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Sample records for 5-year randomized trial

  1. SCANDCLEFT RANDOMIZED TRIALS: SPEECH OUTCOMES IN 5-YEAR-OLDS WITH UCLP - velopharyngeal competency and hypernasality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmander, Anette; Persson, Christina; Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim: Adequate velopharyngeal function and speech are main goals in the treatment of cleft palate. The objective was to investigate if there were differences in velopharyngeal competency (VPC) and hypernasality at age 5 years in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP......) operated on with different surgical methods for primary palatal repair. A secondary aim was to estimate burden of care in terms of received additional secondary surgeries and speech therapy. Design: Three parallel group, randomised clinical trials were undertaken as an international multicentre study by 10...... cleft teams in five countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and the UK. Methods: Three different surgical protocols for primary palatal repair were tested against a common procedure in the total cohort of 448 children born with a non-syndromic UCLP. Speech audio and video recordings of 391 children...

  2. Randomized Clinical Trials on Deep Carious Lesions: 5-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørndal, L; Fransson, H; Bruun, G; Markvart, M; Kjældgaard, M; Näsman, P; Hedenbjörk-Lager, A; Dige, I; Thordrup, M

    2017-07-01

    Deep caries presents a dilemma in terms of which treatment that will render an optimal prognosis by maintaining pulp vitality with absence of apical pathology. Previously, 2 randomized clinical trials were performed testing the short-term effects of stepwise carious tissue removal versus nonselective carious removal to hard dentin with or without pulp exposure. The aim of this article was to report the 5-y outcome on these previously treated patients having radiographically well-defined carious lesions extending into the pulpal quarter of the dentin but with a well-defined radiodense zone between the carious lesion and the pulp. In this long-term study, 239 of 314 (76.2%) patients were analyzed. The stepwise removal group had a significantly higher proportion of success (60.2%) at 5-y follow-up compared with the nonselective carious removal to hard dentin group (46.3%) ( P = 0.031) when pulp exposures per se were included as failures. Pulp exposure rate was significantly lower in the stepwise carious removal group (21.2% vs. 35.5%; P = 0.014). Irrespective of pulp exposure status, the difference (13.3%) was still significant when sustained pulp vitality without apical radiolucency and unbearable pain was considered (95% confidence interval, 3.1-26.3, P = 0.045). After pulp exposure, only 9% ( n = 4) of the analyzed patients were assessed as successful, indicating that the prognosis is highly dubious following conventional pulp-capping procedures (direct pulp capping or partial pulpotomy) in deep carious lesions in adults. In conclusion, the stepwise carious removal group had a significantly higher proportion of pulps with sustained vitality without apical radiolucency versus nonselective carious removal of deep carious lesions in adult teeth at 5-y follow-up ( ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00187837 and NCT00187850).

  3. Preventing repetition of attempted suicide-III. The Amager Project, 5-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahoz, Titia; Hvid, Marianne; Wang, August G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Amager Project was initiated as a quasi-experimental study in 2005, based on an active outreach suicide preventive intervention inspired by the Norwegian Baerum Model. A 1-year follow-up study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial showing that this kind of active outreach...... follow-up study. METHOD: One hundred and thirty-three suicide attempters were included at this 5-year follow-up RCT study at Copenhagen University Hospital, Amager, and randomized to a rapid outreach suicide preventive intervention (OPAC) or TAU. RESULTS: Offering OPAC intervention to patients after...

  4. Results of a Multidisciplinary Treatment Program in 3-Year-Old to 5-Year-Old Overweight or Obese Children A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bocca, Gianni; Corpeleijn, Eva; Stolk, Ronald P.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of a multidisciplinary intervention program for 3-year-old to 5-year-old overweight and obese children compared with a usual-care program. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial conducted from October 2006 to March 2008. Setting: Groningen Expert Center for Kid

  5. A Randomized, Double-masked Clinical Trial Comparing Four Periodontitis Treatment Strategies: 5-year Tooth Loss Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preus, Hans R; Gjermo, Per; Baelum, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tooth loss is the ultimate negative consequence of periodontitis, and reports of the extent to which different treatment strategies may influence the loss of teeth in the long run are hard to find. AIM: To test the hypothesis that there is no difference in the 5-year clinical outcome...... of therapy in terms of tooth mortality between groups of patients treated with conventional over-weeks scaling and root planing (SRP) or same-day full-mouth disinfection (FDIS), with or without adjunctive metronidazole. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 184 patients with moderate to severe periodontitis were randomly...... following completion of periodontal therapy, none of the 4 strategies produced a better end result than the other....

  6. Immediate vs. early loading of SLA implants in the posterior mandible: 5-year results of randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokovic, Vladimir; Jung, Ronald; Feloutzis, Andreas; Todorovic, Vladimir S; Jurisic, Milan; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical results of immediate and early loading (EL) self-tapping implants placed in posterior mandibles. Twelve patients with bilateral edentulous posterior mandibular were randomly assigned to treatment either with immediate (test) or early loaded implants (control). Seventy-two self-tapping implants with SLA surface (Ø 4, 1/4, 8 mm; length 8 and 10 mm) were analyzed in this study. Test implants (36) were loaded on the day of surgery and control implants 6 weeks later. The measuring of implant stability quotient (ISQ) was performed on 0, 6th, 12th, and 52nd week after implant insertion. The bone resorption, modified plaque, and bleeding index were notified at 1 and 5 years later. After 5 years, survival in the both groups was 100%. The mean value of primary implant stability was 76.92 ± 0.79 ISQ. In the first 6 weeks, ISQ values significantly increased in the test group (77.92 ± 1.16 vs. 79.61 ± 0.90) as well as in the control group (7.92 ± 1.05 vs. 77.55 ± 0.99). A significant longitudinal increase in ISQ value was recorded in test and control group. The differences between immediate and early loaded implants were statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). At the 5 years, no statistically significant differences were found between immediate and early loaded implants with respect to mean crestal bone loss measurements (0.4 ± 0.24 vs. 0.8 ± 0.15 mm), mean bleeding index (0.22 ± 0.11 vs. 0.25 ± 0.11), and mean plaque index (0.17 ± 0.15 vs. 0.19 ± 0.20). Based on these results, the self-tapping implants inserted in posterior mandible can provide adequate primary stability value as the main factor for immediate and EL protocol. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Maxillary overdentures supported by four or six implants in the anterior region : 5-year results from a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, Wim; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Cune, Marco S.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare a four-and six-implant maxillary overdenture after an observation period of 5 years. Material and methods: Fifty subjects with functional problems concerning their maxillary denture, who had ample bone volume in the anterior region to place four or six implants, were included a

  8. BST-CarGel® Treatment Maintains Cartilage Repair Superiority over Microfracture at 5 Years in a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanish, William D.; McCormack, Robert; Forriol, Francisco; Mohtadi, Nicholas; Pelet, Stéphane; Desnoyers, Jacques; Méthot, Stéphane; Vehik, Kendra; Restrepo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective The efficacy and safety of BST-CarGel®, a chitosan scaffold for cartilage repair was compared with microfracture alone at 1 year during a multicenter randomized controlled trial in the knee. This report was undertaken to investigate 5-year structural and clinical outcomes. Design The international randomized controlled trial enrolled 80 patients, aged 18 to 55 years, with grade III or IV focal lesions on the femoral condyles. Patients were randomized to receive BST-CarGel® treatment or microfracture alone, and followed standardized 12-week rehabilitation. Co-primary endpoints of repair tissue quantity and quality were evaluated by 3-dimensional MRI quantification of the degree of lesion filling (%) and T2 relaxation times. Secondary endpoints were clinical benefit measured with WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) questionnaires and safety. General estimating equations were used for longitudinal statistical analysis of repeated measures. Results Blinded MRI analysis demonstrated that BST-CarGel®-treated patients showed a significantly greater treatment effect for lesion filling (P = 0.017) over 5 years compared with microfracture alone. A significantly greater treatment effect for BST-CarGel® was also found for repair tissue T2 relaxation times (P = 0.026), which were closer to native cartilage compared to the microfracture group. BST-CarGel® and microfracture groups showed highly significant improvement at 5 years from pretreatment baseline for each WOMAC subscale (P < 0.0001), and there were no differences between the treatment groups. Safety was comparable for both groups. Conclusions BST-CarGel® was shown to be an effective mid-term cartilage repair treatment. At 5 years, BST-CarGel® treatment resulted in sustained and significantly superior repair tissue quantity and quality over microfracture alone. Clinical benefit following BST-CarGel® and microfracture treatment were highly significant over baseline

  9. Deferiprone versus deferoxamine in sickle cell disease: results from a 5-year long-term Italian multi-center randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaruso, Giusi; Vitrano, Angela; Di Maggio, Rosario; Ballas, Samir; Steinberg, Martin H; Rigano, Paolo; Sacco, Massimiliano; Telfer, Paul; Renda, Disma; Barone, Rita; Maggio, Aurelio

    2014-12-01

    Blood transfusion and iron chelation currently represent a supportive therapy to manage anemia, vasculopathy and vaso-occlusion crises in Sickle-Cell-Disease. Here we describe the first 5-year long-term randomized clinical trial comparing Deferiprone versus Deferoxamine in patients with Sickle-Cell-Disease. The results of this study show that Deferiprone has the same effectiveness as Deferoxamine in decreasing body iron burden, measured as repeated measurements of serum ferritin concentrations on the same patient over 5-years and analyzed according to the linear mixed-effects model (LMM) (p=0.822). Both chelators are able to decrease, significantly, serum ferritin concentrations, during 5-years, without any effect on safety (p=0.005). Moreover, although the basal serum ferritin levels were higher in transfused compared with non-transfused group (p=0.031), the changes over time in serum ferritin levels were not statistically significantly different between transfused and non-transfused cohort of patients (p=0.389). Kaplan-Meier curve, during 5-years of study, suggests that Deferiprone does not alter survival in comparison with Deferoxamine (p=0.38). In conclusion, long-term iron chelation therapy with Deferiprone was associated with efficacy and safety similar to that of Deferoxamine. Therefore, in patients with Sickle-Cell-Disease, Deferiprone may represent an effective long-term treatment option.

