikkanen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cbl-associated protein/ponsin (CAP is an adaptor protein that contains a so-called Sorbin homology (SoHo domain and three Src homology 3 (SH3 domains which are engaged in diverse protein-protein interactions. CAP has been shown to function in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion and to be involved in the differentiation of muscle cells and adipocytes. In addition, it participates in signaling pathways through several receptor tyrosine kinases such as insulin and neurotrophin receptors. In the last couple of years, several studies have shed light on the details of these processes and identified novel interaction partners of CAP. In this review, we summarize these recent findings and provide an overview on the function of CAP especially in cell adhesion and membrane receptor signaling.

  9. PKCζ regulates Notch receptor routing and activity in a Notch signaling-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöqvist, Marika; Antfolk, Daniel; Ferraris, Saima; Rraklli, Vilma; Haga, Cecilia; Antila, Christian; Mutvei, Anders; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Holmberg, Johan; Jin, Shaobo; Eriksson, John E; Lendahl, Urban; Sahlgren, Cecilia

    2014-04-01

    Activation of Notch signaling requires intracellular routing of the receptor, but the mechanisms controlling the distinct steps in the routing process is poorly understood. We identify PKCζ as a key regulator of Notch receptor intracellular routing. When PKCζ was inhibited in the developing chick central nervous system and in cultured myoblasts, Notch-stimulated cells were allowed to undergo differentiation. PKCζ phosphorylates membrane-tethered forms of Notch and regulates two distinct routing steps, depending on the Notch activation state. When Notch is activated, PKCζ promotes re-localization of Notch from late endosomes to the nucleus and enhances production of the Notch intracellular domain, which leads to increased Notch activity. In the non-activated state, PKCζ instead facilitates Notch receptor internalization, accompanied with increased ubiquitylation and interaction with the endosomal sorting protein Hrs. Collectively, these data identify PKCζ as a key regulator of Notch trafficking and demonstrate that distinct steps in intracellular routing are differentially modulated depending on Notch signaling status.

  10. Hypocretin/Orexin regulation of dopamine signaling and cocaine self-administration is mediated predominantly by hypocretin receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Courtney D; Rau, Andrew R; Yorgason, Jordan T; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-01-21

    Extensive evidence suggests that the hypocretins/orexins influence cocaine reinforcement and dopamine signaling via actions at hypocretin receptor 1. By comparison, the involvement of hypocretin receptor 2 in reward and reinforcement processes has received relatively little attention. Thus, although there is some evidence that hypocretin receptor 2 regulates intake of some drugs of abuse, it is currently unclear to what extent hypocretin receptor 2 participates in the regulation of dopamine signaling or cocaine self-administration, particularly under high effort conditions. To address this, we examined the effects of hypocretin receptor 1, and/or hypocretin receptor 2 blockade on dopamine signaling and cocaine reinforcement. We used in vivo fast scan cyclic voltammetry to test the effects of hypocretin antagonists on dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens core and a progressive ratio schedule to examine the effects of these antagonists on cocaine self-administration. Results demonstrate that blockade of either hypocretin receptor 1 or both hypocretin receptor 1 and 2 significantly reduces the effects of cocaine on dopamine signaling and decreases the motivation to take cocaine. In contrast, blockade of hypocretin receptor 2 alone had no significant effects on dopamine signaling or self-administration. These findings suggest a differential involvement of the two hypocretin receptors, with hypocretin receptor 1 appearing to be more involved than hypocretin receptor 2 in the regulation of dopamine signaling and cocaine self-administration. When considered with the existing literature, these data support the hypothesis that hypocretins exert a permissive influence on dopamine signaling and motivated behavior via preferential actions on hypocretin receptor 1. PMID:25496218

  11. Effect of Spatial Inhomogeneities on the Membrane Surface on Receptor Dimerization and Signal Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerketta, Romica; Halász, Ádám M; Steinkamp, Mara P; Wilson, Bridget S; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2016-01-01

    Important signal transduction pathways originate on the plasma membrane, where microdomains may transiently entrap diffusing receptors. This results in a non-random distribution of receptors even in the resting state, which can be visualized as "clusters" by high resolution imaging methods. Here, we explore how spatial in-homogeneities in the plasma membrane might influence the dimerization and phosphorylation status of ErbB2 and ErbB3, two receptor tyrosine kinases that preferentially heterodimerize and are often co-expressed in cancer. This theoretical study is based upon spatial stochastic simulations of the two-dimensional membrane landscape, where variables include differential distributions and overlap of transient confinement zones ("domains") for the two receptor species. The in silico model is parameterized and validated using data from single particle tracking experiments. We report key differences in signaling output based on the degree of overlap between domains and the relative retention of receptors in such domains, expressed as escape probability. Results predict that a high overlap of domains, which favors transient co-confinement of both receptor species, will enhance the rate of hetero-interactions. Where domains do not overlap, simulations confirm expectations that homo-interactions are favored. Since ErbB3 is uniquely dependent on ErbB2 interactions for activation of its catalytic activity, variations in domain overlap or escape probability markedly alter the predicted patterns and time course of ErbB3 and ErbB2 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results implicate membrane domain organization as an important modulator of signal initiation, motivating the design of novel experimental approaches to measure these important parameters across a wider range of receptor systems. PMID:27570763

  12. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-01

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. PMID:26996509

  13. Effect of spatial inhomogeneities on the membrane surface on receptor dimerization and signal initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romica Kerketta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Important signal transduction pathways originate on the plasma membrane, where microdomains may transiently entrap diffusing receptors. This results in a non-random distribution of receptors even in the resting state, which can be visualized as clusters by high resolution imaging methods. Here, we explore how spatial in-homogeneities in the plasma membrane might influence the dimerization and phosphorylation status of ErbB2 and ErbB3, two receptor tyrosine kinases that preferentially heterodimerize and are often co-expressed in cancer. This theoretical study is based upon spatial stochastic simulations of the two-dimensional membrane landscape, where variables include differential distributions and overlap of transient confinement zones (domains for the two receptor species. The in silico model is parameterized and validated using data from single particle tracking experiments. We report key differences in signaling output based on the degree of overlap between domains and the relative retention of receptors in such domains, expressed as escape probability. Results predict that a high overlap of domains, which favors transient co-confinement of both receptor species, will enhance the rate of hetero-interactions. Where domains do not overlap, simulations confirm expectations that homo-interactions are favored. Since ErbB3 is uniquely dependent on ErbB2 interactions for activation of its catalytic activity, variations in domain overlap or escape probability markedly alter the predicted patterns and time course of ErbB3 and ErbB2 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results implicate membrane domain organization as an important modulator of signal initiation, motivating the design of novel experimental approaches to measure these important parameters across a wider range of receptor systems.

  14. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Navarro-Villarán, E; González, R; Pereira, S; Soriano-De Castro, L B; Sarrias-Giménez, A; Barrera-Pulido, L; Álamo-Martínez, J M; Serrablo-Requejo, A; Blanco-Fernández, G; Nogales-Muñoz, A; Gila-Bohórquez, A; Pacheco, D; Torres-Nieto, M A; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Suárez-Artacho, G; Bernal-Bellido, C; Marín-Gómez, L M; Barcena, J A; Gómez-Bravo, M A; Padilla, C A; Padillo, F J; Muntané, J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells.

  15. Transcriptional Crosstalk between Nuclear Receptors and Cytokine Signal Transduction Pathways in Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Wang; Xiaohu Zhang; William L. Farrar; Xiaoyi Yang

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily and the transcriptional factors associated with cytokines are inherently different families of signaling molecules and activate gene transcription by binding to their respective responsive element. However, it has become increasingly clear from our works and others that nuclear receptors are important regulators of cytokine production and function through complex and varied interactions between these distinct transcriptional factors. This review provides a general overview of the mechanism of action of nuclear receptors and their transcriptional crosstalk with transcriptional factors associated with cytokine transduction pathways. One of the most important mechanistic aspects is protein to protein interaction through a direct or co-regulator-mediated indirect manner. Such crosstalk is crucially involved in physiological and therapeutic roles of nuclear receptors and their ligands in immunity,inflammation and cytokine-related tumors. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):416-424.

  16. Leishmania major lipophosphoglycan: discrepancy in Toll-like receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Ardestani, Sussan K; Kariminia, Amina; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein

    2010-02-01

    Lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is structurally characterized by a series of phosphoglycan repeat units. Cellular LPG, isolated from promastigotes, has a very similar structure to culture supernatant LPG, but differs in the average number of phosphorylated oligosaccharide repeat units and in glycan composition. Comparison of these LPGs with capillary electrophoresis and immunoblotting indicate that these molecules are highly conserved structurally and composed of galactosylated Gal-Man repeats but their size and molecular weight are very different which is due to glycan portion. There are 30 and 20 repeat units in sLPG and mLPG, respectively. Both LPGs induced nitric oxide in macrophages cell line while sLPG had the higher stimulatory effect. In the presence of anti-TLR2 nitric oxide stimulated by LPG was reduced to control levels. In addition, in the presence of anti-TLR4, nitric oxide stimulated by LPGs was not affected. We propose that lipophosphoglycan induces nitric oxide production via TLR2 signaling pathway. PMID:19769970

  17. Kainate receptors mediate signaling in both transient and sustained OFF bipolar cell pathways in mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghuis, Bart G; Looger, Loren L; Tomita, Susumu; Demb, Jonathan B

    2014-04-30

    A fundamental question in sensory neuroscience is how parallel processing is implemented at the level of molecular and circuit mechanisms. In the retina, it has been proposed that distinct OFF cone bipolar cell types generate fast/transient and slow/sustained pathways by the differential expression of AMPA- and kainate-type glutamate receptors, respectively. However, the functional significance of these receptors in the intact circuit during light stimulation remains unclear. Here, we measured glutamate release from mouse bipolar cells by two-photon imaging of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) expressed on postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cell dendrites. In both transient and sustained OFF layers, cone-driven glutamate release from bipolar cells was blocked by antagonists to kainate receptors but not AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological recordings from bipolar and ganglion cells confirmed the essential role of kainate receptors for signaling in both transient and sustained OFF pathways. Kainate receptors mediated responses to contrast modulation up to 20 Hz. Light-evoked responses in all mouse OFF bipolar pathways depend on kainate, not AMPA, receptors.

  18. Connexins and M3 Muscarinic Receptors Contribute to Heterogeneous Ca2+ Signaling in Mouse Aortic Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Boittin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Smooth muscle tone is controlled by Ca2+ signaling in the endothelial layer. Mouse endothelial cells are interconnected by gap junctions made of Connexin40 (Cx40 and Cx37, which allow the exchange of signaling molecules to coordinate their activity. Here, we investigated the role of Cx40 in the endothelial Ca2+ signaling of the mouse aorta. Methods: Ca2+ imaging was performed on intact aortic endothelium from both wild type (Cx40+/+ and Connexin40-deficient (Cx40 -/- mice. Results: Acetylcholine (ACh induced early fast and high amplitude Ca2+ transients in a fraction of endothelial cells expressing the M3 muscarinic receptors. Inhibition of intercellular communication using carbenoxolone or octanol fully blocked the propagation of ACh-induced Ca2+ transients toward adjacent cells in WT and Cx40-/- mice. As compared to WT, Cx40-/- mice displayed a reduced propagation of ACh-induced Ca2+ waves, indicating that Cx40 contributes to the spreading of Ca2+ signals. The propagation of those Ca2+ responses was not blocked by suramin, a blocker of purinergic ATP receptors, indicating that there is no paracrine effect of ATP release on the Ca2+ waves. Conclusions: Altogether our data show that Cx40 and Cx37 contribute to the propagation and amplification of the Ca2+ signaling triggered by ACh in endothelial cells expressing the M3 muscarinic receptors.

  19. Thrombin-Mediated Direct Activation of Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2: Another Target for Thrombin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hansen, Kristina K; Renaux, Bernard; Polley, Danny; Gibson, Stacy; Vanderboor, Christina; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2016-05-01

    Thrombin is known to signal to cells by cleaving/activating a G-protein-coupled family of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). The signaling mechanism involves the proteolytic unmasking of an N-terminal receptor sequence that acts as a tethered receptor-activating ligand. To date, the recognized targets of thrombin cleavage and activation for signaling are PAR1 and PAR4, in which thrombin cleaves at a conserved target arginine to reveal a tethered ligand. PAR2, which like PAR1 is also cleaved at an N-terminal arginine to unmask its tethered ligand, is generally regarded as a target for trypsin but not for thrombin signaling. We now show that thrombin, at concentrations that can be achieved at sites of acute injury or in a tumor microenvironment, can directly activate PAR2 vasorelaxation and signaling, stimulating calcium and mitogen-activated protein kinase responses along with triggeringβ-arrestin recruitment. Thus, PAR2 can be added alongside PAR1 and PAR4 to the targets, whereby thrombin can affect tissue function.

  20. Molecular determinants of receptor binding and signaling by the CX3C chemokine fractalkine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizoue, L S; Sullivan, S K; King, D S;

    2001-01-01

    Fractalkine/CX3CL1 is a membrane-tethered chemokine that functions as a chemoattractant and adhesion protein by interacting with the receptor CX3CR1. To understand the molecular basis for the interaction, an extensive mutagenesis study of fractalkine's chemokine domain was undertaken. The results...... reveal a cluster of basic residues (Lys-8, Lys-15, Lys-37, Arg-45, and Arg-48) and one aromatic (Phe-50) that are critical for binding and/or signaling. The mutant R48A could bind but not induce chemotaxis, demonstrating that Arg-48 is a signaling trigger. This result also shows that signaling residues......, but not all, pathways required for migration. Fractalkine also binds the human cytomegalovirus receptor US28, and analysis of the mutants indicates that US28 recognizes many of the same epitopes of fractalkine as CX3CR1. Comparison of the binding surfaces of fractalkine and the CC chemokine MCP-1 reveals...

  1. A Coupled Phase-Temperature Model for Dynamics of Transient Neuronal Signal in Mammals Cold Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirana, Firman Ahmad; Husein, Irzaman Sulaiman

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theoretical model consisting of coupled differential equation of membrane potential phase and temperature for describing the neuronal signal in mammals cold receptor. Based on the results from previous work by Roper et al., we modified a nonstochastic phase model for cold receptor neuronal signaling dynamics in mammals. We introduce a new set of temperature adjusted functional parameters which allow saturation characteristic at high and low steady temperatures. The modified model also accommodates the transient neuronal signaling process from high to low temperature by introducing a nonlinear differential equation for the “effective temperature” changes which is coupled to the phase differential equation. This simple model can be considered as a candidate for describing qualitatively the physical mechanism of the corresponding transient process. PMID:27774102

  2. A Coupled Phase-Temperature Model for Dynamics of Transient Neuronal Signal in Mammals Cold Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firman Ahmad Kirana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a theoretical model consisting of coupled differential equation of membrane potential phase and temperature for describing the neuronal signal in mammals cold receptor. Based on the results from previous work by Roper et al., we modified a nonstochastic phase model for cold receptor neuronal signaling dynamics in mammals. We introduce a new set of temperature adjusted functional parameters which allow saturation characteristic at high and low steady temperatures. The modified model also accommodates the transient neuronal signaling process from high to low temperature by introducing a nonlinear differential equation for the “effective temperature” changes which is coupled to the phase differential equation. This simple model can be considered as a candidate for describing qualitatively the physical mechanism of the corresponding transient process.

  3. Transmembrane adaptor proteins in the high-affinity IgE receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr eDraber

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI initiates a cascade of signaling events leading to release of preformed inflammatory and allergy mediators and de novo synthesis and secretion of cytokines and other compounds. The first biochemically well defined step of this signaling cascade is tyrosine phosphorylation of the FcεRI subunits by Src family kinase Lyn, followed by recruitment and activation of Syk kinase. Activity of Syk is decisive for the formation of multicomponent signaling assemblies, the signalosomes, in the vicinity of the receptors. Formation of the signalosomes is dependent on the presence of transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs. These proteins are characterized by a short extracellular domain, a single transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic tail with various motifs serving as anchors for cytoplasmic signaling molecules. In mast cells five TRAPs have been identified (LAT, NTAL, LAX, PAG and GAPT; engagement of four of them (LAT, NTAL, LAX and PAG in FcεRI signaling has been documented. Here we discuss recent progress in the understanding of how TRAPs affect FcεRI-mediated mast cell signaling. The combined data indicate that individual TRAPs have irreplaceable roles in important signaling events such as calcium response, degranulation, cytokines production and chemotaxis.

  4. Intercellular calcium signaling occurs between human osteoblasts and osteoclasts and requires activation of osteoclast P2X7 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas R; Henriksen, Zanne; Sørensen, Ole;

    2002-01-01

    Signaling between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is important in bone homeostasis. We previously showed that human osteoblasts propagate intercellular calcium signals via two mechanisms: autocrine activation of P2Y receptors, and gap junctional communication. In the current work we identified...... mechanically induced intercellular calcium signaling between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and among osteoclasts. Intercellular calcium responses in osteoclasts required P2 receptor activation but not gap junctional communication. Pharmacological studies and reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification demonstrated...... that human osteoclasts expressed functional P2Y1 receptors, but, unexpectedly, desensitization of P2Y1 did not block calcium signaling to osteoclasts. We also found that osteoclasts expressed functional P2X7 receptors and showed that pharmacological inhibition of these receptors blocked calcium signaling...

  5. Dopamine receptors modulate cytotoxicity of natural killer cells via cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter in the nervous system, has been shown to modulate immune function. We have previously reported that five subtypes of DA receptors, including D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R and D5R, are expressed in T lymphocytes and they are involved in regulation of T cells. However, roles of these DA receptor subtypes and their coupled signal-transduction pathway in modulation of natural killer (NK cells still remain to be clarified. The spleen of mice was harvested and NK cells were isolated and purified by negative selection using magnetic activated cell sorting. After NK cells were incubated with various drugs for 4 h, flow cytometry measured cytotoxicity of NK cells against YAC-1 lymphoma cells. NK cells expressed the five subtypes of DA receptors at mRNA and protein levels. Activation of D1-like receptors (including D1R and D5R with agonist SKF38393 enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity, but activation of D2-like receptors (including D2R, D3R and D4R with agonist quinpirole attenuated NK cells. Simultaneously, SKF38393 elevated D1R and D5R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding (CREB level in NK cells, while quinpirole reduced D3R and D4R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated CREB level in NK cells. These effects of SKF38393 were blocked by SCH23390, an antagonist of D1-like receptors, and quinpirole effects were abolished by haloperidol, an antagonist of D2-like receptors. In support these results, H89, an inhibitor of phosphokinase A (PKA, prevented the SKF38393-dependent enhancement of NK cells and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC, counteracted the quinpirole-dependent suppression of NK cells. These findings show that DA receptor subtypes are involved in modulation of NK cells and suggest that D1-like receptors facilitate NK cells by stimulating D1R/D5R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway and D2-like receptors suppress NK cells by inhibiting D3R/D4R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway. The

  6. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    concerning the pharmacological and the physiological functions of GPCR signalling. Theprimary research in this Ph.D. thesis concerns two topics: (1) functional characterization ofCCHamide-2 signalling and (2) functional characterization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor(mAChR) signalling.CCHamide-2...... in mutants created with the CRISP/Cas9 technique showed thatCCHamide-2 is probly an orexigenic peptide and also that is an important factor for larvaldevelopmental timing.In mammals, muscarinic acetylcholine signalling is involved in the signal transmission of theparasympathetic nervous system. However...... little is known about muscarinic acetylcholine receptorsignalling in insects. In this study, I found that two types of mAChRs occur in D. melanogaster, onecoupling to Gq (A-type) and the other to Gi (B-type). Both A- and B-type Dm-mAChRs can beactivated by acetylcholine (ACh), but the classical...

  7. The TNF receptor and Ig superfamily members form an integrated signaling circuit controlling dendritic cell homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Trez, Carl; Ware, Carl F.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) constitute the most potent antigen presenting cells of the immune system, playing a key role bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. Specialized DC subsets differ depending on their origin, tissue location and the influence of trophic factors, the latter remain to be fully understood. Stromal cell and myeloid-associated Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) signaling is required for the local proliferation of lymphoid tissue DC. This review focuses the LTβR signaling cascade as a crucial positive trophic signal in the homeostasis of DC subsets. The noncanonical coreceptor pathway comprised of the Immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily member, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and TNFR superfamily member, Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) counter regulates the trophic signaling by LTβR. Together both pathways form an integrated signaling circuit achieving homeostasis of DC subsets. PMID:18511331

  8. Metabotropic glutamate receptors depress vagal and aortic baroreceptor signal transmission in the NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Chen, C Y; Bonham, A C

    1998-11-01

    We sought to determine whether metabotropic glutamate receptors contribute to frequency-dependent depression of vagal and aortic baroreceptor signal transmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in vivo. In alpha-chloralose-anesthetized rabbits, we determined the number of extracellular action potentials synaptically evoked by low (1 Hz)- or high-frequency vagal (3-20 Hz) or aortic depressor nerve (ADN) (6-80 Hz) stimulation and postsynaptically evoked by the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (2S,1'S, 2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I) attenuated NTS responses monosynaptically evoked by 1-Hz vagus stimulation by 34% (n = 25; P = 0.011), while augmenting AMPA-evoked responses by 64% (n = 17; P = 0.026). The metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) did not affect NTS responses to low-frequency vagal stimulation (n = 11) or AMPA (n = 10) but augmented responses to high-frequency stimulation by 50% (n = 25; P = 0.0001). MPPG also augmented NTS responses to high-frequency ADN stimulation by 35% (n = 9; P = 0.048) but did not affect responses to low-frequency stimulation (n = 9) or AMPA (n = 7). The results suggest that metabotropic glutamate receptors, presumably at presynaptic sites, contribute to frequency-dependent depression of vagal and aortic baroreceptor signal transmission in NTS. PMID:9815076

  9. Mitochondrial H2O2 as an enable signal for triggering autophosphorylation of insulin receptor in neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Persiyantseva, Nadezhda A; Storozhevykh, Tatiana P; Senilova, Yana E; Gorbacheva, Lubov R; Pinelis, Vsevolod G.; Pomytkin, Igor A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Insulin receptors are widely distributed in the brain, where they play roles in synaptic function, memory formation, and neuroprotection. Autophosphorylation of the receptor in response to insulin stimulation is a critical step in receptor activation. In neurons, insulin stimulation leads to a rise in mitochondrial H2O2 production, which plays a role in receptor autophosphorylation. However, the kinetic characteristics of the H2O2 signal and its functional relationships with the i...

  10. Hypocretin/Orexin Regulation of Dopamine Signaling and Cocaine Self-Administration Is Mediated Predominantly by Hypocretin Receptor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, Courtney D.; Rau, Andrew R; Yorgason, Jordan T.; España, Rodrigo A.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive evidence suggests that the hypocretins/orexins influence cocaine reinforcement and dopamine signaling via actions at hypocretin receptor 1. By comparison, the involvement of hypocretin receptor 2 in reward and reinforcement processes has received relatively little attention. Thus, although there is some evidence that hypocretin receptor 2 regulates intake of some drugs of abuse, it is currently unclear to what extent hypocretin receptor 2 participates in the regulation of dopamine s...

  11. Signal transduction by VEGF receptors in regulation of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VEGF/VPF (vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular permeability factor) ligands and receptors are crucial regulators of vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and vascular permeability in vertebrates. VEGF-A, the prototype VEGF ligand, binds and activates two tyrosine kinase receptors: VEGFR1 (Flt-1) and VEGFR2 (KDR/Flk-1). VEGFR1, which occurs in transmembrane and soluble forms, negatively regulates vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during early embryogenesis, but it also acts as a positive regulator of angiogenesis and inflammatory responses, playing a role in several human diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The soluble VEGFR1 is overexpressed in placenta in preeclampsia patients. VEGFR2 has critical functions in physiological and pathological angiogenesis through distinct signal transduction pathways regulating proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. VEGFR3, a receptor for the lymphatic growth factors VEGF-C and VEGF-D, but not for VEGF-A, regulates vascular and lymphatic endothelial cell function during embryogenesis. Loss-of-function variants of VEGFR3 have been identified in lymphedema. Formation of tumor lymphatics may be stimulated by tumor-produced VEGF-C, allowing increased spread of tumor metastases through the lymphatics. Mapping the signaling system of these important receptors may provide the knowledge necessary to suppress specific signaling pathways in major human diseases

  12. N-wasp is essential for the negative regulation of B cell receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohong Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative regulation of receptor signaling is essential for controlling cell activation and differentiation. In B-lymphocytes, the down-regulation of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling is critical for suppressing the activation of self-reactive B cells; however, the mechanism underlying the negative regulation of signaling remains elusive. Using genetically manipulated mouse models and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP, which is coexpressed with WASP in all immune cells, is a critical negative regulator of B-cell signaling. B-cell-specific N-WASP gene deletion causes enhanced and prolonged BCR signaling and elevated levels of autoantibodies in the mouse serum. The increased signaling in N-WASP knockout B cells is concurrent with increased accumulation of F-actin at the B-cell surface, enhanced B-cell spreading on the antigen-presenting membrane, delayed B-cell contraction, inhibition in the merger of signaling active BCR microclusters into signaling inactive central clusters, and a blockage of BCR internalization. Upon BCR activation, WASP is activated first, followed by N-WASP in mouse and human primary B cells. The activation of N-WASP is suppressed by Bruton's tyrosine kinase-induced WASP activation, and is restored by the activation of SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase that inhibits WASP activation. Our results reveal a new mechanism for the negative regulation of BCR signaling and broadly suggest an actin-mediated mechanism for signaling down-regulation.

  13. Agmatine produces antidepressant-like effects by activating AMPA receptors and mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neis, Vivian Binder; Moretti, Morgana; Bettio, Luis Eduardo B; Ribeiro, Camille M; Rosa, Priscila Batista; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Lopes, Mark William; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2016-06-01

    The activation of AMPA receptors and mTOR signaling has been reported as mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of fast-acting agents, specially the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. In the present study, oral administration of agmatine (0.1mg/kg), a neuromodulator that has been reported to modulate NMDA receptors, caused a significant reduction in the immobility time of mice submitted to the tail suspension test (TST), an effect prevented by the administration of DNQX (AMPA receptor antagonist, 2.5μg/site, i.c.v.), BDNF antibody (1μg/site, i.c.v.), K-252a (TrkB receptor antagonist, 1μg/site, i.c.v.), LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor, 10nmol/site, i.c.v.) or rapamycin (selective mTOR inhibitor, 0.2nmol/site, i.c.v.). Moreover, the administration of lithium chloride (non-selective GSK-3β inhibitor, 10mg/kg, p.o.) or AR-A014418 (selective GSK-3β inhibitor, 0.01μg/site, i.c.v.) in combination with a sub-effective dose of agmatine (0.0001mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the immobility time in the TST when compared with either drug alone. Furthermore, increased immunocontents of BDNF, PSD-95 and GluA1 were found in the prefrontal cortex of mice just 1h after agmatine administration. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of agmatine in the TST may be dependent on the activation of AMPA and TrkB receptors, PI3K and mTOR signaling as well as inhibition of GSK-3β, and increase in synaptic proteins. The results contribute to elucidate the complex signaling pathways involved in the antidepressant effect of agmatine and reinforce the pivotal role of these molecular targets for antidepressant responses. PMID:27061850

  14. The Architecture of the TIR Domain Signalosome in the Toll-like Receptor-4 Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Guven-Maiorov; Ozlem Keskin; Attila Gursoy; Carter VanWaes; Zhong Chen; Chung-Jung Tsai; Ruth Nussinov

    2015-01-01

    Scientific Reports | 5:13128 | DOI: 10.1038/srep13128 1 www.nature.com/scientificreports The Architecture of the TIR Domain Signalosome in the Toll-like Receptor-4 Signaling Pathway Emine Guven-Maiorov1,2, Ozlem Keskin1,2, Attila Gursoy2,3, Carter VanWaes4, Zhong Chen4, Chung-Jung Tsai5 & Ruth Nussinov5,6 Activated Toll-like receptors (TLRs) cluster in lipid rafts and induce pro- and anti-tumor responses. The organization of the assembly is critical to the understandin...

  15. TrkB Receptor Signalling: Implications in Neurodegenerative, Psychiatric and Proliferative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart L. Graham

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Trk family of receptors play a wide variety of roles in physiological and disease processes in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. Amongst these the TrkB receptor in particular has attracted major attention due to its critical role in signalling for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, neurotrophin-3 (NT3 and neurotrophin-4 (NT4. TrkB signalling is indispensable for the survival, development and synaptic plasticity of several subtypes of neurons in the nervous system. Substantial evidence has emerged over the last decade about the involvement of aberrant TrkB signalling and its compromise in various neuropsychiatric and degenerative conditions. Unusual changes in TrkB signalling pathway have also been observed and implicated in a range of cancers. Variations in TrkB pathway have been observed in obesity and hyperphagia related disorders as well. Both BDNF and TrkB have been shown to play critical roles in the survival of retinal ganglion cells in the retina. The ability to specifically modulate TrkB signalling can be critical in various pathological scenarios associated with this pathway. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying TrkB signalling, disease implications and explore plausible ameliorative or preventive approaches.

  16. A novel taspine derivative, HMQ1611, inhibits breast cancer cell growth via estrogen receptor α and EGF receptor signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yingzhuan; Zhang, Yanmin; Liu, Cuicui; Zhang, Jie; Smith, Wanli W; Wang, Nan; Chen, Yinnan; Zheng, Lei; He, Langchong

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is a common cancer with a leading cause of cancer mortality in women. Currently, the chemotherapy for breast cancer is underdeveloped. Here, we report a novel taspine derivative, HMQ1611, which has anticancer effects using in vitro and in vivo breast cancer models. HMQ1611 reduced cancer cell proliferation in four human breast cancer cell lines including MDA-MB-231, SK-BR-3, ZR-75-30, and MCF-7. HMQ1611 more potently reduced growth of estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast cancer cells (ZR-75-30 and MCF-7) than ERα-negative cells (MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3). Moreover, HMQ1611 arrested breast cancer cell cycle at S-phase. In vivo tumor xenograft model, treatment of HMQ1611 significantly reduced tumor size and weight compared with vehicles. We also found that HMQ1611 reduced ERα expression and inhibited membrane ERα-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling following the stimulation of cells with estrogen. Knockdown of ERα by siRNA transfection in ZR-75-30 cells attenuated HMQ1611 effects. In contrast, overexpression of ERα in MDA-MB-231 cells enhanced HMQ1611 effects, suggesting that ERα pathway mediated HMQ1611's inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in ERα-positive breast cancer. HMQ1611 also reduced phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream signaling players extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and AKT activation both in ZR-75-30 and MDA-MB-231 cells. These results showed that the novel compound HMQ1611 had anticancer effects, and partially via ERα and/or EGFR signaling pathways, suggesting that HMQ1611 may be a potential novel candidate for human breast cancer intervention.

  17. Membrane receptor signaling and control of DNA repair after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulated evidence indicates that activation of erbB family of receptors, when mutated or over-expressed, mediates chemo and radiotherapy resistance. In this context signaling pathways down-stream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), when abnormally activated, invoke cell survival mechanisms, which leads to resistance against radiation. In several reports it has been demonstrated that molecular targeting of EGFR signaling enhances the cytotoxic effects of radiotherapy. The radiosensitizing effects of EGFR antagonists correlate with a suppression of the ability of tumor cells to repair radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) through non-homologous endjoining repair pathway (NHEJ). The purpose of this review is to highlight the function of EGFR and erbB2 receptors on signaling pathways, i.e. PI3K/Akt activated by ionizing radiation (IR) and involved in repair of DNA-DSB which can explain the radiosensitizing effects of related antagonists. Advances in understanding the mechanism of erbB-signaling in regulating DNA-DSB repair will promote translational approaches to test new strategies for clinically applicable molecular targeting. (orig.)

