WorldWideScience

Sample records for 6-cys protein family

  1. Biochemical and Functional Analysis of Two Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage 6-Cys Proteins: P12 and P41

    OpenAIRE

    Tana Taechalertpaisarn; Cecile Crosnier; S Josefin Bartholdson; Hodder, Anthony N.; Jenny Thompson; Bustamante, Leyla Y.; Wilson, Danny W.; Sanders, Paul R.; Wright, Gavin J.; Rayner, Julian C.; Cowman, Alan F.; Gilson, Paul R.; Crabb, Brendan S

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria in humans, other primates, birds, and rodents all encode multiple 6-cys proteins. Distinct 6-cys protein family members reside on the surface at each extracellular life cycle stage and those on the surface of liver infective and sexual stages have been shown to play important roles in hepatocyte growth and fertilization respectively. However, 6-cys proteins associated with the blood-stage forms of the parasite have no known function. Here...

  2. Biochemical and functional analysis of two Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage 6-cys proteins: P12 and P41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tana Taechalertpaisarn

    Full Text Available The genomes of Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria in humans, other primates, birds, and rodents all encode multiple 6-cys proteins. Distinct 6-cys protein family members reside on the surface at each extracellular life cycle stage and those on the surface of liver infective and sexual stages have been shown to play important roles in hepatocyte growth and fertilization respectively. However, 6-cys proteins associated with the blood-stage forms of the parasite have no known function. Here we investigate the biochemical nature and function of two blood-stage 6-cys proteins in Plasmodium falciparum, the most pathogenic species to afflict humans. We show that native P12 and P41 form a stable heterodimer on the infective merozoite surface and are secreted following invasion, but could find no evidence that this complex mediates erythrocyte-receptor binding. That P12 and P41 do not appear to have a major role as adhesins to erythrocyte receptors was supported by the observation that antisera to these proteins did not substantially inhibit erythrocyte invasion. To investigate other functional roles for these proteins their genes were successfully disrupted in P. falciparum, however P12 and P41 knockout parasites grew at normal rates in vitro and displayed no other obvious phenotypic changes. It now appears likely that these blood-stage 6-cys proteins operate as a pair and play redundant roles either in erythrocyte invasion or in host-immune interactions.

  3. Entamoeba histolytica Lectins Contain Unique 6-Cys or 8-Cys Chitin-Binding Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dellen, Katrina; Ghosh, Sudip K.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Loftus, Brendan; Samuelson, John

    2002-01-01

    The Jacob lectin, the most abundant glycoprotein in the cyst wall of Entamoeba invadens, contains five unique 6-Cys chitin-binding domains (CBDs). We identified Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar genes encoding Jacob homologues, each of which contains two predicted 6-Cys CBDs. A unique 8-Cys CBD was found at the N termini of the E. histolytica chitinase and three other predicted lectins, called Jessie 1 to Jessie 3. The CBDs of four E. histolytica lectins (Jacob, chitinase, and Jessie...

  4. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...... facilitates homophilic cell adhesion. Moreover, IGSF9 family proteins have been implicated in the outgrowth and branching of neurites, axon guidance, synapse maturation, self-avoidance, and tiling. However, despite the few published studies on IGSF9 family proteins, reports on the functions of both Turtle...

  5. Characterization of paralogous protein families in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wei

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High gene numbers in plant genomes reflect polyploidy and major gene duplication events. Oryza sativa, cultivated rice, is a diploid monocotyledonous species with a ~390 Mb genome that has undergone segmental duplication of a substantial portion of its genome. This, coupled with other genetic events such as tandem duplications, has resulted in a substantial number of its genes, and resulting proteins, occurring in paralogous families. Results Using a computational pipeline that utilizes Pfam and novel protein domains, we characterized paralogous families in rice and compared these with paralogous families in the model dicotyledonous diploid species, Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis, which has undergone genome duplication as well, has a substantially smaller genome (~120 Mb and gene complement compared to rice. Overall, 53% and 68% of the non-transposable element-related rice and Arabidopsis proteins could be classified into paralogous protein families, respectively. Singleton and paralogous family genes differed substantially in their likelihood of encoding a protein of known or putative function; 26% and 66% of singleton genes compared to 73% and 96% of the paralogous family genes encode a known or putative protein in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. Furthermore, a major skew in the distribution of specific gene function was observed; a total of 17 Gene Ontology categories in both rice and Arabidopsis were statistically significant in their differential distribution between paralogous family and singleton proteins. In contrast to mammalian organisms, we found that duplicated genes in rice and Arabidopsis tend to have more alternative splice forms. Using data from Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing, we show that a significant portion of the duplicated genes in rice show divergent expression although a correlation between sequence divergence and correlation of expression could be seen in very young genes. Conclusion

  6. Protein Kinase D family kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Wille, Christoph; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Highly invasive pancreatic tumors are often recognized in late stages due to a lack of clear symptoms and pose major challenges for treatment and disease management. Broad-band Protein Kinase D (PKD) inhibitors have recently been proposed as additional treatment option for this disease. PKDs are implicated in the control of cancer cell motility, angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. In particular, PKD2 expression is elevated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is comparably lo...

  7. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact with......-domain proteins catalyse the formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, whereas others appear to target ubiquitinated proteins for degradation and interact with chaperones. Hence, by binding to the 26S proteasome the UBL-domain proteins seem to tailor and direct the basic proteolytic functions of the particle to...... 26S proteasomes. The 26S proteasome is a multisubunit protease which is responsible for the majority of intracellular proteolysis in eukaryotic cells. Before degradation commences most proteins are first marked for destruction by being coupled to a chain of ubiquitin molecules. Some UBL...

  8. On the Entropy of Protein Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, John P.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Cocco, Simona; Jacquin, Hugo; Monasson, Rémi

    2016-03-01

    Proteins are essential components of living systems, capable of performing a huge variety of tasks at the molecular level, such as recognition, signalling, copy, transport, ... The protein sequences realizing a given function may largely vary across organisms, giving rise to a protein family. Here, we estimate the entropy of those families based on different approaches, including Hidden Markov Models used for protein databases and inferred statistical models reproducing the low-order (1- and 2-point) statistics of multi-sequence alignments. We also compute the entropic cost, that is, the loss in entropy resulting from a constraint acting on the protein, such as the mutation of one particular amino-acid on a specific site, and relate this notion to the escape probability of the HIV virus. The case of lattice proteins, for which the entropy can be computed exactly, allows us to provide another illustration of the concept of cost, due to the competition of different folds. The relevance of the entropy in relation to directed evolution experiments is stressed.

  9. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β -lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β -lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β -lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  10. Correlated rigid modes in protein families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, D. A.; Wojtowicz, D.; Przytycka, T. M.; Periwal, V.

    2016-04-01

    A great deal of evolutionarily conserved information is contained in genomes and proteins. Enormous effort has been put into understanding protein structure and developing computational tools for protein folding, and many sophisticated approaches take structure and sequence homology into account. Several groups have applied statistical physics approaches to extracting information about proteins from sequences alone. Here, we develop a new method for sequence analysis based on first principles, in information theory, in statistical physics and in Bayesian analysis. We provide a complete derivation of our approach and we apply it to a variety of systems, to demonstrate its utility and its limitations. We show in some examples that phylogenetic alignments of amino-acid sequences of families of proteins imply the existence of a small number of modes that appear to be associated with correlated global variation. These modes are uncovered efficiently in our approach by computing a non-perturbative effective potential directly from the alignment. We show that this effective potential approaches a limiting form inversely with the logarithm of the number of sequences. Mapping symbol entropy flows along modes to underlying physical structures shows that these modes arise due to correlated compensatory adjustments. In the protein examples, these occur around functional binding pockets.

  11. Tic62: a protein family from metabolism to protein translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soll Jürgen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The function and structure of protein translocons at the outer and inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts (Toc and Tic complexes, respectively are a subject of intensive research. One of the proteins that have been ascribed to the Tic complex is Tic62. This protein was proposed as a redox sensor protein and may possibly act as a regulator during the translocation process. Tic62 is a bimodular protein that comprises an N-terminal module, responsible for binding to pyridine nucleotides, and a C-terminal module which serves as a docking site for ferredoxin-NAD(P-oxido-reductase (FNR. This work focuses on evolutionary analysis of the Tic62-NAD(P-related protein family, derived from the comparison of all available sequences, and discusses the structure of Tic62. Results Whereas the N-terminal module of Tic62 is highly conserved among all oxyphototrophs, the C-terminal region (FNR-binding module is only found in vascular plants. Phylogenetic analyses classify four Tic62-NAD(P-related protein subfamilies in land plants, closely related to members from cyanobacteria and green sulphur bacteria. Although most of the Tic62-NAD(P-related eukaryotic proteins are localized in the chloroplast, one subgroup consists of proteins without a predicted transit peptide. The N-terminal module of Tic62 contains the structurally conserved Rossman fold and probably belongs to the extended family of short-chain dehydrogenases-reductases. Key residues involved in NADP-binding and residues that may attach the protein to the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts or to the Tic complex are proposed. Conclusion The Tic62-NAD(P-related proteins are of ancient origin since they are not only found in cyanobacteria but also in green sulphur bacteria. The FNR-binding module at the C-terminal region of the Tic62 proteins is probably a recent acquisition in vascular plants, with no sequence similarity to any other known motifs. The presence of the FNR

  12. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd;

    2010-01-01

    Despite the essential roles of sphingolipids both as structural components of membranes and critical signalling molecules, we have a limited understanding of how cells sense and regulate their levels. Here we reveal the function in sphingolipid metabolism of the ORM genes (known as ORMDL genes...... in humans)-a conserved gene family that includes ORMDL3, which has recently been identified as a potential risk factor for childhood asthma. Starting from an unbiased functional genomic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we identify Orm proteins as negative regulators of sphingolipid synthesis that form...... a conserved complex with serine palmitoyltransferase, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in sphingolipid production. We also define a regulatory pathway in which phosphorylation of Orm proteins relieves their inhibitory activity when sphingolipid production is disrupted. Changes in ORM gene expression...

  13. Characterization of the Roco Protein Family in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Egmond, Wouter N.; van Haastert, Peter J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The Roco family consists of multidomain Ras-GTPases that include LRRK2, a protein mutated in familial Parkinson's disease. The genome of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum encodes 11 Roco proteins. To study the functions of these proteins, we systematically knocked out the roco genes.

  14. Emergence of protein fold families through rational design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ding

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Diverse proteins with similar structures are grouped into families of homologs and analogs, if their sequence similarity is higher or lower, respectively, than 20%-30%. It was suggested that protein homologs and analogs originate from a common ancestor and diverge in their distinct evolutionary time scales, emerging as a consequence of the physical properties of the protein sequence space. Although a number of studies have determined key signatures of protein family organization, the sequence-structure factors that differentiate the two evolution-related protein families remain unknown. Here, we stipulate that subtle structural changes, which appear due to accumulating mutations in the homologous families, lead to distinct packing of the protein core and, thus, novel compositions of core residues. The latter process leads to the formation of distinct families of homologs. We propose that such differentiation results in the formation of analogous families. To test our postulate, we developed a molecular modeling and design toolkit, Medusa, to computationally design protein sequences that correspond to the same fold family. We find that analogous proteins emerge when a backbone structure deviates only 1-2 angstroms root-mean-square deviation from the original structure. For close homologs, core residues are highly conserved. However, when the overall sequence similarity drops to approximately 25%-30%, the composition of core residues starts to diverge, thereby forming novel families of protein homologs. This direct observation of the formation of protein homologs within a specific fold family supports our hypothesis. The conservation of amino acids in designed sequences recapitulates that of the naturally occurring sequences, thereby validating our computational design methodology.

  15. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  16. Scaling Behaviour of Conserved Sites in Protein Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; WANG Jun; WANG Wei

    2005-01-01

    @@ Base on the database of families of structurally similar proteins, a statistical study is made on the scaling behaviour of occupying probabilities of conserved sites (Pc) in various protein families. A power-law decrease of Pc with the increasing protein-chain length Lf is found. This is related to the power-law scaling behaviour of the occurring probabilities of local contact interactions (Plocal) between residues. In addition, applying residue grouping, we find the same scaling behaviour when the number of residue types is more than 12, indicating that 12 residue types are enough to present the complexity of proteins.

  17. A Network Synthesis Model for Generating Protein Interaction Network Families

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim Sahraeian; Byung-Jun Yoon

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a novel network synthesis model that can generate families of evolutionarily related synthetic protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Given an ancestral network, the proposed model generates the network family according to a hypothetical phylogenetic tree, where the descendant networks are obtained through duplication and divergence of their ancestors, followed by network growth using network evolution models. We demonstrate that this network synthesis model ca...

  18. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  19. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Analyses Using Protein Family Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cuncong; Yooseph, Shibu

    2016-01-01

    Analyses of metagenome data (MG) and metatranscriptome data (MT) are often challenged by a paucity of complete reference genome sequences and the uneven/low sequencing depth of the constituent organisms in the microbial community, which respectively limit the power of reference-based alignment and de novo sequence assembly. These limitations make accurate protein family classification and abundance estimation challenging, which in turn hamper downstream analyses such as abundance profiling of metabolic pathways, identification of differentially encoded/expressed genes, and de novo reconstruction of complete gene and protein sequences from the protein family of interest. The profile hidden Markov model (HMM) framework enables the construction of very useful probabilistic models for protein families that allow for accurate modeling of position specific matches, insertions, and deletions. We present a novel homology detection algorithm that integrates banded Viterbi algorithm for profile HMM parsing with an iterative simultaneous alignment and assembly computational framework. The algorithm searches a given profile HMM of a protein family against a database of fragmentary MG/MT sequencing data and simultaneously assembles complete or near-complete gene and protein sequences of the protein family. The resulting program, HMM-GRASPx, demonstrates superior performance in aligning and assembling homologs when benchmarked on both simulated marine MG and real human saliva MG datasets. On real supragingival plaque and stool MG datasets that were generated from healthy individuals, HMM-GRASPx accurately estimates the abundances of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene families and enables accurate characterization of the resistome profiles of these microbial communities. For real human oral microbiome MT datasets, using the HMM-GRASPx estimated transcript abundances significantly improves detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes. Finally, HMM-GRASPx was used to

  20. Protein folds and families: sequence and structure alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, L; Sander, C

    1999-01-01

    Dali and HSSP are derived databases organizing protein space in the structurally known regions. We use an automatic structure alignment program (Dali) for the classification of all known 3D structures based on all-against-all comparison of 3D structures in the Protein Data Bank. The HSSP database associates 1D sequences with known 3D structures using a position-weighted dynamic programming method for sequence profile alignment (MaxHom). As a result, the HSSP database not only provides aligned sequence families, but also implies secondary and tertiary structures covering 36% of all sequences in Swiss-Prot. The structure classification by Dali and the sequence families in HSSP can be browsed jointly from a web interface providing a rich network of links between neighbours in fold space, between domains and proteins, and between structures and sequences. In particular, this results in a database of explicit multiple alignments of protein families in the twilight zone of sequence similarity. The organization of protein structures and families provides a map of the currently known regions of the protein universe that is useful for the analysis of folding principles, for the evolutionary unification of protein families and for maximizing the information return from experimental structure determination. The databases are available from http://www.embl-ebi.ac.uk/dali/

  1. The complement C3 protein family in invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Nonaka, M

    2011-01-01

    Complement C3 plays a pivotal role in the innate immune system of mammals as the central component of the complement system essential for its activation mechanism and effecter function. C3 has a unique intra-chain thioester bond that is shared by some complement and non-complement proteins forming a thioester protein (TEP) family. Phylogenetic analysis of TEP family genes of vertebrates and invertebrates revealed that the TEP family is divided into two subfamilies, the C3 subfamily and the al...

  2. Protein families: implications for allergen nomenclature, standardisation and specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiteneder, Heimo

    2009-01-01

    Allergens are embedded into the protein universe as members of large families and superfamilies of related proteins which is a direct consequence of their shared evolution. The classification of allergens by protein families offers a valuable frame of reference that allows the design of experiments to study cross-reactivity and allergenic potency of proteins. Information on protein family membership also complements the current official IUIS allergen nomenclature. All presently known allergens belong to one of 140 (1.4%) of the 10,340 protein families currently described by version 23.0 of the Pfam database. This is indicative of a strong bias among allergens towards certain protein architectures that are able to induce an IgE response in an atopic immune system. However, even small variations in the structure of a protein alter its immunological characteristics. Various isoforms of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 were shown to possess highly variant immunogenic and allergenic properties. Ber e 1 and SFA8, two 2S albumins, were revealed to display differential capacities to polarise an immune response. Such data will be exploited in the future for the design of allergy vaccines.

  3. A new family of global protein shape descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Bohr, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    A family of global geometric measures is constructed for protein structure classification. These measures originate from integral formulas of Vassiliev knot invariants and give rise to a unique classification scheme. Our measures can better discriminate between many known protein structures than...

  4. P1 peptidase – a mysterious protein of family Potyviridae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jana Rohožková; Milan Navrátil

    2011-03-01

    The Potyviridae family, named after its type member, Potato virus Y (PVY), is the largest of the 65 plant virus groups and families currently recognized. The coding region for P1 peptidase is located at the very beginning of the viral genome of the family Potyviridae. Until recently P1 was thought of as serine peptidase with RNA-binding activity and with possible influence in cell-to-cell viral spreading. This N-terminal protein, among all of the potyviruses, is the most divergent protein: varying in length and in its amino acid sequence. Nevertheless, P1 peptidase in many ways is still a mysterious viral protein. In this review, we would like to offer a comprehensive overview, discussing the proteomic, biochemical and phylogenetic views of the P1 protein.

  5. Computing a new family of shape descriptors for protein structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Sinclair, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale 3D structure of a protein can be represented by the polygonal curve through the carbon a atoms of the protein backbone. We introduce an algorithm for computing the average number of times that a given configuration of crossings on such polygonal curves is seen, the average being t...... taken over all directions in space. Hereby, we introduce a new family of global geometric measures of protein structures, which we compare with the so-called generalized Gauss integrals....

  6. Calcineurin homologous protein: a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein family

    OpenAIRE

    Di Sole, Francesca; Vadnagara, Komal; MOE, ORSON W.; Babich, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The calcineurin homologous protein (CHP) belongs to an evolutionarily conserved Ca2+-binding protein subfamily. The CHP subfamily is composed of CHP1, CHP2, and CHP3, which in vertebrates share significant homology at the protein level with each other and between other Ca2+-binding proteins. The CHP structure consists of two globular domains containing from one to four EF-hand structural motifs (calcium-binding regions composed of two helixes, E and F, joined by a loop), the myristoylation, a...

  7. Structural similarity of loops in protein families: toward the understanding of protein evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Madej Thomas; Panchenko Anna R

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein evolution and protein classification are usually inferred by comparing protein cores in their conserved aligned parts. Structurally aligned protein regions are separated by less conserved loop regions, where sequence and structure locally deviate from each other and do not superimpose well. Results Our results indicate that even longer protein loops can not be viewed as "random coils" and for the majority of protein families in our test set there exists a linear co...

  8. The SGS3 protein involved in PTGS finds a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Alex

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS is a recently discovered phenomenon that is an area of intense research interest. Components of the PTGS machinery are being discovered by genetic and bioinformatics approaches, but the picture is not yet complete. Results The gene for the PTGS impaired Arabidopsis mutant sgs3 was recently cloned and was not found to have similarity to any other known protein. By a detailed analysis of the sequence of SGS3 we have defined three new protein domains: the XH domain, the XS domain and the zf-XS domain, that are shared with a large family of uncharacterised plant proteins. This work implicates these plant proteins in PTGS. Conclusion The enigmatic SGS3 protein has been found to contain two predicted domains in common with a family of plant proteins. The other members of this family have been predicted to be transcription factors, however this function seems unlikely based on this analysis. A bioinformatics approach has implicated a new family of plant proteins related to SGS3 as potential candidates for PTGS related functions.

  9. Genome-wide Analysis of Ovate Family Proteins in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Jian-ping; Li Hong-ling; Chang Ying

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ovate family proteins (AtOFPs) is a newly found plant-specific protein family interacting with TALE (3-aa loop extension homeodomain proteins) homeodomain proteins in Arabidopsis. Here, based on bioinformatic analysis, we found that Arabidopsis genome actually encoded 17 OVATE domain-containing proteins. One of them, AtOFP19, has not been previously identified. Based on their amino acid sequence similarity, AtOFPs proteins can be divided into two groups. Most of the AtOFPs were located in nuclear, four of them were presented in chloroplast and the remaining two members appeared in cytoplasmic. A genome- wide microarray based gene expression analysis involving 47 stages of vegetative and reproductive development revealed that AtOFPs have diverse expression pattems. Investigation of proteins interaction showed that nine AtOFPs only interacted with TALE homeodomain proteins, which are fundamental regulators of plant meristem function and leaf development. Our work could provide important leads toward functional genomics studies of ovate family proteins, which may be involved in a previously unrecognized control mechanism in plant development

  10. Advances in the Study of SR Protein Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyun Ma; Fuchu He

    2003-01-01

    The name of SR proteins is derived from their typical RS domain that is rich in serine (Ser, S) and arginine (Arg, R). They are conserved in evolution. Up to now, 10 members of the SR protein family have been identified in humans. SR proteins contain one or two RNA binding motifs aside from the RS domain, and also possess special biochemical and immunological features. As to the functions of SR proteins, they facilitate the recruitment of the components of splicesome via protein-protein interaction to prompt the assembly of early splicesome; while in alternative splicing, tissue-specifically expressed SR protein along with the relative ratio of SR protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) is composed of two main regulative mechanisms for alternative splicing. Almost all of the biochemical functions are regulated by reversible phosphorylation.

  11. Advances in the Study of SR Protein Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoyunMa; FuchuHe

    2003-01-01

    The name of SR proteins is derived from their typical RS domain that is rich in serine(Ser,S)and arginine(Arg,R).They are conserved in evolution.Up to now,10 members of the SR protein family have been identified in humans.SR proteins contain one or two RNA binding motifs aside from the RS domain,and also possess special biochemical and immunological features.As to the functions of SR proteins,they facilitate the recruitment of the components of splicesome via protein-protein interaction to prompt the assembly ofearly aplicesome;while in alternative splicing,tissue-specifically expressed SR protein along with the relative ratio of SR protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein(hnRNP)is composed of two main regulative mechanisms for alternative splicing.Almost all of the biochemical functions are regulated by reversible phosphorylation.

  12. Nogo, a star protein in reticulon family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming WANG; Ying HAN; Xiao-Pan ZHANG; Ya-Ping LU

    2006-01-01

    Nogo is widely expressed in higher vertebrate animals. Nogo gene gives rise to multiple isoforms. All the subtypes of Nogo proteins are characterized by a 200-amino-acid C-terminal domain, including two long hydrophobic sequences. Biological functions of Nogo include inhibition of neurite growth from the cell surface via specific receptors,intracellular trafficking, cell division and apoptosis. Here, we briefly review the elementary structure, taxonomic distribution and tissue expression of Nogo, summarize recent discoveries about localization of Nogo and mechanism of action, and discuss the possible functions of Nogo.

  13. Tankyrase Inhibitors Target YAP by Stabilizing Angiomotin Family Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As the key effector in the Hippo pathway, YAP was identified as an oncoprotein whose expression is elevated in various human cancers. However, the development of potentially therapeutic compounds targeting YAP has been slow and limited. Here, we find that tankyrase inhibitors suppress YAP activity. This effect is mediated by anigomotin (AMOT family proteins. Tankyrases associate with AMOT family proteins and promote their degradation through E3 ligase RNF146. By antagonizing tankyrase activity, tankyrase inhibitors stabilize AMOT family proteins, thereby suppressing YAP oncogenic functions. Together, our studies not only demonstrate the tankyrase-RNF146-AMOT axis as an upstream pathway regulating YAP but also reveal a therapeutic opportunity in targeting YAP for cancer treatment.

  14. BCL-2 family proteins as regulators of mitochondria metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Atan

    2016-08-01

    The BCL-2 family proteins are major regulators of apoptosis, and one of their major sites of action are the mitochondria. Mitochondria are the cellular hubs for metabolism and indeed selected BCL-2 family proteins also possess roles related to mitochondria metabolism and dynamics. Here we discuss the link between mitochondrial metabolism/dynamics and the fate of stem cells, with an emphasis on the role of the BID-MTCH2 pair in regulating this link. We also discuss the possibility that BCL-2 family proteins act as metabolic sensors/messengers coming on and off of mitochondria to "sample" the cytosol and provide the mitochondria with up-to-date metabolic information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26827940

  15. Expression and localization of X11 family proteins in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motodate, Rika; Saito, Yuhki; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-09-01

    The X11/Mint family of proteins comprises X11/X11α/Mint1, X11L/X11β/Mint2, and X11L2/X11γ/Mint3. Each of these molecules is an adaptor protein that contains a phosphotyrosine interaction/binding (PI/PTB) and two PDZ domains in its carboxy-terminal region. X11/Mint family members associate with a broad spectrum of membrane proteins, including Alzheimer's β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), alcadeins, and low density lipoprotein receptor proteins, as well as various cytoplasmic proteins including Arf, kalirin-7, and Munc18. In particular, X11 and X11L are thought to play various roles in the regulation of neural functions in brain. Nevertheless, the protein levels and respective localization of individual family members remain controversial. We analyzed the protein levels of X11 and X11L in the corresponding single- and double-knockout mice. X11 and X11L did not exhibit obvious changes of their protein levels when the other was absent, especially in cerebrum in which they were widely co-expressed. In cerebellum, X11 and X11L localized in characteristic patterns in various types of neurons, and X11 protein level increased without an obvious ectopic localization in X11L-knockout mice. Interestingly, only X11L protein existed specifically in brain, whereas, contrary to the accepted view, X11 protein was detected at the highest levels in brain but was also strongly detected in pancreas, testis, and paranephros. Together, our results indicate that both X11 and X11L exert largely in brain neurons, but X11 may also function in peripheral tissues. PMID:27268412

  16. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graether, Steffen P; Boddington, Kelly F

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  17. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen P Graether

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dehydration proteins (dehydrins are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y- and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggest multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins.

  18. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis related (PR proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens.

  19. Identification and characterization of cytosolic Hansenula polymorpha proteins belonging to the Hsp70 protein family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Titorenko, Vladimir I.; Evers, Melchior E.; Diesel, Andre; Samyn, Bart; Beeumen, Josef van; Roggenkamp, Rainer; Kiel, Jan A.K.W.; Klei, Ida J. van der; Veenhuis, Marten

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated two members of the Hsp70 protein family from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha using affinity chromatography. Both proteins were located in the cytoplasm. One of these, designated Hsp72, was inducible in nature (e.g. by heat shock). The second protein (designated Hsc74) was constitutiv

  20. Conventional and novel Gγ protein families constitute the heterotrimeric G-protein signaling network in soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup Roy Choudhury

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-proteins comprised of Gα, Gβ and Gγ proteins are important signal transducers in all eukaryotes. The Gγ protein of the G-protein heterotrimer is crucial for its proper targeting at the plasma membrane and correct functioning. Gγ proteins are significantly smaller and more diverse than the Gα and Gβ proteins. In model plants Arabidopsis and rice that have a single Gα and Gβ protein, the presence of two canonical Gγ proteins provide some diversity to the possible heterotrimeric combinations. Our recent analysis of the latest version of the soybean genome has identified ten Gγ proteins which belong to three distinct families based on their C-termini. We amplified the full length cDNAs, analyzed their detailed expression profile by quantitative PCR, assessed their localization and performed yeast-based interaction analysis to evaluate interaction specificity with different Gβ proteins. Our results show that ten Gγ genes are retained in the soybean genome and have interesting expression profiles across different developmental stages. Six of the newly identified proteins belong to two plant-specific Gγ protein families. Yeast-based interaction analyses predict some degree of interaction specificity between different Gβ and Gγ proteins. This research thus identifies a highly diverse G-protein network from a plant species. Homologs of these novel proteins have been previously identified as QTLs for grain size and yield in rice.

  1. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  2. Evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Mustafa, Arshi; Almén, Markus Sällman; Fredriksson, Robert; Williams, Michael J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins perform a crucial role as molecular switches controlling various cellular responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Recent data have shown that the vertebrate-like G protein families are found across metazoans and their closest unicellular relatives. However, an overall evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like G proteins, including gene family annotations and in particular mapping individual gene gain/loss events across diverse holozoan lineages is still incomplete. Here, with more expanded invertebrate taxon sampling, we have reconstructed phylogenetic trees for each of the G protein classes/families and provide a robust classification and hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G proteins. Our results further extend the evidence that the common ancestor (CA) of holozoans had at least five ancestral Gα genes corresponding to all major vertebrate Gα classes and contain a total of eight genes including two Gβ and one Gγ. Our results also indicate that the GNAI/O-like gene likely duplicated in the last CA of metazoans to give rise to GNAI- and GNAO-like genes, which are conserved across invertebrates. Moreover, homologs of GNB1-4 paralogon- and GNB5 family-like genes are found in most metazoans and that the unicellular holozoans encode two ancestral Gβ genes. Similarly, most bilaterian invertebrates encode two Gγ genes which include a representative of the GNG gene cluster and a putative homolog of GNG13. Interestingly, our results also revealed key evolutionary events such as the Drosophila melanogaster eye specific Gβ subunit that is found conserved in most arthropods and several previously unidentified species specific expansions within Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gα12/13 classes and the GNB1-4 paralogon. Also, we provide an overall proposed evolutionary scenario on the expansions of all G protein families in vertebrate tetraploidizations. Our robust classification/hierarchy is essential to further

  3. In-silico characterization of Formin Binding Protein 4 Family of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amit; Bhattacharya, Simanti; Bagchi, Angshuman; Dasgupta, Rakhi

    2015-03-01

    Members of the Formin Binding Protein 4 Family or the FNBP4 were indirectly reported to be associated with many of the biological processes. These proteins possess two WW domains. So far there are practically no reports regarding the characterization and classification of the protein by any means. Keeping in mind the importance of the proteins from this FNBP4 family, we have tried an in silico approach to come up with a comprehensive analysis of the proteins. We have analyzed the proteins by considering their sequence conservation, their phylogenetic distributions among the different organisms. We have also investigated the functional properties of the WW domains in the proteins. Finally, we have made an attempt to elucidate the structural details of the domains and predicted the possible modes of their interactions. Our findings show that FNBP4 is eukaryotic in its distribution and follows a trend of evolution where animal and plant homologues have evolved in an independent manner. While the WW domain is the only common motif present across the FNBP4 family of proteins, there are different classes (mainly two) of WW domains that are found among different FNBP4 proteins. Structure function predictions indicate a possible role of FNBP4 in either protein stabilization control or transcript processing. Our study on FNBP4 may therefore open up new avenues to generate new interest in this highly important but largely unexplored class of proteins. Future studies with proteins from this family may answer many important questions of protein-protein interactions in different biologically important processes.

  4. Specificity of botulinum protease for human VAMP family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Mori, Masatoshi; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Goshima, Naoki; Kozaki, Shunji; Ihara, Hideshi

    2012-04-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin light chain (BoNT-LC) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that cleaves neuronal SNARE proteins such as SNAP-25, VAMP2, and Syntaxin1. This cleavage interferes with the neurotransmitter release of peripheral neurons and results in flaccid paralysis. SNAP, VAMP, and Syntaxin are representative of large families of proteins that mediate most membrane fusion reactions, as well as both neuronal and non-neuronal exocytotic events in eukaryotic cells. Neuron-specific SNARE proteins, which are target substrates of BoNT, have been well studied; however, it is unclear whether other SNARE proteins are also proteolyzed by BoNT. Herein, we define the substrate specificity of BoNT-LC/B, /D, and /F towards recombinant human VAMP family proteins. We demonstrate that LC/B, /D, and /F are able to cleave VAMP1, 2, and 3, but no other VAMP family proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed that all LC have higher affinity and catalytic activity for the non-neuronal SNARE isoform VAMP3 than for the neuronal VAMP1 and 2 isoforms. LC/D in particular exhibited extremely low catalytic activity towards VAMP1 relative to other interactions, which we determined through point mutation analysis to be a result of the Ile present at residue 48 of VAMP1. We also identified the VAMP3 cleavage sites to be at the Gln 59-Phe 60 (LC/B), Lys 42-Leu 43 (LC/D), and Gln 41-Lys 42 (LC/F) peptide bonds, which correspond to those of VAMP1 or 2. Understanding the substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of BoNT towards human SNARE proteins may aid in the development of novel therapeutic uses for BoNT.

  5. Target Molecular Simulations of RecA Family Protein Filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeng-Tseng Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the RadA family mechanism is crucial to understanding the DNA SOS repair process. In a 2007 report, the archaeal RadA proteins function as rotary motors (linker region: I71-K88 such as shown in Figure 1. Molecular simulations approaches help to shed further light onto this phenomenon. We find 11 rotary residues (R72, T75-K81, M84, V86 and K87 and five zero rotary residues (I71, K74, E82, R83 and K88 in the simulations. Inclusion of our simulations may help to understand the RadA family mechanism.

  6. p53 Family: Role of Protein Isoforms in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiong Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TP53, TP63, and TP73 genes comprise the p53 family. Each gene produces protein isoforms through multiple mechanisms including extensive alternative mRNA splicing. Accumulating evidence shows that these isoforms play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes in normal cells. Their abnormal expression contributes to tumorigenesis and has a profound effect on tumor response to curative therapy. This paper is an overview of isoform diversity in the p53 family and its role in cancer.

  7. The TET Family of Proteins: Functions and Roles in Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adelene Y.Tan; James L.Manley

    2009-01-01

    Translocated in liposarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma and TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15 constitute an interesting and important family of proteins known as the TET proteins. The proteins function in several aspects of cell growth control, including multiple different steps in gene expression, and they are also found mutated in a number of specific diseases. For example, all contain domains for binding nucleic acids and have been shown to function in both RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription and premRNA splicing, possibly connecting these two processes. Chromosomal translocations in human sarcomas result in a fusion of the amino terminus of these proteins, which contains a transcription activation domain, to the DNA-binding domain of a transcription factor. Although the fusion proteins have been characterized in a clinical environment, the function of the cognate full-length protein in normal cells is a more recent topic of study. The first part of this review will describe the TET proteins, followed by detailed descriptions of their multiple roles in cells. The final sections will examine changes that occur in gene regulation in cells expressing the fusion proteins. The clinical implications and treatment of sarcomas will not be addressed but have recently been reviewed.

  8. Evolution of the MAGUK protein gene family in premetazoan lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Trillo Iñaki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-to-cell communication is a key process in multicellular organisms. In multicellular animals, scaffolding proteins belonging to the family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK are involved in the regulation and formation of cell junctions. These MAGUK proteins were believed to be exclusive to Metazoa. However, a MAGUK gene was recently identified in an EST survey of Capsaspora owczarzaki, an unicellular organism that branches off near the metazoan clade. To further investigate the evolutionary history of MAGUK, we have undertook a broader search for this gene family using available genomic sequences of different opisthokont taxa. Results Our survey and phylogenetic analyses show that MAGUK proteins are present not only in Metazoa, but also in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki. However, MAGUKs are absent from fungi, amoebozoans or any other eukaryote. The repertoire of MAGUKs in Placozoa and eumetazoan taxa (Cnidaria + Bilateria is quite similar, except for one class that is missing in Trichoplax, while Porifera have a simpler MAGUK repertoire. However, Vertebrata have undergone several independent duplications and exhibit two exclusive MAGUK classes. Three different MAGUK types are found in both M. brevicollis and C. owczarzaki: DLG, MPP and MAGI. Furthermore, M. brevicollis has suffered a lineage-specific diversification. Conclusions The diversification of the MAGUK protein gene family occurred, most probably, prior to the divergence between Metazoa+choanoflagellates and the Capsaspora+Ministeria clade. A MAGI-like, a DLG-like, and a MPP-like ancestral genes were already present in the unicellular ancestor of Metazoa, and new gene members have been incorporated through metazoan evolution within two major periods, one before the sponge-eumetazoan split and another within the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, choanoflagellates have suffered an independent MAGUK

  9. [Immunodiffusion analysis of plasma proteins in the canine family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, O K; Iurishina, N A; Savina, M A

    1976-01-01

    Immunodiffusion studies have been made on the plasma of 9 species (Vulpes vulpes, V. corsak, Alopex lagopus, Canis aureus, C. lupus, C. familiaris, C. dingo, Nyctereutes procynoides, Fennecus zerde) from the family of Canidae using milk antisera. Unlike rabbit antisera used earlier, milk antisera make it possible to detect more significant antigenic divergency with respect to 5 alpha- and beta-globulins. These globulins seem to have a higher evolution rate of antigenic mosaics as compared to other plasma proteins in the family investigated. The family Canidae serologically may be divided into two main groups: 1) the genus Canis which includes the wolf, domestic dog, dingo, jackal and 2) species which significantly differ from the former (the fox, polar fox, dog fox, fennec). In relation to these two groups, the raccoon dog occupies special position. PMID:62473

  10. Nonagonal cadherins: A new protein family found within the Stramenopiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kyle I G; van West, Pieter; Gachon, Claire M M

    2016-11-15

    Cadherins, a group of molecules typically associated with planar cell polarity and Wnt signalling, have been little reported outside of the animal kingdom. Here, we identify a new family of cadherins in the Stramenopiles, termed Nonagonal after their 9 transmembrane passes, which contrast to the one or seven passes found in other known cadherin families. Manual curation and experimental validation reveal two subclasses of nonagonal cadherins, depending on the number of uninterrupted extracellular cadherin (EC) modules presented. Firstly, shorter mono-exonic, unimodular, protein models, with 3 to 12 EC domains occur as duplicate paralogs in the saprotrophic Labyrinthulomycetes Aurantiochytrium limanicum and Schizochytrium aggregatum, the gastrointestinal Blastocystis hominis (Blastocystae) and as a single copy gene in the autotrophic Pelagophyte Aureococcus anophagefferens. Larger, single copy, multi-exonal, tri-modular protein models, with up to 72 EC domain in total, are found in the Oomycete genera Albugo, Phytophthora, Pythium and Eurychasma. No homolog was found in the closely related autotrophic Phaeophyceae (brown algae) or Bacillariophyceae (diatoms), nor in several genera of plant and animal pathogenic oomycetes (Aphanomyces, Saprolegnia and Hyaloperonospora). This potential absence was further investigated by synteny analysis of the genome regions flanking the cadherin gene models, which are found to be highly variable. Novel to this new cadherin family is the presence of intercalated laminin and putative carbohydrate binding in tri-modular oomycete cadherins and at the N-terminus of thraustochytrid proteins. As we were unable to detect any homologs of proteins involved in signalling pathways where other cadherin families are involved, we present a conceptual hypothesis on the function of nonagonal cadherin based around the presence of putative carbohydrate binding domains. PMID:27498181

  11. Analysis of substructural variation in families of enzymatic proteins with applications to protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fofanov Viacheslav Y

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations caused by a wide range of physico-chemical and biological sources directly influence the function of a protein. For enzymatic proteins, the structure and chemistry of the catalytic binding site residues can be loosely defined as a substructure of the protein. Comparative analysis of drug-receptor substructures across and within species has been used for lead evaluation. Substructure-level similarity between the binding sites of functionally similar proteins has also been used to identify instances of convergent evolution among proteins. In functionally homologous protein families, shared chemistry and geometry at catalytic sites provide a common, local point of comparison among proteins that may differ significantly at the sequence, fold, or domain topology levels. Results This paper describes two key results that can be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of SubStructural Templates (FASST method uses all-against-all substructure comparison to determine Substructural Clusters (SCs. SCs characterize the binding site substructural variation within a protein family. In this paper we focus on examples of automatically determined SCs that can be linked to phylogenetic distance between family members, segregation by conformation, and organization by homology among convergent protein lineages. The Motif Ensemble Statistical Hypothesis (MESH framework constructs a representative motif for each protein cluster among the SCs determined by FASST to build motif ensembles that are shown through a series of function prediction experiments to improve the function prediction power of existing motifs. Conclusions FASST contributes a critical feedback and assessment step to existing binding site substructure identification methods and can be used for the thorough investigation of structure-function relationships. The application of MESH allows for an automated

  12. Protein-protein interactions of PDE4 family members - Functions, interactions and therapeutic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klussmann, Enno

    2016-07-01

    The second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is ubiquitous and directs a plethora of functions in all cells. Although theoretically freely diffusible through the cell from the site of its synthesis it is not evenly distributed. It rather is shaped into gradients and these gradients are established by phospodiesterases (PDEs), the only enzymes that hydrolyse cAMP and thereby terminate cAMP signalling upstream of cAMP's effector systems. Miles D. Houslay has devoted most of his scientific life highly successfully to a particular family of PDEs, the PDE4 family. The family is encoded by four genes and gives rise to around 20 enzymes, all with different functions. M. Houslay has discovered many of these functions and realised early on that PDE4 family enzymes are attractive drug targets in a variety of human diseases, but not their catalytic activity as that is encoded in conserved domains in all family members. He postulated that targeting the intracellular location would provide the specificity that modern innovative drugs require to improve disease conditions with fewer side effects than conventional drugs. Due to the wealth of M. Houslay's work, this article can only summarize some of his discoveries and, therefore, focuses on protein-protein interactions of PDE4. The aim is to discuss functions of selected protein-protein interactions and peptide spot technology, which M. Houslay introduced into the PDE4 field for identifying interacting domains. The therapeutic potential of PDE4 interactions will also be discussed. PMID:26498857

  13. Distinct adaptor proteins assist exit of Kre2-family proteins from the yeast ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Noda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Svp26 protein of S. cerevisiae is an ER- and Golgi-localized integral membrane protein with 4 potential membrane-spanning domains. It functions as an adaptor protein that facilitates the ER exit of Ktr3, a mannosyltransferase required for biosynthesis of O-linked oligosaccharides, and the ER exit of Mnn2 and Mnn5, mannosyltransferases, which participate in the biosynthesis of N-linked oligosaccharides. Ktr3 belongs to the Kre2 family, which consists of 9 members of type-II membrane proteins sharing sequence similarities. In this report, we examined all Kre2 family members and found that the Golgi localizations of two others, Kre2 and Ktr1, were dependent on Svp26 by immunofluorescence microscopy and cell fractionations in sucrose density gradients. We show that Svp26 functions in facilitating the ER exit of Kre2 and Ktr1 by an in vitro COPII budding assay. Golgi localization of Ktr4 was not dependent on Svp26. Screening null mutants of the genes encoding abundant COPII membrane proteins for those showing mislocalization of Ktr4 in the ER revealed that Erv41 and Erv46 are required for the correct Golgi localization of Ktr4. We provide biochemical evidence that the Erv41-Erv46 complex functions as an adaptor protein for ER exit of Ktr4. This is the first demonstration of the molecular function of this evolutionally conserved protein complex. The domain switching experiments show that the lumenal domain of Ktr4 is responsible for recognition by the Erv41-Erv46 complex. Thus, ER exit of Kre2-family proteins is dependent on distinct adaptor proteins and our results provide new insights into the traffic of Kre2-family mannosyltransferases.

  14. Distribution of protein kinase Mzeta and the complete protein kinase C isoform family in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, M U; Benedikz, Eirikur; Hernandez, I;

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a multigene family of at least ten isoforms, nine of which are expressed in brain (alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, delta, straightepsilon, eta, zeta, iota/lambda). Our previous studies have shown that many of these PKCs participate in synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of......, protein kinase Mzeta (PKMzeta). In this study, we used immunoblot and immunocytochemical techniques with isoform-specific antisera to examine the distribution of the complete family of PKC isozymes and PKMzeta in rat brain. Each form of PKC showed a widespread distribution in the brain with a distinct...

  15. PipeAlign: A new toolkit for protein family analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewniak, Frédéric; Bianchetti, Laurent; Brelivet, Yann; Carles, Annaick; Chalmel, Frédéric; Lecompte, Odile; Mochel, Thiebaut; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Arnaud; Muller, Jean; Prigent, Veronique; Ripp, Raymond; Thierry, Jean-Claude; Thompson, Julie D; Wicker, Nicolas; Poch, Olivier

    2003-07-01

    PipeAlign is a protein family analysis tool integrating a five step process ranging from the search for sequence homologues in protein and 3D structure databases to the definition of the hierarchical relationships within and between subfamilies. The complete, automatic pipeline takes a single sequence or a set of sequences as input and constructs a high-quality, validated MACS (multiple alignment of complete sequences) in which sequences are clustered into potential functional subgroups. For the more experienced user, the PipeAlign server also provides numerous options to run only a part of the analysis, with the possibility to modify the default parameters of each software module. For example, the user can choose to enter an existing multiple sequence alignment for refinement, validation and subsequent clustering of the sequences. The aim is to provide an interactive workbench for the validation, integration and presentation of a protein family, not only at the sequence level, but also at the structural and functional levels. PipeAlign is available at http://igbmc.u-strasbg.fr/PipeAlign/.

  16. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Virginie; Campagne, Sébastien; Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain

    2013-05-01

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer. PMID:23306615

  17. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, Virginie, E-mail: virginie.gervais@ipbs.fr [IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), CNRS (France); Campagne, Sebastien [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain, E-mail: alain.milon@ipbs.fr [IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), CNRS (France)

    2013-05-15

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer.

  18. Nkrp1 Family, from Lectins to Protein Interacting Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rozbeský

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin-like receptors include the Nkrp1 protein family that regulates the activity of natural killer (NK cells. Rat Nkrp1a was reported to bind monosaccharide moieties in a Ca2+-dependent manner in preference order of GalNac > GlcNAc >> Fuc >> Gal > Man. These findings established for rat Nkrp1a have been extrapolated to all additional Nkrp1 receptors and have been supported by numerous studies over the past two decades. However, since 1996 there has been controversy and another article showed lack of interactions with saccharides in 1999. Nevertheless, several high affinity saccharide ligands were synthesized in order to utilize their potential in antitumor therapy. Subsequently, protein ligands were introduced as specific binders for Nkrp1 proteins and three dimensional models of receptor/protein ligand interaction were derived from crystallographic data. Finally, for at least some members of the NK cell C-type lectin-like proteins, the “sweet story” was impaired by two reports in recent years. It has been shown that the rat Nkrp1a and CD69 do not bind saccharide ligands such as GlcNAc, GalNAc, chitotetraose and saccharide derivatives (GlcNAc-PAMAM do not directly and specifically influence cytotoxic activity of NK cells as it was previously described.

  19. The Desmosomal Plaque Proteins of the Plakophilin Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Neuber

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three related proteins of the plakophilin family (PKP1_3 have been identified as junctional proteins that are essential for the formation and stabilization of desmosomal cell contacts. Failure of PKP expression can have fatal effects on desmosomal adhesion, leading to abnormal tissue and organ development. Thus, loss of functional PKP 1 in humans leads to ectodermal dysplasia/skin fragility (EDSF syndrome, a genodermatosis with severe blistering of the epidermis as well as abnormal keratinocytes differentiation. Mutations in the human PKP 2 gene have been linked to severe heart abnormalities that lead to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC. In the past few years it has been shown that junctional adhesion is not the only function of PKPs. These proteins have been implicated in cell signaling, organization of the cytoskeleton, and control of protein biosynthesis under specific cellular circumstances. Clearly, PKPs are more than just cell adhesion proteins. In this paper we will give an overview of our current knowledge on the very distinct roles of plakophilins in the cell.

  20. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  1. New microsome-associated HT-family proteins from Nicotiana respond to pollination and define an HT/NOD-24 protein family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katsuhiko Kondo; Bruce McClure

    2008-01-01

    HT-family proteins have been identified in Nicotiana, Solanum,and Petunia.HT-B-type proteins are implicated in S-RNase-based self-incompatibility,but the functions of other family members are unknown.Screening for cDNA sequences with an expression pattern similar to HT-B in Nicotiana alata revealed a new group of small HT-family proteins.designated HT-M.HT-M proteins resemble HT-B in several respects:their pistil-specific expression pattern iS indistinguish-able from HT-B,they pellet with a microsome fraction,and their abundance decreases after pollination.Unlike HT-B,there iS no S-specificity to this response,and RNAi experiments show that HT-M proteins are not necessary for self-incompatibility.Identification of a third group of pistil-specific HT-family proteins helps better define the characteristics of the family and allowed identification of putative new family members.By searching the databases with only the most conserved HT-family sequence elements,the signal sequence and cysteine motifs,we identified nodulin-24-1ike proteins and several small glycine-rich proteins as putative HT-family members.Like HT-M and HT-B,nodulin-24 iS membrane associated.We propose that the conserved features in HT-family proteins are important for targeting or modification and refer to the broader family that includes both HT-and nodulin-24-like proteins as the HT/NOD-24-family.

  2. The Golgin Family of Coiled-Coil Tethering Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz M Witkos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The golgins are a family of predominantly coiled-coil proteins that are localized to the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting an evolutionary conserved function. Golgins are anchored to the Golgi membrane by their carboxy terminus and are predicted to adopt an extended conformation that projects into the surrounding cytoplasm. This arrangement is ideal for the capture or tethering of nearby membranes or cytoskeletal elements. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular traffic at the Golgi apparatus, the maintenance of Golgi architecture, as well as the positioning of the Golgi apparatus within cells. In addition to acting as tethers, some golgins can also sequester various factors at the Golgi membrane, allowing for the spatiotemporal regulation of downstream cellular functions. Although it is now established that golgins are membrane and cytoskeleton tethers, the mechanisms underlying tethering remain poorly defined. Moreover, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering in a physiological context remains to be fully explored. This review will describe our current understanding of golgin function, highlighting recent progress that has been made, and goes on to discuss outstanding questions and potential avenues for future research with regard to this family of conserved Golgi-associated proteins.

  3. Docking validation resources: protein family and ligand flexibility experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudipto; Balius, Trent E; Rizzo, Robert C

    2010-11-22

    A database consisting of 780 ligand-receptor complexes, termed SB2010, has been derived from the Protein Databank to evaluate the accuracy of docking protocols for regenerating bound ligand conformations. The goal is to provide easily accessible community resources for development of improved procedures to aid virtual screening for ligands with a wide range of flexibilities. Three core experiments using the program DOCK, which employ rigid (RGD), fixed anchor (FAD), and flexible (FLX) protocols, were used to gauge performance by several different metrics: (1) global results, (2) ligand flexibility, (3) protein family, and (4) cross-docking. Global spectrum plots of successes and failures vs rmsd reveal well-defined inflection regions, which suggest the commonly used 2 Å criteria is a reasonable choice for defining success. Across all 780 systems, success tracks with the relative difficulty of the calculations: RGD (82.3%) > FAD (78.1%) > FLX (63.8%). In general, failures due to scoring strongly outweigh those due to sampling. Subsets of SB2010 grouped by ligand flexibility (7-or-less, 8-to-15, and 15-plus rotatable bonds) reveal that success degrades linearly for FAD and FLX protocols, in contrast to RGD, which remains constant. Despite the challenges associated with FLX anchor orientation and on-the-fly flexible growth, success rates for the 7-or-less (74.5%) and, in particular, the 8-to-15 (55.2%) subset are encouraging. Poorer results for the very flexible 15-plus set (39.3%) indicate substantial room for improvement. Family-based success appears largely independent of ligand flexibility, suggesting a strong dependence on the binding site environment. For example, zinc-containing proteins are generally problematic, despite moderately flexible ligands. Finally, representative cross-docking examples, for carbonic anhydrase, thermolysin, and neuraminidase families, show the utility of family-based analysis for rapid identification of particularly good or bad

  4. Analysis of membrane proteins in metagenomics: networks of correlated environmental features and protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prianka V; Gianoulis, Tara A; Bjornson, Robert D; Yip, Kevin Y; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark B

    2010-07-01

    Recent metagenomics studies have begun to sample the genomic diversity among disparate habitats and relate this variation to features of the environment. Membrane proteins are an intuitive, but thus far overlooked, choice in this type of analysis as they directly interact with the environment, receiving signals from the outside and transporting nutrients. Using global ocean sampling (GOS) data, we found nearly approximately 900,000 membrane proteins in large-scale metagenomic sequence, approximately a fifth of which are completely novel, suggesting a large space of hitherto unexplored protein diversity. Using GPS coordinates for the GOS sites, we extracted additional environmental features via interpolation from the World Ocean Database, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, and empirical models of dust occurrence. This allowed us to study membrane protein variation in terms of natural features, such as phosphate and nitrate concentrations, and also in terms of human impacts, such as pollution and climate change. We show that there is widespread variation in membrane protein content across marine sites, which is correlated with changes in both oceanographic variables and human factors. Furthermore, using these data, we developed an approach, protein families and environment features network (PEN), to quantify and visualize the correlations. PEN identifies small groups of covarying environmental features and membrane protein families, which we call "bimodules." Using this approach, we find that the affinity of phosphate transporters is related to the concentration of phosphate and that the occurrence of iron transporters is connected to the amount of shipping, pollution, and iron-containing dust.

  5. The complement C3 protein family in invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nonaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement C3 plays a pivotal role in the innate immune system of mammals as the central component of the complement system essential for its activation mechanism and effecter function. C3 has a unique intra-chain thioester bond that is shared by some complement and non-complement proteins forming a thioester protein (TEP family. Phylogenetic analysis of TEP family genes of vertebrates and invertebrates revealed that the TEP family is divided into two subfamilies, the C3 subfamily and the alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M subfamily. The establishment of the TEP genes and differentiation of them into the C3 and A2M subfamilies occurred prior to the divergence of Cnidaria and Bilateria, in a common ancestor of Eumetazoa more than 600 MYA. Since then the A2M subfamily has been retained by all metazoan lineages analyzed thus far. In contrast, the C3 subfamily has been retained only by deuterostomes and some protostomes, and has been lost in multiple protostome lineages. Although the direct functional analysis of the most invertebrate TEPs is still to be performed, conservation of the basic domain structure and functionally important residues for each molecule suggests that the basic function is also conserved. Functional analyses performed on a few invertebrate C3 support this conclusion. The gene duplication events that generated C4 and C5 from C3 occurred in a common ancestor of jawed vertebrates, indicating that invertebrate and cyclostome C3s represent the pre-duplication state. In addition to C3, complement Bf and MASP involved in the activation of C3 are also identified in Cnidaria and some invertebrates, indicating that the complement system is one of the most ancient innate immune systems of Eumetazoa.

  6. A protein relational database and protein family knowledge bases to facilitate structure-based design analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Brooijmans, Natasja; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, R Aldrin; Dejoannis, Jason; Feyfant, Eric; Kowticwar, Rupesh K; Mankala, Jyoti; Palli, Satish; Punyamantula, Sairam; Tatipally, Maneesh; John, Reji K; Humblet, Christine

    2010-08-01

    The Protein Data Bank is the most comprehensive source of experimental macromolecular structures. It can, however, be difficult at times to locate relevant structures with the Protein Data Bank search interface. This is particularly true when searching for complexes containing specific interactions between protein and ligand atoms. Moreover, searching within a family of proteins can be tedious. For example, one cannot search for some conserved residue as residue numbers vary across structures. We describe herein three databases, Protein Relational Database, Kinase Knowledge Base, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, containing protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. In Protein Relational Database, atom-atom distances between protein and ligand have been precalculated allowing for millisecond retrieval based on atom identity and distance constraints. Ring centroids, centroid-centroid and centroid-atom distances and angles have also been included permitting queries for pi-stacking interactions and other structural motifs involving rings. Other geometric features can be searched through the inclusion of residue pair and triplet distances. In Kinase Knowledge Base and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, the catalytic domains have been aligned into common residue numbering schemes. Thus, by searching across Protein Relational Database and Kinase Knowledge Base, one can easily retrieve structures wherein, for example, a ligand of interest is making contact with the gatekeeper residue.