  10. Randomized Comparison of Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) with Surgical Treatment in Patients with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids (REST Trial): Subanalysis of 5-Year MRI Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananthakrishnan, Ganapathy, E-mail: ganapathy.ananthakrishnan@nhs.net [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Murray, Lilian, E-mail: Lilian.murray@glasgow.ac.uk [Vital Statistics (United Kingdom); Ritchie, Moira, E-mail: moira.ritchie@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Murray, Gordon, E-mail: Gordon.murray@ed.ac.uk [Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Department of Medical Statistics (United Kingdom); Bryden, Fiona, E-mail: Fiona.bryden@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Stobhill Hospital (United Kingdom); Lassman, Sue, E-mail: sue.lassman@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Lumsden, Mary Ann, E-mail: Maryann.lumsden@glasgow.ac.uk [Room 12, Level 4, Walton Building, Department of Medical Education and Gynaecology, Reproductive and Maternal Medicine (United Kingdom); Moss, Jon G., E-mail: jon.moss@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To report 5-year contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging findings of the REST trial recruits who underwent either uterine artery embolization (UAE) or myomectomy. Methods. A total of 157 patients were randomized to UAE or surgery (hysterectomy or myomectomy). Ninety-nine patients who had UAE and eight patients who had myomectomy were analyzed. MRI scans at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years were independently interpreted by two radiologists. Dominant fibroid diameter, uterine volume, total fibroid infarction (complete 100 %, almost complete 90-99 %, partial <90 %), and new fibroid formation were the main parameters assessed and related to the need for reintervention. Results. In the UAE group, mean {+-} standard deviation uterine volume was 670 {+-} 503, 422 {+-} 353, and 292 {+-} 287 mL at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years, respectively. Mean dominant fibroid diameter was 7.6 {+-} 3.0, 5.8 {+-} 2.9, and 5 {+-} 2.9 cm at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years. Fibroid infarction at 6 months was complete in 35 % of women, almost complete in 29 %, and partial in 36 %. Need for reintervention was 19, 10, and 33 % in these groups, respectively (p = 0.123). No myomectomy cases had further intervention. At 5 years, the prevalence of new fibroid was 60 % in the myomectomy group and 7 % in the UAE group (p = 0.008). Conclusion. There is a further significant reduction in both uterine volume and dominant fibroid diameter between 6 months and 5 years after UAE. Complete fibroid infarction does not translate into total freedom from a subsequent reintervention. New fibroid formation is significantly higher after myomectomy.

  11. Pathologic complete response and disease-free survival are not surrogate endpoints for 5-year survival in rectal cancer: an analysis of 22 randomized trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovo, Karen; Cabiddu, Mary; Ghilardi, Mara; Lonati, Veronica; Barni, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    Background We performed a literature-based analysis of randomized clinical trials to assess the pathologic complete response (pCR) (ypT0N0 after neoadjuvant therapy) and 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) as potential surrogate endpoints for 5-year overall survival (OS) in rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant (chemo)radiotherapy (CT)RT. Methods A systematic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, the Web of Science, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library was performed. Treatment effects on 3-year DFS and 5-year OS were expressed as rates of patients alive (%), and those on pCR as differences in pCR rates (∆pCR%). A weighted regression analysis was performed at individual- and trial-level to test the association between treatment effects on surrogate (∆pCR% and ∆3yDFS) and the main clinical outcome (∆5yOS). Results Twenty-two trials involving 10,050 patients, were included in the analysis. The individual level surrogacy showed that the pCR% and 3-year DFS were poorly correlated with 5-year OS (R=0.52; 95% CI, 0.31–0.91; P=0.002; and R=0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–1; P=0.002). The trial-level surrogacy analysis confirmed that the two treatment effects on surrogates (∆pCR% and ∆3yDFS) are not strong surrogates for treatment effects on 5-year OS % (R=0.2; 95% CI, −0.29–0.78; P=0.5 and R=0.64; 95% CI, 0.29–1; P=0.06). These findings were confirmed in neoadjuvant CTRT studies but not in phase III trials were 3-year DFS could still represent a valid surrogate. Conclusions This analysis does not support the use of pCR and 3-year DFS% as appropriate surrogate endpoints for 5-year OS% in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy.

  12. The Scandinavian Propaten® trial – Final 5-year Results of a Randomized Trial Comparing Heparin Bonded PTFE Grafts (Propaten®) to standard PTFE Grafts in Fem-Fem and Fem-Pop Position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Houlind, Kim Christian; Gottschalksen, B;

    2016-01-01

    a randomized trial. Methods: Patients with intermittent claudication or critical limb ischaemia requiring femorofemoral or femoropopliteal bypass grafting were randomized in a clinical trial of Hb-PTFE versus standard PTFE in 11 Scandinavian centres between 2005 and 2009. Patients were followed up for 5 years...... with clinical assessment and surveillance Duplex ultrasound imaging. The primary endpoint of this study was primary patency. Secondary endpoints included major amputation and mortality. Results: Overall, 569 patients were enrolled in the randomized trial. Some 552 had follow-up data available for analysis...

  13. Relation of androgen receptor gene polymorphism to bone mineral density and fracture risk in early postmenopausal women during a 5-year randomized hormone replacement therapy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmén, Timo; Heikkinen, Anna-Mari; Mahonen, Anitta; Kröger, Heikki; Komulainen, Marja; Pallonen, Heli; Saarikoski, Seppo; Honkanen, Risto; Mäenpää, Pekka H

    2003-02-01

    In women, the influence of androgens on bone health is not clear. It has been suggested that the androgen receptor (AR) genotype is associated with bone mineral density and serum androgen levels in pre- and perimenopausal women, but the association between AR genotype, bone mineral density, and fracture risk has not been studied in postmenopausal women. Therefore, we studied whether AR polymorphism affects bone mineral density, bone mineral density change, or fracture risk in a 5-year randomized hormone replacement therapy (HRT) trial on 331 early postmenopausal women (mean baseline age, 52.7 +/- 2.3 years). The participants consisted of two treatment groups: the HRT group (n = 151) received a sequential combination of 2 mg estradiol valerate and 1 mg cyproterone acetate with or without vitamin D3, 100-300 IU + 93 mg calcium as lactate/day, and the non-HRT group (n = 180) received 93 mg calcium alone or in combination with vitamin D3, 100-300 IU/day for 5 years. Bone mineral density was measured from lumbar spine and proximal femur (DXA) before and after the 5-year trial. All new symptomatic, radiographically defined fractures were recorded during the follow-up. The length of CAG repeat in exon 1 of AR gene was evaluated after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The subjects were divided into three repeat groups according to AR alleles. None of the baseline characteristics were associated with AR gene polymorphism and HRT treatment. The polymorphism did not influence the calculated annual changes of lumbar or femoral neck bone mineral density during the 5-year follow-up in the HRT (p = 0.926 and 0.146, respectively) or non-HRT (p = 0.818 and 0.917, respectively) groups. In all, 28 women sustained 33 fractures during the follow-up. Thus, the numbers of fractures were limited. The AR repeat length variation was not significantly associated with fracture risk in the HRT or non-HRT groups (p = 0.632 and 0.459, respectively; Cox proportional hazards model

  14. Immediate function on the day of surgery compared with a delayed implant loading process in the mandible: a randomized clinical trial over 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, Asbjorn; Alkumru, Hassan

    2014-12-01

    To appraise the feasibility of loading four implants with a pre-existing denture converted to a fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) on the day of implant surgery compared with waiting for 3- to 4-month healing. Patients with an edentulous, fully healed mandible were recruited in a faculty clinic to partake in a blinded two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial (RCT). The participants received four parallel intraforamina mandibular implants with a moderately rough titanium surface (Brånemark System Mk III or Mk IV TiUnite; Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden). The implants were loaded on the same day by converting the participants' pre-existing denture in the experimental group. The implants were placed using a one-stage surgery procedure, and the participants' pre-existing denture were soft-relined in the control group. For both groups, the permanent 10- to 12-unit FDP consisting of a type-3 cast precious alloy veneered with acrylic and artificial teeth was placed 3-4 months after implant surgery. All participants have been recalled annually for 5 years for appraisal of bone loss and registration of adverse events. Thirty-five of the original 42 participants (83%) returned for clinical and radiological examinations at the 5-year follow-up recall. No selective dropout or specific reasons for dropout was identified in the two study arms; leaving n = 17 (Intention-to-treat group, ITT) in the experimental group, alternatively n = 13 as per protocol group (PP), and n = 18 participants in the control group (ITT = PP). At study commencement, five of the participants assigned to the experimental group did not receive their planned intervention. In the control group, one implant failed to osseointegrate and another failed due to bone loss after 5 years. The crestal bone level changes over 5 years were identical in the experimental and control groups, that is, 1.2 mm (SD = 0.7). There were no differences between the two study arms with regard to incidence of biological and

  15. First generation versus second generation drug-eluting stents for the treatment of bifurcations: 5-year follow-up of the LEADERS all-comers randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundeken, Maik J; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J; Ishibashi, Yuki; Garg, Scot; de Vries, Ton; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Onuma, Yoshinobu; de Winter, Robbert J; Buszman, Pawel; Linke, Axel; Ischinger, Thomas; Klauss, Volker; Eberli, Franz; Corti, Roberto; Wijns, William; Morice, Marie-Claude; di Mario, Carlo; Meier, Bernhard; Jüni, Peter; Yazdani, Ashkan; Copt, Samuel; Windecker, Stephan; Serruys, Patrick W

    2016-06-01

    Historically, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of bifurcation lesions was associated with worse procedural and clinical outcomes when compared with PCI of non-bifurcation lesions. Newer generation drug-eluting stents (DES) might improve long-term clinical outcomes after bifurcation PCI. The LEADERS trial was a 10-center, assessor-blind, non-inferiority, all-comers trial, randomizing 1,707 patients to treatment with a biolimus A9(TM) -eluting stent (BES) with an abluminal biodegradable polymer or a sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) with a durable polymer (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00389220). Five-year clinical outcomes were compared between patients with and without bifurcation lesions and between BES and SES in the bifurcation lesion subgroup. There were 497 (29%) patients with at least 1 bifurcation lesion (BES = 258; SES = 239). At 5-year follow-up, the composite endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI) and clinically-indicated (CI) target vessel revascularization (TVR) was observed more frequently in the bifurcation group (26.6% vs. 22.4%, P = 0.049). Within the bifurcation lesion subgroup, no differences were observed in (cardiac) death or MI rates between BES and SES. However, CI target lesion revascularization (TLR) (10.1% vs. 15.9%, P = 0.0495), and CI TVR (12.0% vs. 19.2%, P = 0.023) rates were significantly lower in the BES group. Definite/probable stent thrombosis (ST) rate was numerically lower in the BES group (3.1% vs. 5.9%, P = 0.15). Very late (>1 year) definite/probable ST rates trended to be lower with BES (0.4% vs. 3.1%, P = 0.057). In the treatment of bifurcation lesions, use of BES led to superior long-term efficacy compared with SES. Safety outcomes were comparable between BES and SES, with an observed trend toward a lower rate of very late definite/probable ST between 1 and 5 years with the BES. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Healthy Aging 5 Years After a Period of Daily Supplementation With Antioxidant Nutrients: A Post Hoc Analysis of the French Randomized Trial SU.VI.MAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, Karen E; Andreeva, Valentina A; Jeandel, Claude; Hercberg, Serge; Galan, Pilar; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2015-10-15