  18. Lack of glucagon receptor signaling and its implications beyond glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon action is transduced by a G protein-coupled receptor located in liver, kidney, intestinal smooth muscle, brain, adipose tissue, heart, pancreatic β-cells, and placenta. Genetically modified animal models have provided important clues about the role of glucagon and its receptor (Gcgr) beyond glucose control. The PubMed database was searched for articles published between 1995 and 2014 using the key terms glucagon, glucagon receptor, signaling, and animal models. Lack of Gcgr signaling has been associated with: i) hypoglycemic pregnancies, altered placentation, poor fetal growth, and increased fetal-neonatal death; ii) pancreatic glucagon cell hyperplasia and hyperglucagonemia; iii) altered body composition, energy state, and protection from diet-induced obesity; iv) impaired hepatocyte survival; v) altered glucose, lipid, and hormonal milieu; vi) altered metabolic response to prolonged fasting and exercise; vii) reduced gastric emptying and increased intestinal length; viii) altered retinal function; and ix) prevention of the development of diabetes in insulin-deficient mice. Similar phenotypic findings were observed in the hepatocyte-specific deletion of Gcgr. Glucagon action has been involved in the modulation of sweet taste responsiveness, inotropic and chronotropic effects in the heart, satiety, glomerular filtration rate, secretion of insulin, cortisol, ghrelin, GH, glucagon, and somatostatin, and hypothalamic signaling to suppress hepatic glucose production. Glucagon (α) cells under certain conditions can transdifferentiate into insulin (β) cells. These findings suggest that glucagon signaling plays an important role in multiple organs. Thus, treatment options designed to block Gcgr activation in diabetics may have implications beyond glucose homeostasis.

  19. Roles of activin receptor-like kinase 7 signaling and its target, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, in lean and obese adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yogosawa, Satomi; Izumi, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    We recently discovered a novel signaling pathway involving activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7), one of the type I transforming growth factor-β receptors. ALK7 and activated Smads 2, 3, and 4 inhibit the master regulators of adipogenesis, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) specifically in differentiated adipocytes, but surprisingly increase both the adipocyte size and lipid content by suppressing lipolysis. Here, we show that, a...

  20. TRPM5, a taste-signaling transient receptor potential ion-channel, is a ubiquitous signaling component in chemosensory cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of TRP channels have been identified as key players in the sensation of smell, temperature, mechanical forces and taste. TRPM5 is known to be abundantly expressed in taste receptor cells where it participates in sweet, amino acid and bitter perception. A role of TRPM5 in other sensory systems, however, has not been studied so far. Results Here, we systematically investigated the expression of TRPM5 in rat and mouse tissues. Apart from taste buds, where we found TRPM5 to be predominantly localized on the basolateral surface of taste receptor cells, TRPM5 immunoreactivity was seen in other chemosensory organs – the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ. Most strikingly, we found solitary TRPM5-enriched epithelial cells in all parts of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Based on their tissue distribution, the low cell density, morphological features and co-immunostaining with different epithelial markers, we identified these cells as brush cells (also known as tuft, fibrillovesicular, multivesicular or caveolated cells. In terms of morphological characteristics, brush cells resemble taste receptor cells, while their origin and biological role are still under intensive debate. Conclusion We consider TRPM5 to be an intrinsic signaling component of mammalian chemosensory organs, and provide evidence for brush cells being an important cellular correlate in the periphery.

  1. Proteomic and functional genomic landscape of receptor tyrosine kinase and ras to extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam A; Tucker, George; Singh, Rohit; Yan, Dong; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Hu, Yanhui; Binari, Richard; Hong, Pengyu; Sun, Xiaoyun; Porto, Maura; Pacifico, Svetlana; Murali, Thilakam; Finley, Russell L; Asara, John M; Berger, Bonnie; Perrimon, Norbert

    2011-10-25

    Characterizing the extent and logic of signaling networks is essential to understanding specificity in such physiological and pathophysiological contexts as cell fate decisions and mechanisms of oncogenesis and resistance to chemotherapy. Cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) screens enable the inference of large numbers of genes that regulate signaling pathways, but these screens cannot provide network structure directly. We describe an integrated network around the canonical receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway, generated by combining parallel genome-wide RNAi screens with protein-protein interaction (PPI) mapping by tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry. We found that only a small fraction of the total number of PPI or RNAi screen hits was isolated under all conditions tested and that most of these represented the known canonical pathway components, suggesting that much of the core canonical ERK pathway is known. Because most of the newly identified regulators are likely cell type- and RTK-specific, our analysis provides a resource for understanding how output through this clinically relevant pathway is regulated in different contexts. We report in vivo roles for several of the previously unknown regulators, including CG10289 and PpV, the Drosophila orthologs of two components of the serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 6 complex; the Drosophila ortholog of TepIV, a glycophosphatidylinositol-linked protein mutated in human cancers; CG6453, a noncatalytic subunit of glucosidase II; and Rtf1, a histone methyltransferase.

  2. Dual intracellular signaling pathways mediated by the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, B; Portier, M; Kernéis, A; Delpech, M; Carillon, C; Le Fur, G; Ferrara, P; Shire, D

    1999-06-25

    It has long been established that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor transduces signals through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/Go inhibitory pathway. Although there have been reports that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor can also mediate an increase in cyclic AMP levels, in most cases the presence of an adenylyl cyclase costimulant or the use of very high amounts of agonist was necessary. Here, we present evidence for dual coupling of the cannabinoid CB receptor to the classical pathway and to a pertussis toxin-insensitive adenylyl cyclase stimulatory pathway initiated with low quantities of agonist in the absence of any costimulant. Treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor with the cannabinoid CP 55,940, {(-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hyd roxypropyl) cyclohexan-1-ol} resulted in cyclic AMP accumulation in a dose-response manner, an accumulation blocked by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor-specific antagonist SR 141716A, {N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-me thyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide hydrochloride}. In CHO cells coexpressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and a cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-luciferase reporter gene system, CP 55,940 induced luciferase expression by a pathway blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-89). Under the same conditions the peripheral cannabinoid CB2 receptor proved to be incapable of inducing cAMP accumulation or luciferase activity. This incapacity allowed us to study the luciferase activation mediated by CB /CB2 chimeric constructs, from which we determined that the first and second internal loop regions of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were involved in transducing the pathway leading to luciferase gene expression. PMID:10422789

  3. Lenalidomide induces lipid raft assembly to enhance erythropoietin receptor signaling in myelodysplastic syndrome progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Kathy L; Basiorka, Ashley A; Johnson, Joseph O; Clark, Justine; Caceres, Gisela; Padron, Eric; Heaton, Ruth; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Wei, Sheng; Sokol, Lubomir; List, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Anemia remains the principal management challenge for patients with lower risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS). Despite appropriate cytokine production and cellular receptor display, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) signaling is impaired. We reported that EpoR signaling is dependent upon receptor localization within lipid raft microdomains, and that disruption of raft integrity abolishes signaling capacity. Here, we show that MDS erythroid progenitors display markedly diminished raft assembly and smaller raft aggregates compared to normal controls (p = 0.005, raft number; p = 0.023, raft size). Because lenalidomide triggers raft coalescence in T-lymphocytes promoting immune synapse formation, we assessed effects of lenalidomide on raft assembly in MDS erythroid precursors and UT7 cells. Lenalidomide treatment rapidly induced lipid raft formation accompanied by EpoR recruitment into raft fractions together with STAT5, JAK2, and Lyn kinase. The JAK2 phosphatase, CD45, a key negative regulator of EpoR signaling, was displaced from raft fractions. Lenalidomide treatment prior to Epo stimulation enhanced both JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation in UT7 and primary MDS erythroid progenitors, accompanied by increased STAT5 DNA binding in UT7 cells, and increased erythroid colony forming capacity in both UT7 and primary cells. Raft induction was associated with F-actin polymerization, which was blocked by Rho kinase inhibition. These data indicate that deficient raft integrity impairs EpoR signaling, and provides a novel strategy to enhance EpoR signal fidelity in non-del(5q) MDS.

  4. Lenalidomide induces lipid raft assembly to enhance erythropoietin receptor signaling in myelodysplastic syndrome progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy L McGraw

    Full Text Available Anemia remains the principal management challenge for patients with lower risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS. Despite appropriate cytokine production and cellular receptor display, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR signaling is impaired. We reported that EpoR signaling is dependent upon receptor localization within lipid raft microdomains, and that disruption of raft integrity abolishes signaling capacity. Here, we show that MDS erythroid progenitors display markedly diminished raft assembly and smaller raft aggregates compared to normal controls (p = 0.005, raft number; p = 0.023, raft size. Because lenalidomide triggers raft coalescence in T-lymphocytes promoting immune synapse formation, we assessed effects of lenalidomide on raft assembly in MDS erythroid precursors and UT7 cells. Lenalidomide treatment rapidly induced lipid raft formation accompanied by EpoR recruitment into raft fractions together with STAT5, JAK2, and Lyn kinase. The JAK2 phosphatase, CD45, a key negative regulator of EpoR signaling, was displaced from raft fractions. Lenalidomide treatment prior to Epo stimulation enhanced both JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation in UT7 and primary MDS erythroid progenitors, accompanied by increased STAT5 DNA binding in UT7 cells, and increased erythroid colony forming capacity in both UT7 and primary cells. Raft induction was associated with F-actin polymerization, which was blocked by Rho kinase inhibition. These data indicate that deficient raft integrity impairs EpoR signaling, and provides a novel strategy to enhance EpoR signal fidelity in non-del(5q MDS.

  5. The sensing of bacteria: emerging principles for the detection of signal sequences by formyl peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufe, Bernd; Zufall, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The ability to detect specific chemical signatures released by bacteria and other microorganisms is a fundamental feature of immune defense against pathogens. There is increasing evidence that chemodetection of such microorganism-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) occurs at many places in the body including specific sets of chemosensory neurons in the mammalian nose. Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a unique family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can detect the presence of bacteria and function as chemotactic receptors. Here, we highlight the recent discovery of a vast family of natural FPR agonists, the bacterial signal peptides (or signal sequences), thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms of bacterial sensing by human and mouse FPRs. Signal peptides in bacteria are formylated, N-terminal protein signatures required for directing the transfer of proteins through the plasma membrane. After their cleavage and release, signal peptides are available for FPR detection and thus provide a previously unrecognized MAMP. With over 170 000 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent one of the largest families of GPCR ligands and one of the most complex classes of natural activators of the innate immune system. By recognizing a conserved three-dimensional peptide motif, FPRs employ an unusual detection mechanism that combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and sensitivity, thus solving the problem of detecting thousands of distinct sequences yet maintaining selectivity. How signal peptides are released by bacteria and sensed by GPCRs and how these processes shape the responses of other cells and whole organisms represents an important topic for future research. PMID:27305707

  6. Inflammatory Mediators and Insulin Resistance in Obesity: Role of Nuclear Receptor Signaling in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Fuentes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral obesity is coupled to a general low-grade chronic inflammatory state characterized by macrophage activation and inflammatory cytokine production, leading to insulin resistance (IR. The balance between proinflammatory M1 and antiinflammatory M2 macrophage phenotypes within visceral adipose tissue appears to be crucially involved in the development of obesity-associated IR and consequent metabolic abnormalities. The ligand-dependent transcription factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs have recently been implicated in the determination of the M1/M2 phenotype. Liver X receptors (LXRs, which form another subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are also important regulators of proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Disregulation of macrophage-mediated inflammation by PPARs and LXRs therefore underlies the development of IR. This review summarizes the role of PPAR and LXR signaling in macrophages and current knowledge about the impact of these actions in the manifestation of IR and obesity comorbidities such as liver steatosis and diabetic osteopenia.

  7. Mediators, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. McDonald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat allergic diseases including both intermittent rhinitis and persistent rhinitis. Besides the research on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for allergic rhinitis, research has also investigated how acupuncture might modulate immune function to exert anti-inflammatory effects. A proposed model has previously hypothesized that acupuncture might downregulate proinflammatory neuropeptides, proinflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophins, modulating transient receptor potential vallinoid (TRPV1, a G-protein coupled receptor which plays a central role in allergic rhinitis. Recent research has been largely supportive of this model. New advances in research include the discovery of a novel cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway activated by acupuncture. A chemokine-mediated proliferation of opioid-containing macrophages in inflamed tissues, in response to acupuncture, has also been demonstrated for the first time. Further research on the complex cross talk between receptors during inflammation is also helping to elucidate the mediators and signalling pathways activated by acupuncture.

  8. Functional requirements for inhibitory signal transmission by the immunomodulatory receptor CD300a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeBell Karen E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation signals can be negatively regulated by cell surface receptors bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs. CD300a, an ITIM bearing type I transmembrane protein, is expressed on many hematopoietic cells, including subsets of lymphocytes. Results We have taken two approaches to further define the mechanism by which CD300a acts as an inhibitor of immune cell receptor signaling. First, we have expressed in Jurkat T cells a chimeric receptor consisting of the extracellular domains of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR2DL2 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic segments of CD300a (KIR-CD300a to explore surrogate ligand-stimulated inhibition of superantigen stimulated T cell receptor (TCR mediated cell signaling. We found that intact CD300a ITIMs were essential for inhibition and that the tyrosine phosphorylation of these ITIMs required the src tyrosine kinase Lck. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the CD300a ITIMs created docking sites for both src homology 2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-1 and SHP-2. Suppression of SHP-1 and SHP-2 expression in KIR-CD300a Jurkat T cells with siRNA and the use of DT40 chicken B cell lines expressing CD300a and deficient in several phosphatases revealed that SHP-1, but not SHP-2 or the src homology 2 domain containing inositol 5’ phosphatase SHIP, was utilized by CD300a for its inhibitory activity. Conclusion These studies provide new insights into the function of CD300a in tuning T and B cell responses.

  9. Apo-ghrelin receptor (apo-GHSR1a Regulates Dopamine Signaling in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras eKern

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The orexigenic peptide hormone ghrelin is synthesized in the stomach and its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a is expressed mainly in the central nervous system (CNS. In this review we confine our discussion to the physiological role of GHSR1a in the brain. Paradoxically, despite broad expression of GHSR1a in the CNS, other than trace amounts in the hypothalamus, ghrelin is undetectable in the brain. In our efforts to elucidate the function of the ligand-free ghrelin receptor (apo-GHSR1a we identified subsets of neurons that co-express GHSR1a and dopamine receptors. In this review we focus on interactions between apo-GHSR1a and dopamine-2 receptor (DRD2 and formation of GHSR1a:DRD2 heteromers in hypothalamic neurons that regulate appetite, and discuss implications for the treatment of Prader-Willi syndrome. GHSR1a antagonists of distinct chemical structures, a quinazolinone and a triazole, respectively enhance and inhibit dopamine signaling through GHSR1a:DRD2 heteromers by an allosteric mechanism. This finding illustrates a potential strategy for designing the next generation of drugs for treating eating disorders as well as psychiatric disorders caused by abnormal dopamine signaling. Treatment with a GHSR1a antagonist that enhances dopamine/DRD2 activity in GHSR1a:DRD2 expressing hypothalamic neurons has the potential to inhibit the uncontrollable hyperphagia associated with Prader-Willi syndrome. DRD2 antagonists are prescribed for treating schizophrenia, but these block dopamine signaling in all DRD2 expressing neurons and are associated with adverse side effects, including enhanced appetite and excessive weight gain. A GHSR1a antagonist of structural class that allosterically blocks dopamine/DRD2 action in GHSR1a:DRD2 expressing neurons would have no effect on neurons expressing DRD2 alone; therefore, the side effects of DRD2 antagonists would potentially be reduced thereby enhancing patient compliance.

  10. Role of ERK/MAPK in endothelin receptor signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvinsson Lars

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelin-1 (ET-1 is a potent vasoactive peptide, which induces vasoconstriction and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs through activation of endothelin type A (ETA and type B (ETB receptors. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK are involved in ET-1-induced VSMC contraction and proliferation. This study was designed to investigate the ETA and ETB receptor intracellular signaling in human VSMCs and used phosphorylation (activation of ERK1/2 as a functional signal molecule for endothelin receptor activity. Results Subconfluent human VSMCs were stimulated by ET-1 at different concentrations (1 nM-1 μM. The activation of ERK1/2 was examined by immunofluorescence, Western blot and phosphoELISA using specific antibody against phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. ET-1 induced a concentration- and time- dependent activation of ERK1/2 with a maximal effect at 10 min. It declined to baseline level at 30 min. The ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2 was completely abolished by MEK1/2 inhibitors U0126 and SL327, and partially inhibited by the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059. A dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan or the ETA antagonist BQ123 blocked the ET-1 effect, while the ETB antagonist BQ788 had no significant effect. However, a selective ETB receptor agonist, Sarafotoxin 6c (S6c caused a time-dependent ERK1/2 activation with a maximal effect by less than 20% of the ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2. Increase in bosentan concentration up to 10 μM further inhibited ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2 and had a stronger inhibitory effect than BQ123 or the combined use of BQ123 and BQ788. To further explore ET-1 intracellular signaling, PKC inhibitors (staurosporin and GF109203X, PKC-delta inhibitor (rottlerin, PKA inhibitor (H-89, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin were applied. The inhibitors showed significant inhibitory effects on ET-1

  11. Dopamine signaling in food addiction: role of dopamine D2 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja-Hyun Baik

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA regulates emotional and motivationalbehavior through the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway.Changes in DA signaling in mesolimbic neurotransmission arewidely believed to modify reward-related behaviors and aretherefore closely associated with drug addiction. Recentevidence now suggests that as with drug addiction, obesitywith compulsive eating behaviors involves reward circuitry ofthe brain, particularly the circuitry involving dopaminergicneural substrates. Increasing amounts of data from humanimaging studies, together with genetic analysis, havedemonstrated that obese people and drug addicts tend to showaltered expression of DA D2 receptors in specific brain areas,and that similar brain areas are activated by food-related anddrug-related cues. This review focuses on the functions of theDA system, with specific focus on the physiological interpretationand the role of DA D2 receptor signaling in foodaddiction. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(11: 519-526

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase is autonomous from the dominant extrasynaptic NMDA receptor extracellular signal-regulated kinase shutoff pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, P J; Luong, N T; Woodward, J J; Chandler, L J

    2008-01-24

    NMDA receptors bidirectionally modulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) through the coupling of synaptic NMDA receptors to an ERK activation pathway that is opposed by a dominant ERK shutoff pathway thought to be coupled to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. In the present study, synaptic NMDA receptor activation of ERK in rat cortical cultures was partially inhibited by the highly selective NR2B antagonist Ro25-6981 (Ro) and the less selective NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 (NVP). When Ro and NVP were added together, inhibition appeared additive and equal to that observed with the NMDA open-channel blocker MK-801. Consistent with a selective coupling of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors to the dominant ERK shutoff pathway, pre-block of synaptic NMDA receptors with MK-801 did not alter the inhibitory effect of bath-applied NMDA on ERK activity. Lastly, in contrast to a complete block of synaptic NMDA receptor activation of ERK by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors had no effect upon ERK activation by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. These results suggest that the synaptic NMDA receptor ERK activation pathway is coupled to both NR2A and NR2B containing receptors, and that the extrasynaptic NMDA receptor ERK inhibitory pathway is not a non-selective global ERK shutoff.

  13. Cocaine-induced alterations in dopamine receptor signaling: implications for reinforcement and reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S M; Pierce, R C

    2005-06-01

    The transition from casual drug use to addiction, and the intense drug craving that accompanies it, has been postulated to result from neuroadaptations within the limbic system caused by repeated drug exposure. This review will examine the implications of cocaine-induced alterations in mesolimbic dopamine receptor signaling within the context of several widely used animal models of addiction. Extensive evidence indicates that dopaminergic mechanisms critically mediate behavioral sensitization to cocaine, cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, cocaine self-administration, and the drug prime-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. The propagation of the long-term neuronal changes associated with recurring cocaine use appears to occur at the level of postreceptor signal transduction. Repeated cocaine treatment causes an up-regulation of the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-signaling pathway within the nucleus accumbens, resulting in a dys-regulation of balanced D1/D2 dopamine-like receptor signaling. The intracellular events arising from enhanced D1-like postsynaptic signaling mediate both facilitatory and compensatory responses to the further reinforcing effects of cocaine. PMID:15922019

  14. Systems model of T cell receptor proximal signaling reveals emergent ultrasensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available Receptor phosphorylation is thought to be tightly regulated because phosphorylated receptors initiate signaling cascades leading to cellular activation. The T cell antigen receptor (TCR on the surface of T cells is phosphorylated by the kinase Lck and dephosphorylated by the phosphatase CD45 on multiple immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs. Intriguingly, Lck sequentially phosphorylates ITAMs and ZAP-70, a cytosolic kinase, binds to phosphorylated ITAMs with differential affinities. The purpose of multiple ITAMs, their sequential phosphorylation, and the differential ZAP-70 affinities are unknown. Here, we use a systems model to show that this signaling architecture produces emergent ultrasensitivity resulting in switch-like responses at the scale of individual TCRs. Importantly, this switch-like response is an emergent property, so that removal of multiple ITAMs, sequential phosphorylation, or differential affinities abolishes the switch. We propose that highly regulated TCR phosphorylation is achieved by an emergent switch-like response and use the systems model to design novel chimeric antigen receptors for therapy.

  15. The Immunobiology of Prostanoid Receptor Signaling in Connecting Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Harizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids, including prostaglandins (PGs, thromboxanes (TXs, and prostacyclins, are synthesized from arachidonic acid (AA by the action of Cyclooxygenase (COX enzymes. They are bioactive inflammatory lipid mediators that play a key role in immunity and immunopathology. Prostanoids exert their effects on immune and inflammatory cells by binding to membrane receptors that are widely expressed throughout the immune system and act at multiple levels in innate and adaptive immunity. The immunoregulatory role of prostanoids results from their ability to regulate cell-cell interaction, antigen presentation, cytokine production, cytokine receptor expression, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, cell-surface molecule levels, and cell migration in both autocrine and paracrine manners. By acting on immune cells of both systems, prostanoids and their receptors have great impact on immune regulation and play a pivotal role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. This paper focuses on the immunobiology of prostanoid receptor signaling because of their potential clinical relevance for various disorders including inflammation, autoimmunity, and tumorigenesis. We mainly discuss the effects of major COX metabolites, PGD2, PGE2, their signaling during dendritic cell (DC-natural killer (NK reciprocal crosstalk, DC-T cell interaction, and subsequent consequences on determining crucial aspects of innate and adaptive immunity in normal and pathological settings.

  16. Involvement of Toll-like receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in epithelial expression of airway remodeling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Tetsuya; Kato, Atsushi; Sakashita, Masafumi; Norton, James E; Suh, Lydia A; Carter, Roderick G; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) colonization and infection is common, and may promote allergic or inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic rhinosinusitis by interacting with airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells not only comprise a physical barrier, but also play key roles in immune, inflammatory, repair, and remodeling responses upon encounters with pathogens. To elucidate the impact of SA on epithelial-mediated remodeling of allergic airways, we tested the hypothesis that SA can enhance the remodeling process. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed SA (HKSA) or transforming growth factor (TGF) α. Cell extracts were collected to measure mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and signaling molecules (Western blot); supernatants were collected to measure protein (ELISA) after 24 hours of stimulation. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition experiments were performed using a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478) and TGF-α was blocked with an anti-TGF-α antibody. HKSA induced both mRNA and protein for TGF-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 from NHBE cells by a Toll-like receptor 2-dependent mechanism. Recombinant human TGF-α also induced mRNA and protein for MMP-1 from NHBE cells; anti-TGF-α antibody inhibited HKSA-induced MMP-1, suggesting that endogenous TGF-α mediates the MMP-1 induction by HKSA. HKSA-induced MMP-1 expression was suppressed when a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor was added, suggesting that EGFR signaling was mediating the HKSA-induced MMP-1 release. Exposure or colonization by SA in the airway may enhance the remodeling of tissue through a TGF-α-dependent induction of MMP-1 expression, and may thereby promote remodeling in airway diseases in which SA is implicated, such as asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25180535

  17. Endosome-mediated retrograde axonal transport of P2X3 receptor signals in primary sensory neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Qiao Chen; BinWang; Chengbiao Wu; Jin Pan; Bo Yuan; Yuan-Yuan Su; Xing-Yu Jiang; Xu Zhang; Lan Bao

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors adopt signaling endosomes to transmit retrograde signals.However,the mechanisms of retrograde signaling for other ligand/receptor systems are poorly understood.Here,we report that the signals of the purinergic (P)2X3 receptor,an ATP-gated ion channel are retrogradely transported in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron axons.We found that Rab5,a small GTPase,controls the early sorting of P2X3 receptors into endosomes,while Rab7 mediates the fast retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.Intraplantar injection and axonal application into the microfluidic chamber of α,β-methylene-ATP (α,β-MeATP),a P2X selective agonist,enhanced the endocytosis and retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.The α,β-MeATP-induced Ca2+ influx activated a pathway comprised of protein kinase C,rat sarcoma viral oncogene and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK),which associated with endocytic P2X3 receptors to form signaling endosomes.Disruption of the lipid rafts abolished the α,β-MeATP-induced ERK phosphorylation,endocytosis and retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.Furthermore,treatment of peripheral axons with α,β-MeATP increased the activation level of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein in the cell bodies of DRG neurons and enhanced neuronal excitability.Impairment of either microtubule-based axonal transport in vivo or dynein function in vitro blocked α,β-MeATP-induced retrograde signals.These results indicate that P2X3 receptor-activated signals are transmitted via retrogradely transported endosomes in primary sensory neurons and provide a novel signaling mechanism for ligand-gated channels.

  18. Research Resource: Tissue-Specific Transcriptomics and Cistromics of Nuclear Receptor Signaling: A Web Research Resource

    OpenAIRE

    Ochsner, Scott A.; Watkins, Christopher M.; LaGrone, Benjamin S.; Steffen, David L.; McKenna, Neil J

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors that recruit coregulators and other transcription factors to gene promoters to effect regulation of tissue-specific transcriptomes. The prodigious rate at which the NR signaling field has generated high content gene expression and, more recently, genome-wide location analysis datasets has not been matched by a committed effort to archiving this information for routine access by bench and clinical scientists. As a first step to...

  19. Altered insulin receptor signalling and β-cell cycle dynamics in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Folli

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance, reduced β-cell mass, and hyperglucagonemia are consistent features in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We used pancreas and islets from humans with T2DM to examine the regulation of insulin signaling and cell-cycle control of islet cells. We observed reduced β-cell mass and increased α-cell mass in the Type 2 diabetic pancreas. Confocal microscopy, real-time PCR and western blotting analyses revealed increased expression of PCNA and down-regulation of p27-Kip1 and altered expression of insulin receptors, insulin receptor substrate-2 and phosphorylated BAD. To investigate the mechanisms underlying these findings, we examined a mouse model of insulin resistance in β-cells--which also exhibits reduced β-cell mass, the β-cell-specific insulin receptor knockout (βIRKO. Freshly isolated islets and β-cell lines derived from βIRKO mice exhibited poor cell-cycle progression, nuclear restriction of FoxO1 and reduced expression of cell-cycle proteins favoring growth arrest. Re-expression of insulin receptors in βIRKO β-cells reversed the defects and promoted cell cycle progression and proliferation implying a role for insulin-signaling in β-cell growth. These data provide evidence that human β- and α-cells can enter the cell-cycle, but proliferation of β-cells in T2DM fails due to G1-to-S phase arrest secondary to defective insulin signaling. Activation of insulin signaling, FoxO1 and proteins in β-cell-cycle progression are attractive therapeutic targets to enhance β-cell regeneration in the treatment of T2DM.

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated calcium signaling in the nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-xin SHEN; Jerrel L YAKEL

    2009-01-01

    Based on the composition of the five subunits forming functional neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), they are grouped into either heteromeric (comprising both α and β subunits) or homomeric (comprising only α subunits) recep-tors. The nAChRs are known to be differentially permeable to calcium ions, with the α7 nAChR subtype having one of the highest permeabilities to calcium. Calcium influx through nAChRs, particularly through the α-bungarotoxin-sensitive α7-containing nAChRs, is a very efficient way to raise cytoplasmic calcium levels. The activation of nAChRs can mediate three types of cytoplasmic calcium signals: (1) direct calcium influx through the nAChRs, (2) indirect calcium influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) which are activated by the nAChR-mediated depolarization, and (3) calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) (triggered by the first two sources) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the ryanodine receptors and inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs). Downstream signaling events mediated by nAChR-mediated calcium responses can be grouped into instantaneous effects (such as neurotransmitter release, which can occur in milliseconds after nAChR activation), short-term effects (such as the recovery of nAChR desensitization through cellular signaling cascades), and long-term effects (such as neuroprotection via gene expression). In addition, nAChR activity can be regulated by cytoplasmic calcium levels, suggesting a complex reciprocal relationship. Further advances in imaging techniques, animal models, and more potent and subtype-selective ligands for neuronal nAChRs would help in understand-ing the neuronal nAChR-mediated calcium signaling, and lead to the development of improved therapeutic treatments.

  1. Bupleurum Polysaccharides Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation via Modulating Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jian; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Guo, Li; LI Hong; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background Bupleurum polysaccharides (BPs), isolated from Bupleurum smithii var. parvifolium, possesses immunomodulatory activity, particularly on inflammation. Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggers innate immune responses through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on host cell membrane. The present study was performed to evaluate whether the therapeutic efficacy of BPs on suppression of LPS’s pathogenecity could be associated with the modulating of TLR4 signaling pathway. Methodolog...

  2. Activin-receptor signaling regulates cocaine-primed behavioral and morphological plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Gancarz, Amy M.; Wang, Zi-Jun; Schroeder, Gabrielle L.; Damez-Werno, Diane; Braunscheidel, Kevin; Mueller, Lauren E.; Monica S Humby; Caccamise, Aaron; Martin, Jennifer A.; Dietz, Karen C.; Neve, Rachael L; Dietz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a life-long relapsing disorder that results from long-term adaptations within the brain. We find that Activin-receptor signaling, including the transcription factor Smad3, is upregulated in the rat nucleus accumbens shell following withdrawal from cocaine. Direct genetic and pharmacological manipulations of this pathway bidirectionally alter cocaine seeking, while governing morphological plasticity in nucleus accumbens neurons. These findings reveal that Activin/Smad3 sig...

  3. Partial agonism through a zinc-Ion switch constructed between transmembrane domains III and VII in the tachykinin NK(1) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, B; Elling, C E; Schwartz, T W

    2000-01-01

    +) in complex with the chelator, also bound to the metal-ion site-engineered NK(1) receptor, but here the metal-ion chelator complex instead acted as a pure antagonist. It is concluded that signaling of even distantly related rhodopsin-like 7TM receptors can be activated through Zn(2+) coordination between...... metal-ion binding residues located at positions III:08 and VII:06. It is suggested that only partial agonism is obtained through this simple well defined metal-ion coordination due to lack of proper interactions with residues also in TM-VI.......Partly due to lack of detailed knowledge of the molecular recognition of ligands the structural basis for partial versus full agonism is not known. In the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor the agonist binding site has previously been structurally and functionally exchanged with an activating metal-ion...