  7. Unifying mechanical and thermodynamic descriptions across the thioredoxin protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottonen, James M.; Xu, Minli; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    We compare various predicted mechanical and thermodynamic properties of nine oxidized thioredoxins (TRX) using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). The DCM is based on a nonadditive free energy decomposition scheme, where entropic contributions are determined from rigidity and flexibility of structure based on distance constraints. We perform averages over an ensemble of constraint topologies to calculate several thermodynamic and mechanical response functions that together yield quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR). Applied to the TRX protein family, QSFR metrics display a rich variety of similarities and differences. In particular, backbone flexibility is well conserved across the family, whereas cooperativity correlation describing mechanical and thermodynamic couplings between residue pairs exhibit distinctive features that readily standout. The diversity in predicted QSFR metrics that describe cooperativity correlation between pairs of residues is largely explained by a global flexibility order parameter describing the amount of intrinsic flexibility within the protein. A free energy landscape is calculated as a function of the flexibility order parameter, and key values are determined where the native-state, transition-state and unfolded-state are located. Another key value identifies a mechanical transition where the global nature of the protein changes from flexible to rigid. The key values of the flexibility order parameter help characterize how mechanical and thermodynamic response is linked. Variation in QSFR metrics, and key characteristics of global flexibility are related to the native state x-ray crystal structure primarily through the hydrogen bond network. Furthermore, comparison of three TRX redox pairs reveals differences in thermodynamic response (i.e., relative melting point) and mechanical properties (i.e., backbone flexibility and cooperativity correlation) that are consistent with experimental data on thermal stabilities and

  8. 14-3-3 proteins and the p53 family : a study in keratinocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Several associations between 14-3-3 proteins and members of the p53 family have been revealed. However, numerous questions regarding 14-3-3 proteins, p53 family members and the relationships between thetwo families remain. This thesis contributes to answer these questions. Downregulation of 14-3-3ζ

  9. [Interconnection between architecture of protein globule and disposition of conformational conservative oligopeptides in proteins from one protein family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batianovskiĭ, A V; Filatov, I V; Namiot, V A; Esipova, N G; Volotovskiĭ, I D

    2012-01-01

    It was shown that selective interactions between helical segments of macromolecules can realize in globular proteins in the segments characterized by the same periodicities of charge distribution i.e. between conformationally conservative oligopeptides. It was found that in the macromolecules of alpha-helical proteins conformationally conservative oligopeptides are disposed at a distance being characteristic of direct interactions. For representatives of many structural families of alpha-type proteins specific disposition of conformationally conservative segments is observed. This disposition is inherent to a particular structural family. Disposition of conformationally conservative segments is not related to homology of the amino acid sequence but reflects peculiarities of native 3D-architectures of protein globules.

  10. Structural and Functional Characterization of the VQ Protein Family and VQ Protein Variants from Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Xinjian; Chi, Yingjun; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing the FxxxVQxhTG or VQ motif interact with WRKY transcription factors. Although VQ proteins have been reported in several plants, knowledge about their structures, functions and evolution is still very limited. Here, we report structural and functional analysis of the VQ protein family from soybean. Like Arabidopsis homologues, soybean VQ proteins bind only Group I and IIc WRKY proteins and a substantial number of their genes are responsive to stress-associated phytohormones. Overexpression of some soybean VQ genes in Arabidopsis had strong effects on plant growth, development, disease resistance and heat tolerance. Phylogenetic analysis, sequence alignment and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the region immediately upstream of the FxxxVQxhTG motif also affects binding to WRKY proteins. Consistent with a larger WRKY-binding VQ domain, soybean VQ22 protein from cultivated soybean contains a 4-amino acid deletion in the region preceding its VQ motif that completely abolishes its binding to WRKY proteins. By contrast, the 4-amino acid deletion is absent in the VQ22 protein from wild soybean species (Glycine soja). Overexpression of wild soybean VQ22 in cultivated soybean inhibited growth, particularly after cold treatment. Thus, the mutation of soybean VQ22 is associated with advantageous phenotypes and may have been positively selected during evolution. PMID:27708406

  11. PATtyFams: Protein families for the microbial genomes in the PATRIC database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Davis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based function assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL. This new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods.

  12. The MTA family proteins as novel histone H3 binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase complex (Mi2/NRD/NuRD/NURD has a broad role in regulation of transcription, DNA repair and cell cycle. Previous studies have revealed a specific interaction between NURD and histone H3N-terminal tail in vitro that is not observed for another HDAC1/2-containing complex, Sin3A. However, the subunit(s responsible for specific binding of H3 by NURD has not been defined. Results In this study, we show among several class I HDAC-containing corepressor complexes only NURD exhibits a substantial H3 tail-binding activity in vitro. We present the evidence that the MTA family proteins within the NURD complex interact directly with H3 tail. Extensive in vitro binding assays mapped the H3 tail-binding domain to the C-terminal region of MTA1 and MTA2. Significantly, although the MTA1 and MTA2 mutant proteins with deletion of the C-terminal H3 tail binding domain were assembled into the endogenous NURD complex when expressed in mammalian cells, the resulting NURD complexes were deficient in binding H3 tail in vitro, indicating that the MTA family proteins are required for the observed specific binding of H3 tail peptide by NURD in vitro. However, chromatin fractionation experiments show that the NURD complexes with impaired MTA1/2-H3 tail binding activity remained to be associated with chromatin in cells. Conclusions Together our study reveals a novel histone H3-binding activity for the MTA family proteins and provides evidence that the MTA family proteins mediate the in vitro specific binding of H3 tail peptide by NURD complex. However, multiple mechanisms are likely to contribute to the chromatin association of NURD complex in cells. Our finding also raises the possibility that the MTA family proteins may exert their diverse biological functions at least in part through their direct interaction with H3 tail.

  13. ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring family of surface proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi, possesses an architecture previously unseen in this protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein family from B. burgdorferi, has been solved, providing insights into the strategies of complement evasion by this zoonotic bacterium and suggesting a common architecture for other members of this protein family. Borrelia burgdorferi is a spirochete responsible for Lyme disease, the most commonly occurring vector-borne disease in Europe and North America. The bacterium utilizes a set of proteins, termed complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), to aid evasion of the human complement system by recruiting and presenting complement regulator factor H on its surface in a manner that mimics host cells. Presented here is the atomic resolution structure of a member of this protein family, ErpC. The structure provides new insights into the mechanism of recruitment of factor H and other factor H-related proteins by acting as a molecular mimic of host glycosaminoglycans. It also describes the architecture of other CRASP proteins belonging to the OspE/F-related paralogous protein family and suggests that they have evolved to bind specific complement proteins, aiding survival of the bacterium in different hosts

  14. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Klaus B; Kedström, Linda Maria Haugaard; Wilbek, Theis S;

    2015-01-01

    related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of...... trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG...... linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic...

  15. Monoubiquitination of Tob/BTG family proteins competes with degradation-targeting polyubiquitination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Tob/BTG family proteins are monoubiquitinated in the absence of E3s in vitro. → Monoubiquitination sites of Tob are identified by mass spectrometry. → The monoubiquitination event correlates with lower levels of polyubiquitination. -- Abstract: Tob belongs to the anti-proliferative Tob/BTG protein family. The expression level of Tob family proteins is strictly regulated both transcriptionally and through post-translational modification. Ubiquitin (Ub)/proteosome-dependent degradation of Tob family proteins is critical in controlling cell cycle progression and DNA damage responses. Various Ub ligases (E3s) are responsible for degradation of Tob protein. Here, we show that Tob family proteins undergo monoubiquitination even in the absence of E3s in vitro. Determination of the ubiquitination site(s) in Tob by mass spectrometric analysis revealed that two lysine residues (Lys48 and Lys63) located in Tob/BTG homology domain are ubiquitinated. A mutant Tob, in which both Lys48 and Lys63 are substituted with alanine, is more strongly polyubiquitinated than wild-type Tob in vivo. These data suggest that monoubiquitination of Tob family proteins confers resistance against polyubiquitination, which targets proteins for degradation. The strategy for regulating the stability of Tob family proteins suggests a novel role for monoubiquitination.

  16. TIS11 Family Proteins and Their Roles in Posttranscriptional Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Baou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression of mRNAs containing adenine-uridine rich elements (AREs in their 3 untranslated regions is mediated by a number of different proteins that interact with these elements to either stabilise or destabilise them. The present review concerns the TPA-inducible sequence 11 (TIS11 protein family, a small family of proteins, that appears to interact with ARE-containing mRNAs and promote their degradation. This family of proteins has been extensively studied in the past decade. Studies have focussed on determining their biochemical functions, identifying their target mRNAs, and determining their roles in cell functions and diseases.

  17. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnhammer Erik L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins.

  18. Evolutionary implications of a power-law distribution of protein family sizes

    CERN Document Server

    Bader, J S

    1999-01-01

    Current-day genomes bear the mark of the evolutionary processes. One of the strongest indications is the sequence homology among families of proteins that perform similar biological functions in different species. The number of proteins in a family can grow over time as genetic information is duplicated through evolution. We explore how evolution directs the size distribution of these families. Theoretical predictions for family sizes are obtained from two models, one in which individual genes duplicate and a second in which the entire genome duplicates. Predictions from these models are compared with the family size distributions for several organisms whose complete genome sequence is known. We find that protein family size distributions in nature follow a power-law distribution. Comparing these results to the model systems, we conclude that genome duplication is the dominant mechanism leading to increased genetic material in the species considered.

  19. Exploiting the Diversity of the Heat-Shock Protein Family for Primary and Secondary Tauopathy Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Abisambra, Jose F.; Jinwal, Umesh K; Jones, Jeffrey R.; Blair, Laura J.; Koren, John; Dickey, Chad A.

    2011-01-01

    The heat shock protein (Hsp) family is an evolutionarily conserved system that is charged with preventing unfolded or misfolded proteins in the cell from aggregating. In Alzheimer’s disease, extracellular accumulation of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and intracellular aggregation of the microtubule associated protein tau may result from mechanisms involving chaperone proteins like the Hsps. Due to the ability of Hsps to regulate aberrantly accumulating proteins like Aβ and tau, therapeutic strat...

  20. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  1. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibu Yooseph

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  2. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayami Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  3. Comparative and functional analysis of the widely occurring family of Nep1-like proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oome, Stan; van den Ackerveken, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Nep1-like proteins (NLP) are best known for their cytotoxic activity in dicot plants. NLP are taxonomically widespread among microbes with very different lifestyles. To learn more about this enigmatic protein family, we analyzed more than 500 available NLP protein sequences from fungi, oomycetes, an

  4. Applications of post-translational modifications of FoxO family proteins in biological functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhao; Yachen Wang; Wei-Guo Zhu

    2011-01-01

    The functions of the FoxO family proteins, in particular their transcriptional activities, are modulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs), including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, methylation and glycosylation. These PTMs occur in response to different cellular stresses, which in turn regulate the subcellular localization of FoxO family proteins, as well as their half-life, DNA binding, transcriptional activity and ability to interact with other cellular proteins. In this review, we summarize the role of PTMs of FoxO family proteins in linking their biological and functional relevance with various diseases.%The functions of the FoxO family proteins,in particular their transcriptional activities,are modulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs),including phosphorylation,acetylation,ubiquitination,methylation and glycosylation.These PTMs occur in response to different cellular stresses,which in turn regulate the subceilular localization of FoxO family proteins,as well as their half-life,DNA binding,transcriptional activity and ability to interact with other cellular proteins.In this review,we summarize the role of PTMs of FoxO family proteins in linking their biological and functional relevance with various diseases.

  5. The mystery of BCL2 family: Bcl-2 proteins and apoptosis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad; Ahad, Amjid; Ahsan, Haseeb

    2015-03-01

    Apoptosis is a critically important biological process that plays an essential role in cell fate and homeostasis. An important component of the apoptotic pathway is the family of proteins commonly known as the B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2). The primary role of Bcl-2 family members is the regulation of apoptosis. Although the structure of Bcl-2 family of proteins was reported nearly 10 years ago, however, it still surprises us with its structural and functional complexity and diversity. A number of studies have demonstrated that Bcl-2 family influences many other cellular processes beyond apoptosis which are generally independent of the regulation of apoptosis, suggesting additional roles for Bcl-2. The disruption of the regulation of apoptosis is a causative event in many diseases. Since the Bcl-2 family of proteins is the key regulator of apoptosis, the abnormalities in its function have been implicated in many diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia and autoimmune diseases. In the past few years, our understanding of the mechanism of action of Bcl-2 family of proteins and its implications in various pathological conditions has enhanced significantly. The focus of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the structure and function of Bcl-2 family of proteins in apoptotic cellular processes. A number of drugs have been developed in the past few years that target different Bcl-2 members. The role of Bcl-2 proteins in the pathogenesis of various diseases and their pharmacological significance as effective molecular therapeutic targets is also discussed.

  6. Functional divergence outlines the evolution of novel protein function in NifH/BchL protein family

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subarna Thakur; Asim K Bothra; Arnab Sen

    2013-11-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is accomplished by prokaryotes through the catalytic action of complex metalloenzyme, nitrogenase. Nitrogenase is a two-protein component system comprising MoFe protein (NifD&K) and Fe protein (NifH). NifH shares structural and mechanistic similarities as well as evolutionary relationships with light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase (BchL), a photosynthesis-related metalloenzyme belonging to the same protein family. We performed a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of the NifH/BchL family in order to elucidate the intrinsic functional diversity and the underlying evolutionary mechanism among the members. To analyse functional divergence in the NifH/BchL family, we have conducted pair-wise estimation in altered evolutionary rates between the member proteins. We identified a number of vital amino acid sites which contribute to predicted functional diversity.We have also made use of the maximum likelihood tests for detection of positive selection at the amino acid level followed by the structure-based phylogenetic approach to draw conclusion on the ancient lineage and novel characterization of the NifH/BchL protein family. Our investigation provides ample support to the fact that NifH protein and BchL share robust structural similarities and have probably deviated from a common ancestor followed by divergence in functional properties possibly due to gene duplication.

  7. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New therapeutic targets in major diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balasundaram Padmanabhan; Shruti Mathur; Manjula Ramu; Shailesh Tripathi

    2016-06-01

    The bromodomains and extra-terminal domain (BET) family proteins recognize acetylated chromatin through their bromodomains (BDs) and helps in regulating gene expression. BDs are chromatin ‘readers’; by interacting with acetylated lysines on the histone tails, they recruit chromatin-regulating proteins on the promoter region to regulate gene expression and repression. Extensive efforts have been employed by the scientific communities worldwide, to identify and develop potential inhibitors of BET family BDs to regulate protein expression by inhibiting acetylated histone (H3/H4) interactions. Several small molecule inhibitors have been reported, which not only have high affinity, but also have high specificity to BET BDs. These developments make BET family proteins to be an important therapeutic targets, for major diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, obesity and inflammation. Here, we review and discuss the structural biology of BET family BDs and their applications in major diseases.

  8. The CCN Family Proteins: Modulators of Bone Development and Novel Targets in Bone-Associated Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Po-Chun Chen; Hsu-Chen Cheng; Shun-Fa Yang; Chiao-Wen Lin; Chih-Hsin Tang

    2014-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins is composed of six extracellular matrix-associated proteins that play crucial roles in skeletal development, wound healing, fibrosis, and cancer. Members of the CCN family share four conserved cysteine-rich modular domains that trigger signal transduction in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival through direct binding to specific integrin receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In the present review, we discuss the roles of the ...

  9. The PIN family of proteins in potato and their putative role in tuberization

    OpenAIRE

    Roumeliotis, Efstathios; Kloosterman, Bjorn; Oortwijn, Marian; Visser, Richard G. F.; Bachem, Christian W. B.

    2013-01-01

    The PIN family of trans-membrane proteins mediates auxin efflux throughout the plant and during various phases of plant development. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the PIN family comprised of 8 members, divided into “short” and “long” PINs according to the length of the hydrophilic domain of the protein. Based on sequence homology using the recently published potato genome sequence (Solanum tuberosum group Phureja) we identified ten annotated potato StPIN genes. Mining the publicly available gene e...

  10. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  11. Bap: a family of surface proteins involved in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2006-03-01

    A group of surface proteins sharing several structural and functional features is emerging as an important element in the biofilm formation process of diverse bacterial species. The first member of this group of proteins was identified in a Staphylococcus aureus mastitis isolate and was named Bap (biofilm-associated protein). As common structural features, Bap-related proteins: (i) are present on the bacterial surface; (ii) show a high molecular weight; (iii) contain a core domain of tandem repeats; (iv) confer upon bacteria the capacity to form a biofilm; (v) play a relevant role in bacterial infectious processes; and (vi) can occasionally be contained in mobile elements. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified and assigned roles to Bap-related proteins in biofilm biology and virulence.

  12. Molecular evolution and expression of the CRAL_TRIO protein family in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gilbert; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-07-01

    CRAL_TRIO domain proteins are known to bind small lipophilic molecules such as retinal, inositol and Vitamin E and include such gene family members as PINTA, α-tocopherol transfer (ATT) proteins, retinoid binding proteins, and clavesins. In insects, very little is known about either the molecular evolution of this family of proteins or their ligand specificity. Here we characterize insect CRAL_TRIO domain proteins and present the first insect CRAL_TRIO protein phylogeny constructed by performing reciprocal BLAST searches of the reference genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, Tribolium castaneum, Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Danaus plexippus. We find several highly conserved amino acid residues in the CRAL_TRIO domain-containing genes across insects and a gene expansion resulting in more than twice as many gene family members in lepidopterans than in other surveyed insect species, but no lepidopteran homolog of the PINTA gene in Drosophila. In addition, we examined the expression pattern of CRAL_TRIO domain genes in Manduca sexta heads using RNA-Seq data. Of the 42 gene family members found in the M. sexta reference genome, we found 30 expressed in the head tissue with similar expression profiles between males and females. Our results suggest this gene family underwent a large expansion in lepidopteran, making the lepidopteran CRAL_TRIO domain family distinct from other holometabolous insect lineages.

  13. Molecular evolution and expression of the CRAL_TRIO protein family in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gilbert; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-07-01

    CRAL_TRIO domain proteins are known to bind small lipophilic molecules such as retinal, inositol and Vitamin E and include such gene family members as PINTA, α-tocopherol transfer (ATT) proteins, retinoid binding proteins, and clavesins. In insects, very little is known about either the molecular evolution of this family of proteins or their ligand specificity. Here we characterize insect CRAL_TRIO domain proteins and present the first insect CRAL_TRIO protein phylogeny constructed by performing reciprocal BLAST searches of the reference genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, Tribolium castaneum, Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Danaus plexippus. We find several highly conserved amino acid residues in the CRAL_TRIO domain-containing genes across insects and a gene expansion resulting in more than twice as many gene family members in lepidopterans than in other surveyed insect species, but no lepidopteran homolog of the PINTA gene in Drosophila. In addition, we examined the expression pattern of CRAL_TRIO domain genes in Manduca sexta heads using RNA-Seq data. Of the 42 gene family members found in the M. sexta reference genome, we found 30 expressed in the head tissue with similar expression profiles between males and females. Our results suggest this gene family underwent a large expansion in lepidopteran, making the lepidopteran CRAL_TRIO domain family distinct from other holometabolous insect lineages. PMID:25684408

  14. Structural insights and ab initio sequencing within the DING proteins family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DING proteins constitute a recently discovered protein family that is ubiquitous in eukaryotes. The structural insights and the physiological involvements of these intriguing proteins are hereby deciphered. DING proteins constitute an intriguing family of phosphate-binding proteins that was identified in a wide range of organisms, from prokaryotes and archae to eukaryotes. Despite their seemingly ubiquitous occurrence in eukaryotes, their encoding genes are missing from sequenced genomes. Such a lack has considerably hampered functional studies. In humans, these proteins have been related to several diseases, like atherosclerosis, kidney stones, inflammation processes and HIV inhibition. The human phosphate binding protein is a human representative of the DING family that was serendipitously discovered from human plasma. An original approach was developed to determine ab initio the complete and exact sequence of this 38 kDa protein by utilizing mass spectrometry and X-ray data in tandem. Taking advantage of this first complete eukaryotic DING sequence, a immunohistochemistry study was undertaken to check the presence of DING proteins in various mice tissues, revealing that these proteins are widely expressed. Finally, the structure of a bacterial representative from Pseudomonas fluorescens was solved at sub-angstrom resolution, allowing the molecular mechanism of the phosphate binding in these high-affinity proteins to be elucidated

  15. Structural insights and ab initio sequencing within the DING proteins family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.elias@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Liebschner, Dorothee [CRM2, Nancy Université (France); Gotthard, Guillaume; Chabriere, Eric [AFMB, Université Aix-Marseille II (France)

    2011-01-01

    DING proteins constitute a recently discovered protein family that is ubiquitous in eukaryotes. The structural insights and the physiological involvements of these intriguing proteins are hereby deciphered. DING proteins constitute an intriguing family of phosphate-binding proteins that was identified in a wide range of organisms, from prokaryotes and archae to eukaryotes. Despite their seemingly ubiquitous occurrence in eukaryotes, their encoding genes are missing from sequenced genomes. Such a lack has considerably hampered functional studies. In humans, these proteins have been related to several diseases, like atherosclerosis, kidney stones, inflammation processes and HIV inhibition. The human phosphate binding protein is a human representative of the DING family that was serendipitously discovered from human plasma. An original approach was developed to determine ab initio the complete and exact sequence of this 38 kDa protein by utilizing mass spectrometry and X-ray data in tandem. Taking advantage of this first complete eukaryotic DING sequence, a immunohistochemistry study was undertaken to check the presence of DING proteins in various mice tissues, revealing that these proteins are widely expressed. Finally, the structure of a bacterial representative from Pseudomonas fluorescens was solved at sub-angstrom resolution, allowing the molecular mechanism of the phosphate binding in these high-affinity proteins to be elucidated.

  16. Matricellular proteins of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN family and the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R Malik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Matricellular proteins are secreted proteins that exist at the border of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM. However, instead of playing a role in structural integrity of the ECM, these proteins, that act as modulators of various surface receptors, have a regulatory function and instruct a multitude of cellular responses. Among matricellular proteins are members of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN protein family. These proteins exert their activity by binding directly to integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans and activating multiple intracellular signaling pathways. CCN proteins also influence the activity of growth factors and cytokines and integrate their activity with integrin signaling. At the cellular level, CCN proteins regulate gene expression and cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, senescence, adhesion, and migration. To date, CCN proteins have been extensively studied in the context of osteo- and chondrogenesis, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis, but the expression of these proteins is also observed in a variety of tissues. The role of CCN proteins in the nervous system has not been systematically studied or described. Thus, the major aim of this review is to introduce the CCN protein family to the neuroscience community. We first discuss the structure, interactions, and cellular functions of CCN proteins and then provide a detailed review of the available data on the neuronal expression and contribution of CCN proteins to nervous system development, function, and pathology.

  17. Evolutionary bases of carbohydrate recognition and substrate discrimination in the ROK protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejo, Maria S; Thompson, Steven M; Miller, Brian G

    2010-06-01

    The ROK (repressor, open reading frame, kinase) protein family (Pfam 00480) is a large collection of bacterial polypeptides that includes sugar kinases, carbohydrate responsive transcriptional repressors, and many functionally uncharacterized gene products. ROK family sugar kinases phosphorylate a range of structurally distinct hexoses including the key carbon source D: -glucose, various glucose epimers, and several acetylated hexosamines. The primary sequence elements responsible for carbohydrate recognition within different functional categories of ROK polypeptides are largely unknown due to a limited structural characterization of this protein family. In order to identify the structural bases for substrate discrimination in individual ROK proteins, and to better understand the evolutionary processes that led to the divergent evolution of function in this family, we constructed an inclusive alignment of 227 representative ROK polypeptides. Phylogenetic analyses and ancestral sequence reconstructions of the resulting tree reveal a discrete collection of active site residues that dictate substrate specificity. The results also suggest a series of mutational events within the carbohydrate-binding sites of ROK proteins that facilitated the expansion of substrate specificity within this family. This study provides new insight into the evolutionary relationship of ROK glucokinases and non-ROK glucokinases (Pfam 02685), revealing the primary sequence elements shared between these two protein families, which diverged from a common ancestor in ancient times. PMID:20512568

  18. Rapid expansion of the protein disulfide isomerase gene family facilitates the folding of venom peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Li, Qing; Jackson, Ronneshia L; Song, Albert S; Boomsma, Wouter; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K; Gruber, Christian W; Purcell, Anthony W; Yandell, Mark; Olivera, Baldomero M; Ellgaard, Lars

    2016-03-22

    Formation of correct disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum is a crucial step for folding proteins destined for secretion. Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) play a central role in this process. We report a previously unidentified, hypervariable family of PDIs that represents the most diverse gene family of oxidoreductases described in a single genus to date. These enzymes are highly expressed specifically in the venom glands of predatory cone snails, animals that synthesize a remarkably diverse set of cysteine-rich peptide toxins (conotoxins). Enzymes in this PDI family, termed conotoxin-specific PDIs, significantly and differentially accelerate the kinetics of disulfide-bond formation of several conotoxins. Our results are consistent with a unique biological scenario associated with protein folding: The diversification of a family of foldases can be correlated with the rapid evolution of an unprecedented diversity of disulfide-rich structural domains expressed by venomous marine snails in the superfamily Conoidea. PMID:26957604

  19. Rapid expansion of the protein disulfide isomerase gene family facilitates the folding of venom peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Li, Qing; Jackson, Ronneshia L;

    2016-01-01

    Formation of correct disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum is a crucial step for folding proteins destined for secretion. Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) play a central role in this process. We report a previously unidentified, hypervariable family of PDIs that represents the most...

  20. Peroxisomal Proteostasis Involves a Lon Family Protein That Functions as Protease and Chaperone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoszewska, Magdalena; Williams, Chris; Kikhney, Alexey; Opalinski, Lukasz; van Roermund, Carlo W. T.; de Boer, Rinse; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are subject to continuous quality control for optimal proteostasis. The knowledge of peroxisome quality control systems is still in its infancy. Here we show that peroxisomes contain a member of the Lon family of proteases (Pln). We show that Pln is a heptameric protein and acts as an ATP-f

  1. A Database of Plastid Protein Families from Red Algae and Apicomplexa and Expression Regulation of the moeB Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V.; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2015-01-01

    We report the database of plastid protein families from red algae, secondary and tertiary rhodophyte-derived plastids, and Apicomplexa constructed with the novel method to infer orthology. The families contain proteins with maximal sequence similarity and minimal paralogous content. The database contains 6509 protein entries, 513 families and 278 nonsingletons (from which 230 are paralog-free, and among the remaining 48, 46 contain at maximum two proteins per species, and 2 contain at maximum...

  2. A Family of Small Coiled-Coil–forming Proteins Functioning at the Late Endosome in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kranz, Andreas; Kinner, Andrea; Kölling, Ralf

    2001-01-01

    The multispanning membrane protein Ste6, a member of the ABC-transporter family, is transported to the yeast vacuole for degradation. To identify functions involved in the intracellular trafficking of polytopic membrane proteins, we looked for functions that block Ste6 transport to the vacuole upon overproduction. In our screen, we identified several known vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) genes (SNF7/VPS32, VPS4, and VPS35) and a previously uncharacterized open r...

  3. The Pfam protein families database: towards a more sustainable future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Robert D; Coggill, Penelope; Eberhardt, Ruth Y; Eddy, Sean R; Mistry, Jaina; Mitchell, Alex L; Potter, Simon C; Punta, Marco; Qureshi, Matloob; Sangrador-Vegas, Amaia; Salazar, Gustavo A; Tate, John; Bateman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    In the last two years the Pfam database (http://pfam.xfam.org) has undergone a substantial reorganisation to reduce the effort involved in making a release, thereby permitting more frequent releases. Arguably the most significant of these changes is that Pfam is now primarily based on the UniProtKB reference proteomes, with the counts of matched sequences and species reported on the website restricted to this smaller set. Building families on reference proteomes sequences brings greater stability, which decreases the amount of manual curation required to maintain them. It also reduces the number of sequences displayed on the website, whilst still providing access to many important model organisms. Matches to the full UniProtKB database are, however, still available and Pfam annotations for individual UniProtKB sequences can still be retrieved. Some Pfam entries (1.6%) which have no matches to reference proteomes remain; we are working with UniProt to see if sequences from them can be incorporated into reference proteomes. Pfam-B, the automatically-generated supplement to Pfam, has been removed. The current release (Pfam 29.0) includes 16 295 entries and 559 clans. The facility to view the relationship between families within a clan has been improved by the introduction of a new tool.

  4. Interactions of the p53 protein family in cellular stress response in gastrointestinal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilgelm, Anna E; Washington, Mary K; Wei, Jinxiong; Chen, Heidi; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Zaika, Alexander I

    2010-03-01

    p53, p63, and p73 are members of the p53 protein family involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, and other critical cellular processes. Here, we investigated the contribution of the entire p53 family in chemotherapeutic drug response in gastrointestinal tumors. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed complexity and variability of expression profiles of the p53 protein family. Using colon and esophageal cancer cells, we found that the integral transcription activity of the entire p53 family, as measured by the reporter analysis, associated with response to drug treatment in studied cells. We also found that p53 and p73, as well as p63 and p73, bind simultaneously to the promoters of p53 target genes. Taken together, our results support the view that the p53 protein family functions as an interacting network of proteins and show that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drug treatment are determined by the total activity of the entire p53 family rather than p53 alone.

  5.  Human carcinoembryonic antygen family proteins, structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Czepczyńska-Krężel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  The CEA related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM contain variable and constant immunoglobulin-like domains and are classified as a member of the immunoglobulin supergene family, IgSF. The seven CEACAM (CD66 antigens (CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM4, CEA, CEACAM6, CEACAM7 and CEACAM8 differ in the number of Ig-like domains, sugar content, presence of isoforms, tissue distribution and form of membrane attachment (transmembrane region or GPI anchor. CEACAMs with a transmembrane region possess a cytoplasmic domain with or without the immunoreceptor motifs. The structural diversity of CEACAMs results in their multifunctionality, especially displayed in calcium independent homo- and heterotypic adhesion interactions. The scientific data, collected mainly for CEA, strongly confirm involvement of this molecule in colorectal cancer. Recent research also indicates that CEACAMs play an important role in signal transduction, recognition and binding of pathogenic bacteria belonging to Neisseria and Escherichia genera.

  6. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  7. Horizontal transfer, not duplication, drives the expansion of protein families in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J Treangen

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by neo- or sub-functionalization deeply impacts the evolution of protein families and is regarded as the main source of adaptive functional novelty in eukaryotes. While there is ample evidence of adaptive gene duplication in prokaryotes, it is not clear whether duplication outweighs the contribution of horizontal gene transfer in the expansion of protein families. We analyzed closely related prokaryote strains or species with small genomes (Helicobacter, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Sulfolobus, average-sized genomes (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, and large genomes (Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobiaceae to untangle the effects of duplication and horizontal transfer. After removing the effects of transposable elements and phages, we show that the vast majority of expansions of protein families are due to transfer, even among large genomes. Transferred genes--xenologs--persist longer in prokaryotic lineages possibly due to a higher/longer adaptive role. On the other hand, duplicated genes--paralogs--are expressed more, and, when persistent, they evolve slower. This suggests that gene transfer and gene duplication have very different roles in shaping the evolution of biological systems: transfer allows the acquisition of new functions and duplication leads to higher gene dosage. Accordingly, we show that paralogs share most protein-protein interactions and genetic regulators, whereas xenologs share very few of them. Prokaryotes invented most of life's biochemical diversity. Therefore, the study of the evolution of biology systems should explicitly account for the predominant role of horizontal gene transfer in the diversification of protein families.

  8. Arabidopsis Ovate Family Proteins, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor Family, Control Multiple Aspects of Plant Growth and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shucai [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Chang, Ying [Northeast Agricultural University; Guo, Jianjun [Harvard University; Zeng, Qingning [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Ellis, Brian [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs), a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7), and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1)-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the first overview of a

  9. Arabidopsis ovate family proteins, a novel transcriptional repressor family, control multiple aspects of plant growth and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucai Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs, a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7, and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the

  10. Exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein gene in familial inclusion body myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, K; Cervenáková, L; Dalakas, M C; Leon-Monzon, M; Isaacson, S H; Nagle, J W; Vasconcelos, O; Goldfarb, L G

    1995-08-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (A beta) occurs in some muscle fibers of patients with inclusion body myopathy and resembles the type of amyloid deposits seen in the affected tissues of patients with Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular amyloidosis. Because mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been identified in patients with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease and Dutch-type cerebrovascular amyloidosis, we searched for mutations of the same region in patients with familial inclusion body myopathy. Sequencing of both alleles in 8 patients from four unrelated families did not reveal any mutations in these exons. The amyloid deposition in familial forms of inclusion body myopathy may be either due to errors in other gene loci, or it is secondary reflecting altered beta APP metabolism or myocyte degeneration and cell membrane degradation.

  11. Immunohistochemical Analysis of IA-2 Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Rat Gastrointestinal Endocrine Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gomi, Hiroshi; Kubota-Murata, Chisato; Yasui, Tadashi; Tsukise, Azuma; Torii, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Islet-associated protein–2 (IA-2) and IA-2β (also known as phogrin) are unique neuroendocrine-specific protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). The IA-2 family of PTPs was originally identified from insulinoma cells and discovered to be major autoantigens in type 1 diabetes. Despite its expression in the neural and canonical endocrine tissues, data on expression of the IA-2 family of PTPs in gastrointestinal endocrine cells (GECs) are limited. Therefore, we immunohistochemically investigated the...

  12. I-BAR family proteins%I-BAR结构域蛋白质家族

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈燕萍; 鲁翔

    2011-01-01

    It is reported that cell movement and migration, particularly the involvement of pseudopodia are contributed to tumor metastasis. The I-BAR family plays a central role in membrane protrusion, which is the basic structure of pseudopod. Rho-family GTPases bind to and activate I-BAR. Then the activated I-BAR could trigger WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein) and WAVE/Scar (WASP family verprolin homologous protein) family protein, and then they trigger the actin nucleation and polymerization mediated by Arp2/3 (actin related proteins 2 and 3) complex.%研究证实,细胞的运动、迁徙与肿瘤转移密切相关,尤其是细胞伪足的参与.I-BAR(Inverse Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs)蛋白质家族因共有一段高度保守的I-BAR结构域而得名,具有结合肌动蛋白、细胞膜和小GTP酶的特点.目前的研究认为,I-BAR蛋白质家族参与细胞膜结构重塑,与细胞伪足的形成有关.I-BAR蛋白质家族介导细胞产生伪足的经典途径为Rho家族GTP酶结合到I-BAR等功能域,使活化的I-BAR蛋白质家族成员激活WASP(Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein)和WAVE/Scar(WASP family verprolin homologous protein)蛋白质家族,从而引发Arp2/3(actin related proteins 2 and 3)复合物介导的肌动蛋白成核和聚合反应.

  13. Ubiquitin-Mediated Regulation of Endocytosis by Proteins of the Arrestin Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Becuwe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In metazoans, proteins of the arrestin family are key players of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRS signaling and trafficking. Following stimulation, activated receptors are phosphorylated, thus allowing the binding of arrestins and hence an “arrest” of receptor signaling. Arrestins act by uncoupling receptors from G proteins and contribute to the recruitment of endocytic proteins, such as clathrin, to direct receptor trafficking into the endocytic pathway. Arrestins also serve as adaptor proteins by promoting the recruitment of ubiquitin ligases and participate in the agonist-induced ubiquitylation of receptors, known to have impact on their subcellular localization and stability. Recently, the arrestin family has expanded following the discovery of arrestin-related proteins in other eukaryotes such as yeasts or fungi. Surprisingly, most of these proteins are also involved in the ubiquitylation and endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins, thus suggesting that the role of arrestins as ubiquitin ligase adaptors is at the core of these proteins' functions. Importantly, arrestins are themselves ubiquitylated, and this modification is crucial for their function. In this paper, we discuss recent data on the intricate connections between arrestins and the ubiquitin pathway in the control of endocytosis.

  14. Reversible and Irreversible Aggregation of Proteins from the FET Family: Influence of Repeats in Protein Chain on Its Aggregation Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of protein chain regions responsible for protein aggregation is an important result of studying of the molecular mechanisms of prion diseases and different proteinopathies associated with the formation of pathological aggregations through the prion mechanism. The ability to control aggregation of proteins could be an important tool in the arsenal of the drug development. Here we demonstrate, on an example of RNA-binding proteins of the FET family from six animal species (human, gorilla, pig, mouse, chicken, zebra fish), the possible role of repeats within the disordered regions. For these proteins, different repeats are revealed in the prion-like (N-terminal disordered) domains, and in the C-terminal disordered regions, predicted using bioinformatics methods. Moreover, we have found that in more complex organisms the number of repeats is increased. It can be hypothesized that the presence of a large number of repeats in the disordered regions in the proteins of the FET-family could both modulate and accelerate the formation of a dynamic cross-beta structure, and pathological aggregates. PMID:26100283

  15. The human fatty acid-binding protein family: Evolutionary divergences and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smathers Rebecca L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are members of the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP family and are involved in reversibly binding intracellular hydrophobic ligands and trafficking them throughout cellular compartments, including the peroxisomes, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. FABPs are small, structurally conserved cytosolic proteins consisting of a water-filled, interior-binding pocket surrounded by ten anti-parallel beta sheets, forming a beta barrel. At the superior surface, two alpha-helices cap the pocket and are thought to regulate binding. FABPs have broad specificity, including the ability to bind long-chain (C16-C20 fatty acids, eicosanoids, bile salts and peroxisome proliferators. FABPs demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation and are present in a spectrum of species including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse and human. The human genome consists of nine putatively functional protein-coding FABP genes. The most recently identified family member, FABP12, has been less studied.

  16. Protein Kinase D family kinases: roads start to segregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Christoph; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Highly invasive pancreatic tumors are often recognized in late stages due to a lack of clear symptoms and pose major challenges for treatment and disease management. Broad-band Protein Kinase D (PKD) inhibitors have recently been proposed as additional treatment option for this disease. PKDs are implicated in the control of cancer cell motility, angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. In particular, PKD2 expression is elevated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is comparably lower. In our recent study we report that both kinases control PDAC cell invasive properties in an isoform-specific, but opposing manner. PKD1 selectively mediates anti-migratory/anti-invasive features by preferential regulation of the actin-regulatory Cofilin-phosphatase Slingshot1L (SSH1L). PKD2, on the other hand enhances invasion and angiogenesis of PDAC cells in 3D-ECM cultures and chorioallantois tumor models by stimulating expression and secretion of matrix-metalloproteinase 7 and 9 (MMP7/9). MMP9 also enhances PKD2-mediated tumor angiogenesis releasing extracellular matrix-bound VEGF-A. We thus suggest high PKD2 expression and loss of PKD1 may be beneficial for tumor cells to enhance their matrix-invading abilities. In our recent study we demonstrate for the first time PKD1 and 2 isoform-selective effects on pancreatic cancer cell invasion, in-vitro and in-vivo, defining isoform-specific regulation of PKDs as a major future issue. PMID:24847910

  17. FAM20: an evolutionarily conserved family of secreted proteins expressed in hematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobos Everardo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematopoiesis is a complex developmental process controlled by a large number of factors that regulate stem cell renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation. Secreted proteins, including the hematopoietic growth factors, play critical roles in these processes and have important biological and clinical significance. We have employed representational difference analysis to identify genes that are differentially expressed during experimentally induced myeloid differentiation in the murine EML hematopoietic stem cell line. Results One identified clone encoded a previously unidentified protein of 541 amino acids that contains an amino terminal signal sequence but no other characterized domains. This protein is a member of family of related proteins that has been named family with sequence similarity 20 (FAM20 with three members (FAM20A, FAM20B and FAM20C in mammals. Evolutionary comparisons revealed the existence of a single FAM20 gene in the simple vertebrate Ciona intestinalis and the invertebrate worm Caenorhabditis elegans and two genes in two insect species, Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae. Six FAM20 family members were identified in the genome of the pufferfish, Fugu rubripes and five members in the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The mouse Fam20a protein was ectopically expressed in a mammalian cell line and found to be a bona fide secreted protein and efficient secretion was dependent on the integrity of the signal sequence. Expression analysis revealed that the Fam20a gene was indeed differentially expressed during hematopoietic differentiation and that the other two family members (Fam20b and Fam20c were also expressed during hematcpoiesis but that their mRNA levels did not vary significantly. Likewise FAM20A was expressed in more limited set of human tissues than the other two family members. Conclusions The FAM20 family represents a new family of secreted proteins with potential functions in regulating

  18. RBP1 Recruits Both Histone Deacetylase-Dependent and -Independent Repression Activities to Retinoblastoma Family Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Albert; Lee, Joseph M; Yang, Wen-Ming; DeCaprio, James A.; William G Kaelin; Seto, Edward; Branton, Philip E.

    1999-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor family proteins block cell proliferation in part by repressing certain E2F-specific promoters. Both histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent and -independent repression activities are associated with the RB “pocket.” The mechanism by which these two repression functions occupy the pocket is unknown. A known RB-binding protein, RBP1, was previously found by our group to be an active corepressor which, if overexpressed, represses E2F-mediated transcription via i...

  19. Variants within the yeast Ty sequence family encode a class of structurally conserved proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, A.M.; Mellor, J; Dobson, M J; J. Chester; Warmington, J R; Indge, K J; Oliver, S. G.; de la Paz, P; Wilson, W; Kingsman, A J

    1985-01-01

    The Ty transposable elements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae form a heterogeneous family within which two broad structural classes (I and II) exist. The two classes differ by two large substitutions and many restriction sites. We show that, like class I elements a class II element, Tyl-17, also appears to contain at least two major protein coding regions, designated TYA and TYB, and the organisational relationship of these regions has been conserved. The TYA genes of both classes encode proteins,...

  20. Expression of NFAT-family proteins in normal human T cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyakh, L; P. Ghosh; Rice, N R

    1997-01-01

    NFAT proteins constitute a family of transcription factors involved in mediating signal transduction. Using a panel of specific antisera in immunoprecipitation assays, we found that NFATp (135 kDa) is constitutively expressed in normal human T cells, while synthesis of NFATc (predominant form of 86 kDa) is induced by ionomycin treatment. NFAT4/x was very weakly expressed in unstimulated cells, and its level did not increase upon treatment with activating agents. NFAT3 protein was not observed...

  1. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  2. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G Richardson

    Full Text Available It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit.Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1% together in three different ways 1 variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2 variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3 all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families. A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT.We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed.We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals.

  3. Nature of protein family signatures: insights from singular value analysis of position-specific scoring matrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira R Kinjo

    Full Text Available Position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs are useful for detecting weak homology in protein sequence analysis, and they are thought to contain some essential signatures of the protein families. In order to elucidate what kind of ingredients constitute such family-specific signatures, we apply singular value decomposition to a set of PSSMs and examine the properties of dominant right and left singular vectors. The first right singular vectors were correlated with various amino acid indices including relative mutability, amino acid composition in protein interior, hydropathy, or turn propensity, depending on proteins. A significant correlation between the first left singular vector and a measure of site conservation was observed. It is shown that the contribution of the first singular component to the PSSMs act to disfavor potentially but falsely functionally important residues at conserved sites. The second right singular vectors were highly correlated with hydrophobicity scales, and the corresponding left singular vectors with contact numbers of protein structures. It is suggested that sequence alignment with a PSSM is essentially equivalent to threading supplemented with functional information. In addition, singular vectors may be useful for analyzing and annotating the characteristics of conserved sites in protein families.

  4. Bid, a widely expressed proapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family, displays lipid transfer activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposti, M D; Erler, Janine Terra; Hickman, J A;

    2001-01-01

    Bid is an abundant proapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family that is crucial for the induction of death receptor-mediated apoptosis in primary tissues such as liver. Bid action has been proposed to involve the relocation of its truncated form, tBid, to mitochondria to facilitate the release of apo...

  5. A maize cDNA encoding a member of the retinoblastoma protein family: involvement in endoreduplication.

    OpenAIRE

    Grafi, G; R.J. Burnett; Helentjaris, T; Larkins, B A; DeCaprio, J A; Sellers, W R; Kaelin, W G

    1996-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB-1) is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a 105-kDa nuclear phosphoprotein. To date, RB genes have been isolated only from metazoans. We have isolated a cDNA from maize endosperm whose predicted protein product (ZmRb) shows homology to the "pocket" A and B domains of the Rb protein family. We found ZmRb behaves as a pocket protein based on its ability to specifically interact with oncoproteins encoded by DNA tumor viruses (E7, T-Ag, E1A). ZmRb can interact in vitro and in ...

  6. WCS120 protein family and proteins soluble upon boiling in cold-acclimated winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitamvas, P.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Prasil, I.T.;

    2007-01-01

    The amount of proteins soluble upon boiling (especially WCS120 proteins) and the ability to develop frost tolerance (FT) after cold acclimation was studied in two frost-tolerant winter wheat cultivars, Mironovskaya 808 and Bezostaya 1. Protein get Not analysis, mass spectrometry (MS) and image...... cultivars. Moreover, the differences of CA and NA samples of the MIR were shown by Liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). (c) 2006 Etsevier GmbH. All rights reserved....

  7. A hybrid clustering approach to recognition of protein families in 114 microbial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogarten J Peter

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grouping proteins into sequence-based clusters is a fundamental step in many bioinformatic analyses (e.g., homology-based prediction of structure or function. Standard clustering methods such as single-linkage clustering capture a history of cluster topologies as a function of threshold, but in practice their usefulness is limited because unrelated sequences join clusters before biologically meaningful families are fully constituted, e.g. as the result of matches to so-called promiscuous domains. Use of the Markov Cluster algorithm avoids this non-specificity, but does not preserve topological or threshold information about protein families. Results We describe a hybrid approach to sequence-based clustering of proteins that combines the advantages of standard and Markov clustering. We have implemented this hybrid approach over a relational database environment, and describe its application to clustering a large subset of PDB, and to 328577 proteins from 114 fully sequenced microbial genomes. To demonstrate utility with difficult problems, we show that hybrid clustering allows us to constitute the paralogous family of ATP synthase F1 rotary motor subunits into a single, biologically interpretable hierarchical grouping that was not accessible using either single-linkage or Markov clustering alone. We describe validation of this method by hybrid clustering of PDB and mapping SCOP families and domains onto the resulting clusters. Conclusion Hybrid (Markov followed by single-linkage clustering combines the advantages of the Markov Cluster algorithm (avoidance of non-specific clusters resulting from matches to promiscuous domains and single-linkage clustering (preservation of topological information as a function of threshold. Within the individual Markov clusters, single-linkage clustering is a more-precise instrument, discerning sub-clusters of biological relevance. Our hybrid approach thus provides a computationally efficient

  8. Gene families of cuticular proteins analogous to peritrophins (CPAPs in Tribolium castaneum have diverse functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinu Jasrapuria

    Full Text Available The functional characterization of an entire class of 17 genes from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which encode two families of Cuticular Proteins Analogous to Peritrophins (CPAPs has been carried out. CPAP genes in T. castaneum are expressed exclusively in cuticle-forming tissues and have been classified into two families, CPAP1 and CPAP3, based on whether the proteins contain either one (CPAP1, or three copies (CPAP3 of the chitin-binding domain, ChtBD2, with its six characteristically spaced cysteine residues. Individual members of the TcCPAP1 and TcCPAP3 gene families have distinct developmental patterns of expression. Many of these proteins serve essential and non-redundant functions in maintaining the structural integrity of the cuticle in different parts of the insect anatomy. Three genes of the TcCPAP1 family and five genes of the TcCPAP3 family are essential for insect development, molting, cuticle integrity, proper locomotion or fecundity. RNA interference (RNAi targeting TcCPAP1-C, TcCPAP1-H, TcCPAP1-J or TcCPAP3-C transcripts resulted in death at the pharate adult stage of development. RNAi for TcCPAP3-A1, TcCPAP3-B, TcCPAP3-D1 or TcCPAP3-D2 genes resulted in different developmental defects, including adult/embryonic mortality, abnormal elytra or hindwings, or an abnormal 'stiff-jointed' gait. These results provide experimental support for specialization in the functions of CPAP proteins in T. castaneum and a biological rationale for the conservation of CPAP orthologs in other orders of insects. This is the first comprehensive functional analysis of an entire class of cuticular proteins with one or more ChtBD2 domains in any insect species.

  9. Characterization of the Pichia pastoris protein-O-mannosyltransferase gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen H Nett

    Full Text Available The methylotrophic yeast, Pichiapastoris, is an important organism used for the production of therapeutic proteins. However, the presence of fungal-like glycans, either N-linked or O-linked, can elicit an immune response or enable the expressed protein to bind to mannose receptors, thus reducing their efficacy. Previously we have reported the elimination of β-linked glycans in this organism. In the current report we have focused on reducing the O-linked mannose content of proteins produced in P. pastoris, thereby reducing the potential to bind to mannose receptors. The initial step in the synthesis of O-linked glycans in P. pastoris is the transfer of mannose from dolichol-phosphomannose to a target protein in the yeast secretory pathway by members of the protein-O-mannosyltransferase (PMT family. In this report we identify and characterize the members of the P. pastoris PMT family. Like Candida albicans, P. pastoris has five PMT genes. Based on sequence homology, these PMTs can be grouped into three sub-families, with both PMT1 and PMT2 sub-families possessing two members each (PMT1 and PMT5, and PMT2 and PMT6, respectively. The remaining sub-family, PMT4, has only one member (PMT4. Through gene knockouts we show that PMT1 and PMT2 each play a significant role in O-glycosylation. Both, by gene knockouts and the use of Pmt inhibitors we were able to significantly reduce not only the degree of O-mannosylation, but also the chain-length of these glycans. Taken together, this reduction of O-glycosylation represents an important step forward in developing the P. pastoris platform as a suitable system for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  10. OmpA family proteins and Pmp-like autotransporter: new adhesins of Waddlia chondrophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Domröse, Andreas; Becker, Elisabeth; Cisse, Ousmane H; Hegemann, Johannes H; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-08-01

    Waddlia chondrophila is a obligate intracellular bacterium belonging to the Chlamydiales order, a clade that also includes the well-known classical Chlamydia responsible for a number of severe human and animal diseases. Waddlia is an emerging pathogen associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans and abortion in ruminants. Adhesion to the host cell is an essential prerequisite for survival of every strict intracellular bacteria and, in classical Chlamydia, this step is partially mediated by polymorphic outer membrane proteins (Pmps), a family of highly diverse autotransporters that represent about 15% of the bacterial coding capacity. Waddlia chondrophila genome however only encodes one putative Pmp-like protein. Using a proteomic approach, we identified several bacterial proteins potentially implicated in the adhesion process and we characterized their expression during the replication cycle of the bacteria. In addition, we demonstrated that the Waddlia Pmp-like autotransporter as well as OmpA2 and OmpA3, two members of the extended Waddlia OmpA protein family, exhibit adhesive properties on epithelial cells. We hypothesize that the large diversity of the OmpA protein family is linked to the wide host range of these bacteria that are able to enter and multiply in various host cells ranging from protozoa to mammalian and fish cells.

  11. A family of GFP-like proteins with different spectral properties in lancelet Branchiostoma floridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushegian Arcady

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the green fluorescent protein (GFP family share sequence similarity and the 11-stranded β-barrel fold. Fluorescence or bright coloration, observed in many members of this family, is enabled by the intrinsic properties of the polypeptide chain itself, without the requirement for cofactors. Amino acid sequence of fluorescent proteins can be altered by genetic engineering to produce variants with different spectral properties, suitable for direct visualization of molecular and cellular processes. Naturally occurring GFP-like proteins include fluorescent proteins from cnidarians of the Hydrozoa and Anthozoa classes, and from copepods of the Pontellidae family, as well as non-fluorescent proteins from Anthozoa. Recently, an mRNA encoding a fluorescent GFP-like protein AmphiGFP, related to GFP from Pontellidae, has been isolated from the lancelet Branchiostoma floridae, a cephalochordate (Deheyn et al., Biol Bull, 2007 213:95. Results We report that the nearly-completely sequenced genome of Branchiostoma floridae encodes at least 12 GFP-like proteins. The evidence for expression of six of these genes can be found in the EST databases. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that a gene encoding a GFP-like protein was present in the common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria. We synthesized and expressed two of the lancelet GFP-like proteins in mammalian cells and in bacteria. One protein, which we called LanFP1, exhibits bright green fluorescence in both systems. The other protein, LanFP2, is identical to AmphiGFP in amino acid sequence and is moderately fluorescent. Live imaging of the adult animals revealed bright green fluorescence at the anterior end and in the basal region of the oral cirri, as well as weaker green signals throughout the body of the animal. In addition, red fluorescence was observed in oral cirri, extending to the tips. Conclusion GFP-like proteins may have been present in the primitive Metazoa. Their

  12. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates. PMID:27635128

  13. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates. PMID:27635128

  14. A primary sequence analysis of the ARGONAUTE protein family in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rodriguez-Leal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA (sRNA-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates.

  15. Influence of the mutation on the stability of pyrin protein and development of familial Mediterranean fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arakelov G G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study was carried out for the molecular modeling of the pyrin protein. Tertiary structure of pyrin protein was developed by de novo modeling and treading methods. Subsequent evaluation of the developed model was also carried out and found it stereochemical correct. Furthermore, influence of the mutation on the stability of the pyrin tertiary structure and development of Familial Mediterranean Fever was also studied in the present study. Total 66 mutations were localized at B30.2 domain of pyrin protein and this domain is responsible for manifestation of Familial Mediterranean Fever. It was also reported that among 66 localized mutations 24 mutations affects the stability of pyrin structure while 25 mutations have neutral effect on the stability and rest 17 mutations have stabilizing effect on the tertiary structure of pyrin.