    This study's objective was to investigate healthy aging in older French adults 5 years after a period of daily nutritional-dose supplementation with antioxidant nutrients. The study was based on the double-blind, randomized trial, Supplementation with Antioxidant Vitamins and Minerals (SU.VI.MAX) Study (1994-2002) and the SU.VI.MAX 2 Follow-up Study (2007-2009). During 1994-2002, participants received a daily combination of vitamin C (120 mg), β-carotene (6 mg), vitamin E (30 mg), selenium (100 µg), and zinc (20 mg) or placebo. Healthy aging was assessed in 2007-2009 by using multiple criteria, including the absence of major chronic disease and good physical and cognitive functioning. Data from a subsample of the SU.VI.MAX 2 cohort, initially free of major chronic disease, with a mean age of 65.3 years in 2007-2009 (n = 3,966), were used to calculate relative risks. Supplementation was associated with a greater healthy aging probability among men (relative risk = 1.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.29) but not among women (relative risk = 0.98, 95% confidence interval: 0.86, 1.11) or all participants (relative risk = 1.07, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.16). Moreover, exploratory subgroup analyses indicated effect modification by initial serum concentrations of zinc and vitamin C. In conclusion, an adequate supply of antioxidant nutrients (equivalent to quantities provided by a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables) may have a beneficial role for healthy aging.

  17. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes at 2 and 3.5 Years for Very Preterm Babies Enrolled in a Randomized Trial of Milking the Umbilical Cord versus Delayed Cord Clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Heike; Sawyer, Alexandra; Amess, Philip; Ayers, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines published by the International Liaison Committee for Resuscitation and by the World Health Organization recommend delaying cord clamping at birth as part of routine care for infants. To study the use of milking of the cord 4 times as an alternative to enhance the redistribution of placental blood into the baby. This is a prospective cohort study of neurodevelopmental assessment by the Bayley III method of very preterm infants who had participated in a trial of delayed cord clamping versus cord milking at birth that was conducted in a neonatal tertiary care hospital. The primary outcomes were differences in cognitive, motor and language development at 2 and 3.5 years. Two-tailed analyses were performed with the x03C7;2 test, Fisher's exact test, t test, Mann-Whitney U test and ANCOVA. Out of the 58 infants enrolled in the original study, 39 infants (67%) were assessed at 2 years and 29 (50%) at 3.5 years of age. Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 and 3.5 years did not significantly differ between the two groups for the three Bayley III composite scores. At 3.5 years there was a trend towards higher scores for girls in the language composite scores (girls: mean = 121.6, SD = 15.22; boys: mean = 101.07, SD = 19.84) and on the motor scale (girls: mean = 124.60, SD = 18.15; boys: mean = 97.86, SD = 17.23). In this small number of participants followed up at 2 and 3.5 years of age, milking of the cord 4 times did not have any long-term adverse effect on neurodevelopmental outcome, suggesting that cord milking could be used as an alternative to delayed cord clamping. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Effect of Breastfeeding Promotion on Early Childhood Caries and Breastfeeding Duration among 5 Year Old Children in Eastern Uganda: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birungi, Nancy; Fadnes, Lars T.; Okullo, Isaac; Kasangaki, Arabat; Nankabirwa, Victoria; Ndeezi, Grace; Tumwine, James K.; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Lie, Stein Atle; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2015-01-01

    Background Although several studies have shown short term health benefits of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), its long term consequences have not been studied extensively in low-income contexts. This study assessed the impact of an EBF promotion initiative for 6 months on early childhood caries (ECC) and breastfeeding duration in children aged 5 years in Mbale, Eastern Uganda. Methods Participants were recruited from the Ugandan site of the PROMISE- EBF cluster randomised trial (ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT00397150). A total of 765 pregnant women from 24 clusters were included in the ratio 1:1 to receive peer counselled promotion of EBF as the intervention or standard of care. At the 5 year follow-up, ECC was recorded under field conditions using the World Health Organization’s decayed missing filled tooth (dmft) index. Adjusted negative binomial and linear regression were used in the analysis. Results Mean breastfeeding duration in the intervention and control groups (n=417) were 21.8 (CI 20.7–22.9) and 21.3(CI 20.7–21.9) months, respectively. The mean dmft was 1.5 (standard deviation [SD] 2.9) and 1.7 (SD 2.9) in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Corresponding prevalence estimates of ECC were 38% and 41%. Negative binomial regression analysis adjusted for cluster effects and loss-to-follow-up by inverse probability weights (IPW) showed an incidence-rate ratio (IRR) of 0.91 (95% CI 0.65–1.2). Comparing the effect of the trial arm on breastfeeding duration showed a difference in months of 0.48 (-0.72 to 1.7). Conclusion PROMISE EBF trial did not impact on early childhood caries or breastfeeding duration at 5 years of age. This study contributes to the body of evidence that promotion of exclusive breastfeeding does not raise oral health concerns. However, the high burden of caries calls for efforts to improve the oral health condition in this setting. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00397150 PMID:25938681

  19. Effect of Breastfeeding Promotion on Early Childhood Caries and Breastfeeding Duration among 5 Year Old Children in Eastern Uganda: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Birungi

    Full Text Available Although several studies have shown short term health benefits of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF, its long term consequences have not been studied extensively in low-income contexts. This study assessed the impact of an EBF promotion initiative for 6 months on early childhood caries (ECC and breastfeeding duration in children aged 5 years in Mbale, Eastern Uganda.Participants were recruited from the Ugandan site of the PROMISE- EBF cluster randomised trial (ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT00397150. A total of 765 pregnant women from 24 clusters were included in the ratio 1:1 to receive peer counselled promotion of EBF as the intervention or standard of care. At the 5 year follow-up, ECC was recorded under field conditions using the World Health Organization's decayed missing filled tooth (dmft index. Adjusted negative binomial and linear regression were used in the analysis.Mean breastfeeding duration in the intervention and control groups (n=417 were 21.8 (CI 20.7-22.9 and 21.3(CI 20.7-21.9 months, respectively. The mean dmft was 1.5 (standard deviation [SD] 2.9 and 1.7 (SD 2.9 in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Corresponding prevalence estimates of ECC were 38% and 41%. Negative binomial regression analysis adjusted for cluster effects and loss-to-follow-up by inverse probability weights (IPW showed an incidence-rate ratio (IRR of 0.91 (95% CI 0.65-1.2. Comparing the effect of the trial arm on breastfeeding duration showed a difference in months of 0.48 (-0.72 to 1.7.PROMISE EBF trial did not impact on early childhood caries or breastfeeding duration at 5 years of age. This study contributes to the body of evidence that promotion of exclusive breastfeeding does not raise oral health concerns. However, the high burden of caries calls for efforts to improve the oral health condition in this setting.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00397150.

  20. Early conversion from cyclosporine to everolimus following living-donor kidney transplantation: outcomes at 5 years posttransplant in the randomized ZEUS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerer, Claudia; Budde, Klemens; Zeier, Martin; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Reinke, Petra; Eisenberger, Ute; Mühlfeld, Anja; Arns, Wolfgang; Stahl, Rolf; Heller, Katharina; Wolters, Heiner H; Suwelack, Barbara; Klehr, Hans Ulrich; Hauser, Ingeborg A; Stangl, Manfred; Nadalin, Silvio; Dürr, Michael; Porstner, Martina; May, Christoph; Wimmer, Peter; Witzke, Oliver; Lehner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    To assess 5-year efficacy, renal, and safety outcomes following early conversion from cyclosporine to everolimus vs. a standard cyclosporine-based regimen in living-donor kidney transplant (LDKT) recipients. The ZEUS study was a randomized, open-label, 1-year, multicenter study in which 300 de novo kidney transplant recipients continued to receive cyclosporine or converted to everolimus at 4.5 months post-transplant, with annual follow-up visits to 5 years post-transplant. Of the 80 LDKT patients who were randomized, 75 completed the 1-year core study and 60 attended the 5-year follow-up visit. At year 5, 15/31 (48.4%) everolimus patients and 20/29 (69.0%) cyclosporine patients remained on the study drug. Mean adjusted estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at year 5 in LDKT recipients was 67.2 vs. 60.8 mL/min/1.73m2 for everolimus vs. cyclosporine (mean difference 6.4 mL/min/1.73m2; p = 0.031). For patients who remained on study drug, the mean difference was 13.2 mL/min/1.73m2 (p = 0.003), but no significant difference was seen in patients who switched from study drug (mean -2.6 mL/min/1.73m2, p = 0.701). Patient and graft survival rates were similar with everolimus and cyclosporine. Biopsy-proven acute rejection occurred in 22.0% vs. 7.5% of LDKT patients randomized to everolimus vs. cyclosporine (p = 0.116). Only 1 LDKT patient discontinued everolimus due to adverse events during years 1 - 5. Early initiation of everolimus with calcineurin-inhibitor (CNI) withdrawal after LDKT improved graft function to 5 years post-transplant compared to standard CNI-based therapy. The renal benefit was concentrated in patients who remained on everolimus. An increase in mild acute rejection was not associated with long-term graft loss.