  4. Cloning of a novel phosphotyrosine binding domain containing molecule, Odin, involved in signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A.; Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.;

    2002-01-01

    We have used a proteomic approach using mass spectrometry to identify signaling molecules involved in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. Using affinity purification by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to enrich for tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, we have identified a novel signaling mo...

  5. The Relaxin Receptor (RXFP1) Utilizes Hydrophobic Moieties on a Signaling Surface of Its N-terminal Low Density Lipoprotein Class A Module to Mediate Receptor Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Roy C. K.; Petrie, Emma J.; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Ling, Jason; Lee, Jeremy C. Y.; Gooley, Paul R.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone relaxin is showing potential as a treatment for acute heart failure. Although it is known that relaxin mediates its actions through the G protein-coupled receptor relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which relaxin binding results in receptor activation. Previous studies have highlighted that the unique N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module of RXFP1 is essential for receptor activation, and it has been hypothesized that this module is the true “ligand” of the receptor that directs the conformational changes necessary for G protein coupling. In this study, we confirmed that an RXFP1 receptor lacking the LDLa module binds ligand normally but cannot signal through any characterized G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, we comprehensively examined the contributions of amino acids in the LDLa module to RXFP1 activity using both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutational analysis together with NMR structural analysis of recombinant LDLa modules. Gain-of-function studies with an inactive RXFP1 chimera containing the LDLa module of the human LDL receptor (LB2) demonstrated two key N-terminal regions of the module that were able to rescue receptor signaling. Loss-of-function mutations of residues in these regions demonstrated that Leu-7, Tyr-9, and Lys-17 all contributed to the ability of the LDLa module to drive receptor activation, and judicious amino acid substitutions suggested this involves hydrophobic interactions. Our results demonstrate that these key residues contribute to interactions driving the active receptor conformation, providing further evidence of a unique mode of G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:23926099

  6. The relaxin receptor (RXFP1) utilizes hydrophobic moieties on a signaling surface of its N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A module to mediate receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Roy C K; Petrie, Emma J; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Ling, Jason; Lee, Jeremy C Y; Gooley, Paul R; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2013-09-27

    The peptide hormone relaxin is showing potential as a treatment for acute heart failure. Although it is known that relaxin mediates its actions through the G protein-coupled receptor relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which relaxin binding results in receptor activation. Previous studies have highlighted that the unique N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module of RXFP1 is essential for receptor activation, and it has been hypothesized that this module is the true "ligand" of the receptor that directs the conformational changes necessary for G protein coupling. In this study, we confirmed that an RXFP1 receptor lacking the LDLa module binds ligand normally but cannot signal through any characterized G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, we comprehensively examined the contributions of amino acids in the LDLa module to RXFP1 activity using both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutational analysis together with NMR structural analysis of recombinant LDLa modules. Gain-of-function studies with an inactive RXFP1 chimera containing the LDLa module of the human LDL receptor (LB2) demonstrated two key N-terminal regions of the module that were able to rescue receptor signaling. Loss-of-function mutations of residues in these regions demonstrated that Leu-7, Tyr-9, and Lys-17 all contributed to the ability of the LDLa module to drive receptor activation, and judicious amino acid substitutions suggested this involves hydrophobic interactions. Our results demonstrate that these key residues contribute to interactions driving the active receptor conformation, providing further evidence of a unique mode of G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:23926099

  7. Combinatory annotation of cell membrane receptors and signalling pathways of Bombyx mori prothoracic glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulos, Panagiotis; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Dedos, Skarlatos G.

    2016-01-01

    The cells of prothoracic glands (PG) are the main site of synthesis and secretion of ecdysteroids, the biochemical products of cholesterol conversion to steroids that shape the morphogenic development of insects. Despite the availability of genome sequences from several insect species and the extensive knowledge of certain signalling pathways that underpin ecdysteroidogenesis, the spectrum of signalling molecules and ecdysteroidogenic cascades is still not fully comprehensive. To fill this gap and obtain the complete list of cell membrane receptors expressed in PG cells, we used combinatory bioinformatic, proteomic and transcriptomic analysis and quantitative PCR to annotate and determine the expression profiles of genes identified as putative cell membrane receptors of the model insect species, Bombyx mori, and subsequently enrich the repertoire of signalling pathways that are present in its PG cells. The genome annotation dataset we report here highlights modules and pathways that may be directly involved in ecdysteroidogenesis and aims to disseminate data and assist other researchers in the discovery of the role of such receptors and their ligands. PMID:27576083

  8. Role of ERK/MAPK in endothelin receptor signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-wen; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2009-01-01

    muscle cells (VSMCs) through activation of endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptors. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in ET-1-induced VSMC contraction and proliferation. This study was designed to investigate...... the ETA and ETB receptor intracellular signaling in human VSMCs and used phosphorylation (activation) of ERK1/2 as a functional signal molecule for endothelin receptor activity. RESULTS: Subconfluent human VSMCs were stimulated by ET-1 at different concentrations (1 nM-1 microM). The activation of ERK1/2...... was examined by immunofluorescence, Western blot and phosphoELISA using specific antibody against phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. ET-1 induced a concentration- and time- dependent activation of ERK1/2 with a maximal effect at 10 min. It declined to baseline level at 30 min. The ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2...

  9. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2009-12-03

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved ?-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. H(1)-Receptor activation triggers the endogenous nitric oxide signalling system in the rat submandibular gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda, Enri; Stranieri, Graciela; Sterin-Borda, Leonor

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histamine is released from mast cells by immunologic and non-immunologic stimuli during salivary gland inflammation, regulating salivary secretion. The receptor-secretory mechanism has not been studied in detail. AIMS: The studies reported were directed toward elucidating signal transduction/second messenger pathways within the rat submandibular gland associated with 2-thiazolylethylamine (ThEA)-induced H(1)-receptor responses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To assess the H(1) receptor subtype expression in the rat submandibular gland, a radioligand binding assay was performed. The study also included inositolphosphates and cyclic GMP accumulation, protein kinase C and nitric oxide synthase activities, and amylase release. RESULTS: The histamine H(1) receptor subtype is expressed on the rat submandibular gland with high-affinity binding sites. The ThEA effect was associated with activation of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, translocation of protein kinase C, stimulation of nitric oxide synthase activity and increased production of cyclic GMP. ThEA stimulation of nitric oxide synthase and cyclic GMP was blunted by agents able to interfere with calcium movilization, while a protein kinase C inhibitor was able to stimulate ThEA action. On the other hand, ThEA stimulation evoked amylase release via the H1 receptor but was not followed by the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway activation. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that, apart from the effect of ThEA on amylase release, it also appears to be a vasoactive chemical mediator that triggers vasodilatation, modulating the course of inflammation. PMID:12581497

  11. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, Karsten; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Xu, Yong; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Park, Sang-Youl; Weiner, Joshua J; Fujii, Hiroaki; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kovach, Amanda; Li, Jun; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang; Peterson, Francis C; Jensen, Davin R; Yong, Eu-Leong; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric; (NU Sinapore); (Van Andel); (MCW); (UCR); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-01-12

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved β-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling.

  12. Src-Like adaptor protein (SLAP) binds to the receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3 and modulates receptor stability and downstream signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Julhash U; Rönnstrand, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3) is an important growth factor receptor in hematopoiesis. Gain-of-function mutations of the receptor contribute to the transformation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) is an interaction partner of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl that can regulate receptor tyrosine kinases-mediated signal transduction. In this study, we analyzed the role of SLAP in signal transduction downstream of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3. The results show that upon ligand stimulation SLAP stably associates with Flt3 through multiple phosphotyrosine residues in Flt3. SLAP constitutively interacts with oncogenic Flt3-ITD and co-localizes with Flt3 near the cell membrane. This association initiates Cbl-dependent receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Depletion of SLAP expression by shRNA in Flt3-transfected Ba/F3 cells resulted in a weaker activation of FL-induced PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling. Meta-analysis of microarray data from patient samples suggests that SLAP mRNA is differentially expressed in different cancers and its expression was significantly increased in patients carrying the Flt3-ITD mutation. Thus, our data suggest a novel role of SLAP in different cancers and in modulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling apart from its conventional role in regulation of receptor stability.

  13. Src-Like adaptor protein (SLAP binds to the receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3 and modulates receptor stability and downstream signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julhash U Kazi

    Full Text Available Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3 is an important growth factor receptor in hematopoiesis. Gain-of-function mutations of the receptor contribute to the transformation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP is an interaction partner of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl that can regulate receptor tyrosine kinases-mediated signal transduction. In this study, we analyzed the role of SLAP in signal transduction downstream of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3. The results show that upon ligand stimulation SLAP stably associates with Flt3 through multiple phosphotyrosine residues in Flt3. SLAP constitutively interacts with oncogenic Flt3-ITD and co-localizes with Flt3 near the cell membrane. This association initiates Cbl-dependent receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Depletion of SLAP expression by shRNA in Flt3-transfected Ba/F3 cells resulted in a weaker activation of FL-induced PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling. Meta-analysis of microarray data from patient samples suggests that SLAP mRNA is differentially expressed in different cancers and its expression was significantly increased in patients carrying the Flt3-ITD mutation. Thus, our data suggest a novel role of SLAP in different cancers and in modulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling apart from its conventional role in regulation of receptor stability.

  14. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation

    OpenAIRE

    Jin‑Chung Chen; Nan‑Yu Ruan; Tzu‑Yung Lin; Han‑Ting Chen

    2012-01-01

    The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively) are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3). To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 ago...

  15. 7TM X-ray structures for class C GPCRs as new drug-discovery tools. 1. mGluR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topiol, Sid; Sabio, Michael

    2016-01-15

    We illustrate, with a focus on mGluR5, how the recently published, first X-ray structures of mGluR 7TM domains, specifically those of mGluR1 and mGluR5 complexed with negative allosteric modulators (NAMs), will begin to influence ligand- (e.g., drug- or sweetener-) discovery efforts involving class C GPCRs. With an extensive docking study allowing full ligand flexibility and full side chain flexibility of all residues in the ligand-binding cavity, we have predicted and analyzed the binding modes of a variety of structurally diverse mGluR5 NAM ligands, showing how the X-ray structures serve to effectively rationalize each ligand's binding characteristics. We demonstrated that the features that are inherent in our earlier overlay model are preserved in the protein structure-based docking models. We identified structurally diverse compounds, which potentially act as mGluR NAMs, and revealed binding-site differences by performing high-throughput docking using a database of approximately six million structures of commercially available compounds and the mGluR1 and mGluR5 X-ray structures. By comparing the 7TM domains of the mGluR5 and mGluR1 X-rays structures, we identified selectivity factors within group I of the mGluRs. Similarly, using homology models that we built for mGluR2 and mGluR4, we have identified the factors leading to the selectivity between group I and groups II and III for ligands occupying the deepest portion of the mGluR5 binding cavity. Finally, we have proposed a structure-based explanation of the pharmacological switching within a set of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) and their corresponding, very close NAM analogs.

  16. Alternate estrogen receptors promote invasion of inflammatory breast cancer cells via non-genomic signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Ohshiro

    Full Text Available Although Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC is a rare and an aggressive type of locally advanced breast cancer with a generally worst prognosis, little work has been done in identifying the status of non-genomic signaling in the invasiveness of IBC. The present study was performed to explore the status of non-genomic signaling as affected by various estrogenic and anti-estrogenic agents in IBC cell lines SUM149 and SUM190. We have identified the presence of estrogen receptor α (ERα variant, ERα36 in SUM149 and SUM190 cells. This variant as well as ERβ was present in a substantial concentration in IBC cells. The treatment with estradiol (E2, anti-estrogenic agents 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 182780, ERβ specific ligand DPN and GPR30 agonist G1 led to a rapid activation of p-ERK1/2, suggesting the involvement of ERα36, ERβ and GPR30 in the non-genomic signaling pathway in these cells. We also found a substantial increase in the cell migration and invasiveness of SUM149 cells upon the treatment with these ligands. Both basal and ligand-induced migration and invasiveness of SUM149 cells were drastically reduced in the presence of MEK inhibitor U0126, implicating that the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 by MEK is involved in the observed motility and invasiveness of IBC cells. We also provide evidence for the upregulation of p-ERK1/2 through immunostaining in IBC patient samples. These findings suggest a role of non-genomic signaling through the activation of p-ERK1/2 in the hormonal dependence of IBC by a combination of estrogen receptors. These findings only explain the failure of traditional anti-estrogen therapies in ER-positive IBC which induces the non-genomic signaling, but also opens newer avenues for design of modified therapies targeting these estrogen receptors.

  17. Binding of receptor-recognized forms of alpha2-macroglobulin to the alpha2-macroglobulin signaling receptor activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, U K; Pizzo, S V

    1998-05-29

    Ligation of the alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M) signaling receptor by receptor-recognized forms of alpha2M (alpha2M*) initiates mitogenesis secondary to increased intracellular Ca2+. We report here that ligation of the alpha2M signaling receptor also causes a 1. 5-2.5-fold increase in wortmannin-sensitive phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity as measured by the quantitation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). PIP3 formation was alpha2M* concentration-dependent with a maximal response at approximately 50 pM ligand concentration. The peak formation of PIP3 occurred at 10 min of incubation. The alpha2M receptor binding fragment mutant K1370R which binds to the alpha2M signaling receptor activating the signaling cascade, increased PIP3 formation by 2-fold. The mutant K1374A, which binds very poorly to the alpha2M signaling receptor, did not cause any increase in PIP3 formation. alpha2M*-induced DNA synthesis was inhibited by wortmannin. 1, 2Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acetoxymethylester a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, drastically reduced alpha2M*-induced increases in PIP3 formation. We conclude that PI3K is involved in alpha2M*-induced mitogenesis in macrophages and intracellular Ca2+ plays a role in PI3K activation. PMID:9593670

  18. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Chang [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Guk [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Tae-Young [Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jihwan [Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang-Yun [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Soon [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byeong-Sun, E-mail: byeongsun@korea.kr [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. {yields} H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. {yields} HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new

  19. Charged MVB protein 5 is involved in T-cell receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Sae Mi; Min, Yoon; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Charged multivesicular body protein 5 (CHMP5) has a key role in multivesicular body biogenesis and a critical role in the downregulation of signaling pathways through receptor degradation. However, the role of CHMP5 in T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling has not been previously investigated. In this study, we utilized a short hairpin RNA-based RNA interference approach to investigate the functional role of CHMP5. Upon TCR stimulation, CHMP5-knockdown (CHMP5(KD)) Jurkat T cells exhibited activation of TCR downstream signaling molecules, such as PKCθ and IKKαβ, and resulted in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and the marked upregulation of TCR-induced gene expression. Moreover, we found that activator protein-1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells transcriptional factors were markedly activated in CHMP5(KD) Jurkat cells in response to TCR stimulation, which led to a significant increase in interleukin-2 secretion. Biochemical studies revealed that CHMP5 endogenously forms high-molecular-weight complexes, including TCR molecules, and specifically interacts with TCRβ. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis also revealed that CHMP5(KD) Jurkat T cells exhibit upregulation of TCR expression on the cell surface compared with control Jurkat T cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that CHMP5 might be involved in the homeostatic regulation of TCR on the cell surface, presumably through TCR recycling or degradation. Thus CHMP5 is implicated in TCR-mediated signaling. PMID:26821576

  20. Charged MVB protein 5 is involved in T-cell receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Sae Mi; Min, Yoon; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-29

    Charged multivesicular body protein 5 (CHMP5) has a key role in multivesicular body biogenesis and a critical role in the downregulation of signaling pathways through receptor degradation. However, the role of CHMP5 in T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling has not been previously investigated. In this study, we utilized a short hairpin RNA-based RNA interference approach to investigate the functional role of CHMP5. Upon TCR stimulation, CHMP5-knockdown (CHMP5(KD)) Jurkat T cells exhibited activation of TCR downstream signaling molecules, such as PKCθ and IKKαβ, and resulted in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and the marked upregulation of TCR-induced gene expression. Moreover, we found that activator protein-1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells transcriptional factors were markedly activated in CHMP5(KD) Jurkat cells in response to TCR stimulation, which led to a significant increase in interleukin-2 secretion. Biochemical studies revealed that CHMP5 endogenously forms high-molecular-weight complexes, including TCR molecules, and specifically interacts with TCRβ. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis also revealed that CHMP5(KD) Jurkat T cells exhibit upregulation of TCR expression on the cell surface compared with control Jurkat T cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that CHMP5 might be involved in the homeostatic regulation of TCR on the cell surface, presumably through TCR recycling or degradation. Thus CHMP5 is implicated in TCR-mediated signaling.

  1. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii: function and putative signaling cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Omri; Ventura, Tomer; Manor, Rivka; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Sagi, Amir

    2013-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) are highly conserved members of the tyrosine kinase receptor superfamily found in metazoans and plants. In arthropods, EGFRs are vital for the proper development of embryos and of adult limbs, gonads, and eyes as well as affecting body size. In searching for genes involved in the growth and development of our model organism, the decapod crustacean (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), a comprehensive transcript library was established using next-generation sequencing. Using this library, the expression of several genes assigned to the signal transduction pathways mediated by EGFRs was observed, including a transcript encoding M. rosenbergii EGFR (Mr-EGFR), several potential ligands upstream to the receptor, and most of the putative downstream signal transducer genes. The deduced protein encoded by Mr-EGFR, representing the first such receptor reported thus far in crustaceans, shows sequence similarity to other arthropod EGFRs. The M. rosenbergii gene is expressed in most tested tissues. The role of Mr-EGFR was revealed by temporarily silencing the transcript through weekly injections of double-stranded Mr-EGFR RNA. Such treatment resulted in a significant reduction in growth and a delay in the appearance of a male secondary sexual characteristic, namely the appendix masculina. An additional function of Mr-EGFR was revealed with respect to eye development. Although the optic ganglion appeared to have retained its normal morphology, Mr-EGFR-silenced individuals developed abnormal eyes that presented irregular organization of the ommatidia, reflected by unorganized receptor cells occupying large areas of the dioptric portion and by a shortened crystalline tract layer.

  3. Distinct Signaling Cascades Elicited by Different Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2 Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cattaneo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2 is a remarkably versatile transmembrane protein belonging to the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family. FPR2 is activated by an array of ligands, which include structurally unrelated lipids and peptide/proteins agonists, resulting in different intracellular responses in a ligand-specific fashion. In addition to the anti-inflammatory lipid, lipoxin A4, several other endogenous agonists also bind FPR2, including serum amyloid A, glucocorticoid-induced annexin 1, urokinase and its receptor, suggesting that the activation of FPR2 may result in potent pro- or anti-inflammatory responses. Other endogenous ligands, also present in biological samples, include resolvins, amyloidogenic proteins, such as beta amyloid (Aβ-42 and prion protein (Prp106–126, the neuroprotective peptide, humanin, antibacterial peptides, annexin 1-derived peptides, chemokine variants, the neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27, and mitochondrial peptides. Upon activation, intracellular domains of FPR2 mediate signaling to G-proteins, which trigger several agonist-dependent signal transduction pathways, including activation of phospholipase C (PLC, protein kinase C (PKC isoforms, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, p38MAPK, as well as the phosphorylation of cytosolic tyrosine kinases, tyrosine kinase receptor transactivation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of regulatory transcriptional factors, release of calcium and production of oxidants. FPR2 is an attractive therapeutic target, because of its involvement in a range of normal physiological processes and pathological diseases. Here, we review and discuss the most significant findings on the intracellular pathways and on the cross-communication between FPR2 and tyrosine kinase receptors triggered by different FPR2

  4. Genetic evidence for an indispensable role of somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases in brassinosteroid signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Gou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis thaliana somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs consist of five members, SERK1 to SERK5, of the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase subfamily II (LRR-RLK II. SERK3 was named BRI1-Associated Receptor Kinase 1 (BAK1 due to its direct interaction with the brassinosteroid (BR receptor BRI1 in vivo, while SERK4 has also been designated as BAK1-Like 1 (BKK1 for its functionally redundant role with BAK1. Here we provide genetic and biochemical evidence to demonstrate that SERKs are absolutely required for early steps in BR signaling. Overexpression of four of the five SERKs-SERK1, SERK2, SERK3/BAK1, and SERK4/BKK1-suppressed the phenotypes of an intermediate BRI1 mutant, bri1-5. Overexpression of the kinase-dead versions of these four genes in the bri1-5 background, on the other hand, resulted in typical dominant negative phenotypes, resembling those of null BRI1 mutants. We isolated and generated single, double, triple, and quadruple mutants and analyzed their phenotypes in detail. While the quadruple mutant is embryo-lethal, the serk1 bak1 bkk1 triple null mutant exhibits an extreme de-etiolated phenotype similar to a null bri1 mutant. While overexpression of BRI1 can drastically increase hypocotyl growth of wild-type plants, overexpression of BRI1 does not alter hypocotyl growth of the serk1 bak1 bkk1 triple mutant. Biochemical analysis indicated that the phosphorylation level of BRI1 in serk1 bak1 bkk1 is incapable of sensing exogenously applied BR. As a result, the unphosphorylated level of BES1 has lost its sensitivity to the BR treatment in the triple mutant, indicating that the BR signaling pathway has been completely abolished in the triple mutant. These data clearly demonstrate that SERKs are essential to the early events of BR signaling.

  5. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2016-03-05

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

  6. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor signaling and its impact on reproduction in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y; McFarlane, Heather; Maddineni, Sreenivasa R; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2009-09-01

    In birds, as in other vertebrates, reproduction is controlled by the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis with each component secreting specific neuropeptides or hormones. Until recently, it was believed this axis is exclusively under the stimulatory control of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone I (GnRH-I) which in turn, stimulates luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion from the pituitary gland. However, the discovery of a novel inhibitory hypothalamic peptide able to reduce LH secretion (gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone: GnIH) challenged this dogma. Furthermore, with the characterization of its specific receptor (GnIHR), progress has been made to clarify the physiological relevance of GnIH in birds. This short review discusses the recent advances in GnIHR signaling at the level of the pituitary gland and the gonads. GnIHR is a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family which couples to G(alphai) and, upon activation inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity, thus reducing intracellular cAMP levels. This implies that GnIH interferes with signaling of any GPCR coupled to G(alphas), including GnRH, LH and FSH receptors. In the chicken pituitary gland, the GnRHR-II/GnIHR ratio changes during sexual maturation in favor of GnRHR-II that appears to result in hypothalamic control of gonadotropin secretion shifting from inhibitory to stimulatory, with corresponding changes in GnRH-induced cAMP levels. Within the gonads, GnIH and its receptor may act in an autocrine/paracrine manner and may interfere with LH and FSH signaling to influence ovarian follicular maturation and recruitment, as well as spermatogenesis. PMID:19332068

  7. Regulation of T cell receptor signaling by the actin cytoskeleton and poroelastic cytoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The actin cytoskeleton plays essential roles in modulating T-cell activation. Most models of T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering, signalosome assembl, y and immune synapse formation invoke actin-dependent mechanisms. As T cells are constitutively motile cells, TCR triggering and signaling occur against a cytoskeletal backdrop that is constantly remodeling. While the interplay between actin dynamics and TCR signaling have been the focus of research for many years, much of the work in T cells has considered actin largely for its ‘scaffolding’ function. We examine the roles of the actin cytoskeleton in TCR signaling and immune synapse formation with an emphasis on how poroelasticity, an ensemble feature of actin dynamics with the cytosol, relates to how T cells respond to stimulation. PMID:24117819

  8. Regulation of T-cell receptor signaling by the actin cytoskeleton and poroelastic cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F

    2013-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays essential roles in modulating T-cell activation. Most models of T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering signalosome assembly and immune synapse formation invoke actin-dependent mechanisms. As T cells are constitutively motile cells, TCR triggering and signaling occur against a cytoskeletal backdrop that is constantly remodeling. While the interplay between actin dynamics and TCR signaling have been the focus of research for many years, much of the work in T cells has considered actin largely for its 'scaffolding' function. We examine the roles of the actin cytoskeleton in TCR signaling and immune synapse formation with an emphasis on how poroelasticity, an ensemble feature of actin dynamics with the cytosol, relates to how T cells respond to stimulation. PMID:24117819

  9. Epigenetics of Estrogen Receptor Signaling: Role in Hormonal Cancer Progression and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Monica; Cortez, Valerie [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UTHSCSA, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Vadlamudi, Ratna K., E-mail: vadlamudi@uthscsa.edu [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UTHSCSA, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Estrogen receptor (ERα) signaling plays a key role in hormonal cancer progression. ERα is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that modulates gene transcription via recruitment to the target gene chromatin. Emerging evidence suggests that ERα signaling has the potential to contribute to epigenetic changes. Estrogen stimulation is shown to induce several histone modifications at the ERα target gene promoters including acetylation, phosphorylation and methylation via dynamic interactions with histone modifying enzymes. Deregulation of enzymes involved in the ERα -mediated epigenetic pathway could play a vital role in ERα driven neoplastic processes. Unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic changes are reversible, and hence offer novel therapeutic opportunities to reverse ERα driven epigenetic changes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on mechanisms by which ERα signaling potentiates epigenetic changes in cancer cells via histone modifications.

  10. Calcium-sensing receptor: a key target for extracellular calcium signaling in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Jones

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Though both clinicians and scientists have long recognized the influence of extracellular calcium on the function of muscle and nervous tissue, recent insights reveal that the mechanisms allowing changes in extracellular calcium to alter cellular excitability have been incompletely understood. For many years the effects of calcium on neuronal signaling were explained only in terms of calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels and biophysical charge screening. More recently however, it has been recognized that the calcium-sensing receptor is prevalent in the nervous system and regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal activity via multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the multiplicity of mechanisms by which changes in extracellular calcium alter neuronal signaling and propose that multiple mechanisms are required to describe the full range of experimental observations.

  11. Epigenetics of Estrogen Receptor Signaling: Role in Hormonal Cancer Progression and Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrogen receptor (ERα) signaling plays a key role in hormonal cancer progression. ERα is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that modulates gene transcription via recruitment to the target gene chromatin. Emerging evidence suggests that ERα signaling has the potential to contribute to epigenetic changes. Estrogen stimulation is shown to induce several histone modifications at the ERα target gene promoters including acetylation, phosphorylation and methylation via dynamic interactions with histone modifying enzymes. Deregulation of enzymes involved in the ERα -mediated epigenetic pathway could play a vital role in ERα driven neoplastic processes. Unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic changes are reversible, and hence offer novel therapeutic opportunities to reverse ERα driven epigenetic changes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on mechanisms by which ERα signaling potentiates epigenetic changes in cancer cells via histone modifications

  12. Endocytosis of pro-inflammatory cytokine receptors and its relevance for signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Heike M; Wohlfahrt, Julia; Mais, Christine; Hergovits, Sabine; Jahn, Daniel; Geier, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are key players of the innate and adaptive immunity. Their activity needs to be tightly controlled to allow the initiation of an appropriate immune response as defense mechanism against pathogens or tissue injury. Excessive or sustained signaling of either of these cytokines leads to severe diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), steatohepatitis, periodic fevers and even cancer. Studies carried out in the last 30 years have emphasized that an elaborate control system for each of these cytokines exists. Here, we summarize what is currently known about the involvement of receptor endocytosis in the regulation of these pro-inflammatory cytokines' signaling cascades. Particularly in the last few years it was shown that this cellular process is far more than a mere feedback mechanism to clear cytokines from the circulation and to shut off their signal transduction. PMID:27071147

  13. Enhanced airway smooth muscle cell thromboxane receptor signaling via activation of JNK MAPK and extracellular calcium influx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Ying; Cao, Yongxiao; Zhang, Yaping;

    2011-01-01

    airway smooth muscle cells by using an organ culture model and a set of selective pharmacological inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and calcium signal pathways. Western-blot, immunohistochemistry, myograph and a selective TP receptor agonist U46619 were used for examining TP receptor...... signal proteins and function. Organ culture of rat bronchial segments for up to 48 h induces a time-dependently increased airway contractile response to U46619. This indicates that organ culture increases TP receptor signaling in the airway smooth muscle cells. The enhanced bronchial contraction was...... attenuated by the inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK activity, chelation of extracellular calcium and calcium channel blocker nifedipine, suggesting that JNK MAPK activity and elevated intracellular calcium level are required for the TP receptor signaling. In conclusion, airway smooth muscle...

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor signalling in human breast cancer cells operates parallel to estrogen receptor α signalling and results in tamoxifen insensitive proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major problem in the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER) α -positive breast cancer patients. Although the mechanisms behind tamoxifen resistance are still not completely understood, clinical data suggests that increased expression of receptor tyrosine kinases is involved. Here, we studied the estrogen and anti-estrogen sensitivity of human breast cancer MCF7 cells that have a moderate, retroviral-mediated, ectopic expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (MCF7-EGFR). Proliferation of MCF7-EGFR and parental cells was induced by 17β-estradiol (E2), epidermal growth factor (EGF) or a combination of these. Inhibition of proliferation under these conditions was investigated with 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (TAM) or fulvestrant at 10-12 to 10-6 M. Cells were lysed at different time points to determine the phosphorylation status of EGFR, MAPK1/3, AKT and the expression of ERα. Knockdown of target genes was established using smartpool siRNAs. Transcriptomics analysis was done 6 hr after stimulation with growth factors using Affymetrix HG-U133 PM array plates. While proliferation of parental MCF7 cells could only be induced by E2, proliferation of MCF7-EGFR cells could be induced by either E2 or EGF. Treatment with TAM or fulvestrant did significantly inhibit proliferation of MCF7-EGFR cells stimulated with E2 alone. EGF treatment of E2/TAM treated cells led to a marked cell proliferation thereby overruling the anti-estrogen-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation. Under these conditions, TAM however did still inhibit ERα- mediated transcription. While siRNA-mediated knock-down of EGFR inhibited the EGF- driven proliferation under TAM/E2/EGF condition, knock down of ERα did not. The TAM resistant cell proliferation mediated by the conditional EGFR-signaling may be dependent on the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the MEK/MAPK pathway, since a MEK inhibitor (U0126), did not block the proliferation. Transcriptomic analysis under the various E2/TAM

  15. Ethanol affects NMDA receptor signaling at climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in mice and impairs cerebellar LTD

    OpenAIRE

    He, Qionger; Titley, Heather; Grasselli, Giorgio; Piochon, Claire; Hansel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol profoundly influences cerebellar circuit function and motor control. It has recently been demonstrated that functional N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are postsynaptically expressed at climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses in the adult cerebellum. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from mouse cerebellar slices, we examined whether ethanol can affect NMDA receptor signaling in mature Purkinje cells. NMDA receptor-mediated currents were isolated by bath application of...