  16. Database of amino acid-nucleotide contacts in the DNA complexes with homeodomain family proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of amino acid-nucleotide contacts in interfaces of the protein-DNA complexes, intended to find consistencies in the protein-DNA recognition, is a complex problem that requires analysis of the physicochemical characteristics of these contacts, of the positions of the participating amino acids and nucleotides in the chains of the protein and the DNA, respectively, as well as conservatism of these contacts. Thus, those heterogeneous data should be systematized. For this purpose we have developed a database of amino acid-nucleotide contacts ANTPC (Amino acid Nucleotide Type Position Conservation) following the archetypal example of the proteins in the homeodomain family. We show that it can be used for comparison and classification of interfaces of the protein-DNA complexes

  17. Identification, structure, and differential expression of members of a BURP domain containing protein family in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Cheryl; Coryell, Virginia; Khanna, Anupama; Keim, Paul; Vodkin, Lila; Shoemaker, Randy C

    2002-08-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) exhibiting homology to a BURP domain containing gene family were identified from the Glycine max (L.) Merr. EST database. These ESTs were assembled into 16 contigs of variable sizes and lengths. Consistent with the structure of known BURP domain containing proteins, the translation products exhibit a modular structure consisting of a C-terminal BURP domain, an N-terminal signal sequence, and a variable internal region. The soybean family members exhibit 35-98% similarity in a -100-amino-acid C-terminal region, and a phylogenetic tree constructed using this region shows that some soybean family members group together in closely related pairs, triplets, and quartets, whereas others remain as singletons. The structure of these groups suggests that multiple gene duplication events occurred during the evolutionary history of this family. The depth and diversity of G. max EST libraries allowed tissue-specific expression patterns of the putative soybean BURPs to be examined. Consistent with known BURP proteins, the newly identified soybean BURPs have diverse expression patterns. Furthermore, putative paralogs can have both spatially and quantitatively distinct expression patterns. We discuss the functional and evolutionary implications of these findings, as well as the utility of EST-based analyses for identifying and characterizing gene families. PMID:12175072

  18. Detection of distant evolutionary relationships between protein families using theory of sequence profile-profile comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venclovas Česlovas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of common evolutionary origin (homology is a primary means of inferring protein structure and function. At present, comparison of protein families represented as sequence profiles is arguably the most effective homology detection strategy. However, finding the best way to represent evolutionary information of a protein sequence family in the profile, to compare profiles and to estimate the biological significance of such comparisons, remains an active area of research. Results Here, we present a new homology detection method based on sequence profile-profile comparison. The method has a number of new features including position-dependent gap penalties and a global score system. Position-dependent gap penalties provide a more biologically relevant way to represent and align protein families as sequence profiles. The global score system enables an analytical solution of the statistical parameters needed to estimate the statistical significance of profile-profile similarities. The new method, together with other state-of-the-art profile-based methods (HHsearch, COMPASS and PSI-BLAST, is benchmarked in all-against-all comparison of a challenging set of SCOP domains that share at most 20% sequence identity. For benchmarking, we use a reference ("gold standard" free model-based evaluation framework. Evaluation results show that at the level of protein domains our method compares favorably to all other tested methods. We also provide examples of the new method outperforming structure-based similarity detection and alignment. The implementation of the new method both as a standalone software package and as a web server is available at http://www.ibt.lt/bioinformatics/coma. Conclusion Due to a number of developments, the new profile-profile comparison method shows an improved ability to match distantly related protein domains. Therefore, the method should be useful for annotation and homology modeling of uncharacterized

  19. Slipins: ancient origin, duplication and diversification of the stomatin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young J Peter W

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stomatin is a membrane protein that was first isolated from human red blood cells. Since then, a number of stomatin-like proteins have been identified in all three domains of life. The conservation among these proteins is remarkable, with bacterial and human homologs sharing 50 % identity. Despite being associated with a variety of diseases such as cancer, kidney failure and anaemia, precise functions of these proteins remain unclear. Results We have constructed a comprehensive phylogeny of all 'stomatin-like' sequences that share a 150 amino acid domain. We show these proteins comprise an ancient family that arose early in prokaryotic evolution, and we propose a new nomenclature that reflects their phylogeny, based on the name "slipin" (stomatin-like protein. Within prokaryotes there are two distinct subfamilies that account for the two different origins of the eight eukaryotic stomatin subfamilies, one of which gave rise to eukaryotic SLP-2, renamed here "paraslipin". This was apparently acquired through the mitochondrial endosymbiosis and is widely distributed amongst the major kingdoms. The other prokaryotic subfamily gave rise to the ancestor of the remaining seven eukaryotic subfamilies. The highly diverged "alloslipin" subfamily is represented only by fungal, viral and ciliate sequences. The remaining six subfamilies, collectively termed "slipins", are confined to metazoa. Protostome stomatin, as well as a newly reported arthropod subfamily slipin-4, are restricted to invertebrate groups, whilst slipin-1 (previously SLP-1 is present in nematodes and higher metazoa. In vertebrates, the stomatin family expanded considerably, with at least two duplication events giving rise to podocin and slipin-3 subfamilies (previously SLP-3, with the retained ancestral sequence giving rise to vertebrate stomatin. Conclusion Stomatin-like proteins have their origin in an ancient duplication event that occurred early on in the evolution

  20. A novel family of Apicomplexan glideosome-associated proteins with an inner membrane-anchoring role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Hayley E; Tonkin, Christopher J; O'Donnell, Rebecca A; Tham, Wai-Hong; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Gould, Sven; Cowman, Alan F; Crabb, Brendan S; Gilson, Paul R

    2009-09-11

    The phylum Apicomplexa are a group of obligate intracellular parasites responsible for a wide range of important diseases. Central to the lifecycle of these unicellular parasites is their ability to migrate through animal tissue and invade target host cells. Apicomplexan movement is generated by a unique system of gliding motility in which substrate adhesins and invasion-related proteins are pulled across the plasma membrane by an underlying actin-myosin motor. The myosins of this motor are inserted into a dual membrane layer called the inner membrane complex (IMC) that is sandwiched between the plasma membrane and an underlying cytoskeletal basket. Central to our understanding of gliding motility is the characterization of proteins residing within the IMC, but to date only a few proteins are known. We report here a novel family of six-pass transmembrane proteins, termed the GAPM family, which are highly conserved and specific to Apicomplexa. In Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii the GAPMs localize to the IMC where they form highly SDS-resistant oligomeric complexes. The GAPMs co-purify with the cytoskeletal alveolin proteins and also to some degree with the actin-myosin motor itself. Hence, these proteins are strong candidates for an IMC-anchoring role, either directly or indirectly tethering the motor to the cytoskeleton.

  1. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    -alpha;-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABA(B1......-2) and T1R2-3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity...

  2. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  3. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in proteins belonging to the amphitropic protein family

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rob C A Keller

    2014-12-01

    The role of protein–lipid interactions is increasingly recognized to be of importance in numerous biological processes. Bioinformatics is being increasingly used as a helpful tool in studying protein–lipid interactions. Especially recently developed approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins can be implemented. In this study one of those bioinformatics approaches specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins is expanded. The approach is explored further by features which can be easily obtained manually. Some interesting examples of members of the amphitropic protein family have been investigated in order to demonstrate the additional features of this bioinformatics approach. The results in this study seem to indicate interesting characteristics of amphitropic proteins and provide insight into the mechanistic functioning and overall understanding of this intriguing class of proteins. Additionally, the results demonstrate that the presented bioinformatics approach might be either an interesting starting point in protein–lipid interactions studies or a good tool for selecting new focus points for more detailed experimental research of proteins with known overall protein–lipid binding abilities.

  4. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  5. Pu-Erh Tea Extract Induces the Degradation of FET Family Proteins Involved in the Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available FET family proteins consist of fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS, Ewing's sarcoma (EWS, and TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15 (TAF15. Mutations in the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43, and FET family proteins are associated with the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a fatal neurodegenerative disease. There is currently no cure for this disease and few effective treatments are available. Epidemiological studies indicate that the consumption of tea is associated with a reduced risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. The results of this study revealed that components of a pu-erh tea extract (PTE interacted with FET family proteins but not with TDP-43 or SOD1. PTE induced the degradation of FET family proteins but had no effects on TDP-43 or SOD1. The most frequently occurring ALS-linked FUS/TLS mutant protein, R521C FUS/TLS, was also degraded in the presence of PTE. Furthermore, ammonium chloride, a lysosome inhibitor, but not lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, reduced the degradation of FUS/TLS protein by PTE. PTE significantly reduced the incorporation of R521C FUS/TLS into stress granules under stress conditions. These findings suggest that PTE may have beneficial health effects, including preventing the onset of FET family protein-associated neurodegenerative diseases and delaying the progression of ALS by inhibiting the cytoplasmic aggregation of FET family proteins.

  6. Phylogeny of the Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase (VKOR) Family and Evolutionary Relationship to the Disulfide Bond Formation Protein B (DsbB) Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Carville G; Krettler, Christoph; Reinhart, Christoph; Watzka, Matthias; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-29

    In humans and other vertebrate animals, vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR) family enzymes are the gatekeepers between nutritionally acquired K vitamins and the vitamin K cycle responsible for posttranslational modifications that confer biological activity upon vitamin K-dependent proteins with crucial roles in hemostasis, bone development and homeostasis, hormonal carbohydrate regulation and fertility. We report a phylogenetic analysis of the VKOR family that identifies five major clades. Combined phylogenetic and site-specific conservation analyses point to clade-specific similarities and differences in structure and function. We discovered a single-site determinant uniquely identifying VKOR homologs belonging to human pathogenic, obligate intracellular prokaryotes and protists. Building on previous work by Sevier et al. (Protein Science 14:1630), we analyzed structural data from both VKOR and prokaryotic disulfide bond formation protein B (DsbB) families and hypothesize an ancient evolutionary relationship between the two families where one family arose from the other through a gene duplication/deletion event. This has resulted in circular permutation of primary sequence threading through the four-helical bundle protein folds of both families. This is the first report of circular permutation relating distant a-helical membrane protein sequences and folds. In conclusion, we suggest a chronology for the evolution of the five extant VKOR clades.

  7. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane.

  8. Molecular characterization and expression profiling of the protein disulfide isomerase gene family in Brachypodium distachyon L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Zhu

    Full Text Available Protein disulfide isomerases (PDI are involved in catalyzing protein disulfide bonding and isomerization in the endoplasmic reticulum and functions as a chaperone to inhibit the aggregation of misfolded proteins. Brachypodium distachyon is a widely used model plant for temperate grass species such as wheat and barley. In this work, we report the first molecular characterization, phylogenies, and expression profiles of PDI and PDI-like (PDIL genes in B. distachyon in different tissues under various abiotic stresses. Eleven PDI and PDIL genes in the B. distachyon genome by in silico identification were evenly distributed across all five chromosomes. The plant PDI family has three conserved motifs that are involved in catalyzing protein disulfide bonding and isomerization, but a different exon/intron structural organization showed a high degree of structural differentiation. Two pairs of genes (BdPDIL4-1 and BdPDIL4-2; BdPDIL7-1 and BdPDIL7-2 contained segmental duplications, indicating each pair originated from one progenitor. Promoter analysis showed that Brachypodium PDI family members contained important cis-acting regulatory elements involved in seed storage protein synthesis and diverse stress response. All Brachypodium PDI genes investigated were ubiquitously expressed in different organs, but differentiation in expression levels among different genes and organs was clear. BdPDIL1-1 and BdPDIL5-1 were expressed abundantly in developing grains, suggesting that they have important roles in synthesis and accumulation of seed storage proteins. Diverse treatments (drought, salt, ABA, and H2O2 induced up- and down-regulated expression of Brachypodium PDI genes in seedling leaves. Interestingly, BdPDIL1-1 displayed significantly up-regulated expression following all abiotic stress treatments, indicating that it could be involved in multiple stress responses. Our results provide new insights into the structural and functional characteristics of the

  9. Sifting through genomes with iterative-sequence clustering produces a large, phylogenetically diverse protein-family resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpton Thomas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New computational resources are needed to manage the increasing volume of biological data from genome sequencing projects. One fundamental challenge is the ability to maintain a complete and current catalog of protein diversity. We developed a new approach for the identification of protein families that focuses on the rapid discovery of homologous protein sequences. Results We implemented fully automated and high-throughput procedures to de novo cluster proteins into families based upon global alignment similarity. Our approach employs an iterative clustering strategy in which homologs of known families are sifted out of the search for new families. The resulting reduction in computational complexity enables us to rapidly identify novel protein families found in new genomes and to perform efficient, automated updates that keep pace with genome sequencing. We refer to protein families identified through this approach as “Sifting Families,” or SFams. Our analysis of ~10.5 million protein sequences from 2,928 genomes identified 436,360 SFams, many of which are not represented in other protein family databases. We validated the quality of SFam clustering through statistical as well as network topology–based analyses. Conclusions We describe the rapid identification of SFams and demonstrate how they can be used to annotate genomes and metagenomes. The SFam database catalogs protein-family quality metrics, multiple sequence alignments, hidden Markov models, and phylogenetic trees. Our source code and database are publicly available and will be subject to frequent updates (http://edhar.genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/sifting_families/.

  10. Stealth Proteins: In Silico Identification of a Novel Protein Family Rendering Bacterial Pathogens Invisible to Host Immune Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  11. Stealth proteins: in silico identification of a novel protein family rendering bacterial pathogens invisible to host immune defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sperisen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  12. Characterization of the deleted in autism 1 protein family: implications for studying cognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhari Aziz

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1 and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L, lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental

  13. Investigating the Host Binding Signature on the Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 Protein Family

    OpenAIRE

    Janes, Joel H.; Wang, Christopher P.; Emily Levin-Edens; Inès Vigan-Womas; Micheline Guillotte; Martin Melcher; Odile Mercereau-Puijalon; Smith, Joseph D

    2011-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family plays a central role in antigenic variation and cytoadhesion of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 proteins/var genes are classified into three main subfamilies (UpsA, UpsB, and UpsC) that are hypothesized to have different roles in binding and disease. To investigate whether these subfamilies have diverged in binding specificity and test if binding could be predicted by adhesion domain classification, we genera...

  14. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-10-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  15. A combinatorial approach to detect coevolved amino acid networks in protein families of variable divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Baussand

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Communication between distant sites often defines the biological role of a protein: amino acid long-range interactions are as important in binding specificity, allosteric regulation and conformational change as residues directly contacting the substrate. The maintaining of functional and structural coupling of long-range interacting residues requires coevolution of these residues. Networks of interaction between coevolved residues can be reconstructed, and from the networks, one can possibly derive insights into functional mechanisms for the protein family. We propose a combinatorial method for mapping conserved networks of amino acid interactions in a protein which is based on the analysis of a set of aligned sequences, the associated distance tree and the combinatorics of its subtrees. The degree of coevolution of all pairs of coevolved residues is identified numerically, and networks are reconstructed with a dedicated clustering algorithm. The method drops the constraints on high sequence divergence limiting the range of applicability of the statistical approaches previously proposed. We apply the method to four protein families where we show an accurate detection of functional networks and the possibility to treat sets of protein sequences of variable divergence.

  16. Structure, Expression and Function of the novel KIND Domain Family Protein very-KIND

    OpenAIRE

    Bedrossian, Anaid

    2008-01-01

    In neurons the Ras signaling pathway is activated by a large number of various stimuli, including trophic factors, neurotransmitters and modulatory peptides. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) mediate the activation of Ras GTPases, by catalyzing the exchange of GDP for GTP, and facilitate signaling networks crosstalk. In this work, very-KIND (VKIND), a new brain specific RasGEF was structurally and functionally characterized. VKIND belongs to the KIND protein family along with the non...

  17. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, S.; Fargnoli, J.; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk a...

  18. First Report of a Molecular Prenatal Diagnosis in a Tunisian Family with Lysinuric Protein Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Esseghir, Nadia; Bouchlaka, Chiraz Souissi; Fredj, Sondess Hadj; Chehida, Amel Ben; Azzouz, Hatem; Fontaine, Monique; Tebib, Neji; Dridi, Marie Françoise Ben; Briand, Gilbert; Messaoud, Taieb; Elgaaied, Amel Ben Ammar; Kaabachi, Naziha

    2011-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI, MIM# 222700) is an inherited aminoaciduria caused by defective transport of cationic amino acids (CAAs; arginine, lysine, ornithine) at the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the intestine and kidney. We report the first prenatal diagnosis by direct mutational analysis of LPI performed in a Tunisian family. An amniotic fluid sample was carried out at 16 weeks of gestation in a 32-year-old Tunisian woman who consulted for prenatal diagnosis. The 147...

  19. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:27129202

  20. The role of the acidity of N-heteroaryl sulfonamides as inhibitors of bcl-2 family protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touré, B Barry; Miller-Moslin, Karen; Yusuff, Naeem; Perez, Lawrence; Doré, Michael; Joud, Carol; Michael, Walter; DiPietro, Lucian; van der Plas, Simon; McEwan, Michael; Lenoir, Francois; Hoe, Madelene; Karki, Rajesh; Springer, Clayton; Sullivan, John; Levine, Kymberly; Fiorilla, Catherine; Xie, Xiaoling; Kulathila, Raviraj; Herlihy, Kara; Porter, Dale; Visser, Michael

    2013-02-14

    Overexpression of the antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins is commonly associated with cancer cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics. Here, we describe the structure-based optimization of a series of N-heteroaryl sulfonamides that demonstrate potent mechanism-based cell death. The role of the acidic nature of the sulfonamide moiety as it relates to potency, solubility, and clearance is examined. This has led to the discovery of novel heterocyclic replacements for the acylsulfonamide core of ABT-737 and ABT-263. PMID:24900652

  1. PHOG-BLAST – a new generation tool for fast similarity search of protein families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mironov Andrey A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need to compare protein profiles frequently arises in various protein research areas: comparison of protein families, domain searches, resolution of orthology and paralogy. The existing fast algorithms can only compare a protein sequence with a protein sequence and a profile with a sequence. Algorithms to compare profiles use dynamic programming and complex scoring functions. Results We developed a new algorithm called PHOG-BLAST for fast similarity search of profiles. This algorithm uses profile discretization to convert a profile to a finite alphabet and utilizes hashing for fast search. To determine the optimal alphabet, we analyzed columns in reliable multiple alignments and obtained column clusters in the 20-dimensional profile space by applying a special clustering procedure. We show that the clustering procedure works best if its parameters are chosen so that 20 profile clusters are obtained which can be interpreted as ancestral amino acid residues. With these clusters, only less than 2% of columns in multiple alignments are out of clusters. We tested the performance of PHOG-BLAST vs. PSI-BLAST on three well-known databases of multiple alignments: COG, PFAM and BALIBASE. On the COG database both algorithms showed the same performance, on PFAM and BALIBASE PHOG-BLAST was much superior to PSI-BLAST. PHOG-BLAST required 10–20 times less computer memory and computation time than PSI-BLAST. Conclusion Since PHOG-BLAST can compare multiple alignments of protein families, it can be used in different areas of comparative proteomics and protein evolution. For example, PHOG-BLAST helped to build the PHOG database of phylogenetic orthologous groups. An essential step in building this database was comparing protein complements of different species and orthologous groups of different taxons on a personal computer in reasonable time. When it is applied to detect weak similarity between protein families, PHOG-BLAST is less

  2. Molecular evolution of Cide family proteins: Novel domain formation in early vertebrates and the subsequent divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhirong

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cide family proteins including Cidea, Cideb and Cidec/Fsp27, contain an N-terminal CIDE-N domain that shares sequence similarity to the N-terminal CAD domain (NCD of DNA fragmentation factors Dffa/Dff45/ICAD and Dffb/Dff40/CAD, and a unique C-terminal CIDE-C domain. We have previously shown that Cide proteins are newly emerged regulators closely associated with the development of metabolic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and liver steatosis. They modulate many metabolic processes such as lipolysis, thermogenesis and TAG storage in brown adipose tissue (BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT, as well as fatty acid oxidation and lipogenesis in the liver. Results To understand the evolutionary process of Cide proteins and provide insight into the role of Cide proteins as potential metabolic regulators in various species, we searched various databases and performed comparative genomic analysis to study the sequence conservation, genomic structure, and phylogenetic tree of the CIDE-N and CIDE-C domains of Cide proteins. As a result, we identified signature sequences for the N-terminal region of Dffa, Dffb and Cide proteins and CIDE-C domain of Cide proteins, and observed that sequences homologous to CIDE-N domain displays a wide phylogenetic distribution in species ranging from lower organisms such as hydra (Hydra vulgaris and sea anemone (Nematostella vectensis to mammals, whereas the CIDE-C domain exists only in vertebrates. Further analysis of their genomic structures showed that although evolution of the ancestral CIDE-N domain had undergone different intron insertions to various positions in the domain among invertebrates, the genomic structure of Cide family in vertebrates is stable with conserved intron phase. Conclusion Based on our analysis, we speculate that in early vertebrates CIDE-N domain was evolved from the duplication of NCD of Dffa. The CIDE-N domain somehow acquired the CIDE-C domain that was formed around the

  3. Hypoxia-induced modulation of apoptosis and BCL-2 family proteins in different cancer cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Sermeus

    Full Text Available Hypoxia plays an important role in the resistance of tumour cells to chemotherapy. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this process are not well understood. Moreover, according to the cell lines, hypoxia differently influences cell death. The study of the effects of hypoxia on the apoptosis induced by 5 chemotherapeutic drugs in 7 cancer cell types showed that hypoxia generally inhibited the drug-induced apoptosis. In most cases, the effect of hypoxia was the same for all the drugs in one cell type. The expression profile of 93 genes involved in apoptosis as well as the protein level of BCL-2 family proteins were then investigated. In HepG2 cells that are strongly protected against cell death by hypoxia, hypoxia decreased the abundance of nearly all the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins while none of them are decreased in A549 cells that are not protected against cell death by hypoxia. In HepG2 cells, hypoxia decreased NOXA and BAD abundance and modified the electrophoretic mobility of BIM(EL. BIM and NOXA are important mediators of etoposide-induced cell death in HepG2 cells and the hypoxia-induced modification of these proteins abundance or post-translational modifications partly account for chemoresistance. Finally, the modulation of the abundance and/or of the post-translational modifications of most proteins of the BCL-2 family by hypoxia involves p53-dependent and -independent pathways and is cell type-dependent. A better understanding of these cell-to-cell variations is crucial in order to overcome hypoxia-induced resistance and to ameliorate cancer therapy.

  4. Functional characterization of fidgetin, an AAA-family protein mutated in fidget mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Mahaffey, Connie L; Bérubé, Nathalie; Nystuen, Arne; Frankel, Wayne N

    2005-03-10

    The mouse fidget mutation is an autosomal recessive mutation that renders reduced or absent semicircular canals, microphthalmia, and various skeletal abnormalities to affected mice. We previously identified the defective gene which encodes fidgetin, a new member of the ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). Here, we report on the subcellular localization of fidgetin as well as that of two closely related proteins, fidgetin-like 1 and fidgetin-like 2. Epitope-tagging and immunostaining revealed that both fidgetin and fidgetin-like 2 were predominantly localized to the nucleus, whereas fidgetin-like 1 was both nuclear and cytoplasmic. Furthermore, deletion studies identified a putative bipartite nuclear localization signal in the middle portion of the fidgetin protein. Since AAA proteins are known to form functional hetero- or homo-hexamers, we used reciprocal immunoprecipitation to examine the potential interaction among these proteins. We found that fidgetin interacted with itself and this specific interaction was abolished when either the N- or C-terminus of the protein was truncated. Taken together, our results suggest that fidgetin is a nuclear AAA-family protein with the potential to form homo-oligomers, thus representing the first step towards the elucidation of fidgetin's cellular function and the disease mechanism in fidget mutant mice.

  5. Functional conservation among members of the Salmonella typhimurium InvA family of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginocchio, C C; Galán, J E

    1995-02-01

    InvA, which is essential for Salmonella spp. to enter cultured epithelial cells, is a member of a family of proteins involved in either flagellar biosynthesis or the secretion of virulence determinants by a number of plant and mammalian pathogens. The predicted overall secondary structures of these proteins show significant similarities and indicate a modular construction with a hydrophobic amino-terminal half, consisting of six to eight potential transmembrane domains, and a hydrophilic carboxy terminus which is predicted to reside in the cytoplasm. These proteins can be aligned over the entire length of their polypeptide sequences, with the highest degree of homology found in the amino terminus and clusters of conserved residues in the carboxy terminus. We examined the functional conservation among members of this protein family by assessing the ability of MxiA of Shigella flexneri and LcrD of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to restore invasiveness to an invA mutant of Salmonella typhimurium. We found that MxiA was able to complement the entry defect of the invA mutant strain of S. typhimurium. In contrast, LcrD failed to complement the same strain. However, a plasmid carrying a gene encoding a chimeric protein consisting of the amino terminus of LcrD and the carboxy terminus of InvA complemented the defect of the Salmonella invA mutant. These results indicate that the secretory systems in which these proteins participate are functionally similar and that the Salmonella and Shigella systems are very closely related. These data also suggest that determinants of specificity may be located at the carboxy termini of these proteins.

  6. Correlation analysis for protein evolutionary family based on amino acid position mutations and application in PDZ domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been widely recognized that the mutations at specific directions are caused by the functional constraints in protein family and the directional mutations at certain positions control the evolutionary direction of the protein family. The mutations at different positions, even distantly separated, are mutually coupled and form an evolutionary network. Finding the controlling mutative positions and the mutative network among residues are firstly important for protein rational design and enzyme engineering. METHODOLOGY: A computational approach, namely amino acid position conservation-mutation correlation analysis (CMCA, is developed to predict mutually mutative positions and find the evolutionary network in protein family. The amino acid position mutative function, which is the foundational equation of CMCA measuring the mutation of a residue at a position, is derived from the MSA (multiple structure alignment database of protein evolutionary family. Then the position conservation correlation matrix and position mutation correlation matrix is constructed from the amino acid position mutative equation. Unlike traditional SCA (statistical coupling analysis approach, which is based on the statistical analysis of position conservations, the CMCA focuses on the correlation analysis of position mutations. CONCLUSIONS: As an example the CMCA approach is used to study the PDZ domain of protein family, and the results well illustrate the distantly allosteric mechanism in PDZ protein family, and find the functional mutative network among residues. We expect that the CMCA approach may find applications in protein engineering study, and suggest new strategy to improve bioactivities and physicochemical properties of enzymes.

  7. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Matsumori, Haruka [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel [Department of Biology of the Cell Nucleus, Institute of Molecular Genetics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Goldberg, Ilya G. [Image Informatics and Computational Biology Unit, Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Suite 100, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Nakao, Mitsuyoshi [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Saitoh, Noriko [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Harata, Masahiko, E-mail: mharata@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation.

  8. Characterization of a family of novel cysteine- serine-rich nuclear proteins (CSRNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Gingras

    Full Text Available Gene array analysis has been widely used to identify genes induced during T cell activation. Our studies identified an immediate early gene that is strongly induced in response to IL-2 in mouse T cells which we named cysteine- serine-rich nuclear protein-1 (CSRNP-1. The human ortholog was previously identified as an AXIN1 induced gene (AXUD1. The protein does not contain sequence defined domains or motifs annotated in public databases, however the gene is a member of a family of three mammalian genes that share conserved regions, including cysteine- and serine-rich regions and a basic domain, they encode nuclear proteins, possess transcriptional activation domain and bind the sequence AGAGTG. Consequently we propose the nomenclature of CSRNP-1, -2 and -3 for the family. To elucidate the physiological functions of CSRNP-1, -2 and -3, we generated mice deficient for each of these genes by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Although the CSRNP proteins have the hallmark of transcription factors and CSRNP-1 expression is highly induced by IL-2, deletion of the individual genes had no obvious consequences on normal mouse development, hematopoiesis or T cell functions. However, combined deficiencies cause partial neonatal lethality suggesting that the genes have redundant functions.

  9. Transgenic analyses of TGIF family proteins in Drosophila imply their role in cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    TG-interacting factors (TGIFs) belong to a family of TALE-homeodomain proteins including TGIF, TGIF2, and TGIF2LX/Y (TGIF2 like on X or Y chromosome) in human. They potentially play important functions in various tissues during development. Mutations in TGIF are frequently associated with malformation of forebrain and facial structures; TGIF2 proteins are over-expressed in many ovarian cancer cell lines; and TGIF2LX/Y are specifically expressed in adult testis. The molecular functions of these proteins have been investigated mostly in cultured cells. TGIF and TGIF2 have been found as transcriptional repressors that modulate TGF-beta signaling. However,these findings are far from sufficient to explain their mutant phenotypes or expression patterns, and the functions of TGIF2LX/Y have never been reported. Here we use Drosophila as a model system to explore the functions of TGIF family proteins in vivo. We observed in fly tissues such as fat body, epithelia, and neuronal cells, that expressing human TGIF2 or human TGIF2LX generally inhibited cell growth in size and number. Co-expressing Drosophila Myc, Cyclin E, or human c-MycS partially rescued the growth inhibition induced by human TGIFs, whereas activated insulin pathway signaling did not. Taken together, we provide in vivo evidence for the potential functions of human TGIF2 and TGIF2LX in growth control. Additionally, we confirmed that Drosophila TGIFs are transcriptional activators by assaying their activities in spermatogenesis.

  10. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation

  11. Characterization of the conserved interaction between GATA and FOG family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Kasper; Liew, Chu Kong; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Gell, David A; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2002-09-20

    The N-terminal zinc finger (ZnF) from GATA transcription factors mediates interactions with FOG family proteins. In FOG proteins, the interacting domains are also ZnFs; these domains are related to classical CCHH fingers but have an His --> Cys substitution at the final zinc-ligating position. Here we demonstrate that different CCHC fingers in the FOG family protein U-shaped contact the N-terminal ZnF of GATA-1 in the same fashion although with different affinities. We also show that these interactions are of moderate affinity, which is interesting given the presumed low concentrations of these proteins in the nucleus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the variant CCHC topology enhances binding affinity, although the His --> Cys change is not essential for the formation of a stably folded domain. To ascertain the structural basis for the contribution of the CCHC arrangement, we have determined the structure of a CCHH mutant of finger nine from U-shaped. The structure is very similar overall to the wild-type domain, with subtle differences at the C terminus that result in loss of the interaction in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that the CCHC zinc binding topology is required for the integrity of GATA-FOG interactions and that weak interactions can play important roles in vivo.

  12. Comparison of ligand migration and binding in heme proteins of the globin family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Nienhaus; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-12-01

    The binding of small diatomic ligands such as carbon monoxide or dioxygen to heme proteins is among the simplest biological processes known. Still, it has taken many decades to understand the mechanistic aspects of this process in full detail. Here, we compare ligand binding in three heme proteins of the globin family, myoglobin, a dimeric hemoglobin, and neuroglobin. The combination of structural, spectroscopic, and kinetic experiments over many years by many laboratories has revealed common properties of globins and a clear mechanistic picture of ligand binding at the molecular level. In addition to the ligand binding site at the heme iron, a primary ligand docking site exists that ensures efficient ligand binding to and release from the heme iron. Additional, secondary docking sites can greatly facilitate ligand escape after its dissociation from the heme. Although there is only indirect evidence at present, a preformed histidine gate appears to exist that allows ligand entry to and exit from the active site. The importance of these features can be assessed by studies involving modified proteins (via site-directed mutagenesis) and comparison with heme proteins not belonging to the globin family.

  13. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  14. The antiviral spectra of TRIM5α orthologues and human TRIM family proteins against lentiviral production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiga Ohmine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rhesus monkey TRIM5α (TRIM5αrh recognizes the incoming HIV-1 core through its C-terminal B30.2(PRYSPRY domain and promotes its premature disassembly or degradation before reverse transcription. Previously, we have shown that TRIM5αrh blocks HIV-1 production through the N-terminal RBCC domain by the recognition of Gag polyproteins. Although all TRIM family proteins have RBCC domains, it remains elusive whether they possess similar late-restriction activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the antiviral spectra of TRIM5α orthologues and human TRIM family members which have a genetic locus proximal to human TRIM5α (TRIM5αhu, against primate lentiviral production. When HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs were generated in the presence of TRIM5α proteins, rhesus, African green and cynomolgus monkey TRIM5α (TRIM5αag and TRIM5αcy, but not TRIM5αhu, were efficiently incorporated into VLPs, suggesting an interaction between HIV-1 Gag and TRIM5α proteins. TRIM5αrh potently restricted the viral production of HIV-1 groups M and O and HIV-2, but not simian lentiviruses including SIV(MAC1A11, SIV(AGMTan-1 or SIV(AGMSAB-1. TRIM5αhu did not show notable late restriction activities against these lentiviruses. TRIM5αag and TRIM5αcy showed intermediate restriction phenotypes against HIV-1 and HIV-2, but showed no restriction activity against SIV production. A series of chimeric TRIM5α constructs indicated that the N-terminal region of TRIM5αag and TRIM5αcy are essential for the late restriction activity, while the C-terminal region of TRIM5αcy negatively regulates the late restriction activity against HIV-1. When select human TRIM family proteins were examined, TRIM21 and 22 were efficiently incorporated into HIV-1 VLPs, while only TRIM22 reduced HIV-1 titers up to 5-fold. The antiviral activities and encapsidation efficiencies did not correlate with their relative expression levels in the producer cells. CONCLUSIONS

  15. Structure of a UPF0150-family protein from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of the hypothetical protein TTHA0281 from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution. The TTHA0281 protein forms a homotetramer in which each monomer adopts an α-β-β-β-α fold. TTHA0281 is a hypothetical protein from Thermus thermophilus HB8 that belongs to an uncharacterized protein family, UPF0150, in the Pfam database and to COG1598 in the National Center for Biotechnology Information Database of Clusters of Orthologous Groups. The X-ray crystal structure of the protein was determined by a multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique and was refined at 1.9 Å resolution to a final R factor of 18.5%. The TTHA0281 monomer adopts an α-β-β-β-α fold and forms a homotetramer. Based on the properties and functions of structural homologues of the TTHA0281 monomer, the TTHA0281 protein is speculated to be involved in RNA metabolism, including RNA binding and cleavage

  16. Intermediates in the folding equilibrium of repeat proteins from the TPR family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Charro, Vicente; Rey, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    In recent decades, advances in computational methods and experimental biophysical techniques have improved our understanding of protein folding. Although some of these advances have been remarkable, the structural variability of globular proteins usually encountered makes it difficult to extract general features of their folding processes. To overcome this difficulty, experimental and computational studies of the folding of repeat (or modular) proteins are of interest. Because their native structures can be described as linear arrays of the same, repeated, supersecondary structure unit, it is possible to seek a possibly independent behavior of the different modules without taking into account the intrinsic stability associated with different secondary structure motifs. In this work we have used a Monte Carlo-based simulation to study the folding equilibrium of four repeat proteins belonging to the tetratricopeptide repeat family. Our studies provide new insights into their energy profiles, enabling investigation about the existence of intermediate states and their relative stabilities. We have also performed structural analyses to describe the structure of these intermediates, going through the vast number of conformations obtained from the simulations. In this way, we have tried to identify the regions of each protein in which the modular structure yields a different behavior and, more specifically, regions of the proteins that can stay folded when the rest of the chain has been thermally denatured.

  17. Phylogenetic distribution and membrane topology of the LytR-CpsA-Psr protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger-Bächi Brigitte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial cell wall is the target of many antibiotics and cell envelope constituents are critical to host-pathogen interactions. To combat resistance development and virulence, a detailed knowledge of the individual factors involved is essential. Members of the LytR-CpsA-Psr family of cell envelope-associated attenuators are relevant for β-lactam resistance, biofilm formation, and stress tolerance, and they are suggested to play a role in cell wall maintenance. However, their precise function is still unknown. This study addresses the occurrence as well as sequence-based characteristics of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins. Results A comprehensive list of LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins was established, and their phylogenetic distribution and clustering into subgroups was determined. LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins were present in all Gram-positive organisms, except for the cell wall-deficient Mollicutes and one strain of the Clostridiales. In contrast, the majority of Gram-negatives did not contain LytR-CpsA-Psr family members. Despite high sequence divergence, the LytR-CpsA-Psr domains of different subclusters shared a highly similar, predicted mixed a/β-structure, and conserved charged residues. PhoA fusion experiments, using MsrR of Staphylococcus aureus, confirmed membrane topology predictions and extracellular location of its LytR-CpsA-Psr domain. Conclusion The LytR-CpsA-Psr domain is unique to bacteria. The presence of diverse subgroups within the LytR-CpsA-Psr family might indicate functional differences, and could explain variations in phenotypes of respective mutants reported. The identified conserved structural elements and amino acids are likely to be important for the function of the domain and will help to guide future studies of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins.

  18. Structural, evolutionary and functional analysis of the NAC domain protein family in Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Steven G; Saïdi, Mohammed N; Hefer, Charles A; Myburg, Alexander A; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    NAC domain transcription factors regulate many developmental processes and stress responses in plants and vary widely in number and family structure. We analysed the characteristics and evolution of the NAC gene family of Eucalyptus grandis, a fast-growing forest tree in the rosid order Myrtales. NAC domain genes identified in the E. grandis genome were subjected to amino acid sequence, phylogenetic and motif analyses. Transcript abundance in developing tissues and abiotic stress conditions in E. grandis and E. globulus was quantified using RNA-seq and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). One hundred and eighty-nine E. grandis NAC (EgrNAC) proteins, arranged into 22 subfamilies, are extensively duplicated in subfamilies associated with stress response. Most EgrNAC genes form tandem duplicate arrays that frequently carry signatures of purifying selection. Sixteen amino acid motifs were identified in EgrNAC proteins, eight of which are enriched in, or unique to, Eucalyptus. New candidates for the regulation of normal and tension wood development and cold responses were identified. This first description of a Myrtales NAC domain family reveals an unique history of tandem duplication in stress-related subfamilies that has likely contributed to the adaptation of eucalypts to the challenging Australian environment. Several new candidates for the regulation of stress, wood formation and tree-specific development are reported. PMID:25385212

  19. Multisignal control of expression of the LHCX protein family in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Lucilla; Stella, Giulio Rocco; Rogato, Alessandra; Bailleul, Benjamin; Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Annunziata, Rossella; Sanges, Remo; Thaler, Michael; Lepetit, Bernard; Lavaud, Johann; Jaubert, Marianne; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-06-01

    Diatoms are phytoplanktonic organisms that grow successfully in the ocean where light conditions are highly variable. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of light acclimation in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum show that carotenoid de-epoxidation enzymes and LHCX1, a member of the light-harvesting protein family, both contribute to dissipate excess light energy through non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). In this study, we investigate the role of the other members of the LHCX family in diatom stress responses. Our analysis of available genomic data shows that the presence of multiple LHCX genes is a conserved feature of diatom species living in different ecological niches. Moreover, an analysis of the levels of four P. tricornutum LHCX transcripts in relation to protein expression and photosynthetic activity indicates that LHCXs are differentially regulated under different light intensities and nutrient starvation, mostly modulating NPQ capacity. We conclude that multiple abiotic stress signals converge to regulate the LHCX content of cells, providing a way to fine-tune light harvesting and photoprotection. Moreover, our data indicate that the expansion of the LHCX gene family reflects functional diversification of its members which could benefit cells responding to highly variable ocean environments. PMID:27225826

  20. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers. PMID:12430019

  1. Cryo-EM structure of lysenin pore elucidates membrane insertion by an aerolysin family protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Martin, Thomas G.; Naylor, Claire E.; Basak, Ajit K.; Titball, Richard W.; Savva, Christos G.

    2016-04-01

    Lysenin from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia fetida belongs to the aerolysin family of small β-pore-forming toxins (β-PFTs), some members of which are pathogenic to humans and animals. Despite efforts, a high-resolution structure of a channel for this family of proteins has been elusive and therefore the mechanism of activation and membrane insertion remains unclear. Here we determine the pore structure of lysenin by single particle cryo-EM, to 3.1 Å resolution. The nonameric assembly reveals a long β-barrel channel spanning the length of the complex that, unexpectedly, includes the two pre-insertion strands flanking the hypothetical membrane-insertion loop. Examination of other members of the aerolysin family reveals high structural preservation in this region, indicating that the membrane-insertion pathway in this family is conserved. For some toxins, proteolytic activation and pro-peptide removal will facilitate unfolding of the pre-insertion strands, allowing them to form the β-barrel of the channel.

  2. A new family of giardial cysteine-rich non-VSP protein genes and a novel cyst protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J Davids

    Full Text Available Since the Giardia lamblia cyst wall is necessary for survival in the environment and host infection, we tested the hypothesis that it contains proteins other than the three known cyst wall proteins. Serial analysis of gene expression during growth and encystation revealed a gene, "HCNCp" (High Cysteine Non-variant Cyst protein, that was upregulated late in encystation, and that resembled the classic Giardia variable surface proteins (VSPs that cover the trophozoite plasmalemma. HCNCp is 13.9% cysteine, with many "CxxC" tetrapeptide motifs and a transmembrane sequence near the C-terminus. However, HCNCp has multiple "CxC" motifs rarely found in VSPs, and does not localize to the trophozoite plasmalemma. Moreover, the HCNCp C-terminus differed from the canonical VSP signature. Full-length epitope-tagged HCNCp expressed under its own promoter was upregulated during encystation with highest expression in cysts, including 42 and 21 kDa C-terminal fragments. Tagged HCNCp targeted to the nuclear envelope in trophozoites, and co-localized with cyst proteins to encystation-specific secretory vesicles during encystation. HCNCp defined a novel trafficking pathway as it localized to the wall and body of cysts, while the cyst proteins were exclusively in the wall. Unlike VSPs, HCNCp is expressed in at least five giardial strains and four WB subclones expressing different VSPs. Bioinformatics identified 60 additional large high cysteine membrane proteins (HCMp containing > or = 20 CxxC/CxC's lacking the VSP-specific C-terminal CRGKA. HCMp were absent or rare in other model or parasite genomes, except for Tetrahymena thermophila with 30. MEME analysis classified the 61 gHCMp genes into nine groups with similar internal motifs. Our data suggest that HCNCp is a novel invariant cyst protein belonging to a new HCMp family that is abundant in the Giardia genome. HCNCp and the other HCMp provide a rich source for developing parasite-specific diagnostic reagents

  3. Regulation of cellulase expression, sporulation, and morphogenesis by velvet family proteins in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuimei; Dong, Yanmei; Wang, Fangzhong; Jiang, Baojie; Wang, Mingyu; Fang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Homologs of the velvet protein family are encoded by the ve1, vel2, and vel3 genes in Trichoderma reesei. To test their regulatory functions, the velvet protein-coding genes were disrupted, generating Δve1, Δvel2, and Δvel3 strains. The phenotypic features of these strains were examined to identify their functions in morphogenesis, sporulation, and cellulase expression. The three velvet-deficient strains produced more hyphal branches, indicating that velvet family proteins participate in the morphogenesis in T. reesei. Deletion of ve1 and vel3 did not affect biomass accumulation, while deletion of vel2 led to a significantly hampered growth when cellulose was used as the sole carbon source in the medium. The deletion of either ve1 or vel2 led to the sharp decrease of sporulation as well as a global downregulation of cellulase-coding genes. In contrast, although the expression of cellulase-coding genes of the ∆vel3 strain was downregulated in the dark, their expression in light condition was unaffected. Sporulation was hampered in the ∆vel3 strain. These results suggest that Ve1 and Vel2 play major roles, whereas Vel3 plays a minor role in sporulation, morphogenesis, and cellulase expression.

  4. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui, E-mail: thiamtsu@yahoo.com [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Cheah, Yew-Hoong [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Bioassay Unit, Herbal Medicine Research Center, Institute for Medical Research, Jalan Pahang, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Meenakshii, Nallappan [Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X{sub L} expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  5. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. ► Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. ► Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. ► DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. ► DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  6. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis.

  7. NF-κB signaling pathways regulated by CARMA family of scaffold proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marzenna Blonska; Xin Lin

    2011-01-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors plays a crucial role in cell activation,survival and proliferation.Its aberrant activity results in cancer,immunodeficiency or autoimmune disorders.Over the past two decades,tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of the signals that regulate NF-κB activation,especially how scaffold proteins link different receptors to the NF-κB-activating complex,the IκB kinase complex.The growing number of these scaffolds underscores the complexity of the signaling networks in different cell types.In this review,we discuss the role of scaffold molecules in signaling cascades induced by stimulation of antigen receptors,G-protein-coupled receptors and C-type Lectin receptors,resulting in NF-κB activation.Especially,we focus on the family of Caspase recruitment domain(CARD)-containing proteins known as CARMA and their function in activation of NF-κB,as well as the link of these scaffolds to the development of various neoplastic diseases through regulation of NF-κB.

  8. Clan CD of cysteine peptidases as an example of evolutionary divergences in related protein families across plant clades

    OpenAIRE

    Cambra Marin, Ines; García Ramos, Francisco Javier; Martinez Muñoz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses are powerful tools that can be used to analyze the presence, conservation, and evolution of protein families and to elucidate issues concerning their function. To deal with these questions, we have chosen the clan CD of cysteine peptidases, which is formed by different protein families that play key roles in plants. An evolutionary comparative analysis of clan CD cysteine peptidases in representative species of different taxonomic groups that appeared during the e...

  9. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha activates Src-family kinases and controls integrin-mediated responses in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Muranjan, M; Sap, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fyn and c-Src are two of the most widely expressed Src-family kinases. Both are strongly implicated in the control of cytoskeletal organization and in the generation of integrin-dependent signalling responses in fibroblasts. These proteins are representative of a large family of tyros...

  10. Myosin binding protein C:Structural abnormalities in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The muscle protein myosin binding protein C (MyBPC) is a large multi-domain protein whose role in the sarcomere is complex and not yet fully understood. Mutations in MyBPC are strongly associated with the heart disease familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) and these experiments of nature have provided some insight into the intricate workings of this protein in the heart. While some regions of the MyBPC molecule have been assigned a function in the regulation of muscle contraction, the interaction of other regions with various parts of the myosin molecule and the sarcomeric proteins, actin and titin, remain obscure. In additic n, several intra-domain interactions between adjacent MyBPC molecules have been identified. Although the basic structure of the molecule (a series of immunoglobulin and fibronectin domains) has been elucidated, the assembly of MyBPC in the sarcomere is a topic for debate. By analysing the MyBPC sequence with respect to FHC-causing mutations it is possible to identify individual residues or regions of each domain that may be important either for binding or regulation. This review looks at the current literature, in concert with alignments and the structural models of MyBPC, in an attempt to understand how FHC mutations may lead to the disease state.

  11. Molecular evolution of a chordate specific family of G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leese Florian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chordate evolution is a history of innovations that is marked by physical and behavioral specializations, which led to the development of a variety of forms from a single ancestral group. Among other important characteristics, vertebrates obtained a well developed brain, anterior sensory structures, a closed circulatory system and gills or lungs as blood oxygenation systems. The duplication of pre-existing genes had profound evolutionary implications for the developmental complexity in vertebrates, since mutations modifying the function of a duplicated protein can lead to novel functions, improving the evolutionary success. Results We analyzed here the evolution of the GPRC5 family of G protein-coupled receptors by comprehensive similarity searches and found that the receptors are only present in chordates and that the size of the receptor family expanded, likely due to genome duplication events in the early history of vertebrate evolution. We propose that a single GPRC5 receptor coding gene originated in a stem chordate ancestor and gave rise by duplication events to a gene family comprising three receptor types (GPRC5A-C in vertebrates, and a fourth homologue present only in mammals (GPRC5D. Additional duplications of GPRC5B and GPRC5C sequences occurred in teleost fishes. The finding that the expression patterns of the receptors are evolutionarily conserved indicates an important biological function of these receptors. Moreover, we found that expression of GPRC5B is regulated by vitamin A in vivo, confirming previous findings that linked receptor expression to retinoic acid levels in tumor cell lines and strengthening the link between the receptor expression and the development of a complex nervous system in chordates, known to be dependent on retinoic acid signaling. Conclusions GPRC5 receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptors with unique sequence characteristics, may represent a molecular novelty that helped non

  12. Hydrogen bond networks determine emergent mechanical and thermodynamic properties across a protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallakyan Sargis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gram-negative bacteria use periplasmic-binding proteins (bPBP to transport nutrients through the periplasm. Despite immense diversity within the recognized substrates, all members of the family share a common fold that includes two domains that are separated by a conserved hinge. The hinge allows the protein to cycle between open (apo and closed (ligated conformations. Conformational changes within the proteins depend on a complex interplay of mechanical and thermodynamic response, which is manifested as an increase in thermal stability and decrease of flexibility upon ligand binding. Results We use a distance constraint model (DCM to quantify the give and take between thermodynamic stability and mechanical flexibility across the bPBP family. Quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR are readily evaluated because the DCM links mechanical and thermodynamic properties. We have previously demonstrated that QSFR is moderately conserved across a mesophilic/thermophilic RNase H pair, whereas the observed variance indicated that different enthalpy-entropy mechanisms allow similar mechanical response at their respective melting temperatures. Our predictions of heat capacity and free energy show marked diversity across the bPBP family. While backbone flexibility metrics are mostly conserved, cooperativity correlation (long-range couplings also demonstrate considerable amount of variation. Upon ligand removal, heat capacity, melting point, and mechanical rigidity are, as expected, lowered. Nevertheless, significant differences are found in molecular cooperativity correlations that can be explained by the detailed nature of the hydrogen bond network. Conclusion Non-trivial mechanical and thermodynamic variation across the family is explained by differences within the underlying H-bond networks. The mechanism is simple; variation within the H-bond networks result in altered mechanical linkage properties that directly affect

  13. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of the Brassica rapa SET-domain protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2011-12-01

    allowed the development of a coherent and rational nomenclature of this important family of proteins in plants, as in animals. The results obtained in this study will provide a base for nomenclature of KMTs in other plant species and facilitate the functional characterization of these important epigenetic regulatory genes in Brassica crops.

  14. Comparative genome analysis reveals a conserved family of actin-like proteins in apicomplexan parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibley L David

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Apicomplexa is an early-branching eukaryotic lineage that contains a number of important human and animal pathogens. Their complex life cycles and unique cytoskeletal features distinguish them from other model eukaryotes. Apicomplexans rely on actin-based motility for cell invasion, yet the regulation of this system remains largely unknown. Consequently, we focused our efforts on identifying actin-related proteins in the recently completed genomes of Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium spp., Cryptosporidium spp., and Theileria spp. Results Comparative genomic and phylogenetic studies of apicomplexan genomes reveals that most contain only a single conventional actin and yet they each have 8–10 additional actin-related proteins. Among these are a highly conserved Arp1 protein (likely part of a conserved dynactin complex, and Arp4 and Arp6 homologues (subunits of the chromatin-remodeling machinery. In contrast, apicomplexans lack canonical Arp2 or Arp3 proteins, suggesting they lost the Arp2/3 actin polymerization complex on their evolutionary path towards intracellular parasitism. Seven of these actin-like proteins (ALPs are novel to apicomplexans. They show no phylogenetic associations to the known Arp groups and likely serve functions specific to this important group of intracellular parasites. Conclusion The large diversity of actin-like proteins in apicomplexans suggests that the actin protein family has diverged to fulfill various roles in the unique biology of intracellular parasites. Conserved Arps likely participate in vesicular transport and gene expression, while apicomplexan-specific ALPs may control unique biological traits such as actin-based gliding motility.

  15. T cell inactivation by poxviral B22 family proteins increases viral virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Alzhanova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197 caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination.

  16. Elucidating the Activation Mechanism of the Insulin-Family Proteins with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Anastasios; Kuyucak, Serdar; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-family proteins bind to their own receptors, but insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) can also bind to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A), activating unique and alternative signaling pathways from those of insulin. Although extensive studies of insulin have revealed that its activation is associated with the opening of the B chain-C terminal (BC-CT), the activation mechanism of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) still remains unknown. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of the insulin-family proteins comparing their activation process and mechanism using molecular dynamics simulations to reveal new insights into their specificity to the insulin receptor. We have found that all the proteins appear to exhibit similar stochastic dynamics in their conformational change to an active state. For the IGFs, our simulations show that activation involves two opening locations: the opening of the BC-CT section away from the core, similar to insulin; and the additional opening of the BC-CT section away from the C domain. Furthermore, we have found that these two openings occur simultaneously in IGF-I, but not in IGF-II, where they can occur independently. This suggests that the BC-CT section and the C domain behave as a unified domain in IGF-I, but as two independent domains in IGF-II during the activation process, implying that the IGFs undergo different activation mechanisms for receptor binding. The probabilities of the active and inactive states of the proteins suggest that IGF-II is hyperactive compared to IGF-I. The hinge residue and the hydrophobic interactions in the core are found to play a critical role in the stability and activity of IGFs. Overall, our simulations have elucidated the crucial differences and similarities in the activation mechanisms of the insulin-family proteins, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed differences between IGF-I and IGF-II in receptor binding. PMID

  17. The Aspergillus fumigatus Damage Resistance Protein Family Coordinately Regulates Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Azole Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ergosterol is a major and specific component of the fungal plasma membrane, and thus, the cytochrome P450 enzymes (Erg proteins that catalyze ergosterol synthesis have been selected as valuable targets of azole antifungals. However, the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has developed worldwide resistance to azoles largely through mutations in the cytochrome P450 enzyme Cyp51 (Erg11. In this study, we demonstrate that a cytochrome b5-like heme-binding damage resistance protein (Dap family, comprised of DapA, DapB, and DapC, coordinately regulates the functionality of cytochrome P450 enzymes Erg5 and Erg11 and oppositely affects susceptibility to azoles. The expression of all three genes is induced in an azole concentration-dependent way, and the decreased susceptibility to azoles requires DapA stabilization of cytochrome P450 protein activity. In contrast, overexpression of DapB and DapC causes dysfunction of Erg5 and Erg11, resulting in abnormal accumulation of sterol intermediates and further accentuating the sensitivity of ΔdapA strains to azoles. The results of exogenous-hemin rescue and heme-binding-site mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the heme binding of DapA contributes the decreased azole susceptibility, while DapB and -C are capable of reducing the activities of Erg5 and Erg11 through depletion of heme. In vivo data demonstrate that inactivated DapA combined with activated DapB yields an A. fumigatus mutant that is easily treatable with azoles in an immunocompromised mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to the single Dap proteins found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we suggest that this complex Dap family regulatory system emerged during the evolution of fungi as an adaptive means to regulate ergosterol synthesis in response to environmental stimuli.

  18. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, a novel class of plant-specific growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucai eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox. Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants.

  19. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, A Novel Class of Plant-Specific Growth Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Ellis, Brian

    2016-01-01

    OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs) are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs) in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper, and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox). Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants. PMID:27065353

  20. A conserved function in phosphatidylinositol metabolism for mammalian Vps13 family proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sook Park

    Full Text Available The Vps13 protein family is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. In humans, mutations in the gene encoding the family member VPS13A lead to the neurodegenerative disorder chorea-acanthocytosis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there is just a single version of VPS13, thereby simplifying the task of unraveling its molecular function(s. While VPS13 was originally identified in yeast by its role in vacuolar sorting, recent studies have revealed a completely different function for VPS13 in sporulation, where VPS13 regulates phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PtdIns(4P levels in the prospore membrane. This discovery raises the possibility that the disease phenotype associated with vps13A mutants in humans is due to misregulation of PtdIns(4P in membranes. To determine whether VPS13A affects PtdIns(4P in membranes from mammalian neuronal cells, phosphatidylinositol phosphate pools were compared in PC12 tissue culture cells in the absence or presence of VPS13A. Consistent with the yeast results, the localization of PtdIns(4P is specifically altered in VPS13A knockdown cells while other phosphatidylinositol phosphates appear unaffected. In addition, VPS13A is necessary to prevent the premature degeneration of neurites that develop in response to Nerve Growth Factor. The regulation of PtdIns(4P is therefore a conserved function of the Vps13 family and may play a role in the maintenance of neuronal processes in mammals.

  1. Rhizavidin from Rhizobium etli: the first natural dimer in the avidin protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helppolainen, Satu H.; Nurminen, Kirsi P.; Määttä, Juha A. E.; Halling, Katrin K.; Slotte, J. Peter; Huhtala, Tuulia; Liimatainen, Timo; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Airenne, Kari J.; Närvänen, Ale; Jänis, Janne; Vainiotalo, Pirjo; Valjakka, Jarkko; Kulomaa, Markku S.; Nordlund, Henri R.