  1. Satisfaction and Clinical Outcomes Among Patients with Immediately Loaded Mandibular Overdentures Supported by One or Two Dental Implants: Results of a 5-Year Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronstrom, Mats; Davis, Ben; Loney, Robert; Gerrow, Jack; Hollender, Lars

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes among subjects with mandibular overdentures supported by one or two immediately placed dental implants 5 years after loading. Thirty-six subjects (16 men and 20 women) received one or two dental implants in the anterior mandible, and all implants were loaded the day of surgery. Subjects were scheduled for follow-up 3-, 6-, and 12 months after implant placement and thereafter annually for 4 more years. Patient satisfaction scores were measured with the Oral Health Impact Profile-EDENT (OHIPEDENT) questionnaire. Seventeen subjects (7 male and 10 female) with a mean age of 59.4 years (range, 44 to 74 years) were available for the 5-year follow-up examination. Nine subjects with 10 failing implants were excluded during the first year and nine subjects were lost to follow-up. No implants failed between the 12- and 60-month follow-up examinations, and the need for denture maintenance was low. Mean peri-implant bone change was 0.92 mm, and the Spearman test failed to show correlation between the insertion torque value and implant stability quotient. Patient satisfaction scores increased significantly when compared with baseline values and continued to be high for both groups, with no significant differences. Ten implants in nine subjects failed early, but no failures were observed after the 12-month examination. No significant differences were found between subjects in the two groups with respect to implant survival rates and peri-implant bone loss, and patient satisfaction scores continued to be high. Although patient satisfaction and implant success were high during the 12- to 60-month period, the results should be interpreted with caution because of the high number of failing implants and patients lost to follow-up. More research is needed to study outcomes of treatment with immediately loaded mandibular implant overdentures.

  2. Care and Aftercare Related to Implant-Retained Dental Crowns in the Maxillary Aesthetic Region : A 5-Year Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Anita; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Meijndert, Leo; Vissink, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To prospectively assess surgical and prosthetic care and aftercare related to the placement of implant-retained dental crowns after local bone augmentation in patients missing one tooth in the maxillary aesthetic region. Methods: Ninety-three patients were randomly allocated to one of three loc

  3. Growth hormone treatment in children with short stature born small for gestational age: 5-year results of a randomized, double-blind, dose-response trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sas, Theo; Waal, Wouter; Houdijk, M.; Jansen, Maarten; Reeser, M.; Mulder, Paul; Hokken-Koelega, Anita

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe growth-promoting effect of continuous GH treatment was evaluated over 5 yr in 79 children with short stature (height SD score, less than -1.88) born small for gestational age (SGA; birth length SD score, less than -1.88). Patients were randomly and blindly assigned to 1 of 2 GH dosage groups (3 vs. 6 IU/m2 body surface-day). GH deficiency was not an exclusion criterium. After 5 yr of GH treatment almost every child had reached a height well within the normal range for healthy ...

  4. Deinstitutionalization revisited: a 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial of hospital-based rehabilitation versus specialized assertive intervention (OPUS) versus standard treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Øhlenschlæger, Johan; Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard;

    2010-01-01

    in a special part of the Copenhagen OPUS trial and randomized to either the specialized assertive intervention program (OPUS), standard treatment or hospital-based rehabilitation. RESULTS: It was a stable pattern that patients randomized to hospital-based rehabilitation spent more days in psychiatric wards......BACKGROUND: The effects of hospital-based rehabilitation including weekly supportive psychodynamic therapy compared with specialized assertive intervention and standard treatment has not previously been investigated in first-episode psychosis. The aim of the study was to examine long-term effect...... and in supported housing throughout the 5-year follow-up period compared with the two other groups. Patients in OPUS treatment spent significantly fewer days in psychiatric wards and supported housing in the first 3 years compared with patients in hospital-based rehabilitation. Due to attrition and small sample...

  5. Household Consumption of Thiamin-Fortified Fish Sauce Increases Erythrocyte Thiamin Concentrations among Rural Cambodian Women and Their Children Younger Than 5 Years of Age: A Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Kyly C; Karakochuk, Crystal D; Kroeun, Hou; Sokhoing, Ly; Chan, Benny B; Borath, Mam; Sophonneary, Prak; Moore, Kirsten; Tong, Jeffery K T; McLean, Judy; Talukder, Aminuzzaman; Lynd, Larry D; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Kitts, David D; Green, Tim J

    2017-02-01

    To assess whether ad libitum consumption of thiamin-fortified fish sauce over 6 months yields higher erythrocyte thiamin diphosphate concentrations (eTDP) among women of childbearing age and their children aged 12-59 months compared with control sauce containing no thiamin. In this double-blind, randomized controlled efficacy trial, 276 nonpregnant, nonlactating women (18-45 years of age) and their families in Prey Veng, Cambodia, were randomized to receive 1 of 3 fish sauce formulations: low thiamin concentration (low, 2 g/L), high thiamin concentration (high, 8 g/L), or a control (no thiamin) fish sauce. Baseline (t = 0) and endline (t = 6 months) eTDP were measured with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. Fish sauce consumption did not differ between treatment groups (P = .19). In intent-to-treat analysis, women's baseline-adjusted endline eTDP (mean; 95% CI) was higher among women in the low (259; 245-274 nmol/L) and high (257; 237-276 nmol/L) groups compared with control (184; 169-198 nmol/L; P < .001); low and high groups did not differ (P = .83). Similarly, children's baseline-adjusted eTDP was higher in the low (259; 246-271 nmol/L) and high (257; 243-270 nmol/L) groups compared with control (213; 202-224 nmol/L; P < .001). Fortified fish sauce appears to be an efficacious means of improving biochemical thiamin status in nonpregnant, nonlactating women and their children (1-5 years of age) living in rural Cambodia. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02221063. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metal ion levels and functional results following resurfacing hip arthroplasty versus conventional small-diameter metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty; a 3 to 5year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisseling, P.; Smolders, J.M.; Hol, A.; Susante, J.L.C. van

    2015-01-01

    We present an update of a randomized controlled trial on 71 patients (<65 years) who received either a resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) (n=38) or cementless 28-mm metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) (n=33). Metal ion levels and functional outcome scores were analyzed with a mean f

  7. [Long-term effects of osteopathic treatment of chronic prostatitis with chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a 5-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial and considerations on the pathophysiological context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, S; Cimniak, U; Rütz, M; Resch, K L

    2013-03-01

    The etiology of chronic prostatitis chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is still unclear. As no pathological findings exist the diagnosis of CP/CPPS is essentially a diagnosis by exclusion and functional disorders, so-called somatoform disorders play a more important role. Osteopathy treats functional disorders of the musculoskeletal system including all associated internal organs but little attention has so far been paid to this treatment method. Therefore, the 5-year follow-up period was intended to show that this is a sustainable form of therapy using exclusively manual and gentle techniques and simple treatment procedures resulting in manageable costs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sustainability of osteopathic treatment could be demonstrated even after 5 years. This was a randomized controlled study initially involving 5 treatment sessions, a follow-up without treatment after 6 weeks and further follow-up after 1.5 and 5 years. Of the 20 patients 19 in the test group participated in the 5-year follow-up. The control group were not asked because it would have been unacceptable to expect the patients to refrain from having treatment for as long as 5 years. The men were aged between 29 and 70 years. The patients were asked to complete the international prostate symptom score (IPSS), the National Institutes of Health chronic prostatitis symptom index (NIH-CPSI) and the quality of life (QOL) questionnaires once again and in particular to state whether they had received osteopathic treatment specifically for the prostate problem and how often they had been treated. The follow-up assessment of the symptoms of chronic prostatitis (NIH-CPSI) showed that they had further improved after 1.5 years (intragroup difference -1.8 points, 95 % confidence interval CI=-3.8 to 0.3) and also after 5 years (intragroup difference -1.3 points 95 % CI=-3.4 to 0.8). The urinary tract symptoms (IPSS) showed a statistically significant improvement (intergroup

  8. Metal ion levels and functional results following resurfacing hip arthroplasty versus conventional small-diameter metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty; a 3 to 5year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisseling, Pepijn; Smolders, José M H; Hol, Annemiek; van Susante, Job L C

    2015-01-01

    We present an update of a randomized controlled trial on 71 patients (resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) (n=38) or cementless 28-mm metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) (n=33). Metal ion levels and functional outcome scores were analyzed with a mean follow-up of 58 months (SD 8.1). No clear shifts in relatively good outcome was encountered between RHA and THA. Metal ion levels appear to equalize between groups after 3 years. Median cobalt and chromium remained below 1.3 μg/L throughout follow-up in both groups. Six revisions were performed, of which three for pseudotumor formation (one THA, two RHA). In conclusion there were no clinical differences between the two groups and metal ion levels were lower than other series remained low, however, pseudotumor formation was not eliminated.

  9. Prediction of late distant recurrence after 5 years of endocrine treatment: a combined analysis of patients from the Austrian breast and colorectal cancer study group 8 and arimidex, tamoxifen alone or in combination randomized trials using the PAM50 risk of recurrence score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Ivana; Cuzick, Jack; Dowsett, Mitch; Lopez-Knowles, Elena; Filipits, Martin; Dubsky, Peter; Cowens, John Wayne; Ferree, Sean; Schaper, Carl; Fesl, Christian; Gnant, Michael

    2015-03-10

    We have previously shown that the PAM50-based risk of recurrence (ROR) score is significantly correlated with distant recurrence in both the translational research cohort within the Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination (ATAC) trial (TransATAC) and Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group 8 (ABCSG 8) randomized trials. Here, we focus on the ROR score for predicting distant recurrence after 5 years of follow-up in a combined analysis of these two randomized trials. Long-term follow-up data and tissue samples were obtained from 2,137 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer from the ABCSG 8 and TransATAC trials. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to determine the prognostic value of ROR for distant recurrence beyond 5 years in the combined data set. A total of 2,137 women who did not have a recurrence 5 years after diagnosis were included in the combined analyses. The Clinical Treatment Score (CTS) was the strongest prognostic factor 5 years after diagnosis (univariable: likelihood ratio [LR] χ(2) = 94.12, bivariable: LR χ(2) = 61.43). The ROR score was significantly prognostic by itself in years 5 to 10. In the node-negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative subgroup, more prognostic value for late distant recurrence was added by the ROR score compared with the CTS. The ROR score added clinically meaningful prognostic information to the CTS in all patients and all subgroups in the late follow-up period. These results suggest that the ROR score may be helpful for separating patients into risk groups who could be spared or potentially benefit from extended hormonal therapy beyond 5 years of treatment. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Hormone replacement therapy dissociates fat mass and bone mass, and tends to reduce weight gain in early postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled 5-year clinical trial of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L B; Vestergaard, P; Hermann, A P

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on weight changes, body composition, and bone mass in early postmenopausal women in a partly randomized comprehensive cohort study design. A total of 2016 women ages 45-58 years from 3 months to 2 years past last...... of the weight gain was a decline in physical fitness. Women opting for HRT had a significantly lower body weight at inclusion than the other participants, but the results in the self-selected part of the study followed the pattern found in the randomized part. The change in fat mass was the strongest predictor...

  11. 5-Year randomized clinical evaluation of posterior bulk-fill restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    Purpose/aim: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Materials and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age...