  16. CqsA-CqsS quorum-sensing signal-receptor specificity in Photobacterium angustum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xiaobo; Miller, Laura C; Ng, Wai-Leung; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2014-02-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of bacterial cell-cell communication that relies on the production, detection and population-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. The QS system commonly found in vibrios and photobacteria consists of the CqsA synthase/CqsS receptor pair. Vibrio cholerae CqsA/S synthesizes and detects (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one (C10-CAI-1), whereas Vibrio harveyi produces and detects a distinct but similar molecule, (Z)-3-aminoundec-2-en-4-one (Ea-C8-CAI-1). To understand the signalling properties of the larger family of CqsA-CqsS pairs, here, we characterize the Photobacterium angustum CqsA/S system. Many photobacterial cqsA genes harbour a conserved frameshift mutation that abolishes CAI-1 production. By contrast, their cqsS genes are intact. Correcting the P. angustum cqsA reading frame restores production of a mixture of CAI-1 moieties, including C8-CAI-1, C10-CAI-1, Ea-C8-CAI-1 and Ea-C10-CAI-1. This signal production profile matches the P. angustum CqsS receptor ligand-detection capability. The receptor exhibits a preference for molecules with 10-carbon tails, and the CqsS Ser(168) residue governs this preference. P. angustum can overcome the cqsA frameshift to produce CAI-1 under particular limiting growth conditions presumably through a ribosome slippage mechanism. Thus, we propose that P. angustum uses CAI-1 signalling for adaptation to stressful environments.

  17. Specification, annotation, visualization and simulation of a large rule-based model for ERBB receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creamer Matthew S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical/computational models are needed to understand cell signaling networks, which are complex. Signaling proteins contain multiple functional components and multiple sites of post-translational modification. The multiplicity of components and sites of modification ensures that interactions among signaling proteins have the potential to generate myriad protein complexes and post-translational modification states. As a result, the number of chemical species that can be populated in a cell signaling network, and hence the number of equations in an ordinary differential equation model required to capture the dynamics of these species, is prohibitively large. To overcome this problem, the rule-based modeling approach has been developed for representing interactions within signaling networks efficiently and compactly through coarse-graining of the chemical kinetics of molecular interactions. Results Here, we provide a demonstration that the rule-based modeling approach can be used to specify and simulate a large model for ERBB receptor signaling that accounts for site-specific details of protein-protein interactions. The model is considered large because it corresponds to a reaction network containing more reactions than can be practically enumerated. The model encompasses activation of ERK and Akt, and it can be simulated using a network-free simulator, such as NFsim, to generate time courses of phosphorylation for 55 individual serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues. The model is annotated and visualized in the form of an extended contact map. Conclusions With the development of software that implements novel computational methods for calculating the dynamics of large-scale rule-based representations of cellular signaling networks, it is now possible to build and analyze models that include a significant fraction of the protein interactions that comprise a signaling network, with incorporation of the site

  18. Genetic dissection of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling during luteinizing hormone-induced oocyte maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minnie Hsieh

    Full Text Available Recent evidence that luteinizing hormone (LH stimulation of ovulatory follicles causes transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has provided insights into the mechanisms of ovulation. However, the complete array of signals that promote oocyte reentry into the meiotic cell cycle in the follicle are still incompletely understood. To elucidate the signaling downstream of EGFR involved in oocyte maturation, we have investigated the LH responses in granulosa cells with targeted ablation of EGFR. Oocyte maturation and ovulation is disrupted when EGFR expression is progressively reduced. In granulosa cells from mice with either global or granulosa cell-specific disruption of EGFR signaling, LH-induced phosphorylation of MAPK3/1, p38MAPK, and connexin-43 is impaired. Although the LH-induced decrease in cGMP is EGFR-dependent in wild type follicles, LH still induces a decrease in cGMP in Egfr(delta/f Cyp19-Cre follicles. Thus compensatory mechanisms appear activated in the mutant. Spatial propagation of the LH signal in the follicle also is dependent on the EGF network, and likely is important for the control of signaling to the oocyte. Thus, multiple signals and redundant pathways contribute to regulating oocyte reentry into the cell cycle.

  19. Wedelolactone induces growth of breast cancer cells by stimulation of estrogen receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehybova, Tereza; Smarda, Jan; Daniel, Lukas; Brezovsky, Jan; Benes, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Wedelolactone, a plant coumestan, was shown to act as anti-cancer agent for breast and prostate carcinomas in vitro and in vivo targeting multiple cellular proteins including androgen receptors, 5-lipoxygenase and topoisomerase IIα. It is cytotoxic to breast, prostate, pituitary and myeloma cancer cell lines in vitro at μM concentrations. In this study, however, a novel biological activity of nM dose of wedelolactone was demonstrated. Wedelolactone acts as agonist of estrogen receptors (ER) α and β as demonstrated by transactivation of estrogen response element (ERE) in cells transiently expressing either ERα or ERβ and by molecular docking of this coumestan into ligand binding pocket of both ERα and ERβ. In breast cancer cells, wedelolactone stimulates growth of estrogen receptor-positive cells, expression of estrogen-responsive genes and activates rapid non-genomic estrogen signalling. All these effects can be inhibited by pretreatment with pure ER antagonist ICI 182,780 and they are not observed in ER-negative breast cancer cells. We conclude that wedelolactone acts as phytoestrogen in breast cancer cells by stimulating ER genomic and non-genomic signalling pathways.

  20. Toll-like receptor signaling: a perspective to develop vaccine against leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rakesh K; Srivastava, Ankita; Singh, Nisha

    2012-09-01

    The toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the sentinel factor of the innate immunity, which are essential for host defense. These receptors detect the presence of conserved molecular patterns of potentially pathogenic microorganisms and contribute in both, cellular as well as humoral immune responses. Leishmania is an intracellular pathogen that silently invades host immune system. After phagocytosis, it divides and proliferates in the harmful environment of host macrophages by down-regulating its vital effector functions. In leishmaniasis, the outcome of the infection basically relies on the skewed balance between Th1/Th2 immune responses. Lots of work have been done and on progress but still characterization of either preventive or prophylactic candidate antigen/s is far from satisfactory. How does Leishmania regulate host innate immune system? Still it is unanswered. TLRs play very important role during inflammatory process of various diseases such as cancer, bacterial and viral infections but TLR signaling is comparatively less explained in leishmanial infection. In the context to Th1/Th2 dichotomy, identification of leishmanial antigens that modulate toll-like receptor signaling will certainly help in the development of future vaccine. This review will initially describe global properties of TLRs, and later will discuss their role in the pathogenesis of leishmaniasis.

  1. New insights of P2X7 receptor signaling pathway in alveolar functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amarjit

    2013-01-01

    Purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated cation channel, is unique among all other family members because of its ability to respond to various stimuli and to modulate pro-inflammatory signaling. The activation of P2X7R in immune cells is absolutely required for mature interleukin -1beta (IL-1beta) and IL-18 production and release. Lung alveoli are lined by the structural alveolar epithelial type I (AEC I) and alveolar epithelial type II cells (AEC II). AEC I plays important roles in alveolar barrier protection and fluid homeostasis whereas AEC II synthesizes and secrete surfactant and prevents alveoli from collapse. Earlier studies indicated that purinergic P2X7 receptors were specifically expressed in AEC I. However, their implication in alveolar functions has not been explored. This paper reviews two important signaling pathways of P2X7 receptors in surfactant homeostatsis and Acute Lung Injury (ALI). Thus, P2X7R resides at the critical nexus of alveolar pathophysiology. PMID:23634990

  2. Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification-associated PDGFRB mutations impair the receptor signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Florence A; Velghe, Amélie I; Stevens, Monique; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Essaghir, Ahmed; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGF) bind to two related receptor tyrosine kinases, which are encoded by the PDGFRA and PDGFRB genes. Recently, heterozygous PDGFRB mutations have been described in patients diagnosed with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC or Fahr disease), a rare inherited neurological disorder. The goal of the present study was to determine whether these mutations had a positive or negative impact on the PDGFRB activity. We first showed that the E1071V mutant behaved like wild-type PDGFRB and may represent a polymorphism unrelated to IBGC. In contrast, the L658P mutant had no kinase activity and failed to activate any of the pathways normally stimulated by PDGF. The R987W mutant activated Akt and MAP kinases but did not induce the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) after PDGF stimulation. Phosphorylation of phospholipase Cγ was also decreased. Finally, we showed that the R987W mutant was more rapidly degraded upon PDGF binding compared to wild-type PDGFRB. In conclusion, PDGFRB mutations associated with IBGC impair the receptor signalling. PDGFRB loss of function in IBGC is consistent with recently described inactivating mutations in the PDGF-B ligand. These results raise concerns about the long-term safety of PDGF receptor inhibition by drugs such as imatinib. PMID:25292412

  3. Potentiation of nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth by fluvoxamine: role of sigma-1 receptors, IP3 receptors and cellular signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nishimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been widely used and are a major therapeutic advance in psychopharmacology. However, their pharmacology is quite heterogeneous. The SSRI fluvoxamine, with sigma-1 receptor agonism, is shown to potentiate nerve-growth factor (NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC 12 cells. However, the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying potentiation by fluvoxamine are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the roles of cellular signaling pathways in the potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by fluvoxamine and sigma-1 receptor agonists. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The effects of three SSRIs (fluvoxamine, sertraline, paroxetine and three sigma-1 receptor agonists (SA4503, 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl piperidine (PPBP, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA-sulfate on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were examined. Also examined were the effects of the sigma-1 receptor antagonist NE-100, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3 receptor antagonist, and specific inhibitors of signaling pathways in the potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by selective sigma-1 receptor agonist SA4503. Fluvoxamine (but not sertraline or paroxetine and the sigma-1 receptor agonists SA4503, PPBP, and DHEA-sulfate significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The potentiation by fluvoxamine and the three sigma-1 receptor agonists was blocked by co-administration of the selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist NE-100, suggesting that sigma-1 receptors play a role in blocking the enhancement of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, the potentiation by SA4503 was blocked by co-administration of the IP(3 receptor antagonist xestospongin C. In addition, the specific inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC-gamma, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, p38MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and the Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK

  4. Discovery-driven research and bioinformatics in nuclear receptor and coregulator signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Neil J

    2011-08-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors that interact with coregulators and other transcription factors to direct tissue-specific programs of gene expression. Recent years have witnessed a rapid acceleration of the output of high-content data platforms in this field, generating discovery-driven datasets that have collectively described: the organization of the NR superfamily (phylogenomics); the expression patterns of NRs, coregulators and their target genes (transcriptomics); ligand- and tissue-specific functional NR and coregulator sites in DNA (cistromics); the organization of nuclear receptors and coregulators into higher order complexes (proteomics); and their downstream effects on homeostasis and metabolism (metabolomics). Significant bioinformatics challenges lie ahead both in the integration of this information into meaningful models of NR and coregulator biology, as well as in the archiving and communication of datasets to the global nuclear receptor signaling community. While holding great promise for the field, the ascendancy of discovery-driven research in this field brings with it a collective responsibility for researchers, publishers and funding agencies alike to ensure the effective archiving and management of these data. This review will discuss factors lying behind the increasing impact of discovery-driven research, examples of high-content datasets and their bioinformatic analysis, as well as a summary of currently curated web resources in this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translating nuclear receptors from health to disease. PMID:21029773

  5. RGS proteins destroy spare receptors: Effects of GPCR-interacting proteins and signal deamplification on measurements of GPCR agonist potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidiac, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Many GPCRs are able to activate multiple distinct signaling pathways, and these may include biochemical cascades activated via either heterotrimeric G proteins or by β-arrestins. The relative potencies and/or efficacies among a series of agonists that act on a common receptor can vary depending upon which signaling pathway is being activated. This phenomenon is known as biased signaling or functional selectivity, and is presumed to reflect underlying differences in ligand binding affinities for alternate conformational states of the receptor. The first part of this review discusses how various cellular GPCR interacting proteins (GIPs) can influence receptor conformation and thereby affect ligand-receptor interactions and contribute to signaling bias. Upon activation, receptors trigger biochemical cascades that lead to altered cellular function, and measuring points along the cascade (e.g., second messenger production) conveys information about receptor activity. As a signal continues along its way, the observed concentration dependence of a GPCR ligand may change due to amplification and saturation of biochemical steps. The second part of this review considers additional cellular factors that affect signal processing, focusing mainly on structural elements and deamplification mechanisms, and discusses the relevance of these to measurements of potency and functional selectivity. PMID:26297537

  6. The role of endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan

    2011-04-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a primary function of mediating xenobiotic metabolism through transcriptional activation of Phase I and Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. Although no high-affinity physiological activators of AHR have been discovered, the endogenous signaling of the AHR pathway is believed to play an important role in the development and function of the cardiovascular system, based on the observations on ahr gene-deficient mice. The AHR knockout mice develop cardiac hypertrophy, abnormal vascular structure in multiple organs and altered blood pressure depending on their host environment. In this review, the endogenous role of AHR in cardiovascular physiology, including heart function, vascular development and blood pressure regulation has been summarized and discussed.

  7. Biology of common beta receptor-signaling cytokines: IL-3, IL-5, and GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Moczygemba, Margarita; Huston, David P

    2003-10-01

    IL-3, IL-5, and GM-CSF are related hematopoietic cytoines that are important for allergic inflammation. The receptors for human IL-5, IL-3, and GM-CSF are members of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily and are comprised of a cytokine-specific alpha chain and the common beta chain that is shared among these cytokines for signaling. Each of these cytokines contributes to the differentiation and function of leukocyte subpopulations and have clinical importance in protective immunity and in the pathophysiology of a spectrum of immunologic diseases that are as diverse as allergy and asthma, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and malignancies. Delineating the biology of these cytokines is enabling the development of new strategies for diagnosing and treating these diseases and modulating immune responses. PMID:14564341

  8. ELABELA: a hormone essential for heart development signals via the apelin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Serene C; Ho, Lena; Tian, Jing; Reversade, Bruno

    2013-12-23

    We report here the discovery and characterization of a gene, ELABELA (ELA), encoding a conserved hormone of 32 amino acids. Present in human embryonic stem cells, ELA is expressed at the onset of zebrafish zygotic transcription and is ubiquitous in the naive ectodermal cells of the embryo. Using zinc-finger-nuclease-mediated gene inactivation in zebrafish, we created an allelic series of ela mutants. ela null embryos have impaired endoderm differentiation potential marked by reduced gata5 and sox17 expression. Loss of Ela causes embryos to develop with a rudimentary heart or no heart at all, surprisingly phenocopying the loss of the apelin receptor (aplnr), which we show serves as Ela's cognate G protein-coupled receptor. Our results reveal the existence of a peptide hormone, ELA, which, together with APLNR, forms an essential signaling axis for early cardiovascular development.

  9. Downstream reporter gene imaging for signal transduction pathway of dopamine type 2 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Uyenchi N.; Min, Jung Joon; Moon, Sung Min; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Midicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The Dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) signal pathway regulates gene expression by phosphorylation of proteins including cAMP reponse element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor. In this study, we developed a reporter strategy using the GAL4 fusion CREB to assess the phosphorylation of CREB, one of the targets of the D2R signal transduction pathway. We used three plasmids: GAL4 fusion transactivator (pCMV-CREB), firefly luciferase reporter with GAL4 binding sites (pG5-FLUC), and D2R plasmid (pCMV-D2R). Group 1 293T cells were transiently transfected with pCMV-CREB and pG5-FLUC, and group 2 cells were transfected with all three plasmids. Transfected cells were stimulated with different concentrations of dopamine (0-200 M). For animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells (1x10{sup 6}) were subcutaneously injected on the left and right thigh of six nude mice, respectively. Dopamine stimiulation was performed with intraperitoneal injection of L-DOPA incombination with carbidopa, a peripheral DOPA decarboxylase inhibitor. Bioluminescence optical imaging studies were performed before and after L-DOPA injection. In cell culture studies, group 1 cells showed strong luciferase activity which implies direct activation of the signaling pathway due to growth factors contained in culture medium. Group 2 cells showed strong luciferase activity and a further increase after administration of dopamine. In animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells showed bioluminescence signal before L-DOPA injection, but signal from group 2 cells significantly increased 12 h after L-DOPA injection. The signal from group 1 cells disappeared thereafter, but group 2 cells continued to show signal until 36 h of L-DOPA injection. This study demonstrates imaging of the D2R signal transduction pathway and should be useful for noninvasive imaging of downstream effects of G-coupled protein pathways.

  10. Desipramine inhibits histamine H1 receptor-induced Ca2+ signaling in rat hypothalamic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ah Kang

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus in the brain is the main center for appetite control and integrates signals from adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. Antidepressants are known to modulate the activities of hypothalamic neurons and affect food intake, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which antidepressants modulate hypothalamic function remain unclear. Here we have investigated how hypothalamic neurons respond to treatment with antidepressants, including desipramine and sibutramine. In primary cultured rat hypothalamic cells, desipramine markedly suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ evoked by histamine H1 receptor activation. Desipramine also inhibited the histamine-induced Ca(2+ increase and the expression of corticotrophin-releasing hormone in hypothalamic GT1-1 cells. The effect of desipramine was not affected by pretreatment with prazosin or propranolol, excluding catecholamine reuptake activity of desipramine as an underlying mechanism. Sibutramine which is also an antidepressant but decreases food intake, had little effect on the histamine-induced Ca(2+ increase or AMP-activated protein kinase activity. Our results reveal that desipramine and sibutramine have different effects on histamine H1 receptor signaling in hypothalamic cells and suggest that distinct regulation of hypothalamic histamine signaling might underlie the differential regulation of food intake between antidepressants.

  11. Effect of docosahexaenoic acid on interleukin-2 receptor signaling pathway in lipid rafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) regulated the functions of membrane receptors in T cells and suppressed T cell -mediated immune responses. But the molecular mechanisms of immune regulation are not yet elucidated. Lipid rafts are plasma membrane microdomains, in which many receptors localized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of DHA on IL-2R signaling pathway in lipid rafts. We isolated lipid rafts by discontinuous sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and found that DHA could change the composition of lipid rafts and alter the distribution of key molecules of IL-2R signaling pathway, which transferred from lipid rafts to detergent-soluble membrane fractions. These results revealed that DHA treatment increased the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids especially n(3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in lipid rafts and changed the lipid environment of membrane microdomains in T cells. Compared with controls, DHA changed the localization of IL-2R, STAT5a and STAT5b in lipid rafts and suppressed the expression of JAK1, JAK3 and tyrosine phosphotyrosine in soluble membrane fractions. Summarily, this study concluded the effects of DHA on IL-2R signaling pathway in lipid rafts and explained the regulation of PUFAs in T cell-mediated immune responses.

  12. Macroscopic law of conservation revealed in the population dynamics of Toll-like receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvarajoo Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stimulating the receptors of a single cell generates stochastic intracellular signaling. The fluctuating response has been attributed to the low abundance of signaling molecules and the spatio-temporal effects of diffusion and crowding. At population level, however, cells are able to execute well-defined deterministic biological processes such as growth, division, differentiation and immune response. These data reflect biology as a system possessing microscopic and macroscopic dynamics. This commentary discusses the average population response of the Toll-like receptor (TLR 3 and 4 signaling. Without requiring detailed experimental data, linear response equations together with the fundamental law of information conservation have been used to decipher novel network features such as unknown intermediates, processes and cross-talk mechanisms. For single cell response, however, such simplicity seems far from reality. Thus, as observed in any other complex systems, biology can be considered to possess order and disorder, inheriting a mixture of predictable population level and unpredictable single cell outcomes.

  13. PPARs: Nuclear Receptors Controlled by, and Controlling, Nutrient Handling through Nuclear and Cytosolic Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Moreno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, which are known to regulate lipid homeostasis, are tightly controlled by nutrient availability, and they control nutrient handling. In this paper, we focus on how nutrients control the expression and action of PPARs and how cellular signaling events regulate the action of PPARs in metabolically active tissues (e.g., liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and white adipose tissue. We address the structure and function of the PPARs, and their interaction with other nuclear receptors, including PPAR cross-talk. We further discuss the roles played by different kinase pathways, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinases/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK MAPK, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, Akt/protein kinase B (Akt/PKB, and the NAD+-regulated protein deacetylase SIRT1, serving to control the activity of the PPARs themselves as well as that of a key nutrient-related PPAR coactivator, PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α. We also highlight how currently applied nutrigenomic strategies will increase our understanding on how nutrients regulate metabolic homeostasis through PPAR signaling.

  14. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  15. Receptor subtype involved in α1-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ sig-naling in cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-li LUO; Jian GAO; Lin-lin FAN; Yu TANG; You-yi ZHANG; Qi-de HAN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The enhancement of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in response to α1-adrener-gic receptor (α1-AR) stimulation is an essential signal transduction event in the regulation of cardiac functions, such as cardiac growth, cardiac contraction, and cardiac adaptation to various situations. The present study was intended to determine the role(s) of the α1-AR subtype(s) in mediating this response. Methods: We evaluated the effects of subtype-specific agonists and antagonists of the α1- AR on the intracellular Ca2+ signaling of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes using a confocal microscope. Results: After being cultured for 48 h, the myocytes exhibited spontaneous local Ca2+ release, sparks, and global Ca2+ transients. The activation of the α1-AR with phenylephrine, a selective agonist of the α1-AR, dose-dependently increased the frequency of Ca2+ transients with an EC50 value of 2.3 μmol/L. Blocking the α1A-AR subtype with 5-methyhirapidil (5-Mu) inhi-bited the stimulatory effect of phenylephrine with an IC50 value of 6.7 nmol/L. In contrast, blockade of the α1B-AR and α1D-AR subtypes with chloroethylclonidine and BMY 7378, respectively, did not affect the phenylephrine effect. Similarly, the local Ca2+ spark numbers were also increased by the activation of theα1-AR, and this effect could be abolished selectively by 5-Mu. More importantly, A61603, a novel selective α1A-AR agonist, mimicked the effects of phenylephrine, but with more potency (EC50 value =6.9 nmol/L) in the potentiation of Ca2+ transients, and blockade of the α1A-AR by 5-Mu caused abolishment of its effects. Conclusion: These results indicate that α1-adrenergic stimulation of intracellular Ca2+ activity is mediated selectively by the α1A-AR.

  16. Agonist-directed signaling of serotonin 5-HT2C receptors: differences between serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrom, J R; Chang, M S; Chu, H; Niswender, C M; Sanders-Bush, E

    1999-08-01

    For more than 40 years the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has been known to modify serotonin neurotransmission. With the advent of molecular and cellular techniques, we are beginning to understand the complexity of LSD's actions at the serotonin 5-HT2 family of receptors. Here, we discuss evidence that signaling of LSD at 5-HT2C receptors differs from the endogenous agonist serotonin. In addition, RNA editing of the 5-HT2C receptor dramatically alters the ability of LSD to stimulate phosphatidylinositol signaling. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand the mechanism(s) of partial agonism.

  17. Insulin receptor regulates food intake through sulfakinin signaling in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xianyu; Yu, Na; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-06-01

    Insects obtain energy and nutrients via feeding to support growth and development. The insulin signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of feeding; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show that insulin signaling regulates food intake via crosstalk with neuropeptide sulfakinin in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Silencing of the insulin receptor (InR) decreased the food intake in the penultimate and final instar stages, leading to a decrease of weight gain and mortality during larval-pupal metamorphosis. Interestingly, the knockdown of InR co-occurred with an increased expression of sulfakinin (sk), a gene encoding neuropeptide SK functioning as a satiety signal. In parallel, double silencing of sk and InR eliminated the inhibitory effect on food intake as induced by silencing of InR and the larvae died as prepupae. In conclusion, this study shows, for the first time, that the insulin/InR signaling regulates food intake through the sulfakinin signaling pathway in the larval stages of this important model and pest insect, indicating a novel target for pest control. PMID:26972481

  18. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kenneth A; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Bates, Carlton M

    2016-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and FGF ligands are highly expressed in the developing kidney and lower urinary tract. Several classic studies showed many effects of exogenous FGF ligands on embryonic renal tissues in vitro and in vivo. Another older landmark publication showed that mice with a dominant negative Fgfr fragment had severe renal dysplasia. Together, these studies revealed the importance of FGFR signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development. With the advent of modern gene targeting techniques, including conditional knockout approaches, several publications have revealed critical roles for FGFR signaling in many lineages of the kidney and lower urinary tract at different stages of development. FGFR signaling has been shown to be critical for early metanephric mesenchymal patterning, Wolffian duct patterning including induction of the ureteric bud, ureteric bud branching morphogenesis, nephron progenitor survival and nephrogenesis, and bladder mesenchyme patterning. FGFRs pattern these tissues by interacting with many other growth factor signaling pathways. Moreover, the many genetic Fgfr and Fgf animal models have structural defects mimicking numerous congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract seen in humans. Finally, many studies have shown how FGFR signaling is critical for kidney and lower urinary tract patterning in humans. PMID:26293980

  19. B-cell receptor signalling and its crosstalk with other pathways in normal and malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Vaclav; Mraz, Marek

    2015-03-01

    The physiology of B cells is intimately connected with the function of their B-cell receptor (BCR). B-cell lymphomas frequently (dys)regulate BCR signalling and thus take advantage of this pre-existing pathway for B-cell proliferation and survival. This has recently been underscored by clinical trials demonstrating that small molecules (fosfamatinib, ibrutinib, idelalisib) inhibiting BCR-associated kinases (SYK, BTK, PI3K) have an encouraging clinical effect. Here we describe the current knowledge of the specific aspects of BCR signalling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and normal B cells. Multiple factors can contribute to BCR pathway (dys)regulation in these malignancies and the activation of 'chronic' or 'tonic' BCR signalling. In lymphoma B cells, the balance of initiation, amplitude and duration of BCR activation can be influenced by a specific immunoglobulin structure, the expression and mutations of adaptor molecules (like GAB1, BLNK, GRB2, CARD11), the activity of kinases (like LYN, SYK, PI3K) or phosphatases (like SHIP-1, SHP-1 and PTEN) and levels of microRNAs. We also discuss the crosstalk of BCR with other signalling pathways (NF-κB, adhesion through integrins, migration and chemokine signalling) to emphasise that the 'BCR inhibitors' target multiple pathways interconnected with BCR, which might explain some of their clinical activity.

  20. Chlorogenic acid improves late diabetes through adiponectin receptor signaling pathways in db/db mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Jin

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA on glucose and lipid metabolism in late diabetic db/db mice, as well as on adiponectin receptors and their signaling molecules, to provide evidence for CGA in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We randomly divided 16 female db/db mice into db/db-CGA and db/db-control (CON groups equally; db/m mice were used as control mice. The mice in both the db/db-CGA and db/m-CGA groups were administered 80 mg/kg/d CGA by lavage for 12 weeks, whereas the mice in both CON groups were given equal volumes of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS by lavage. At the end of the intervention, we assessed body fat and the parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism in the plasma, liver and skeletal muscle tissues as well as the levels of aldose reductase (AR and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 in the kidneys and measured adiponectin receptors and the protein expression of their signaling molecules in liver and muscle tissues. After 12 weeks of intervention, compared with the db/db-CON group, the percentage of body fat, fasting plasma glucose (FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c in the db/db-CGA group were all significantly decreased; TGF-β1 protein expression and AR activity in the kidney were both decreased; and the adiponectin level in visceral adipose was increased. The protein expression of adiponectin receptors (ADPNRs, the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the liver and muscle, and the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α in the liver were all significantly greater. CGA could lower the levels of fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c during late diabetes and improve kidney fibrosis to some extent through the modulation of adiponectin receptor signaling pathways in db/db mice.

  1. Signaling pathways involved in the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor by erlotinib in hepatocellular cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Huether; Michael H(o)pfner; Andreas P Sutter; Viola Baradari; Detlef Schuppan; Hans Scherübl

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the underlying mechanisms of erlotinib-induced growth inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: Erlotinib-induced alterations in gene expression were evaluated using cDNA array technology;changes in protein expression and/or protein activation due to erlotinib treatment as well as IGF-1-induced EGFR transactivation were investigated using Western blotting. RESULTS: Erlotinib treatment inhibited the mitogen activated protein (MAP)-kinase pathway and signal transducer of activation and transcription (STAT)mediated signaling which led to an altered expression of apoptosis and cell cycle regulating genes as demonstrated by cDNA array technology. Overexpression of proapoptotic factors like caspases and gadds associated with a down-regulation of antiapoptoticfactors like Bcl-2, Bcl-XL or jun D accounted for erlotinib's potency to induce apoptosis. Downregulation of cell cycle regulators promoting the G1/S-transition and overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and gadds contributed to the induction of a G1/Go-arrest in response to erlotinib. Furthermore, we displayed the transactivation of EGFR-mediated signaling by the IGF-1-receptor and showed erlotinib's inhibitory effects on the receptor-receptor cross talk. CONCLUSION: Our study sheds light on the understanding of the mechanisms of action of EGFR-TKinhibition in HCC-cells and thus might facilitate the design of combination therapies that act additively or synergistically. Moreover, our data on the pathways responding to erlotinib treatment could be helpful in predicting the responsiveness of tumors to EGFR-TKIs in the future.

  2. NMDA receptor activation regulates sociability by its effect on mTOR signaling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burket, Jessica A; Benson, Andrew D; Tang, Amy H; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2015-07-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex is one example of a syndromic form of autism spectrum disorder associated with disinhibited activity of mTORC1 in neurons (e.g., cerebellar Purkinje cells). mTORC1 is a complex protein possessing serine/threonine kinase activity and a key downstream molecule in a signaling cascade beginning at the cell surface with the transduction of neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate and acetylcholine) and nerve growth factors (e.g., Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor). Interestingly, the severity of the intellectual disability in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex may relate more to this metabolic disturbance (i.e., overactivity of mTOR signaling) than the density of cortical tubers. Several recent reports showed that rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, improved sociability and other symptoms in mouse models of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and autism spectrum disorder, consistent with mTORC1 overactivity playing an important pathogenic role. NMDA receptor activation may also dampen mTORC1 activity by at least two possible mechanisms: regulating intraneuronal accumulation of arginine and the phosphorylation status of a specific extracellular signal regulating kinase (i.e., ERK1/2), both of which are "drivers" of mTORC1 activity. Conceivably, the prosocial effects of targeting the NMDA receptor with agonists in mouse models of autism spectrum disorders result from their ability to dampen mTORC1 activity in neurons. Strategies for dampening mTORC1 overactivity by NMDA receptor activation may be preferred to its direct inhibition in chronic neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders.

  3. TGFβ activated kinase 1 (TAK1 at the crossroad of B cell receptor and Toll-like receptor 9 signaling pathways in human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Szili

    Full Text Available B cell development and activation are regulated by combined signals mediated by the B cell receptor (BCR, receptors for the B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF-R and the innate receptor, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9. However, the underlying mechanisms by which these signals cooperate in human B cells remain unclear. Our aim was to elucidate the key signaling molecules at the crossroads of BCR, BAFF-R and TLR9 mediated pathways and to follow the functional consequences of costimulation.Therefore we stimulated purified human B cells by combinations of anti-Ig, B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF and the TLR9 agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. Phosphorylation status of various signaling molecules, B cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, plasma blast generation and the frequency of IgG producing cells were investigated. We have found that BCR induced signals cooperate with BAFF-R- and TLR9-mediated signals at different levels of cell activation. BCR and BAFF- as well as TLR9 and BAFF-mediated signals cooperate at NFκB activation, while BCR and TLR9 synergistically costimulate mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs, ERK, JNK and p38. We show here for the first time that the MAP3K7 (TGF beta activated kinase, TAK1 is responsible for the synergistic costimulation of B cells by BCR and TLR9, resulting in an enhanced cell proliferation, plasma blast generation, cytokine and antibody production. Specific inhibitor of TAK1 as well as knocking down TAK1 by siRNA abrogates the synergistic signals. We conclude that TAK1 is a key regulator of receptor crosstalk between BCR and TLR9, thus plays a critical role in B cell development and activation.