    2007-01-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris. The symbiotic plasmid p42d of R. etli comprises a gene encoding a putative (strept)avidin-like protein, named rhizavidin. The amino acid sequence identity of rhizavidin in relation to other known avidin-like proteins is 20–30%. The amino acid residues involved in the (strept)avidin–biotin interaction are well conserved in rhizavidin. The structural and functional properties of rhizavidin were carefully studied, and we found that rhizavidin shares characteristics with bradavidin, streptavidin and avidin. However, we found that it is the first naturally occurring dimeric protein in the avidin protein family, in contrast with tetrameric (strept)avidin and bradavidin. Moreover, it possesses a proline residue after a flexible loop (GGSG) in a position close to Trp-110 in avidin, which is an important biotin-binding residue. [3H]Biotin dissociation and ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry) experiments showed dimeric rhizavidin to be a high-affinity biotin-binding protein. Its thermal stability was lower than that of avidin; although similar to streptavidin, it was insensitive to proteinase K. The immunological cross-reactivity of rhizavidin was tested with human serum samples obtained from cancer patients exposed to (strept)avidin. No significant cross-reactivity was observed. The biodistribution of the protein was studied by SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) imaging in rats. Similarly to avidin, rhizavidin was observed to accumulate rapidly, mainly in the liver. Evidently, rhizavidin could be used as a complement to (strept)avidin in (strept)avidin–biotin technology. PMID:17447892

  2. Trichinella spiralis: genome database searches for the presence and immunolocalization of protein disulphide isomerase family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, C P; Clemente, I; Mendes, T; Novo, C

    2016-01-01

    The formation of nurse cells in host muscle cells during Trichinella spiralis infection is a key step in the infective mechanism. Collagen trimerization is set up via disulphide bond formation, catalysed by protein disulphide isomerase (PDI). In T. spiralis, some PDI family members have been identified but no localization is described and no antibodies specific for T. spiralis PDIs are available. In this work, computational approaches were used to search for non-described PDIs in the T. spiralis genome database and to check the cross-reactivity of commercial anti-human antibodies with T. spiralis orthologues. In addition to a previously described PDI (PDIA2), endoplasmic reticulum protein (ERp57/PDIA3), ERp72/PDIA4, and the molecular chaperones calreticulin (CRT), calnexin (CNX) and immunoglobulin-binding protein/glucose-regulated protein (BIP/GRP78), we identified orthologues of the human thioredoxin-related-transmembrane proteins (TMX1, TMX2 and TMX3) in the genome protein database, as well as ERp44 (PDIA10) and endoplasmic reticulum disulphide reductase (ERdj5/PDIA19). Immunocytochemical staining of paraffin sections of muscle infected by T. spiralis enabled us to localize some orthologues of the human PDIs (PDIA3 and TMX1) and the chaperone GRP78. A theoretical three-dimensional model for T. spiralis PDIA3 was constructed. The localization and characteristics of the predicted linear B-cell epitopes and amino acid sequence of the immunogens used for commercial production of anti-human PDIA3 antibodies validated the use of these antibodies for the immunolocalization of T. spiralis PDIA3 orthologues. These results suggest that further study of the role of the PDIs and chaperones during nurse cell formation is desirable. PMID:25475092

  3. FAMSA: Fast and accurate multiple sequence alignment of huge protein families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deorowicz, Sebastian; Debudaj-Grabysz, Agnieszka; Gudyś, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of modern sequencing platforms has contributed to the unprecedented growth of protein families databases. The abundance of sets containing hundreds of thousands of sequences is a formidable challenge for multiple sequence alignment algorithms. The article introduces FAMSA, a new progressive algorithm designed for fast and accurate alignment of thousands of protein sequences. Its features include the utilization of the longest common subsequence measure for determining pairwise similarities, a novel method of evaluating gap costs, and a new iterative refinement scheme. What matters is that its implementation is highly optimized and parallelized to make the most of modern computer platforms. Thanks to the above, quality indicators, i.e. sum-of-pairs and total-column scores, show FAMSA to be superior to competing algorithms, such as Clustal Omega or MAFFT for datasets exceeding a few thousand sequences. Quality does not compromise on time or memory requirements, which are an order of magnitude lower than those in the existing solutions. For example, a family of 415519 sequences was analyzed in less than two hours and required no more than 8 GB of RAM. FAMSA is available for free at http://sun.aei.polsl.pl/REFRESH/famsa. PMID:27670777

  4. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Bcl-2 Family Proteins for Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a complex etiology and displays a wide range of cellular escape pathways that allow it to resist different treatment modalities. Crucial signaling molecules that function downstream of the survival pathways, particularly at points where several of these pathways crosstalk, provide valuable targets for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. Bcl-2 family member proteins are anti-apoptotic molecules that are known to be overexpressed in most cancers including PC. The anti-apoptotic machinery has been linked to the observed resistance developed to chemotherapy and radiation and therefore is important from the targeted drug development point of view. Over the past ten years, our group has extensively studied a series of small molecule inhibitors of Bcl-2 against PC and provide solid preclinical platform for testing such novel drugs in the clinic. This review examines the efficacy, potency, and function of several small molecule inhibitor drugs targeted to the Bcl-2 family of proteins and their preclinical progress against PC. This article further focuses on compounds that have been studied the most and also discusses the anti-cancer potential of newer class of Bcl-2 drugs

  5. The Plasmodium PHIST and RESA-Like Protein Families of Human and Rodent Malaria Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cristina K; Naissant, Bernina; Coppi, Alida; Bennett, Brandy L; Aime, Elena; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Janse, Chris J; Coppens, Isabelle; Sinnis, Photini; Templeton, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The phist gene family has members identified across the Plasmodium genus, defined by the presence of a domain of roughly 150 amino acids having conserved aromatic residues and an all alpha-helical structure. The family is highly amplified in P. falciparum, with 65 predicted genes in the genome of the 3D7 isolate. In contrast, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei 3 genes are identified, one of which is an apparent pseudogene. Transcripts of the P. berghei phist genes are predominant in schizonts, whereas in P. falciparum transcript profiles span different asexual blood stages and gametocytes. We pursued targeted disruption of P. berghei phist genes in order to characterize a simplistic model for the expanded phist gene repertoire in P. falciparum. Unsuccessful attempts to disrupt P. berghei PBANKA_114540 suggest that this phist gene is essential, while knockout of phist PBANKA_122900 shows an apparent normal progression and non-essential function throughout the life cycle. Epitope-tagging of P. falciparum and P. berghei phist genes confirmed protein export to the erythrocyte cytoplasm and localization with a punctate pattern. Three P. berghei PEXEL/HT-positive exported proteins exhibit at least partial co-localization, in support of a common vesicular compartment in the cytoplasm of erythrocytes infected with rodent malaria parasites.

  6. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site. PMID:27599864

  7. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site.

  8. Expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) family members in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor is believed to be important in tumorigenesis and altered AP-1 activity was associated with cell transformation. We aimed to assess the potential role of AP-1 family members as novel biomarkers in breast cancer. We studied the expression of AP-1 members at the mRNA level in 72 primary breast tumors and 37 adjacent non-tumor tissues and evaluated its correlation with clinicopathological parameters including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2/neu status. Expression levels of Ubiquitin C (UBC) were used for normalization. Protein expression of AP-1 members was assessed using Western blot analysis in a subset of tumors. We used student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, logistic regression and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for statistical analyses. We found significant differences in the expression of AP-1 family members between tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues for all AP-1 family members except Fos B. Fra-1, Fra-2, Jun-B and Jun-D mRNA levels were significantly higher in tumors compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001), whilst c-Fos and c-Jun mRNA levels were significantly lower in tumors compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001). In addition, Jun-B overexpression had outstanding discrimination ability to differentiate tumor tissues from adjacent non-tumor tissues as determined by ROC curve analysis. Moreover, Fra-1 was significantly overexpressed in the tumors biochemically classified as ERα negative (p = 0.012) and PR negative (p = 0.037). Interestingly, Fra-1 expression was significantly higher in triple-negative tumors compared with luminal carcinomas (p = 0.01). Expression levels of Fra-1 and Jun-B might be possible biomarkers for prognosis of breast cancer

  9. The C1q family of proteins: insights into the emerging non-traditional functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane eGhebrehiwet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders—including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh and colleagues showing that pregnant C1q-/- mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q-/- mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al., which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. Recent evidence also shows that C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNFα-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the TNF family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral cytokine-like activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions.

  10. Evolution of signal multiplexing by 14-3-3-binding 2R-ohnologue protein families in the vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Tinti, Michele; Johnson, Catherine; Toth, Rachel; Ferrier, David Ellard Keith; MacKintosh, Carol

    2012-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins regulate cellular responses to stimuli by docking onto pairs of phosphorylated residues on target proteins. The present study shows that the human 14-3-3-binding phosphoproteome is highly enriched in 2R-ohnologues, which are proteins in families of two to four members that were generated by two rounds of whole genome duplication at the origin of the vertebrates. We identify 2R-ohnologue families whose members share a ‘lynchpin’, defined as a 14-3-3-binding phosphosite that is ...

  11. [Advances in the research of LuxR family protein in quorum-sensing system of gram-negative bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Xiang, J

    2016-09-20

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-density-dependent method for information transmission among bacteria, as well as a mechanism for the bacteria to adapt to environment. LuxR family protein plays a key role in gram-negative bacterial QS system as a kind of transcription regulators and participates in a variety of biological behaviors with LuxI protein and signal molecules, such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, virulence factors production, and so on. The advances in the research of LuxR family protein in QS system of gram-negative bacteria were summarized in this review. PMID:27647069

  12. Investigating the host binding signature on the Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Joel H; Wang, Christopher P; Levin-Edens, Emily; Vigan-Womas, Inès; Guillotte, Micheline; Melcher, Martin; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Smith, Joseph D

    2011-05-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family plays a central role in antigenic variation and cytoadhesion of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 proteins/var genes are classified into three main subfamilies (UpsA, UpsB, and UpsC) that are hypothesized to have different roles in binding and disease. To investigate whether these subfamilies have diverged in binding specificity and test if binding could be predicted by adhesion domain classification, we generated a panel of 19 parasite lines that primarily expressed a single dominant var transcript and assayed binding against 12 known host receptors. By limited dilution cloning, only UpsB and UpsC var genes were isolated, indicating that UpsA var gene expression is rare under in vitro culture conditions. Consequently, three UpsA variants were obtained by rosette purification and selection with specific monoclonal antibodies to create a more representative panel. Binding assays showed that CD36 was the most common adhesion partner of the parasite panel, followed by ICAM-1 and TSP-1, and that CD36 and ICAM-1 binding variants were highly predicted by adhesion domain sequence classification. Binding to other host receptors, including CSA, VCAM-1, HABP1, CD31/PECAM, E-selectin, Endoglin, CHO receptor "X", and Fractalkine, was rare or absent. Our findings identify a category of larger PfEMP1 proteins that are under dual selection for ICAM-1 and CD36 binding. They also support that the UpsA group, in contrast to UpsB and UpsC var genes, has diverged from binding to the major microvasculature receptor CD36 and likely uses other mechanisms to sequester in the microvasculature. These results demonstrate that CD36 and ICAM-1 have left strong signatures of selection on the PfEMP1 family that can be detected by adhesion domain sequence classification and have implications for how this family of proteins is specializing to exploit hosts with varying levels of anti-malaria immunity. PMID:21573138

  13. Investigating the host binding signature on the Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 protein family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel H Janes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 family plays a central role in antigenic variation and cytoadhesion of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 proteins/var genes are classified into three main subfamilies (UpsA, UpsB, and UpsC that are hypothesized to have different roles in binding and disease. To investigate whether these subfamilies have diverged in binding specificity and test if binding could be predicted by adhesion domain classification, we generated a panel of 19 parasite lines that primarily expressed a single dominant var transcript and assayed binding against 12 known host receptors. By limited dilution cloning, only UpsB and UpsC var genes were isolated, indicating that UpsA var gene expression is rare under in vitro culture conditions. Consequently, three UpsA variants were obtained by rosette purification and selection with specific monoclonal antibodies to create a more representative panel. Binding assays showed that CD36 was the most common adhesion partner of the parasite panel, followed by ICAM-1 and TSP-1, and that CD36 and ICAM-1 binding variants were highly predicted by adhesion domain sequence classification. Binding to other host receptors, including CSA, VCAM-1, HABP1, CD31/PECAM, E-selectin, Endoglin, CHO receptor "X", and Fractalkine, was rare or absent. Our findings identify a category of larger PfEMP1 proteins that are under dual selection for ICAM-1 and CD36 binding. They also support that the UpsA group, in contrast to UpsB and UpsC var genes, has diverged from binding to the major microvasculature receptor CD36 and likely uses other mechanisms to sequester in the microvasculature. These results demonstrate that CD36 and ICAM-1 have left strong signatures of selection on the PfEMP1 family that can be detected by adhesion domain sequence classification and have implications for how this family of proteins is specializing to exploit hosts with varying levels of anti

  14. Drosophila 60A gene, another transforming growth factor beta family member, is closely related to human bone morphogenetic proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Wharton, K. A.; Thomsen, G H; Gelbart, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The 60A gene, a member of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily of signaling proteins, has been identified in Drosophila melanogaster. From its inferred protein sequence we predict the precursor is secreted and processed to release a growth factor-like molecule. The 60A gene is expressed throughout development with peaks of transcription during early embryogenesis, in pupae, and in adult males. The putative 60A protein shows greater sequence similarity to three vertebrate family mem...

  15. Molecular pathology of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, B.; French, J. A.; Carrier, L.; Jeremy, R W; McTaggart, D R; Nicholson, M R; Hambly, B; Semsarian, C; Richmond, D R; Schwartz, K.; Trent, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    DNA studies in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) have shown that it is caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins which make up the muscle sarcomere. The majority of mutations in the FHC genes result from missense changes, although one of the most recent genes to be identified (cardiac myosin binding protein C gene, MYBPC3) has predominantly DNA mutations which produce truncated proteins. Both dominant negative and haploinsufficiency models have been proposed to explain the mol...

  16. The macro domain protein family: structure, functions, and their potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weidong; Li, Xiaolei; Fu, Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    Macro domains are ancient, highly evolutionarily conserved domains that are widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life. The 'macro fold' is roughly 25kDa in size and is composed of a mixed α-β fold with similarity to the P loop-containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases. They function as binding modules for metabolites of NAD(+), including poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which is synthesized by PAR polymerases (PARPs). Although there is a high degree of sequence similarity within this family, particularly for residues that might be involved in catalysis or substrates binding, it is likely that the sequence variation that does exist among macro domains is responsible for the specificity of function of individual proteins. Recent findings have indicated that macro domain proteins are functionally promiscuous and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological functions, such as DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. Significant advances in the field of macro domain have occurred in the past few years, including biological insights and the discovery of novel signaling pathways. To provide a framework for understanding these recent findings, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the known and proposed biochemical, cellular and physiological roles of the macro domain family. Recent data that indicate a critical role of macro domain regulation for the proper progression of cellular differentiation programs will be discussed. In addition, the effect of dysregulated expression of macro domain proteins will be considered in the processes of tumorigenesis and bacterial pathogenesis. Finally, a series of observations will be highlighted that should be addressed in future efforts to develop macro domains as effective therapeutic targets.

  17. X-ray structures of two proteins belonging to Pfam DUF178 revealed unexpected structural similarity to the DUF191 Pfam family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burley Stephen K

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pfam is a comprehensive collection of protein domains and families, with a range of well-established information including genome annotation. Pfam has two large series of functionally uncharacterized families, known as Domains of Unknown Function (DUFs and Uncharacterized Protein Families (UPFs. Results Crystal structures of two proteins from Deinococcus radiodurans and Streptomyces coelicolor belonging to Pfam protein family DUF178 (ID: PF02621 have been determined using Selenium-Single-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (Se-SAD. Based on the structure, we have identified the putative function for this family of protein. Conclusion Unexpectedly, we found that DUF178 Pfam is remarkably similar to Pfam family DUF191 suggesting that the sequence-based classification alone may not be sufficient to classify proteins into Pfam families.

  18. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins.

  19. Expression analysis of the Theileria parva subtelomere-encoded variable secreted protein gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Schmuckli-Maurer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria parva transforms bovine lymphocytes inducing uncontrolled proliferation. Proteins released from the parasite are assumed to contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell and parasite persistence. With 85 members, genes encoding subtelomeric variable secreted proteins (SVSPs form the largest gene family in T. parva. The majority of SVSPs contain predicted signal peptides, suggesting secretion into the host cell cytoplasm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed SVSP expression in T. parva-transformed cell lines established in vitro by infection of T or B lymphocytes with cloned T. parva parasites. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed mRNA expression for a wide range of SVSP genes. The pattern of mRNA expression was largely defined by the parasite genotype and not by host background or cell type, and found to be relatively stable in vitro over a period of two months. Interestingly, immunofluorescence analysis carried out on cell lines established from a cloned parasite showed that expression of a single SVSP encoded by TP03_0882 is limited to only a small percentage of parasites. Epitope-tagged TP03_0882 expressed in mammalian cells was found to translocate into the nucleus, a process that could be attributed to two different nuclear localisation signals. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis reveals a complex pattern of Theileria SVSP mRNA expression, which depends on the parasite genotype. Whereas in cell lines established from a cloned parasite transcripts can be found corresponding to a wide range of SVSP genes, only a minority of parasites appear to express a particular SVSP protein. The fact that a number of SVSPs contain functional nuclear localisation signals suggests that proteins released from the parasite could contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell. This initial characterisation will facilitate future studies on the regulation of SVSP gene

  20. Solution structure of Arabidopsis thaliana protein At5g39720.1, a member of the AIG2-like protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solution structure of A. thaliana protein At5g39720.1 reported here is the first for a member of the AIG2-like family (PF06094). The three-dimensional structure shows similarity to those determined for members of the uncharacterized Pfam family UPF0131. The three-dimensional structure of Arabidopsis thaliana protein At5g39720.1 was determined by NMR spectroscopy. It is the first representative structure of Pfam family PF06094, which contains protein sequences similar to that of AIG2, an A. thaliana protein of unknown function induced upon infection by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The At5g39720.1 structure consists of a five-stranded β-barrel surrounded by two α-helices and a small β-sheet. A long flexible α-helix protrudes from the structure at the C-terminal end. A structural homology search revealed similarity to three members of Pfam family UPF0131. Conservation of residues in a hydrophilic cavity able to bind small ligands in UPF0131 proteins suggests that this may also serve as an active site in AIG2-like proteins

  1. Extracellular matrix family proteins that are potential targets of Dd-STATa in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Nao; Nishio, Keiko; Maeda, Mineko; Urushihara, Hideko; Kawata, Takefumi

    2004-10-01

    Dd-STATa is a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins, which is activated by cAMP and is thereby translocated into the nuclei of anterior tip cells of the prestalk region of the slug. By using in situ hybridization analyses, we found that the SLF308 cDNA clone, which contains the ecmF gene that encodes a putative extracellular matrix protein and is expressed in the anterior tip cells, was greatly down-regulated in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. Disruption of the ecmF gene, however, resulted in almost no phenotypic change. The absence of any obvious mutant phenotype in the ecmF-null mutant could be due to a redundancy of similar genes. In fact, a search of the Dictyostelium whole genome database demonstrates the existence of an additional 16 homologues, all of which contain a cellulose-binding module. Among these homologues, four genes show Dd-STATa-dependent expression, while the others are Dd-STATa-independent. We discuss the potential role of Dd-STATa in morphogenesis via its effect on the interaction between cellulose and these extracellular matrix family proteins.

  2. CGRP Receptor Family and Accessory Protein Localization: Implications for Predicted Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R. Oliver

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, adrenomedullin, amylin, and calcitonin are functionally related neuropeptides. Certain of these peptides mediate their action through receptors which have common components, such as the receptor activity modifying proteins (RAMPs and CGRP-receptor component protein, as well as possibly through other distinct receptors. Specifically, the molecular pharmacology of CGRP and adrenomedullin is determined by coexpression of one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs with calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR. Additionally, through formation of another hetero-oligomer, RAMPs also govern the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor, which in association with RAMP1 or RAMP3, binds amylin with high affinity. We have used multiple approaches to discern the regional and cellular expression of these various receptor components and binding sites for the above neuropeptides in multiple species and in different tissues. Techniques applied include in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and radioligand autoradiography. These data allow further understanding of both the complexity of receptor-receptor component and receptor-ligand interactions in vivo. Interestingly, these localization data suggest that RAMPs may interact with receptors additional to those already identified for the CGRP family and may be involved in binding innate neuropeptides or other neurotransmitters which are not members of the calcitonin gene-related peptide fam

  3. Characterization of two patched receptors for the vertebrate hedgehog protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, David; Stone, Donna M.; Brush, Jennifer; Ryan, Anne; Armanini, Mark; Frantz, Gretchen; Rosenthal, Arnon; de Sauvage, Frederic J.

    1998-01-01

    The multitransmembrane protein Patched (PTCH) is the receptor for Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a secreted molecule implicated in the formation of embryonic structures and in tumorigenesis. Current models suggest that binding of Shh to PTCH prevents the normal inhibition of the seven-transmembrane-protein Smoothened (SMO) by PTCH. According to this model, the inhibition of SMO signaling is relieved after mutational inactivation of PTCH in the basal cell nevus syndrome. Recently, PTCH2, a molecule with sequence homology to PTCH, has been identified. To characterize both PTCH molecules with respect to the various Hedgehog proteins, we have isolated the human PTCH2 gene. Biochemical analysis of PTCH and PTCH2 shows that they both bind to all hedgehog family members with similar affinity and that they can form a complex with SMO. However, the expression patterns of PTCH and PTCH2 do not fully overlap. While PTCH is expressed throughout the mouse embryo, PTCH2 is found at high levels in the skin and in spermatocytes. Because Desert Hedgehog (Dhh) is expressed specifically in the testis and is required for germ cell development, it is likely that PTCH2 mediates its activity in vivo. Chromosomal localization of PTCH2 places it on chromosome 1p33–34, a region deleted in some germ cell tumors, raising the possibility that PTCH2 may be a tumor suppressor in Dhh target cells. PMID:9811851

  4. Distinct roles of the RasGAP family proteins in C. elegans associative learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurkó, M Dávid; Csermely, Péter; Sőti, Csaba; Steták, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) are regulators of the conserved Ras/MAPK pathway. Various roles of some of the RasGAPs in learning and memory have been reported in different model systems, yet, there is no comprehensive study to characterize all gap genes in any organism. Here, using reverse genetics and neurobehavioural tests, we studied the role of all known genes of the rasgap family in C. elegans in associative learning and memory. We demonstrated that their proteins are implicated in different parts of the learning and memory processes. We show that gap-1 contribute redundantly with gap-3 to the chemosensation of volatile compounds, gap-1 plays a major role in associative learning, while gap-2 and gap-3 are predominantly required for short- and long-term associative memory. Our results also suggest that the C. elegans Ras orthologue let-60 is involved in multiple processes during learning and memory. Thus, we show that the different classes of RasGAP proteins are all involved in cognitive function and their complex interplay ensures the proper formation and storage of novel information in C. elegans. PMID:26469632

  5. Evolution of signal multiplexing by 14-3-3-binding 2R-ohnologue protein families in the vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Michele; Johnson, Catherine; Toth, Rachel; Ferrier, David E. K.; MacKintosh, Carol

    2012-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins regulate cellular responses to stimuli by docking onto pairs of phosphorylated residues on target proteins. The present study shows that the human 14-3-3-binding phosphoproteome is highly enriched in 2R-ohnologues, which are proteins in families of two to four members that were generated by two rounds of whole genome duplication at the origin of the vertebrates. We identify 2R-ohnologue families whose members share a ‘lynchpin’, defined as a 14-3-3-binding phosphosite that is conserved across members of a given family, and aligns with a Ser/Thr residue in pro-orthologues from the invertebrate chordates. For example, the human receptor expression enhancing protein (REEP) 1–4 family has the commonest type of lynchpin motif in current datasets, with a phosphorylatable serine in the –2 position relative to the 14-3-3-binding phosphosite. In contrast, the second 14-3-3-binding sites of REEPs 1–4 differ and are phosphorylated by different kinases, and hence the REEPs display different affinities for 14-3-3 dimers. We suggest a conceptual model for intracellular regulation involving protein families whose evolution into signal multiplexing systems was facilitated by 14-3-3 dimer binding to lynchpins, which gave freedom for other regulatory sites to evolve. While increased signalling complexity was needed for vertebrate life, these systems also generate vulnerability to genetic disorders. PMID:22870394

  6. A family of structurally related RING finger proteins interacts specifically with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcM4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Noel, G; Niedenthal, R; Tamura, T; Harbers, K

    1999-07-01

    The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcM4 was previously shown to be necessary for normal mouse development. As a first step in identifying target proteins or proteins involved in the specificity of UbcM4-mediated ubiquitylation, we have isolated seven cDNAs encoding proteins that specifically interact with UbcM4 but with none of the other Ubcs tested. This interaction was observed in yeast as well as in mammalian cells. With one exception, all UbcM4-interacting proteins (UIPs) belong to a family of proteins that contain a RING finger motif. As they are structurally related to RING finger proteins that have recently been shown to play an essential role in protein ubiquitylation and degradation, the possibility is discussed that UIPs are involved in the specific recognition of substrate proteins of UbcM4.

  7. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) protein is a host restriction factor for poxviruses, but it can be overcome by some poxvirus host-range proteins that share homology with vaccinia virus C7 protein. To understand the mechanism of action for this important family of host-range factors, we determined the crystal structures of C7 and myxoma virus M64, a C7 family member that is unable to antagonize SAMD9. Despite their different functions and only 23% sequence identity, the two proteins have very similar overall structures, displaying a previously unidentified fold comprised of a compact 12-stranded antiparallel β-sandwich wrapped in two short α helices. Extensive structure-guided mutagenesis of C7 identified three loops clustered on one edge of the β sandwich as critical for viral replication and binding with SAMD9. The loops are characterized with functionally important negatively charged, positively charged, and hydrophobic residues, respectively, together forming a unique "three-fingered molecular claw." The key residues of the claw are not conserved in two C7 family members that do not antagonize SAMD9 but are conserved in distantly related C7 family members from four poxvirus genera that infect diverse mammalian species. Indeed, we found that all in the latter group of proteins bind SAMD9. Taken together, our data indicate that diverse mammalian poxviruses use a conserved molecular claw in a C7-like protein to target SAMD9 and overcome host restriction.

  8. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes. PMID:26811291

  9. Disorder and structure in the Rab11 binding domain of Rab11 family interacting protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Liu, Yuqi; Bose, Kakoli; Henry, Gillian D; Baleja, James D

    2009-01-27

    Rab11 plays a central role in plasma membrane recycling which returns cellular receptors for reuse at the cell surface. A recently identified family of Rab11 interacting proteins (FIP) includes FIP2. The C-terminal region of FIP2 is essential for colocalization with Rab11 on early endosomes and for enabling formation of higher-order oligomers. Rab11 binding and oligomerization of FIP2 are separable. Here we have determined the three-dimensional structure of the 40-residue coiled-coil oligomerization domain of FIP2 in the absence of Rab11 using NMR methods. The N-terminal half showed strong NOE cross-peaks and well-dispersed NMR resonances, whereas the C-terminal half had fewer NOE cross-peaks and less chemical shift dispersion. The 10 C-terminal residues were mostly disordered. The final structures of the dimer had favorable Ramachandran angles and a root-mean-square deviation of 0.59 +/- 0.13 A over superimposed backbone residues. The structure allows a comparison to a structure of FIP2 in complex with Rab11 that was determined crystallographically. In complex with Rab11, the C-terminal residues are not disordered but have a helical structure that predicts residual dipolar coupling constants that are incompatible with those measured on the unbound FIP2. In both structures, a histidine residue is found at the normally hydrophobic position of the heptad repeat of the coiled coil, and here we show its ionization destabilizes the coiled-coil structure. Together, these data allow us to build a model in which the binding of FIP family proteins to Rab11 can be described in terms of conformational changes and that suggests new modes of regulation. PMID:19119858

  10. Transcriptional regulation of Sox2 by the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Jéssica M; Ferreirós, Alba; Carneiro, Carmen; Morey, Lluis; Da Silva-Álvarez, Sabela; Fernandes, Tânia; Abad, María; Di Croce, Luciano; García-Caballero, Tomás; Serrano, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen; Vidal, Anxo; Collado, Manuel

    2015-02-20

    Cellular reprogramming to iPSCs has uncovered unsuspected links between tumor suppressors and pluripotency factors. Using this system, it was possible to identify tumor suppressor p27 as a repressor of Sox2 during differentiation. This led to the demonstration that defects in the repression of Sox2 can contribute to tumor development. The members of the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins, pRb, p107 and p130, are negative regulators of the cell cycle with tumor suppressor activity and with roles in differentiation. In this work we studied the relative contribution of the retinoblastoma family members to the regulation of Sox2 expression. We found that deletion of Rb or p130 leads to impaired repression of Sox2, a deffect amplified by inactivation of p53. We also identified binding of pRb and p130 to an enhancer with crucial regulatory activity on Sox2 expression. Using cellular reprogramming we tested the impact of the defective repression of Sox2 and confirmed that Rb deficiency allows the generation of iPSCs in the absence of exogenous Sox2. Finally, partial depletion of Sox2 positive cells reduced the pituitary tumor development initiated by Rb loss in vivo. In summary, our results show that Sox2 repression by pRb is a relevant mechanism of tumor suppression.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of Sox2 by the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Carmen; Morey, Lluis; Silva-Álvarez, Sabela Da; Fernandes, Tânia; Abad, María; Croce, Luciano Di; García-Caballero, Tomás; Serrano, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen; Vidal, Anxo; Collado, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming to iPSCs has uncovered unsuspected links between tumor suppressors and pluripotency factors. Using this system, it was possible to identify tumor suppressor p27 as a repressor of Sox2 during differentiation. This led to the demonstration that defects in the repression of Sox2 can contribute to tumor development. The members of the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins, pRb, p107 and p130, are negative regulators of the cell cycle with tumor suppressor activity and with roles in differentiation. In this work we studied the relative contribution of the retinoblastoma family members to the regulation of Sox2 expression. We found that deletion of Rb or p130 leads to impaired repression of Sox2, a deffect amplified by inactivation of p53. We also identified binding of pRb and p130 to an enhancer with crucial regulatory activity on Sox2 expression. Using cellular reprogramming we tested the impact of the defective repression of Sox2 and confirmed that Rb deficiency allows the generation of iPSCs in the absence of exogenous Sox2. Finally, partial depletion of Sox2 positive cells reduced the pituitary tumor development initiated by Rb loss in vivo. In summary, our results show that Sox2 repression by pRb is a relevant mechanism of tumor suppression. PMID:25576924

  12. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism.

    OpenAIRE

    Medori, R; Tritschler, H J

    1993-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp)-->AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. We confirmed the 178Asn mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced p...

  13. A case of familial central precocious puberty caused by a novel mutation in the makorin RING finger protein 3 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Grandone, Anna; Cantelmi, Grazia; Cirillo, Grazia; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Luongo, Caterina; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Perrone, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background Central precocious puberty (CPP) is often familial but its genetic cause is largely unknown. Very recently, the makorin RING finger protein 3 (MKRN3) gene, located on chromosome 15 in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)-associated region (15q11-q13), has been found mutated in 5 families with familial precocious puberty. The MKRN3 is a maternal imprinted gene and the phenotype is expressed only when the MKRN3 mutations are localized on the allele inherited from the father. The function ...

  14. A family of intermediate filament-like proteins is sequentially assembled into the cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-White, Brooke R; Ivey, F Douglas; Cheng, Katherine; Szatanek, Tomasz; Lorestani, Alexander; Beckers, Con J; Ferguson, David J P; Sahoo, Nivedita; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii divides by a unique process of internal budding that involves the assembly of two daughter cells within the mother. The cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma, which is composed of microtubules associated with an inner membrane complex (IMC), has an important role in this process. The IMC, which is directly under the plasma membrane, contains a set of flattened membranous sacs lined on the cytoplasmic side by a network of filamentous proteins. This network contains a family of intermediate filament-like proteins or IMC proteins. In order to elucidate the division process, we have characterized a 14-member subfamily of Toxoplasma IMC proteins that share a repeat motif found in proteins associated with the cortical alveoli in all alveolates. By creating fluorescent protein fusion reporters for the family members we determined the spatiotemporal patterns of all 14 IMC proteins through tachyzoite development. This revealed several distinct distribution patterns and some provide the basis for novel structural models such as the assembly of certain family members into the basal complex. Furthermore we identified IMC15 as an early marker of budding and, lastly, the dynamic patterns observed throughout cytokinesis provide a timeline for daughter parasite development and division.

  15. In vivo imaging of the tonoplast intrinsic protein family in Arabidopsis roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khonsari Roman H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs are widely used as markers for vacuolar compartments in higher plants. Ten TIP isoforms are encoded by the Arabidopsis genome. For several isoforms, the tissue and cell specific pattern of expression are not known. Results We generated fluorescent protein fusions to the genomic sequences of all members of the Arabidopsis TIP family whose expression is predicted to occur in root tissues (TIP1;1 and 1;2; TIP2;1, 2;2 and 2;3; TIP4;1 and expressed these fusions, both individually and in selected pairwise combinations, in transgenic Arabidopsis. Analysis by confocal microscopy revealed that TIP distribution varied between different cell layers within the root axis, with extensive co-expression of some TIPs and more restricted expression patterns for other isoforms. TIP isoforms whose expression overlapped appeared to localise to the tonoplast of the central vacuole, vacuolar bulbs and smaller, uncharacterised structures. Conclusion We have produced a comprehensive atlas of TIP expression in Arabidopsis roots, which reveals novel expression patterns for not previously studied TIPs.

  16. The cloning and expression characterization of the centrosome protein genes family (centrin genes) in rat testis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Xiaodong(孙晓冬); GE; Yehua(葛晔华); MA; Jing(马静); YU; Zuoren(俞作仁); LI; Sai(李赛); WANG; Yongchao(王永潮); XUE; Shepu(薛社普); HAN; Daishu(韩代书)

    2002-01-01

    Centrins are members of the centrosome protein family, which is highly conserved during revolution. The homologous genes of centrin in many organisms had been cloned, but the sequences of the rat centrin genes were not reported yet in GenBank. We cloned the cDNA fragments of centrin-1, -2 and -3 from the rat testis by RT-PCR, and analyzed the homology of the deduced amino acid sequences. The expression characterization of centrin genes in rat spermatogenesis was carried out by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The results show that the homology of the corresponding centrin proteins in human, mouse and rat is high. The expression of centrin-1 is testis-specific, spermatogenic cell-specific and developmental stage-related. Centrin-1 begins to be transcribed when the meiosis occurs, and its mRNA level reaches the peak in round spermatids. Centrin-2 and centrin-3 are highly expressed in spermatogonia and their mRNA level decreases markedly when meiosis occurs. These results suggest that centrin-1 may play roles in meiosis and spermiogenesis, and centrin-2 and centrin-3 may be related to mitosis.

  17. Molecular cloning and expression of the transformation sensitive epithelial marker stratifin. A member of a protein family that has been involved in the protein kinase C signalling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H;

    1993-01-01

    keratinocyte proteins) that share peptide sequences with each other, with protein 14-3-3 and with the kinase C inhibitory protein. Immunofluorescence staining of keratinocytes showed that two of these proteins (IEF SSPs 9124 and 9126) localize to the Golgi apparatus, while stratifin is distributed diffusely....... We have cloned and sequenced cDNAs coding for members of this family. The complete identity of the sequenced peptides from stratifin with the amino acid sequence translated from the stratifin cDNA clone indicated that this cDNA codes for stratifin. The identity of clones 1054, HS1 and AS1 is less...... clear as, with few exceptions, none of the individual peptide sequences fits the predicted protein sequences. The polypeptides synthesized by clones 1054 and HS1 in the vaccinia expression system, on the other hand, comigrate with proteins 9126 and 9124, suggesting cell-type-specific expression...

  18. The claudin family of proteins in human malignancy: a clinical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, are the most apical component of the junctional complex and provide one form of cell–cell adhesion in epithelial and endothelial cells. Nearly 90% of malignant tumors are derived from the epithelium. Loss of cell–cell adhesion is one of the steps in the progression of cancer to metastasis. At least three main tight junction family proteins have been discovered: occludin, claudin, and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM). Claudins are the most important structural and functional components of tight junction integral membrane proteins, with at least 24 members in mammals. They are crucial for the paracellular flux of ions and small molecules. Overexpression or downregulation of claudins is frequently observed in epithelial-derived cancers. However, molecular mechanisms by which claudins affect tumorigenesis remain largely unknown. As the pivotal proteins in epithelial cells, altered expression and distribution of different claudins have been reported in a wide variety of human malignancies, including pancreatic, colonic, lung, ovarian, thyroid, prostate, esophageal, and breast cancers. In this review, we will give the readers an overall picture of the changes in claudin expression observed in various cancers and their mechanisms of regulation. Downregulation of claudins contributes to epithelial transformation by increasing the paracellular permeability of nutrients and growth factors to cancerous cells. In the cases of upregulation of claudin expression, the barrier function of the cancerous epithelia changes, as they often display a disorganized arrangement of tight junction strands with increased permeability to paracellular markers. Finally, we will summarize the literature suggesting that claudins may become useful biomarkers for cancer detection and diagnosis as well as possible therapeutic targets for cancer treatment

  19. Automatic discovery of cross-family sequence features associated with protein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krings Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods for predicting protein function directly from amino acid sequences are useful tools in the study of uncharacterised protein families and in comparative genomics. Until now, this problem has been approached using machine learning techniques that attempt to predict membership, or otherwise, to predefined functional categories or subcellular locations. A potential drawback of this approach is that the human-designated functional classes may not accurately reflect the underlying biology, and consequently important sequence-to-function relationships may be missed. Results We show that a self-supervised data mining approach is able to find relationships between sequence features and functional annotations. No preconceived ideas about functional categories are required, and the training data is simply a set of protein sequences and their UniProt/Swiss-Prot annotations. The main technical aspect of the approach is the co-evolution of amino acid-based regular expressions and keyword-based logical expressions with genetic programming. Our experiments on a strictly non-redundant set of eukaryotic proteins reveal that the strongest and most easily detected sequence-to-function relationships are concerned with targeting to various cellular compartments, which is an area already well studied both experimentally and computationally. Of more interest are a number of broad functional roles which can also be correlated with sequence features. These include inhibition, biosynthesis, transcription and defence against bacteria. Despite substantial overlaps between these functions and their corresponding cellular compartments, we find clear differences in the sequence motifs used to predict some of these functions. For example, the presence of polyglutamine repeats appears to be linked more strongly to the "transcription" function than to the general "nuclear" function/location. Conclusion We have developed a novel and useful approach for

  20. Inducible Expression of Chimeric EWS/ETS Proteins Confers Ewing's Family Tumor-Like Phenotypes to Human Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Okita, Hajime; Nakaijima, Hideki; Horiuchi, Yasuomi; Sato, Ban; TAGUCHI, Tomoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Katagiri, Yohko U; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Hata, Jun-Ichi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2008-01-01

    Ewing's family tumor (EFT) is a rare pediatric tumor of unclear origin that occurs in bone and soft tissue. Specific chromosomal translocations found in EFT cause EWS to fuse to a subset of ets transcription factor genes (ETS), generating chimeric EWS/ETS proteins. These proteins are believed to play a crucial role in the onset and progression of EFT. However, the mechanisms responsible for the EWS/ETS-mediated onset remain unclear. Here we report the establishment of a tetracycline-controlle...

  1. Plant F-box protein evolution is determined by lineage-specific timing of major gene family expansion waves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Navarro-Quezada

    Full Text Available F-box proteins (FBPs represent one of the largest and fastest evolving gene/protein families in the plant kingdom. The FBP superfamily can be divided in several subfamilies characterized by different C-terminal protein-protein interaction domains that recruit targets for proteasomal degradation. Hence, a clear picture of their phylogeny and molecular evolution is of special interest for the general understanding of evolutionary histories of multi-domain and/or large protein families in plants. In an effort to further understand the molecular evolution of F-box family proteins, we asked whether the largest subfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana, which carries a C-terminal F-box associated domain (FBA proteins shares evolutionary patterns and signatures of selection with other FBPs. To address this question, we applied phylogenetic and molecular evolution analyses in combination with the evaluation of transcriptional profiles. Based on the 2219 FBA proteins we de novo identified in 34 completely sequenced plant genomes, we compared their evolutionary patterns to a previously analyzed large subfamily carrying C-terminal kelch repeats. We found that these two large FBP subfamilies generally tend to evolve by massive waves of duplication, followed by sequence conservation of the F-box domain and sequence diversification of the target recruiting domain. We conclude that the earlier in evolutionary time a major wave of expansion occurred, the more pronounced these selection signatures are. As a consequence, when performing cross species comparisons among FBP subfamilies, significant differences will be observed in the selective signatures of protein-protein interaction domains. Depending on the species, the investigated subfamilies comprise up to 45% of the complete superfamily, indicating that other subfamilies possibly follow similar modes of evolution.

  2. Thrombolamban, the 22-kDa platelet substrate of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, is immunologically homologous with the Ras family of GTP-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet inhibition by agents that increase intracellular levels of cAMP is associated with cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of specific intracellular proteins, including a membrane-associated 22-kDa microsomal protein called thrombolamban. In view of recent studies suggesting that platelets also contain 22-kDa GTP-binding proteins that are homologous with ras-encoded p21 proteins, the present work was undertaken to examine the possibility that thrombolamban and the Ras-like proteins were the same. Platelet microsomes were labeled with [γ-32P]ATP and the labeled proteins were examined by autoradiography of sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. On Western blots of both one-dimensional and two-dimensional gels, thrombolamban immunoreacted with M90, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the GTP-binding domain of Ras p21 proteins, but not with Y13-259, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes another domain and is specific for Ras proteins. Overlay experiments with unlabeled platelet microsomes demonstrated numerous low molecular weight proteins that bound [α-32P]GTP, although none could be identified as thrombolamban. Finally, thrombolamban was immunoprecipitated by M90. These studies show that thrombolamban is a low molecular weight protein that is immunologically related to the Ras family of GTP-binding proteins

  3. Members of the Pmp protein family of Chlamydia pneumoniae mediate adhesion to human cells via short repetitive peptide motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölleken, Katja; Schmidt, Eleni; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2010-11-01

    Chlamydiae sp. are obligate intracellular pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans. Adhesion of the infectious elementary body to the eukaryotic host cell is a pivotal step in chlamydial pathogenesis. Here we describe the characterization of members of the polymorphic membrane protein family (Pmp), the largest protein family (with up to 21 members) unique to Chlamydiaceae. We show that yeast cells displaying Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 on their surfaces, or beads coated with the recombinant proteins, adhere to human epithelial cells. A hallmark of the Pmp protein family is the presence of multiple repeats of the tetrapeptide motifs FxxN and GGA(I, L, V) and deletion analysis shows that at least two copies of these motifs are needed for adhesion. Importantly, pre-treatment of human cells with recombinant Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 protein reduces infectivity upon subsequent challenge with Chlamydia pneumoniae and correlates with diminished attachment of Chlamydiae to target cells. Antibodies specific for Pmp21 can neutralize infection in vitro. Finally, a combination of two different Pmp proteins in infection blockage experiments shows additive effects, possibly suggesting similar functions. Our findings imply that Pmp6, Pmp20 and Pmp21 act as adhesins, are vital during infection and thus represent promising vaccine candidates.

  4. A guild of 45 CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families and multiple CRISPR/Cas subtypes exist in prokaryotic genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Haft

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs are a family of DNA direct repeats found in many prokaryotic genomes. Repeats of 21-37 bp typically show weak dyad symmetry and are separated by regularly sized, nonrepetitive spacer sequences. Four CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families, designated Cas1 to Cas4, are strictly associated with CRISPR elements and always occur near a repeat cluster. Some spacers originate from mobile genetic elements and are thought to confer "immunity" against the elements that harbor these sequences. In the present study, we have systematically investigated uncharacterized proteins encoded in the vicinity of these CRISPRs and found many additional protein families that are strictly associated with CRISPR loci across multiple prokaryotic species. Multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models have been built for 45 Cas protein families. These models identify family members with high sensitivity and selectivity and classify key regulators of development, DevR and DevS, in Myxococcus xanthus as Cas proteins. These identifications show that CRISPR/cas gene regions can be quite large, with up to 20 different, tandem-arranged cas genes next to a repeat cluster or filling the region between two repeat clusters. Distinctive subsets of the collection of Cas proteins recur in phylogenetically distant species and correlate with characteristic repeat periodicity. The analyses presented here support initial proposals of mobility of these units, along with the likelihood that loci of different subtypes interact with one another as well as with host cell defensive, replicative, and regulatory systems. It is evident from this analysis that CRISPR/cas loci are larger, more complex, and more heterogeneous than previously appreciated.

  5. Domain-swapped dimer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551: structural insights into domain swapping of cytochrome c family proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nagao

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c (cyt c family proteins, such as horse cyt c, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551 (PA cyt c551, and Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c552 (HT cyt c552, have been used as model proteins to study the relationship between the protein structure and folding process. We have shown in the past that horse cyt c forms oligomers by domain swapping its C-terminal helix, perturbing the Met-heme coordination significantly compared to the monomer. HT cyt c552 forms dimers by domain swapping the region containing the N-terminal α-helix and heme, where the heme axial His and Met ligands belong to different protomers. Herein, we show that PA cyt c551 also forms domain-swapped dimers by swapping the region containing the N-terminal α-helix and heme. The secondary structures of the M61A mutant of PA cyt c551 were perturbed slightly and its oligomer formation ability decreased compared to that of the wild-type protein, showing that the stability of the protein secondary structures is important for domain swapping. The hinge loop of domain swapping for cyt c family proteins corresponded to the unstable region specified by hydrogen exchange NMR measurements for the monomer, although the swapping region differed among proteins. These results show that the unstable loop region has a tendency to become a hinge loop in domain-swapped proteins.

  6. Deficiency of pRb family proteins and p53 in invasive urothelial tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng; Mo, Lan; Zheng, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Changkun; Lepor, Herbert; Lee, Eva Y-H P; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2009-12-15

    Defects in pRb tumor suppressor pathway occur in approximately 50% of the deadly muscle-invasive urothelial carcinomas in humans and urothelial carcinoma is the most prevalent epithelial cancer in long-term survivors of hereditary retinoblastomas caused by loss-of-function RB1 mutations. Here, we show that conditional inactivation of both RB1 alleles in mouse urothelium failed to accelerate urothelial proliferation. Instead, it profoundly activated the p53 pathway, leading to extensive apoptosis, and selectively induced pRb family member p107. Thus, pRb loss triggered multiple fail-safe mechanisms whereby urothelial cells evade tumorigenesis. Additional loss of p53 in pRb-deficient urothelial cells removed these p53-dependent tumor barriers, resulting in late-onset hyperplasia, umbrella cell nuclear atypia, and rare-occurring low-grade, superficial papillary bladder tumors, without eliciting invasive carcinomas. Importantly, mice deficient in both pRb and p53, but not those deficient in either protein alone, were highly susceptible to subthreshold carcinogen exposure and developed invasive urothelial carcinomas that strongly resembled the human counterparts. The invasive lesions had a marked reduction of p107 but not p130 of the pRb family. Our data provide compelling evidence, indicating that urothelium, one of the slowest cycling epithelia, is remarkably resistant to transformation by pRb or p53 deficiency; that concurrent loss of these two tumor suppressors is necessary but insufficient to initiate urothelial tumorigenesis along the invasive pathway; that p107 may play a critical role in suppressing invasive urothelial tumor formation; and that replacing/restoring the function of pRb, p107, or p53 could be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to block urothelial tumor progression.

  7. The Odorant Binding Protein Gene Family from the Genome of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ping

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemosensory systems play key roles in the survival and reproductive success of insects. Insect chemoreception is mediated by two large and diverse gene superfamilies, chemoreceptors and odorant binding proteins (OBPs. OBPs are believed to transport hydrophobic odorants from the environment to the olfactory receptors. Results We identified a family of OBP-like genes in the silkworm genome and characterized their expression using oligonucleotide microarrays. A total of forty-four OBP genes were annotated, a number comparable to the 57 OBPs known from Anopheles gambiae and 51 from Drosophila melanogaster. As seen in other fully sequenced insect genomes, most silkworm OBP genes are present in large clusters. We defined six subfamilies of OBPs, each of which shows lineage-specific expansion and diversification. EST data and OBP expression profiles from multiple larvae tissues of day three fifth instars demonstrated that many OBPs are expressed in chemosensory-specific tissues although some OBPs are expressed ubiquitously and others exclusively in non-chemosensory tissues. Some atypical OBPs are expressed throughout development. These results reveal that, although many OBPs are chemosensory-specific, others may have more general physiological roles. Conclusion Silkworms possess a number of OBPs genes similar to other insects. Their expression profiles suggest that many OBPs may be involved in olfaction and gustation as well as general carriers of hydrophobic molecules. The expansion of OBP gene subfamilies and sequence divergence indicate that the silkworm OBP family acquired functional diversity concurrently with functional constraints. Further investigation of the OBPs of the silkworm could give insights in the roles of OBPs in chemoreception.

  8. New insights on the sialidase protein family revealed by a phylogenetic analysis in metazoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Giacopuzzi

    Full Text Available Sialidases are glycohydrolytic enzymes present from virus to mammals that remove sialic acid from oligosaccharide chains. Four different sialidase forms are known in vertebrates: the lysosomal NEU1, the cytosolic NEU2 and the membrane-associated NEU3 and NEU4. These enzymes modulate the cell sialic acid content and are involved in several cellular processes and pathological conditions. Molecular defects in NEU1 are responsible for sialidosis, an inherited disease characterized by lysosomal storage disorder and neurodegeneration. The studies on the biology of sialic acids and sialyltransferases, the anabolic counterparts of sialidases, have revealed a complex picture with more than 50 sialic acid variants selectively present in the different branches of the tree of life. The gain/loss of specific sialoconjugates have been proposed as key events in the evolution of deuterostomes and Homo sapiens, as well as in the host-pathogen interactions. To date, less attention has been paid to the evolution of sialidases. Thus we have conducted a survey on the state of the sialidase family in metazoan. Using an in silico approach, we identified and characterized sialidase orthologs from 21 different organisms distributed among the evolutionary tree: Metazoa relative (Monosiga brevicollis, early Deuterostomia, precursor of Chordata and Vertebrata (teleost fishes, amphibians, reptiles, avians and early and recent mammals. We were able to reconstruct the evolution of the sialidase protein family from the ancestral sialidase NEU1 and identify a new form of the enzyme, NEU5, representing an intermediate step in the evolution leading to the modern NEU3, NEU4 and NEU2. Our study provides new insights on the mechanisms that shaped the substrate specificity and other peculiar properties of the modern mammalian sialidases. Moreover, we further confirm findings on the catalytic residues and identified enzyme loop portions that behave as rapidly diverging regions and may

  9. Interconversion of two GDP-bound conformations and their selection in an Arf-family small G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishikiori, Masaki; Xiang, Hongyu; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Katoh, Etsuko

    2011-07-13

    ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) and other Arf-family small G proteins participate in many cellular functions via their characteristic GTP/GDP conformational cycles, during which a nucleotide(∗)Mg(2+)-binding site communicates with a remote N-terminal helix. However, the conformational interplay between the nucleotides, the helix, the protein core, and Mg(2+) has not been fully delineated. Herein, we report a study of the dynamics of an Arf-family protein, Arl8, under various conditions by means of NMR relaxation spectroscopy. The data indicated that, when GDP is bound, the protein core, which does not include the N-terminal helix, reversibly transition between an Arf-family GDP form and another conformation that resembles the Arf-family GTP form. Additionally, we found that the N-terminal helix and Mg(2+), respectively, stabilize the aforementioned former and latter conformations in a population-shift manner. Given the dynamics of the conformational changes, we can describe the Arl8 GTP/GDP cycle in terms of an energy diagram.

  10. Direct binding of specific AUF1 isoforms to tandem zinc finger domains of tristetraprolin (TTP) family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, Vishram P; Zucconi, Beth E; Wilson, Gerald M; Blackshear, Perry J

    2012-02-17

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype of a family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins that can bind to AU-rich elements in mRNAs and promote their decay. TTP binds to mRNA through its central tandem zinc finger domain; it then promotes mRNA deadenylation, considered to be the rate-limiting step in eukaryotic mRNA decay. We found that TTP and its related family members could bind to certain isoforms of another AU-rich element-binding protein, HNRNPD/AUF1, as well as a related protein, laAUF1. The interaction domain within AUF1p45 appeared to be a C-terminal "GY" region, and the interaction domain within TTP was the tandem zinc finger domain. Surprisingly, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP occurred even with TTP mutants that lacked RNA binding activity. In cell extracts, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP potentiated TTP binding to ARE-containing RNA probes, as determined by RNA gel shift assays; AUF1p45 did not bind to the RNA probes under these conditions. Using purified, recombinant proteins and a synthetic RNA target in FRET assays, we demonstrated that AUF1p45, but not AUF1p37, increased TTP binding affinity for RNA ∼5-fold. These data suggest that certain isoforms of AUF1 can serve as "co-activators" of TTP family protein binding to RNA. The results raise interesting questions about the ability of AUF1 isoforms to regulate the mRNA binding and decay-promoting activities of TTP and its family members as well as the ability of AUF1 proteins to serve as possible physical links between TTP and other mRNA decay proteins and structures.

  11. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis XH/XS-domain proteins indicates overlapping and distinct functions for members of this gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haroon; Graner, Sonja; Luschnig, Christian

    2014-03-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is essential for de novo DNA methylation in higher plants, and recent reports established novel elements of this silencing pathway in the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana. Involved in de novo DNA methylation 2 (IDN2) and the closely related factor of DNA methylation (FDM) are members of a plant-specific family of dsRNA-binding proteins characterized by conserved XH/XS domains and implicated in the regulation of RdDM at chromatin targets. Genetic analyses have suggested redundant as well as non-overlapping activities for different members of the gene family. However, detailed insights into the function of XH/XS-domain proteins are still elusive. By the generation and analysis of higher-order mutant combinations affected in IDN2 and further members of the gene family, we have provided additional evidence for their redundant activity. Distinct roles for members of the XH/XS-domain gene family were indicated by differences in their expression and subcellular localization. Fluorescent protein-tagged FDM genes were expressed either in nuclei or in the cytoplasm, suggestive of activities of XH/XS-domain proteins in association with chromatin as well as outside the nuclear compartment. In addition, we observed altered location of a functional FDM1-VENUS reporter from the nucleus into the cytoplasm under conditions when availability of further FDM proteins was limited. This is suggestive of a mechanism by which redistribution of XH/XS-domain proteins could compensate for the loss of closely related proteins.

  12. Expression of GIMAP1, a GTPase of the immunity-associated protein family, is not up-regulated in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Christine

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GIMAP (GTPase of the immunity-associated protein family proteins are a family of putative GTPases believed to be regulators of cell death in lymphomyeloid cells. GIMAP1 was the first reported member of this gene family, identified as a gene up-regulated at the RNA level in the spleens of mice infected with the malarial parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. Methods A monoclonal antibody against mouse GIMAP1 was developed and was used to analyse the expression of the endogenous protein in tissues of normal mice and in defined sub-populations of cells prepared from lymphoid tissues using flow cytometry. It was also used to assess the expression of GIMAP1 protein after infection and/or immunization of mice with P. chabaudi. Real-time PCR analysis was employed to measure the expression of GIMAP1 for comparison with the protein level analysis. Results GIMAP1 protein expression was detected in all lineages of lymphocytes (T, B, NK, in F4/80+ splenic macrophages and in some lymphoid cell lines. Additional evidence is presented suggesting that the strong expression by mature B cells of GIMAP1 and other GIMAP genes and proteins seen in mice may be a species-dependent characteristic. Unexpectedly, no increase was found in the expression of GIMAP1 in P. chabaudi infected mice at either the mRNA or protein level, and this remained so despite applying a number of variations to the protocol. Conclusion The model of up-regulation of GIMAP1 in response to infection/immunization with P. chabaudi is not a robustly reproducible experimental system. The GIMAP1 protein is widely expressed in lymphoid cells, with an interesting increase in expression in the later stages of B cell development. Alternative approaches will be required to define the functional role of this GTPase in immune cells.

  13. The Caenorhabditis elegans Protein FIC-1 Is an AMPylase That Covalently Modifies Heat-Shock 70 Family Proteins, Translation Elongation Factors and Histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truttmann, Matthias C.; Guo, Xuanzong; Engert, Christoph; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein AMPylation by Fic domain-containing proteins (Fic proteins) is an ancient and conserved post-translational modification of mostly unexplored significance. Here we characterize the Caenorhabditis elegans Fic protein FIC-1 in vitro and in vivo. FIC-1 is an AMPylase that localizes to the nuclear surface and modifies core histones H2 and H3 as well as heat shock protein 70 family members and translation elongation factors. The three-dimensional structure of FIC-1 is similar to that of its human ortholog, HYPE, with 38% sequence identity. We identify a link between FIC-1-mediated AMPylation and susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, establishing a connection between AMPylation and innate immunity in C. elegans. PMID:27138431

  14. Rwdd1, a Thymus Aging Related Molecule, Is a New Member of the Intrinsically Unstructured Protein Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Kang; Dai Chen; Li Wang; Lian Duan; Shirong Liu; Long Tang; Qingfeng Liu; Lianxian Cui; Wei He

    2008-01-01

    We had previously identified a novel protein termed Rwdd1 whose expression in thymus iS decreased in aged or oxidatively stressed mice.In the present study,we found that Rwdd1 expressed in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells showed a slower migration rate on SDS-PAGE gel.in addition,Rwdd1 was more sensitive to proteinase proteolysis.Furthermore,being a highly acidic protein which contains an RWD domain,Rwdd1 shared a high level of sequence similarity with Gir2,a member of the intrinsically unstructured protein(IUP).These findings suggest that Rwdd1 is a novel member of the IUP family.