  12. Two consecutive randomized controlled pertussis booster trials in children initially vaccinated in infancy with an acellular vaccine: The first with a five-component Tdap vaccine to 5-year olds and the second with five- or monocomponent Tdap vaccines at age 14-15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, R M; Gustafsson, L; Hallander, H O; Ljungman, M; Olin, P; Gothefors, L; Nilsson, L; Netterlid, E

    2015-07-17

    Prior study children from a DTaP efficacy trial were recruited at ages 5 and 15 years to randomized booster trials addressing immunogenicity and reactogenicity; 475 preschool children received mixed or separate injections of a reduced antigen vaccine (Tdap5, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and an inactivated polio vaccine, and 230 adolescents received the same or another booster vaccine (Tdap1, SSI, Denmark). Pre-vaccination antibody concentrations against pertussis antigens were significantly higher at 15 than 5 years of age, probably due to natural boosting between the studies. Tdap5 induced comparable anti-PT concentrations at both ages, but antibody responses were significantly higher to filamentous haemagglutinin, pertactin and fimbriae 2/3 in adolescents. As expected, a higher amount of PT (Tdap1, 20μg) induced a stronger anti-PT response than a lower amount (Tdap5, 2.5μg). The frequency of adverse events was low and there were no serious adverse reactions. All local reactions had an early onset and a short duration. A large swelling or redness of more than half of the upper arm circumference was reported in 8/475 5-year-olds and in 6/230 15-year-olds. Children vaccinated with Tdap5 reported more moderate pain in adolescence than at preschool age, whereas itching was only reported in preschool children. Sweden introduced DTaP vaccines in 1996 after a 17-year hiatus with no general pertussis vaccination and pertussis was still endemic at the time of the studies. The frequency of adverse events was nevertheless low in both preschool children and adolescents and antibody responses were adequate. These studies document immunogenicity and reactogenicity in a trial cohort consecutively vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines from infancy to adolescence. The adolescent study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov on 26 March 2009 (NCT00870350).

  13. Late-term clinical outcomes with zotarolimus- and sirolimus-eluting stents. 5-year follow-up of the ENDEAVOR III (A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Medtronic Endeavor Drug [ABT-578] Eluting Coronary Stent System Versus the Cypher Sirolimus-Eluting Coronary Stent System in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandzari, David E; Mauri, Laura; Popma, Jeffrey J; Turco, Mark A; Gurbel, Paul A; Fitzgerald, Peter J; Leon, Martin B

    2011-05-01

    This study sought to compare late safety and efficacy outcomes following percutaneous coronary revascularization with zotarolimus-eluting stents (ZES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES). Despite higher late lumen loss and binary restenosis with ZES compared with SES, it is uncertain whether differences in early angiographic measures translate into more disparate late clinical events. Clinical outcomes were prospectively evaluated through 5 years in the ENDEAVOR III (A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Medtronic Endeavor Drug [ABT-578] Eluting Coronary Stent System Versus the Cypher Sirolimus-Eluting Coronary Stent System in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions) that randomized 436 patients of relatively low anatomic and clinical risk to treatment with ZES (n = 323) or SES (n = 113) and evaluated a primary endpoint of 8-month angiographic late lumen loss. At 5 years (completeness of follow-up: 95.2%), pre-specified endpoints of all-cause mortality (5.2% vs. 13.0%, p = 0.02), myocardial infarction (1.0% vs. 4.6%, p = 0.03), and the composite event rates of cardiac death/myocardial infarction (1.3% vs. 6.5%, p = 0.009) and major adverse cardiac events (14.0% vs. 22.2%, p = 0.05) were significantly lower among patients treated with ZES. Rates of target lesion (8.1% ZES vs. 6.5% SES, p = 0.68) and target vessel revascularization were similar between treatment groups. Stent thrombosis was infrequent and similar in both groups (0.7% ZES vs. 0.9% SES, p = 1.0). Between 9 months and 5 years, progression of major adverse cardiac events was significantly more common with SES than with ZES (16.7% vs. 7.8%, p = 0.015). Despite initially higher angiographic late lumen loss, rates of clinical restenosis beyond the protocol-specified angiographic follow-up period remain stable with ZES compared with the rates for SES, resulting in similar late-term efficacy. Over 5 years, significant differences in death, myocardial infarction, and composite endpoints favored treatment with ZES

  14. Long-term (5 year safety of bronchial thermoplasty: Asthma Intervention Research (AIR trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavord Ian D

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchial thermoplasty (BT is a bronchoscopic procedure that improves asthma control by reducing excess airway smooth muscle. Treated patients have been followed out to 5 years to evaluate long-term safety of this procedure. Methods Patients enrolled in the Asthma Intervention Research Trial were on inhaled corticosteroids ≥200 μg beclomethasone or equivalent + long-acting-beta2-agonists and demonstrated worsening of asthma on long-acting-β2-agonist withdrawal. Following initial evaluation at 1 year, subjects were invited to participate in a 4 year safety study. Adverse events (AEs and spirometry data were used to assess long-term safety out to 5 years post-BT. Results 45 of 52 treated and 24 of 49 control group subjects participated in long-term follow-up of 5 years and 3 years respectively. The rate of respiratory adverse events (AEs/subject was stable in years 2 to 5 following BT (1.2, 1.3, 1.2, and 1.1, respectively,. There was no increase in hospitalizations or emergency room visits for respiratory symptoms in Years 2, 3, 4, and 5 compared to Year 1. The FVC and FEV1 values showed no deterioration over the 5 year period in the BT group. Similar results were obtained for the Control group. Conclusions The absence of clinical complications (based on AE reporting and the maintenance of stable lung function (no deterioration of FVC and FEV1 over a 5-year period post-BT in this group of patients with moderate to severe asthma support the long-term safety of the procedure out to 5 years.

  15. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations: A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 5 years. Caries risk and bruxing habits of the participants were estimated. No post-operative sensitivity was reported. At 5-year 183, 68 Class I and 115 Class II, restorations were evaluated. Ten restorations failed (5.5%), all Class II, 4 SDR-CeramX mono+ and 6 CeramX mono+-only restorations. The main reasons for failure were tooth fracture (6) and secondary caries (4). The annual failure rate (AFR) for all restorations (Class I and II) was for the bulk-filled-1.1% and for the resin composite-only restorations 1.3% (p=0.12). For the Class II restorations, the AFR was 1.4% and 2.1%, respectively. The stress decreasing flowable bulk-fill resin composite technique showed good durability during the 5-year follow-up. The use of a 4mm incremental technique with the flowable bulk-fill resin composite showed during the 5-year follow up slightly better, but not statistical significant, durability compared to the conventional 2mm layering technique in posterior resin composite restorations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations. A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly......Objective: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Material and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.......4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4...

  17. Traditional endodontic surgery versus modern technique: a 5-year controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorici, Silvia; Difalco, Paolo; Caradonna, Luigi; Tetè, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we compared outcomes of traditional apicoectomy versus modern apicoectomy, by means of a controlled clinical trial with a 5-year follow-up. The study investigated 938 teeth in 843 patients. On the basis of the procedure performed, the teeth were grouped in 3 groups. Differences between the groups were the method of osteotomy (type of instruments used), type of preparation of retrograde cavity (different apicoectomy angles and instruments used for root-end preparation), and root-end filling material used (gray mineral trioxide aggregate or silver amalgam). Outcome (tooth healing) was estimated after 1 and 5 years, postoperatively. Clinical success rates after 1 year were 67% (306 teeth), 90% (186 teeth), and 94% (256 teeth) according to traditional apicoectomy (group 1), modern microsurgical apicoectomy using burns for osteotomy (group 2) or using piezo-osteotomy (group 3), respectively. After 1 year, group comparison results were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Linear trend test was also statistically significant (P < 0.0001), pointing out larger healing from group 1 to group 3. After 5 years, teeth were classified into 2 groups on the basis of root-end filling material used. Clinical success was 90.8% (197 teeth) in the silver amalgam group versus 96% (309 teeth) in the mineral trioxide aggregate group (P < 0.00214). Multiple logistic regression analysis found that surgical technique was independently associated to tooth healing. In conclusion, modern apicoectomy resulted in a probability of success more than 5 times higher (odds ratio, 5.20 [95% confidence interval, 3.94-6.92]; P < 0.001) compared with the traditional technique.

  18. Docetaxel- and 5-FU-concurrent radiotherapy in patients presenting unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a FNCLCC-ACCORD/0201 randomized phase II trial's pre-planned analysis and case report of a 5.5-year disease-free survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiffert Didier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore possible improvement in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC we performed a randomized, non-comparative phase II study evaluating docetaxel - plus either daily continuous 5 FU or weekly cisplatin concurrent to radiotherapy. We report here the results of the docetaxel plus 5 FU regimen stopped according to the interim analysis. The docetaxel plus cisplatin arm was continued. Methods Forty (40 chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable LAPC were randomly assigned (1:1 to either continuous fluorouracil (5-FU 200 mg/m2/day (protracted IV and docetaxel (DCT 20 mg/m2/week or DCT 20 mg/m2 and cisplatin (CDDP 20 mg/m2, plus concurrent radiotherapy for a period of 6 weeks. The radiation dose to the primary tumor was 54 Gy in 30 fractions. The trial's primary endpoint was the 6-month crude non-progression rate (NPR. Secondary endpoints were tolerance, objective response rate, and overall survival. Accrual was to be stopped if at 6 months more than 13 disease progressions were observed in 20 patients. Results Eighteen (18 progressions occurred at 6 months in the 5-FU-DCT arm. Six-month NPR was 10% (95%CI: 0-23. Six and 12-month survivals were 85% (95%CI: 64-95 and 40% (95%CI: 22-61; median overall survival was 10.1 months. Median progression-free survival was 4.3 months. We report the case of one patient who was amenable to surgery and has been in complete response (CR for 5.5 years. Toxicities grade ≥ 3 were reported in 75% of patients; no treatment-related death occurred. Severe toxicities were mainly vomiting (35%, abdominal pain (10% and fatigue (10%. Conclusions Combination of 5-FU, docetaxel and radiotherapy has inadequate efficacy in the treatment of LAPC despite good tolerance for the 5-FU-DCT regimen. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00112697

  19. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations. A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    .4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4mm......Objective: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Material and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52...... as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the ormocer-based nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly...