  4. Growth Hormone-induced JAK2 Signaling and GH Receptor Down-regulation: Role of GH Receptor Intracellular Domain Tyrosine Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Luqin; Jiang, Jing; Frank, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    GH receptor (GHR) mediates important somatogenic and metabolic effects of GH. A thorough understanding of GH action requires intimate knowledge of GHR activation mechanisms, as well as determinants of GH-induced receptor down-regulation. We previously demonstrated that a GHR mutant in which all intracellular tyrosine residues were changed to phenylalanine was defective in its ability to activate signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)5 and deficient in GH-induced down-regulati...

  5. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han-Ting; Ruan, Nan-Yu; Chen, Jin-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Yung

    2012-09-24

    The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively) are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3). To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 agonists bromocriptine and quinpirole significantly induced Akt and GSK3 phosphorylation, as well as ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) activation. The D2S receptor-induced Akt signals were profoundly inhibited by the internalization blockers monodansyl cadaverine and concanavalin A. Activation of the D2S receptor in HEK-293/rD2S cells appeared to trigger Akt/phospho-Akt translocation to the cell membrane. In addition to our cell culture experiments, we studied D2 receptor-dependent Akt in vivo by systemic administration of the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole. The results show that quinpirole evoked Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in the ventral striatum. Furthermore, intra-accumbens administration of wortmannin, a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) inhibitor, significantly suppressed the quinpirole-evoked behavioural activation. Overall, we demonstrate that activation of the dopamine D2S receptor stimulates Akt/GSK3 signalling. In addition, in vivo Akt activity in the ventral striatum appears to play an important role in systemic D2/D3 agonist-induced behavioural activation.

  6. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin‑Chung Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3. To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 agonists bromocriptine and quinpirole significantly induced Akt and GSK3 phosphorylation, as well as ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. The D2S receptor-induced Akt signals were profoundly inhibited by the internalization blockers monodansyl cadaverine and concanavalin A. Activation of the D2S receptor in HEK-293/rD2S cells appeared to trigger Akt/phospho-Akt translocation to the cell membrane. In addition to our cell culture experiments, we studied D2 receptor-dependent Akt in vivo by systemic administration of the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole. The results show that quinpirole evoked Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in the ventral striatum. Furthermore, intra-accumbens administration of wortmannin, a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, significantly suppressed the quinpirole-evoked behavioural activation. Overall, we demonstrate that activation of the dopamine D2S receptor stimulates Akt/GSK3 signalling. In addition, in vivo Akt activity in the ventral striatum appears to play an important role in systemic D2/D3 agonist-induced behavioural activation.

  7. Dopamine Receptor Signaling in MIN6 β-Cells Revealed by Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Brittany; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2016-08-01

    Insulin secretion defects are central to the development of type II diabetes mellitus. Glucose stimulation of insulin secretion has been extensively studied, but its regulation by other stimuli such as incretins and neurotransmitters is not as well understood. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of insulin secretion by dopamine, which is synthesized in pancreatic β-cells from circulating L-dopa. Previous research has shown that this inhibition is mediated primarily by activation of the dopamine receptor D3 subtype (DRD3), even though both DRD2 and DRD3 are expressed in β-cells. To understand this dichotomy, we investigated the dynamic interactions between the dopamine receptor subtypes and their G-proteins using two-color fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) of mouse MIN6 β-cells. We show that proper membrane localization of exogenous G-proteins depends on both the Gβ and Gγ subunits being overexpressed in the cell. Triple transfections of the dopamine receptor subtype and Gβ and Gγ subunits, each labeled with a different-colored fluorescent protein (FP), yielded plasma membrane expression of all three FPs and permitted an FFS evaluation of interactions between the dopamine receptors and the Gβγ complex. Upon dopamine stimulation, we measured a significant decrease in interactions between DRD3 and the Gβγ complex, which is consistent with receptor activation. In contrast, dopamine stimulation did not cause significant changes in the interactions between DRD2 and the Gβγ complex. These results demonstrate that two-color FFS is a powerful tool for measuring dynamic protein interactions in living cells, and show that preferential DRD3 signaling in β-cells occurs at the level of G-protein release. PMID:27508444

  8. Signaling mechanism for modulation by ATP of glycine receptors on rat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Gong; Zhou, Wei; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    ATP modulates voltage- and ligand-gated channels in the CNS via the activation of ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors. While P2Y receptors are expressed in retinal neurons, the function of these receptors in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we demonstrated that ATP suppressed glycine receptor-mediated currents of OFF type ganglion cells (OFF-GCs) dose-dependently, and the effect was in part mediated by P2Y1 and P2Y11, but not by P2X. The ATP effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of a Gq/11 protein inhibitor and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, but not phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor. The ATP effect was accompanied by an increase in [Ca(2+)]i through the IP3-sensitive pathway and was blocked by intracellular Ca(2+)-free solution. Furthermore, the ATP effect was eliminated in the presence of PKC inhibitors. Neither PKA nor PKG system was involved. These results suggest that the ATP-induced suppression may be mediated by a distinct Gq/11/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/PKC signaling pathway, following the activation of P2Y1,11 and other P2Y subtypes. Consistently, ATP suppressed glycine receptor-mediated light-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents of OFF-GCs. These results suggest that ATP may modify the ON-to-OFF crossover inhibition, thus changing action potential patterns of OFF-GCs. PMID:27357477

  9. Cannabinoid receptor 1 signaling in cardiovascular regulating nuclei in the brainstem: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr M. Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids elicit complex hemodynamic responses in experimental animals that involve both peripheral and central sites. Centrally administered cannabinoids have been shown to predominantly cause pressor response. However, very little is known about the mechanism of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R-centrally evoked pressor response. In this review, we provided an overview of the contemporary knowledge regarding the cannabinoids centrally elicited cardiovascular responses and the possible underlying signaling mechanisms. The current review focuses on the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM as the primary brainstem nucleus implicated in CB1R-evoked pressor response.

  10. Role of ERK/MAPK in endothelin receptor signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-wen; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2009-01-01

    muscle cells (VSMCs) through activation of endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptors. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in ET-1-induced VSMC contraction and proliferation. This study was designed to investigate...... showed significant inhibitory effects on ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2. However, blockage of L-type Ca2+ channels or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, chelating extracellular Ca2+ or emptying internal Ca2+ stores, did not affect ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2. CONCLUSION: The ETA...

  11. New insights of P2X7 receptor signaling pathway in alveolar functions

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Amarjit

    2013-01-01

    Purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated cation channel, is unique among all other family members because of its ability to respond to various stimuli and to modulate pro-inflammatory signaling. The activation of P2X7R in immune cells is absolutely required for mature interleukin -1beta (IL-1beta) and IL-18 production and release. Lung alveoli are lined by the structural alveolar epithelial type I (AEC I) and alveolar epithelial type II cells (AEC II). AEC I plays important roles in alv...

  12. Chlorogenic Acid Improves Late Diabetes through Adiponectin Receptor Signaling Pathways in db/db Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Shasha Jin; Cuiqing Chang; Lantao Zhang; Yang Liu; Xianren Huang; Zhimin Chen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) on glucose and lipid metabolism in late diabetic db/db mice, as well as on adiponectin receptors and their signaling molecules, to provide evidence for CGA in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We randomly divided 16 female db/db mice into db/db-CGA and db/db-control (CON) groups equally; db/m mice were used as control mice. The mice in both the db/db-CGA and db/m-CGA groups were administered 80 mg/kg/d CGA by lavage f...

  13. Growth hormone, interferon-gamma, and leukemia inhibitory factor utilize insulin receptor substrate-2 in intracellular signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, L S; Norstedt, G; Billestrup, Nils;

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) is tyrosyl-phosphorylated following stimulation of 3T3-F442A fibroblasts with growth hormone (GH), leukemia inhibitory factor and interferon-gamma. In response to GH and leukemia inhibitory factor, IRS-2 is immediately...... indicated that tyrosine residues in GH receptor are not necessary for tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-2; however, the regions of GH receptor necessary for IRS-2 tyrosyl phosphorylation are the same as those required for JAK2 association and tyrosyl phosphorylation. The role of IRS-2 as a signaling molecule...... of multiple members of the cytokine family of receptors that activate JAK kinases....

  14. Comprehensive logic based analyses of Toll-like receptor 4 signal transduction pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kumar Padwal

    Full Text Available Among the 13 TLRs in the vertebrate systems, only TLR4 utilizes both Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR-domain-containing adapter interferon-β-inducing Factor (TRIF adaptors to transduce signals triggering host-protective immune responses. Earlier studies on the pathway combined various experimental data in the form of one comprehensive map of TLR signaling. But in the absence of adequate kinetic parameters quantitative mathematical models that reveal emerging systems level properties and dynamic inter-regulation among the kinases/phosphatases of the TLR4 network are not yet available. So, here we used reaction stoichiometry-based and parameter independent logical modeling formalism to build the TLR4 signaling network model that captured the feedback regulations, interdependencies between signaling kinases and phosphatases and the outcome of simulated infections. The analyses of the TLR4 signaling network revealed 360 feedback loops, 157 negative and 203 positive; of which, 334 loops had the phosphatase PP1 as an essential component. The network elements' interdependency (positive or negative dependencies in perturbation conditions such as the phosphatase knockout conditions revealed interdependencies between the dual-specific phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 and the kinases in MAPK modules and the role of PP2A in the auto-regulation of Calmodulin kinase-II. Our simulations under the specific kinase or phosphatase gene-deficiency or inhibition conditions corroborated with several previously reported experimental data. The simulations to mimic Yersinia pestis and E. coli infections identified the key perturbation in the network and potential drug targets. Thus, our analyses of TLR4 signaling highlights the role of phosphatases as key regulatory factors in determining the global interdependencies among the network elements; uncovers novel signaling connections; identifies potential drug targets for

  15. Progesterone receptors - animal models and cell signalling in breast cancer: Diverse activation pathways for the progesterone receptor: possible implications for breast biology and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progesterone and estradiol, and their nuclear receptors, play essential roles in the physiology of the reproductive tract, the mammary gland and the nervous system. Estrogens have traditionally been considered associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. There is, however, compelling evidence that progesterone plays an important role in breast cell proliferation and cancer. Herein, we review the possible role of progestins and the progesterone receptor-associated signaling pathways in the development of breast cancer, as well as the therapeutic possibilities arising from our growing knowledge of the activation of the progesterone receptor by other proliferative mechanisms

  16. Differential pathway coupling efficiency of the activated insulin receptor drives signaling selectivity by xmeta, an allosteric partial agonist antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    XMetA, an anti-insulin receptor (IR) monoclonal antibody, is an allosteric partial agonist of the IR. We have previously reported that XMetA activates the “metabolic-biased” Akt kinase signaling pathway while having little or no effect on the “mitogenic” MAPK signaling pathwayof ERK 1/2. To inves...

  17. Linking ligand perception by PEPR pattern recognition receptors to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and downstream immune signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Walker, Robin K; Zhao, Yichen; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2012-11-27

    Little is known about molecular steps linking perception of pathogen invasion by cell surface sentry proteins acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to downstream cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, a critical step in plant immune signaling cascades. Some PRRs recognize molecules (such as flagellin) associated with microbial pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs), whereas others bind endogenous plant compounds (damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) such as peptides released from cells upon attack. This work focuses on the Arabidopsis DAMPs plant elicitor peptides (Peps) and their receptors, PEPR1 and PEPR2. Pep application causes in vivo cGMP generation and downstream signaling that is lost when the predicted PEPR receptor guanylyl cyclase (GC) active site is mutated. Pep-induced Ca(2+) elevation is attributable to cGMP activation of a Ca(2+) channel. Some differences were identified between Pep/PEPR signaling and the Ca(2+)-dependent immune signaling initiated by the flagellin peptide flg22 and its cognate receptor Flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2). FLS2 signaling may have a greater requirement for intracellular Ca(2+) stores and inositol phosphate signaling, whereas Pep/PEPR signaling requires extracellular Ca(2+). Maximal FLS2 signaling requires a functional Pep/PEPR system. This dependence was evidenced as a requirement for functional PEPR receptors for maximal flg22-dependent Ca(2+) elevation, H(2)O(2) generation, defense gene [WRKY33 and Plant Defensin 1.2 (PDF1.2)] expression, and flg22/FLS2-dependent impairment of pathogen growth. In a corresponding fashion, FLS2 loss of function impaired Pep signaling. In addition, a role for PAMP and DAMP perception in bolstering effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is reported; loss of function of either FLS2 or PEPR receptors impaired the hypersensitive response (HR) to an avirulent pathogen.

  18. An angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation switch patch revealed through evolutionary trace analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Yao, Rong; Ma, Jian-Nong;

    2010-01-01

    Seven transmembrane (7TM) or G protein-coupled receptors constitute a large superfamily of cell surface receptors sharing a structural motif of seven transmembrane spanning alpha helices. Their activation mechanism most likely involves concerted movements of the transmembrane helices, but remains...

  19. An Angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation switch patch revealed through Evolutionary Trace analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Yao, Rong; Ma, Jian-Nong;

    2010-01-01

    Seven transmembrane (7TM) or G protein-coupled receptors constitute a large superfamily of cell surface receptors sharing a structural motif of seven transmembrane spanning alpha helices. Their activation mechanism most likely involves concerted movements of the transmembrane helices, but remains...

  20. PRMT1-mediated methylation of the EGF receptor regulates signaling and cetuximab response

    KAUST Repository

    Liao, Hsin-Wei

    2015-11-16

    Posttranslational modifications to the intracellular domain of the EGFR are known to regulate EGFR functions; however, modifications to the extracellular domain and their effects remain relatively unexplored. Here, we determined that methylation at R198 and R200 of the EGFR extracellular domain by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) enhances binding to EGF and subsequent receptor dimerization and signaling activation. In a mouse orthotopic colorectal cancer xenograft model, expression of a methylation-defective EGFR reduced tumor growth. Moreover, increased EGFR methylation sustained signaling activation and cell proliferation in the presence of the therapeutic EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab. In colorectal cancer patients, EGFR methylation level also correlated with a higher recurrence rate after cetuximab treatment and reduced overall survival. Together, these data indicate that R198/R200 methylation of the EGFR plays an important role in regulating EGFR functionality and resistance to cetuximab treatment.

  1. Neuron-glia interactions through the Heartless FGF receptor signaling pathway mediate morphogenesis of Drosophila astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Tobias; Sheehan, Amy; Tasdemir-Yilmaz, Ozge E; Freeman, Marc R

    2014-07-16

    Astrocytes are critically important for neuronal circuit assembly and function. Mammalian protoplasmic astrocytes develop a dense ramified meshwork of cellular processes to form intimate contacts with neuronal cell bodies, neurites, and synapses. This close neuron-glia morphological relationship is essential for astrocyte function, but it remains unclear how astrocytes establish their intricate morphology, organize spatial domains, and associate with neurons and synapses in vivo. Here we characterize a Drosophila glial subtype that shows striking morphological and functional similarities to mammalian astrocytes. We demonstrate that the Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor Heartless autonomously controls astrocyte membrane growth, and the FGFs Pyramus and Thisbe direct astrocyte processes to ramify specifically in CNS synaptic regions. We further show that the shape and size of individual astrocytes are dynamically sculpted through inhibitory or competitive astrocyte-astrocyte interactions and Heartless FGF signaling. Our data identify FGF signaling through Heartless as a key regulator of astrocyte morphological elaboration in vivo.

  2. Transferrin receptor facilitates TGF-β and BMP signaling activation to control craniofacial morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, R; Zhang, K; Liu, K; Shao, X; Ding, Z; Wang, F; Hong, Y; Zhu, M; Li, H; Li, H

    2016-01-01

    The Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS), consisting of cleft palate, glossoptosis and micrognathia, is a common human birth defect. However, how this abnormality occurs remains largely unknown. Here we report that neural crest cell (NCC)-specific knockout of transferrin receptor (Tfrc), a well known transferrin transporter protein, caused micrognathia, cleft palate, severe respiratory distress and inability to suckle in mice, which highly resemble human PRS. Histological and anatomical analysis revealed that the cleft palate is due to the failure of palatal shelves elevation that resulted from a retarded extension of Meckel's cartilage. Interestingly, Tfrc deletion dramatically suppressed both transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in cranial NCCs-derived mandibular tissues, suggesting that Tfrc may act as a facilitator of these two signaling pathways during craniofacial morphogenesis. Together, our study uncovers an unknown function of Tfrc in craniofacial development and provides novel insight into the etiology of PRS. PMID:27362800

  3. Multi-organ Site Metastatic Reactivation Mediated by Non-canonical Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hua; Chakraborty, Goutam; Zhang, Zhanguo; Akalay, Intissar; Gadiya, Mayur; Gao, Yaquan; Sinha, Surajit; Hu, Jian; Jiang, Cizhong; Akram, Muzaffar; Brogi, Edi; Leitinger, Birgit; Giancotti, Filippo G

    2016-06-30

    Genetic screening identifies the atypical tetraspanin TM4SF1 as a strong mediator of metastatic reactivation of breast cancer. Intriguingly, TM4SF1 couples the collagen receptor tyrosine kinase DDR1 to the cortical adaptor syntenin 2 and, hence, to PKCα. The latter kinase phosphorylates and activates JAK2, leading to the activation of STAT3. This non-canonical mechanism of signaling induces the expression of SOX2 and NANOG; sustains the manifestation of cancer stem cell traits; and drives metastatic reactivation in the lung, bone, and brain. Bioinformatic analyses and pathological studies corroborate the clinical relevance of these findings. We conclude that non-canonical DDR1 signaling enables breast cancer cells to exploit the ubiquitous interstitial matrix component collagen I to undergo metastatic reactivation in multiple target organs. PMID:27368100

  4. Characterization of ubiquitination dependent dynamics in growth factor receptor signaling by quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akimov, Vyacheslav; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Nielsen, Mogens M;

    2011-01-01

    or chains of ubiquitin molecules of various types and lengths to targeted proteins is known to alter proteins' lifespan, localization and function and to modulate protein interactions. Despite its central importance in various aspects of cellular life and function there are only a limited number of reports...... investigating ubiquitination on a proteomic scale, mainly due to the inherited complexity and heterogeneity of ubiquitination. We describe here a quantitative proteomics strategy based on the specificity of ubiquitin binding domains (UBDs) and Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC......) for selectively decoding ubiquitination-driven processes involved in the regulation of cellular signaling networks. We applied this approach to characterize the temporal dynamics of ubiquitination events accompanying epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal transduction. We used recombinant UBDs derived...

  5. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Relays Metabolic Signals to Promote Cellular Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Fanny L

    2016-01-01

    While sensing the cell environment, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) interacts with different pathways involved in cellular homeostasis. This review summarizes evidence suggesting that cellular regeneration in the context of aging and diseases can be modulated by AHR signaling on stem cells. New insights connect orphaned observations into AHR interactions with critical signaling pathways such as WNT to propose a role of this ligand-activated transcription factor in the modulation of cellular regeneration by altering pathways that nurture cellular expansion such as changes in the metabolic efficiency rather than by directly altering cell cycling, proliferation, or cell death. Targeting the AHR to promote regeneration might prove to be a useful strategy to avoid unbalanced disruptions of homeostasis that may promote disease and also provide biological rationale for potential regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:27563312

  6. Loss of Dlg-1 in the mouse lens impairs fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SungKyoung Lee

    Full Text Available Coordination of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival is essential for normal development and maintenance of tissues in the adult organism. Growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways and planar cell polarity pathways are two regulators of many developmental processes. We have previously shown through analysis of mice conditionally null in the lens for the planar cell polarity gene (PCP, Dlg-1, that Dlg-1 is required for fiber differentiation. Herein, we asked if Dlg-1 is a regulator of the Fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr signaling pathway, which is known to be required for fiber cell differentiation. Western blot analysis of whole fiber cell extracts from control and Dlg-1 deficient lenses showed that levels of the Fgfr signaling intermediates pErk, pAkt, and pFrs2α, the Fgfr target, Erm, and the fiber cell specific protein, Mip26, were reduced in the Dlg-1 deficient fiber cells. The levels of Fgfr2 were decreased in Dlg-1 deficient lenses compared to controls. Conversely, levels of Fgfr1 in Dlg-1 deficient lenses were increased compared to controls. The changes in Fgfr levels were found to be specifically in the triton insoluble, cytoskeletal associated fraction of Dlg-1 deficient lenses. Immunofluorescent staining of lenses from E13.5 embryos showed that expression levels of pErk were reduced in the transition zone, a region of the lens that exhibits PCP, in the Dlg-1 deficient lenses as compared to controls. In control lenses, immunofluorescent staining for Fgfr2 was observed in the epithelium, transition zone and fibers. By E13.5, the intensity of staining for Fgfr2 was reduced in these regions of the Dlg-1 deficient lenses. Thus, loss of Dlg-1 in the lens impairs Fgfr signaling and leads to altered levels of Fgfrs, suggesting that Dlg-1 is a modulator of Fgfr signaling pathway at the level of the receptors and that Dlg-1 regulates fiber cell differentiation through its role in PCP.

  7. The human angiotensin AT(1) receptor supports G protein-independent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Aplin, Mark; Hansen, Jonas Tind;

    2008-01-01

    (1) receptor actions. However, it is currently unknown whether the human angiotensin AT(1) receptor can signal through G protein-independent mechanisms - and if so, what the physiological impact of such signalling is. We have performed a detailed pharmacological analysis of the human angiotensin AT(1......) receptor using a battery of angiotensin analogues and registered drugs targeting this receptor. We show that the human angiotensin AT(1) receptor signals directly through G protein-independent pathways and supports NIH3T3 cellular proliferation. The realization of G protein-independent signalling...

  8. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  9. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Ju [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Soo Yeon [Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seong Su [University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kim, Chan Woo [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Sandeep [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Park, Byeoung Soo [Nanotoxtech Co., Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Eun [Division of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeo Pyo [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hanjoong, E-mail: hjo@emory.edu [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hyun, E-mail: pyh012@sch.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-R{beta} and NF-{kappa}B-signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C{gamma}1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-{kappa}B-a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  10. Honey bee dopamine and octopamine receptors linked to intracellular calcium signaling have a close phylogenetic and pharmacological relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle T Beggs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three dopamine receptor genes have been identified that are highly conserved among arthropod species. One of these genes, referred to in honey bees as Amdop2, shows a close phylogenetic relationship to the a-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor family. In this study we examined in parallel the functional and pharmacological properties of AmDOP2 and the honey bee octopamine receptor, AmOA1. For comparison, pharmacological properties of the honey bee dopamine receptors AmDOP1 and AmDOP3, and the tyramine receptor AmTYR1, were also examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using HEK293 cells heterologously expressing honey bee biogenic amine receptors, we found that activation of AmDOP2 receptors, like AmOA1 receptors, initiates a rapid increase in intracellular calcium levels. We found no evidence of calcium signaling via AmDOP1, AmDOP3 or AmTYR1 receptors. AmDOP2- and AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular calcium were inhibited by 10 µM edelfosine indicating a requirement for phospholipase C-β activity in this signaling pathway. Edelfosine treatment had no effect on AmDOP2- or AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP. The synthetic compounds mianserin and epinastine, like cis-(Z-flupentixol and spiperone, were found to have significant antagonist activity on AmDOP2 receptors. All 4 compounds were effective antagonists also on AmOA1 receptors. Analysis of putative ligand binding sites offers a possible explanation for why epinastine acts as an antagonist at AmDOP2 receptors, but fails to block responses mediated via AmDOP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that AmDOP2, like AmOA1, is coupled not only to cAMP, but also to calcium-signalling and moreover, that the two signalling pathways are independent upstream of phospholipase C-β activity. The striking similarity between the pharmacological properties of these 2 receptors suggests an underlying conservation of structural properties related to receptor

  11. Quantitative Single-Cell Analysis of Signaling Pathways Activated Immediately Downstream of Histamine Receptor Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Unen, Jakobus; Rashidfarrokhi, Ali; Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Postma, Marten; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Goedhart, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) can visualize responses of individual cells in real time. Here, we evaluated whether FRET-based biosensors provide sufficient contrast and specificity to measure activity of G-protein-coupled receptors. The four histamine receptor subtypes (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R) respond to the ligand histamine by activating three canonical heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated signaling pathways with a reported high degree of specificity. Using FRET-based biosensors, we demonstrate that H1R activates Gαq. We also observed that H1R activates Gαi, albeit at a 10-fold lower potency. In addition to increasing cAMP levels, most likely via Gαs, we found that the H2R induces Gαq-mediated calcium release. The H3R and H4R activated Gαi with high specificity and a high potency. We demonstrate that a number of FRET sensors provide sufficient contrast to: 1) analyze the specificity of the histamine receptor subtypes for different heterotrimeric G-protein families with single-cell resolution, 2) probe for antagonist specificity, and 3) allow the measurement of single-cell concentration-response curves. PMID:27358232

  12. Effects of the neurotensin NTS₁ receptor agonist PD149163 on visual signal detection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, Todd M; Prus, Adam J

    2013-12-01

    Antipsychotic drugs provide limited efficacy for cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Recent studies have found that the neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonist and putative atypical antipsychotic drug PD149163 reverses deficits in sensory-gating and novel object recognition, suggesting that this compound may have the potential to improve cognitive functioning in schizophrenia. The present study sought to extend these investigations by evaluating the effects of PD149163 on sustained attention using a visual signal detection operant task in rats. PD149163, the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine, and the dopamine D2/3 receptor antagonist raclopride all significantly decreased percent "hit" accuracy, while none of these compounds altered "correct rejections" (compared to vehicle control). Clozapine and raclopride significantly increased response latency, while high doses of PD149163 and raclopride significantly increased trial omissions. Nicotine, which was tested as a positive control, significantly improved overall performance in this task and did not affect response latency or trial omissions. The present findings suggest that neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonists, like antipsychotic drugs, may inhibit sustained attention in this task despite having different pharmacological mechanisms of action.

  13. Conservation of toll-like receptor signaling pathways in teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, M.K.; Smith, K.D.; Aderem, A.; Hood, L.; Winton, J.R.; Roach, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    In mammals, toll-like receptors (TLR) recognize ligands, including pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and respond with ligand-specific induction of genes. In this study, we establish evolutionary conservation in teleost fish of key components of the TLR-signaling pathway that act as switches for differential gene induction, including MYD88, TIRAP, TRIF, TRAF6, IRF3, and IRF7. We further explore this conservation with a molecular phylogenetic analysis of MYD88. To the extent that current genomic analysis can establish, each vertebrate has one ortholog to each of these genes. For molecular tree construction and phylogeny inference, we demonstrate a methodology for including genes with only partial primary sequences without disrupting the topology provided by the high-confidence full-length sequences. Conservation of the TLR-signaling molecules suggests that the basic program of gene regulation by the TLR-signaling pathway is conserved across vertebrates. To test this hypothesis, leukocytes from a model fish, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were stimulated with known mammalian TLR agonists including: Diacylated and triacylated forms of lipoprotein, flagellin, two forms of LPS, synthetic double-stranded RNA, and two imidazoquinoline compounds (loxoribine and R848). Trout leukocytes responded in vitro to a number of these agonists with distinct patterns of cytokine expression that correspond to mammalian responses. Our results support the key prediction from our phylogenetic analyses that strong selective pressure of pathogenic microbes has preserved both TLR recognition and signaling functions during vertebrate evolution. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Signaling and Function in Cardiovascular Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Marie A; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2016-08-01

    Excellent reviews on central N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) signaling and function in cardiovascular regulating neuronal pools have been reported. However, much less attention has been given to NMDAR function in peripheral tissues, particularly the heart and vasculature, although a very recent review discusses such function in the kidney. In this short review, we discuss the NMDAR expression and complexity of its function in cardiovascular tissues. In conscious (contrary to anesthetized) rats, activation of the peripheral NMDAR triggers cardiovascular oxidative stress through the PI3K-ERK1/2-NO signaling pathway, which ultimately leads to elevation in blood pressure. Evidence also implicates Ca release, in the peripheral NMDAR-mediated pressor response. Despite evidence of circulating potent ligands (eg, D-aspartate and L-aspartate, L-homocysteic acid, and quinolinic acid) and also their coagonist (eg, glycine or D-serine), the physiological role of peripheral cardiovascular NMDAR remains elusive. Nonetheless, the cardiovascular relevance of the peripheral NMDAR might become apparent when its signaling is altered by drugs, such as alcohol, which interact with the NMDAR or its downstream signaling mechanisms. PMID:27046337

  15. A Brassinosteroid-Signaling Kinase Interacts withMultiple Receptor-Like Kinases in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Dear Editor, Higher plants have evolved hundreds of genes encodingreceptor-like kinases (RLKs), which function as cell surfacereceptors perceiving developmental and environmental sig-nals (Shiu et al., 2004). Many RLKs have been shown to playspecific roles in hormone responses, developmental regula-tion, defense against pathogen infection, and adaptationto abiotic stresses (Chae et al., 2009; Antolin-Llovera et al.,2012). The mechanisms that ensure specific signal transduc-tion from each RLK to target cellular responses remain poorlyunderstood. Recent studies revealed that many RLKs trans-duce signals by phosphorylating receptor-like cytoplasmickinases (RLCKs), which lack the transmembrane domainsbut are anchored at the plasma membrane through lipidmodification (Tang et al., 2008; Zhang et al., 2010; Shi et al.,2013). There are over 400 RLKs and only about 150 RLCKs inArabidopsis (Shiu et al., 2004). One outstanding question iswhether each RLCK mediates signaling downstream of a spe-cific RLK, participates in multiple RLK pathways, or mediatescrosstalk between RLK pathways.

  16. CD28 and T cell antigen receptor signal transduction coordinately regulate interleukin 2 gene expression in response to superantigen stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Activation of an immune response requires intercellular contact between T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APC). Interaction of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) with antigen in the context of major histocompatibility molecules mediates signal transduction, but T cell activation appears to require the induction of a second costimulatory signal transduction pathway. Recent studies suggest that interaction of CD28 with B7 on APC might deliver such a costimulatory signal. To investigate...

  17. P2Y₁ receptor-dependent diacylglycerol signaling microdomains in β cells promote insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Anne; Idevall-Hagren, Olof; Tengholm, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) controls numerous cell functions by regulating the localization of C1-domain-containing proteins, including protein kinase C (PKC), but little is known about the spatiotemporal dynamics of the lipid. Here, we explored plasma membrane DAG dynamics in pancreatic β cells and determined whether DAG signaling is involved in secretagogue-induced pulsatile release of insulin. Single MIN6 cells, primary mouse β cells, and human β cells within intact islets were transfected with translocation biosensors for DAG, PKC activity, or insulin secretion and imaged with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Muscarinic receptor stimulation triggered stable, homogenous DAG elevations, whereas glucose induced short-lived (7.1 ± 0.4 s) but high-amplitude elevations (up to 109 ± 10% fluorescence increase) in spatially confined membrane regions. The spiking was mimicked by membrane depolarization and suppressed after inhibition of exocytosis or of purinergic P2Y₁, but not P2X receptors, reflecting involvement of autocrine purinoceptor activation after exocytotic release of ATP. Each DAG spike caused local PKC activation with resulting dissociation of its substrate protein MARCKS from the plasma membrane. Inhibition of spiking reduced glucose-induced pulsatile insulin secretion. Thus, stimulus-specific DAG signaling patterns appear in the plasma membrane, including distinct microdomains, which have implications for the kinetic control of exocytosis and other membrane-associated processes.