  15. Nitrobindin: An Ubiquitous Family of All β-Barrel Heme-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Giovanna; Ascenzi, Paolo; Polticelli, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Rhodnius prolixus nitrophorins (Rp-NPs), Arabidopsis thaliana nitrobindin (At-Nb), and Homo sapiens THAP4 (Hs-THAP4) are the unique known proteins that use a β-barrel fold to bind ferric heme, which is devoted to NO transport and/or catalysis. The eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel Rp-NPs, which represent the only heme-binding lipocalins, are devoted to deliver NO into the blood vessel of the host and to scavenge histamine during blood sucking. Regarding Nbs, crystallographic data suggest the ability of At-Nb and Hs-THAP4 to bind ferric heme; however, no data are available with respect to these functions in the natural host. Here, a bioinformatics investigation based on the amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures of At-Nb and Hs-THAP4 suggests a conservation of the 10-stranded antiparallel β-barrel Nb structural module in all life kingdoms of the evolutionary ladder. In particular, amino acid residues involved in the heme recognition and in the structure stabilization of the Nb structural module are highly conserved (identity > 29%; homology > 83%). Moreover, molecular models of putative Nbs from different organisms match very well with each other and known three-dimensional structures of Nbs. Furthermore, phylogenetic tree reconstruction indicates that NPs and Nbs group in distinct clades. These data indicate that 10-stranded β-barrel Nbs constitute a new ubiquitous heme protein family spanning from bacteria to Homo sapiens. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):423-428, 2016. PMID:27080126

  16. Familial acromegaly due to aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene mutation in a Turkish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyazoglu, Mutlu; Sayitoglu, Muge; Firtina, Sinem; Hatipoglu, Esra; Gazioglu, Nurperi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2014-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) is associated with 15-20% of familial isolated pituitary adenomas and 50-80% of cases with AIP mutation exhibit a somatotropinoma. Herein we report clinical characteristics of a large family where AIP R304X variants have been identified. AIP mutation analysis was performed on a large (n = 52) Turkish family across six generations. Sella MRIs of 30 family members were obtained. Basal pituitary hormone levels were evaluated in 13 family members harboring an AIP mutation. Thirteen of 52 family members (25%) were found to have a heterozygous nonsense germline R304X mutation in the AIP gene. Seven of the 13 mutation carriers (53.8%) had current or previous history of pituitary adenoma. Of these 7 mutation carriers, all but one had somatotropinoma/somatolactotropinoma (85.7% of the pituitary adenomas). Of the 6 acromegaly patients with AIP mutation (F/M: 3/3) the mean age at diagnosis of acromegaly was 32 ± 10.3 years while the mean age of symptom onset was 24.8 ± 9.9 years. Three of the six (50%) acromegaly cases with AIP mutation within the family presented with a macroadenoma and none presented with gigantism. Biochemical disease control was achieved in 66.6% (4/6) of the mutation carriers with acromegaly after a mean follow-up period of 18.6 ± 17.6 years. Common phenotypic characteristics of familial pituitary adenoma or somatotropinoma due to AIP mutation vary between families or even between individuals within a family. PMID:23743763

  17. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2007-07-01

    In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins) are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution.

  18. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin B Zeldovich

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution.

  19. A correspondence between solution-state dynamics of an individual protein and the sequence and conformational diversity of its family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Friedland

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conformational ensembles are increasingly recognized as a useful representation to describe fundamental relationships between protein structure, dynamics and function. Here we present an ensemble of ubiquitin in solution that is created by sampling conformational space without experimental information using "Backrub" motions inspired by alternative conformations observed in sub-Angstrom resolution crystal structures. Backrub-generated structures are then selected to produce an ensemble that optimizes agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR Residual Dipolar Couplings (RDCs. Using this ensemble, we probe two proposed relationships between properties of protein ensembles: (i a link between native-state dynamics and the conformational heterogeneity observed in crystal structures, and (ii a relation between dynamics of an individual protein and the conformational variability explored by its natural family. We show that the Backrub motional mechanism can simultaneously explore protein native-state dynamics measured by RDCs, encompass the conformational variability present in ubiquitin complex structures and facilitate sampling of conformational and sequence variability matching those occurring in the ubiquitin protein family. Our results thus support an overall relation between protein dynamics and conformational changes enabling sequence changes in evolution. More practically, the presented method can be applied to improve protein design predictions by accounting for intrinsic native-state dynamics.

  20. Protein sequence evidence for monophyly of the carnivore families Procyonidae and Mustelidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, W W

    1986-05-01

    The amino acid sequence of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin A of the ring-tailed cat, Bassariscus astutus, has been determined. The sequence of the Bassariscus alpha A chain, which is 173 residues long, was compared with the previously determined set of 41 mammalian alpha A sequences. Among the investigated carnivores (dog, cat, sloth bear, American mink, gray seal, and California sea lion) the Bassariscus alpha A sequence exclusively shares two amino acid replacements with the alpha A chain of the mink, Mustela vison: 7 His----Gln and 61 Ile----Val. The Mustela and Bassariscus alpha A sequences differ at only three positions and have no replacements in common with any of the other investigated carnivore alpha A chains. Furthermore, the replacement 7 His----Gln has only been found in three-toed sloth, whereas 61 Ile----Val occurs scattered in three other taxa: pig, rhinoceros, and prosimians. It thus is most parsimonious to join Bassariscus and Mustela--and consequently their respective families, Procyonidae and Mustelidae--as sister groups in the phylogenetic tree of mammalian alpha A sequences. PMID:3444403

  1. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1 is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ. Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution.

  2. Trefoil factor family (TFF) proteins as potential serum biomarkers in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocka, M; Langer, D; Petrtyl, J; Vockova, P; Hanus, T; Kalousova, M; Zima, T; Petruzelka, L

    2015-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) is composed of three secretory proteins (TFF1, TFF2 and TFF3) that play an important role in mucosal protection of gastrointestinal tract. Their overexpression in colorectal tumors seems to be associated with more aggressive disease. We collected serum samples from 79 healthy controls and 97 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer at the time of diagnosis or at progression. Serum levels of TTF1-3, CEA and CA19-9 were measured by ELISA. Serum TFF1 and TFF3 levels were significantly higher in patients with colorectal cancer compared to healthy controls (p TFF3 correlated with extent of liver involvement in patient without pulmonary metastases and patients with higher TFF3 levels had significantly worse outcome (p TFF3 had higher sensitivity and the same specificity. Our results indicate that TFF3 is an effective biomarker in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with higher sensitivity than CEA a CA19-9. TFF3 levels strongly correlate with extension of liver disease and seem to have prognostic value.

  3. Familial Alzheimer's disease mutations differentially alter amyloid β-protein oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessel, Megan Murray; Bernstein, Summer; Kemper, Martin; Teplow, David B; Bowers, Michael T

    2012-11-21

    Although most cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are sporadic, ∼5% of cases are genetic in origin. These cases, known as familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), are caused by mutations that alter the rate of production or the primary structure of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Changes in the primary structure of Aβ alter the peptide's assembly and toxic activity. Recently, a primary working hypothesis for AD has evolved where causation has been attributed to early, soluble peptide oligomer states. Here we posit that both experimental and pathological differences between FAD-related mutants and wild-type Aβ could be reflected in the early oligomer distributions of these peptides. We use ion mobility-based mass spectrometry to probe the structure and early aggregation states of three mutant forms of Aβ40 and Aβ42: Tottori (D7N), Flemish (A21G), and Arctic (E22G). Our results indicate that the FAD-related amino acid substitutions have no noticeable effect on Aβ monomer cross section, indicating there are no major structural changes in the monomers. However, we observe significant changes to the aggregation states populated by the various Aβ mutants, indicating that structural changes present in the monomers are reflected in the oligomers. Moreover, the early oligomer distributions differ for each mutant, suggesting a possible structural basis for the varied pathogenesis of different forms of FAD.

  4. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  5. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothini Odman-Naresh

    Full Text Available Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM, an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps, which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran

  6. The claudin family of proteins in human malignancy: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding L

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lei Ding,1,2 Zhe Lu,2,4 Qun Lu,2,3 Yan-Hua Chen2,3 1Department of Oncology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, 3Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA; 4Department of Basic Medicine, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, are the most apical component of the junctional complex and provide one form of cell–cell adhesion in epithelial and endothelial cells. Nearly 90% of malignant tumors are derived from the epithelium. Loss of cell–cell adhesion is one of the steps in the progression of cancer to metastasis. At least three main tight junction family proteins have been discovered: occludin, claudin, and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM. Claudins are the most important structural and functional components of tight junction integral membrane proteins, with at least 24 members in mammals. They are crucial for the paracellular flux of ions and small molecules. Overexpression or downregulation of claudins is frequently observed in epithelial-derived cancers. However, molecular mechanisms by which claudins affect tumorigenesis remain largely unknown. As the pivotal proteins in epithelial cells, altered expression and distribution of different claudins have been reported in a wide variety of human malignancies, including pancreatic, colonic, lung, ovarian, thyroid, prostate, esophageal, and breast cancers. In this review, we will give the readers an overall picture of the changes in claudin expression observed in various cancers and their mechanisms of regulation. Downregulation of claudins contributes to epithelial transformation by increasing the paracellular permeability of nutrients and growth factors to cancerous cells. In the cases of upregulation of claudin expression, the barrier function of the cancerous

  7. A New Gene Family (ariel) Encodes Asparagine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Antigens, Which Resemble the Amebic Vaccine Candidate Serine-Rich E. histolytica Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Zhiming; Samuelson, John

    1998-01-01

    A family of genes, called ariel, are named for and encode asparagine-rich Entamoeba histolytica antigens containing 2 to 16 octapeptide repeats. Ariel proteins, which are constitutively expressed by trophozoites, belong to a large antigen family that includes the serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP), an amebic vaccine candidate.

  8. Multi-species protein similarity clustering reveals novel expanded immune gene families in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Ian C; Modak, Tejashree H; Lane, Chris E; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2016-06-01

    Comparative genomics research in non-model species has highlighted how invertebrate hosts possess complex diversified repertoires of immune molecules. The levels of diversification in particular immune gene families appear to differ between invertebrate lineages and even between species within lineages, reflecting differences not only in evolutionary histories, but also in life histories, environmental niches, and pathogen exposures. The goal of this research was to identify immune-related gene families experiencing high levels of diversification in eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica. Families containing 1) transcripts differentially expressed in eastern oysters in response to bacterial challenge and 2) a larger number of transcripts compared to other species included those coding for the C1q and C-type lectin domain containing proteins (C1qDC and CTLDC), GTPase of the immune-associated proteins (GIMAP), scavenger receptors (SR), fibrinogen-C domain containing proteins (also known as FREPs), dopamine beta-hydrolase (DBH), interferon-inducible 44 (IFI44), serine protease inhibitors, apextrin, and dermatopontin. Phylogenetic analysis of two of the families significantly expanded in bivalves, IFI44 and GIMAP, showed a patchy distribution within both protostomes and deuterostomes, suggesting multiple independent losses and lineage-specific expansions. Increased availability of genomic information for a broader range of non-model species broadly distributed through vertebrate and invertebrate phyla will likely lead to improved knowledge on mechanisms of immune-gene diversification. PMID:27033806

  9. Bacillus cereus efflux protein BC3310 - a multidrug transporter of the unknown major facilitator family, UMF-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin K Kroeger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic classification divides the major facilitator superfamily (MFS into 82 families, including 25 families that are comprised of transporters with no characterized functions. This study describes functional data for BC3310 from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, a member of the unknown major facilitator family 2 (UMF 2. BC3310 was shown to be a multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to ethidium bromide, SDS and silver nitrate when heterologously expressed in E. coli DH5α ΔacrAB. A conserved aspartate residue (D105 in putative transmembrane helix 4 was identified, which was essential for the energy dependent ethidium bromide efflux by BC3310. Transport proteins of the MFS comprise specific sequence motifs. Sequence analysis of UMF 2 proteins revealed that they carry a variant of the MFS motif A, which may be used as a marker to distinguish easily between this family and other MFS proteins. Genes orthologous to bc3310 are highly conserved within the B. cereus group of organisms and thus belong to the core genome, suggesting an important conserved functional role in the normal physiology of these bacteria.

  10. Mouse whey acidic protein is a novel member of the family of 'four-disulfide core' proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Hennighausen, L G; Sippel, A E

    1982-01-01

    Unlike in other mammalian species, the major whey protein in mouse is not alpha-lactalbumin, but a cysteine rich, acidic protein with a molecular weight of 14.0 kDa. We have deduced the amino acid sequence of this mouse acidic of whey protein from the nucleotide sequence of cloned cDNA. The positions of the half cysteines suggest that mouse whey acidic protein (WAP) is a two domain protein, very similar in structure to the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin and the hypothalamic carrier protei...

  11. Annotation and analysis of a large cuticular protein family with the R&R Consensus in Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ningjia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most abundant family of insect cuticular proteins, the CPR family, is recognized by the R&R Consensus, a domain of about 64 amino acids that binds to chitin and is present throughout arthropods. Several species have now been shown to have more than 100 CPR genes, inviting speculation as to the functional importance of this large number and diversity. Results We have identified 156 genes in Anopheles gambiae that code for putative cuticular proteins in this CPR family, over 1% of the total number of predicted genes in this species. Annotation was verified using several criteria including identification of TATA boxes, INRs, and DPEs plus support from proteomic and gene expression analyses. Two previously recognized CPR classes, RR-1 and RR-2, form separate, well-supported clades with the exception of a small set of genes with long branches whose relationships are poorly resolved. Several of these outliers have clear orthologs in other species. Although both clades are under purifying selection, the RR-1 variant of the R&R Consensus is evolving at twice the rate of the RR-2 variant and is structurally more labile. In contrast, the regions flanking the R&R Consensus have diversified in amino-acid composition to a much greater extent in RR-2 genes compared with RR-1 genes. Many genes are found in compact tandem arrays that may include similar or dissimilar genes but always include just one of the two classes. Tandem arrays of RR-2 genes frequently contain subsets of genes coding for highly similar proteins (sequence clusters. Properties of the proteins indicated that each cluster may serve a distinct function in the cuticle. Conclusion The complete annotation of this large gene family provides insight on the mechanisms of gene family evolution and clues about the need for so many CPR genes. These data also should assist annotation of other Anopheles genes.

  12. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  13. Biochemical analysis of the human ENA/VASP-family proteins, MENA, VASP and EVL, in homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Motoki; Ueno, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    MENA, VASP and EVL are members of the ENA/VASP family of proteins and are involved in cytoplasmic actin remodeling. Previously, we found that EVL directly interacts with RAD51, an essential protein in the homologous recombinational repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stimulates the RAD51-mediated recombination reactions in vitro. The EVL-knockdown MCF7 cells exhibited a clear reduction in RAD51-foci formation, suggesting that EVL may function in the DSB repair pathway through RAD51-mediated homologous recombination. However, the DSB repair defects were less significant in the EVL-knockdown cells, implying that two EVL paralogues, MENA and VASP, may complement the EVL function in human cells. Therefore, in the present study, we purified human MENA, VASP and EVL as recombinant proteins, and compared their biochemical activities in vitro. We found that all three proteins commonly exhibited the RAD51 binding, DNA binding and DNA-annealing activities. Stimulation of the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing was also observed with all three proteins. In addition, surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that MENA, VASP and EVL mutually interacted. These results support the ideas that the ENA/VASP-family proteins are functionally redundant in homologous recombination, and that all three may be involved in the DSB repair pathway in humans.

  14. Loss of Gq/11 Family G Proteins in the Nervous System Causes Pituitary Somatotroph Hypoplasia and Dwarfism in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wettschureck, N.; Moers, A.; Wallenwein, B.; Parlow, A.F; Maser-Gluth, C; Offermanns, S.

    2005-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gq/11 family transduce signals from a variety of neurotransmitter and hormone receptors and have therefore been implicated in various functions of the nervous system. Using the Cre/loxP system, we generated mice which lack the genes coding for the α subunits of the two main members of the Gq/11 family, gnaq and gna11, selectively in neuronal and glial precursor cells. Mice with defective gnaq and gna11 genes were morphologically normal, but they died shortly a...

  15. Identification and Expression Profiling of the BTB Domain-Containing Protein Gene Family in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daojun Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The BTB domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif. In this study, we identified 56 BTB domain-containing protein genes in the silkworm, in addition to 46 in the honey bee, 55 in the red flour beetle, and 53 in the monarch butterfly. Silkworm BTB protein genes were classified into nine subfamilies according to their domain architecture, and most of them could be mapped on the different chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that silkworm BTB protein genes may have undergone a duplication event in three subfamilies: BTB-BACK-Kelch, BTB-BACK-PHR, and BTB-FLYWCH. Comparative analysis demonstrated that the orthologs of each of 13 BTB protein genes present a rigorous orthologous relationship in the silkworm and other surveyed insects, indicating conserved functions of these genes during insect evolution. Furthermore, several silkworm BTB protein genes exhibited sex-specific expression in larval tissues or at different stages during metamorphosis. These findings not only contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of insect BTB protein gene families but also provide a basis for further investigation of the functions of BTB protein genes in the silkworm.

  16. A new Apicomplexa-specific protein kinase family : multiple members in Plasmodium falciparum, all with an export signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercereau-Puijalon Odile

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium spp. is a major health burden in tropical countries. The development of new control tools, including vaccines and drugs, is urgently needed. The availability of genome sequences from several malaria parasite species provides a basis on which to identify new potential intervention targets. Database mining for orthologs to the Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite protein R45, a vaccine candidate, led us identify a new gene family. Results Orthologs to the P. falciparum trophozoite protein R45 were detected exclusively in protozoan parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa, including several Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. All family members are hybrid genes with a conserved C-terminal protein kinase domain of a novel type, recently called FIKK kinase, associated with a non conserved N-terminal region without any known functional signature. While a single copy gene was detected in most species, considerable gene expansion was observed in P. falciparum and its closest phylogenic relative P. reichenowi, with 20 and six copies, respectively, each with a distinct N-terminal domain. Based on full length protein sequence, pairs of orthologs were observed in closely related species, such as P. berghei and P.y. yoelii, P. vivax and P. knowlesi, or P. reichenowi and P. falciparum. All 20 P. falciparum paralogs possess a canonical Plasmodium export element downstream of a signal / anchor sequence required for exportation outside the parasitophorous vacuole. This is consistent with the reported association of the trophozoite protein R45, the only paralog characterised to date, with the infected red blood cell membrane. Interestingly, most genes are located in the subtelomeric region of chromosomes, in association with other multigene families contributing to the remodelling of the infected red blood cell membrane, in particular the ring erythrocyte surface

  17. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis

  18. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang, E-mail: wangdang511@126.com; Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis.

  19. A novel firmicute protein family related to the actinobacterial resuscitation-promoting factors by non-orthologous domain displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finan Christopher L

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Micrococcus luteus growth and resuscitation from starvation-induced dormancy is controlled by the production of a secreted growth factor. This autocrine resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf is the founder member of a family of proteins found throughout and confined to the actinobacteria (high G + C Gram-positive bacteria. The aim of this work was to search for and characterise a cognate gene family in the firmicutes (low G + C Gram-positive bacteria and obtain information about how they may control bacterial growth and resuscitation. Results In silico analysis of the accessory domains of the Rpf proteins permitted their classification into several subfamilies. The RpfB subfamily is related to a group of firmicute proteins of unknown function, represented by YabE of Bacillus subtilis. The actinobacterial RpfB and firmicute YabE proteins have very similar domain structures and genomic contexts, except that in YabE, the actinobacterial Rpf domain is replaced by another domain, which we have called Sps. Although totally unrelated in both sequence and secondary structure, the Rpf and Sps domains fulfil the same function. We propose that these proteins have undergone "non-orthologous domain displacement", a phenomenon akin to "non-orthologous gene displacement" that has been described previously. Proteins containing the Sps domain are widely distributed throughout the firmicutes and they too fall into a number of distinct subfamilies. Comparative analysis of the accessory domains in the Rpf and Sps proteins, together with their weak similarity to lytic transglycosylases, provide clear evidence that they are muralytic enzymes. Conclusions The results indicate that the firmicute Sps proteins and the actinobacterial Rpf proteins are cognate and that they control bacterial culturability via enzymatic modification of the bacterial cell envelope.

  20. A membrane protein family with high potential for suitable therapies (Una famiglia di proteine di membrana con possibili potenzialità terapeutiche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Amato

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The author presents an excursus of the results, obtained using advanced techniques, in researches on a membrane protein family, the G protein-coupled receptors (GCCP, that are localized on the cell membrane ad have a crucial role in many physiological processes.In detail studies aimed to identify mechanisms, biological, genetic and molecular, of the GCPR Group with opioid ligands, with particular attention to the mu-receptor, elective for the opioids with strong analgesic effects, are reported. The hypothesis is put forward that,on the basis of the already obtained results, new analgesic therapies with less undesired effects and more advantageous for the patients can be developed.

  1. Yeast lacking the amphiphysin family protein Rvs167 is sensitive to disruptions in sphingolipid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toume, Moeko; Tani, Motohiro

    2016-08-01

    Rvs167 and Rvs161 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are amphiphysin family proteins, which are involved in several important cellular events, such as invagination and scission of endocytic vesicles, and actin cytoskeleton organization. It has been reported that cellular dysfunctions caused by deletion of RVS167 or RVS161 are rescued by deletion of specific nonessential sphingolipid-metabolizing enzyme genes. Here, we found that yeast cells lacking RVS167 or RVS161 exhibit a decrease in sphingolipid levels. In rvs167∆ cells, the expression level of Orm2, a negative regulator of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) catalyzing the initial step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, was increased in a calcineurin-dependent manner, and the decrease in sphingolipid levels in rvs167∆ cells was reversed on deletion of ORM2. Moreover, repression of both ORM1 and ORM2 expression or overexpression of SPT caused a strong growth defect of rvs167∆ cells, indicating that enhancement of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis is detrimental to rvs167∆ cells. In contrast, partial repression of LCB1-encoding SPT suppressed abnormal phenotypes caused by the deletion of RVS167, including supersensitivity to high temperature and salt stress, and impairment of endocytosis and actin cytoskeleton organization. In addition, the partial repression of SPT activity suppressed the temperature supersensitivity and abnormal vacuolar morphology caused by deletion of VPS1 encoding a dynamin-like GTPase, which is required for vesicle scission and is functionally closely related to Rvs167/Rvs161, whereas repression of both ORM1 and ORM2 expression in vps1∆ cells caused a growth defect. Thus, it was suggested that proper regulation of SPT activity is indispensable for amphiphysin-deficient cells. PMID:27312128

  2. Fast and Accurate Multivariate Gaussian Modeling of Protein Families: Predicting Residue Contacts and Protein-Interaction Partners

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo Baldassi; Marco Zamparo; Christoph Feinauer; Andrea Procaccini; Riccardo Zecchina; Martin Weigt; Andrea Pagnani

    2014-01-01

    International audience In the course of evolution, proteins show a remarkable conservation of their three-dimensional structure and their biological function, leading to strong evolutionary constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Our method aims at extracting such constraints from rapidly accumulating sequence data, and thereby at inferring protein structure and function from sequence information alone. Recently, global statistical inference methods (e.g. direc...

  3. Characterization of cDNA encoding human placental anticoagulant protein (PP4): Homology with the lipocortin family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundmann, U.; Abel, K.J.; Bohn, H.; Loebermann, H.; Lottspeich, F.; Kuepper, H. (Research Institutes, Postfach (West Germany))

    1988-06-01

    A cDNA library prepared from human placenta was screened for sequences encoding the placental protein 4 (PP4). PP4 is an anticoagulant protein that acts as an indirect inhibitor of the thromboplastin-specific complex, which is involved in the blood coagulation cascade. Partial amino acid sequence information from PP4-derived cyanogen bromide fragments was used to design three oligonucleotide probes for screening the library. From 10{sup 6} independent recombinants, 18 clones were identified that hybridized to all three probes. These 18 recombinants contained cDNA inserts encoding a protein of 320 amino acid residues. In addition to the PP4 cDNA the authors identified 9 other recombinants encoding a protein with considerable similarity (74%) to PP4, which was termed PP4-X. PP4 and PP4-X belong to the lipocortin family, as judged by their homology to lipocortin I and calpactin I.

  4. Characterization of cDNA encoding human placental anticoagulant protein (PP4): Homology with the lipocortin family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cDNA library prepared from human placenta was screened for sequences encoding the placental protein 4 (PP4). PP4 is an anticoagulant protein that acts as an indirect inhibitor of the thromboplastin-specific complex, which is involved in the blood coagulation cascade. Partial amino acid sequence information from PP4-derived cyanogen bromide fragments was used to design three oligonucleotide probes for screening the library. From 106 independent recombinants, 18 clones were identified that hybridized to all three probes. These 18 recombinants contained cDNA inserts encoding a protein of 320 amino acid residues. In addition to the PP4 cDNA the authors identified 9 other recombinants encoding a protein with considerable similarity (74%) to PP4, which was termed PP4-X. PP4 and PP4-X belong to the lipocortin family, as judged by their homology to lipocortin I and calpactin I

  5. Immunization with Individual Proteins of the Lrp/AsnC Family Induces Protection Against Brucella melitensis 16M Challenges in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhui eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonoses worldwide. Subunit vaccines are promising for the prevention of human brucellosis. In our previous protective antigen screening studies, we identified a new protective antigen, BMEI0357, which belongs to the Lrp/asnC protein family, a conserved transcriptional regulator in bacteria that is absent in eukaryotes. In the present study, the Brucella genome annotation was screened and a total of 6 proteins were identified as members of the Lrp/AsnC family. Lrp/AsnC proteins have 2 domains that are conserved among the family members. However, sequence similarities between these proteins ranged from 9% to 50%, indicating high sequence heterogeneity. To test whether proteins of this family have similar characteristics, all 6 proteins were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins were purified and their protective efficacy was evaluated in BALB/c mice challenged with Brucella melitensis 16M. The results show that all 6 Lrp/AsnC proteins could induce a protective immune response against Brucella melitensis 16M. Antibodies against the Lrp/AsnC proteins were detected in the immunized mice. However, levels of antibodies against these proteins were relatively variable in human brucellosis sera. Taken together, our results show that these 6 proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family in Brucella could induce protective immune responses in mice.

  6. PfEMP1 – A Parasite Protein Family of Key Importance in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Immunity and Pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars; Jensen, Anja T R

    2015-01-01

    membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of high-molecular weight and highly variable antigens appears to be the most prominent. In this chapter, we aim to provide a systematic overview of the current knowledge about these proteins, their structure, their function, how they are presented on the erythrocyte...... surface, and how the var genes encoding them are regulated. The role of PfEMP1 in the pathogenesis of malaria, PfEMP1-specific immune responses, and the prospect of PfEMP1-specific vaccination against malaria are also covered briefly....

  7. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty-three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  8. A novel family of Toxoplasma IMC proteins displays a hierarchical organization and functions in coordinating parasite division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Josh R; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A; de Leon, Jessica Cruz; Huynh, My-Hang; Carruthers, Vern B; Morrissette, Naomi S; Bradley, Peter J

    2010-09-09

    Apicomplexans employ a peripheral membrane system called the inner membrane complex (IMC) for critical processes such as host cell invasion and daughter cell formation. We have identified a family of proteins that define novel sub-compartments of the Toxoplasma gondii IMC. These IMC Sub-compartment Proteins, ISP1, 2 and 3, are conserved throughout the Apicomplexa, but do not appear to be present outside the phylum. ISP1 localizes to the apical cap portion of the IMC, while ISP2 localizes to a central IMC region and ISP3 localizes to a central plus basal region of the complex. Targeting of all three ISPs is dependent upon N-terminal residues predicted for coordinated myristoylation and palmitoylation. Surprisingly, we show that disruption of ISP1 results in a dramatic relocalization of ISP2 and ISP3 to the apical cap. Although the N-terminal region of ISP1 is necessary and sufficient for apical cap targeting, exclusion of other family members requires the remaining C-terminal region of the protein. This gate-keeping function of ISP1 reveals an unprecedented mechanism of interactive and hierarchical targeting of proteins to establish these unique sub-compartments in the Toxoplasma IMC. Finally, we show that loss of ISP2 results in severe defects in daughter cell formation during endodyogeny, indicating a role for the ISP proteins in coordinating this unique process of Toxoplasma replication.

  9. A novel family of Toxoplasma IMC proteins displays a hierarchical organization and functions in coordinating parasite division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh R Beck

    Full Text Available Apicomplexans employ a peripheral membrane system called the inner membrane complex (IMC for critical processes such as host cell invasion and daughter cell formation. We have identified a family of proteins that define novel sub-compartments of the Toxoplasma gondii IMC. These IMC Sub-compartment Proteins, ISP1, 2 and 3, are conserved throughout the Apicomplexa, but do not appear to be present outside the phylum. ISP1 localizes to the apical cap portion of the IMC, while ISP2 localizes to a central IMC region and ISP3 localizes to a central plus basal region of the complex. Targeting of all three ISPs is dependent upon N-terminal residues predicted for coordinated myristoylation and palmitoylation. Surprisingly, we show that disruption of ISP1 results in a dramatic relocalization of ISP2 and ISP3 to the apical cap. Although the N-terminal region of ISP1 is necessary and sufficient for apical cap targeting, exclusion of other family members requires the remaining C-terminal region of the protein. This gate-keeping function of ISP1 reveals an unprecedented mechanism of interactive and hierarchical targeting of proteins to establish these unique sub-compartments in the Toxoplasma IMC. Finally, we show that loss of ISP2 results in severe defects in daughter cell formation during endodyogeny, indicating a role for the ISP proteins in coordinating this unique process of Toxoplasma replication.

  10. Identification and characterization of a novel Cut family cDNA that encodes human copper transporter protein CutC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper is an essential heavy metal trace element that plays important roles in cell physiology. The Cut family was associated with the copper homeostasis and involved in several important metabolisms, such as uptake, storage, delivery, and efflux of copper. In this study, a novel Cut family cDNA was isolated from the human fetal brain library, which encodes a 273 amino acid protein with a molecular mass of about 29.3 kDa and a calculated pI of 8.17. It was named hCutC (human copper transporter protein CutC). The ORF of hCutC gene was cloned into pQE30 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli M15. The secreted hCutC protein was purified to a homogenicity of 95% by using the Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. RT-PCR analysis showed that the hCutC gene expressed extensively in human tissues. Subcellular location analysis of hCutC-EGFP fusion protein revealed that hCutC was distributed to cytoplasm of COS-7 cells, and both cytoplasm and nucleus of AD293 cells. The results suggest that hCutC may be one shuttle protein and play important roles in intracellular copper trafficking

  11. Multimodal Interaction with BCL-2 Family Proteins Underlies the Pro-Apoptotic Activity of PUMA BH3

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Amanda L.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; LaBelle, James L.; Braun, Craig R.; Opoku-Nsiah, Kwadwo A.; Bird, Gregory H.; Walensky, Loren D.

    2013-01-01

    PUMA is a pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member that drives the apoptotic response to a diversity of p53-dependent and independent cellular insults. Deciphering the spectrum of PUMA interactions that confer its context-dependent pro-apoptotic properties remains a high priority goal. Here, we report the synthesis of PUMA SAHBs, structurally-stabilized PUMA BH3 helices that, in addition to broadly targeting anti-apoptotic proteins, directly bind to BAX. NMR, photocrosslinking, and biochemical analy...

  12. A novel mutation (G114V) in the prion protein gene in a family with inherited prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M-M; Peoc'h, K; Haïk, S; Bouchet, C; Vernengo, L; Mañana, G; Salamano, R; Carrasco, L; Lenne, M; Beaudry, P; Launay, J-M; Laplanche, J-L

    2005-04-26

    Inherited prion diseases are characterized by mutations in the PRNP gene encoding the prion protein (PrP). We report a novel missense mutation in the PRNP gene (resulting in a G114V mutation in PrP) in members of a Uruguayan family with clinical and histopathologic features of prion disease. Affected individuals were characterized by an early age at onset, initial neuropsychiatric symptoms, late dementia with prominent pyramidal and extrapyramidal symptoms, and long disease duration.

  13. A 14-3-3 Family Protein from Wild Soybean (Glycine Soja Regulates ABA Sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Sun

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the 14-3-3 family proteins are key regulators of multiple stress signal transduction cascades. By conducting genome-wide analysis, researchers have identified the soybean 14-3-3 family proteins; however, until now, there is still no direct genetic evidence showing the involvement of soybean 14-3-3s in ABA responses. Hence, in this study, based on the latest Glycine max genome on Phytozome v10.3, we initially analyzed the evolutionary relationship, genome organization, gene structure and duplication, and three-dimensional structure of soybean 14-3-3 family proteins systematically. Our results suggested that soybean 14-3-3 family was highly evolutionary conserved and possessed segmental duplication in evolution. Then, based on our previous functional characterization of a Glycine soja 14-3-3 protein GsGF14o in drought stress responses, we further investigated the expression characteristics of GsGF14o in detail, and demonstrated its positive roles in ABA sensitivity. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses in Glycine soja seedlings and GUS activity assays in PGsGF14O:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis showed that GsGF14o expression was moderately and rapidly induced by ABA treatment. As expected, GsGF14o overexpression in Arabidopsis augmented the ABA inhibition of seed germination and seedling growth, promoted the ABA induced stomata closure, and up-regulated the expression levels of ABA induced genes. Moreover, through yeast two hybrid analyses, we further demonstrated that GsGF14o physically interacted with the AREB/ABF transcription factors in yeast cells. Taken together, results presented in this study strongly suggested that GsGF14o played an important role in regulation of ABA sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

  14. A 14-3-3 Family Protein from Wild Soybean (Glycine Soja) Regulates ABA Sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Sun, Mingzhe; Jia, Bowei; Chen, Chao; Qin, Zhiwei; Yang, Kejun; Shen, Yang; Meiping, Zhang; Mingyang, Cong; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the 14-3-3 family proteins are key regulators of multiple stress signal transduction cascades. By conducting genome-wide analysis, researchers have identified the soybean 14-3-3 family proteins; however, until now, there is still no direct genetic evidence showing the involvement of soybean 14-3-3s in ABA responses. Hence, in this study, based on the latest Glycine max genome on Phytozome v10.3, we initially analyzed the evolutionary relationship, genome organization, gene structure and duplication, and three-dimensional structure of soybean 14-3-3 family proteins systematically. Our results suggested that soybean 14-3-3 family was highly evolutionary conserved and possessed segmental duplication in evolution. Then, based on our previous functional characterization of a Glycine soja 14-3-3 protein GsGF14o in drought stress responses, we further investigated the expression characteristics of GsGF14o in detail, and demonstrated its positive roles in ABA sensitivity. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses in Glycine soja seedlings and GUS activity assays in PGsGF14O:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis showed that GsGF14o expression was moderately and rapidly induced by ABA treatment. As expected, GsGF14o overexpression in Arabidopsis augmented the ABA inhibition of seed germination and seedling growth, promoted the ABA induced stomata closure, and up-regulated the expression levels of ABA induced genes. Moreover, through yeast two hybrid analyses, we further demonstrated that GsGF14o physically interacted with the AREB/ABF transcription factors in yeast cells. Taken together, results presented in this study strongly suggested that GsGF14o played an important role in regulation of ABA sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

  15. Evolutionary and Functional Analysis of the Key Pluripotency Factor Oct4 and Its Family Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinmin Zhang; Yuzhen Ma; Xiuying Liu; Qi Zhou; Xiu-Jie Wang

    2013-01-01

    Oct4 is one of the key pluripotent factors essential for embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.Oct4 belongs to the POU domain family,which contains multiples genes with various important functions.Although the function of Oct4 has been extensively studied,detailed comparison of Oct4 with other POU family genes and their evolutionary analysis are still lacking.Here,we systematically identified POU family genes from lower to higher animal species.We observed an expansion of POU family genes in vertebrates,with an additional increment in mammalian genomes.We analyzed the phylogenetic relationship,tissue specific expression profiles and regulatory networks of POU family genes of the human genome,and predicted the putative binding microRNAs of human POU family genes.These results provide the first comprehensive evolutionary and comparative analysis of POU family genes,which will help to better understand the relationships among POU family genes and shed light on their future functional studies.

  16. Identification and characterization of a chitin-binding protein purified from coelomic fluid of the lugworm Arenicola marina defining a novel protein sequence family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitashenkova, Nina; Moeller, Jesper Bonnet; Leth-Larsen, Rikke;

    2012-01-01

    , respectively, were isolated from a coelomocyte cDNA library. The two clones designated AML-1a and AML-1b were 92% identical at the protein level, and represent a novel type of protein sequence family. Purified AML-1 induced agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes, which could be inhibited by N......-acetylated saccharides. Recombinant AML-1b showed the same band pattern as the native protein, whereas recombinant AML-1a reduced lacked a 27-kDa band. AML-1b bound GlcNAc-derivatized columns and chitin, whereas AML-1a did not bind to these matrices. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed, that AML-1 is expressed...... by coelomocytes, in the nephridium and in round cells in epidermis and in eggs. Moreover, AML-1 expression was up-regulated in response to a parasitic infection. We conclude that AML-1 purified from coelomic fluid is encoded by AML-1b and represents a novel type of protein family that binds acetylated components....

  17. A combined LDL receptor/LDL receptor adaptor protein 1 mutation as the cause for severe familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufi, Muhidien; Rust, Stephan; Walter, Michael; Schaefer, Juergen R

    2013-05-25

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) results from impaired catabolism of plasma low density lipoproteins (LDL), thus leading to high cholesterol, atherosclerosis, and a high risk of premature myocardial infarction. FH is commonly caused by defects of the LDL receptor or its main ligand apoB, together mediating cellular uptake and clearance of plasma LDL. In some cases FH is inherited by mutations in the genes of PCSK9 and LDLRAP1 (ARH) in a dominant or recessive trait. The encoded proteins are required for LDL receptor stability and internalization within the LDLR pathway. To detect the underlying genetic defect in a family of Turkish descent showing unregular inheritance of severe FH, we screened the four candidate genes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) mutation analysis. We identified different combinatory mixtures of LDLR- and LDLRAP1-gene defects as the cause for severe familial hypercholesterolemia in this family. We also show for the first time that a heterozygous LDLR mutation combined with a homozygous LDLRAP1 mutation produces a more severe hypercholesterolemia phenotype in the same family than a homozygous LDLR mutation alone. PMID:23510778

  18. Insights into the evolution of the CSP gene family through the integration of evolutionary analysis and comparative protein modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna Kulmuni

    Full Text Available Insect chemical communication and chemosensory systems rely on proteins coded by several gene families. Here, we have combined protein modeling with evolutionary analysis in order to study the evolution and structure of chemosensory proteins (CSPs within arthropods and, more specifically, in ants by using the data available from sequenced genomes. Ants and other social insects are especially interesting model systems for the study of chemosensation, as they communicate in a highly complex social context and much of their communication relies on chemicals. Our ant protein models show how this complexity has shaped CSP evolution; the proteins are highly modifiable by their size, surface charge and binding pocket. Based on these findings, we divide ant CSPs into three groups: typical insect CSPs, an ancient 5-helical CSP and hymenopteran CSPs with a small binding pocket, and suggest that these groups likely serve different functions. The hymenopteran CSPs have duplicated repeatedly in individual ant lineages. In these CSPs, positive selection has driven surface charge changes, an observation which has possible implications for the interaction between CSPs and ligands or odorant receptors. Our phylogenetic analysis shows that within the Arthropoda the only highly conserved gene is the ancient 5-helical CSP, which is likely involved in an essential ubiquitous function rather than chemosensation. During insect evolution, the 6-helical CSPs have diverged and perform chemosensory functions among others. Our results contribute to the general knowledge of the structural differences between proteins underlying chemosensation and highlight those protein properties which have been affected by adaptive evolution.

  19. Insights into the evolution of the CSP gene family through the integration of evolutionary analysis and comparative protein modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmuni, Jonna; Havukainen, Heli

    2013-01-01

    Insect chemical communication and chemosensory systems rely on proteins coded by several gene families. Here, we have combined protein modeling with evolutionary analysis in order to study the evolution and structure of chemosensory proteins (CSPs) within arthropods and, more specifically, in ants by using the data available from sequenced genomes. Ants and other social insects are especially interesting model systems for the study of chemosensation, as they communicate in a highly complex social context and much of their communication relies on chemicals. Our ant protein models show how this complexity has shaped CSP evolution; the proteins are highly modifiable by their size, surface charge and binding pocket. Based on these findings, we divide ant CSPs into three groups: typical insect CSPs, an ancient 5-helical CSP and hymenopteran CSPs with a small binding pocket, and suggest that these groups likely serve different functions. The hymenopteran CSPs have duplicated repeatedly in individual ant lineages. In these CSPs, positive selection has driven surface charge changes, an observation which has possible implications for the interaction between CSPs and ligands or odorant receptors. Our phylogenetic analysis shows that within the Arthropoda the only highly conserved gene is the ancient 5-helical CSP, which is likely involved in an essential ubiquitous function rather than chemosensation. During insect evolution, the 6-helical CSPs have diverged and perform chemosensory functions among others. Our results contribute to the general knowledge of the structural differences between proteins underlying chemosensation and highlight those protein properties which have been affected by adaptive evolution. PMID:23723994

  20. The repertoire of olfactory C family G protein-coupled receptors in zebrafish: candidate chemosensory receptors for amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngai John

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate odorant receptors comprise at least three types of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs: the OR, V1R, and V2R/V2R-like receptors, the latter group belonging to the C family of GPCRs. These receptor families are thought to receive chemosensory information from a wide spectrum of odorant and pheromonal cues that influence critical animal behaviors such as feeding, reproduction and other social interactions. Results Using genome database mining and other informatics approaches, we identified and characterized the repertoire of 54 intact "V2R-like" olfactory C family GPCRs in the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analysis – which also included a set of 34 C family GPCRs from fugu – places the fish olfactory receptors in three major groups, which are related to but clearly distinct from other C family GPCRs, including the calcium sensing receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABA-B receptor, T1R taste receptors, and the major group of V2R vomeronasal receptor families. Interestingly, an analysis of sequence conservation and selective pressure in the zebrafish receptors revealed the retention of a conserved sequence motif previously shown to be required for ligand binding in other amino acid receptors. Conclusion Based on our findings, we propose that the repertoire of zebrafish olfactory C family GPCRs has evolved to allow the detection and discrimination of a spectrum of amino acid and/or amino acid-based compounds, which are potent olfactory cues in fish. Furthermore, as the major groups of fish receptors and mammalian V2R receptors appear to have diverged significantly from a common ancestral gene(s, these receptors likely mediate chemosensation of different classes of chemical structures by their respective organisms.

  1. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque, 1818) tetraspanin membrane protein family: Identification, characterization, and expression analysis of CD63 cDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    CD63, known as lysosome associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP-3), is a member of the tetraspanin integral membrane protein family. This protein plays many important roles in immuno-physiological functions. In this communication, we report the identification, characterization, and expression analysis...

  2. Identification of a novel PROS1 c.1113T -> GG frameshift mutation in a family with mixed type I/type III protein S deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, Min Ki; Mulder, Rene; Platteel, Mathieu; Brouwer, Jan-Leendert P.; van der Steege, Gerrit; van der Meer, Jan

    2006-01-01

    We report a family with type I and type III protein S (PS) deficiency, which showed to be phenotypic variants of the same genetic disease. Direct sequencing analysis of the PROS1 gene was performed to establish the genotype. The ratio of protein C antigen and total PS antigen levels (protein C/S rat

  3. Telencephalin protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis by activating the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping Yang; Dapeng Wu; Xiaojie Zhang; Xiang Wang; Yi Peng; Zhiping Hu

    2012-01-01

    Telencephalin is a neural glycoprotein that reduces apoptosis induced by amyloid beta protein in the human neural tumor cell line PAJU.In this study,we examined the role of the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway in this process.Western blot analysis demonstrated that telencephalin,phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B were not expressed in PAJU cells transfected with empty plasmid,while they were expressed in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid.After treatment with 1.0 nM amyloid beta protein 42,expression of telencephalin and phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B in the transfected cells gradually diminished,while levels of phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin increased.In addition,the high levels of telencephalin,phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B expression in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid could be suppressed by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002.These findings indicate that telencephalin activates the ezrin/radixin/moesin family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis.

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein (IGFBP) and IGFBP-related Protein Gene Families

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Buel D.; Roalson, Eric H.; Thompson, Cullen

    2007-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) activity is regulated by six high affinity binding proteins (IGFBPs) and possibly by some of the nine IGFBP-related proteins (IGFBP-rPs). To determine the phylogenetic relationship of this proposed gene superfamily, we conducted maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference analyses on a matrix of amino acid sequences from a diversity of vertebrate species. A single most likely phylogram, ML bootstrap, and Bayesian consensus tree of 10,000,000 generations rev...

  5. Expression of the Prion Protein Family Member Shadoo Causes Drug Hypersensitivity That Is Diminished by the Coexpression of the Wild Type Prion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyeste, Antal; Bencsura, Petra; Vida, István; Hegyi, Zoltán; Homolya, László; Fodor, Elfrieda; Welker, Ervin

    2016-02-26

    The prion protein (PrP) seems to exert both neuroprotective and neurotoxic activities. The toxic activities are associated with the C-terminal globular parts in the absence of the flexible N terminus, specifically the hydrophobic domain (HD) or the central region (CR). The wild type prion protein (PrP-WT), having an intact flexible part, exhibits neuroprotective qualities by virtue of diminishing many of the cytotoxic effects of these mutant prion proteins (PrPΔHD and PrPΔCR) when coexpressed. The prion protein family member Doppel, which possesses a three-dimensional fold similar to the C-terminal part of PrP, is also harmful to neuronal and other cells in various models, a phenotype that can also be eliminated by the coexpression of PrP-WT. In contrast, another prion protein family member, Shadoo (Sho), a natively disordered protein possessing structural features similar to the flexible N-terminal tail of PrP, exhibits PrP-WT-like protective properties. Here, we report that, contrary to expectations, Sho expression in SH-SY5Y or HEK293 cells induces the same toxic phenotype of drug hypersensitivity as PrPΔCR. This effect is exhibited in a dose-dependent manner and is also counteracted by the coexpression of PrP-WT. The opposing effects of Shadoo in different model systems revealed here may be explored to help discern the relationship of the various toxic activities of mutant PrPs with each other and the neurotoxic effects seen in neurodegenerative diseases, such as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy and Alzheimer disease.

  6. Cloning and mutational analysis of the gamma gene from Azotobacter vinelandii defines a new family of proteins capable of metallocluster binding and protein stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Luis M; Rangaraj, Priya; Homer, Mary J; Roberts, Gary P; Ludden, Paul W

    2002-04-19

    Dinitrogenase is a heterotetrameric (alpha(2)beta(2)) enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium and contains the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) at its active site. Certain Azotobacter vinelandii mutant strains unable to synthesize FeMo-co accumulate an apo form of dinitrogenase (lacking FeMo-co), with a subunit composition alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2), which can be activated in vitro by the addition of FeMo-co. The gamma protein is able to bind FeMo-co or apodinitrogenase independently, leading to the suggestion that it facilitates FeMo-co insertion into the apoenzyme. In this work, the non-nif gene encoding the gamma subunit (nafY) has been cloned, sequenced, and found to encode a NifY-like protein. This finding, together with a wealth of knowledge on the biochemistry of proteins involved in FeMo-co and FeV-co biosyntheses, allows us to define a new family of iron and molybdenum (or vanadium) cluster-binding proteins that includes NifY, NifX, VnfX, and now gamma. In vitro FeMo-co insertion experiments presented in this work demonstrate that gamma stabilizes apodinitrogenase in the conformation required to be fully activable by the cofactor. Supporting this conclusion, we show that strains containing mutations in both nafY and nifX are severely affected in diazotrophic growth and extractable dinitrogenase activity when cultured under conditions that are likely to occur in natural environments. This finding reveals the physiological importance of the apodinitrogenase-stabilizing role of which both proteins are capable. The relationship between the metal cluster binding capabilities of this new family of proteins and the ability of some of them to stabilize an apoenzyme is still an open matter. PMID:11823455

  7. Wide diversity in structure and expression profiles among members of the Caenorhabditis elegans globin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinogradov Serge

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of high throughput genome sequencing facilities and powerful high performance bioinformatic tools has highlighted hitherto unexpected wide occurrence of globins in the three kingdoms of life. In silico analysis of the genome of C. elegans identified 33 putative globin genes. It remains a mystery why this tiny animal might need so many globins. As an inroad to understanding this complexity we initiated a structural and functional analysis of the globin family in C. elegans. Results All 33 C. elegans putative globin genes are transcribed. The translated sequences have the essential signatures of single domain bona fide globins, or they contain a distinct globin domain that is part of a larger protein. All globin domains can be aligned so as to fit the globin fold, but internal interhelical and N- and C-terminal extensions and a variety of amino acid substitutions generate much structural diversity among the globins of C. elegans. Likewise, the encoding genes lack a conserved pattern of intron insertion positioning. We analyze the expression profiles of the globins during the progression of the life cycle, and we find that distinct subsets of globins are induced, or repressed, in wild-type dauers and in daf-2(e1370/insulin-receptor mutant adults, although these animals share several physiological features including resistance to elevated temperature, oxidative stress and hypoxic death. Several globin genes are upregulated following oxygen deprivation and we find that HIF-1 and DAF-2 each are required for this response. Our data indicate that the DAF-2 regulated transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO positively modulates hif-1 transcription under anoxia but opposes expression of the HIF-1 responsive globin genes itself. In contrast, the canonical globin of C. elegans, ZK637.13, is not responsive to anoxia. Reduced DAF-2 signaling leads to enhanced transcription of this globin and DAF-16 is required for this effect

  8. A family of RS domain proteins with novel subcellular localization and trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, Steven J.; Thomas C Schulz; Davey, Philippa; Claudianos, Charles; Russell, Carrie; Peter D. Rathjen

    2005-01-01

    We report the sequence, conservation and cell biology of a novel protein, Psc1, which is expressed and regulated within the embryonic pluripotent cell population of the mouse. The Psc1 sequence includes an RS domain and an RNA recognition motif (RRM), and a sequential arrangement of protein motifs that has not been demonstrated for other RS domain proteins. This arrangement was conserved in a second mouse protein (BAC34721). The identification of Psc1 and BAC34721 homologues in vertebrates an...

  9. The maize INDETERMINATE1 flowering time regulator defines a highly conserved zinc finger protein family in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colasanti Joseph

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maize INDETERMINATE1 gene, ID1, is a key regulator of the transition to flowering and the founding member of a transcription factor gene family that encodes a protein with a distinct arrangement of zinc finger motifs. The zinc fingers and surrounding sequence make up the signature ID domain (IDD, which appears to be found in all higher plant genomes. The presence of zinc finger domains and previous biochemical studies showing that ID1 binds to DNA suggests that members of this gene family are involved in transcriptional regulation. Results Comparison of IDD genes identified in Arabidopsis and rice genomes, and all IDD genes discovered in maize EST and genomic databases, suggest that ID1 is a unique member of this gene family. High levels of sequence similarity amongst all IDD genes from maize, rice and Arabidopsis suggest that they are derived from a common ancestor. Several unique features of ID1 suggest that it is a divergent member of the maize IDD family. Although no clear ID1 ortholog was identified in the Arabidopsis genome, highly similar genes that encode proteins with identity extending beyond the ID domain were isolated from rice and sorghum. Phylogenetic comparisons show that these putative orthologs, along with maize ID1, form a group separate from other IDD genes. In contrast to ID1 mRNA, which is detected exclusively in immature leaves, several maize IDD genes showed a broad range of expression in various tissues. Further, Western analysis with an antibody that cross-reacts with ID1 protein and potential orthologs from rice and sorghum shows that all three proteins are detected in immature leaves only. Conclusion Comparative genomic analysis shows that the IDD zinc finger family is highly conserved among both monocots and dicots. The leaf-specific ID1 expression pattern distinguishes it from other maize IDD genes examined. A similar leaf-specific localization pattern was observed for the putative ID1 protein

  10. ngs (notochord granular surface) gene encodes a novel type of intermediate filament family protein essential for notochord maintenance in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiangjun; Xia, Zhidan; Zu, Yao; Telfer, Helena; Hu, Jing; Yu, Jingyi; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen; Lin, Shuo; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-25

    The notochord is an important organ involved in embryonic patterning and locomotion. In zebrafish, the mature notochord consists of a single stack of fully differentiated, large vacuolated cells called chordocytes, surrounded by a single layer of less differentiated notochordal epithelial cells called chordoblasts. Through genetic analysis of zebrafish lines carrying pseudo-typed retroviral insertions, a mutant exhibiting a defective notochord with a granular appearance was isolated, and the corresponding gene was identified as ngs (notochord granular surface), which was specifically expressed in the notochord. In the mutants, the notochord started to degenerate from 32 hours post-fertilization, and the chordocytes were then gradually replaced by smaller cells derived from chordoblasts. The granular notochord phenotype was alleviated by anesthetizing the mutant embryos with tricaine to prevent muscle contraction and locomotion. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ngs encodes a new type of intermediate filament (IF) family protein, which we named chordostatin based on its function. Under the transmission electron microcopy, bundles of 10-nm-thick IF-like filaments were enriched in the chordocytes of wild-type zebrafish embryos, whereas the chordocytes in ngs mutants lacked IF-like structures. Furthermore, chordostatin-enhanced GFP (EGFP) fusion protein assembled into a filamentous network specifically in chordocytes. Taken together, our work demonstrates that ngs encodes a novel type of IF protein and functions to maintain notochord integrity for larval development and locomotion. Our work sheds light on the mechanisms of notochord structural maintenance, as well as the evolution and biological function of IF family proteins.

  11. SVM-Prot 2016: A Web-Server for Machine Learning Prediction of Protein Functional Families from Sequence Irrespective of Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao Feng; Li, Shuang; Zeng, Xian; Chen, Shang Ying; Zhang, Peng; Qin, Chu; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Zhe; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Yu Zong

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of protein function is important for biological, medical and therapeutic studies, but many proteins are still unknown in function. There is a need for more improved functional prediction methods. Our SVM-Prot web-server employed a machine learning method for predicting protein functional families from protein sequences irrespective of similarity, which complemented those similarity-based and other methods in predicting diverse classes of proteins including the distantly-related proteins and homologous proteins of different functions. Since its publication in 2003, we made major improvements to SVM-Prot with (1) expanded coverage from 54 to 192 functional families, (2) more diverse protein descriptors protein representation, (3) improved predictive performances due to the use of more enriched training datasets and more variety of protein descriptors, (4) newly integrated BLAST analysis option for assessing proteins in the SVM-Prot predicted functional families that were similar in sequence to a query protein, and (5) newly added batch submission option for supporting the classification of multiple proteins. Moreover, 2 more machine learning approaches, K nearest neighbor and probabilistic neural networks, were added for facilitating collective assessment of protein functions by multiple methods. SVM-Prot can be accessed at http://bidd2.nus.edu.sg/cgi-bin/svmprot/svmprot.cgi. PMID:27525735

  12. SVM-Prot 2016: A Web-Server for Machine Learning Prediction of Protein Functional Families from Sequence Irrespective of Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying Hong; Xu, Jing Yu; Tao, Lin; Li, Xiao Feng; Li, Shuang; Zeng, Xian; Chen, Shang Ying; Zhang, Peng; Qin, Chu; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Zhe; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Yu Zong

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of protein function is important for biological, medical and therapeutic studies, but many proteins are still unknown in function. There is a need for more improved functional prediction methods. Our SVM-Prot web-server employed a machine learning method for predicting protein functional families from protein sequences irrespective of similarity, which complemented those similarity-based and other methods in predicting diverse classes of proteins including the distantly-related proteins and homologous proteins of different functions. Since its publication in 2003, we made major improvements to SVM-Prot with (1) expanded coverage from 54 to 192 functional families, (2) more diverse protein descriptors protein representation, (3) improved predictive performances due to the use of more enriched training datasets and more variety of protein descriptors, (4) newly integrated BLAST analysis option for assessing proteins in the SVM-Prot predicted functional families that were similar in sequence to a query protein, and (5) newly added batch submission option for supporting the classification of multiple proteins. Moreover, 2 more machine learning approaches, K nearest neighbor and probabilistic neural networks, were added for facilitating collective assessment of protein functions by multiple methods. SVM-Prot can be accessed at http://bidd2.nus.edu.sg/cgi-bin/svmprot/svmprot.cgi. PMID:27525735

  13. Familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with a point mutation at codon 210 of the prion protein gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Nancy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, the most known human prion disease, is usually sporadic but approximately 15% of the cases are familial. To date, seven CJD cases with codon 210 mutation (GTT to ATT have been reported in the literature. We describe a case of a 57 year-old woman who presented gait disturbances and rapidly progressive dementia, leading to death four months after onset. Electroencephalogram revealed periodic activity, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed hypersignal in basal ganglia, and test for 14-3-3 protein was strongly positive in the CSF. The complete prion protein gene coding region was sequenced after PCR amplification, showing a point mutation in codon 210. This is the first case of CJD with codon 210 mutation diagnosed in Brazil. We emphasize the role of genetic search for prion protein gene mutation, even in patients presenting clinical features resembling sporadic CJD.