  20. Results from the 5-year SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet asthma prevention (GAP) trial in children with grass pollen allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovirta, Erkka; Petersen, Thomas H; Piotrowska, Teresa; Laursen, Mette K; Andersen, Jens S; Sørensen, Helle F; Klink, Rabih

    2017-07-06

    Allergy immunotherapy targets the immunological cause of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma and has the potential to alter the natural course of allergic disease. The primary objective was to investigate the effect of the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet compared with placebo on the risk of developing asthma. A total of 812 children (5-12 years), with a clinically relevant history of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and no medical history or signs of asthma, were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, comprising 3 years of treatment and 2 years of follow-up. There was no difference in time to onset of asthma, defined by prespecified asthma criteria relying on documented reversible impairment of lung function (primary endpoint). Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet significantly reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms or using asthma medication at the end of trial (odds ratio = 0.66, P year posttreatment follow-up, and during the entire 5-year trial period. Also, grass allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms were 22% to 30% reduced (P years). At the end of the trial, the use of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis pharmacotherapy was significantly less (27% relative difference to placebo, P < .001). Total IgE, grass pollen-specific IgE, and skin prick test reactivity to grass pollen were all reduced compared to placebo. Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms and using asthma medication, and had a positive, long-term clinical effect on rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and medication use but did not show an effect on the time to onset of asthma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-term (5 year) safety of bronchial thermoplasty: Asthma Intervention Research (AIR) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomson, Neil C; Rubin, Adalberto S; Niven, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a bronchoscopic procedure that improves asthma control by reducing excess airway smooth muscle. Treated patients have been followed out to 5 years to evaluate long-term safety of this procedure....

  2. Final screening round of the NELSON lung cancer screening trial : the effect of a 2.5-year screening interval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yousaf-Khan, Uraujh; van der Aalst, Carlijn; de Jong, Pim A; Heuvelmans, Marjolein; Scholten, Ernst; Lammers, Jan-Willem; van Ooijen, Peter; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Weenink, Carla; Groen, Harry; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Ten Haaf, Kevin; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Koning, Harry

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the USA annual lung cancer screening is recommended. However, the optimal screening strategy (eg, screening interval, screening rounds) is unknown. This study provides results of the fourth screening round after a 2.5-year interval in the Dutch-Belgian Lung Cancer Screening trial (NEL

  3. Intranasal LH-RH treatment of cryptorchidism. A clinical trial and 5 years follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Mauritzen, K; Skakkebaek, N E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of intranasal LH-RH on cryptorchidism was investigated in 45 prepubertal boys with 68 undescended testes. A daily dose of 1.2 mg LH-RH was given for 4 weeks. A total of 16 testes (24%) descended. Follow-up examination 5 years later showed that relapse had occurred in two cases. Fifty-t...

  4. Surgery versus prolonged conservative treatment for sciatica: 5-year results of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lequin, Michiel B.; Verbaan, Dagmar; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Brand, Ronald; Gerrit J. Bouma; Vandertop, William P.; Peul, Wilco C; ,

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study describes the 5 years’ results of the Sciatica trial focused on pain, disability, (un)satisfactory recovery and predictors for unsatisfactory recovery. Design A randomised controlled trial. Setting Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants Five years’ follow-up data from 231 of 283 patients (82%) were collected. Intervention Early surgery or an intended 6 months of conservative treatment. Main outcome measures Scores from Roland disability questionnaire, visual analogue scale (V...

  5. A randomized lifestyle intervention with 5-year follow-up in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: pronounced short-term impact but long-term adherence problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Bernt; Nilssön, Torbjörn K; Borch-Johnsen, Knut;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To compare data on cardiovascular risk factor changes in lipids, insulin, proinsulin, fibrinolysis, leptin and C-reactive protein, and on diabetes incidence, in relation to changes in lifestyle. METHODS: The study was a randomized lifestyle intervention trial conducted in northern Sweden...... with a single counselling session. Follow-up was conducted at 1, 3 and 5 years. RESULTS: At 1-year follow-up, an extensive cardio-metabolic risk factor reduction was demonstrated in the intensive intervention group, along with a 70% decrease of progress to type 2 diabetes. At 5-year follow-up, most...... of these beneficial effects had disappeared. Reported physical activity and fibre intake as well as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were still increased, and fasting insulin and proinsulin were lower. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention affected several important cardio-metabolic risk variables beneficially...

  6. Final screening round of the NELSON lung cancer screening trial: the effect of a 2.5-year screening interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf-Khan, Uraujh; van der Aalst, Carlijn; de Jong, Pim A; Heuvelmans, Marjolein; Scholten, Ernst; Lammers, Jan-Willem; van Ooijen, Peter; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Weenink, Carla; Groen, Harry; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Ten Haaf, Kevin; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Koning, Harry

    2017-01-01

    In the USA annual lung cancer screening is recommended. However, the optimal screening strategy (eg, screening interval, screening rounds) is unknown. This study provides results of the fourth screening round after a 2.5-year interval in the Dutch-Belgian Lung Cancer Screening trial (NELSON). Europe's largest, sufficiently powered randomised lung cancer screening trial was designed to determine whether low-dose CT screening reduces lung cancer mortality by ≥25% compared with no screening after 10 years of follow-up. The screening arm (n=7915) received screening at baseline, after 1 year, 2 years and 2.5 years. Performance of the NELSON screening strategy in the final fourth round was evaluated. Comparisons were made between lung cancers detected in the first three rounds, in the final round and during the 2.5-year interval. In round 4, 46 cancers were screen-detected and there were 28 interval cancers between the third and fourth screenings. Compared with the second round screening (1-year interval), in round 4 a higher proportion of stage IIIb/IV cancers (17.3% vs 6.8%, p=0.02) and higher proportions of squamous-cell, bronchoalveolar and small-cell carcinomas (p=0.001) were detected. Compared with a 2-year interval, the 2.5-year interval showed a higher non-significant stage distribution (stage IIIb/IV 17.3% vs 5.2%, p=0.10). Additionally, more interval cancers manifested in the 2.5-year interval than in the intervals of previous rounds (28 vs 5 and 28 vs 19). A 2.5-year interval reduced the effect of screening: the interval cancer rate was higher compared with the 1-year and 2-year intervals, and proportion of advanced disease stage in the final round was higher compared with the previous rounds. ISRCTN63545820. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Effects of a Randomized Reading Intervention Study Aimed at 9-Year-Olds: A 5-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2016-05-01

    The present paper reports on a 5-year follow-up of a randomized reading intervention in grade 3 in Sweden. An intervention group (n = 57) received daily training for 12 weeks in phoneme/grapheme mapping, reading comprehension and reading speed, whereas a control group (n = 55) participated in ordinary classroom activities. The main aim was to investigate if there were remaining effects of the intervention on reading-related skills. Previous analyses showed that the intervention group performed significantly better than the control group on spelling, reading speed, reading comprehension and phoneme awareness at the immediate post-test with sustained effects 1 year later. Results from the 5-year follow-up show that the only significant difference between the intervention (n = 47) and the control group (n = 37) was on word decoding. There was also a significant interaction effect of group assignment and initial word decoding, in the way that the lowest-performing students benefitted the most from the intervention. Another aim was to examine if the children identified in a screening (n = 2212) as poor readers in grade 2 still performed worse than typical readers. The analyses showed that the typically developing students (n = 66) outperformed the students identified as poor readers in grade 2 on working memory, spelling, reading comprehension and word decoding. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Fluorouracil Based Chemoradiation with Either Gemcitabine or Fluorouracil Chemotherapy Following Resection of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: 5-Year Analysis of the US Intergroup/RTOG 9704 Phase III Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regine, William F.; Winter, K.A.; Abrams, R.; Safran, H.; Hoffman, J.P.; Konski, A.; Benson, A.B.; Macdonald, J.S.; Rich, T.A.; Willett, C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The impact of the addition of gemcitabine (G) to 5-FU chemoradiation (CRT) on 5-year overall survival (OS) in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma are presented with updated results of a phase III trial. Methods Following resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients were randomized to pre and post CRT 5-FU vs. pre and post CRT G. 5-FU = continuous (CI) at 250 mg/m2/day. G = 1000 mg/m2 weekly; both given over 3 weeks pre and 12 weeks post - CRT. CRT = 50.4 Gy with CI 5-FU. Primary endpoint was survival for all patients and for pancreatic head tumor patients. Results Four hundred and fifty-one patients were eligible. Univariate analysis showed no difference in OS. Pancreatic head tumor patients (n=388) had a median survival and 5-year OS of 20.5 months and 22% with G vs. 17.1 months and 18% with 5-FU. On multivariate analysis, patients on the G arm with pancreatic head tumors experienced a trend towards improved OS (p=0.08). First site of relapse local recurrence in 28% of patients vs. distant relapse in 73%. Conclusion(s) The sequencing of 5-FU CRT with G as done in this trial is not associated with a statistically significant improvement in OS. Despite local recurrence being approximately half of that reported in previous adjuvant trials, distant disease relapse still occurs in ≥ 70% of patients. These findings serve as the basis for the recently activated EORTC/US Intergroup RTOG 0848 phase III adjuvant trial evaluating the impact of CRT after completion of a full course of G. PMID:21499862

  9. A cluster randomised trial to evaluate a physical activity intervention among 3-5 year old children attending long day care services: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finch Meghan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young children are not participating in recommended levels of physical activity and exhibit high levels of sedentary behaviour. Childcare services provide access to large numbers of young children for prolonged periods, yet there is limited experimental evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical activity interventions implemented in this setting. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and acceptability of a multi-component physical activity intervention, delivered by childcare service staff, in increasing the physical activity levels of children attending long day care services. Methods/Design The study will employ a cluster randomised controlled trial design. Three hundred children aged between 3-5 years from twenty randomly selected long day care services in the Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia will be invited to participate in the trial. Ten of the 20 long day care services will be randomly allocated to deliver the intervention with the remaining ten services allocated to a wait list control group. The physical activity intervention will consist of a number of strategies including: delivering structured fundamental movement skill activities, increasing physical activity opportunities, increasing staff role modelling, providing children with a physical activity promoting indoor and outdoor environment and limiting children's small screen recreation and sedentary behaviours. Intervention effectiveness will be measured via child physical activity levels during attendance at long day care. The study also seeks to determine the acceptability and extent of implementation of the intervention by services and their staff participating in the study. Discussion The trial will address current gaps in the research evidence base and contribute to the design and delivery of future interventions promoting physical activity for young children in long day care settings. Trial registration Australian New