  18. Estrogen/estrogen receptor alpha signaling in mouse posterofrontal cranial suture fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron W James

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While premature suture fusion, or craniosynostosis, is a relatively common condition, the cause is often unknown. Estrogens are associated with growth plate fusion of endochondral bones. In the following study, we explore the previously unknown significance of estrogen/estrogen receptor signaling in cranial suture biology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Firstly, estrogen receptor (ER expression was examined in physiologically fusing (posterofrontal and patent (sagittal mouse cranial sutures by quantitative RT-PCR. Next, the cranial suture phenotype of ER alpha and ER beta knockout (alphaERKO, betaERKO mice was studied. Subsequently, mouse suture-derived mesenchymal cells (SMCs were isolated; the effects of 17-beta estradiol or the estrogen antagonist Fulvestrant on gene expression, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation were examined in vitro. Finally, in vivo experiments were performed in which Fulvestrant was administered subcutaneously to the mouse calvaria. Results showed that increased ERalpha but not ERbeta transcript abundance temporally coincided with posterofrontal suture fusion. The alphaERKO but not betaERKO mouse exhibited delayed posterofrontal suture fusion. In vitro, addition of 17-beta estradiol enhanced both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation in suture-derived mesenchymal cells, effects reversible by Fulvestrant. Finally, in vivo application of Fulvestrant significantly diminished calvarial osteogenesis, inhibiting suture fusion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Estrogen signaling through ERalpha but not ERbeta is associated with and necessary for normal mouse posterofrontal suture fusion. In vitro studies suggest that estrogens may play a role in osteoblast and/or chondrocyte differentiation within the cranial suture complex.

  19. Diverse signaling systems activated by the sweet taste receptor in human GLP-1-secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Takeda, Shigeki; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Kojima, Itaru

    2014-08-25

    Sweet taste receptor regulates GLP-1 secretion in enteroendocrine L-cells. We investigated the signaling system activated by this receptor using Hutu-80 cells. We stimulated them with sucralose, saccharin, acesulfame K and glycyrrhizin. These sweeteners stimulated GLP-1 secretion, which was attenuated by lactisole. All these sweeteners elevated cytoplasmic cyclic AMP ([cAMP]c) whereas only sucralose and saccharin induced a monophasic increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]c). Removal of extracellular calcium or sodium and addition of a Gq/11 inhibitor greatly reduced the [Ca(2+)]c responses to two sweeteners. In contrast, acesulfame K induced rapid and sustained reduction of [Ca(2+)]c. In addition, glycyrrhizin first reduced [Ca(2+)]c which was followed by an elevation of [Ca(2+)]c. Reductions of [Ca(2+)]c induced by acesulfame K and glycyrrhizin were attenuated by a calmodulin inhibitor or by knockdown of the plasma membrane calcium pump. These results indicate that various sweet molecules act as biased agonists and evoke strikingly different patterns of intracellular signals. PMID:25017733

  20. An electrostatic selection mechanism controls sequential kinase signaling downstream of the T cell receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neel H; Wang, Qi; Yan, Qingrong; Karandur, Deepti; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Fallahee, Ian R; Russ, William P; Ranganathan, Rama; Weiss, Arthur; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of events that initiates T cell signaling is dictated by the specificities and order of activation of the tyrosine kinases that signal downstream of the T cell receptor. Using a platform that combines exhaustive point-mutagenesis of peptide substrates, bacterial surface-display, cell sorting, and deep sequencing, we have defined the specificities of the first two kinases in this pathway, Lck and ZAP-70, for the T cell receptor ζ chain and the scaffold proteins LAT and SLP-76. We find that ZAP-70 selects its substrates by utilizing an electrostatic mechanism that excludes substrates with positively-charged residues and favors LAT and SLP-76 phosphosites that are surrounded by negatively-charged residues. This mechanism prevents ZAP-70 from phosphorylating its own activation loop, thereby enforcing its strict dependence on Lck for activation. The sequence features in ZAP-70, LAT, and SLP-76 that underlie electrostatic selectivity likely contribute to the specific response of T cells to foreign antigens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20105.001 PMID:27700984

  1. Aberrant Activation of the RANK Signaling Receptor Induces Murine Salivary Gland Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M Szwarc

    Full Text Available Unlike cancers of related exocrine tissues such as the mammary and prostate gland, diagnosis and treatment of aggressive salivary gland malignancies have not markedly advanced in decades. Effective clinical management of malignant salivary gland cancers is undercut by our limited knowledge concerning the key molecular signals that underpin the etiopathogenesis of this rare and heterogeneous head and neck cancer. Without knowledge of the critical signals that drive salivary gland tumorigenesis, tumor vulnerabilities cannot be exploited that allow for targeted molecular therapies. This knowledge insufficiency is further exacerbated by a paucity of preclinical mouse models (as compared to other cancer fields with which to both study salivary gland pathobiology and test novel intervention strategies. Using a mouse transgenic approach, we demonstrate that deregulation of the Receptor Activator of NFkB Ligand (RANKL/RANK signaling axis results in rapid tumor development in all three major salivary glands. In line with its established role in other exocrine gland cancers (i.e., breast cancer, the RANKL/RANK signaling axis elicits an aggressive salivary gland tumor phenotype both at the histologic and molecular level. Despite the ability of this cytokine signaling axis to drive advanced stage disease within a short latency period, early blockade of RANKL/RANK signaling markedly attenuates the development of malignant salivary gland neoplasms. Together, our findings have uncovered a tumorigenic role for RANKL/RANK in the salivary gland and suggest that targeting this pathway may represent a novel therapeutic intervention approach in the prevention and/or treatment of this understudied head and neck cancer.

  2. Mitochondria-derived hydrogen peroxide selectively enhances T cell receptor-initiated signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Tejpal; Levine, Alan D

    2013-09-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-initiated signal transduction is reported to increase production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide (O2˙(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as second messengers. Although H2O2 can modulate signal transduction by inactivating protein phosphatases, the mechanism and the subcellular localization of intracellular H2O2 as a second messenger of the TCR are not known. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the dismutation of highly reactive O2˙(-) into H2O2 and thus acts as an intracellular generator of H2O2. As charged O2˙(-) is unable to diffuse through intracellular membranes, cells express distinct SOD isoforms in the cytosol (Cu,Zn-SOD) and mitochondria (Mn-SOD), where they locally scavenge O2˙(-) leading to production of H2O2. A 2-fold organelle-specific overexpression of either SOD in Jurkat T cell lines increases intracellular production of H2O2 but does not alter the levels of intracellular H2O2 scavenging enzymes such as catalase, membrane-bound peroxiredoxin1 (Prx1), and cytosolic Prx2. We report that overexpression of Mn-SOD enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of TCR-associated membrane proximal signal transduction molecules Lck, LAT, ZAP70, PLCγ1, and SLP76 within 1 min of TCR cross-linking. This increase in mitochondrial H2O2 specifically modulates MAPK signaling through the JNK/cJun pathway, whereas overexpressing Cu,Zn-SOD had no effect on any of these TCR-mediated signaling molecules. As mitochondria translocate to the immunological synapse during TCR activation, we hypothesize this translocation provides the effective concentration of H2O2 required to selectively modulate downstream signal transduction pathways.

  3. Signalling mechanism for somatostatin receptor 5-mediated suppression of AMPA responses in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qin-Qin; Sheng, Wen-Long; Zhang, Gong; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is involved in a variety of physiological functions via the activation of five subtypes of specific receptors (sst1-5). Here, we investigated the effects of SRIF on AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated currents (AMPA currents) in isolated rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) using patch-clamp techniques. Immunofluorescence double labelling demonstrated the expression of sst5 in rat GCs. Consistent to this, whole cell AMPA currents of GCs were dose-dependently suppressed by SRIF, and the effect was reversed by the sst5 antagonist BIM-23056. Intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S or pre-incubation with the Gi/o inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) abolished the SRIF effect. The SRIF effect was mimicked by the administration of either 8-Br-cAMP or forskolin, but was eliminated by the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonists H-89/KT5720/Rp-cAMP. Moreover, SRIF increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels and did not suppress the AMPA currents when GCs were infused with an intracellular Ca(2+)-free solution or in the presence of ryanodine receptor modulators caffeine/ryanodine. Furthermore, the SRIF effect was eliminated when the activity of calmodulin (CaM), calcineurin and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) was blocked with W-7, FK-506 and okadaic acid, respectively. SRIF persisted to suppress the AMPA currents when cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-/phosphatidylcholine (PC)-phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways were blocked. In rat flat-mount retinas, SRIF suppressed AMPAR-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) in GCs. We conclude that a distinct Gi/o/cAMP-PKA/ryanodine/Ca(2+)/CaM/calcineurin/PP1 signalling pathway comes into play due to the activation of sst5 to mediate the SRIF effect on GCs. PMID:26969240

  4. Targeting colorectal cancer via its microenvironment by inhibiting IGF-1 Receptor-insulin receptor substrate and STAT3 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lopez, Elsa; Flashner-Abramson, Efrat; Shalapour, Shabnam; Zhong, Zhenyu; Taniguchi, Koji; Levitzki, Alexander; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) exerts critical pro-tumorigenic effects through cytokines and growth factors that support cancer cell proliferation, survival, motility and invasion. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) stimulate colorectal cancer (CRC) development and progression via cell autonomous and microenvironmental effects. Using a unique inhibitor, NT157, which targets both IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and STAT3, we show that these pathways regulate many TME functions associated with sporadic colonic tumorigenesis in CPC-APC mice, in which cancer development is driven by loss of the Apc tumor suppressor gene. NT157 causes a substantial reduction in tumor burden by affecting cancer cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) and myeloid cells. Decreased cancer cell proliferation and increased apoptosis were accompanied by inhibition of CAF activation and decreased inflammation. Furthermore, NT157 inhibited expression of pro-tumorigenic cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, including IL-6, IL-11 and IL-23 as well as CCL2, CCL5, CXCL7, CXCL5, ICAM1 and TGFβ; decreased cancer cell migratory activity and reduced their proliferation in the liver. NT157 represents a new class of anti-cancer drugs that affect both the malignant cell and its supportive microenvironment. PMID:26364612

  5. Phospho-kinase profile of triple negative breast cancer and androgen receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the oncogenesis of different tumors, as is the case in prostate cancer. In triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) a gene expression classification has described different subgroups including a luminal androgen subtype. The AR can be controlled by several mechanisms like the activation of membrane tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling pathways. However little is known in TNBC about how the AR is modulated by these mechanisms and the potential therapeutic strategists to inhibit its expression. We used human samples to evaluate the expression of AR by western-blot and phospho-proteomic kinase arrays that recognize membrane tyrosine kinase receptors and downstream mediators. Western-blots in human cell lines were carried out to analyze the expression and activation of individual proteins. Drugs against these kinases in different conditions were used to measure the expression of the androgen receptor. PCR experiments were performed to assess changes in the AR gene after therapeutic modulation of these pathways. AR is present in a subset of TNBC and its expression correlates with activated membrane receptor kinases-EGFR and PDGFRβ in human samples and cell lines. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway in TNBC cell lines decreased notably the expression of the AR. Concomitant administration of the anti-androgen bicalutamide with the EGFR, PDGFRβ and Erk1/2 inhibitors, decreased the amount of AR compared to each agent given alone, and had an additive anti-proliferative effect. Administration of dihydrotestosterone augmented the expression of AR that was not modified by the inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR or Erk1/2 pathways. AR expression was posttranscriptionally regulated by PI3K or Erk1/2 inhibition. Our results describe the expression of the AR in TNBC as a druggable target and further suggest the combination of bicalutamide with inhibitors of EGFR, PDGFRβ or Erk1/2 for future development

  6. Differential actions of orexin receptors in brainstem cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons revealed by receptor knockouts: implications for orexinergic signaling in arousal and narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi A Kohlmeier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orexin neuropeptides influence multiple homeostatic functions and play an essential role in the expression of normal sleep-wake behavior. While their two known receptors (OX1 and OX2 are targets for novel pharmacotherapeutics, the actions mediated by each receptor remain largely unexplored. Using brain slices from mice constitutively lacking either receptor, we used whole-cell and Ca2+ imaging methods to delineate the cellular actions of each receptor within cholinergic (laterodorsal tegmental nucleus; LDT and monoaminergic (dorsal raphe; DR and locus coeruleus; LC brainstem nuclei – where orexins promote arousal and suppress REM sleep. In slices from OX2-/- mice, orexin-A (300 nM elicited wild-type responses in LDT, DR and LC neurons consisting of a depolarizing current and augmented voltage-dependent Ca2+ transients. In slices from OX1-/- mice, the depolarizing current was absent in LDT and LC neurons and was attenuated in DR neurons, although Ca2+-transients were still augmented. Since orexin-A produced neither of these actions in slices lacking both receptors, our findings suggest that orexin-mediated depolarization is mediated by both receptors in DR, but is exclusively mediated by OX1 in LDT and LC neurons, even though OX2 is present and OX2 mRNA appears elevated in brainstems from OX1-/- mice. Considering published behavioral data, these findings support a model in which orexin-mediated excitation of mesopontine cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons contributes little to stabilizing spontaneous waking and sleep bouts, but functions in context-dependent arousal and helps restrict muscle atonia to REM sleep. The augmented Ca2± transients mediated by both receptors appeared mediated by influx via L-type Ca2+ channels, which is often linked to transcriptional signaling. This could provide an adaptive signal to compensate for receptor loss or prolonged antagonism and may contribute to the reduced severity of narcolepsy in single receptor

  7. Fluorescence/bioluminescence resonance energy transfer techniques to study G-protein-coupled receptor activation and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Martin J; Nuber, Susanne; Hoffmann, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and BRET) techniques allow the sensitive monitoring of distances between two labels at the nanometer scale. Depending on the placement of the labels, this permits the analysis of conformational changes within a single protein (for example of a receptor) or the monitoring of protein-protein interactions (for example, between receptors and G-protein subunits). Over the past decade, numerous such techniques have been developed to monitor the activation and signaling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in both the purified, reconstituted state and in intact cells. These techniques span the entire spectrum from ligand binding to the receptors down to intracellular second messengers. They allow the determination and the visualization of signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution. With these techniques, it has been demonstrated that GPCR signals may show spatial and temporal patterning. In particular, evidence has been provided for spatial compartmentalization of GPCRs and their signals in intact cells and for distinct physiological consequences of such spatial patterning. We review here the FRET and BRET technologies that have been developed for G-protein-coupled receptors and their signaling proteins (G-proteins, effectors) and the concepts that result from such experiments. PMID:22407612

  8. FGF-receptor signalling controls neural cell diversity in the zebrafish hindbrain by regulating olig2 and sox9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esain, Virginie; Postlethwait, John H; Charnay, Patrick; Ghislain, Julien

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the generation of neural cell diversity are the subject of intense investigation, which has highlighted the involvement of different signalling molecules including Shh, BMP and Wnt. By contrast, relatively little is known about FGF in this process. In this report we identify an FGF-receptor-dependent pathway in zebrafish hindbrain neural progenitors that give rise to somatic motoneurons, oligodendrocyte progenitors and differentiating astroglia. Using a combination of chemical and genetic approaches to conditionally inactivate FGF-receptor signalling, we investigate the role of this pathway. We show that FGF-receptor signalling is not essential for the survival or maintenance of hindbrain neural progenitors but controls their fate by coordinately regulating key transcription factors. First, by cooperating with Shh, FGF-receptor signalling controls the expression of olig2, a patterning gene essential for the specification of somatic motoneurons and oligodendrocytes. Second, FGF-receptor signalling controls the development of both oligodendrocyte progenitors and astroglia through the regulation of sox9, a gliogenic transcription factor the function of which we show to be conserved in the zebrafish hindbrain. Overall, for the first time in vivo, our results reveal a mechanism of FGF in the control of neural cell diversity. PMID:20023158

  9. Orexin/hypocretin receptor 1 signaling mediates Pavlovian cue-food conditioning and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Sara E; Cole, Sindy; Petrovich, Gorica D

    2016-08-01

    Learned food cues can drive feeding in the absence of hunger, and orexin/hypocretin signaling is necessary for this type of overeating. The current study examined whether orexin also mediates cue-food learning during the acquisition and extinction of these associations. In Experiment 1, rats underwent two sessions of Pavlovian appetitive conditioning, consisting of tone-food presentations. Prior to each session, rats received either the orexin 1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 (SB) or vehicle systemically. SB treatment did not affect conditioned responses during the first conditioning session, measured as food cup behavior during the tone and latency to approach the food cup after the tone onset, compared to the vehicle group. During the second conditioning session, SB treatment attenuated learning. All groups that received SB, prior to either the first or second conditioning session, displayed significantly less food cup behavior and had longer latencies to approach the food cup after tone onset compared to the vehicle group. These findings suggest orexin signaling at the 1 receptor mediates the consolidation and recall of cue-food acquisition. In Experiment 2, another group of rats underwent tone-food conditioning sessions (drug free), followed by two extinction sessions under either SB or vehicle treatment. Similar to Experiment 1, SB did not affect conditioned responses during the first session. During the second extinction session, the group that received SB prior to the first extinction session, but vehicle prior to the second, expressed conditioned food cup responses longer after tone offset, when the pellets were previously delivered during conditioning, and maintained shorter latencies to approach the food cup compared to the other groups. The persistence of these conditioned behaviors indicates impairment in extinction consolidation due to SB treatment during the first extinction session. Together, these results demonstrate an important role for orexin

  10. HER/ErbB Receptor Interactions and Signaling Patterns in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi; Opresko, Lee K.; Shankaran, Harish; Chrisler, William B.; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2009-10-31

    Knowledge about signaling pathways is typically compiled based on data gathered using different cell lines. This approach implicitly assumes that cell line dependence is not important, which can be misleading because different cell lines do not always respond to a particular stimulus in the same way. The lack of coherent data collected from closely related cellular systems can be detrimental to the efforts to understand the regulation of biological processes. In this study, we report the development of a library of human mammary epithelial (HME) cell lines which express endogenous levels of the cell surface receptor EGFR/HER1, and different levels of HER2 and HER3. Using our clone library, we have quantified the interactions among the HER1-3 receptors and systematically investigated the existing hypotheses about their interaction patterns. Contrary to earlier suggestions, we find that lateral interactions with HER2 do not lead to strong transactivation between EGFR and HER3. Our study identified HER2 as the dominant dimerization partner for both EGFR and HER3, and revealed that EGFR and HER3 activations are only weakly linked in HME cells. We have also quantified the time-dependent activation patterns of the downstream effectors Erk and Akt. We found that HER3 signaling makes the strongest contribution to Akt activation and that, stimulation of either EGFR or HER3 pathways activate Erk at significant levels. Our study shows that cell libraries formed from closely related clones can be a powerful resource for pursuing the quantitative investigations that are necessary for developing a systems level understanding of cell signaling.

  11. Signaling through urokinase and urokinase receptor in lung cancer cells requires interactions with beta1 integrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi-Hui; Hill, Marla L; Brumwell, Alexis N; Chapman, Harold A; Wei, Ying

    2008-11-15

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is upregulated upon tumor cell invasion and correlates with poor lung cancer survival. Although a cis-interaction with integrins has been ascribed to uPAR, whether this interaction alone is critical to urokinase (uPA)- and uPAR-dependent signaling and tumor promotion is unclear. Here we report the functional consequences of point mutations of uPAR (H249A-D262A) that eliminate beta1 integrin interactions but maintain uPA binding, vitronectin attachment and association with alphaV integrins, caveolin and epidermal growth factor receptor. Disruption of uPAR interactions with beta1 integrins recapitulated previously reported findings with beta1-integrin-derived peptides that attenuated matrix-dependent ERK activation, MMP expression and in vitro migration by human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The uPAR mutant cells acquired enhanced capacity to adhere to vitronectin via uPAR-alphaVbeta5-integrin, rather than through the uPAR-alpha3beta1-integrin complex and they were unable to initiate uPA signaling to activate ERK, Akt or Stat1. In an orthotopic lung cancer model, uPAR mutant cells exhibited reduced tumor size compared with cells expressing wild-type uPAR. Taken together, the results indicate that uPAR-beta1-integrin interactions are essential to signals induced by integrin matrix ligands or uPA that support lung cancer cell invasion in vitro and progression in vivo. PMID:18940913

  12. Hepatic growth hormone and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in body growth, steatosis and metabolic liver cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kristina M; Themanns, Madeleine; Friedbichler, Katrin; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm; Esterbauer, Harald; Tuckermann, Jan P; Moriggl, Richard

    2012-09-25

    Growth hormone (GH) and glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in the control of processes that are essential for the maintenance of vital body functions including energy supply and growth control. GH and GCs have been well characterized to regulate systemic energy homeostasis, particular during certain conditions of physical stress. However, dysfunctional signaling in both pathways is linked to various metabolic disorders associated with aberrant carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In liver, GH-dependent activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 controls a variety of physiologic functions within hepatocytes. Similarly, GCs, through activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), influence many important liver functions such as gluconeogenesis. Studies in hepatic Stat5 or GR knockout mice have revealed that they similarly control liver function on their target gene level and indeed, the GR functions often as a cofactor of STAT5 for GH-induced genes. Gene sets, which require physical STAT5-GR interaction, include those controlling body growth and maturation. More recently, it has become evident that impairment of GH-STAT5 signaling in different experimental models correlates with metabolic liver disease, ranging from hepatic steatosis to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). While GH-activated STAT5 has a protective role in chronic liver disease, experimental disruption of GC-GR signaling rather seems to ameliorate metabolic disorders under metabolic challenge. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge about hepatic GH-STAT5 and GC-GR signaling in body growth, metabolism, and protection from fatty liver disease and HCC development.

  13. Enhancement of leptin receptor signaling by SOCS3 deficiency induces development of gastric tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki-Ohara, K; Mayuzumi, H; Kato, S; Minokoshi, Y; Otsubo, T; Kawamura, Y I; Dohi, T; Matsuzaki, G; Yoshimura, A

    2014-01-01

    Leptin acts on its receptor (ObR) in the hypothalamus to inhibit food intake and energy expenditure. Leptin and ObR are also expressed in the gastrointestinal tract; however, the physiological significance of leptin signaling in the gut remains uncertain. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) is a key negative feedback regulator of ObR-mediated signaling in the hypothalamus. We now show that gastrointestinal epithelial cell-specific SOCS3 conditional knockout (T3b-SOCS3 cKO) mice developed gastric tumors by enhancing leptin production and the ObRb/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. All T3b-SOCS3 cKO mice developed tumors in the stomach but not in the bowels by 2 months of age, even though the SOCS3 deletion occurred in both the epithelium of stomach and bowels. The tumors developed in the absence of the inflammatory response and all cKO mice died within 6 months. These tumors displayed pathology and molecular alterations, such as an increase in MUC2 (Mucin 2, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming) and TFF3 (trefoil factor 3), resembling human intestinal-type gastric tumors. Administration of antileptin antibody to T3b-SOCS3 cKO mice reduced hyperplasia of gastric mucosa, which is the step of the initiation of gastric tumor. These data suggest that SOCS3 is an antigastric tumor gene that suppresses leptin overexpression and ObRb/STAT3 hyperactivation, supporting the hypothesis that the leptin/ObRb/STAT3 axis accelerates tumorigenesis and that it may represent a new therapeutic target for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling Mecanismos moleculares de señalización del receptor de glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.Esta revisión destaca los más recientes hallazgos sobre los mecanismos moleculares del receptor de glucocorticoides (GR. La mayoría de los efectos de los glucocorticoides son mediados por los GR intracelulares presentes en casi todos los tejidos y controlan la activación transcripcional por mecanismos directos e indirectos. Las respuestas a los glucocorticoides son específicas para cada gen y tejido. Los GR se asocian en forma selectiva con ligandos producidos en la glándula adrenal, corticosteroides, en respuesta a cambios neuroendocrinos. La interacción del ligando con el GR promueve: a la unión del GR a elementos genómicos de respuesta a glucocorticoides, modulando la transcripción; b la interacción de monómeros del GR con otros factores de transcripción activados por otras vías, llevando a la transrepresión. El GR regula un amplio espectro de funciones fisiológicas, incluyendo la

  15. G-protein coupled receptor signaling architecture of mammalian immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Polouliakh

    Full Text Available A series of recent studies on large-scale networks of signaling and metabolic systems revealed that a certain network structure often called "bow-tie network" are observed. In signaling systems, bow-tie network takes a form with diverse and redundant inputs and outputs connected via a small numbers of core molecules. While arguments have been made that such network architecture enhances robustness and evolvability of biological systems, its functional role at a cellular level remains obscure. A hypothesis was proposed that such a network function as a stimuli-reaction classifier where dynamics of core molecules dictate downstream transcriptional activities, hence physiological responses against stimuli. In this study, we examined whether such hypothesis can be verified using experimental data from Alliance for Cellular Signaling (AfCS that comprehensively measured GPCR related ligands response for B-cell and macrophage. In a GPCR signaling system, cAMP and Ca2+ act as core molecules. Stimuli-response for 32 ligands to B-Cells and 23 ligands to macrophages has been measured. We found that ligands with correlated changes of cAMP and Ca2+ tend to cluster closely together within the hyperspaces of both cell types and they induced genes involved in the same cellular processes. It was found that ligands inducing cAMP synthesis activate genes involved in cell growth and proliferation; cAMP and Ca2+ molecules that increased together form a feedback loop and induce immune cells to migrate and adhere together. In contrast, ligands without a core molecules response are scattered throughout the hyperspace and do not share clusters. G-protein coupling receptors together with immune response specific receptors were found in cAMP and Ca2+ activated clusters. Analyses have been done on the original software applicable for discovering 'bow-tie' network architectures within the complex network of intracellular signaling where ab initio clustering has been

  16. Regulation of protease-activated receptor 1 signaling by the adaptor protein complex 2 and R4 subfamily of regulator of G protein signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Buxin; Siderovski, David P; Neubig, Richard R; Lawson, Mark A; Trejo, Joann

    2014-01-17

    The G protein-coupled protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is irreversibly proteolytically activated by thrombin. Hence, the precise regulation of PAR1 signaling is important for proper cellular responses. In addition to desensitization, internalization and lysosomal sorting of activated PAR1 are critical for the termination of signaling. Unlike most G protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 internalization is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2) and epsin-1, rather than β-arrestins. However, the function of AP-2 and epsin-1 in the regulation of PAR1 signaling is not known. Here, we report that AP-2, and not epsin-1, regulates activated PAR1-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis via two different mechanisms that involve, in part, a subset of R4 subfamily of "regulator of G protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. A significantly greater increase in activated PAR1 signaling was observed in cells depleted of AP-2 using siRNA or in cells expressing a PAR1 (420)AKKAA(424) mutant with defective AP-2 binding. This effect was attributed to AP-2 modulation of PAR1 surface expression and efficiency of G protein coupling. We further found that ectopic expression of R4 subfamily members RGS2, RGS3, RGS4, and RGS5 reduced activated PAR1 wild-type signaling, whereas signaling by the PAR1 AKKAA mutant was minimally affected. Intriguingly, siRNA-mediated depletion analysis revealed a function for RGS5 in the regulation of signaling by the PAR1 wild type but not the AKKAA mutant. Moreover, activation of the PAR1 wild type, and not the AKKAA mutant, induced Gαq association with RGS3 via an AP-2-dependent mechanism. Thus, AP-2 regulates activated PAR1 signaling by altering receptor surface expression and through recruitment of RGS proteins. PMID:24297163

  17. Blockade of IL-36 receptor signaling does not prevent from TNF-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Derer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Interleukin (IL-36α is a newly described member of the IL-1 cytokine family with a known inflammatory and pathogenic function in psoriasis. Recently, we could demonstrate that the receptor (IL-36R, its ligand IL-36α and its antagonist IL-36Ra are expressed in synovial tissue of arthritis patients. Furthermore, IL-36α induces MAP-kinase and NFκB signaling in human synovial fibroblasts with subsequent expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. METHODS: To understand the pathomechanism of IL-36 dependent inflammation, we investigated the biological impact of IL-36α signaling in the hTNFtg mouse. Also the impact on osteoclastogenesis by IL-36α was tested in murine and human osteoclast assays. RESULTS: Diseased mice showed an increased expression of IL-36R and IL-36α in inflamed knee joints compared to wildtype controls. However, preventively treating mice with an IL-36R blocking antibody led to no changes in clinical onset and pattern of disease. Furthermore, blockade of IL-36 signaling did not change histological signs of TNF-induced arthritis. Additionally, no alteration on bone homeostasis was observed in ex vivo murine and human osteoclast differentiation assays. CONCLUSION: Thus we conclude that IL-36α does not affect the development of inflammatory arthritis.

  18. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-lei Han; Guo-hua Liu; Jin Guo; Shu-juan Yu; Jing Huang

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2-damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2-induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2-induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway.

  19. Perturbed T cell IL7 receptor-signaling in chronic Chagas disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albareda, M. Cecilia; Perez-Mazliah, Damián; Natale, M. Ailén; Castro-Eiro, Melisa; Alvarez, María G.; Viotti, Rodolfo; Bertocchi, Graciela; Lococo, Bruno; Tarleton, Rick L; Laucella, Susana A.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that immune responses in subjects with chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection display features common to other persistent infections with signs of T cell exhaustion. Alterations in cytokine receptor signal transduction have emerged as one of the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of T cell exhaustion. Herein, we performed an analysis of the expression of IL-7R components (CD127 and CD132) on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and evaluated IL-7-dependent signaling events in patients at different clinical stages of chronic chagasic heart disease. Subjects with no signs of cardiac disease showed a decrease in CD127+CD132+ cells and a reciprocal gain of CD127-CD132+ in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells compared to either patients exhibiting heart enlargement or uninfected controls. T. cruzi infection, in vitro, was able to stimulate the downregulation of CD127 and the upregulation of CD132 on T cells. IL-7-induced phosphorylation of STAT5 as well as Bcl-2 and CD25 expression were lower in T. cruzi-infected subjects compared with uninfected controls. The serum levels of IL-7 was also increased in chronic chagasic patients. The present study highlights perturbed IL-7/IL-7R T cell signaling through STAT5 as a potential mechanism of T cell exhaustion in chronic T. cruzi infection. PMID:25769928

  20. Genomics of signaling crosstalk of estrogen receptor alpha in breast cancer cells.

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    Peter Dudek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha is a ligand-regulated transcription factor. However, a wide variety of other extracellular signals can activate ERalpha in the absence of estrogen. The impact of these alternate modes of activation on gene expression profiles has not been characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that estrogen, growth factors and cAMP elicit surprisingly distinct ERalpha-dependent transcriptional responses in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. In response to growth factors and cAMP, ERalpha primarily activates and represses genes, respectively. The combined treatments with the anti-estrogen tamoxifen and cAMP or growth factors regulate yet other sets of genes. In many cases, tamoxifen is perverted to an agonist, potentially mimicking what is happening in certain tamoxifen-resistant breast tumors and emphasizing the importance of the cellular signaling environment. Using a computational analysis, we predicted that a Hox protein might be involved in mediating such combinatorial effects, and then confirmed it experimentally. Although both tamoxifen and cAMP block the proliferation of MCF7 cells, their combined application stimulates it, and this can be blocked with a dominant-negative Hox mutant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The activating signal dictates both target gene selection and regulation by ERalpha, and this has consequences on global gene expression patterns that may be relevant to understanding the progression of ERalpha-dependent carcinomas.