  14. An atypical member of the light-harvesting complex stress-related protein family modulates diatom responses to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Benjamin; Rogato, Alessandra; de Martino, Alessandra; Coesel, Sacha; Cardol, Pierre; Bowler, Chris; Falciatore, Angela; Finazzi, Giovanni

    2010-10-19

    Diatoms are prominent phytoplanktonic organisms that contribute around 40% of carbon assimilation in the oceans. They grow and perform optimally in variable environments, being able to cope with unpredictable changes in the amount and quality of light. The molecular mechanisms regulating diatom light responses are, however, still obscure. Using knockdown Phaeodactylum tricornutum transgenic lines, we reveal the key function of a member of the light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) protein family, denoted LHCX1, in modulation of excess light energy dissipation. In contrast to green algae, this gene is already maximally expressed in nonstressful light conditions and encodes a protein required for efficient light responses and growth. LHCX1 also influences natural variability in photoresponse, as evidenced in ecotypes isolated from different latitudes that display different LHCX1 protein levels. We conclude, therefore, that this gene plays a pivotal role in managing light responses in diatoms. PMID:20921421

  15. Family-wide Structural Analysis of Human Numb-Associated Protein Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Sorrell, Fiona J.; Szklarz, Marta; Abdul Azeez, Kamal R.; Elkins, Jon M.; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Summary The highly diverse Numb-associated kinase (NAK) family has been linked to broad cellular functions including receptor-mediated endocytosis, Notch pathway modulation, osteoblast differentiation, and dendrite morphogenesis. Consequently, NAK kinases play a key role in a diverse range of diseases from Parkinson's and prostate cancer to HIV. Due to the plasticity of this kinase family, NAK kinases are often inhibited by approved or investigational drugs and have been associated with side ...

  16. Remarkable evolutionary relatedness among the enzymes and proteins from the α-amylase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeček, Štefan; Gabriško, Marek

    2016-07-01

    The α-amylase is a ubiquitous starch hydrolase catalyzing the cleavage of the α-1,4-glucosidic bonds in an endo-fashion. Various α-amylases originating from different taxonomic sources may differ from each other significantly in their exact substrate preference and product profile. Moreover, it also seems to be clear that at least two different amino acid sequences utilizing two different catalytic machineries have evolved to execute the same α-amylolytic specificity. The two have been classified in the Cabohydrate-Active enZyme database, the CAZy, in the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13 and GH57. While the former and the larger α-amylase family GH13 evidently forms the clan GH-H with the families GH70 and GH77, the latter and the smaller α-amylase family GH57 has only been predicted to maybe define a future clan with the family GH119. Sequences and several tens of enzyme specificities found throughout all three kingdoms in many taxa provide an interesting material for evolutionarily oriented studies that have demonstrated remarkable observations. This review emphasizes just the three of them: (1) a close relatedness between the plant and archaeal α-amylases from the family GH13; (2) a common ancestry in the family GH13 of animal heavy chains of heteromeric amino acid transporter rBAT and 4F2 with the microbial α-glucosidases; and (3) the unique sequence features in the primary structures of amylomaltases from the genus Borrelia from the family GH77. Although the three examples cannot represent an exhaustive list of exceptional topics worth to be interested in, they may demonstrate the importance these enzymes possess in the overall scientific context. PMID:27154042

  17. Structural and functional studies of a family of Dictyostelium discoideum developmentally regulated, prestalk genes coding for small proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escalante Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum executes a multicellular development program upon starvation. This morphogenetic process requires the differential regulation of a large number of genes and is coordinated by extracellular signals. The MADS-box transcription factor SrfA is required for several stages of development, including slug migration and spore terminal differentiation. Results Subtractive hybridization allowed the isolation of a gene, sigN (SrfA-induced gene N, that was dependent on the transcription factor SrfA for expression at the slug stage of development. Homology searches detected the existence of a large family of sigN-related genes in the Dictyostelium discoideum genome. The 13 most similar genes are grouped in two regions of chromosome 2 and have been named Group1 and Group2 sigN genes. The putative encoded proteins are 87–89 amino acids long. All these genes have a similar structure, composed of a first exon containing a 13 nucleotides long open reading frame and a second exon comprising the remaining of the putative coding region. The expression of these genes is induced at10 hours of development. Analyses of their promoter regions indicate that these genes are expressed in the prestalk region of developing structures. The addition of antibodies raised against SigN Group 2 proteins induced disintegration of multi-cellular structures at the mound stage of development. Conclusion A large family of genes coding for small proteins has been identified in D. discoideum. Two groups of very similar genes from this family have been shown to be specifically expressed in prestalk cells during development. Functional studies using antibodies raised against Group 2 SigN proteins indicate that these genes could play a role during multicellular development.

  18. C-terminal motif prediction in eukaryotic proteomes using comparative genomics and statistical over-representation across protein families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan S; Provart, Nicholas J; Cutler, Sean R

    2007-01-01

    Background The carboxy termini of proteins are a frequent site of activity for a variety of biologically important functions, ranging from post-translational modification to protein targeting. Several short peptide motifs involved in protein sorting roles and dependent upon their proximity to the C-terminus for proper function have already been characterized. As a limited number of such motifs have been identified, the potential exists for genome-wide statistical analysis and comparative genomics to reveal novel peptide signatures functioning in a C-terminal dependent manner. We have applied a novel methodology to the prediction of C-terminal-anchored peptide motifs involving a simple z-statistic and several techniques for improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Results We examined the statistical over-representation of position-specific C-terminal tripeptides in 7 eukaryotic proteomes. Sequence randomization models and simple-sequence masking were applied to the successful reduction of background noise. Similarly, as C-terminal homology among members of large protein families may artificially inflate tripeptide counts in an irrelevant and obfuscating manner, gene-family clustering was performed prior to the analysis in order to assess tripeptide over-representation across protein families as opposed to across all proteins. Finally, comparative genomics was used to identify tripeptides significantly occurring in multiple species. This approach has been able to predict, to our knowledge, all C-terminally anchored targeting motifs present in the literature. These include the PTS1 peroxisomal targeting signal (SKL*), the ER-retention signal (K/HDEL*), the ER-retrieval signal for membrane bound proteins (KKxx*), the prenylation signal (CC*) and the CaaX box prenylation motif. In addition to a high statistical over-representation of these known motifs, a collection of significant tripeptides with a high propensity for biological function exists between species, among

  19. The UlaG protein family defines novel structural and functional motifs grafted on an ancient RNase fold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coll Miquel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial populations are highly successful at colonizing new habitats and adapting to changing environmental conditions, partly due to their capacity to evolve novel virulence and metabolic pathways in response to stress conditions and to shuffle them by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. A common theme in the evolution of new functions consists of gene duplication followed by functional divergence. UlaG, a unique manganese-dependent metallo-β-lactamase (MBL enzyme involved in L-ascorbate metabolism by commensal and symbiotic enterobacteria, provides a model for the study of the emergence of new catalytic activities from the modification of an ancient fold. Furthermore, UlaG is the founding member of the so-called UlaG-like (UlaGL protein family, a recently established and poorly characterized family comprising divalent (and perhaps trivalent metal-binding MBLs that catalyze transformations on phosphorylated sugars and nucleotides. Results Here we combined protein structure-guided and sequence-only molecular phylogenetic analyses to dissect the molecular evolution of UlaG and to study its phylogenomic distribution, its relatedness with present-day UlaGL protein sequences and functional conservation. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that UlaGL sequences are present in Bacteria and Archaea, with bona fide orthologs found mainly in mammalian and plant-associated Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The incongruence between the UlaGL tree and known species trees indicates exchange by HGT and suggests that the UlaGL-encoding genes provided a growth advantage under changing conditions. Our search for more distantly related protein sequences aided by structural homology has uncovered that UlaGL sequences have a common evolutionary origin with present-day RNA processing and metabolizing MBL enzymes widespread in Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. This observation suggests an ancient origin for the UlaGL family within the broader trunk

  20. Plant acyl-CoA-binding proteins: An emerging family involved in plant development and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhi-Yan; Arias, Tatiana; Meng, Wei; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) was first identified in mammals as a neuropeptide, and was demonstrated to belong to an important house-keeping protein family that extends across eukaryotes and some prokaryotes. In plants, the Arabidopsis ACBP family consists of six AtACBPs (AtACBP1 to AtACBP6), and has been investigated using gene knock-out mutants and overexpression lines. Herein, recent findings on the AtACBPs are examined to provide an insight on their functions in various plant developmental processes, such as embryo and seed development, seed dormancy and germination, seedling development and cuticle formation, as well as their roles under various environmental stresses. The significance of the AtACBPs in acyl-CoA/lipid metabolism, with focus on their interaction with long to very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters and their potential role in the formation of lipid droplets in seeds and vegetative tissues are discussed. In addition, recent findings on the rice ACBP family are presented. The similarities and differences between ACBPs from Arabidopsis and rice, that represent eudicot and monocot model plants, respectively, are analyzed and the evolution of plant ACBPs by phylogenetic analysis reviewed. Finally, we propose potential uses of plant ACBPs in phytoremediation and in agriculture related to the improvement of environmental stress tolerance and seed oil production. PMID:27368137

  1. BCL-2 family proteins as 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets and determinants of response in myeloid malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenberger, J M; Kornblau, S M; Pierceall, W E; Lena, R; Chow, D; Shi, C-X; Mantei, J; Ahmann, G; Gonzales, I M; Choudhary, A; Valdez, R; Camoriano, J; Fauble, V; Tiedemann, R E; Qiu, Y H; Coombes, K R; Cardone, M; Braggio, E; Yin, H; Azorsa, D O; Mesa, R A; Stewart, A K; Tibes, R

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic molecular vulnerabilities enhancing hypomethylating agents in myeloid malignancies have remained elusive. RNA-interference drug modifier screens identified antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members as potent 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets. In further dissecting BCL-XL, BCL-2 and MCL-1 contribution to 5-Azacytidine activity, siRNA silencing of BCL-XL and MCL-1, but not BCL-2, exhibited variable synergy with 5-Azacytidine in vitro. The BCL-XL, BCL-2 and BCL-w inhibitor ABT-737 sensitized most cell lines more potently compared with the selective BCL-2 inhibitor ABT-199, which synergized with 5-Azacytidine mostly at higher doses. Ex vivo, ABT-737 enhanced 5-Azacytidine activity across primary AML, MDS and MPN specimens. Protein levels of BCL-XL, BCL-2 and MCL-1 in 577 AML patient samples showed overlapping expression across AML FAB subtypes and heterogeneous expression within subtypes, further supporting a concept of dual/multiple BCL-2 family member targeting consistent with RNAi and pharmacologic results. Consequently, silencing of MCL-1 and BCL-XL increased the activity of ABT-199. Functional interrogation of BCL-2 family proteins by BH3 profiling performed on patient samples significantly discriminated clinical response versus resistance to 5-Azacytidine-based therapies. On the basis of these results, we propose a clinical trial of navitoclax (clinical-grade ABT-737) combined with 5-Azacytidine in myeloid malignancies, as well as to prospectively validate BH3 profiling in predicting 5-Azacytidine response. PMID:24451410

  2. BCL-2 family proteins as 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets and determinants of response in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenberger, J M; Kornblau, S M; Pierceall, W E; Lena, R; Chow, D; Shi, C-X; Mantei, J; Ahmann, G; Gonzales, I M; Choudhary, A; Valdez, R; Camoriano, J; Fauble, V; Tiedemann, R E; Qiu, Y H; Coombes, K R; Cardone, M; Braggio, E; Yin, H; Azorsa, D O; Mesa, R A; Stewart, A K; Tibes, R

    2014-08-01

    Synergistic molecular vulnerabilities enhancing hypomethylating agents in myeloid malignancies have remained elusive. RNA-interference drug modifier screens identified antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members as potent 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets. In further dissecting BCL-XL, BCL-2 and MCL-1 contribution to 5-Azacytidine activity, siRNA silencing of BCL-XL and MCL-1, but not BCL-2, exhibited variable synergy with 5-Azacytidine in vitro. The BCL-XL, BCL-2 and BCL-w inhibitor ABT-737 sensitized most cell lines more potently compared with the selective BCL-2 inhibitor ABT-199, which synergized with 5-Azacytidine mostly at higher doses. Ex vivo, ABT-737 enhanced 5-Azacytidine activity across primary AML, MDS and MPN specimens. Protein levels of BCL-XL, BCL-2 and MCL-1 in 577 AML patient samples showed overlapping expression across AML FAB subtypes and heterogeneous expression within subtypes, further supporting a concept of dual/multiple BCL-2 family member targeting consistent with RNAi and pharmacologic results. Consequently, silencing of MCL-1 and BCL-XL increased the activity of ABT-199. Functional interrogation of BCL-2 family proteins by BH3 profiling performed on patient samples significantly discriminated clinical response versus resistance to 5-Azacytidine-based therapies. On the basis of these results, we propose a clinical trial of navitoclax (clinical-grade ABT-737) combined with 5-Azacytidine in myeloid malignancies, as well as to prospectively validate BH3 profiling in predicting 5-Azacytidine response. PMID:24451410

  3. Novel interactions between the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 and the NFAR protein family: Implications for the HTLV lifecycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane; Hall, William W; Ratner, Lee; Sheehy, Noreen

    2016-07-01

    The human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1/HTLV-2) antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 play key roles in the HTLV lifecycles and persistence in the host. Nuclear Factors Associated with double-stranded RNA (NFAR) proteins NF90/110 function in the lifecycles of several viruses and participate in host innate immunity against infection and oncogenesis. Using GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate specific novel interactions between HBZ/APH-2 and NF90/110 and characterised the protein domains involved. Moreover we show that NF90/110 significantly enhance Tax mediated LTR activation, an effect that was abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. Additionally we found that HBZ and APH-2 modulate the promoter activity of survivin and are capable of antagonising NF110-mediated survivin activation. Thus interactions between HTLV antisense proteins and the NFAR protein family have an overall positive impact on HTLV infection. Hence NFARs may represent potential therapeutic targets in HTLV infected cells. PMID:27110706

  4. Virulence Plasmid of Rhodococcus equi Contains Inducible Gene Family Encoding Secreted Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Barbara A.; Prescott, John F.; Palmer, Guy H.; Takai, Shinji; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Alperin, Debra C.; Hines, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals. This facultative intracellular pathogen produces similar lesions in immunocompromised humans, particularly in AIDS patients. Virulent strains of R. equi bear a large plasmid that is required for intracellular survival within macrophages and for virulence in foals and mice. Only two plasmid-encoded proteins have been described previously; a 15- to 17-kDa surface protein designated virulence-associated protein A (VapA) and an a...

  5. A Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein with a high activity against members of the family Noctuidae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, B.; Buysse, L; Decock, C.; Jansens, S.; Piens, C; Saey, B; Seurinck, J; Van Audenhove, K; Van Rie, J.; A. van Vliet; Peferoen, M.

    1996-01-01

    The full characterization of a novel insecticidal crystal protein, named Cry9Ca1 according to the revised nomenclature for Cry proteins, from Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi is reported. The crystal protein has 1,157 amino acids and a molecular mass of 129.8 kDa. It has the typical features of the Lepidoptera-active crystal proteins such as five conserved sequence blocks. Also, it is truncated upon trypsin digestion to a toxic fragment of 68.7 kDa by removal of 43 amino acids at the ...

  6. FERM family proteins and their importance in cellular movements and wound healing (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanquet, David C; Ye, Lin; Harding, Keith G; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-07-01

    Motility is a requirement for a number of biological processes, including embryonic development, neuronal development, immune responses, cancer progression and wound healing. Specific to wound healing is the migration of endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other key cellular players into the wound space. Aberrations in wound healing can result in either chronic wounds or abnormally healed wounds. The protein 4.1R, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) superfamily consists of over 40 proteins all containing a three lobed N-terminal FERM domain which binds a variety of cell-membrane associated proteins and lipids. The C-terminal ends of these proteins typically contain an actin-binding domain (ABD). These proteins therefore mediate the linkage between the cell membrane and the actin cytoskeleton, and are involved in cellular movements and migration. Certain FERM proteins have been shown to promote cancer metastasis via this very mechanism. Herein we review the effects of a number of FERM proteins on wound healing and cancer. We show how these proteins typically aid wound healing through their effects on increasing cellular migration and movements, but also typically promote metastasis in cancer. We conclude that FERM proteins play important roles in cellular migration, with markedly different outcomes in the context of cancer and wound healing.

  7. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): Codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medori, R.; Tritschler, H.J. (Universita di Bologna (Italy))

    1993-10-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp) [yields] AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. The authors confirmed the 178[sup Asn] mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178[sup Asn] reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straeussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129[sup Met/Val]. Moreover, of five 178[sup Asn] individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129[sup Met] and three have 129[sup Met/Val], suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178[sup Asn] mutation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. SCPS: a fast implementation of a spectral method for detecting protein families on a genome-wide scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paccanaro Alberto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important problem in genomics is the automatic inference of groups of homologous proteins from pairwise sequence similarities. Several approaches have been proposed for this task which are "local" in the sense that they assign a protein to a cluster based only on the distances between that protein and the other proteins in the set. It was shown recently that global methods such as spectral clustering have better performance on a wide variety of datasets. However, currently available implementations of spectral clustering methods mostly consist of a few loosely coupled Matlab scripts that assume a fair amount of familiarity with Matlab programming and hence they are inaccessible for large parts of the research community. Results SCPS (Spectral Clustering of Protein Sequences is an efficient and user-friendly implementation of a spectral method for inferring protein families. The method uses only pairwise sequence similarities, and is therefore practical when only sequence information is available. SCPS was tested on difficult sets of proteins whose relationships were extracted from the SCOP database, and its results were extensively compared with those obtained using other popular protein clustering algorithms such as TribeMCL, hierarchical clustering and connected component analysis. We show that SCPS is able to identify many of the family/superfamily relationships correctly and that the quality of the obtained clusters as indicated by their F-scores is consistently better than all the other methods we compared it with. We also demonstrate the scalability of SCPS by clustering the entire SCOP database (14,183 sequences and the complete genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (6,690 sequences. Conclusions Besides the spectral method, SCPS also implements connected component analysis and hierarchical clustering, it integrates TribeMCL, it provides different cluster quality tools, it can extract human-readable protein

  9. PE11, a PE/PPE family protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is involved in cell wall remodeling and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parul; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Reddy, Jala Ram Chandra; Prasad, R B N; Kotturu, Sandeep Kumar; Ghosh, Sudip; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2016-02-23

    The role of the unique proline-glutamic acid (PE)/proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE) family of proteins in the pathophysiology and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is not clearly understood. One of the PE family proteins, PE11 (LipX or Rv1169c), specific to pathogenic mycobacteria is found to be over-expressed during infection of macrophages and in active TB patients. In this study, we report that M. smegmatis expressing PE11 (Msmeg-PE11) exhibited altered colony morphology and cell wall lipid composition leading to a marked increase in resistance against various environmental stressors and antibiotics. The cell envelope of Msmeg-PE11 also had greater amount of glycolipids and polar lipids. Msmeg-PE11 was found to have better survival rate in infected macrophages. Mice infected with Msmeg-PE11 had higher bacterial load, showed exacerbated organ pathology and mortality. The liver and lung of Msmeg-PE11-infected mice also had higher levels of IL-10, IL-4 and TNF-α cytokines, indicating a potential role of this protein in mycobacterial virulence.

  10. The Role of Bcl-2 Family Proteins in Therapy Responses of Malignant Astrocytic Gliomas: Bcl2L12 and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotini M. Kouri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a highly aggressive and lethal brain cancer with a median survival of less than two years after diagnosis. Hallmarks of GBM tumors include soaring proliferative indices, high levels of angiogenesis, diffuse invasion into normal brain parenchyma, resistance toward therapy-induced apoptosis, and pseudopallisading necrosis. Despite the recent advances in neurosurgery, radiation therapy, and the development of targeted chemotherapeutic regimes, GBM remains one of the deadliest types of cancer. Particularly, the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ in combination with radiation therapy prolonged patient survival only marginally, and clinical studies assessing efficacies of targeted therapies, foremost ATP mimetics inhibiting the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, revealed only few initial responders; tumor recurrence is nearly universal, and salvage therapies to combat such progression remain ineffective. Consequently, myriad preclinical and clinical studies began to define the molecular mechanisms underlying therapy resistance of GBM tumors, and pointed to the Bcl-2 protein family, in particular the atypical member Bcl2-Like 12 (Bcl2L12, as important regulators of therapy-induced cell death. This review will discuss the multi-faceted modi operandi of Bcl-2 family proteins, describe their roles in therapy resistance of malignant glioma, and outline current and future drug development efforts to therapeutically target Bcl-2 proteins.

  11. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  12. Members of the heat-shock protein 70 family promote cancer cell growth by distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Mikkel; Daugaard, Mads; Jensen, Mette Hartvig;

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the stress-inducible heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has gained plenty of attention as a putative target for tumor therapy, little is known about the role of other Hsp70 proteins in cancer. Here we present the first thorough analysis of the expression and function of the cytosolic Hsp70...

  13. CATH FunFHMMer web server: protein functional annotations using functional family assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sayoni; Sillitoe, Ian; Lee, David; Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Ward, John; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-07-01

    The widening function annotation gap in protein databases and the increasing number and diversity of the proteins being sequenced presents new challenges to protein function prediction methods. Multidomain proteins complicate the protein sequence-structure-function relationship further as new combinations of domains can expand the functional repertoire, creating new proteins and functions. Here, we present the FunFHMMer web server, which provides Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for query protein sequences based on the functional classification of the domain-based CATH-Gene3D resource. Our server also provides valuable information for the prediction of functional sites. The predictive power of FunFHMMer has been validated on a set of 95 proteins where FunFHMMer performs better than BLAST, Pfam and CDD. Recent validation by an independent international competition ranks FunFHMMer as one of the top function prediction methods in predicting GO annotations for both the Biological Process and Molecular Function Ontology. The FunFHMMer web server is available at http://www.cathdb.info/search/by_funfhmmer.

  14. Annotation of Selaginella moellendorffii Major Intrinsic Proteins and the Evolution of the Protein Family in Terrestrial Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderberg, Hanna I; Kjellbom, Per; Johanson, Urban

    2012-01-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) also called aquaporins form pores in membranes to facilitate the permeation of water and certain small polar solutes across membranes. MIPs are present in virtually every organism but are uniquely abundant in land plants. To elucidate the evolution and function of MIPs in terrestrial plants, the MIPs encoded in the genome of the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii were identified and analyzed. In total 19 MIPs were found in S. moellendorffii belonging to 6 of the 7 MIP subfamilies previously identified in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Only three of the MIPs were classified as members of the conserved water specific plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily whereas almost half were found to belong to the diverse NOD26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily permeating various solutes. The small number of PIPs in S. moellendorffii is striking compared to all other land plants and no other species has more NIPs than PIPs. Similar to moss, S. moellendorffii only has one type of tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP). Based on ESTs from non-angiosperms we conclude that the specialized groups of TIPs present in higher plants are not found in primitive vascular plants but evolved later in a common ancestor of seed plants. We also note that the silicic acid permeable NIP2 group that has been reported from angiosperms appears at the same time. We suggest that the expansion of the number MIP isoforms in higher plants is primarily associated with an increase in the different types of specialized tissues rather than the emergence of vascular tissue per se and that the loss of subfamilies has been possible due to a functional overlap between some subfamilies. PMID:22639644

  15. Annotation of Selaginella moellendorffii Major Intrinsic Proteins and the Evolution of the Protein Family in Terrestrial Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Anderberg, Hanna I.; Kjellbom, Per; Johanson, Urban

    2012-01-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) also called aquaporins form pores in membranes to facilitate the permeation of water and certain small polar solutes across membranes. MIPs are present in virtually every organism but are uniquely abundant in land plants. To elucidate the evolution and function of MIPs in terrestrial plants, the MIPs encoded in the genome of the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii were identified and analyzed. In total 19 MIPs were found in S. moellendorffii belonging to 6 of ...

  16. Annotation of Selaginella moellendorffii major intrinsic proteins and the evolution of the protein family in terrestrial plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Isa Anderberg

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs also called aquaporins form pores in membranes to facilitate the permeation of water and certain small polar solutes across membranes. MIPs are present in virtually every organism but are uniquely abundant in land plants. To elucidate the evolution and function of MIPs in terrestrial plants, the MIPs encoded in the genome of the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii were identified and analyzed. In total 19 MIPs were found in S. moellendorffii belonging to six of the seven MIP subfamilies previously identified in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Only three of the MIPs were classified as members of the conserved water specific plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP subfamily whereas almost half were found to belong to the diverse NOD26-like intrinsic protein (NIP subfamily permeating various solutes. The small number of PIPs in S. moellendorffii is striking compared to all other land plants and no other species has more NIPs than PIPs. Similar to moss, S. moellendorffii only has one type of tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP. Based on ESTs from non-angiosperms we conclude that the specialized groups of TIPs present in higher plants are not found in primitive vascular plants but evolved later in a common ancestor of seed plants. We also note that the silicic acid permeable NIP2 group that has been reported from angiosperms appears at the same time. We suggest that the expansion of the number MIP isoforms in higher plants is primarily associated with an increase in the different types of specialized tissues rather than the emergence of vascular tissue per se and that the loss of subfamilies has been possible due to a functional overlap between some subfamilies.

  17. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND PROTEIN ENGINEERING STRATEGY OF SUBTILASES, THE FAMILY OF SUBTILISIN-LIKE SERINE PROTEINASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIEZEN, RJ; DEVOS, WM; LEUNISSEN, JAM

    1991-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, > 50 subtilases are known, > 40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase a

  18. Homology modelling and protein engineering strategy of subtilases, the family of subtilisin-like serine proteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siezen, Roland J.; Vos, Willem M. de; Leunissen, Jack A.M.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1991-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, >50 subtilases are known, >40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase and

  19. Molecular and expression analysis of a LIM protein gene family from flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, A; Gass, N; Mundel, C; Baltz, R; Kräuter, R; Evrard, J L; Steinmetz, A

    2000-10-01

    LIM-domain proteins participate in important cellular processes in eukaryotes, including gene transcription and actin cytoskeleton organization. They are predominantly found in animals, but have also been identified in yeast and plants. Following the characterization ofa LIM-domain protein in sunflower pollen, we carried out an extensive search for these proteins in flowering plants. We have isolated and studied cDNAs and/or genomic sequences for two novel LIM-domain proteins from sunflower, three from tobacco, and one from Arabidopsis. The plant proteins are structurally related to the cytoskeleton-associated CRP class of LIM proteins in animals, but show several distinctive features, including a second, atypical, LIM domain. We have performed comparative expression studies of these genes, as well as of one other gene from tobacco and two additional Arabidopsis genes whose sequences are available from databases. These studies, carried out by RT-PCR in the presence of gene-specific primers, showed that, in sunflower and tobacco, pollen grains and sporophytic tissues express different sets of LIM proteins. With the exception of one Arabidopsis gene--which has two introns--all the genes analyzed contain four introns at conserved positions, indicating that the ancestral gene from which the various copies evolved in higher plants allready had this split structure. PMID:11085265

  20. Discovery of cyclotides in the fabaceae plant family provides new insights into the cyclization, evolution, and distribution of circular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poth, Aaron G; Colgrave, Michelle L; Philip, Reynold; Kerenga, Bomai; Daly, Norelle L; Anderson, Marilyn A; Craik, David J

    2011-04-15

    Cyclotides are plant proteins whose defining structural features are a head-to-tail cyclized backbone and three interlocking disulfide bonds, which in combination are known as a cyclic cystine knot. This unique structural motif confers cyclotides with exceptional resistance to proteolysis. Their endogenous function is thought to be as plant defense agents, associated with their insecticidal and larval growth-inhibitory properties. However, in addition, an array of pharmaceutically relevant biological activities has been ascribed to cyclotides, including anti-HIV, anthelmintic, uterotonic, and antimicrobial effects. So far, >150 cyclotides have been elucidated from members of the Rubiaceae, Violaceae, and Cucurbitaceae plant families, but their wider distribution among other plant families remains unclear. Clitoria ternatea (Butterfly pea) is a member of plant family Fabaceae and through its usage in traditional medicine to aid childbirth bears similarity to Oldenlandia affinis, from which many cyclotides have been isolated. Using a combination of nanospray and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analyses, we examined seed extracts of C. ternatea and discovered cyclotides in the Fabaceae, the third-largest family of flowering plants. We characterized 12 novel cyclotides, thus expanding knowledge of cyclotide distribution and evolution within the plant kingdom. The discovery of cyclotides containing novel sequence motifs near the in planta cyclization site has provided new insights into cyclotide biosynthesis. In particular, MS analyses of the novel cyclotides from C. ternatea suggest that Asn to Asp variants at the cyclization site are more common than previously recognized. Moreover, this study provides impetus for the examination of other economically and agriculturally significant species within Fabaceae, now the largest plant family from which cyclotides have been described. PMID:21194241

  1. Ancylostoma ceylanicum Excretory-Secretory Protein 2 Adopts a Netrin-Like Fold and Defines a Novel Family of Nematode Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Kucera; L Harrison; M Cappello; Y Modis

    2011-12-31

    Hookworms are human parasites that have devastating effects on global health, particularly in underdeveloped countries. Ancylostoma ceylanicum infects humans and animals, making it a useful model organism to study disease pathogenesis. A. ceylanicum excretory-secretory protein 2 (AceES-2), a highly immunoreactive molecule secreted by adult worms at the site of intestinal attachment, is partially protective when administered as a mucosal vaccine against hookworm anemia. The crystal structure of AceES-2 determined at 1.75 {angstrom} resolution shows that it adopts a netrin-like fold similar to that found in tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases (TIMPs) and in complement factors C3 and C5. However, recombinant AceES-2 does not significantly inhibit the 10 most abundant human matrix metalloproteases or complement-mediated cell lysis. The presence of a highly acidic surface on AceES-2 suggests that it may function as a cytokine decoy receptor. Several small nematode proteins that have been annotated as TIMPs or netrin-domain-containing proteins display sequence homology in structurally important regions of AceES-2's netrin-likefold. Together, our results suggest that AceES-2 defines a novel family of nematode netrin-like proteins, which may function to modulate the host immune response to hookworm and other parasites.

  2. Familial lysinuric protein intolerance presenting as coma in two adult siblings.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, P. J.; Dale, G; Bates, D.

    1989-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is an inborn error of metabolism which usually presents in infancy with failure to thrive and vomiting. Two patients are described who presented in adult life with hyperammonaemic coma due to LPI. Both had been underweight and had had intermittent gastrointestinal symptoms during childhood. They were of normal intellect and had maintained good health, until presentation in their thirties, by unconscious dietary protein avoidance. The diagnosis of LPI should...

  3. Probing Protein Interactions with Stapled Peptides: Myc Family and Insulin Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Rebecca Yue

    2013-01-01

    One of the most exciting frontiers of expanding pharmacopeia to combat currently untreatable diseases is achieving specifically and potently disruption of unwanted protein-protein interactions where traditional small molecule drugs tend to fall short. Our laboratory has developed the methodology of peptide stapling and pioneered successful applications in multiple disease models since its induction over a decade ago. One common feature of past applications is the use of a single stapled pepti...

  4. The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond Syndrome Protein Family Is Involved in RNA Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savchenko, A; Krogan, Nevan; Cort, John R.; Evdokimova, Elena; Lew, Jocelyne M.; Yee, Adelinda; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Andrade, Miguel; Bochkarev, Alexey; Watson, James D.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Greenblatt, Jack; Hughes, Timothy; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Rommens, Johanna M.; Edwards, Aled M.

    2005-05-13

    A combination of structural, biochemical, and genetic studies in model organisms was used to infer a cellular role for the human protein (SBDS) responsible for Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome. The crystal structure of the SBDS homologue in Archaeoglobus fulgidus, AF0491, revealed a three domain protein. The N-terminal domain, which harbors the majority of disease-linked mutations, has a novel three-dimensional fold.

  5. Multiple ETS family proteins regulate PF4 gene expression by binding to the same ETS binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Okada

    Full Text Available In previous studies on the mechanism underlying megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, several ETS motifs were found in each megakaryocyte-specific gene promoter. Although these studies suggested that several ETS family proteins regulate megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, only a few ETS family proteins have been identified. Platelet factor 4 (PF4 is a megakaryocyte-specific gene and its promoter includes multiple ETS motifs. We had previously shown that ETS-1 binds to an ETS motif in the PF4 promoter. However, the functions of the other ETS motifs are still unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate a novel functional ETS motif in the PF4 promoter and identify proteins binding to the motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP bound to the -51 ETS site. Expression of FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP activated the PF4 promoter in HepG2 cells. Mutation of a -51 ETS site attenuated FLI-1-, ELF-1-, and GABP-mediated transactivation of the promoter. siRNA analysis demonstrated that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression in HEL cells. Among these three proteins, only FLI-1 synergistically activated the promoter with GATA-1. In addition, only FLI-1 expression was increased during megakaryocytic differentiation. Finally, the importance of the -51 ETS site for the activation of the PF4 promoter during physiological megakaryocytic differentiation was confirmed by a novel reporter gene assay using in vitro ES cell differentiation system. Together, these data suggest that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression through the -51 ETS site in megakaryocytes and implicate the differentiation stage-specific regulation of PF4 gene expression by multiple ETS factors.

  6. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R [UHN; (Toronto); (HWMRI)

    2011-11-23

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 Å crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  7. Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L. SUN-domain protein gene family: evidence for the existence of two divergent classes of SUN proteins in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons Carl R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear envelope that separates the contents of the nucleus from the cytoplasm provides a surface for chromatin attachment and organization of the cortical nucleoplasm. Proteins associated with it have been well characterized in many eukaryotes but not in plants. SUN (Sad1p/Unc-84 domain proteins reside in the inner nuclear membrane and function with other proteins to form a physical link between the nucleoskeleton and the cytoskeleton. These bridges transfer forces across the nuclear envelope and are increasingly recognized to play roles in nuclear positioning, nuclear migration, cell cycle-dependent breakdown and reformation of the nuclear envelope, telomere-led nuclear reorganization during meiosis, and karyogamy. Results We found and characterized a family of maize SUN-domain proteins, starting with a screen of maize genomic sequence data. We characterized five different maize ZmSUN genes (ZmSUN1-5, which fell into two classes (probably of ancient origin, as they are also found in other monocots, eudicots, and even mosses. The first (ZmSUN1, 2, here designated canonical C-terminal SUN-domain (CCSD, includes structural homologs of the animal and fungal SUN-domain protein genes. The second (ZmSUN3, 4, 5, here designated plant-prevalent mid-SUN 3 transmembrane (PM3, includes a novel but conserved structural variant SUN-domain protein gene class. Mircroarray-based expression analyses revealed an intriguing pollen-preferred expression for ZmSUN5 mRNA but low-level expression (50-200 parts per ten million in multiple tissues for all the others. Cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA for a PM3-type maize gene, ZmSUN4, is described. Peptide antibodies to ZmSUN3, 4 were used in western-blot and cell-staining assays to show that they are expressed and show concentrated staining at the nuclear periphery. Conclusions The maize genome encodes and expresses at least five different SUN-domain proteins, of which the PM3

  8. Evolution, expression differentiation and interaction specificity of heterotrimeric G-protein subunit gene family in the mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulab C Arya

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1, three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3, and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5 genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica

  9. Final Report. The Role of RUB (related to ubiquitin) Family of Proteins in the Hormone Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callis, Judy [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-03-22

    The Rub pathway is a conserved protein modification pathway. RUB (called Rubp1 in budding yeast, Nedd8 in animals and RUB in plants) is a ubiquitin-like 76-amino acid protein. It covalently attaches to protein using an enzymatic machinery analogous to the enzymes that attach ubiquitin to its substrate proteins. However, the nature of the complement of Rub-modified proteins in organisms was not clear. From bioinformatics analyses, one can identify a Rub activating enzymes and Rub conjugating enzymes. However, in many cases, their biochemical properties were not described. In DOE-funded work, we made major advances in our understanding of the Rub pathway in yeast and plants, work that is applicable to other organisms as well. There is a multi-subunit enzyme called SCF in all eukaryotes. The SCF consists of several subunits that serve as a scaffold (the cullin, SKP and RBX subunits) and one subunit that interacts with the substrate. This cullin protein (called Cdc53p in yeast and CULLIN 1 in plants and animals) was a known Rub target. In this work, we identified additional Rub targets in yeast as the other cullin-like proteins Cul3p and Rtt101p. Additionally we described the conservation of the Rub pathway because plant RUB1 can conjugated to yeast Cdc53p- in yeast. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized the Rub activating enzymes and showed that they are not biochemically equivalent. We also showed that the Rub pathway is essential in plants and characterized plants with reduced levels of rub proteins. These plants are affected in multiple developmental processes. We discovered that they over-produce ethylene as dark-grown seedlings. We characterized a mutant allele of CULLIN1 in Arabidopsis with impaired interaction with RBX and showed that it is unstable in vivo. We used our knowledge of monitoring protein degradation to map the degradation determinants in a plant transcription factor. Finally, we took a mass spectrometric approach to identify

  10. Metalloproteins diversified: the auracyanins are a family of cupredoxins that stretch the spectral and redox limits of blue copper proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeremy D; McIntosh, Chelsea L; Halsey, Christopher M; Lada, Bryan M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Cooley, Jason W; Blankenship, Robert E

    2013-11-19

    The metal sites of electron transfer proteins are tuned for function. The type 1 copper site is one of the most utilized metal sites in electron transfer reactions. This site can be tuned by the protein environment from +80 mV to +680 mV in typical type 1 sites. Accompanying this huge variation in midpoint potentials are large changes in electronic structure, resulting in proteins that are blue, green, or even red. Here, we report a family of blue copper proteins, the auracyanins, from the filamentous anoxygenic phototroph Chloroflexus aurantiacus that display the entire known spectral and redox variations known in the type 1 copper site. C. aurantiacus encodes four auracyanins, labeled A-D. The midpoint potentials vary from +83 mV (auracyanin D) to +423 mV (auracyanin C). The electronic structures vary from classical blue copper UV-vis absorption spectra (auracyanin B) to highly perturbed spectra (auracyanins C and D). The spectrum of auracyanin C is temperature-dependent. The expansion and divergent nature of the auracyanins is a previously unseen phenomenon.

  11. In Entamoeba histolytica, a BspA family protein is required for chemotaxis toward tumour necrosis factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Silvestre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Entamoeba histolytica cell migration is essential for the development of human amoebiasis (an infectious disease characterized by tissue invasion and destruction. The tissue inflammation associated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF secretion by host cells is a well-documented feature of amoebiasis. Tumour necrosis factor is a chemoattractant for E. histolytica, and the parasite may have a TNF receptor at its cell surface. Methods: confocal microscopy, RNA Sequencing, bioinformatics, RNA antisense techniques and histological analysis of human colon explants were used to characterize the interplay between TNF and E. histolytica. Results: an antibody against human TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 stained the E. histolytica trophozoite surface and (on immunoblots binds to a 150-kDa protein. Proteome screening with the TNFR1 sequence revealed a BspA family protein in E. histolytica that carries a TNFR signature domain and six leucine-rich repeats (named here as "cell surface protein", CSP, in view of its cellular location. Cell surface protein shares structural homologies with Toll-Like receptors, colocalizes with TNF and is internalized in TNF-containing vesicles. Reduction of cellular CSP levels abolished chemotaxis toward TNF and blocked parasite invasion of human colon. Conclusions: there is a clear link between TNF chemotaxis, CSP and pathogenesis.

  12. Fisheries productivity and its effects on the consumption of animal protein and food sharing of fishers' and non-fishers' families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Mikaelle Kaline Bezerra; de Melo, Clarissy Dinyz; Lopes, Priscila Fabiana Macedo

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the consumption of animal protein and food sharing among fishers' and non-fishers' families of the northeastern Brazilian coast. The diet of these families was registered through the 24-hour-recall method during 10 consecutive days in January (good fishing season) and June (bad fishing season) 2012. Fish consumption was not different between the fishers' and non-fishers' families, but varied according to fisheries productivity to both groups. Likewise, food sharing was not different between the two groups, but food was shared more often when fisheries were productive. Local availability of fish, more than a direct dependency on fisheries, determines local patterns of animal protein consumption, but a direct dependency on fisheries exposes families to a lower-quality diet in less-productive seasons. As such, fisheries could shape and affect the livelihoods of coastal villages, including fishers' and non-fishers' families.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of the calcium-dependent protein kinase gene family inGossypium raimondii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li-bei; YU Ding-wei; ZHAO Feng-li; PANG Chao-you; SONG Mei-zhen; WEI Heng-ling; FAN Shu-li; YU Shu-xun

    2015-01-01

    Plant calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in diverse physiological processes by regulating the downstream components of calcium signaling. To date, only a few species of the plant CDPK gene family have been functionaly identiifed. In addition, there has been no systematic analysis of the CDPK family in cotton. Here, 41 putative cotton CDPK (GrCDPK) genes were identiifedvia bioinformatics analysis of the entire genome ofGossypium raimondi and were classiifed into four groups based on evolutionary relatedness. Gene structure analysis indicated that most of these GrCDPK genes share a similar intron-exon structure (7 or 8 exons), strongly supporting their close evolutionary relationships. Chromosomal distributions and phylogenetics analysis showed that 13 pairs of GrCDPK genes arosevia segmental duplication events. Furthermore, using microarray data of upland cotton (G. hirsutumL.), comparative proifles analysis of these GhCDPKs indicated that some of the encoding genes might be involved in the responses to multiple abiotic stresses and play important regulatory roles during cotton ifber development. This study is the ifrst genome-wide analysis of the CDPK family in cotton, and it wil provide valuable information for the further functional characterization of cotton CDPK genes.

  14. Distinct transport selectivity of two structural subclasses of the nodulin-like intrinsic protein family of plant aquaglyceroporin channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ian S; Roberts, Daniel M

    2005-12-27

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) are a diverse class of integral membrane proteins that facilitate the transport of water and some small solutes across cellular membranes. X-ray structures of MIPs indicate that a tetrad of residues (the ar/R region) form a narrow pore constriction that constitutes the selectivity filter. In comparison with mammalian and microbial species, plants have a greater number and diversity of MIPs with greater than 30 genes encoding four phylogenetic subfamilies with eight different classes of ar/R sequences. The nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily in Arabidopsis can be subdivided into two ar/R subgroups: the NIP subgroup I, which resembles the archetype of the family, soybean nodulin 26, and the NIP subgroup II, which is represented by the Arabidopsis protein AtNIP6;1. These two NIPs differ principally by the substitution of a conserved alanine (NIP subgroup II) for a conserved tryptophan (NIP subgroup I) in the helix 2 position (H2) of the ar/R filter. A comparison of the water and solute tranport properties of the two proteins was performed by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Nodulin 26 is an aquaglyceroporin with a modest osmotic water permeability (P(f)) and the ability to transport uncharged solutes such as glycerol and formamide. In constrast, AtNIP6;1 showed no measurable water permeability but transported glycerol, formamide, as well as larger solutes that were impermeable to nodulin 26. By site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the H2 position is the crucial determinant that confers these transport behaviors. A comparison of the NIPs and tonoplast-intrinsic proteins (TIP) shows that the H2 residue can predict the transport profile for water and glycerol with histidine found in TIP-like aquaporins, tryptophan found in aquaglyceroporins (NIP I), and alanine found in water-impermeable glyceroporins (AtNIP6;1). PMID:16363796

  15. Identification of MarvelD3 as a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of the occludin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balda Maria S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tight junctions are an intercellular adhesion complex of epithelial and endothelial cells, and form a paracellular barrier that restricts the diffusion of solutes on the basis of size and charge. Tight junctions are formed by multiprotein complexes containing cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. How these components work together to form functional tight junctions is still not well understood and will require a complete understanding of the molecular composition of the junction. Results Here we identify a new transmembrane component of tight junctions: MarvelD3, a four-span transmembrane protein. Its predicted transmembrane helices form a Marvel (MAL and related proteins for vesicle traffic and membrane link domain, a structural motif originally discovered in proteins involved in membrane apposition and fusion events, such as the tight junction proteins occludin and tricellulin. In mammals, MarvelD3 is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms. Both isoforms exhibit a broad tissue distribution and are expressed by different types of epithelial as well as endothelial cells. MarvelD3 co-localises with occludin at tight junctions in intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. RNA interference experiments in Caco-2 cells indicate that normal MarvelD3 expression is not required for the formation of functional tight junctions but depletion results in monolayers with increased transepithelial electrical resistance. Conclusions Our data indicate that MarvelD3 is a third member of the tight junction-associated occludin family of transmembrane proteins. Similar to occludin, normal expression of MarvelD3 is not essential for the formation of functional tight junctions. However, MarvelD3 functions as a determinant of epithelial paracellular permeability properties.

  16. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salojärvi Jarkko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4 domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. Results SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918 but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11. We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PS51059 domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Conclusions The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation.

  17. Molecular identification and expression analysis of filaggrin-2, a member of the S100 fused-type protein family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Wu

    Full Text Available Genes of the S100 fused-type protein (SFTP family are clustered within the epidermal differentiation complex and encode essential components that maintain epithelial homeostasis and barrier functions. Recent genetic studies have shown that mutations within the gene encoding the SFTP filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris and are major predisposing factors for atopic dermatitis. As a vital component of healthy skin, filaggrin is also a precursor of natural moisturizing factors. Here we present the discovery of a member of this family, designated as filaggrin-2 (FLG2 that is expressed in human skin. The FLG2 gene encodes a histidine- and glutamine-rich protein of approximately 248 kDa, which shares common structural features with other SFTP members, in particular filaggrin. We found that FLG2 transcripts are present in skin, thymus, tonsils, stomach, testis and placenta. In cultured primary keratinocytes, FLG2 mRNA expression displayed almost the same kinetics as that of filaggrin following Ca(2+ stimulation, suggesting an important role in molecular regulation of epidermal terminal differentiation. We provide evidences that like filaggrin, FLG2 is initially expressed by upper granular cells, proteolytically processed and deposited in the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum (SC layers of normal epidermis. Thus, FLG2 and filaggrin may have overlapping and perhaps synergistic roles in the formation of the epidermal barrier, protecting the skin from environmental insults and the escape of moisture by offering precursors of natural moisturizing factors.

  18. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the Alfin-like protein family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    Full Text Available In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family.

  19. The mouse fidgetin gene defines a new role for AAA family proteins in mammalian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G A; Mahaffey, C L; Nystuen, A; Letts, V A; Frankel, W N

    2000-10-01

    The mouse mutation fidget arose spontaneously in a heterogeneous albino stock. This mutant mouse is characterized by a side-to-side head-shaking and circling behaviour, due to reduced or absent semicircular canals. Fidget mice also have small eyes, associated with cell-cycle delay and insufficient growth of the retinal neural epithelium, and lower penetrance skeletal abnormalities, including pelvic girdle dysgenesis, skull bone fusions and polydactyly. By positional cloning, we found the gene mutated in fidget mice, fidgetin (Fign), which encodes a new member of the 'meiotic' or subfamily-7 (SF7; ref. 7) group of ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). We also discovered two closely related mammalian genes. AAA proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate a variety of functions, including membrane fusion, proteolysis, peroxisome biogenesis, endosome sorting and meiotic spindle formation, but functions for the SF7 AAA proteins are largely unknown. Fidgetin is the first mutant AAA protein found in a mammalian developmental mutant, thus defining a new role for these proteins in embryonic development.

  20. Characterization of a family of ice-active proteins from the Ryegrass, Lolium perenne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumble, Krishnanand D; Demmer, Jerome; Fish, Steven; Hall, Claire; Corrales, Sofia; DeAth, Angela; Elton, Clare; Prestidge, Ross; Luxmanan, Selvanesan; Marshall, Craig J; Wharton, David A

    2008-12-01

    Five genes coding for ice-active proteins were identified from an expressed sequence tag database of Lolium perenne cDNA libraries. Each of the five genes were characterized by the presence of an N-terminal signal peptide, a region enriched in hydrophilic amino acids and a leucine-rich region in four of the five genes that is homologous with the receptor domain of receptor-like protein kinases of plants. The C-terminal region of all five genes contains sequence homologous with Lolium and Triticum ice-active proteins. Of the four ice-active proteins (IAP1, IAP2, IAP3 and IAP5) cloned, three could be expressed in Escherichia coli and recovered in a functional form in order to study their ice activity. All three ice-active proteins had recrystallization inhibition activity but showed no detectable antifreeze or ice nucleation activity at the concentration tested. IAP2 and IAP5 formed distinct hexagonal-shaped crystals in the nanolitre osmometer as compared to the weakly hexagonal crystals produced by IAP3. PMID:18835384

  1. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow: a multifaceted family of proteins with a complex expression profile in fast and slow twitch skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maegen A Ackermann

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C comprises a complex family of proteins expressed in slow and fast type skeletal muscles. Similar to its fast and cardiac counterparts, sMyBP-C functions to modulate the formation of actomyosin cross-bridges, and to organize and stabilize sarcomeric A- and M-bands. The slow form of MyBP-C was originally classified as a single protein, however several variants encoded by the single MYBPC1 gene have been recently identified. Alternative splicing of the 5’ and 3’ ends of the MYBPC1 transcript has led to the differential expression of small unique segments interspersed between common domains. In addition, the NH2-terminus of sMyBP-C undergoes complex phosphorylation. Thus, alternative splicing and phosphorylation appear to regulate the functional activities of sMyBP-C. sMyBP-C proteins are not restricted to slow twitch muscles, but they are abundantly expressed in fast twitch muscles, too. Using bioinformatic tools, we herein perform a systematic comparison of the known human and mouse sMyBP-C variants. In addition, using single fiber westerns and antibodies to a common region of all known sMyBP-C variants, we present a detailed and comprehensive characterization of the expression profile of sMyBP-C proteins in the slow twitch soleus and the fast twitch flexor digitorum brevis (FDB mouse muscles. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that distinct sMyBP-C variants are co-expressed in the same fiber, and that their expression profile differs among fibers. Given the differential expression of sMyBP-C variants in single fibers, it becomes apparent that each variant or combination thereof may play unique roles in the regulation of actomyosin cross-bridges formation and the stabilization of thick filaments.

  2. The primary structure of fatty-acid-binding protein from nurse shark liver. Structural and evolutionary relationship to the mammalian fatty-acid-binding protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medzihradszky, K F; Gibson, B W; Kaur, S; Yu, Z H; Medzihradszky, D; Burlingame, A L; Bass, N M

    1992-02-01

    The primary structure of a fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) isolated from the liver of the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) was determined by high-performance tandem mass spectrometry (employing multichannel array detection) and Edman degradation. Shark liver FABP consists of 132 amino acids with an acetylated N-terminal valine. The chemical molecular mass of the intact protein determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (Mr = 15124 +/- 2.5) was in good agreement with that calculated from the amino acid sequence (Mr = 15121.3). The amino acid sequence of shark liver FABP displays significantly greater similarity to the FABP expressed in mammalian heart, peripheral nerve myelin and adipose tissue (61-53% sequence similarity) than to the FABP expressed in mammalian liver (22% similarity). Phylogenetic trees derived from the comparison of the shark liver FABP amino acid sequence with the members of the mammalian fatty-acid/retinoid-binding protein gene family indicate the initial divergence of an ancestral gene into two major subfamilies: one comprising the genes for mammalian liver FABP and gastrotropin, the other comprising the genes for mammalian cellular retinol-binding proteins I and II, cellular retinoic-acid-binding protein myelin P2 protein, adipocyte FABP, heart FABP and shark liver FABP, the latter having diverged from the ancestral gene that ultimately gave rise to the present day mammalian heart-FABP, adipocyte FABP and myelin P2 protein sequences. The sequence for intestinal FABP from the rat could be assigned to either subfamily, depending on the approach used for phylogenetic tree construction, but clearly diverged at a relatively early evolutionary time point. Indeed, sequences proximately ancestral or closely related to mammalian intestinal FABP, liver FABP, gastrotropin and the retinoid-binding group of proteins appear to have arisen prior to the divergence of shark liver FABP and should therefore also be present in elasmobranchs

  3. The Gas2 family protein Pigs is a microtubule +TIP that affects cytoskeleton organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdler, Gemma C; Applewhite, Derek A; Perry, Wick M G; Rogers, Stephen L; Röper, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Coordination between different cytoskeletal systems is crucial for many cell biological functions, including cell migration and mitosis, and also plays an important role during tissue morphogenesis. Proteins of the class of cytoskeletal crosslinkers, or cytolinkers, have the ability to interact with more than one cytoskeletal system at a time and are prime candidates to mediate any coordination. One such class comprises the Gas2-like proteins, combining a conserved calponin-homology-type actin-binding domain and a Gas2 domain predicted to bind microtubules (MTs). This domain combination is also found in spectraplakins, huge cytolinkers that play important roles in many tissues in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we dissect the ability of the single Drosophila Gas2-like protein Pigs to interact with both actin and MT cytoskeletons, both in vitro and in vivo, and illustrate complex regulatory interactions that determine the localisation of Pigs to and its effects on the cytoskeleton.

  4. A family of E. coli expression vectors for laboratory scale and high throughput soluble protein production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottomley Stephen P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past few years, both automated and manual high-throughput protein expression and purification has become an accessible means to rapidly screen and produce soluble proteins for structural and functional studies. However, many of the commercial vectors encoding different solubility tags require different cloning and purification steps for each vector, considerably slowing down expression screening. We have developed a set of E. coli expression vectors with different solubility tags that allow for parallel cloning from a single PCR product and can be purified using the same protocol. Results The set of E. coli expression vectors, encode for either a hexa-histidine tag or the three most commonly used solubility tags (GST, MBP, NusA and all with an N-terminal hexa-histidine sequence. The result is two-fold: the His-tag facilitates purification by immobilised metal affinity chromatography, whilst the fusion domains act primarily as solubility aids during expression, in addition to providing an optional purification step. We have also incorporated a TEV recognition sequence following the solubility tag domain, which allows for highly specific cleavage (using TEV protease of the fusion protein to yield native protein. These vectors are also designed for ligation-independent cloning and they possess a high-level expressing T7 promoter, which is suitable for auto-induction. To validate our vector system, we have cloned four different genes and also one gene into all four vectors and used small-scale expression and purification techniques. We demonstrate that the vectors are capable of high levels of expression and that efficient screening of new proteins can be readily achieved at the laboratory level. Conclusion The result is a set of four rationally designed vectors, which can be used for streamlined cloning, expression and purification of target proteins in the laboratory and have the potential for being adaptable to a high

  5. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations of membrane remodeling by Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs family proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan; Haohua, Wen; Lanyuan, Lu; Jun, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Membrane curvature is no longer thought of as a passive property of the membrane; rather, it is considered as an active, regulated state that serves various purposes in the cell such as between cells and organelle definition. While transport is usually mediated by tiny membrane bubbles known as vesicles or membrane tubules, such communication requires complex interplay between the lipid bilayers and cytosolic proteins such as members of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) superfamily of proteins. With rapid developments in novel experimental techniques, membrane remodeling has become a rapidly emerging new field in recent years. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are important tools for obtaining atomistic information regarding the structural and dynamic aspects of biological systems and for understanding the physics-related aspects. The availability of more sophisticated experimental data poses challenges to the theoretical community for developing novel theoretical and computational techniques that can be used to better interpret the experimental results to obtain further functional insights. In this review, we summarize the general mechanisms underlying membrane remodeling controlled or mediated by proteins. While studies combining experiments and molecular dynamics simulations recall existing mechanistic models, concurrently, they extend the role of different BAR domain proteins during membrane remodeling processes. We review these recent findings, focusing on how multiscale molecular dynamics simulations aid in understanding the physical basis of BAR domain proteins, as a representative of membrane-remodeling proteins. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21403182) and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. CityU 21300014).