  10. Radiographic Progression of Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis Who Achieve Minimal Disease Activity in Response to Golimumab Therapy: Results Through 5 Years of a Randomized, Placebo‐Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Beutler, Anna; Gladman, Dafna; Mease, Philip; Krueger, Gerald G.; McInnes, Iain B.; Helliwell, Philip; Coates, Laura C.; Xu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate long‐term outcomes in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients who achieved or did not achieve minimal disease activity (MDA) through 5 years of golimumab treatment in the GO‐REVEAL trial. Methods The GO‐REVEAL trial was a phase III, randomized, double‐blind trial with placebo‐control through week 24 followed by an open‐label extension of golimumab 50/100 mg treatment up to 5 years. In these post‐hoc analyses, MDA was defined by the presence of ≥5 of 7 PsA outcome measures (≤1 swollen joint, ≤1 tender joint, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index [PASI] ≤1, patient pain score ≤15, patient global disease activity score ≤20 [range 0–100], Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI] ≤0.5, and ≤1 tender enthesis point). Results Treatment with golimumab yielded significantly higher MDA response rates versus patients randomized to placebo at week 14 (23.5% versus 1.0%; P golimumab‐treated patients overall. Irrespective of treatment randomization, achievement of MDA at ≥3 and ≥4 consecutive visits was associated with significantly less radiographic progression and more improvement in MDA components allowing specific assessment of physical function (HAQ DI) and overall disease activity (patient global assessment of disease activity) at week 256 versus patients not achieving MDA. Logistic regression analyses indicated that a 1‐unit higher baseline HAQ DI score yielded a significantly lower likelihood of achieving MDA at ≥3 (odds ratio 0.514 [95% confidence interval 0.321–0.824]; P = 0.006) and ≥4 (odds ratio 0.480 [95% confidence interval 0.290–0.795]; P = 0.004) consecutive visits. Conclusion Among golimumab‐treated PsA patients, better long‐term functional improvement, patient global assessment, and radiographic outcomes were observed when patients achieved persistent MDA. PMID:25779603

  11. a randomized controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in chronic neck pain by means of a randomized clinical trial. 77 with chronic neck pain who scored > 40 mm on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) were randomized to a nine week Iyengar yoga program with weekly 90-minute classes or to a self-care/exercise program. The primary outcome measure was change of mean pain at rest (VAS) from baseline to week ten. Secondary outcomes included pain at motion, functional disabilit...

  12. 'Be active, eat right', evaluation of an overweight prevention protocol among 5-year-old children: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veldhuis Lydian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children has at least doubled in the past 25 years with a major impact on health. In 2005 a prevention protocol was developed applicable within Youth Health Care. This study aims to assess the effects of this protocol on prevalence of overweight and health behaviour among children. Methods and design A cluster randomised controlled trial is conducted among 5-year-old children included by 44 Youth Health Care teams randomised within 9 Municipal Health Services. The teams are randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. The teams measure the weight and height of all children. When a child in the intervention group is detected with overweight according to the international age and gender specific cut-off points of BMI, the prevention protocol is applied. According to this protocol parents of overweight children are invited for up to three counselling sessions during which they receive personal advice about a healthy lifestyle, and are motivated for and assisted in behavioural change. The primary outcome measures are Body Mass Index and waist circumference of the children. Parents will complete questionnaires to assess secondary outcome measures: levels of overweight inducing/reducing behaviours (i.e. being physically active, having breakfast, drinking sweet beverages and watching television/playing computer games, parenting styles, parenting practices, and attitudes of parents regarding these behaviours, health-related quality of life of the children, and possible negative side effects of the prevention protocol. Data will be collected at baseline (when the children are aged 5 years, and after 12 and 24 months of follow-up. Additionally, a process and a cost-effectiveness evaluation will be conducted. Discussion In this study called 'Be active, eat right' we evaluate an overweight prevention protocol for use in the setting of Youth Health Care. It is hypothesized that the

  13. THE SCANDCLEFT RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIALS: SPEECH OUTCOMES IN 5-YEAR-OLDS WITH UCLP – consonant proficiency and errors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Persson, Christina; Lohmander, Anette

    2017-01-01

    for primary palatal repair. A secondary aim was to estimate burden of care in terms of received additional secondary surgeries and speech therapy. Design: Three parallel group, randomised clinical trials were undertaken as an international multicentre study by 10 cleft teams in five countries: Denmark...... and transcribed phonetically. The main outcome measure was Percent Consonants Correct (PCC) from blinded assessments. Results: In Trial 1, arm A showed statistically significant higher PCC scores (82%) than arm B (78%) (p = .045). No significant differences were found between prevalences in Trial 2, A: 79%, C: 82...... in terms of secondary pharyngeal surgeries, number of fistulae, and speech therapy visits differed. Trial registration: ISRCTN29932826. Keywords: Primary palatal repair, unilateral cleft lip and palate, consonant proficiency, cleft speech characteristics, randomised clinical trial...

  14. The Design of Cluster Randomized Crossover Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietbergen, Charlotte; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2011-01-01

    The inefficiency induced by between-cluster variation in cluster randomized (CR) trials can be reduced by implementing a crossover (CO) design. In a simple CO trial, each subject receives each treatment in random order. A powerful characteristic of this design is that each subject serves as its own control. In a CR CO trial, clusters of subjects…

  15. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus whole breast irradiation: 5-year survival analysis of a phase 3 randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livi, Lorenzo; Meattini, Icro; Marrazzo, Livia; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Pallotta, Stefania; Saieva, Calogero; Paiar, Fabiola; Scotti, Vieri; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Bastiani, Paolo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Sanchez, Luis; Nori, Jacopo; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Simonetta

    2015-03-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been introduced as an alternative treatment method for selected patients with early stage breast cancer (BC). Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the theoretical advantage of a further increase in dose conformity compared with three-dimensional techniques, with more normal tissue sparing. The aim of this randomised trial is to compare the local recurrence and survival of APBI using the IMRT technique after breast-conserving surgery to conventional whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in early stage BC. This study was performed at the University of Florence (Florence, Italy). Women aged more than 40years affected by early BC, with a maximum pathological tumour size of 25mm, were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either WBI or APBI using IMRT. Patients in the APBI arm received a total dose of 30 Gy to the tumour bed in five daily fractions. The WBI arm received 50Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a boost on the tumour bed of 10Gy in five fractions. The primary end-point was occurrence of ipsilateral breast tumour recurrences (IBTRs); the main analysis was by intention-to-treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02104895. A total of 520 patients were randomised (260 to external WBI and 260 to APBI with IMRT) between March 2005 and June 2013. At a median follow-up of 5.0 years (Interquartile Range (IQR) 3.4-7.0), the IBTR rate was 1.5% (three cases) in the APBI group (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1-3.0) and in the WBI group (three cases; 95% CI 0.0-2.8). No significant difference emerged between the two groups (log rank test p=0.86). We identified seven deaths in the WBI group and only one in the APBI group (p=0.057). The 5-year overall survival was 96.6% for the WBI group and 99.4% for the APBI group. The APBI group presented significantly better results considering acute (p=0.0001), late (p=0.004), and cosmetic outcome (p=0.045). To our knowledge, this is the first randomised

  16. Implant-supported mandibular overdentures retained with ball or bar attachments: a randomized prospective 5-year study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Holm, B

    2001-01-01

    Astra Tech dental implants placed in the anterior part of the mandible. The denture attachment system for the patients was chosen randomly by drawing lots. Eleven patients drew the bar attachment system and fifteen patients drew the ball attachment system. Plaque Index, Gingival Index, and probing...

  17. Function: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuri Seyed Kazem

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevention of pulmonary complications after coronary artery bypass graft is attended as a very important issue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of pulmonary rehabilitation before surgery for reducing the risk of pulmonary complications after surgery. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients undergoing heart surgery were randomly divided into two groups A and B. Chest physiotherapy was performed before and after surgery on group A patients however it was done on group B’s, only after surgery. Effects of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation were compared between two groups, using spirometry and arterial blood gas (ABG. Results: Thirty nine males (65% and 21 females (35% with mean age of 8.10 ± 9.56 were analyzed.The mean differences were statistically significant for predicted forced vital capacity (FVC (CI95%:1.3 to 8.7 and Predicted Peak Flow indices (PEF (CI 95%: 1.9 to 9.4 of spirometry indicator,PCO2 index (of ABG parameter (CI 95%: 1.4 to 8.9 and mean oxygen saturation (mean Spo2 (CI 95%: 0.6 to 1.7 of ABG index in two groups. Conclusion: The performance of pulmonary rehabilitation program before surgery is recommended, as it may result in the reduction of complications of heart surgery.

  18. Zinc as an adjunct to antibiotics for the treatment of severe pneumonia in children <5 years: a meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Hong-Tao; Tan, Qi; Luo, Ming-Zhu; Li, Qiang; Yu, Jia-Lin; Wu, Qing-Chen

    2016-03-14

    The effect of Zn, as an adjunct to antibiotics, on the treatment of severe pneumonia in young children is still under debate; therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the therapeutic role of Zn for severe pneumonia in children younger than 5 years. PubMed, Cochrane library and Embase databases were systematically searched from inception until October 2015 for randomised-controlled trials (RCT) that assessed the effect of Zn as an adjunct to antibiotics for severe pneumonia. Random-effects model was used for calculating the pooled estimates, and intention-to-treat principle was also applied. Nine RCT involving 2926 children were included. Overall, the pooled results showed that adjunct treatment with Zn failed to reduce the time to recovery from severe pneumonia (hazard ratios (HR)=1·04; 95% CI 0·90, 1·19; I(2)=39%; P=0·58), hospital length of stay (HR=1·04; 95% CI 0·83, 1·33; I(2)=57%; P=0·74), treatment failure (relative risk (RR)=0·95; 95% CI 0·79, 1·14; I(2)=20%; P=0·58) or change of antibiotics (RR=1·07; 95% CI 0·79, 1·45; I(2)=44%; P=0·67). In addition, continuous outcomes were consistent while meta-analysed with standard mean difference, and all outcomes remained stable in intention-to-treat analysis. No significant differences were observed in the two groups between death rate, adverse events or recovery times of severe pneumonia indicators. Our results suggested that adjunct treatment with Zn failed to benefit young children in the treatment of severe pneumonia. Considering the clinical heterogeneity, baseline characteristics of children, definition of severe pneumonia and Zn supplement way should be taken into consideration in future research. This study was registered at PRESPERO as CRD42015019798.