  1. Attenuation of signaling pathways stimulated by pathologically activated FGF-receptor 2 mutants prevents craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswarakumar, V P; Ozcan, F; Lew, E D; Bae, J H; Tomé, F; Booth, C J; Adams, D J; Lax, I; Schlessinger, J

    2006-12-01

    Craniosynostosis, the fusion of one or more of the sutures of the skull vault before the brain completes its growth, is a common (1 in 2,500 births) craniofacial abnormality, approximately 20% of which occurrences are caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF receptors (FGFRs). We describe a genetic and pharmacological approach for the treatment of a murine model system of Crouzon-like craniosynostosis induced by a dominant mutation in Fgfr2c. Using genetically modified mice, we demonstrate that premature fusion of sutures mediated by Crouzon-like activated Fgfr2c mutant is prevented by attenuation of signaling pathways by selective uncoupling between the docking protein Frs2alpha and activated Fgfr2c, resulting in normal skull development. We also demonstrate that attenuation of Fgfr signaling in a calvaria organ culture with an Fgfr inhibitor prevents premature fusion of sutures without adversely affecting calvaria development. These experiments show that attenuation of FGFR signaling by pharmacological intervention could be applied for the treatment of craniosynostosis or other severe bone disorders caused by mutations in FGFRs that currently have no treatment. PMID:17132737

  2. Human heterochromatin protein 1 isoforms regulate androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Takeuchi, Ario; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Inokuchi, Junichi; Song, Yoohyun; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is critical for the tumorigenesis and development of prostate cancer, as well as the progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously showed that the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) β isoform plays a critical role in transactivation of AR signaling as an AR coactivator that promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation. However, the roles of other HP1 isoforms, HP1α and HP1γ, in AR expression and prostate cancer remain unclear. Here, we found that knockdown of HP1γ, but not HP1α, reduced AR expression and cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in LNCaP cells. Conversely, overexpression of full-length HP1α and its C-terminal deletion mutant increased AR expression and cell growth, whereas overexpression of HP1γ had no effect. Similarly, HP1α overexpression promoted 22Rv1 cell growth, whereas HP1γ knockdown reduced the proliferation of CxR cells, a castration-resistant LNCaP derivative. Taken together, HP1 isoforms distinctly augment AR signaling and cell growth in prostate cancer. Therefore, silencing of HP1β and HP1γ may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of prostate cancer.

  3. Bile acid signaling through farnesoid X and TGR5 receptors in hepatobiliary and intestinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bojan Stanimirov; Karmen Stankovand Momir Mikov

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The well-known functions of bile acids (BAs) are the emulsification and absorption of lipophilic xenobiotics. However, the emerging evidences in the past decade showed that BAs act as signaling molecules that not only autoregulate their own metabolism and enterohepatic recirculation, but also as important regulators of integrative metabolism by ac-tivating nuclear and membrane-bound G protein-coupled re-ceptors. The present review was to get insight into the role of maintenance of BA homeostasis and BA signaling pathways in development and management of hepatobiliary and intestinal diseases. DATA SOURCES: Detailed and comprehensive search of PubMed and Scopus databases was carried out for original and review articles. RESULTS: Disturbances in BA homeostasis contribute to the development of several hepatobiliary and intestinal disorders, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, liver cirrhosis, choles-terol gallstone disease, intestinal diseases and both hepatocel-lular and colorectal carcinoma. CONCLUSION: Further efforts made in order to advance the understanding of sophisticated BA signaling network may be promising in developing novel therapeutic strategies related not only to hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal but also sys-temic diseases.

  4. Bupleurum polysaccharides attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation via modulating Toll-like receptor 4 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bupleurum polysaccharides (BPs, isolated from Bupleurum smithii var. parvifolium, possesses immunomodulatory activity, particularly on inflammation. Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS triggers innate immune responses through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 on host cell membrane. The present study was performed to evaluate whether the therapeutic efficacy of BPs on suppression of LPS's pathogenecity could be associated with the modulating of TLR4 signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: LPS stimulated expression and activation of factors in the TLR4 signaling system, including TLR4, CD14, IRAK4, TRAF6, NF-κB, and JNK, determined using immunocytochemical and/or Western blot assays. BPs significantly inhibited these effects of LPS. LPS increased pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-12p40, and IFN-β and NO production, evaluated using ELISA and Griess reaction assays, respectively. BPs antagonized these effects of LPS. Interestingly, BPs alone augmented secretion of some pro-inflammatory cytokines of non-LPS stimulated macrophages and enhanced phagocytic activity towards fluorescent E.coli bioparticles. In a rat model of acute lung injury (ALI with pulmonary hemorrhage and inflammation, BPs ameliorated lung injuries and suppressed TLR4 expression. SIGNIFICANCE: The therapeutic properties of BPs in alleviating inflammatory diseases could be attributed to its inhibitory effect on LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling.

  5. Hypertensive stretch regulates endothelial exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies through VEGF receptor 2 signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xiong; Zhenqian Hu; Xiaofan Han; Beibei Jiang; Rongli Zhang; Xiaoyu Zhang; Yao Lu

    2013-01-01

    Regulated endothelial exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs),the first stage in leukocyte trafficking,plays a pivotal role in inflammation and injury.Acute mechanical stretch has been closely associated with vascular inflammation,although the precise mechanism is unknown.Here,we show that hypertensive stretch regulates the exocytosis of WPBs of endothelial ceils (ECs) through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling pathways.Stretch triggers a rapid release (within minutes) of von Willebrand factor and interleukin-8 from WPBs in cultured human ECs,promoting the interaction between leukocytes and ECs through the translocation of P-selectin to the cell membrane.We further show that hypertensive stretch significantly induces P-selectin translocation of intact ECs and enhances leukocyte adhesion both ex vivo and in vivo.Stretch-induced endothelial exocytosis is mediated via a VEGFR2/PLCy1/calcium pathway.Interestingly,stretch also induces a negative feedback via a VEGFR2/Akt/nitric oxide pathway.Such dual effects are confirmed using pharmacological and genetic approaches in carotid artery segments,as well as in acute hypertensive mouse models.These studies reveal mechanical stretch as a potent agonist for endothelial exocytosis,which is modulated by VEGFR2 signaling.Thus,VEGFR2 signaling pathways may represent novel therapeutic targets in limiting hypertensive stretch-related inflammation.

  6. Promiscuous Seven Transmembrane Receptors Sensing L-α-amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. T....... The present review describes the current status of promiscuous L-α-amino acid sensors, the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), the GPRC6A receptor, the T1R1/T1R3 receptor and also their molecular pharmacology, expression pattern and physiological significance.......A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight...

  7. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein activates GATA4 transcription and mediates cardiac hypertrophic signaling from angiotensin II receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pressure overload and prolonged angiotensin II (Ang II infusion elicit cardiac hypertrophy in Ang II receptor 1 (AT(1 null mouse, whereas Ang II receptor 2 (AT(2 gene deletion abolishes the hypertrophic response. The roles and signals of the cardiac AT(2 receptor still remain unsettled. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF was shown to bind to the AT(2 receptor and transmit the hypertrophic signal. Using PLZF knockout mice we directed our studies on the function of PLZF concerning the cardiac specific transcription factor GATA4, and GATA4 targets. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PLZF knockout and age-matched wild-type (WT mice were treated with Ang II, infused at a rate of 4.2 ng·kg(-1·min(-1 for 3 weeks. Ang II elevated systolic blood pressure to comparable levels in PLZF knockout and WT mice (140 mmHg. WT mice developed prominent cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis after Ang II infusion. In contrast, there was no obvious cardiac hypertrophy or fibrosis in PLZF knockout mice. An AT(2 receptor blocker given to Ang II-infused wild type mice prevented hypertrophy, verifying the role of AT(2 receptor for cardiac hypertrophy. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that PLZF bound to the GATA4 gene regulatory region. A Luciferase assay verified that PLZF up-regulated GATA4 gene expression and the absence of PLZF expression in vivo produced a corresponding repression of GATA4 protein. CONCLUSIONS: PLZF is an important AT(2 receptor binding protein in mediating Ang II induced cardiac hypertrophy through an AT(2 receptor-dependent signal pathway. The angiotensin II-AT(2-PLZF-GATA4 signal may further augment Ang II induced pathological effects on cardiomyocytes.

  8. Structural heterogeneity of membrane receptors and GTP-binding proteins and its functional consequences for signal transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Boege, Fritz; Neumann, Eberhard; Helmreich, Ernst J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Recent information obtained, mainly by recombinant cDNA technology, on structural heterogeneity of hormone and transmitter receptors, of GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins) and, especially, of G-protein-linked receptors is reviewed and the implications of structural heterogeneity for diversity of hormone and transmitter actions is discussed. For the future, three-dimensional structural analysis of membrane proteins participating in signal transmission and transduction pathways is needed in orde...

  9. Purinergic receptor-induced Ca2+ signaling in the neuroepithelium of the vomeronasal organ of larval Xenopus laevis

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, Katarina; Sansone, Alfredo; Hassenklöver, Thomas; Manzini, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Purinergic signaling has considerable impact on the functioning of the nervous system, including the special senses. Purinergic receptors are expressed in various cell types in the retina, cochlea, taste buds, and the olfactory epithelium. The activation of these receptors by nucleotides, particularly adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and its breakdown products, has been shown to tune sensory information coding to control the homeostasis and to regulate the cell turnover in these organs. While ...

  10. Mechanistic insights into the role of C-type lectin receptor/CARD9 signaling in human antifungal immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2016-01-01

    Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous d...

  11. Mechanistic Insights into the Role of C-Type Lectin Receptor/CARD9 Signaling in Human Antifungal Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2016-01-01

    Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous d...

  12. Suppression of sustained and transient ON signals of amacrine cells by GABA is mediated by different receptor subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张道启; 杨如; 杨雄里

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from amacrine cells in the isolated, superfused carp retina, and the effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on sustained and transient ON signals of these cells were studied. Exogenous GABA application partially suppressed the sustained response of ON amacrine cells, which could be completely reversed by picrotoxin (PTX), a chloride channel blocker, and by bicuculline (BCC), a specific GABA_A receptor antagonist. On the other hand, suppression by GABA of the ON response which was predominantly driven by rod signals in a certain portion of transient ON-OFF amacrine cells was completely blocked by PTX, but not by BCC, indicating that GABA_C receptors may be involved in the effect. These results suggest that GABA_A and GABA_C receptors may be respectively involved in mediating the transmission of sustained and transient signals in the carp inner retina.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4, a novel signal transducer for lipopolysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨清武; 朱佩芳; 王正国; 蒋建新

    2002-01-01

    LPS activation effect. Finally, for CD14 negative cells, the receptor combined LPS-LBP-sCD14 compound has not yet been identified. Some details indicated that a “co-receptor” for LPS signal transduction must exist. Although standard biochemical approaches, transfection assay, and immunologic tacties were all employed to search for this co-receptor, it has not yet been found. The find of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) provides a new opportunity to study the mechanism of LPS action.

  14. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Mi Bonde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or β-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R. It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of β-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit β-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability to recruit β-arrestins could lead to different cellular or in vivo outcomes than lack of ability to interact with G proteins, it is essential to distinguish between these two mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied five AT1R mutants previously published to display pathway separation: D74N, DRY/AAY, Y292F, N298A, and Y302F (Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering: 2.50, 3.49-3.51, 7.43, 7.49, and 7.53. We find that D74N, DRY/AAY, and N298A mutants are more prone to β-arrestin recruitment than WT. In contrast, receptor mutants Y292F and Y302F showed impaired ability to recruit β-arrestin in response to Sar1-Ile4-Ile8 (SII Ang II, a ligand solely activating the β-arrestin pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis reveals that the underlying conformations induced by these AT1R mutants most likely represent principally different mechanisms of uncoupling the G protein, which for some mutants may be due to their increased ability to recruit β-arrestin2. Hereby, these findings have important implications for drug discovery and 7TMR

  15. OCA-B integrates B cell antigen receptor-, CD40L- and IL 4-mediated signals for the germinal center pathway of B cell development.

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, X F; Reichlin, A; Luo, Y.; Roeder, R. G.; Nussenzweig, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    Many of the key decisions in lymphocyte differentiation and activation are dependent on integration of antigen receptor and co-receptor signals. Although there is significant understanding of these receptors and their signaling pathways, little is known about the molecular requirements for signal integration at the level of activation of gene expression. Here we show that in primary B cells, expression of the B-cell specific transcription coactivator OCA-B (also known as OBF-1 or Bob-1) is re...

  16. DMPD: Inhibition of toll-like receptor and cytokine signaling--a unifying theme inischemic tolerance. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15545925 Inhibition of toll-like receptor and cytokine signaling--a unifying theme ...png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Inhibition of toll-like receptor and cytokine signaling--a unifying theme i...nischemic tolerance. PubmedID 15545925 Title Inhibition of toll-like receptor and... cytokine signaling--a unifying theme inischemic tolerance. Authors Kariko K, Weissman D, Welsh FA. Publicat

  17. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE - and amyloid beta 1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slowik Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that the chemotactic G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL1 and the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE play an important role in the inflammatory response involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Therefore, the expression and co-localisation of mouse formyl peptide receptor (mFPR 1 and 2 as well as RAGE in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model using immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR were analysed. The involvement of rat or human FPR1/FPRL1 (corresponds to mFPR1/2 and RAGE in amyloid-β 1–42 (Aβ1-42-induced signalling were investigated by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cAMP level in primary rat glial cells (microglia and astrocytes and transfected HEK 293 cells was measured. Formyl peptide receptors and RAGE were inhibited by a small synthetic antagonist WRW4 and an inactive receptor variant delta-RAGE, lacking the intracytoplasmatic domains. Results We demonstrated a strong increase of mFPR1/2 and RAGE expression in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice co-localised to the glial cells. In addition, the Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction is dependant on FPRL1, but also on FPR1. For the first time, we have shown a functional interaction between FPRL1/FPR1 and RAGE in RAGE ligands S100B- or AGE-mediated signalling by ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement. In addition a possible physical interaction between FPRL1 as well as FPR1 and RAGE was shown with co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The results suggest that both formyl peptide receptors play an essential role in Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells. The interaction with RAGE could explain the broad ligand spectrum of formyl peptide receptors and their important role for inflammation and the host defence against infections.

  18. Toll-like receptor signaling in neonatal sepsis and inflammation: a matter of orchestration and conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Kirsten; Speer, Christian P

    2013-12-01

    Altered neonatal Toll-like receptor (TLR) function is hypothesized to contribute to the heightened susceptibility to infection and perpetuated inflammation in term and preterm neonates, clinically evident in neonatal sepsis and increased rates of inflammatory disorders. Current data indicate that basal TLR expression in term neonates equals adult expression patterns, while expression in preterm infants seems to increase, depending on gestational age. Regarding TLR signaling, some studies suggest TLR incompetence in neonates associated with impaired pro-inflammatory responses, others describe neonatal TLR function well developed and allude to its hyper-inflammation tendency. We discuss the competing positions and considerable limitations of research approaches and conclude that neonatal innate immunity is not generally less able to respond to TLR stimulation. Moreover, we describe pre-conditioning factors other than immaturity having a comparable impact. In the long term, better understanding of the complex interplay of pre- and postnatal conditions and maturation-dependent neonatal TLR function may provide new therapeutic approaches.

  19. Parathyroid hormone receptor signalling in osterix-expressing mesenchymal progenitors is essential for tooth root formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Wanida; Sakagami, Naoko; Nishimori, Shigeki; Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Dental root formation is a dynamic process in which mesenchymal cells migrate toward the site of the future root, differentiate and secrete dentin and cementum. However, the identities of dental mesenchymal progenitors are largely unknown. Here we show that cells expressing osterix are mesenchymal progenitors contributing to all relevant cell types during morphogenesis. The majority of cells expressing parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) are in the dental follicle and on the root surface, and deletion of its receptor (PPR) in these progenitors leads to failure of eruption and significantly truncated roots lacking periodontal ligaments. The PPR-deficient progenitors exhibit accelerated cementoblast differentiation with upregulation of nuclear factor I/C (Nfic). Deletion of histone deacetylase-4 (HDAC4) partially recapitulates the PPR deletion root phenotype. These findings indicate that PPR signalling in dental mesenchymal progenitors is essential for tooth root formation, underscoring importance of the PTHrP-PPR system during root morphogenesis and tooth eruption. PMID:27068606

  20. Nuclear Factor-κB: Activation and Regulation during Toll-like Receptor Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruaidhrí J. Carmody; Youhai H. Chen

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize distinct microbial components to initiate the innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR activation culminates in the expression of appropriate pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory factors to meet pathogenic challenges. The transcription factor NF-κB is the master regulator of all TLR-induced responses and its activation is the pivotal event in TLR-mediated activation of the innate immune response. Many of the key molecular events required for TLR-induced NF-κB activation have been elucidated. However, much remain to be learned about the ability of TLRs to generate pathogen-specific responses using a limited number of transcription factors. This review will focus on our current understanding of NF-κB activation by TLRs and potential mechanisms for achieving a signal-specific response through NF-κB.

  1. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet;

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region....... In addition, all aGPCRs but one (GPR123) contain a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain that mediates autoproteolytic cleavage at the GPCR autoproteolysis site motif to generate N- and a C-terminal fragments (NTF and CTF, respectively) during protein maturation. Subsequently, the NTF and CTF...... recent advances in understanding the biological functions, signaling mechanisms, and disease associations of the aGPCRs....

  2. Asperosaponin VI promotes progesterone receptor expression in decidual cells via the notch signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Zhou, Chun; Li, Yadi; Gao, Feixia; Wu, Haiwang; Yang, Lilin; Qiu, Weiyu; Zhu, Lin; Du, Xin; Lin, Weixian; Huang, Dandan; Liu, Haibin; Liang, Chun; Luo, Songping

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) is a common clinical condition, but its reasons remain unknown in 37-79% of the affected women. The steroid hormone progesterone (P4) is an integral mediator of early pregnancy events, exerting its effects via the progesterone receptor (PR). Dipsaci Radix (DR) has long been used for treating gynecological diseases in Chinese medicine, while its molecular mechanisms and active ingredients are still unclear. We report here the progesterone-like effects of the alcohol extraction and Asperosaponin VI from DR in primary decidual cells and HeLa cell line. We first determined the safe concentration of Asperosaponin VI in the cells with MTT assay and then found by using dual luciferase reporter and Western blotting that Asperosaponin VI significantly increased PR expression. Moreover, we explored the mechanisms of action of the DR extracts and Asperosaponin VI, and the results showed that they could activate Notch signaling, suggesting that they may function by promoting decidualization. PMID:27370099

  3. Transmembrane signalling at the epidermal growth factor receptor. Positive regulation by the C-terminal phosphotyrosine residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magni, M; Pandiella, A; Helin, K;

    1991-01-01

    Mutant epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors (obtained by substitution of one, two or three C-terminal autophosphorylable tyrosine residues with phenylalanine residues or by deletion of the C-terminal 19 amino acids, including the distal tyrosine) were expressed in mouse NIH-3T3 fibroblast clones...... a positive role in the regulation of transmembrane signalling at the EGF receptor. The stepwise decrease in signal generation observed in single, double and triple point mutants suggest that the role of phosphotyrosine residues is not in the participation in specific amino acid sequences, but rather...

  4. Kaempferol as a flavonoid induces osteoblastic differentiation via estrogen receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Ava

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavonoids, a group of compounds mainly derived from vegetables and herbal medicines, chemically resemble estrogen and some have been used as estrogen substitutes. Kaempferol, a flavonol derived from the rhizome of Kaempferia galanga L., is a well-known phytoestrogen possessing osteogenic effects that is also found in a large number of plant foods. The herb K. galanga is a popular traditional aromatic medicinal plant that is widely used as food spice and in medicinal industries. In the present study, both the estrogenic and osteogenic properties of kaempferol are evaluated. Methods Kaempferol was first evaluated for its estrogenic properties, including its effects on estrogen receptors. The osteogenic properties of kaempferol were further determined its induction effects on specific osteogenic enzymes and genes as well as the mineralization process in cultured rat osteoblasts. Results Kaempferol activated the transcriptional activity of pERE-Luc (3.98 ± 0.31 folds at 50 μM and induced estrogen receptor α (ERα phosphorylation in cultured rat osteoblasts, and this ER activation was correlated with induction and associated with osteoblast differentiation biomarkers, including alkaline phosphatase activity and transcription of osteoblastic genes, e.g., type I collagen, osteonectin, osteocalcin, Runx2 and osterix. Kaempferol also promoted the mineralization process of osteoblasts (4.02 ± 0.41 folds at 50 μM. ER mediation of the kaempferol-induced effects was confirmed by pretreatment of the osteoblasts with an ER antagonist, ICI 182,780, which fully blocked the induction effect. Conclusion Our results showed that kaempferol stimulates osteogenic differentiation of cultured osteoblasts by acting through the estrogen receptor signaling.

  5. Signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUO, LIQIANG; LIU, YUQIANG; DING, ZHIBO; SUN, WENDONG; YUAN, MINGZHEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms used during signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRM3) in prostate cancer. The microarray datasets of GSE3325, including 5 clinically localized primary prostate cancers and 4 benign prostate tissues, were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) in primary prostate cancer tissues compared with benign controls were screened using the Limma package. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Next, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with DEGs were predicted and miRNA-target DEG analysis was performed using a Web-based Gene Set Analysis Toolkit. Finally, the PPI network and the miRNA-target DEG network were integrated using Cytoscape. In total, 224 DEGs were screened in the prostate cancer tissues, including 113 upregulated and 111 downregulated genes. CHRM3 and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were enriched in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. EGF and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (Myc) were enriched in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. EGF with the highest degree of connectivity was the hub node in the PPI network, and miR-34b could interact with Myc directly in the miRNA-target DEG network. EGF and Myc may exhibit significant roles in the progression of prostate cancer via regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and the MAPK signaling pathway. CHRM3 may activate these two pathways in prostate cancer progression. Thus, these two key factors and pathways may be crucial mechanisms during signal transduction by CHRM3 in prostate cancer. PMID:26870222

  6. Microenvironmental stiffness enhances glioma cell proliferation by stimulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhavi Umesh

    Full Text Available The aggressive and rapidly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM is associated with profound tissue stiffening and genomic lesions in key members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that increasing microenvironmental stiffness in culture can strongly enhance glioma cell behaviors relevant to tumor progression, including proliferation, yet it has remained unclear whether stiffness and EGFR regulate proliferation through common or independent signaling mechanisms. Here we test the hypothesis that microenvironmental stiffness regulates cell cycle progression and proliferation in GBM tumor cells by altering EGFR-dependent signaling. We began by performing an unbiased reverse phase protein array screen, which revealed that stiffness modulates expression and phosphorylation of a broad range of signals relevant to proliferation, including members of the EGFR pathway. We subsequently found that culturing human GBM tumor cells on progressively stiffer culture substrates both dramatically increases proliferation and facilitates passage through the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, consistent with an EGFR-dependent process. Western Blots showed that increasing microenvironmental stiffness enhances the expression and phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream effector Akt. Pharmacological loss-of-function studies revealed that the stiffness-sensitivity of proliferation is strongly blunted by inhibition of EGFR, Akt, or PI3 kinase. Finally, we observed that stiffness strongly regulates EGFR clustering, with phosphorylated EGFR condensing into vinculin-positive focal adhesions on stiff substrates and dispersing as microenvironmental stiffness falls to physiological levels. Our findings collectively support a model in which tissue stiffening promotes GBM proliferation by spatially and biochemically amplifying EGFR signaling.

  7. Microenvironmental stiffness enhances glioma cell proliferation by stimulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, Vaibhavi; Rape, Andrew D; Ulrich, Theresa A; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The aggressive and rapidly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with profound tissue stiffening and genomic lesions in key members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that increasing microenvironmental stiffness in culture can strongly enhance glioma cell behaviors relevant to tumor progression, including proliferation, yet it has remained unclear whether stiffness and EGFR regulate proliferation through common or independent signaling mechanisms. Here we test the hypothesis that microenvironmental stiffness regulates cell cycle progression and proliferation in GBM tumor cells by altering EGFR-dependent signaling. We began by performing an unbiased reverse phase protein array screen, which revealed that stiffness modulates expression and phosphorylation of a broad range of signals relevant to proliferation, including members of the EGFR pathway. We subsequently found that culturing human GBM tumor cells on progressively stiffer culture substrates both dramatically increases proliferation and facilitates passage through the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, consistent with an EGFR-dependent process. Western Blots showed that increasing microenvironmental stiffness enhances the expression and phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream effector Akt. Pharmacological loss-of-function studies revealed that the stiffness-sensitivity of proliferation is strongly blunted by inhibition of EGFR, Akt, or PI3 kinase. Finally, we observed that stiffness strongly regulates EGFR clustering, with phosphorylated EGFR condensing into vinculin-positive focal adhesions on stiff substrates and dispersing as microenvironmental stiffness falls to physiological levels. Our findings collectively support a model in which tissue stiffening promotes GBM proliferation by spatially and biochemically amplifying EGFR signaling. PMID:25000176

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor signalling in human breast cancer cells operates parallel to estrogen receptor α signalling and results in tamoxifen insensitive proliferation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerkens, M.; Zhang, Y.; Wester, L.; Water, van de B.; Meerman, J.H.N.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tamoxifen resistance is a major problem in the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER) α -positive breast cancer patients. Although the mechanisms behind tamoxifen resistance are still not completely understood, clinical data suggests that increased expression of receptor tyrosine kinases is

  9. Reconstitution of the B cell antigen receptor signaling components in COS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saouaf, S J; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Rowley, R B; Bolen, J B; Mahajan, S

    1995-11-10

    To elucidate interactions occurring between B cell protein tyrosine kinases and the signaling components of the B cell antigen receptor, we have co-transfected into COS cells individual tyrosine kinases together with chimeric cell surface receptors containing the cytoplasmic domains of Ig alpha or Ig beta. Of the tyrosine kinases transfected (Lyn, Blk, Hck, Syk, Fyn), only Blk was able to phosphorylate and subsequently associate with cotransfected Ig alpha and Ig beta chimeras in vivo. Association between Blk and the Ig alpha and Ig beta cytoplasmic domains was shown by mutational analyses to be the result of an SH2-phosphotyrosine interaction. We identified the tyrosine residues of the Ig alpha and Ig beta cytoplasmic domains was shown by mutational analyses to be the result of an SH2-phosphotyrosine interaction. We identified the tyrosine residues of the Ig alpha and Ig beta cytoplasmic domains phosphorylated by Blk. The enzymatic activity and membrane association of Blk were required for the observed phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta chimeras. Sequences within the amino-terminal unique domain of Blk are responsible for recognition and subsequent phosphorylation of the Ig alpha chimera since transfer of the unique region of Blk to Fyn results in the chimeric kinase's ability to phosphorylate the cytoplasmic domain of Ig alpha. These findings indicate that the unique domain of Src family kinases may direct recognition of certain substrates leading to their phosphorylation. PMID:7592958

  10. Vitamin D receptor signaling is required for heart development in zebrafish embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hye-Joo

    2016-02-12

    Vitamin D has been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of vitamin D in heart development during embryonic period is largely unknown. Vitamin D induces its genomic effects through its nuclear receptor, the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The present study investigated the role of VDR on heart development by antisense-mediated knockdown approaches in zebrafish model system. In zebrafish embryos, two distinct VDR genes (vdra and vdrb) have been identified. Knockdown of vdra has little effect on heart development, whereas disrupting vdrb gene causes various cardiac phenotypes, characterized by pericardial edema, slower heart rate and laterality defects. Depletion of both vdra and vdrb (vdra/b) produce additive, but not synergistic effects. To determine whether atrioventricular (AV) cardiomyocytes are properly organized in these embryos, the expression of bmp4, which marks the developing AV boundary at 48 h post-fertilization, was examined. Notably, vdra/b-deficient embryos display ectopic expression of bmp4 towards the ventricle or throughout atrial and ventricular chambers. Taken together, these results suggest that VDR signaling plays an essential role in heart development. PMID:26797277

  11. AMPA receptors commandeer an ancient cargo exporter for use as an auxiliary subunit for signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Harmel

    Full Text Available Fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mainly mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptors of the AMPA subtype (AMPARs. AMPARs are protein complexes of the pore-lining α-subunits GluA1-4 and auxiliary β-subunits modulating their trafficking and gating. By a proteomic approach, two homologues of the cargo exporter cornichon, CNIH-2 and CNIH-3, have recently been identified as constituents of native AMPARs in mammalian brain. In heterologous reconstitution experiments, CNIH-2 promotes surface expression of GluAs and modulates their biophysical properties. However, its relevance in native AMPAR physiology remains controversial. Here, we have studied the role of CNIH-2 in GluA processing both in heterologous cells and primary rat neurons. Our data demonstrate that CNIH-2 serves an evolutionarily conserved role as a cargo exporter from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. CNIH-2 cycles continuously between ER and Golgi complex to pick up cargo protein in the ER and then to mediate its preferential export in a coat protein complex (COP II dependent manner. Interaction with GluA subunits breaks with this ancestral role of CNIH-2 confined to the early secretory pathway. While still taking advantage of being exported preferentially from the ER, GluAs recruit CNIH-2 to the cell surface. Thus, mammalian AMPARs commandeer CNIH-2 for use as a bona fide auxiliary subunit that is able to modify receptor signaling.

  12. Melanocortin 3 Receptor Signaling in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons Increases the Motivation for Food Reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Rahul; Omrani, Azar; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; de Vrind, Véronne A J; Van Rozen, Andrea J; Ophuis, Ralph J A Oude; Garner, Keith; Kallo, Imre; Ghanem, Alexander; Liposits, Zsolt; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; la Fleur, Susanne E; Adan, Roger A H

    2016-08-01

    The central melanocortin (MC) system mediates its effects on food intake via MC3 (MC3R) and MC4 receptors (MC4R). Although the role of MC4R in meal size determination, satiation, food preference, and motivation is well established, the involvement of MC3R in the modulation of food intake has been less explored. Here, we investigated the role of MC3R on the incentive motivation for food, which is a crucial component of feeding behavior. Dopaminergic neurons within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have a crucial role in the motivation for food. We here report that MC3Rs are expressed on VTA dopaminergic neurons and that pro-opiomelanocortinergic (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (Arc) innervate these VTA dopaminergic neurons. Our findings show that intracerebroventricular or intra-VTA infusion of the selective MC3R agonist γMSH increases responding for sucrose under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, but not free sucrose consumption in rats. Furthermore, ex vivo electrophysiological recordings show increased VTA dopaminergic neuronal activity upon γMSH application. Consistent with a dopamine-mediated effect of γMSH, the increased motivation for sucrose after intra-VTA infusion of γMSH was blocked by pretreatment with the dopamine receptor antagonist α-flupenthixol. Taken together, we demonstrate an Arc POMC projection onto VTA dopaminergic neurons that modulates motivation for palatable food via activation of MC3R signaling. PMID:26852738

  13. Evaluation of bovine thymic function by measurement of signal joint T-cell receptor excision circles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisazumi, Rinnosuke; Kayumi, Miya; Zhang, Weidong; Kikukawa, Ryuji; Nasu, Tetuo; Yasuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    A signal joint T-cell receptor excision circle (sjTREC) is a circular DNA produced by T-cell receptor α gene rearrangement in the thymus. Measurements of sjTREC values have been used to evaluate thymic function. We recently established a quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay of bovine sjTREC. In the present study, we used this QPCR assay to measure the sjTREC value in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells and we then evaluated the relationships between sjTREC values and peripheral blood T-cell number, growth stage, gender, and meteorological season. The sjTREC value was highest at the neonatal stage, and its value subsequently decreased with age. On the other hand, the peripheral T-cell number increased with age. The sjTREC value in calves up to 50-days old was significantly higher for males than for females, suggesting that thymic function might differ by gender. In addition, the sjTREC value and the peripheral T-cell number were significantly higher in calves in the summer season than in calves in the winter season. These data suggest that bovine thymic function is highly variable and varies according to the growth stage, gender, and environmental factors such as air temperature or the UV index.