  6. Ectromelia virus encodes a family of Ankyrin/F-box proteins that regulate NFκB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A notable feature of poxviruses is their ability to inhibit the antiviral response, including the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway. NFκB is a transcription factor that is sequestered in the cytoplasm until cell stimulation, and relies on the SCF (Skp1, culllin-1, F-box) ubiquitin ligase to target its inhibitor, IκBα, for degradation. IκBα is recruited to the SCF by the F-box domain-containing protein βTrCP. Here, we show that ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox, encodes four F-box-containing proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165, all of which contain Ankyrin (Ank) domains. The Ank/F-box proteins inhibit NFκB nuclear translocation, and this inhibition is dependent on the F-box domain. We also demonstrate that EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165 prevent IκBα degradation, suggesting that they target the SCF. This study identifies a new mechanism by which ectromelia virus inhibits NFκB. - Highlights: • Ectromelia virus encodes four Ank/F-box proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154 and EVM165. • The Ank/F-box proteins inhibit NFκB nuclear translocation, dependent on the F-box. • The Ank/F-box proteins prevent IκBα degradation, suggesting they target the SCF. • Deletion of a single Ank/F-box gene from ECTV does not prevent viral NFκB inhibition. • This study identifies a new mechanism by which ectromelia virus inhibits NFκB

  7. Ectromelia virus encodes a family of Ankyrin/F-box proteins that regulate NFκB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burles, Kristin, E-mail: burles@ualberta.ca; Buuren, Nicholas van; Barry, Michele

    2014-11-15

    A notable feature of poxviruses is their ability to inhibit the antiviral response, including the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway. NFκB is a transcription factor that is sequestered in the cytoplasm until cell stimulation, and relies on the SCF (Skp1, culllin-1, F-box) ubiquitin ligase to target its inhibitor, IκBα, for degradation. IκBα is recruited to the SCF by the F-box domain-containing protein βTrCP. Here, we show that ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox, encodes four F-box-containing proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165, all of which contain Ankyrin (Ank) domains. The Ank/F-box proteins inhibit NFκB nuclear translocation, and this inhibition is dependent on the F-box domain. We also demonstrate that EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165 prevent IκBα degradation, suggesting that they target the SCF. This study identifies a new mechanism by which ectromelia virus inhibits NFκB. - Highlights: • Ectromelia virus encodes four Ank/F-box proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154 and EVM165. • The Ank/F-box proteins inhibit NFκB nuclear translocation, dependent on the F-box. • The Ank/F-box proteins prevent IκBα degradation, suggesting they target the SCF. • Deletion of a single Ank/F-box gene from ECTV does not prevent viral NFκB inhibition. • This study identifies a new mechanism by which ectromelia virus inhibits NFκB.

  8. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein

    OpenAIRE

    Hoepflinger, Marion C.; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking ma...

  9. The nfkb1 promoter is controlled by proteins of the Ets family.

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, P F; Ludford-Menting, M J; Deacon, N J; Kola, I; Doherty, R R

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding NFKB1 is autoregulated, responding to NF-kappa B/Rel activation through NF-kappa B binding sites in its promoter, which also contains putative sites for Ets proteins. One of the Ets sites, which we refer to as EBS4, is located next to an NF-kappa B/Rel binding site, kB3, which is absolutely required for activity of the promoter in Jurkat T cells in response to activation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), PMA/ionomycin, or the Tax protein from human T cell leukemia vi...

  10. Tandem Duplication Events in the Expansion of the Small Heat Shock Protein Gene Family in Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsticevic, Flavia J.; Arce, Débora P.; Ezpeleta, Joaquín; Tapia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In plants, fruit maturation and oxidative stress can induce small heat shock protein (sHSP) synthesis to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although the tomato reference genome was published in 2012, the actual number and functionality of sHSP genes remain unknown. Using a transcriptomic (RNA-seq) and evolutionary genomic approach, putative sHSP genes in the Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706) genome were investigated. A sHSP gene family of 33 members was established. Remarkably, roughly half of the members of this family can be explained by nine independent tandem duplication events that determined, evolutionarily, their functional fates. Within a mitochondrial class subfamily, only one duplicated member, Solyc08g078700, retained its ancestral chaperone function, while the others, Solyc08g078710 and Solyc08g078720, likely degenerated under neutrality and lack ancestral chaperone function. Functional conservation occurred within a cytosolic class I subfamily, whose four members, Solyc06g076570, Solyc06g076560, Solyc06g076540, and Solyc06g076520, support ∼57% of the total sHSP RNAm in the red ripe fruit. Subfunctionalization occurred within a new subfamily, whose two members, Solyc04g082720 and Solyc04g082740, show heterogeneous differential expression profiles during fruit ripening. These findings, involving the birth/death of some genes or the preferential/plastic expression of some others during fruit ripening, highlight the importance of tandem duplication events in the expansion of the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome. Despite its evolutionary diversity, the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome seems to be endowed with a core set of four homeostasis genes: Solyc05g014280, Solyc03g082420, Solyc11g020330, and Solyc06g076560, which appear to provide a baseline protection during both fruit ripening and heat shock stress in different tomato tissues. PMID:27565886

  11. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73

  12. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leão, Mariana; Gomes, Sara; Bessa, Cláudia; Soares, Joana; Raimundo, Liliana [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Monti, Paola; Fronza, Gilberto [Mutagenesis Unit, Istituto di Ricerca e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino-IST-Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Pereira, Clara [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Saraiva, Lucília, E-mail: lucilia.saraiva@ff.up.pt [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73.

  13. Phylogenetic Analysis of the NEEP21/Calcyon/P19 Family of Endocytic Proteins: Evidence for Functional Evolution in the Vertebrate CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Muthusamy, Nagendran; Ahmed, Sanaa A.; Rana, Brinda K.; Navarre, Sammy; Kozlowski, David J.; Liberles, David A; Bergson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Endocytosis and vesicle trafficking are required for optimal neural transmission. Yet, little is currently known about the evolution of neuronal proteins regulating these processes. Here, we report the first phylogenetic study of NEEP21, calcyon, and P19, a family of neuronal proteins implicated in synaptic receptor endocytosis and recycling, as well as in membrane protein trafficking in the somatodendritic and axonal compartments of differentiated neurons. Database searches identified orthol...

  14. A Functional Family-Wide Screening of SP/KLF Proteins Identifies a Subset of Suppressors of KRAS-Mediated Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Lomberk, Gwen A.; Tsuji, Shoichiro; DeMars, Cathrine J.; Bardsley, Michael R.; Lin,Yi-Hui; Almada, Luciana L.; Han, Jing-Jing; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Ordog, Tamas; Buttar, Navtej S; Urrutia, Raul

    2011-01-01

    SP/KLF transcription factors comprise an emerging group of proteins that may behave as tumor suppressors. Incidentally, many cancers displaying alterations in certain KLF proteins are also associated with a high incidence of KRAS mutations. Therefore, we here investigate whether SP/KLF proteins suppress KRAS-mediated cell growth, and more importantly, the potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Using a comprehensive, family-wide screening of the 24 SP/KLF members, we discover that SP5,...

  15. Protein Interaction Screening for the Ankyrin Repeats and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) Box (ASB) Family Identify Asb11 as a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Resident Ubiquitin Ligase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Christina Aaen; Smedegaard, Stine; Sylvestersen, Kathrine Beck;

    2014-01-01

    The Ankyrin and SOCS (Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling) box (ASB) family of proteins function as the substrate recognition subunit in a subset of Elongin-Cullin-SOCS (ECS) E3 ubiquitin ligases. Despite counting with 18 members in humans, the identity of the physiological targets of the Asb protei...... in vivo. In summary, we provide a comprehensive protein-protein interaction data resource that can aid the biological and functional characterization of ASB ubiquitin ligases....

  16. Structural characterization of the stringent response related exopolyphosphatase/guanosine pentaphosphate phosphohydrolase protein family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Laurberg, Martin; Liljas, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    . This revealed a structural flexibility that has previously been described as a "butterfly-like" cleft opening around the active site in other actin-like superfamily proteins. A calcium ion is observed at the center of this region in type I crystals, substantiating that PPX/GPPA enzymes use metal ions...

  17. The BET Family of Proteins Targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integration near Transcription Start Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan De Rijck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome into host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here, we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 and MLV integrase specifically interact and colocalize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins’ chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75 retargets MLV integration away from transcription start sites and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conforming to the HIV integration pattern. Together, these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors.

  18. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wei Liu,1,* Jin-Feng Ning,2,* Qing-Wei Meng,1 Jing Hu,1 Yan-Bin Zhao,1 Chao Liu,3 Li Cai11The Fourth Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 2The Thoracic Surgery Department, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 3General Surgery Department, Mudanjiang Guanliju Central Hospital, Mishan, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10 against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase–ligand interaction space in the PDB.Keywords: EGFR, kinase

  19. Arsenite induces apoptosis in human mesenchymal stem cells by altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by activating intrinsic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Environmental exposure to arsenic is an important public health issue. The effects of arsenic on different tissues and organs have been intensively studied. However, the effects of arsenic on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have not been reported. This study is designed to investigate the cell death process caused by arsenite and its related underlying mechanisms on MSCs. The rationale is that absorbed arsenic in the blood circulation can reach to the bone marrow and may affect the cell survival of MSCs. Methods: MSCs of passage 1 were purchased from Tulane University, grown till 70% confluency level and plated according to the experimental requirements followed by treatment with arsenite at various concentrations and time points. Arsenite (iAsIII) induced cytotoxic effects were confirmed by cell viability and cell cycle analysis. For the presence of canonic apoptosis markers; DNA damage, exposure of intramembrane phosphotidylserine, protein and m-RNA expression levels were analyzed. Results: iAsIII induced growth inhibition, G2-M arrest and apoptotic cell death in MSCs, the apoptosis induced by iAsIII in the cultured MSCs was, via altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by involving intrinsic pathway. Conclusion: iAsIII can induce apoptosis in bone marrow-derived MSCs via Bcl-2 family proteins, regulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Due to the multipotency of MSC, acting as progenitor cells for a variety of connective tissues including bone, adipose, cartilage and muscle, these effects of arsenic may be important in assessing the health risk of the arsenic compounds and understanding the mechanisms of arsenic-induced harmful effects.

  20. Inhibition of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases induces abortive translocation and degradation of the cellular prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocki, Pawel; Sawicki, Maxime; Mays, Charles E; Hong, Seo Jung; Chapman, Daniel C; Westaway, David; Williams, David B

    2016-03-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders for which there is no effective treatment. Because the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is required for propagation of the infectious scrapie form of the protein, one therapeutic strategy is to reduce PrP(C) expression. Recently FK506, an inhibitor of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases, was shown to increase survival in animal models of prion disease, with proposed mechanisms including calcineurin inhibition, induction of autophagy, and reduced PrP(C) expression. We show that FK506 treatment results in a profound reduction in PrP(C) expression due to a defect in the translocation of PrP(C) into the endoplasmic reticulum with subsequent degradation by the proteasome. These phenotypes could be bypassed by replacing the PrP(C) signal sequence with that of prolactin or osteopontin. In mouse cells, depletion of ER luminal FKBP10 was almost as potent as FK506 in attenuating expression of PrP(C). However, this occurred at a later stage, after translocation of PrP(C) into the ER. Both FK506 treatment and FKBP10 depletion were effective in reducing PrP(Sc) propagation in cell models. These findings show the involvement of FKBP proteins at different stages of PrP(C) biogenesis and identify FKBP10 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prion diseases. PMID:26764098

  1. A Peroxiredoxin Promotes H2O2 Signaling and Oxidative Stress Resistance by Oxidizing a Thioredoxin Family Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon D. Brown

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available H2O2 can cause oxidative damage associated with age-related diseases such as diabetes and cancer but is also used to initiate diverse responses, including increased antioxidant gene expression. Despite significant interest, H2O2-signaling mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we present a mechanism for the propagation of an H2O2 signal that is vital for the adaptation of the model yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, to oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxins are abundant peroxidases with conserved antiaging and anticancer activities. Remarkably, we find that the only essential function for the thioredoxin peroxidase activity of the Prx Tpx1(hPrx1/2 in resistance to H2O2 is to inhibit a conserved thioredoxin family protein Txl1(hTxnl1/TRP32. Thioredoxins regulate many enzymes and signaling proteins. Thus, our discovery that a Prx amplifies an H2O2 signal by driving the oxidation of a thioredoxin-like protein has important implications, both for Prx function in oxidative stress resistance and for responses to H2O2.

  2. Structural Basis for Telomerase RNA Recognition and RNP Assembly by the Holoenzyme La Family Protein p65

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahavir; Wang, Zhonghua; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Patel, Anooj; Cascio, Duilio; Collins, Kathleen; Feigon, Juli (UCLA); (UCB)

    2012-07-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex essential for maintenance of telomere DNA at linear chromosome ends. The catalytic core of Tetrahymena telomerase comprises a ternary complex of telomerase RNA (TER), telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), and the essential La family protein p65. NMR and crystal structures of p65 C-terminal domain and its complex with stem IV of TER reveal that RNA recognition is achieved by a combination of single- and double-stranded RNA binding, which induces a 105{sup o} bend in TER. The domain is a cryptic, atypical RNA recognition motif with a disordered C-terminal extension that forms an {alpha} helix in the complex necessary for hierarchical assembly of TERT with p65-TER. This work provides the first structural insight into biogenesis and assembly of TER with a telomerase-specific protein. Additionally, our studies define a structurally homologous domain (xRRM) in genuine La and LARP7 proteins and suggest a general mode of RNA binding for biogenesis of their diverse RNA targets.

  3. Recent Progress in the Structure Determination of GPCRs, a Membrane Protein Family with High Potential as Pharmaceutical Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Abola, Enrique; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-11-30

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a highly diverse and ubiquitous family of integral membrane proteins, transmitting signals inside the cells in response to an assortment of disparate extra-cellular stimuli. Their strategic location on the cell surface and their involvement in crucial cellular and physiological processes turn these receptors into highly important pharmaceutical targets. Recent technological developments aimed at stabilization and crystallization of these receptors have led to significant breakthroughs in GPCR structure determination efforts. One of the successful approaches involved receptor stabilization with the help of a fusion partner combined with crystallization in lipidic cubic phase (LCP). The success of using an LCP matrix for crystallization is generally attributed to the creation of a more native, membrane-like stabilizing environment for GPCRs just prior to nucleation and to the formation of type I crystal lattices, thus generating highly ordered and strongly diffracting crystals. Here they describe protocols for reconstituting purified GPCRs in LCP, performing pre-crystallization assays, setting up crystallization trials in manual mode, detecting crystallization hits, optimizing crystallization conditions, harvesting, and collecting crystallographic data. The protocols provide a sensible framework for approaching crystallization of stabilized GPCRs in LCP, however, as in any crystallization experiment, extensive screening and optimization of crystallization conditions as well as optimization of protein construct and purification steps are required. The process remains risky and these protocols do not necessarily guarantee success.

  4. Structure of armadillo ACBP: a new member of the acyl-CoA-binding protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. ACBP is a carrier for activated long-chain fatty acids and has been associated with many aspects of lipid metabolism. Its secondary structure is highly similar to that of the corresponding form of bovine ACBP and exhibits the unique flattened α-helical bundle (up–down–down–up) motif reported for animal, yeast and insect ACBPs. Conformational differences are located in loops and turns, although these structural differences do not suffice to account for features that could be related to the unusual biochemistry and lipid metabolism of the Harderian gland

  5. Structure of armadillo ACBP: a new member of the acyl-CoA-binding protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costabel, Marcelo D., E-mail: costabel@criba.edu.ar [Grupo de Biofísica, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ermácora, Mario R. [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Bernal (Argentina); Santomé, José A. [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas (IQUIFYB), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica (UBA-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alzari, Pedro M. [Unité de Biochimie Structurale, Institut Pasteur, Paris (France); Guérin, Diego M. A. [Unidad de Biofisica (CSIC-UPV/EHU), PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Grupo de Biofísica, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2006-10-01

    The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. ACBP is a carrier for activated long-chain fatty acids and has been associated with many aspects of lipid metabolism. Its secondary structure is highly similar to that of the corresponding form of bovine ACBP and exhibits the unique flattened α-helical bundle (up–down–down–up) motif reported for animal, yeast and insect ACBPs. Conformational differences are located in loops and turns, although these structural differences do not suffice to account for features that could be related to the unusual biochemistry and lipid metabolism of the Harderian gland.

  6. Banana Ovate Family Protein MaOFP1 and MADS-Box Protein MuMADS1 Antagonistically Regulated Banana Fruit Ripening

    OpenAIRE

    Juhua Liu; Jing Zhang; Wei Hu; Hongxia Miao; Jianbin Zhang; Caihong Jia; Zhuo Wang; Biyu Xu; Zhiqiang Jin

    2015-01-01

    The ovate family protein named MaOFP1 was identified in banana (Musa acuminata L.AAA) fruit by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) method using the banana MADS-box gene MuMADS1 as bait and a 2 day postharvest (DPH) banana fruit cDNA library as prey. The interaction between MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 was further confirmed by Y2H and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) methods, which showed that the MuMADS1 K domain interacted with MaOFP1. Real-time quantitative PCR evaluation of MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 ex...

  7. Members of the Hsp70 family of proteins in the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    López-Ribot, J L; Chaffin, W L

    1996-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of cell wall and cytosolic extracts obtained from parental and ssa1 and ssa2 single- and double-mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) products of these genes, previously thought to be restricted to the cell interior, are also present in the cell wall. A cell wall location was further confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence with intact cells and biotinylation of extracellular Hsp70. Hsp70s have been implicat...

  8. Trace amines: Identification of a family of mammalian G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Borowsky, Beth; Adham, Nika; Jones, Kenneth A.; Raddatz, Rita; Artymyshyn, Roman; Ogozalek, Kristine L.; Durkin, Margaret M.; Lakhlani, Parul P.; Bonini, James A.; Pathirana, Sudam; Boyle, Noel; Pu, Xiaosui; Kouranova, Evguenia; Lichtblau, Harvey; Ochoa, F. Yulina

    2001-01-01

    Tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, tryptamine, and octopamine are biogenic amines present in trace levels in mammalian nervous systems. Although some “trace amines” have clearly defined roles as neurotransmitters in invertebrates, the extent to which they function as true neurotransmitters in vertebrates has remained speculative. Using a degenerate PCR approach, we have identified 15 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) from human and rodent tissues. Together with the orphan receptor PNR, these rece...

  9. The retinoblastoma protein binds to a family of E2F transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, J A; Saito, M; Vidal, M;

    1993-01-01

    for E2F-2 and E2F-3 were mapped to 1p36 and 6q22, respectfully, confirming their independence from E2F-1. However, the E2F-2 and E2F-3 proteins are closely related to E2F-1. Both E2F-2 and E2F-3 bound to wild-type but not mutant E2F recognition sites, and they bound specifically to the retinoblastoma...

  10. Dictyostelium nucleomorphin is a member of the BRCT-domain family of cell cycle checkpoint proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-11-18

    A search of the Dictyostelium genome project database (http://dictybase.org/db/cgi-bin/blast.pl) with nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates the nuclear number, predicted it to be encoded by a larger gene containing a putative breast cancer carboxy-terminus domain (BRCT). Using RT-PCR, Northern and Western blotting we have identified a differentially expressed, 2318 bp cDNA encoding a protein isoform of Dictyostelium NumA with an apparent molecular weight of 70 kDa that we have called NumB. It contains a single amino-terminal BRCT-domain spanning residues 125-201. Starvation of shaking cultures reduces NumA expression by approximately 88+/-5.6%, whereas NumB expression increases approximately 35+/-3.5% from vegetative levels. NumC, a third isoform that is also expressed during development but not growth, remains to be characterized. These findings suggest NumB may be a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. PMID:15535983

  11. Involvement of C4 protein of beet severe curly top virus (family Geminiviridae in virus movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunling Teng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV is a leafhopper transmitted geminivirus with a monopartite genome. C4 proteins encoded by geminivirus play an important role in virus/plant interaction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To understand the function of C4 encoded by BSCTV, two BSCTV mutants were constructed by introducing termination codons in ORF C4 without affecting the amino acids encoded by overlapping ORF Rep. BSCTV mutants containing disrupted ORF C4 retained the ability to replicate in Arabidopsis protoplasts and in the agro-inoculated leaf discs of N. benthamiana, suggesting C4 is not required for virus DNA replication. However, both mutants did not accumulate viral DNA in newly emerged leaves of inoculated N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis, and the inoculated plants were asymptomatic. We also showed that C4 expression in plant could help C4 deficient BSCTV mutants to move systemically. C4 was localized in the cytosol and the nucleus in both Arabidopsis protoplasts and N. benthamiana leaves and the protein appeared to bind viral DNA and ds/ssDNA nonspecifically, displaying novel DNA binding properties. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that C4 protein in BSCTV is involved in symptom production and may facilitate virus movement instead of virus replication.

  12. New member of the guanosine triphosphatase activating protein family in the human epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangqi Li; Qiang Liu; Shigui Liu; Jinsong Zhang; Yonglian Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the guanosine triphosphatase activating proteins (GAPs) on spermatogenesis has been studied for years,though no GAPs have been explored in epididymis, an essential organ for sperm maturation. In this study, a new GAP member, designated as MacGAP, was cloned in human epididymis. The MacGAP gene encodes a protein of 618 amino acids with a putative size of 70 kDa and harbors the conservedRhoGAPdomain. The N-terminal and C-terminal peptides of MacGAP were expressed and their corresponding antiserawere prepared. The antisera against N-terminal peptide could detect antigen as low as 0.3 ng, and its specificity was alsoconfirmed. However, the antisera against C-terminal peptide failed to detect its antigen because of its low sensitivity.Immunohistochemistry showed that the MacGAP protein was dependent on epididymis and had a region-specific expression pattern, with high expression in the epithelial cells' basal section in the caput region. The results have created a foundation for further interpretation of the biological effects of GAPs in sperm maturation.

  13. CYFIP family proteins between autism and intellectual disability: links with Fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eBardoni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID and autism spectrum disorders (ADS have in common alterations in some brain circuits and brain abnormalities, such as synaptic transmission and dendritic spines morphology. Recent studies have indicated a differential expression for specific categories of genes as a cause for both types of disease, while an increasing number of genes is recognized to produce both disorders. An example is the Fragile X Mental retardation gene, FMR1, whose silencing causes the Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of intellectual disability and autism, also characterized by physical hallmarks. FMRP, the protein encoded by FMR1, is an RNA-binding protein with an important role in translational control. Among the interactors of FMRP, CYFIP1/2 proteins are good candidates for intellectual disability and autism, on the bases of their genetic implication and functional properties, even if the precise functional significance of the CYFIP/FMRP interaction is not understood yet. CYFIP1 and CYFIP2 represent a link between Rac1, the Wave complex and FMRP, favoring the cross talk between actin polymerization and translational control

  14. Mitochondrial trafficking in neurons and the role of the Miro family of GTPase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsa, Nicol; Norkett, Rosalind; Higgs, Nathalie; Lopez-Domenech, Guillermo; Kittler, Josef T

    2013-12-01

    Correct mitochondrial dynamics are essential to neuronal function. These dynamics include mitochondrial trafficking and quality-control systems that maintain a precisely distributed and healthy mitochondrial network, so that local energy demands or Ca2+-buffering requirements within the intricate architecture of the neuron can be met. Mitochondria make use of molecular machinery that couples these organelles to microtubule-based transport via kinesin and dynein motors, facilitating the required long-range movements. These motors in turn are associated with a variety of adaptor proteins allowing additional regulation of the complex dynamics demonstrated by these organelles. Over recent years, a number of new motor and adaptor proteins have been added to a growing list of components implicated in mitochondrial trafficking and distribution. Yet, there are major questions that remain to be addressed about the regulation of mitochondrial transport complexes. One of the core components of this machinery, the mitochondrial Rho GTPases Miro1 (mitochondrial Rho 1) and Miro2 have received special attention due to their Ca2+-sensing and GTPase abilities, marking Miro an exceptional candidate for co-ordinating mitochondrial dynamics and intracellular signalling pathways. In the present paper, we discuss the wealth of literature regarding Miro-mediated mitochondrial transport in neurons and recently highlighted involvement of Miro proteins in mitochondrial turnover, emerging as a key process affected in neurodegeneration. PMID:24256248

  15. Response of maize serine/arginine-rich protein gene family in seedlings to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao; Guo, Yuqi; Cui, Weiling; Xu, Aihua; Tian, Zengyuan

    2014-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) in eukaryotic organisms is closely related to the gene regulation in plant abiotic stress responses, in which serine/arginine-rich proteins (SR proteins) act as key regulators. The genome sequence of maize inbred line B73 was analyzed, showing that the promoter regions of SR genes possess about three to eight kinds of cis-acting regulatory elements. Twenty-seven SR genes encode alkaline proteins, and 23 of which are divided into five subgroups in terms of the first RNA recognition motif (RRM) at the amino terminal. The expression of SR genes showed tissue-specific and genotype-dependent features under drought stress in the hybrid Zhengdan-958 and its parents, Zheng-58 and Chang-7-2 via bidirectional hierarchical clustering. SR genes were down-regulated in roots while they were up-regulated in shoots under drought stress. However, SR genes were down-regulated in both roots and shoots in three different rehydration stages after severe drought stress. Additionally, a widespread alternative splicing exists in all SR genes although SR genes showed differential expression tendency under drought stress and/or during rehydration stages. Results above will deepen our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant response to abiotic stress from the perspective of AS-network.

  16. Mapping the mutual information network of enzymatic families in the protein structure to unveil functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Daniel; Oliva, Baldo; Marino Buslje, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids committed to a particular function correlate tightly along evolution and tend to form clusters in the 3D structure of the protein. Consequently, a protein can be seen as a network of co-evolving clusters of residues. The goal of this work is two-fold: first, we have combined mutual information and structural data to describe the amino acid networks within a protein and their interactions. Second, we have investigated how this information can be used to improve methods of prediction of functional residues by reducing the search space. As a main result, we found that clusters of co-evolving residues related to the catalytic site of an enzyme have distinguishable topological properties in the network. We also observed that these clusters usually evolve independently, which could be related to a fail-safe mechanism. Finally, we discovered a significant enrichment of functional residues (e.g. metal binding, susceptibility to detrimental mutations) in the clusters, which could be the foundation of new prediction tools. PMID:22848494

  17. Role of AtCDC48 & the AtCDC48 Regulatory Protein Family, PUX, in Plant Cell Morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarek, Sebastian, Y.

    2009-11-08

    The long-term objective of this work is to understand the molecular events and mechanisms involved in secretory membrane trafficking and organelle biogenesis, which are crucial for normal plant growth and development. Our studies have suggested a vital role for the cytosolic chaperone Cdc48p/p97 during cytokinesis and cell expansion which are highly dependent upon secretory membrane trafficking. Localization studies have shown that the plant Cdc48p/p97, AtCDC48, and the Arabidopsis ortholog of the ER- and Golgi-associated SNARE, syntaxin 5, (referred to as SYP31) are targeted to the division plane during cytokinesis. In addition, AtCDC48 and SYP31 were shown to interact in vitro and in vivo. To characterize further the function of AtCDC48 and SYP31 we have utilized affinity chromatography and MALDI-MS to identify several plant-specific proteins that interact with SYP31 and/or modulate the activity of AtCDC48 including two UBX (i.e. ubiquitin-like) domain containing proteins, PUX1 and PUX2 (Proteins containing UBX domain). These proteins define a plant protein family consisting of 15 uncharacterized members that we postulate interact with AtCDC48. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that PUX2 is a novel membrane adapter for AtCDC48 that mediates AtCDC48/SYP31 interaction and is likely to control AtCDC48-dependent membrane fusion. In contrast, PUX1 negatively regulates AtCDC48 by inhibiting its ATPase activity and by promoting the disassembly of the active hexamer. These findings provide the first evidence that the assembly and disassembly of the CDC48/p97complex is actually a dynamic process. This new unexpected level of regulation for CDC48/p97 was demonstrated to be critical in vivo as pux1 loss-of-function mutants grow faster than wild-type plants. These studies suggest a role for AtCDC48 in plant cell cycle progression including cytokinesis and/or cell expansion. The proposed studies are designed to: 1) characterize further the localization and function of At

  18. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cekanova, Maria, E-mail: mcekanov@utk.edu [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fernando, Romaine I. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Siriwardhana, Nalin [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sukhthankar, Mugdha [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Parra, Columba de la [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR (United States); Woraratphoka, Jirayus [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Malone, Christine [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ström, Anders [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Baek, Seung J. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wade, Paul A. [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Saxton, Arnold M. [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Donnell, Robert M. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pestell, Richard G. [Department of Cancer Biology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis.

  19. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis

  20. Functional Cooperation of the Proapoptotic Bcl2 Family Proteins Bmf and Bim In Vivo ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hübner, Anette; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Rincon, Mercedes; Richard A Flavell; Davis, Roger J

    2009-01-01

    Bcl2-modifying factor (Bmf) is a member of the BH3-only group of proapoptotic proteins. To test the role of Bmf in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutated Bmf alleles that disrupt Bmf expression, prevent Bmf phosphorylation by the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) on Ser74, or mimic Bmf phosphorylation on Ser74. We report that the loss of Bmf causes defects in uterovaginal development, including an imperforate vagina and hydrometrocolpos. We also show that the phosphorylation of Bmf ...

  1. Shared RNA-binding sites for interacting members of the Drosophila ELAV family of neuronal proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Borgeson, Claudia D.; Samson, Marie-Laure

    2005-01-01

    The product of the Drosophila embryonic lethal abnormal visual system is a conserved protein (ELAV) necessary for normal neuronal differentiation and maintenance. It possesses three RNA-binding domains and is involved in the regulation of RNA metabolism. The long elav 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) is necessary for autoregulation. We used RNA-binding assays and in vitro selection to identify the ELAV best binding site in the elav 3′-UTR. This site resembles ELAV-binding sites identified prev...

  2. Retinoblastoma family proteins: New players in DNA repair by non-homologous end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Paul H; Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2016-03-01

    Loss of retinoblastoma protein (RB1) function is a major driver in cancer development. We have recently reported that, in addition to its well-documented functions in cell cycle and fate control, RB1 and its paralogs have a novel role in regulating DNA repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here we summarize our findings and present mechanistic hypotheses on how RB1 may support the DNA repair process and the therapeutic implications for patients who harbor RB1-negative cancers. PMID:27308588

  3. LaeA control of velvet family regulatory proteins for light-dependent development and fungal cell-type specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Sarikaya Bayram

    Full Text Available VeA is the founding member of the velvet superfamily of fungal regulatory proteins. This protein is involved in light response and coordinates sexual reproduction and secondary metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans. In the dark, VeA bridges VelB and LaeA to form the VelB-VeA-LaeA (velvet complex. The VeA-like protein VelB is another developmental regulator, and LaeA has been known as global regulator of secondary metabolism. In this study, we show that VelB forms a second light-regulated developmental complex together with VosA, another member of the velvet family, which represses asexual development. LaeA plays a key role, not only in secondary metabolism, but also in directing formation of the VelB-VosA and VelB-VeA-LaeA complexes. LaeA controls VeA modification and protein levels and possesses additional developmental functions. The laeA null mutant results in constitutive sexual differentiation, indicating that LaeA plays a pivotal role in inhibiting sexual development in response to light. Moreover, the absence of LaeA results in the formation of significantly smaller fruiting bodies. This is due to the lack of a specific globose cell type (Hülle cells, which nurse the young fruiting body during development. This suggests that LaeA controls Hülle cells. In summary, LaeA plays a dynamic role in fungal morphological and chemical development, and it controls expression, interactions, and modification of the velvet regulators.

  4. Yersinia outer protein YopE affects the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum through targeting of multiple Rho family GTPases

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vlahou, Georgia

    2009-07-14

    Abstract Background All human pathogenic Yersinia species share a virulence-associated type III secretion system that translocates Yersinia effector proteins into host cells to counteract infection-induced signaling responses and prevent phagocytosis. Dictyostelium discoideum has been recently used to study the effects of bacterial virulence factors produced by internalized pathogens. In this study we explored the potential of Dictyostelium as model organism for analyzing the effects of ectopically expressed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops). Results The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence factors YopE, YopH, YopM and YopJ were expressed de novo within Dictyostelium and their effects on growth in axenic medium and on bacterial lawns were analyzed. No severe effect was observed for YopH, YopJ and YopM, but expression of YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein for Rho GTPases, was found to be highly detrimental. GFP-tagged YopE expressing cells had less conspicuous cortical actin accumulation and decreased amounts of F-actin. The actin polymerization response upon cAMP stimulation was impaired, although chemotaxis was unaffected. YopE also caused reduced uptake of yeast particles. These alterations are probably due to impaired Rac1 activation. We also found that YopE predominantly associates with intracellular membranes including the Golgi apparatus and inhibits the function of moderately overexpressed RacH. Conclusion The phenotype elicited by YopE in Dictyostelium can be explained, at least in part, by inactivation of one or more Rho family GTPases. It further demonstrates that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as an efficient and easy-to-handle model organism in order to analyze the function of a translocated GAP protein of a human pathogen.

  5. Chironex fleckeri (box jellyfish) venom proteins: expansion of a cnidarian toxin family that elicits variable cytolytic and cardiovascular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Diane L; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; McInerney, Bernie V; Mulvenna, Jason; Seymour, Jamie E; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2014-02-21

    The box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri produces extremely potent and rapid-acting venom that is harmful to humans and lethal to prey. Here, we describe the characterization of two C. fleckeri venom proteins, CfTX-A (∼40 kDa) and CfTX-B (∼42 kDa), which were isolated from C. fleckeri venom using size exclusion chromatography and cation exchange chromatography. Full-length cDNA sequences encoding CfTX-A and -B and a third putative toxin, CfTX-Bt, were subsequently retrieved from a C. fleckeri tentacle cDNA library. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the new toxins belong to a small family of potent cnidarian pore-forming toxins that includes two other C. fleckeri toxins, CfTX-1 and CfTX-2. Phylogenetic inferences from amino acid sequences of the toxin family grouped CfTX-A, -B, and -Bt in a separate clade from CfTX-1 and -2, suggesting that the C. fleckeri toxins have diversified structurally and functionally during evolution. Comparative bioactivity assays revealed that CfTX-1/2 (25 μg kg(-1)) caused profound effects on the cardiovascular system of anesthetized rats, whereas CfTX-A/B elicited only minor effects at the same dose. Conversely, the hemolytic activity of CfTX-A/B (HU50 = 5 ng ml(-1)) was at least 30 times greater than that of CfTX-1/2. Structural homology between the cubozoan toxins and insecticidal three-domain Cry toxins (δ-endotoxins) suggests that the toxins have a similar pore-forming mechanism of action involving α-helices of the N-terminal domain, whereas structural diversification among toxin members may modulate target specificity. Expansion of the cnidarian toxin family therefore provides new insights into the evolutionary diversification of box jellyfish toxins from a structural and functional perspective. PMID:24403082

  6. Activated RhoA is a positive feedback regulator of the Lbc family of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Frank; Carter, Angela M; Dada, Olugbenga; Gutowski, Stephen; Hadas, Jana; Chen, Zhe; Sternweis, Paul C

    2013-04-19

    The monomeric Rho GTPases are essential for cellular regulation including cell architecture and movement. A direct mechanism for hormonal regulation of the RhoA-type GTPases is their modulation by the G12 and G13 proteins via RH (RGS homology) containing RhoGEFs. In addition to the interaction of the G protein α subunits with the RH domain, activated RhoA also binds to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of PDZRhoGEF. The latter interaction is now extended to all seven members of the homologous Lbc family of RhoGEFs which includes the RH-RhoGEFs. This is evinced by direct measurements of binding or through effects on selected signaling pathways in cells. Overexpression of these PH domains alone can block RhoA-dependent signaling in cells to various extents. Whereas activated RhoA does not modulate the intrinsic activity of the RhoGEFs, activated RhoA associated with phospholipid vesicles can facilitate increased activity of soluble RhoGEFs on vesicle-delimited substrate (RhoA-GDP). This demonstrates feasibility of the hypothesis that binding of activated RhoA to the PH domains acts as a positive feedback mechanism. This is supported by cellular studies in which mutation of this binding site on PH strongly attenuates the stimulation of RhoA observed by overexpression of five of the RhoGEF DH-PH domains. This mutation is even more dramatic in the context of full-length p115RhoGEF. The utilization of this mechanism by multiple RhoGEFs suggests that this regulatory paradigm may be a common feature in the broader family of RhoGEFs.

  7. Rice Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Gene Family and Its Role in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jai S. Rohila; Yinong Yang

    2007-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MARK) cascade is an important signaling module that transduces extracellular stimuli into intracellular responses in eukaryotic organisms. An increasing body of evidence has shown that the MAPK-mediated cellular signaling is crucial to plant growth and development, as well as biotic and abiotic stress responses. To date, a total of 17 MARK genes have been identified from the rice genome. Expression profiling, biochemical characterization and/or functional analysis were carried out with many members of the rice MARK gene family, especially those associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this review, the phylogenetic relationship and classification of rice MARK genes are discussed to facilitate a simple nomenclature and standard annotation of the rice MARK gene family. Functional data relating to biotic and abiotic stress responses are reviewed for each MARK group and show that despite overlapping in functionality, there is a certain level of functional specificity among different rice MAP kinases. The future challenges are to functionally characterize each MARK, to identify their downstream substrates and upstream kinases, and to genetically manipulate the MARK signaling pathway in rice crops for the improvement of agronomically important traits.

  8. Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) in plants: a complex gene family with major impacts on plant phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Kerrie L; Bhave, Mrinal

    2007-10-01

    The ubiquitous cell membrane proteins called aquaporins are now firmly established as channel proteins that control the specific transport of water molecules across cell membranes in all living organisms. The aquaporins are thus likely to be of fundamental significance to all facets of plant growth and development affected by plant-water relations. A majority of plant aquaporins have been found to share essential structural features with the human aquaporin and exhibit water-transporting ability in various functional assays, and some have been shown experimentally to be of critical importance to plant survival. Furthermore, substantial evidence is now available from a number of plant species that shows differential gene expression of aquaporins in response to abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold and clearly establishes the aquaporins as major players in the response of plants to conditions that affect water availability. This review summarizes the function and regulation of these genes to develop a greater understanding of the response of plants to water insufficiency, and particularly, to identify tolerant genotypes of major crop species including wheat and rice and plants that are important in agroforestry.

  9. Signal transduction mediated by Bid, a pro-death Bcl-2 family proteins, connects the death receptor and mitochondria apoptosis pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Two major apoptosis pathways have been defined in mammalian cells, the Fas/TNF-R1 death receptor pathway and the mitochondria pathway. The Bcl-2 family proteins consist of both anti-apoptosis and pro- apoptosis members that regulate apoptosis, mainly by controlling the release of cytochrome c and other mitochondrial apoptotic events. However, death signals mediated by Fas/TNF-R1 receptors can usually activate caspases directly, bypassing the need for mitochondria and escaping the regulation by Bcl-2 family proteins. Bid is a novel pro-apoptosis Bcl-2 family protein that is activated by caspase 8 in response to Fas/TNF-R1 death receptor signals. Activated Bid is translocated to mitochondria and induces cytochrome c release, which in turn activates downstream caspases. Such a connection between the two apoptosis pathways could be important for induction of apoptosis in certain types of cells and responsible for the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases.

  10. TET family proteins and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Asuka; Baba, Yoshifumi; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Miyake, Keisuke; Kosumi, Keisuke; Harada, Kazuto; Kurashige, Junji; Iwagami, Shiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoya; Yamamoto, Manabu; Oda, Shinya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Baba, Hideo

    2015-09-15

    Mammalian DNA is epigenetically marked by 5'-cytosine methylation (5-methylcytosine [5-mC]). The Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes (TET1, TET2, and TET3) are implicated in DNA demethylation, through dioxygenase activity that converts 5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC). Although decreased TET is reportedly associated with decreased 5-hmC levels in various cancers, functions of 5-hmC and TET expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are unclear. We used ELISA and immunohistochemistry tests to analyze 5-hmC status in ESCC tissues, RT-qPCR to analyze TET family mRNA expression in normal and tumor tissues, and pyrosequencing to quantify LINE-1 (i.e., global DNA methylation) levels. ELISA and immunohistochemical testing showed 5-hmC levels were significantly lower in ESCC than in paired normal tissues (P ESCCs than paired normal tissues (P ESCCs (P = 0.003, r = 0.33). 5-hmC levels were also significantly associated with LINE-1 methylation level (P = 0.0002, r = 0.39). Patients with low 5-hmC levels had shorter overall survival than those with higher levels, although not significantly so (P = 0.084). In conclusion, 5-hmC expression was decreased in ESCC tissues, and was associated with TET2 expression level. TET2 reduction and subsequent 5-hmC loss might affect ESCC development.

  11. Membrane metabolism mediated by Sec14 family members influences Arf GTPase activating protein activity for transport from the trans-Golgi

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Tania A.; Fairn, Gregory D.; Poon, Pak P.; Shmulevitz, Maya; McMaster, Christopher R.; Singer, Richard A.; Johnston, Gerald C.

    2005-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a family of Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) GTPase activating protein (GAP) proteins with the Gcs1 + Age2 ArfGAP pair providing essential overlapping function for the movement of transport vesicles from the trans-Golgi network. We have generated a temperature-sensitive but stable version of the Gcs1 protein that is impaired only for trans-Golgi transport and find that deleterious effects of this enfeebled Gcs1-4 mutant protein are relieved by ...

  12. Application of a sensitive collection heuristic for very large protein families: Evolutionary relationship between adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL and classic mammalian lipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berezovsky Igor

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manually finding subtle yet statistically significant links to distantly related homologues becomes practically impossible for very populated protein families due to the sheer number of similarity searches to be invoked and analyzed. The unclear evolutionary relationship between classical mammalian lipases and the recently discovered human adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL; a patatin family member is an exemplary case for such a problem. Results We describe an unsupervised, sensitive sequence segment collection heuristic suitable for assembling very large protein families. It is based on fan-like expanding, iterative database searches. To prevent inclusion of unrelated hits, additional criteria are introduced: minimal alignment length and overlap with starting sequence segments, finding starting sequences in reciprocal searches, automated filtering for compositional bias and repetitive patterns. This heuristic was implemented as FAMILYSEARCHER in the ANNIE sequence analysis environment and applied to search for protein links between the classical lipase family and the patatin-like group. Conclusion The FAMILYSEARCHER is an efficient tool for tracing distant evolutionary relationships involving large protein families. Although classical lipases and ATGL have no obvious sequence similarity and differ with regard to fold and catalytic mechanism, homology links detected with FAMILYSEARCHER show that they are evolutionarily related. The conserved sequence parts can be narrowed down to an ancestral core module consisting of three β-strands, one α-helix and a turn containing the typical nucleophilic serine. Moreover, this ancestral module also appears in numerous enzymes with various substrate specificities, but that critically rely on nucleophilic attack mechanisms.

  13. Family of receptor-linked protein tyrosine phosphatases in humans and Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the regulation of cell proliferation by tyrosine phosphorylation, characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases is essential. The human genes LCA (leukocyte common antigen) and LAR encode putative receptor-linked PTPases. By using consensus sequence probes, two additional receptor-linked PTPase genes, DLAR and DPTP, were isolated from Drosophila melanogaster. The extra-cellular segments of both DLAR and DPTP are composed of multiple immunoglobulin-like domains and fibronectin type III-like domains. The cytoplasmic region of DLAR and DPTP, as well as human LCA and LAR, are composed of two tandemly repeated PTPase domains. PTPase activities of immunoprecipitated LCA and LAR were demonstrated by measuring the release of phosphate from a 32P-labeled [Tyr(P)]peptide. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains of LCA, LAR, DLAR, and DPTP, expressed in Escherichia coli, have PTPase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that a conserved cysteine residue is essential for PTPase activity

  14. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  15. Molecular cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of GPRC6A, a novel family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    surface. In this work, we report the existence of two additional GPRC6A isoforms (2 and 3) carrying in-frame deletions in the ATD. Except for the kidney, where isoforms 1 and 2 appear equally expressed, isoforms 2 and 3 are generally less abundant than isoform 1. Analysis of the intron-exon composition of...... from a human kidney cDNA (DNA complementary to RNA) library and shown to encode a protein of 926 amino acids (aa). Protein sequence analysis revealed the presence of a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain and an unusually long amino-terminal domain (ATD) of 590 amino acids. These traits, along with a...... significant homology to the human calcium-sensing receptor (CaR, 34% aa sequence identity), the taste receptor 1 (T1R1, 28%), and the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1, 24%), places GPRC6A in family C of the GPCRs. Interestingly, GPRC6A bears the highest resemblance with an odorant goldfish 5...

  16. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars. PMID:27625666

  17. The Action of Bcl-2 Apoptotic Family Proteins and Caspases in Mediating Follicle Atresia in Adult Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Petculescu-Ciochină

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Among follicles present on the surface of the ovary only a small part reach ovulation, the majority entering atresia, which is an apoptotic process regulated hormonally in general. Apoptosis (from greek: apo = from, ptosis = falling - is a normal physiological process, genetically programmed cell death, which carries energy consumption by activating a program of internal suicide. This occurs at each stage of follicular development and is accompanied by a significant reduction in the number of follicles present at birth. Development stage-dependent mechanisms coordinate the evolution of follicles, leading to ovulation of a very small number of them. At follicular level apoptosis involves many morphological and biochemical processes that are based on pro-and anti-apoptotic members of Bcl-2 family of proteins (located on mitochondrial outer membrane and caspases. These changes aim internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, cell retraction followed by its wrinkling, cytoskeleton disruption, preservation of cytoplasmic organelles structure and function, loss of intercellular ties with the reduced expression of conexine 43 (key protein of communication junctions between granulose cells, progressive fragmentation of nucleus and cytoplasm, and finally the appearance of apoptotic bodies, and their inclusion by phagocytes, without the involvement of any inflammatory response.

  18. Bactericidal/Permeability-increasing protein fold-containing family member A1 in airway host protection and respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Clemente J; Cohn, Lauren

    2015-05-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fold-containing family member A1 (BPIFA1), formerly known as SPLUNC1, is one of the most abundant proteins in respiratory secretions and has been identified with increasing frequency in studies of pulmonary disease. Its expression is largely restricted to the respiratory tract, being highly concentrated in the upper airways and proximal trachea. BPIFA1 is highly responsive to airborne pathogens, allergens, and irritants. BPIFA1 actively participates in host protection through antimicrobial, surfactant, airway surface liquid regulation, and immunomodulatory properties. Its expression is modulated in multiple lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory malignancies, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of BPIFA1 in pulmonary pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. This review highlights the versatile properties of BPIFA1 in antimicrobial protection and its roles as a sensor of environmental exposure and regulator of immune cell function. A greater understanding of the contribution of BPIFA1 to disease pathogenesis and activity may clarify if BPIFA1 is a biomarker and potential drug target in pulmonary disease.

  19. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars. PMID:27625666

  20. Discovery of new protein families and functions: new challenges in functional metagenomics for biotechnologies and microbial ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eUfarté

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid expansion of new sequencing technologies has enabled large-scale functional exploration of numerous microbial ecosystems, by establishing catalogues of functional genes and by comparing their prevalence in various microbiota. However, sequence similarity does not necessarily reflect functional conservation, since just a few modifications in a gene sequence can have a strong impact on the activity and the specificity of the corresponding enzyme or the recognition for a sensor. Similarly, some microorganisms harbor certain identified functions yet do not have the expected related genes in their genome. Finally, there are simply too many protein families whose function is not yet known, even though they are highly abundant in certain ecosystems. In this context, the discovery of new protein functions, using either sequence-based or activity-based approaches, is of crucial importance for the discovery of new enzymes and for improving the quality of annotation in public databases. This paper lists and explores the latest advances in this field, along with the challenges to be addressed, particularly where microfluidic technologies are concerned.

  1. Genome-wide survey and expression analysis of the calcium-dependent protein kinase gene family in cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Hou, Xiaowan; Xia, Zhiqiang; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Wang, Lianzhe; Zou, Meiling; Lu, Cheng; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) play important roles in regulating plant tolerance to abiotic stress and signal transduction; however, no data are currently available regarding the CPK family in cassava. Herein, we identified 27 CPK genes from cassava based on our previous genome sequencing data. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cassava CPKs could be clustered into three groups, which was further supported by gene structure and conserved protein motif analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MeCPK genes showed distinct expression patterns in different tissues between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties, indicating their involvement in the functional diversity of different varieties. Transcriptomics, interaction networks, and co-expression assays revealed a broad transcriptional response of cassava CPKs and CPK-mediated networks to drought stress and their differential expression profiles in different varieties, implying their contribution to drought stress tolerance in cassava. Expression analysis of eight MeCPK genes suggested a comprehensive response to osmotic stress, salt, cold, abscisic acid, and H2O2, which indicated that cassava CPKs might be convergence points for different signaling pathways. This study provides a basis for crop improvements and understanding of abiotic stress responses and signal transduction mediated by CPKs in cassava. PMID:26272723

  2. 3D structure prediction of histone acetyltransferase (HAC proteins of the p300/CBP family and their interactome in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Cemanovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Histone acetylation is an important posttranslational modification correlated with gene activation. In Arabidopsis thaliana the histone acetyltransferase (HAC proteins of the CBP family are homologous to animal p300/CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding proteins, which are important histone acetyltransferases participating in many physiological processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study the 3-D structure of all HAC protein subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana: HAC1, HAC2, HAC4, HAC5 and HAC12 is predicted by homology modeling and confirmed by Ramachandran plot analysis. The amino acid sequences HAC family members are highly similar to the sequences of the homologous human p300/CREB protein. Conservation of p300/CBP domains among the HAC proteins was examined further by sequence alignment and pattern search. The domains of p300/CBP required for the HAC function, such as PHD, TAZ and ZZ domains, are conserved in all HAC proteins. Interactome analysis revealed that HAC1, HAC5 and HAC12 proteins interact with S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase domaincontaining protein that shows methyltransferase activity, suggesting an additional function of the HAC proteins. Additionally, HAC5 has a strong interaction value for the putative c-myb-like transcription factor MYB3R-4, which suggests that it also may have a function in regulation of DNA replication.

  3. A Family of Zinc Finger Proteins Is Required forChromosome-specific Pairing and Synapsis during Meiosis in C.elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2006-06-07

    Homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis are prerequisitefor accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis. Here, we show that afamily of four related C2H2 zinc-finger proteins plays a central role inthese events in C. elegans. These proteins are encoded within a tandemgene cluster. In addition to the X-specific HIM-8 protein, threeadditional paralogs collectively mediate the behavior of the fiveautosomes. Each chromosome relies on a specific member of the family topair and synapse with its homolog. These "ZIM" proteins concentrate atspecial regions called meiotic pairing centers on the correspondingchromosomes. These sites are dispersed along the nuclear envelope duringearly meiotic prophase, suggesting a role analogous to thetelomere-mediated meiotic bouquet in other organisms. To gain insightinto the evolution of these components, wecharacterized homologs in C.briggsae and C. remanei, which revealed changes in copy number of thisgene family within the nematode lineage.

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis and Evolution of the Pto-Like Protein Kinase (PLPK) Gene Family in Pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Jelli; Jahn, Molly; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    The tomato Pto gene, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase (STK) domain-containing protein, confers resistance to bacterial speck disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). In this study, in vivo recognition assays using PVX constructs showed that AvrPto was specifically recognized in the pepper genotypes. This AvrPto recognition caused a nonhost hypersensitive response (HR) and localization of the PVX::AvrPto fusion protein to inoculated pepper leaf tissues, which indicates the presence of a similar Pto recognition mechanism in pepper as in tomato. However, genome-wide analysis in pepper revealed no Pto clade corresponding to that in tomato, suggesting an alternative system for Pto recognition in pepper. Nevertheless, 25 Pto-like protein kinases (PLPKs) with a highly conserved STK domain have been identified in the pepper genome. For the majority of the amino acid sites in the STK domain of Ptos and PLPKs, nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) nucleotide substitution ratios (ω) were less than one, suggesting that purifying selection played a predominant role in the evolutionary process. However, some amino acid sites were found to be subjected to episodic positive selection in the course of evolution of Pto homologs, and, thus, different evolutionary processes might have shaped the Pto gene family in plants. Based on RNA-seq data, PLPK genes and other Pto pathway genes, such as Prf, Pti1, Pti5, and Pti6 were expressed in all tested pepper genotypes. Therefore, the nonhost HR against Pst in pepper may be due to the recognition of the AvrPto effector by a PLPK homolog, and subsequent action of downstream components of the Pto signaling pathway. However, the possibility remains that the recognition of AvrPto in pepper plants may involve activities of other receptor like kinases (RLKs). The identification of the PLPKs in this study will serve as a foundation for further efforts to understand the roles of PLPKs in nonhost resistance. PMID:27536870

  5. Hornerin, an S100 family protein, is functional in breast cells and aberrantly expressed in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleming Jodie M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests an emerging role for S100 protein in breast cancer and tumor progression. These ubiquitous proteins are involved in numerous normal and pathological cell functions including inflammatory and immune responses, Ca2+ homeostasis, the dynamics of cytoskeleton constituents, as well as cell proliferation, differentiation, and death. Our previous proteomic analysis demonstrated the presence of hornerin, an S100 family member, in breast tissue and extracellular matrix. Hornerin has been reported in healthy skin as well as psoriatic and regenerating skin after wound healing, suggesting a role in inflammatory/immune response or proliferation. In the present study we investigated hornerin’s potential role in normal breast cells and breast cancer. Methods The expression levels and localization of hornerin in human breast tissue, breast tumor biopsies, primary breast cells and breast cancer cell lines, as well as murine mammary tissue were measured via immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and PCR. Antibodies were developed against the N- and C-terminus of the protein for detection of proteolytic fragments and their specific subcellular localization via fluorescent immunocytochemisty. Lastly, cells were treated with H2O2 to detect changes in hornerin expression during induction of apoptosis/necrosis. Results Breast epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts and macrophages express hornerin and show unique regulation of expression during distinct phases of mammary development. Furthermore, hornerin expression is decreased in invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas and less aggressive breast carcinoma phenotypes, and cellular expression of hornerin is altered during induction of apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of post-translational fragments that display differential subcellular localization. Conclusions Our data opens new possibilities for hornerin and its

  6. Origins and Evolution of WUSCHEL-Related Homeobox Protein Family in Plant Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaibin Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX is a large group of transcription factors specifically found in plants. WOX members contain the conserved homeodomain essential for plant development by regulating cell division and differentiation. However, the evolutionary relationship of WOX members in plant kingdom remains to be elucidated. In this study, we searched 350 WOX members from 50 species in plant kingdom. Linkage analysis of WOX protein sequences demonstrated that amino acid residues 141–145 and 153–160 located in the homeodomain are possibly associated with the function of WOXs during the evolution. These 350 members were grouped into 3 clades: the first clade represents the conservative WOXs from the lower plant algae to higher plants; the second clade has the members from vascular plant species; the third clade has the members only from spermatophyte species. Furthermore, among the members of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, we observed ubiquitous expression of genes in the first clade and the diversified expression pattern of WOX genes in distinct organs in the second clade and the third clade. This work provides insight into the origin and evolutionary process of WOXs, facilitating their functional investigations in the future.