  14. Enhanced GABA Transmission Drives Bradykinesia Following Loss of Dopamine D2 Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Julia C; Friend, Danielle M; Kaplan, Alanna R; Shin, Jung Hoon; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Kravitz, Alexxai V; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-05-18

    Bradykinesia is a prominent phenotype of Parkinson's disease, depression, and other neurological conditions. Disruption of dopamine (DA) transmission plays an important role, but progress in understanding the exact mechanisms driving slowness of movement has been impeded due to the heterogeneity of DA receptor distribution on multiple cell types within the striatum. Here we show that selective deletion of DA D2 receptors (D2Rs) from indirect-pathway medium spiny neurons (iMSNs) is sufficient to impair locomotor activity, phenocopying DA depletion models of Parkinson's disease, despite this mouse model having intact DA transmission. There was a robust enhancement of GABAergic transmission and a reduction of in vivo firing in striatal and pallidal neurons. Mimicking D2R signaling in iMSNs with Gi-DREADDs restored the level of tonic GABAergic transmission and rescued the motor deficit. These findings indicate that DA, through D2R activation in iMSNs, regulates motor output by constraining the strength of GABAergic transmission. PMID:27196975

  15. Neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol rely on estrogen receptor membrane initiated signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eFiocchetti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2 exerts protective effects in the central nervous system besides its crucial role in many physiological and pathological events. E2 effects are not restricted to the brain areas related with the control of the reproductive function, but rather are widespread throughout the developing and the adult brain. E2 actions are mediated by estrogen receptors (i.e., ERα and ERβ belonging to the nuclear receptor super family. As members of the ligand-regulated transcription factor family, the actions of ERs in the brain were thought to mediate only the E2 long-term transcriptional effects. However, a growing body of evidence has emerged indicating the presence of rapid, membrane initiated E2 effects in the brain which result independent from ER transcriptional activities and involved in E2-induced neuroprotection. Aim of this review is to focus on the rapid effects of E2 in the brain taking into account the specific contribution of the signaling pathway of ERβ subtype in neuroprotective actions of E2.

  16. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Influences Transplant Outcomes in Response to Environmental Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, S Kyle; Fechner, John H; Zhang, Xiaoji; Torrealba, Jose; Bradfield, Christopher A; Mezrich, Joshua D

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a cytosolic transcription factor with numerous endogenous and xenobiotic ligands, most notably 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Recent data suggests that TCDD may induce regulatory T cells, while a second AHR ligand, FICZ, promotes Th17 differentiation. The aim was to examine whether injection of recipient mice with either TCDD or FICZ altered skin allograft rejection in a fully mismatched model. TCDD or FICZ was given to recipient C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally (IP). Twenty-four hr later, donor skin was grafted from BALB/c mice. An additional dose of FICZ was given on day 3. Treatment with TCDD delayed graft rejection for more than 4 weeks while FICZ treatment accelerated rejection by 1 - 2 days. In vivo exposure with TCDD led to a rise in the frequency of FoxP3(+) CD4(+) T cells in the spleen, while FICZ increased IL-17 secretion by splenocytes from treated animals. Activation of the AHR receptor by different AHR ligands in vivo resulted in opposing effects on skin graft survival. AHR serves as a sensor to environmental signals, with effects on the acquired immune system that may alter outcomes after organ transplantation. This model will be useful to further delineate direct effects of the environment on the immune system and outcomes of organ transplantation. PMID:23002321

  17. Chronic stress accelerates ligature-induced periodontitis by suppressing glucocorticoid receptorsignaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan; Zhao, Lisheng

    2016-03-25

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease. Recent studies have shown that chronic stress (CS) might modulate periodontal disease, but there are few models of CS-induced periodontitis, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study established a rat model of periodontitis associated with CS induced by nylon thread ligatures. The severity of periodontitis was evaluated in this model by radiographic and pathological examination. The inflammatory reaction indicated by the elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Open-field tests and serum corticosterone were used to evaluate CS. The results showed that CS induced behavioral changes and increased corticosterone levels of the animals with periodontitis. CS stimulation markedly increased alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket depth and the number of plaques. It also enhanced the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that CS accelerated the ligature-induced pathological changes associated with periodontitis. Further analysis of the mechanisms involved showed that GR-α expression was significantly downregulated in periodontal tissues of the animals undergoing CS. Blocking GR-α signaling in lipopolysaccharide and corticosteroid-treated human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells in vitro significantly upregulated the expression of p-Akt (protein kinase B) and TLR4, promoted nuclear factor-κB activity and increased levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. This research suggests that CS might accelerate the pathological progression of periodontitis by a GR-α signaling-mediated inflammatory response and that this may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in patients with CS.

  18. Histamine H(3 receptor-mediated signaling protects mice from cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Beghdadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histamine is a biogenic amine that has been shown to contribute to several pathological conditions, such as allergic conditions, experimental encephalomyelitis, and malaria. In humans, as well as in murine models of malaria, increased plasma levels of histamine are associated with severity of infection. We reported recently that histamine plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of experimental cerebral malaria (CM in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Histamine exerts its biological effects through four different receptors designated H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present work, we explored the role of histamine signaling via the histamine H3 receptor (H3R in the pathogenesis of murine CM. We observed that the lack of H3R expression (H3R(-/- mice accelerates the onset of CM and this was correlated with enhanced brain pathology and earlier and more pronounced loss of blood brain barrier integrity than in wild type mice. Additionally tele-methylhistamine, the major histamine metabolite in the brain, that was initially present at a higher level in the brain of H3R(-/- mice was depleted more quickly post-infection in H3R(-/- mice as compared to wild-type counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that histamine regulation through the H3R in the brain suppresses the development of CM. Thus modulating histamine signaling in the central nervous system, in combination with standard therapies, may represent a novel strategy to reduce the risk of progression to cerebral malaria.

  19. Nucleotide receptor signaling in murine macrophages is linked to reactive oxygen species generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Zachary A; Guerra, Alma N; Hill, Lindsay M; Gavala, Monica L; Prabhu, Usha; Aga, Mini; Hall, David J; Bertics, Paul J

    2007-05-15

    Macrophage activation is critical in the innate immune response and can be regulated by the nucleotide receptor P2X7. In this regard, P2X7 signaling is not well understood but has been implicated in controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by various leukocytes. Although ROS can contribute to microbial killing, the role of ROS in nucleotide-mediated cell signaling is unclear. In this study, we report that the P2X7 agonists ATP and 3'-O-(4-benzoyl) benzoic ATP (BzATP) stimulate ROS production by RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. These effects are potentiated in lipopolysaccharide-primed cells, demonstrating an important interaction between extracellular nucleotides and microbial products in ROS generation. In terms of nucleotide receptor specificity, RAW 264.7 macrophages that are deficient in P2X7 are greatly reduced in their capacity to generate ROS in response to BzATP treatment (both with and without LPS priming), thus supporting a role for P2X7 in this process. Because MAP kinase activation is key for nucleotide regulation of macrophage function, we also tested the hypothesis that P2X7-mediated MAP kinase activation is dependent on ROS production. We observed that BzATP stimulates MAP kinase (ERK1/ERK2, p38, and JNK1/JNK2) phosphorylation and that the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid strongly attenuate BzATP-mediated JNK1/JNK2 and p38 phosphorylation but only slightly reduce BzATP-induced ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation. These studies reveal that P2X7 can contribute to macrophage ROS production, that this effect is potentiated upon lipopolysaccharide exposure, and that ROS are important participants in the extracellular nucleotide-mediated activation of several MAP kinase systems. PMID:17448897

  20. Tyrosine kinase signalling in breast cancer: ErbB family receptor tyrosine kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ERBB family receptor tyrosine kinases are overexpressed in a significant subset of breast cancers. One of these receptors, HER2/neu, or ErbB-2, is the target for a new rational therapeutic antibody, Herceptin. Other inhibitors that target this receptor, and another family member, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, are moving into clinical trials. Both of these receptors are sometimes overexpressed in breast cancer, and still subject to regulation by hormones and other physiological regulators. Optimal use of therapeutics targeting these receptors will require consideration of the several modes of regulation of these receptors and their interactions with steroid receptors

  1. N-linked glycosylation of protease-activated receptor-1 at extracellular loop 2 regulates G-protein signaling bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Antonio G; Smith, Thomas H; Chen, Buxin; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Cordova, Isabel Canto; Kenakin, Terry; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Trejo, JoAnn

    2015-07-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for the coagulant protease thrombin. Similar to other GPCRs, PAR1 is promiscuous and couples to multiple heterotrimeric G-protein subtypes in the same cell and promotes diverse cellular responses. The molecular mechanism by which activation of a given GPCR with the same ligand permits coupling to multiple G-protein subtypes is unclear. Here, we report that N-linked glycosylation of PAR1 at extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) controls G12/13 versus Gq coupling specificity in response to thrombin stimulation. A PAR1 mutant deficient in glycosylation at ECL2 was more effective at stimulating Gq-mediated phosphoinositide signaling compared with glycosylated wildtype receptor. In contrast, wildtype PAR1 displayed a greater efficacy at G12/13-dependent RhoA activation compared with mutant receptor lacking glycosylation at ECL2. Endogenous PAR1 rendered deficient in glycosylation using tunicamycin, a glycoprotein synthesis inhibitor, also exhibited increased PI signaling and diminished RhoA activation opposite to native receptor. Remarkably, PAR1 wildtype and glycosylation-deficient mutant were equally effective at coupling to Gi and β-arrestin-1. Consistent with preferential G12/13 coupling, thrombin-stimulated PAR1 wildtype strongly induced RhoA-mediated stress fiber formation compared with mutant receptor. In striking contrast, glycosylation-deficient PAR1 was more effective at increasing cellular proliferation, associated with Gq signaling, than wildtype receptor. These studies suggest that N-linked glycosylation at ECL2 contributes to the stabilization of an active PAR1 state that preferentially couples to G12/13 versus Gq and defines a previously unidentified function for N-linked glycosylation of GPCRs in regulating G-protein signaling bias. PMID:26100877

  2. Chapter Three - Ubiquitination and Protein Turnover of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in GPCR Signaling and Cellular Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penela, P

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for regulating a wide variety of physiological processes, and distinct mechanisms for GPCR inactivation exist to guarantee correct receptor functionality. One of the widely used mechanisms is receptor phosphorylation by specific G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), leading to uncoupling from G proteins (desensitization) and receptor internalization. GRKs and β-arrestins also participate in the assembly of receptor-associated multimolecular complexes, thus initiating alternative G-protein-independent signaling events. In addition, the abundant GRK2 kinase has diverse "effector" functions in cellular migration, proliferation, and metabolism homeostasis by means of the phosphorylation or interaction with non-GPCR partners. Altered expression of GRKs (particularly of GRK2 and GRK5) occurs during pathological conditions characterized by impaired GPCR signaling including inflammatory syndromes, cardiovascular disease, and tumor contexts. It is increasingly appreciated that different pathways governing GRK protein stability play a role in the modulation of kinase levels in normal and pathological conditions. Thus, enhanced GRK2 degradation by the proteasome pathway occurs upon GPCR stimulation, what allows cellular adaptation to chronic stimulation in a physiological setting. β-arrestins participate in this process by facilitating GRK2 phosphorylation by different kinases and by recruiting diverse E3 ubiquitin ligase to the receptor complex. Different proteolytic systems (ubiquitin-proteasome, calpains), chaperone activities and signaling pathways influence the stability of GRKs in different ways, thus endowing specificity to GPCR regulation as protein turnover of GRKs can be differentially affected. Therefore, modulation of protein stability of GRKs emerges as a versatile mechanism for feedback regulation of GPCR signaling and basic cellular processes. PMID:27378756

  3. Predominant membrane localization is an essential feature of the bacterial signal recognition particle receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graumann Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The signal recognition particle (SRP receptor plays a vital role in co-translational protein targeting, because it connects the soluble SRP-ribosome-nascent chain complex (SRP-RNCs to the membrane bound Sec translocon. The eukaryotic SRP receptor (SR is a heterodimeric protein complex, consisting of two unrelated GTPases. The SRβ subunit is an integral membrane protein, which tethers the SRP-interacting SRα subunit permanently to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The prokaryotic SR lacks the SRβ subunit and consists of only the SRα homologue FtsY. Strikingly, although FtsY requires membrane contact for functionality, cell fractionation studies have localized FtsY predominantly to the cytosolic fraction of Escherichia coli. So far, the exact function of the soluble SR in E. coli is unknown, but it has been suggested that, in contrast to eukaryotes, the prokaryotic SR might bind SRP-RNCs already in the cytosol and only then initiates membrane targeting. Results In the current study we have determined the contribution of soluble FtsY to co-translational targeting in vitro and have re-analysed the localization of FtsY in vivo by fluorescence microscopy. Our data show that FtsY can bind to SRP-ribosome nascent chains (RNCs in the absence of membranes. However, these soluble FtsY-SRP-RNC complexes are not efficiently targeted to the membrane. In contrast, we observed effective targeting of SRP-RNCs to membrane-bond FtsY. These data show that soluble FtsY does not contribute significantly to cotranslational targeting in E. coli. In agreement with this observation, our in vivo analyses of FtsY localization in bacterial cells by fluorescence microscopy revealed that the vast majority of FtsY was localized to the inner membrane and that soluble FtsY constituted only a negligible species in vivo. Conclusion The exact function of the SRP receptor (SR in bacteria has so far been enigmatic. Our data show that the bacterial SR is

  4. Analysis of ligand-receptor cross-linked fragments by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, C.D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sargsyan, H. [City University of New York (CUNY); Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Naider, F. [City University of New York (CUNY); Becker, J.M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2005-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a class of integral membrane receptor proteins that are characterized by a signature seven-transmembrane (7-TM) configuration. The a-factor receptor (Ste2p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a GPCR that, upon binding of a peptide ligand, transduces a signal to initiate a cascade of events leading to the mating of haploid yeast cells. This study summarizes the application of affinity purification and of matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) experiments using biotinylated photoactivatable a-factor analogs. Affinity purification and enrichment of biotinylated peptides by monomeric avidin beads resulted in mass spectrometric detection of specific signals corresponding to crosslinked fragments of Ste2p. Data obtained from cyanogen bromide (CNBr) fragments of receptor cross-linked to an a-factor analog with the photoaffinity group p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine on position 1 were in agreement with the previous results reported by our laboratory suggesting the cross-linking between position 1 of a-factor and a region of Ste2p covering residues 251 294.

  5. Interactions between polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling pathway and exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants affect human semen quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokken, L J S; Lundberg, P J; Spanò, M;

    2014-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may affect male reproductive function. Many dioxin-like POPs exert their effects by activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signalling pathway. We analysed whether gene-environment interactions between polymorphisms in AHR (R554K) and AHR repressor...... and the expression of the pro-apoptotic marker protein Fas. The data indicate that susceptibility to adverse effects of POP exposure on male reproductive function is dependent on polymorphisms in genes involved in AHR signalling....

  6. A receptor state space model of the insulin signalling system in glucose transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Catheryn W; Coster, Adelle C F

    2015-12-01

    Insulin is a potent peptide hormone that regulates glucose levels in the blood. Insulin-sensitive cells respond to insulin stimulation with the translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM), enabling the clearance of glucose from the blood. Defects in this process can give rise to insulin resistance and ultimately diabetes. One widely cited model of insulin signalling leading to glucose transport is that of Sedaghat et al. (2002) Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. 283, E1084-E1101. Consisting of 20 deterministic ordinary differential equations (ODEs), it is the most comprehensive model of insulin signalling to date. However, the model possesses some major limitations, including the non-conservation of key components. In the current work, we detail mathematical and sensitivity analyses of the Sedaghat model. Based on the results of these analyses, we propose a reduced state space model of the insulin receptor subsystem. This reduced model maintains the input-output relation of the original model but is computationally more efficient, analytically tractable and resolves some of the limitations of the Sedaghat model.

  7. Signal transduction in light–oxygen–voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Estella F.; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Borbat, Peter P.; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H.; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications. PMID:26648256

  8. Nicotinic Acid Increases Adiponectin Secretion from Differentiated Bovine Preadipocytes through G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Kopp

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The transition period in dairy cows (3 weeks prepartum until 3 weeks postpartum is associated with substantial mobilization of energy stores, which is often associated with metabolic diseases. Nicotinic acid (NA is an antilipolytic and lipid-lowering compound used to treat dyslipidaemia in humans, and it also reduces non-esterified fatty acids in cattle. In mice the G-protein coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A ligand NA positively affects the secretion of adiponectin, an important modulator of glucose and fat metabolism. In cattle, the corresponding data linking NA to adiponectin are missing. Our objective was to examine the effects of NA on adiponectin and AMPK protein abundance and the expression of mRNAs of related genes such as chemerin, an adipokine that enhances adiponectin secretion in vitro. Differentiated bovine adipocytes were incubated with pertussis toxin (PTX to verify the involvement of GPR signaling, and treated with 10 or 15 µM NA for 12 or 24 h. NA increased adiponectin concentrations (p ≤ 0.001 and the mRNA abundances of GPR109A (p ≤ 0.05 and chemerin (p ≤ 0.01. Pre-incubation with PTX reduced the adiponectin response to NA (p ≤ 0.001. The NA-stimulated secretion of adiponectin and the mRNA expression of chemerin in the bovine adipocytes were suggestive of GPR signaling-dependent improved insulin sensitivity and/or adipocyte metabolism in dairy cows.

  9. Tie1: an orphan receptor provides context for angiopoietin-2/Tie2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sarah B; Kontos, Christopher D

    2016-09-01

    Angiopoietin-1/Tie2 (ANG1/Tie2) signaling is well documented as regulating angiogenesis and vessel maturation. This pathway is complicated by involvement of the orphan receptor Tie1, which has been implicated as both a positive and negative regulator of ANG1/Tie2 signaling, and ANG2, which can serve as both a Tie2 agonist and antagonist, depending on the context. Two papers in this issue of the JCI provide new insight into this complicated pathway. Korhonen et al. reveal that Tie1 acts to modulate the effects of ANG1 and ANG2 on Tie2 in vitro and in vivo. Kim et al. demonstrate that ANG2 acts as a Tie2 agonist in non-pathological conditions, whereas in the setting of inflammation, ANG2 functions as a Tie2 antagonist and promotes vascular dysfunction. Both studies indicate that inflammation promotes cleavage of the ectodomain of Tie1 and that this cleavage event corresponds with the switch of ANG2 from a Tie2 agonist to an antagonist. The results of these studies lay the groundwork for future strategies to therapeutically exploit this pathway in diseases characterized by adverse vascular remodeling and increased permeability. PMID:27548526

  10. Catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II suppress the androgen receptor signaling and prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-08-21

    Although the new generation of androgen receptor (AR) antagonists like enzalutamide (ENZ) prolong survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), AR-driven tumors eventually recur indicating that additional therapies are required to fully block AR function. Since DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) was demonstrated to be essential for AR to initiate gene transcription, this study tested whether catalytic inhibitors of Topo II can block AR signaling and suppress ENZ-resistant CRPC growth. Using multiple prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that catalytic Topo II inhibitors, ICRF187 and ICRF193 inhibited transcription activities of the wild-type AR, mutant ARs (F876L and W741C) and the AR-V7 splice variant. ICRF187 and ICRF193 decreased AR recruitment to target promoters and reduced AR nuclear localization. Both ICRF187 and ICRF193 also inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycling at the G2/M phase. ICRF187 inhibited tumor growth of castration-resistant LNCaP and 22RV1 xenografts as well as ENZ-resistant MR49F xenografts. We conclude that catalytic Topo II inhibitors can block AR signaling and inhibit tumor growth of CRPC xenografts, identifying a potential co-targeting approach using these inhibitors in combination with AR pathway inhibitors in CRPC.

  11. Toll-like receptor signalling in regenerative myogenesis: friend and foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration in normal and diseased muscle is regulated by multiple factors and cells present in the injured muscle micro-environment. In addition to muscle progenitor cells, several immunocytes participate in the regenerative response. Among them, macrophages are one of the most important components of the immune response that governs the step-wise progression of muscle regeneration. The initial role of macrophages is to phagocytose muscle cell debris and later, through their transition to an anti-inflammatory phenotype, they promote regeneration. However, in several genetic muscle disorders, continuous muscle injury disrupts the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory macrophages, leading to an overall inflammatory milieu and inhibition of muscle regeneration. Accumulating evidence suggests that Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signalling plays an important role in the regulation of macrophage phenotypes during regenerative myogenesis in response to both acute and chronic muscle injury. Here, we discuss the role of TLR signalling in regulating macrophage phenotypes and skeletal muscle regeneration in healthy and diseased muscle. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26956975

  12. The Thyroid Hormone Receptors Inhibit Hepatic Interleukin-6 Signaling During Endotoxemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; Alonso-Merino, Elvira; Saiz-Ladera, Cristina; Valiño, Arturo José; Regadera, Javier; Alemany, Susana; Aranda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Decreased thyroidal hormone production is found during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic shock in animals as well as in critically ill patients. Here we studied the role of the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) in activation of STAT3, NF-κB and ERK, which play a key role in the response to inflammatory cytokines during sepsis. TR knockout mice showed down-regulation of hepatic inflammatory mediators, including interleukin 6 (IL-6) in response to LPS. Paradoxically, STAT3 and ERK activity were higher, suggesting that TRs could act as endogenous repressors of these pathways. Furthermore, hyperthyroidism increased cytokine production and mortality in response to LPS, despite decreasing hepatic STAT3 and ERK activity. This suggested that TRs could directly repress the response of the cells to inflammatory mediators. Indeed, we found that the thyroid hormone T3 suppresses IL-6 signalling in macrophages and hepatocarcinoma cells, inhibiting STAT3 activation. Consequently, the hormone strongly antagonizes IL-6-stimulated gene transcription, reducing STAT3 recruitment and histone acetylation at IL-6 target promoters. In conclusion, TRs are potent regulators of inflammatory responses and immune homeostasis during sepsis. Reduced responses to IL-6 should serve as a negative feedback mechanism for preventing deleterious effects of excessive hormone signaling during infections. PMID:27484112

  13. Augmented noncanonical BMP type II receptor signaling mediates the synaptic abnormality of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Risa; Roy, Sougata; Ascano, Manuel; Martinez-Cerdeno, Veronica; Ariza-Torres, Jeanelle; Kim, Sunghwan; Louie, Justin; Lu, Yao; Leyton, Patricio; Bloch, Kenneth D; Kornberg, Thomas B; Hagerman, Paul J; Hagerman, Randi; Lagna, Giorgio; Hata, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), a common inherited form of intellectual disability and autism. FXS correlates with abnormal synapse and dendritic spine development, but the molecular link between the absence of the FMR1 product FMRP, an RNA binding protein, and the neuropathology is unclear. We found that the messenger RNA encoding bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR2) is a target of FMRP. Depletion of FMRP increased BMPR2 abundance, especially that of the full-length isoform that bound and activated LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1), a component of the noncanonical BMP signal transduction pathway that stimulates actin reorganization to promote neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Heterozygosity for BMPR2 rescued the morphological abnormalities in neurons both in Drosophila and in mouse models of FXS, as did the postnatal pharmacological inhibition of LIMK1 activity. Compared with postmortem prefrontal cortex tissue from healthy subjects, the amount of full-length BMPR2 and of a marker of LIMK1 activity was increased in this brain region from FXS patients. These findings suggest that increased BMPR2 signal transduction is linked to FXS and that the BMPR2-LIMK1 pathway is a putative therapeutic target in patients with FXS and possibly other forms of autism. PMID:27273096

  14. Pituitary androgen receptor signalling regulates prolactin but not gonadotrophins in the male mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura O'Hara

    Full Text Available Production of the androgen testosterone is controlled by a negative feedback loop within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis. Stimulation of testicular Leydig cells by pituitary luteinising hormone (LH is under the control of hypothalamic gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH, while suppression of LH secretion by the pituitary is controlled by circulating testosterone. Exactly how androgens exert their feedback control of gonadotrophin secretion (and whether this is at the level of the pituitary, as well as the role of AR in other pituitary cell types remains unclear. To investigate these questions, we exploited a transgenic mouse line (Foxg1 Cre/+; AR fl/y which lacks androgen receptor in the pituitary gland. Both circulating testosterone and gonadotrophins are unchanged in adulthood, demonstrating that AR signalling is dispensable in the male mouse pituitary for testosterone-dependent regulation of LH secretion. In contrast, Foxg1 Cre/+; AR fl/y males have a significant increase in circulating prolactin, suggesting that, rather than controlling gonadotrophins, AR-signalling in the pituitary acts to suppress aberrant prolactin production in males.

  15. Purinergic receptors and calcium signalling in human pancreatic duct cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette R; Krabbe, Simon; Novak, Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Purinergic receptors regulate various processes including epithelial transport. There are several studies on P2 receptors in pancreatic ducts of various species, but relatively little is known about these receptors in human tissue. The aim of this study was to identify purinergic receptors in hum...

  16. Synthetic and Receptor Signaling Explorations of the Mitragyna Alkaloids: Mitragynine as an Atypical Molecular Framework for Opioid Receptor Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruegel, Andrew C; Gassaway, Madalee M; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Váradi, András; Majumdar, Susruta; Filizola, Marta; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-06-01

    Mu-opioid receptor agonists represent mainstays of pain management. However, the therapeutic use of these agents is associated with serious side effects, including potentially lethal respiratory depression. Accordingly, there is a longstanding interest in the development of new opioid analgesics with improved therapeutic profiles. The alkaloids of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa, represented by the prototypical member mitragynine, are an unusual class of opioid receptor modulators with distinct pharmacological properties. Here we describe the first receptor-level functional characterization of mitragynine and related natural alkaloids at the human mu-, kappa-, and delta-opioid receptors. These results show that mitragynine and the oxidized analogue 7-hydroxymitragynine, are partial agonists of the human mu-opioid receptor and competitive antagonists at the kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. We also show that mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are G-protein-biased agonists of the mu-opioid receptor, which do not recruit β-arrestin following receptor activation. Therefore, the Mitragyna alkaloid scaffold represents a novel framework for the development of functionally biased opioid modulators, which may exhibit improved therapeutic profiles. Also presented is an enantioselective total synthesis of both (-)-mitragynine and its unnatural enantiomer, (+)-mitragynine, employing a proline-catalyzed Mannich-Michael reaction sequence as the key transformation. Pharmacological evaluation of (+)-mitragynine revealed its much weaker opioid activity. Likewise, the intermediates and chemical transformations developed in the total synthesis allowed the elucidation of previously unexplored structure-activity relationships (SAR) within the Mitragyna scaffold. Molecular docking studies, in combination with the observed chemical SAR, suggest that Mitragyna alkaloids adopt a binding pose at the mu-opioid receptor that is distinct from that of classical opioids. PMID

  17. Integration of G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways for Activation of a Transcription Factor (EGR-3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehai Tan; Pam Sanders; Jack Bolado Jr.; Mike Whitney

    2003-01-01

    We recently reported the use of a gene-trapping approach to isolate cell clones in which a reporter gene had integrated into genes modulated by T-cell activation. We have now tested a panel of clones from that report and identified the one that responds to a variety of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The βlactamase tagged EGR-3 Jurkat cell was used to dissect specific GPCR signaling in vivo. Three GPCRs were studied, including the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (Gicoupled) that was endogenously expressed, the platelet activation factor (PAF) receptor (Gq-coupled), andβ2 adrenergic receptor (Gs-coupled) that was both stably transfected. Agonists for each receptor activated transcription of theβ-lactamase tagged EGR-3 gene. Induction of EGR-3 through CXCR4 was blocked by pertussis toxin and PD58059, a specific inhibitor of MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase). Neither of these inhibitors blocked isoproterenol or PAF-mediated activation of EGR-3. Conversely, β2- and PAF-mediated EGR-3 activation was blocked by the p38, specific inhibitor SB580. In addition, bothβ2- and PAF-mediated EGR-3 activation could be synergistically activated by CXCR4 activation. This combined result indicates that EGR-3 can be activated through distinct signal transduction pathways by different GPCRs and that signals can be integrated and amplified to efficiently tune the level of activation.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor signaling blockade combined with radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory W; Saba, Corey; Armstrong, Eric A; Huang, Shyh-Min; Benavente, Sergio; Ludwig, Dale L; Hicklin, Daniel J; Harari, Paul M

    2007-02-01

    Signaling through the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is implicated in cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, metastasis, and resistance to cytotoxic cancer therapies. Targeted disruption of IGF-IR signaling combined with cytotoxic therapy may therefore yield improved anticancer efficacy over conventional treatments alone. In this study, a fully human anti-IGF-IR monoclonal antibody A12 (ImClone Systems, Inc., New York, NY) is examined as an adjunct to radiation therapy. IGF-IR expression is shown for a diverse cohort of cell lines, whereas targeted IGF-IR blockade by A12 inhibits IGF-IR phosphorylation and activation of the downstream effectors Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Anchorage-dependent proliferation and xenograft growth is inhibited by A12 in a dose-dependent manner, particularly for non-small cell lung cancer lines. Clonogenic radiation survival of H226 and H460 cells grown under anchorage-dependent conditions is impaired by A12, demonstrating a radiation dose-enhancing effect for IGF-IR blockade. Postradiation anchorage-independent colony formation is inhibited by A12 in A549 and H460 cells. In the H460 xenograft model, combining A12 and radiation significantly enhances antitumor efficacy compared with either modality alone. These effects may be mediated by promotion of radiation-induced, double-stranded DNA damage and apoptosis as observed in cell culture. In summary, these results validate IGF-IR signal transduction blockade as a promising strategy to improve radiation therapy efficacy in human tumors, forming a basis for future clinical trials. PMID:17283150

  19. Orexin-1 receptor signaling increases motivation for cocaine-associated cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzley, Brandon S; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2015-05-01

    The orexin/hypocretin system is involved in multiple cocaine addiction processes that involve drug-associated environmental cues, including cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking and expression of conditioned place preference. However, the orexin system does not play a role in several behaviors that are less cue-dependent, such as cocaine-primed reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking and low-effort cocaine self-administration. We hypothesized that cocaine-associated cues, but not cocaine alone, engage signaling at orexin-1 receptors (OX1Rs), and this cue-engaged OX1R signaling increases motivation for cocaine. Motivation for cocaine was measured in Sprague-Dawley rats with behavioral-economic demand curve analysis after pretreatment with the OX1R antagonist SB-334867 (SB) or vehicle with and without light + tone cues. Demand for cocaine was higher when cocaine