  7. The complex becomes more complex: protein-protein interactions of SnRK1 with DUF581 family proteins provide a framework for cell- and stimulus type-specific SnRK1 signaling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlen eNietzsche

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, SNF1-related kinase (SnRK1 responds to the availability of carbohydrates as well as to environmental stresses by down-regulating ATP consuming biosynthetic processes, while stimulating energy-generating catabolic reactions through gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation. The functional SnRK1 complex is a heterotrimer where the catalytic alpha subunit associates with a regulatory beta subunit and an activating gamma subunit. Several different metabolites as well as the hormone abscisic acid (ABA have been shown to modulate SnRK1 activity in a cell- and stimulus-type specific manner. It has been proposed that tissue- or stimulus-specific expression of adapter proteins mediating SnRK1 regulation can at least partly explain the differences observed in SnRK1 signaling. By using yeast two-hybrid and in planta bi-molecular fluorescence complementation assays we were able to demonstrate that proteins containing the domain of unknown function (DUF 581 could interact with both isoforms of the SnRK1 alpha subunit (AKIN10/11 of Arabidopsis. A structure/function analysis suggests that the DUF581 is a generic SnRK1 interaction module and co-expression with DUF581 proteins in plant cells leads to reallocation of the kinase to specific regions within the nucleus. Yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that SnRK1 and DUF581 proteins can share common interaction partners inside the nucleus. The analysis of available microarray data implies that expression of the 19 members of the DUF581 encoding gene family in Arabidopsis is differentially regulated by hormones and environmental cues, indicating specialized functions of individual family members. We hypothesize that DUF581 proteins could act as mediators conferring tissue- and stimulus-type specific differences in SnRK1 regulation.

  8. Feeding and the rhodopsin family G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs in nematodes and arthropods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Carlos dos Reis Cardoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologues of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster, suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologues of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors.

  9. Feeding and the rhodopsin family g-protein coupled receptors in nematodes and arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Fonseca, Vera G; Power, Deborah M

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs) play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologs of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster), suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologs of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR) that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors. PMID:23264768

  10. Structural analyses of the CRISPR protein Csc2 reveal the RNA-binding interface of the type I-D Cas7 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrle, Ajla; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Sharma, Kundan; Ebert, Judith; Basquin, Claire; Urlaub, Henning; Marchfelder, Anita; Conti, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Upon pathogen invasion, bacteria and archaea activate an RNA-interference-like mechanism termed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). A large family of Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins mediates the different stages of this sophisticated immune response. Bioinformatic studies have classified the Cas proteins into families, according to their sequences and respective functions. These range from the insertion of the foreign genetic elements into the host genome to the activation of the interference machinery as well as target degradation upon attack. Cas7 family proteins are central to the type I and type III interference machineries as they constitute the backbone of the large interference complexes. Here we report the crystal structure of Thermofilum pendens Csc2, a Cas7 family protein of type I-D. We found that Csc2 forms a core RRM-like domain, flanked by three peripheral insertion domains: a lid domain, a Zinc-binding domain and a helical domain. Comparison with other Cas7 family proteins reveals a set of similar structural features both in the core and in the peripheral domains, despite the absence of significant sequence similarity. T. pendens Csc2 binds single-stranded RNA in vitro in a sequence-independent manner. Using a crosslinking - mass-spectrometry approach, we mapped the RNA-binding surface to a positively charged surface patch on T. pendens Csc2. Thus our analysis of the key structural and functional features of T. pendens Csc2 highlights recurring themes and evolutionary relationships in type I and type III Cas proteins.

  11. Src family protein tyrosine kinase regulates the basolateral K channel in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) by phosphorylation of KCNJ10 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengbiao; Wang, Lijun; Thomas, Sherin; Wang, Kemeng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Rinehart, Jesse; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2013-09-01

    The loss of function of the basolateral K channels in the distal nephron causes electrolyte imbalance. The aim of this study is to examine the role of Src family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK) in regulating K channels in the basolateral membrane of the mouse initial distal convoluted tubule (DCT1). Single-channel recordings confirmed that the 40-picosiemen (pS) K channel was the only type of K channel in the basolateral membrane of DCT1. The suppression of SFK reversibly inhibited the basolateral 40-pS K channel activity in cell-attached patches and decreased the Ba(2+)-sensitive whole-cell K currents in DCT1. Inhibition of SFK also shifted the K reversal potential from -65 to -43 mV, suggesting a role of SFK in determining the membrane potential in DCT1. Western blot analysis showed that KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a key component of the basolateral 40-pS K channel in DCT1, was a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. LC/MS analysis further confirmed that SFK phosphorylated KCNJ10 at Tyr(8) and Tyr(9). The single-channel recording detected the activity of a 19-pS K channel in KCNJ10-transfected HEK293T cells and a 40-pS K channel in the cells transfected with KCNJ10+KCNJ16 (Kir.5.1) that form a heterotetramer in the basolateral membrane of the DCT. Mutation of Tyr(9) did not alter the channel conductance of the homotetramer and heterotetramer. However, it decreased the whole-cell K currents, the probability of finding K channels, and surface expression of KCNJ10 in comparison to WT KCNJ10. We conclude that SFK stimulates the basolateral K channel activity in DCT1, at least partially, by phosphorylating Tyr(9) on KCNJ10. We speculate that the modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of KCNJ10 should play a role in regulating membrane transport function in DCT1.

  12. The Schistosoma mansoni tegumental-allergen-like (TAL protein family: influence of developmental expression on human IgE responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin M Fitzsimmons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A human IgE response to Sm22.6 (a dominant IgE target in Schistosoma mansoni is associated with the development of partial immunity. Located inside the tegument, the molecule belongs to a family of proteins from parasitic platyhelminths, the Tegument-Allergen-Like proteins (TALs. In addition to containing dynein-light-chain domains, these TALs also contain EF-hand domains similar to those found in numerous EF-hand allergens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: S. mansoni genome searches revealed 13 members (SmTAL1-13 within the species. Recent microarray data demonstrated they have a wide range of life-cycle transcriptional profiles. We expressed SmTAL1 (Sm22.6, SmTAL2, 3, 4, 5 and 13 as recombinant proteins and measured IgE and IgG4 in 200 infected males (7-60 years from a schistosomiasis endemic region in Uganda. For SmTAL1 and 3 (transcribed in schistosomula through adult-worms and adult-worms, respectively and SmTAL5 (transcribed in cercariae through adult-worms, detectable IgE responses were rare in 7-9 year olds, but increased with age. At all ages, IgE to SmTAL2 (expressed constitutively, was rare while anti-SmTAL2 IgG4 was common. Levels of IgE and IgG4 to SmTAL4 and 13 (transcribed predominantly in the cercariae/skin stage were all low. CONCLUSIONS: We have not measured SmTAL protein abundance or exposure in live parasites, but the antibody data suggests to us that, in endemic areas, there is priming and boosting of IgE to adult-worm SmTALs by occasional death of long-lived worms, desensitization to egg SmTALs through continuous exposure to dying eggs and low immunogenicity of larval SmTALs due to immunosuppression in the skin by the parasite. Of these, it is the gradual increase in IgE to the worm antigens that parallels age-dependent immunity seen in endemic areas.

  13. Primary structures of two ribonucleases from ginseng calluses - New members of the PR-10 family of intracellular pathogenesis-related plant proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moiseyev, GP; Fedoreyeva, LI; Zhuravlev, YN; Yasnetskaya, E; Jekel, PA; Beintema, JJ

    1997-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of two ribonucleases from a callus cell culture of Panax ginseng were determined, The two sequences differ at 26% of the amino acid positions, Homology was found with a large family of intracellular pathogenesis-related proteins, food allergens and tree pollen allergens from

  14. Inhibition of hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein – a novel therapeutic option for treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuorio A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alpo Vuorio,1,2 Matti J Tikkanen,3 Petri T Kovanen4 1Health Center Mehiläinen, Vantaa, Finland; 2Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Lappeenranta, Finland; 3Heart and Lung Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum, Helsinki, Finland; 4Wihuri Research Institute, Biomedicum, Helsinki, Finland Abstract: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL-receptor gene (LDLR. Patients with homozygous FH (hoFH have inherited a mutated LDLR gene from both parents, and therefore all their LDL-receptors are incapable of functioning normally. In hoFH, serum LDL levels often exceed 13 mmol/L and tendon and cutaneous xanthomata appear early (under 10 years of age. If untreated, this extremely severe form of hypercholesterolemia may cause death in childhood or in early adulthood. Based on recent data, it can be estimated that the prevalence of hoFH is about 1:500,000 or even 1:400,000. Until now, the treatment of hoFH has been based on high-dose statin treatment combined with LDL apheresis. Since the LDL cholesterol-lowering effect of statins is weak in this disease, and apheresis is a cumbersome treatment and not available at all centers, alternative novel pharmaceutical therapies are needed. Lomitapide is a newly introduced drug, capable of effectively decreasing serum LDL cholesterol concentration in hoFH. It inhibits the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP. By inhibiting in hepatocytes the transfer of triglycerides into very low density lipoprotein particles, the drug blocks their assembly and secretion into the circulating blood. Since the very low density lipoprotein particles are precursors of LDL particles in the circulation, the reduced secretion of the former results in lower plasma concentration of the latter. The greatest concern in lomitapide treatment has been the increase in liver fat, which can be, however

  15. Analysis of the hybrid proline-rich protein families from seven plant species suggests rapid diversification of their sequences and expression patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer Lukáš; Cvrčková Fatima; Dvořáková Lenka

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Plant hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs) are putative cell wall proteins consisting, usually, of a repetitive proline-rich (PR) N-terminal domain and a conserved eight-cysteine motif (8 CM) C-terminal domain. Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of HyPRPs might provide not only insight into their so far elusive function, but also a model for other large protein families in plants. Results We have performed a phylogenetic analysis of HyPRPs from seven plant species, i...

  16. Analysis of ColE1 MbeC unveils an extended ribbon-helix-helix family of nicking accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Varsaki, Athanasia; Moncalián, Gabriel; Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Drainas, Constantin; Cruz, Fernando de la

    2009-01-01

    MbeC is a 13-kDa ColEl-encoded protein required for efficient mobilization of ColE1, a plasmid widely used in cloning vector technology. MbeC protein was purified and used for in vitro DNA binding, which showed that it binds specifically double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing the ColEl oriT. Amino acid sequence comparison and secondary structure prediction imply that MbeC is related to the ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) protein family. Alignment with RHH members pointed to a conserved arginine (R13...

  17. OVATE Family Protein 8 Positively Mediates Brassinosteroid Signaling through Interacting with the GSK3-like Kinase in Rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OVATE gene was first identified as a key regulator of fruit shape in tomato. OVATE family proteins (OFPs are characterized as plant-specific transcription factors and conserved in Arabidopsis, tomato, and rice. Roles of OFPs involved in plant development and growth are largely unknown. Brassinosteroids (BRs are a class of steroid hormones involved in diverse biological functions. OsGKS2 plays a critical role in BR signaling by phosphorylating downstream components such as OsBZR1 and DLT. Here we report in rice that OsOFP8 plays a positive role in BR signaling pathway. BL treatment induced the expression of OsOFP8 and led to enhanced accumulation of OsOFP8 protein. The gain-of-function mutant Osofp8 and OsOFP8 overexpression lines showed enhanced lamina joint inclination, whereas OsOFP8 RNAi transgenic lines showed more upright leaf phenotype, which suggest that OsOFP8 is involved in BR responses. Further analyses indicated that OsGSK2 interacts with and phosphorylates OsOFP8. BRZ treatment resulted in the cytoplasmic distribution of OsOFP8, and bikinin treatment reduced the cytoplasmic accumulation of OsOFP8. Phosphorylation of OsOFP8 by OsGSK2 is needed for its nuclear export. The phospphorylated OsOFP8 shuttles to the cytoplasm and is targeted for proteasomal degradation. These results indicate that OsOFP8 is a substrate of OsGSK2 and the function of OsOFP8 in plant growth and development is at least partly through the BR signaling pathway.

  18. Copy number variation of lipocalin family genes for male-specific proteins in tilapia and its association with gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirak, A; Golik, M; Lee, B-Y; Howe, A E; Kocher, T D; Hulata, G; Ron, M; Seroussi, E

    2008-11-01

    Lipocalins are involved in the binding of small molecules like sex steroids. We show here that the previously reported tilapia male-specific protein (MSP) is a lipocalin encoded by a variety of paralogous and homologous genes in different tilapia species. Exon-intron boundaries of MSP genes were typical of the six-exon genomic structure of lipocalins, and the transcripts were capable of encoding 200 amino-acid polypeptides that consisted of a putative signal peptide and a lipocalin domain. Cysteine residues are conserved in positions analogous to those forming the three disulfide bonds characteristic of the ligand pocket. The calculated molecular mass of the secreted MSP (20.4 kDa) was less than half of that observed, suggesting that it is highly glycosylated like its homologue tributyltin-binding protein. Analysis of sequence variations revealed three types of paralogs MSPA, MSPB and MSPC. Expression of both MSPA and MSPB was detected in testis. In haploid Oreochromis niloticus embryos, each of these types consisted of two closely related paralogs, and asymmetry between MSP copy numbers on the maternal (six copies) and the paternal (three copies) chromosomes was observed. Using this polymorphism we mapped MSPA and MSPC to linkage group 12 of an F(2) mapping family derived from a cross between O. niloticus and Oreochromis aureus. Females with high MSP copy number were more frequent by more than twofold than males. Gender-MSPC combinations showed significant deviation from expected Mendelian segregation (P=0.009) suggesting elimination of males with MSPC copies. We discuss different hypotheses to explain this elimination, including possibility for allelic conflict resulted by the hybridization. PMID:18648387

  19. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. Ann

    2011-01-01

    kinase SNF1 complex, and an adaptor–regulator related to the SNF1/AMPK family, AKINβγ. CBM20s and CBM48s of amylolytic enzymes occur predominantly in the microbial world, whereas the non-amylolytic proteins containing these modules are mostly of plant and animal origin. Comparison of amino acid sequences......Starch-binding domains (SBDs) comprise distinct protein modules that bind starch, glycogen or related carbohydrates and have been classified into different families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The present review focuses on SBDs of CBM20 and CBM48 found in amylolytic enzymes from several...... glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13, GH14, GH15, GH31, GH57 and GH77, as well as in a number of regulatory enzymes, e.g., phosphoglucan, water dikinase-3, genethonin-1, laforin, starch-excess protein-4, the β-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase and its homologues from sucrose non-fermenting-1 protein...

  20. Genome-wide identification, evolution, and expression analysis of RNA-binding glycine-rich protein family in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Zhang; Yanxin Zhao; Hailin Xiao; Yonglian Zheng; Bing Yue

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-binding glycine-rich protein (RB-GRP) family is characterized by the presence of a glycine-rich domain arranged in (Gly)n-X repeats and an RNA-recognition motif (RRM). RB-GRPs participate in varied physiological and bio-chemical processes especial y in the stress response of plants. In this study, a total of 23 RB-GRPs distributed on 10 chromosomes were identified in maize (Zea mays L.), and they were divided into four subgroups according to their conserved domain architecture. Five pairs of paralogs were identified, while none of them was located on the same chromosomal region, suggesting that segmental duplication is predominant in the duplication events of the RB-GRPs in maize. Comparative analysis of RB-GRPs in maize, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum) revealed that two exclusive subgroups were only identified in maize. Expression of eight ZmRB-GRPs was significantly regulated by at least two kinds of stresses. In addition, cis-elements predicted in the promoter regions of the ZmRB-GRPs also indicated that these ZmRB-GRPs would be involved in stress response of maize. The preliminary genome-wide analysis of the RB-GRPs in maize would provide useful information for further study on the function of the ZmRB-GRPs.

  1. Pentatricopeptide-repeat family protein RF6 functions with hexokinase 6 to rescue rice cytoplasmic male sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenchao; Yu, Changchun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Lili; Dan, Zhiwu; Zhou, Wei; He, Chunlan; Zeng, Yafei; Yao, Guoxin; Qi, Jianzhao; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhu, Renshan; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhu, Yingguo

    2015-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been extensively used for hybrid seed production in many major crops. Honglian CMS (HL-CMS) is one of the three major types of CMS in rice and has contributed greatly to food security worldwide. The HL-CMS trait is associated with an aberrant chimeric mitochondrial transcript, atp6-orfH79, which causes pollen sterility and can be rescued by two nonallelic restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes, Rf5 or Rf6. Here, we report the identification of Rf6, which encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family protein with a characteristic duplication of PPR motifs 3-5. RF6 is targeted to mitochondria, where it physically associates with hexokinase 6 (OsHXK6) and promotes the processing of the aberrant CMS-associated transcript atp6-orfH79 at nucleotide 1238, which ensures normal pollen development and restores fertility. The duplicated motif 3 of RF6 is essential for RF6-OsHXK6 interactions, processing of the aberrant transcript, and restoration of fertility. Furthermore, reductions in the level of OsHXK6 result in atp6-orfH79 transcript accumulation and male sterility. Together these results reveal a novel mechanism for CMS restoration by which RF6 functions with OsHXK6 to restore HL-CMS fertility. The present study also provides insight into the function of hexokinase 6 in regulating mitochondrial RNA metabolism and may facilitate further exploitation of heterosis in rice.

  2. Conserved waters mediate structural and functional activation of family A (rhodopsin-like) G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, T.; Chance, M; Palczewski, K

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors with seven transmembrane {alpha}-helices (GPCRs) comprise the largest receptor superfamily and are involved in detecting a wide variety of extracellular stimuli. The availability of high-resolution crystal structures of five prototypical GPCRs, bovine and squid rhodopsin, engineered A2A-adenosine, {beta}1- and {beta}2-adrenergic receptors, permits comparative analysis of features common to these and likely all GPCRs. We provide an analysis of the distribution of water molecules in the transmembrane region of these GPCR structures and find conserved contacts with microdomains demonstrated to be involved in receptor activation. Colocalization of water molecules associating with highly conserved and functionally important residues in several of these GPCR crystal structures supports the notion that these waters are likely to be as important to proper receptor function as the conserved residues. Moreover, in the absence of large conformational changes in rhodopsin after photoactivation, we propose that ordered waters contribute to the functional plasticity needed to transmit activation signals from the retinal-binding pocket to the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin and that fundamental features of the mechanism of activation, involving these conserved waters, are shared by many if not all family A receptors.

  3. Combined inhibition of BET family proteins and histone deacetylases as a potential epigenetics-based therapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Pawel K; Herner, Alexander; Mello, Stephano S; Wirth, Matthias; Hausmann, Simone; Sánchez-Rivera, Francisco J; Lofgren, Shane M; Kuschma, Timo; Hahn, Stephan A; Vangala, Deepak; Trajkovic-Arsic, Marija; Gupta, Aayush; Heid, Irina; Noël, Peter B; Braren, Rickmer; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Sipos, Bence; Sayles, Leanne C; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Heßmann, Elisabeth; Ellenrieder, Volker; Esposito, Irene; Jacks, Tyler; Bradner, James E; Khatri, Purvesh; Sweet-Cordero, E Alejandro; Attardi, Laura D; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Guenter; Sage, Julien; Siveke, Jens T

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal human cancers and shows resistance to any therapeutic strategy used. Here we tested small-molecule inhibitors targeting chromatin regulators as possible therapeutic agents in PDAC. We show that JQ1, an inhibitor of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of proteins, suppresses PDAC development in mice by inhibiting both MYC activity and inflammatory signals. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA synergizes with JQ1 to augment cell death and more potently suppress advanced PDAC. Finally, using a CRISPR-Cas9–based method for gene editing directly in the mouse adult pancreas, we show that de-repression of p57 (also known as KIP2 or CDKN1C) upon combined BET and HDAC inhibition is required for the induction of combination therapy–induced cell death in PDAC. SAHA is approved for human use, and molecules similar to JQ1 are being tested in clinical trials. Thus, these studies identify a promising epigenetic-based therapeutic strategy that may be rapidly implemented in fatal human tumors. PMID:26390243

  4. Trefoil factor family protein 3 (TFF3) is present in cartilage during endochondral ossification in the developing mouse fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelić, Nikola; Belovari, Tatjana; Baus Lončar, Mirela

    2013-04-01

    Trefoil factor family protein 3 (TFF3) is found in cartilage affected by osteoarthritis and septic arthritis, whereas no TFF3 presence is observed in healthy cartilage. During endochondral ossification, bone tissue replaces degenerating cartilage. There is no data about the role of TFF3 in this process. Our aim was to study the localization of TFF3 in cartilage during endochondral ossification in the mouse fetus. CD1 mouse fetuses, days 14-17, were isolated, fixed, and paraffin embedded. Fetuses were cut into 6μm sections, and processed for immunohistochemical staining with affinity purified polyclonal rabbit anti-TFF3 antibody. TFF3 was present in cartilage chondrocytes undergoing endochondral ossification, particularly in zone of proliferation, hypertrophy and calcification as well as in zone of cartilage degeneration during the monitored fetal period. Resting cartilage showed no presence of TFF3, while during endochondral ossification TFF3 localization showed an analogous pattern to that reported in cartilage affected by osteoarthritis and septic arthritis. Our data indicate that the role of TFF3 in these pathological conditions is similar to its role in the physiological process of endochondral ossification.

  5. CRL6, a member of the CHD protein family, is required for crown root development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihua; Wang, Di; Gan, Ting; Liu, Linglong; Long, Wuhua; Wang, Yunlong; Niu, Mei; Li, Xiaohui; Zheng, Ming; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-08-01

    The root system in monocotyledonous plants is largely composed of postembryonic shoot-borne roots named crown roots, which are important for nutrients and water uptake. The molecular mechanism underlying regulation of crown root development is not fully explored. In this study, we characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant defective in crown root formation, designated as crown rootless6 (crl6). Histological analysis showed that CRL6 influences crown root formation by regulating primordial initiation and development. Map-based cloning and subsequent complementation tests verified that the CRL6 gene encodes a member of the large chromodomain, helicase/ATPase, and DNA-binding domain (CHD) family protein. Realtime RT-PCR analysis showed that CRL6 was most highly expressed in the stem base region where crown roots initiated. In addition, auxin-action inhibited phenotype was observed during crl6 development. The expressions of OsIAA genes were down-regulated in crl6. Our results provide evidence that CRL6 plays an important role in crown root development in rice via auxin-related signaling pathway. PMID:27108205

  6. SSCP analysis and sequencing of the human prion protein gene (PRNP) detects two different 24 bp deletions in an atypical Alzheimer`s disease family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, R.T.; Go, R.C.P.; Harrell, L.E.; Acton, R.T. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is a progressive, degenerative neurological disorder of the central nervous system. AD is the fourth leading cause of death in elderly persons 65 years or older in Western industrialized societies. The etiology of AD is unknown, but clinical, pathological, epidemiological, and molecular investigations suggest it is etiologically heterogeneous. Mutations in the amyloid protein are rare and segregate with the disease in a few early-onset familial AD (FAD) families. Similarities between AD and the unconventional viral (UCV) diseases, and between the amyloid and prion proteins, implicate the human prion protein gene (PRNP) as another candidate gene. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was used to screen for mutations at this locus in 82 AD patients from 54 families (30 FAD), vs. 39 age-matched controls. A 24-bp deletion around codon 68 that codes for one of five Gly-Pro rich octarepeats was identified in two affected sibs and one offspring of one late-onset FAD family. Two other affected sibs, three unaffected sibs, and three offspring from this family, in addition to one sporadic AD patient and three age-matched controls, were heterozygous for another octarepeat deletion located around codon 82. Two of the four affected sibs had features of PD, including one who was autopsy-verified AD and PD. Although these deletions were found infrequently in other AD patients and controls, they appear to be a rare polymorphism that is segregating in this FAD family. It does not appear that mutations at the PRNP locus are frequently associated with AD in this population. 54 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of reduced glutathione transport: role of the MRP/CFTR/ABCC and OATP/SLC21A families of membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial step in reduced glutathione (GSH) turnover in all mammalian cells is its transport across the plasma membrane into the extracellular space; however, the mechanisms of GSH transport are not clearly defined. GSH export is required for the delivery of its constituent amino acids to other tissues, detoxification of drugs, metals, and other reactive compounds of both endogenous and exogenous origin, protection against oxidant stress, and secretion of hepatic bile. Recent studies indicate that some members of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP/CFTR or ABCC) family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, as well as some members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP or SLC21A) family of transporters contribute to this process. In particular, five of the 12 members of the MRP/CFTR family appear to mediate GSH export from cells namely, MRP1, MRP2, MRP4, MRP5, and CFTR. Additionally, two members of the OATP family, rat Oatp1 and Oatp2, have been identified as GSH transporters. For the Oatp1 transporter, efflux of GSH may provide the driving force for the uptake of extracellular substrates. In humans, OATP-B and OATP8 do not appear to transport GSH; however, other members of this family have yet to be characterized in regards to GSH transport. In yeast, the ABC proteins Ycf1p and Bpt1p transport GSH from the cytosol into the vacuole, whereas Hgt1p mediates GSH uptake across the plasma membrane. Because transport is a key step in GSH homeostasis and is intimately linked to its biological functions, GSH export proteins are likely to modulate essential cellular functions

  8. Fungus- and wound-induced accumulation of mRNA containing a class II chitinase of the pathogenesis-related protein 4 (PR-4) family of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Juan Manuel; Campo, Sonia; Murillo, Isabel; Coca, Mária; San Segundo, Blanca

    2003-07-01

    Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are plant proteins that are induced in response to pathogen attack. PR proteins are grouped into independent families based on their sequences and properties. The PR-4 family comprises class I and class II chitinases. We have isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a chitinase from maize which shares a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with the class II chitinases of the PR-4 family of PR proteins. Our results indicate that fungal infection, and treatment either with fungal elicitors or with moniliformin, a mycotoxin produced by the fungus Fusarium moniliforme, increase the level of ZmPR4 mRNA. In situ mRNA hybridization analysis in sections obtained from fungus-infected germinating embryos revealed that ZmPR4 mRNA accumulation occurs in those cell types that first establish contact with the pathogen. ZmPR4 mRNA accumulation is also stimulated by treatment with silver nitrate whereas the application of the hormones gibberellic acid or acetylsalicylic acid has no effect. Wounding, or treatment with abscisic acid or methyl jasmonate, results in accumulation of ZmPR4 mRNA in maize leaves. Furthermore, the ZmPR4 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and used to obtain polyclonal antibodies that specifically recognized ZmPR4 in protein extracts from fungus-infected embryos. Accumulation of ZmPR4 mRNA in fungus-infected maize tissues was accompanied by a significant accumulation of the corresponding protein. The possible implications of these findings as part of the general defence response of maize plants against pathogens are discussed. PMID:13677464

  9. Comparative analysis of serine/arginine-rich proteins across 27 eukaryotes: insights into sub-family classification and extent of alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale N Richardson

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS of pre-mRNA is a fundamental molecular process that generates diversity in the transcriptome and proteome of eukaryotic organisms. SR proteins, a family of splicing regulators with one or two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs at the N-terminus and an arg/ser-rich domain at the C-terminus, function in both constitutive and alternative splicing. We identified SR proteins in 27 eukaryotic species, which include plants, animals, fungi and "basal" eukaryotes that lie outside of these lineages. Using RNA recognition motifs (RRMs as a phylogenetic marker, we classified 272 SR genes into robust sub-families. The SR gene family can be split into five major groupings, which can be further separated into 11 distinct sub-families. Most flowering plants have double or nearly double the number of SR genes found in vertebrates. The majority of plant SR genes are under purifying selection. Moreover, in all paralogous SR genes in Arabidopsis, rice, soybean and maize, one of the two paralogs is preferentially expressed throughout plant development. We also assessed the extent of AS in SR genes based on a splice graph approach (http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/as/gmap_SRgenes. AS of SR genes is a widespread phenomenon throughout multiple lineages, with alternative 3' or 5' splicing events being the most prominent type of event. However, plant-enriched sub-families have 57%-88% of their SR genes experiencing some type of AS compared to the 40%-54% seen in other sub-families. The SR gene family is pervasive throughout multiple eukaryotic lineages, conserved in sequence and domain organization, but differs in gene number across lineages with an abundance of SR genes in flowering plants. The higher number of alternatively spliced SR genes in plants emphasizes the importance of AS in generating splice variants in these organisms.

  10. A novel highly divergent protein family identified from a viviparous insect by RNA-seq analysis: a potential target for tsetse fly-specific abortifacients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B Benoit

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In tsetse flies, nutrients for intrauterine larval development are synthesized by the modified accessory gland (milk gland and provided in mother's milk during lactation. Interference with at least two milk proteins has been shown to extend larval development and reduce fecundity. The goal of this study was to perform a comprehensive characterization of tsetse milk proteins using lactation-specific transcriptome/milk proteome analyses and to define functional role(s for the milk proteins during lactation. Differential analysis of RNA-seq data from lactating and dry (non-lactating females revealed enrichment of transcripts coding for protein synthesis machinery, lipid metabolism and secretory proteins during lactation. Among the genes induced during lactation were those encoding the previously identified milk proteins (milk gland proteins 1-3, transferrin and acid sphingomyelinase 1 and seven new genes (mgp4-10. The genes encoding mgp2-10 are organized on a 40 kb syntenic block in the tsetse genome, have similar exon-intron arrangements, and share regions of amino acid sequence similarity. Expression of mgp2-10 is female-specific and high during milk secretion. While knockdown of a single mgp failed to reduce fecundity, simultaneous knockdown of multiple variants reduced milk protein levels and lowered fecundity. The genomic localization, gene structure similarities, and functional redundancy of MGP2-10 suggest that they constitute a novel highly divergent protein family. Our data indicates that MGP2-10 function both as the primary amino acid resource for the developing larva and in the maintenance of milk homeostasis, similar to the function of the mammalian casein family of milk proteins. This study underscores the dynamic nature of the lactation cycle and identifies a novel family of lactation-specific proteins, unique to Glossina sp., that are essential to larval development. The specificity of MGP2-10 to tsetse and their critical role during

  11. Oligomerization of BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator: structural basis for the aggregation of proteins in this family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general tetramerization and oligomerization scheme is proposed for BenM and other LysR-type transcriptional regulators based on two newly characterized structures of the effector-binding domain of BenM. An analysis of these structures in the light of other LysR-type structures may explain the general solubility problems associated with this protein family. LysR-type transcriptional regulators comprise the largest family of homologous regulatory DNA-binding proteins in bacteria. A problematic challenge in the crystallization of LysR-type regulators stems from the insolubility and precipitation difficulties encountered with high concentrations of the full-length versions of these proteins. A general oligomerization scheme is proposed for this protein family based on the structures of the effector-binding domain of BenM in two different space groups, P4322 and C2221. These structures used the same oligomerization scheme of dimer–dimer interactions as another LysR-type regulator, CbnR, the full-length structure of which is available [Muraoka et al. (2003 ▶), J. Mol. Biol.328, 555–566]. Evaluation of packing relationships and surface features suggests that BenM can form infinite oligomeric arrays in crystals through these dimer–dimer interactions. By extrapolation to the liquid phase, such dimer–dimer interactions may contribute to the significant difficulty in crystallizing full-length members of this family. The oligomerization of dimeric units to form biologically important tetramers appears to leave unsatisfied oligomerization sites. Under conditions that favor association, such as neutral pH and concentrations appropriate for crystallization, higher order oligomerization could cause solubility problems with purified proteins. A detailed model by which BenM and other LysR-type transcriptional regulators may form these arrays is proposed

  12. Epstein-Barr virus interactions with the Bcl-2 protein family and apoptosis in human tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin FU; Chen HE; Zheng-rong MAO

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV),a human gammaherpesvirus carried by more than 90% of the world's population,is associated with malignant tumors such as Burkitt's lymphoma (BL),Hodgkin lymphoma,post-transplant lymphoma,extra-nodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma,and nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas in immune-compromised patients.In the process of infection,EBV faces challenges:the host cell environment is harsh,and the survival and apoptosis of host cells are precisely regulated.Only when host cells receive sufficient survival signals may they immortalize.To establish efficiently a lytic or long-term latent infection,EBV must escape the host cell immunologic mechanism and resist host cell apoptosis by interfering with multiple signaling pathways.This review details the apoptotic pathway disrupted by EBV in EBV-infected cells and describes the interactions of EBV gene products with host cellular factors as well as the function of these factors,which decide the fate of the host cell.The relationships between other EBV-encoded genes and proteins of the B-cell leukemia/lymphoma (Bcl) family are unknown.Still,EBV seems to contribute to establishing its own latency and the formation of tumors by modifying events that impact cell survival and proliferation as well as the immune response of the infected host.We discuss potential therapeutic drugs to provide a foundation for further studies of tumor pathogenesis aimed at exploiting novel therapeutic strategies for EBV-associated diseases.

  13. Characterization of Danio rerio Mn2+-dependent ADP-ribose/CDP-alcohol diphosphatase, the structural prototype of the ADPRibase-Mn-like protein family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Rui Rodrigues

    Full Text Available The ADPRibase-Mn-like protein family, that belongs to the metallo-dependent phosphatase superfamily, has different functional and structural prototypes. The functional one is the Mn(2+-dependent ADP-ribose/CDP-alcohol diphosphatase from Rattus norvegicus, which is essentially inactive with Mg(2+ and active with low micromolar Mn(2+ in the hydrolysis of the phosphoanhydride linkages of ADP-ribose, CDP-alcohols and cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR in order of decreasing efficiency. The structural prototype of the family is a Danio rerio protein with a known crystallographic structure but functionally uncharacterized. To estimate the structure-function correlation with the same protein, the activities of zebrafish ADPRibase-Mn were studied. Differences between zebrafish and rat enzymes are highlighted. The former showed a complex activity dependence on Mn(2+, significant (≈25% Mg(2+-dependent activity, but was almost inactive on cADPR (150-fold less efficient than the rat counterpart. The low cADPR hydrolase activity agreed with the zebrafish genome lacking genes coding for proteins with significant homology with cADPR-forming enzymes. Substrate-docking to zebrafish wild-type protein, and characterization of the ADPRibase-Mn H97A mutant pointed to a role of His-97 in catalysis by orientation, and to a bidentate water bridging the dinuclear metal center as the potential nucleophile. Finally, three structural elements that delimit the active site entrance in the zebrafish protein were identified as unique to the ADPRibase-Mn-like family within the metallo-dependent phosphatase superfamily.

  14. The TIS11 primary response gene is a member of a gene family that encodes proteins with a highly conserved sequence containing an unusual Cys-His repeat.

    OpenAIRE

    Varnum, B C; Ma, Q F; T. H. Chi; Fletcher, B.; Herschman, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    The TIS11 primary response gene is rapidly and transiently induced by both 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and growth factors. The predicted TIS11 protein contains a 6-amino-acid repeat, YKTELC. We cloned two additional cDNAs, TIS11b and TIS11d, that contain the YKTELC sequence. TIS11, TIS11b, and TIS11d proteins share a 67-amino-acid region of sequence similarity that includes the YKTELC repeat and two cysteine-histidine containing repeats. TIS11 gene family members are not coordinately...

  15. Chorioallantoic Fusion Defects and Embryonic Lethality Resulting from Disruption of Zfp36L1, a Gene Encoding a CCCH Tandem Zinc Finger Protein of the Tristetraprolin Family

    OpenAIRE

    Stumpo, Deborah J.; Byrd, Noah A.; Phillips, Ruth S.; Ghosh, Sanjukta; Maronpot, Robert R.; Castranio, Trisha; Meyers, Erik N.; Mishina, Yuji; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2004-01-01

    The mouse gene Zfp36L1 encodes zinc finger protein 36-like 1 (Zfp36L1), a member of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of tandem CCCH finger proteins. TTP can bind to AU-rich elements within the 3′-untranslated regions of the mRNAs encoding tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), leading to accelerated mRNA degradation. TTP knockout mice exhibit an inflammatory phenotype that is largely due to increased TNF secretion. Zfp36L1 has activities sim...

  16. Molecular cloning, heterologous expression and functional characterization of a novel translationally-controlled tumor protein (TCTP) family member from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Youssef B; Bóia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza H; da Silveira, Rafael B; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga M; Veiga, Silvio S

    2012-01-01

    Envenoming with brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) is common throughout the world. Cutaneous symptoms following spider bite accidents include dermonecrosis, erythema, itching and pain. In some cases, accidents can cause hypersensibility or even allergic reactions. These responses could be associated with histaminergic events, such as an increase in vascular permeability and vasodilatation. A protein that may be related to the effects of spider venom was identified from a previously obtained cDNA library of the L. intermedia venom gland. The amino acid sequence of this protein is homologous to proteins from the TCTP (translationally-controlled tumor protein) family, which are extracellular histamine-releasing factors (HRF) that are associated with the allergic reactions to parasites. Herein, we described the cloning, heterologous expression, purification and functional characterization of a novel member of the TCTP family from the Loxosceles intermedia venom gland. This recombinant protein, named LiRecTCTP, causes edema, enhances vascular permeability and is likely related to the inflammatory activity of the venom. Moreover, LiRecTCTP presents an immunological relationship with mammalian TCTPs. PMID:22051631

  17. Molecular cloning, heterologous expression and functional characterization of a novel translationally-controlled tumor protein (TCTP) family member from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Youssef B; Bóia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza H; da Silveira, Rafael B; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga M; Veiga, Silvio S

    2012-01-01

    Envenoming with brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) is common throughout the world. Cutaneous symptoms following spider bite accidents include dermonecrosis, erythema, itching and pain. In some cases, accidents can cause hypersensibility or even allergic reactions. These responses could be associated with histaminergic events, such as an increase in vascular permeability and vasodilatation. A protein that may be related to the effects of spider venom was identified from a previously obtained cDNA library of the L. intermedia venom gland. The amino acid sequence of this protein is homologous to proteins from the TCTP (translationally-controlled tumor protein) family, which are extracellular histamine-releasing factors (HRF) that are associated with the allergic reactions to parasites. Herein, we described the cloning, heterologous expression, purification and functional characterization of a novel member of the TCTP family from the Loxosceles intermedia venom gland. This recombinant protein, named LiRecTCTP, causes edema, enhances vascular permeability and is likely related to the inflammatory activity of the venom. Moreover, LiRecTCTP presents an immunological relationship with mammalian TCTPs.

  18. The Fras1/Frem family of extracellular matrix proteins: structure, function, and association with Fraser syndrome and the mouse bleb phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Petros; Makrygiannis, Apostolos K; Chalepakis, Georges

    2008-01-01

    Fras1 and the structurally related proteins Frem1, Frem2, and Frem3, comprise a novel family of extracellular matrix proteins, which localize in a similar fashion underneath the lamina densa of epithelial basement membranes. They are involved in the structural adhesion of the skin epithelium to its underlying mesenchyme. Deficiency in the individual murine Fras1/Frem genes gives rise to the bleb phenotype, which is equivalent to the human hereditary disorder Fraser syndrome, characterized by cryptophthalmos (hidden eyes), embryonic skin blistering, renal agenesis, and syndactyly. Recent studies revealed a functional cooperation between the Fras1/Frem gene products, in which Fras1, Frem1 and Frem2 are simultaneously stabilized at the lowermost region of the basement membrane by forming a macromolecular ternary complex. Loss of any of these proteins results in the collapse of the protein assembly, thus providing a molecular explanation for the highly similar phenotypic defects displayed by the respective mutant mice. Here, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the structure, function, and interplay between the proteins of the Fras1/Frem family and further propose a possible scenario for the evolution of the corresponding genes.

  19. The pURI family of expression vectors: a versatile set of ligation independent cloning plasmids for producing recombinant His-fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, José Antonio; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2011-03-01

    A family of restriction enzyme- and ligation-independent cloning vectors has been developed for producing recombinant His-tagged fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. These are based on pURI2 and pURI3 expression vectors which have been previously used for the successful production of recombinant proteins at the milligram scale. The newly designed vectors combines two different promoters (lpp(p)-5 and T7 RNA polymerase Ø10), two different endoprotease recognition sites for the His₆-tag removal (enterokinase and tobacco etch virus), different antibiotic selectable markers (ampicillin and erythromycin resistance), and different placements of the His₆-tag (N- and C-terminus). A single gene can be cloned and further expressed in the eight pURI vectors by using six nucleotide primers, avoiding the restriction enzyme and ligation steps. A unique NotI site was introduced to facilitate the selection of the recombinant plasmid. As a case study, the new vectors have been used to clone the gene coding for the phenolic acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum. Interestingly, the obtained results revealed markedly different production levels of the target protein, emphasizing the relevance of the cloning strategy on soluble protein production yield. Efficient purification and tag removal steps showed that the affinity tag and the protease cleavage sites functioned properly. The novel family of pURI vectors designed for parallel cloning is a useful and versatile tool for the production and purification of a protein of interest. PMID:21055470

  20. Structural characterization of the protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a metalloprotein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2009-03-11

    The genome of many cyanobacacteria contain the sequence for a small protein (<100 amino acids) with a commom "domain of unknown function" grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that fall into the DUF683 family, cce_0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce_0567, to 1.84 Å resolution. Cce_0567 crystallized in space group P21 with two protein molecules and one Ni2+ cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two α-helices from residues P11 to G41 (α1) and L49-E74 (α2) with the second α-helix containing a short 310-helix (Y46 - N48). A four-residue linker (L42 - D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle that cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce_0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of ~1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer coordinate with Ni2+ in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni2+ was titrated into 15N-labelled cce_0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni2+ binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce_0567 upon binding Ni2+, even in large molar excess of Ni2+, indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce_0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of ~62ºC that was reversible.

  1. Structural characterization of the protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a metalloprotein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchko, Garry W; Robinson, Howard; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2009-04-01

    The genomes of many cyanobacteria contain the sequence for a small protein with a common "Domain of Unknown Function" grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that falls into the DUF683 family, cce_0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce_0567, to 1.84 A resolution. Cce_0567 crystallized in space group P2(1) with two protein molecules and one Ni(2+) cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two alpha-helices, residues P11 to G41 (alpha1) and L49-E74 (alpha2), with the second alpha-helix containing a short 3(10)-helix (Y46-N48). A four-residue linker (L42-D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle and cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce_0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of approximately 1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer is coordinated with Ni(2+) in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni(2+) was titrated into (15)N-labeled cce_0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni(2+) binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce_0567 upon binding Ni(2+), even in large molar excess of Ni(2+), indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce_0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of approximately 62 degrees C

  2. Structural Characterization of the Protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a Metalloprotein Associated with Nitrogen Fixation in the DUF683 Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, G.; Robinson, H; Addlagatta, A

    2009-01-01

    The genomes of many cyanobacteria contain the sequence for a small protein with a common 'Domain of Unknown Function' grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that falls into the DUF683 family, cce 0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce 0567, to 1.84 A resolution. Cce 0567 crystallized in space group P2(1) with two protein molecules and one Ni(2+) cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two alpha-helices, residues P11 to G41 (alpha1) and L49-E74 (alpha2), with the second alpha-helix containing a short 3(10)-helix (Y46-N48). A four-residue linker (L42-D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle and cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce 0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of approximately 1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer is coordinated with Ni(2+) in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni(2+) was titrated into (15)N-labeled cce 0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni(2+) binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce 0567 upon binding Ni(2+), even in large molar excess of Ni(2+), indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce 0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of approximately 62

  3. The progress of the study on reticulons protein family%Reticulons家族蛋白研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周金武; 程肖蕊; 周文霞; 张永祥

    2009-01-01

    Reticulons(RTNs)蛋白是一类广泛存在于真菌、植物及动物等真核生物的膜蛋白,主要定位于内质网,尤其是管状内质网,原核生物中至今尚未发现其同系物.哺乳动物基因组中有RTN1、RTN2、RTN3及RTN4共四类相互独立的基因,因启动子及选择性剪接方式不同每个基因可产生不同转录本.RTNs家族成员氨基端序列高度可变且大小显著不同,羧基端的约200个氨基酸残基则高度保守,被称为内质网蛋白同源结构域(reticulon-homology domain,RHD).RTNs高度可变的氨基端赋予其各成员物种特异性及细胞特异性的功能,羧基端的RHD则是其执行基本细胞功能的基础.越来越多的研究结果表明,RTNs可参与蛋白转运、参与膜结构形态发生或稳定及细胞分裂、构成内质网膜通道或转运体、调节细胞凋亡、调节β分泌酶(β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1,BACE1)活性及抑制神经再生等.该文就RTNs家族各成员基因和蛋白的结构特性以及功能特点的研究进展进行简要综述.%Reticulons(RTNs), predominantly associated with endoplasmic reticulumare(ER), especially tubular ER, widely exist as a family of membrane-bound proteins in eukaryotic organisms including fungi, plants and animals, but no homologues have been identified in prokaryotes so far. There are four independent RTN genes, such as RTN1, RTN2, RTN3 and RTN4 in mamalian genome, and each of them produces a range of transcripts due to deferential promoter usage and/or alternative splicing. All RTNs share a highly conserved C-terminal reticulon homology domain(RHD) of 200 or so amino-acid residues whereas the N-terminal regions are highly variable in sequence and length. It is the variability in N-terminus and the conservation in C-terminus of RTNs that confers species/cell-specific functions and a common cellular fuction to each member respectively. Many studies indicated that RTNs participate in protein trafficking and membrane

  4. The CREC family, a novel family of multiple EF-hand, low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins localised to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H

    2000-01-01

    in quite diverse invertebrate organisms such as DCB-45 and SCF in Drosophila melanogaster, SCF in Bombyx mori, CCB-39 in Caenorhabditis elegans and Pfs40/PfERC in Plasmodium falciparum. The Ca(2+) affinity is rather low with dissociation constants around 10(-4)-10(-3) M. The proteins may participate in Ca...

  5. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Gene Family in Brassica rapa

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Kun; Guo, Wenjin; Lu, Junxing; Yu, Hao; Qu, Cunmin; Tang, Zhanglin; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are fundamental signal transduction modules in plants, controlling cell division, development, hormone signaling, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although MAPKs have been investigated in several plant species, a comprehensive analysis of the MAPK gene family has hitherto not been performed in Brassica rapa. In this study, we identified 32 MAPKs in the B. rapa genome by conducting BLASTP and syntenic block analyses, and screening for th...

  6. WASH and WAVE actin regulators of the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family are controlled by analogous structurally related complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Da; Gomez, Timothy S.; Metlagel, Zoltan; Umetani, Junko; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Rosen, Michael K.; BILLADEAU, DANIEL D.

    2010-01-01

    We recently showed that the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family member, WASH, localizes to endosomal subdomains and regulates endocytic vesicle scission in an Arp2/3-dependent manner. Mechanisms regulating WASH activity are unknown. Here we show that WASH functions in cells within a 500 kDa core complex containing Strumpellin, FAM21, KIAA1033 (SWIP), and CCDC53. Although recombinant WASH is constitutively active toward the Arp2/3 complex, the reconstituted core assembly is inhibite...

  7. Plasma Protein Carbonyls and Breast Cancer Risk in Sisters Discordant for Breast Cancer from the New York Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Zipprich, Jennifer; Terry, Mary Beth; Liao, Yuyan; Agrawal, Meenakshi; Gurvich, Irina; Senie, Ruby; Santella, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are important in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including breast cancer. Several population-based case-control studies have demonstrated that various biomarkers of oxidative stress are associated with an increase in breast cancer risk. We selected sisters discordant for breast cancer (n=645) from the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry to explore factors that contribute to variation in plasma protein carbonyls, and to determine whether this bio...

  8. To control and to be controlled – understanding the Arabidopsis SLIM1 function in sulfur deficiency through comprehensive investigation of the EIL protein family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eWawrzyńska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available SSLIM1, a member of the EIN3-like (EIL family of transcription factors in Arabidopsis, is the regulator of many sulfur-deficiency responsive genes. Among the five other proteins of the family, three regulate ethylene responses and two have unassigned functions. Contrary to the well-defined ethylene signaling, the pathway leading from sensing sulfate status to the activation of its acquisition via SLIM1 is completely unknown. SLIM1 binds to the 20 nt-long specific UPE-box sequence; however, it also recognizes the shorter TEIL sequence, unique for the whole EIL family. SLIM1 takes part in the upregulation and downregulation of various sulfur metabolism genes, but also it controls the degradation of glucosinolates under sulfur deficient conditions. Besides facilitating the increased flux through the sulfate assimilation pathway, SLIM1 induces microRNA395, specifically targeting ATP sulfurylases and a low-affinity sulfate transporter, SULTR2;1, thus affecting sulfate translocation to the shoot. Here, we briefly review the identification, structural characteristics and molecular function of SLIM1 from the perspective of the whole EIL protein family.

  9. Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-3 (PvMSP3: expression of an 11 member multigene family in blood-stage parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlin Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three members of the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-3 (PvMSP3 family (PvMSP3-α, PvMSP3-β and PvMSP3-γ were initially characterized and later shown to be part of a larger highly diverse family, encoded by a cluster of genes arranged head-to-tail in chromosome 10. PvMSP3-α and PvMSP3-β have become genetic markers in epidemiological studies, and are being evaluated as vaccine candidates. This research investigates the gene and protein expression of the entire family and pertinent implications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A 60 kb multigene locus from chromosome 10 in P. vivax (Salvador 1 strain was studied to classify the number of pvmsp3 genes present, and compare their transcription, translation and protein localization patterns during blood-stage development. Eleven pvmsp3 paralogs encode an N-terminal NLRNG signature motif, a central domain containing repeated variable heptad sequences, and conserved hydrophilic C-terminal features. One additional ORF in the locus lacks these features and was excluded as a member of the family. Transcripts representing all eleven pvmsp3 genes were detected in trophozoite- and schizont-stage RNA. Quantitative immunoblots using schizont-stage extracts and antibodies specific for each PvMSP3 protein demonstrated that all but PvMSP3.11 could be detected. Homologs were also detected by immunoblot in the closely related simian species, P. cynomolgi and P. knowlesi. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed that eight of the PvMSP3s are present in mature schizonts. Uniquely, PvMSP3.7 was expressed exclusively at the apical end of merozoites. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Specific proteins were detected representing the expression of 10 out of 11 genes confirmed as members of the pvmsp3 family. Eight PvMSP3s were visualized surrounding merozoites. In contrast, PvMSP3.7 was detected at the apical end of the merozoites. Pvmsp3.11 transcripts were present, though no corresponding protein was detected

  10. Characterization of pII Family (GlnK1, GlnK2, GlnB) Protein Uridylylation in Response to Nitrogen Availability for Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connelly, Heather M [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan [ORNL; Lankford, Patricia K [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The GlnK and GlnB proteins are members of the pII signal transduction protein family, which is essential in nitrogen regulation due to this protein family's ability to sense internal cellular ammonium levels and control cellular response. The role of GlnK in nitrogen regulation has been studied in a variety of bacteria but previously has been uncharacterized in the purple nonsulfur anoxygenic phototropic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris. R. palustris has tremendous metabolic versatility in its modes of energy generation and carbon metabolism, and it employs a sensitive nitrogen-ammonium regulation system that may vary from that of other commonly studied bacteria. In R. palustris, there are three annotated forms of pII proteins: GlnK1, GlnK2, and GlnB. Here we describe, for the first time, the characterization of GlnK1, GlnK2, and GlnB modifications as a response to nitrogen availability, thereby providing information about how this bacterium regulates the AmtB ammonium transporter and glutamine synthetase, which controls the rate of glutamate to glutamine conversion. Using a strategy of creating C-terminally tagged GlnK and GlnB proteins followed by tandem affinity purification in combination with top-down mass spectrometry, four isoforms of the GlnK2 and GlnB proteins and two isoforms of the GlnK1 protein were characterized at high resolution and mass accuracy. Wild-type or endogenous expression of all three proteins was also examined under normal ammonium conditions and ammonium starvation to ensure that the tagging and affinity purification methods employed did not alter the natural state of the proteins. All three proteins were found to undergo uridylylation under ammonium starvation conditions, presumably to regulate the AmtB ammonium transporter and glutamine synthetase. Under high-ammonium conditions, the GlnK1, GlnK2, and GlnB proteins are unmodified. This experimental protocol involving high-resolution mass spectrometry measurements of intact

  11. Membrane metabolism mediated by Sec14 family members influences Arf GTPase activating protein activity for transport from the trans-Golgi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tania A; Fairn, Gregory D; Poon, Pak P; Shmulevitz, Maya; McMaster, Christopher R; Singer, Richard A; Johnston, Gerald C

    2005-09-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a family of Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) GTPase activating protein (GAP) proteins with the Gcs1 + Age2 ArfGAP pair providing essential overlapping function for the movement of transport vesicles from the trans-Golgi network. We have generated a temperature-sensitive but stable version of the Gcs1 protein that is impaired only for trans-Golgi transport and find that deleterious effects of this enfeebled Gcs1-4 mutant protein are relieved by increased gene dosage of the gcs1-4 mutant gene itself or by the SFH2 gene (also called CSR1), encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP). This effect was not seen for the SEC14 gene, encoding the founding member of the yeast PITP protein family, even though the Gcs1 and Age2 ArfGAPs are known to be downstream effectors of Sec14-mediated activity for trans-Golgi transport. Sfh2-mediated suppression of inadequate Gcs1-4 function depended on phospholipase D, whereas inadequate Gcs1-4 activity was relieved by increasing levels of diacylglycerol (DAG). Recombinant Gcs1 protein was found to bind certain phospholipids but not DAG. Our findings favor a model of Gcs1 localization through binding to specific phospholipids and activation of ArfGAP activity by DAG-mediated membrane curvature as the transport vesicle is formed. Thus, ArfGAPs are subject to both temporal and spatial regulation that is facilitated by Sfh2-mediated modulation of the lipid environment. PMID:16126894

  12. A novel BH3 mimetic efficiently induces apoptosis in melanoma cells through direct binding to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, including phosphorylated Mcl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubo; Xie, Mingzhou; Song, Ting; Sheng, Hongkun; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zhichao

    2015-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family modulates sensitivity to chemotherapy in many cancers, including melanoma, in which the RAS/BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway is constitutively activated. Mcl-1, a major anti-apoptotic protein in the Bcl-2 family, is extensively expressed in melanoma and contributes to melanoma's well-documented chemoresistance. Here, we provide the first evidence that Mcl-1 phosphorylation at T163 by ERK1/2 and JNK is associated with the resistance of melanoma cell lines to the existing BH3 mimetics gossypol, S1 and ABT-737, and a novel anti-apoptotic mechanism of phosphorylated Mcl-1 (pMcl-1) is revealed. pMcl-1 antagonized the known BH3 mimetics by sequestering pro-apoptotic proteins that were released from Bcl-2/Mcl-1. Furthermore, an anthraquinone BH3 mimetic, compound 6, was identified to be the first small molecule to that induces endogenous apoptosis in melanoma cells by directly binding Bcl-2, Mcl-1, and pMcl-1 and disrupting the heterodimers of these proteins. Although compound 6 induced upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa, its apoptotic induction was independent of Noxa. These data reveal the promising therapeutic potential of targeting pMcl-1 to treat melanoma. Compound 6 is therefore a potent drug that targets pMcl-1 in melanoma.

  13. Angiotensinogen gene-inducible enhancer-binding protein 1, a member of a new family of large nuclear proteins that recognize nuclear factor kappa B-binding sites through a zinc finger motif.

    OpenAIRE

    Ron, D; Brasier, A R; Habener, J F

    1991-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of the rat angiotensinogen gene during the acute-phase response is dependent on a previously characterized acute-phase response element (APRE) that binds at least two types of nuclear proteins: a cytokine-inducible activity indistinguishable from nuclear factor kappa-B (NF kappa B) and a family of C/EBP-like proteins. We screened a rat liver cDNA expression library with a labeled APRE DNA probe and isolated a single clone that encodes a sequence-specific APRE-bindin...

  14. Inherited prion disease with A117V mutation of the prion protein gene: a novel Hungarian family

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, G; Ertsey, C; Majtenyi, C; Jelencsik, I; Laszlo, L; Flicker, H; Strain, L.; Szirmai, I; Budka, H.

    2001-01-01

    Three members of a family with inherited prion disease are reported. One additional family member had a progressive neurological disease without details. Two developed symptoms of ataxia, dementia, myoclonus, rigidity, and hemiparesis, and one had a different phenotype with the combination of lower motor neuron deficit, parkinsonism, intellectual decline, and ataxia. In this last patient cell loss of the anterior horn motor neurons and chronic neurogenic muscle atrophy was evid...

  15. Identification of A cGMP-dependent protein</