  19. Omega-3 supplementation during the first 5 years of life and later academic performance: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, B K; Toelle, B G; Webb, K L; Almqvist, C; Marks, G B

    2015-04-01

    Consumption of oily fish more than once per week has been shown to improve cognitive outcomes in children. However, it is unknown whether similar benefits can be achieved by long-term omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. The objective was to investigate the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during the first 5 years of life on subsequent academic performance in children by conducting a secondary analysis of the CAPS (Childhood Asthma Prevention Study). A total of 616 infants with a family history of asthma were randomised to receive tuna fish oil (high in long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, active) or Sunola oil (low in omega-3 fatty acids, control) from the time breastfeeding ceased or at the age of 6 months until the age of 5 years. Academic performance was measured by a nationally standardised assessment of literacy and numeracy (National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN)) in school years 3, 5, 7 and 9. Plasma omega-3 fatty acid levels were measured at regular intervals until 8 years of age. Between-group differences in test scores, adjusted for maternal age, birth weight and maternal education, were estimated using mixed-model regression. Among 239 children, there were no significant differences in NAPLAN scores between active and control groups. However, at 8 years, the proportion of omega-3 fatty acid in plasma was positively associated with the NAPLAN score (0.13 s.d. unit increase in score per 1% absolute increase in plasma omega-3 fatty acid (95% CI 0.03, 0.23)). Our findings do not support the practice of supplementing omega-3 fatty acids in the diet of young children to improve academic outcomes. Further exploration is needed to understand the association between plasma omega-3 fatty acid levels at 8 years and academic performance.

  20. Sentinel node biopsy in head and neck squamous cell cancer: 5-year follow-up of a European multicenter trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkureishi, Lee W T; Ross, Gary L; Shoaib, Taimur

    2010-01-01

    Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) may represent an alternative to elective neck dissection for the staging of patients with early head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). To date, the technique has been successfully described in a number of small single-institution studies. This report describes...... the long-term follow-up of a large European multicenter trial evaluating the accuracy of the technique....

  1. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram;

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...... variable. Generation of trial databases and/or biobanks originating in large randomized clinical trials has successfully increased the knowledge obtained from those trials. At the 10th Cardiovascular Trialist Workshop, possibilities and pitfalls in designing and accessing clinical trial databases were......, in particular with respect to collaboration with the trial sponsor and to analytic pitfalls. The advantages of creating screening databases in conjunction with a given clinical trial are described; and finally, the potential for posttrial database studies to become a platform for training young scientists...

  2. The design of cluster randomized crossover trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, C.; Moerbeek, M.

    2011-01-01

    The inefficiency induced by between-cluster variation in cluster randomized (CR) trials can be reduced by implementing a crossover (CO) design. In a simple CO trial, each subject receives each treatment in random order. A powerful characteristic of this design is that each subject serves as its own

  3. INTRAMUSCULAR VERSUS INTRADERMAL HEPATITIS B REVACCINATION IN HEALTHY NON-RESPONDER CHILDREN:A 5-YEAR PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuang Guihua; Yan Hong; Wang Xueliang; Wu Qian; Wang Lirong; Gao Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    Objective With the same times of injection to compare low-dose intradermal regimen with routine-dose intramuscular inoculation in revaccination of non-responders to hepatitis B vaccine. Methods 40 healthy non-responder children collected by screening were administrated a three-dose revaccination randomly by intramuscular or intradermal route (10 vs 2 g per dose), and regularly tested for serologic markers up to five years. By the end of follow-up, a booster dose (5 μg) was given to those who had lost anti-HBs of ≥10 mIU/mL (seroprotection) and anamnestic response was estimated thereafter. Results All 17 intramuscular and 22 of 23 intradermal children effected seroprotection after revaccination. Intradermal children lost seroprotection over time significantly rapider compared with intramuscular children (Log Rank test, P= 0.029). In year 5, 50% of intramuscular but only 18.2% of intradermal children still maintained seroprotection (P=0.075). 12-14 days after the booster dose, all the eight intramuscular children developed an anamnestic response with anti-HBs titer increasing greater, but two of the 18 intradermal children failed to mount seroprotective level. Conclusion Three-routine-dose intramuscular revaccination was significantly effective than low-dose intradermal one with the same times of injection, especially in long-term immunity. We recommend routine-dose intramuscular protocol in revaccination of non-responders.

  4. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...

  5. Blinding in randomized clinical trials: imposed impartiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, A; Boutron, I

    2011-01-01

    Blinding, or "masking," is a crucial method for reducing bias in randomized clinical trials. In this paper, we review important methodological aspects of blinding, emphasizing terminology, reporting, bias mechanisms, empirical evidence, and the risk of unblinding. Theoretical considerations...

  6. Registration of randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østervig, R M; Sonne, A; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Registration of interventional studies is necessary according to the Declaration of Helsinki but implementation has been a challenge for many journals. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (Acta) requires registration for studies conducted after January 1(st) 2010. We aimed to assess...... registered when it could be verified that patient enrolment was started after registration in a trial registry. RESULTS: We identified 200 RCTs. Dates for patient enrolment were not specified in 51 (25.5%). The proportion of correctly registered trials increased significantly from 17.1% (19/111) for trials...

  7. Randomized clinical trials in HEPATOLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, L L; Nikolova, D; Gluud, C

    1999-01-01

    . Quality was assessed by means of a validated 5-point scale and separate quality components associated with empirical evidence of bias. Only 26% of all RCTs reported sample size calculations, 52% adequate generation of the allocation sequence, 34% adequate allocation concealment and 34% double......, single-center trials, and trials with no external funding. Quality did not improve with time and was not associated with country of origin. The main conclusions are that the quality of RCTs in HEPATOLOGY needs improvement and that the probability of high quality increased with the number of centers...

  8. Random allocation software for parallel group randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghaei Mahmood

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typically, randomization software should allow users to exert control over the different aspects of randomization including block design, provision of unique identifiers and control over the format and type of program output. While some of these characteristics have been addressed by available software, none of them have all of these capabilities integrated into one package. The main objective of the Random Allocation Software project was to enhance the user's control over different aspects of randomization in parallel group trials, including output type and format, structure and ordering of generated unique identifiers and enabling users to specify group names for more than two groups. Results The program has different settings for: simple and blocked randomizations; length, format and ordering of generated unique identifiers; type and format of program output; and saving sessions for future use. A formatted random list generated by this program can be used directly (without further formatting by the coordinator of the research team to prepare and encode different drugs or instruments necessary for the parallel group trial. Conclusions Random Allocation Software enables users to control different attributes of the random allocation sequence and produce qualified lists for parallel group trials.

  9. Randomization in substance abuse clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolson Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A well designed randomized clinical trial rates as the highest level of evidence for a particular intervention's efficacy. Randomization, a fundamental feature of clinical trials design, is a process invoking the use of probability to assign treatment interventions to patients. In general, randomization techniques pursue the goal of providing objectivity to the assignment of treatments, while at the same time balancing for treatment assignment totals and covariate distributions. Numerous randomization techniques, each with varying properties of randomness and balance, are suggested in the statistical literature. This paper reviews common randomization techniques often used in substance abuse research and an application from a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA-funded clinical trial in substance abuse is used to illustrate several choices an investigator faces when designing a clinical trial. Results Comparisons and contrasts of randomization schemes are provided with respect to deterministic and balancing properties. Specifically, Monte Carlo simulation is used to explore the balancing nature of randomization techniques for moderately sized clinical trials. Results demonstrate large treatment imbalance for complete randomization with less imbalance for the urn or adaptive scheme. The urn and adaptive randomization methods display smaller treatment imbalance as demonstrated by the low variability of treatment allocation imbalance. For all randomization schemes, covariate imbalance between treatment arms was small with little variation between adaptive schemes, stratified schemes and unstratified schemes given that sample sizes were moderate to large. Conclusion We develop this paper with the goal of reminding substance abuse researchers of the broad array of randomization options available for clinical trial designs. There may be too quick a tendency for substance abuse researchers to implement the fashionable urn

  10. Long-term safety and performance of the orbital atherectomy system for treating calcified coronary artery lesions: 5-Year follow-up in the ORBIT I trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, Parloop; Parikh, Parth [Care Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Ahmedabad 380060, Gujarat (India); Patel, Apurva [Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chag, Milan; Chandarana, Anish [Care Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Ahmedabad 380060, Gujarat (India); Parikh, Roosha [Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Parikh, Keyur, E-mail: keyur.parikh@cims.me [Care Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Ahmedabad 380060, Gujarat (India)

    2015-06-15

    Background/Purpose: The ORBIT I trial, a first-in-man study, was conducted to evaluate the safety and performance of the orbital atherectomy system (OAS) in treating de novo calcified coronary lesions. Methods/Materials: Fifty patients were enrolled between May and July 2008 based on several criteria, and were treated with the OAS followed by stent placement. The safety and performance of the OAS were evaluated by procedural success, device success, and overall major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) rates, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI) and need for target lesion revascularization (TLR). Our institution enrolled and treated 33 of the 50 patients and continued follow-up for 5 years. Results: Average age was 54 years and 91% were males. Mean lesion length was 15.9 mm. Device success was 100%, and average number of orbital atherectomy devices (OAD) used per patient was 1.3. Stents were placed directly after OAS in 31/32 patients (96.9%). All stents (average stent per lesion 1.1) were successfully deployed with 0.3% residual stenosis. The overall cumulative MACE rate was 6.1% in-hospital, 9.1% at 30 days, 12.1% at 6 months, 15.2% at 2 years, 18.2% at 3 years and 21.2% at 5 years (4 total cardiac deaths). None of the patients had Q-wave MIs. Angiographic complications were observed in 5 patients. No flow/slow flow due to distal embolization was observed. Conclusions: The ORBIT I trial suggests that OAS treatment continues to offer a safe and effective method to change compliance of calcified coronary lesions to facilitate optimal stent placement in these difficult-to-treat patients.

  11. Clinical Research Methodology 3: Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I; Imrey, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    Randomized assignment of treatment excludes reverse causation and selection bias and, in sufficiently large studies, effectively prevents confounding. Well-implemented blinding prevents measurement bias. Studies that include these protections are called randomized, blinded clinical trials and, when conducted with sufficient numbers of patients, provide the most valid results. Although conceptually straightforward, design of clinical trials requires thoughtful trade-offs among competing approaches-all of which influence the number of patients required, enrollment time, internal and external validity, ability to evaluate interactions among treatments, and cost.

  12. A cluster randomised trial of a telephone-based intervention for parents to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in their 3- to 5-year-old children: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fletcher Amanda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption in childhood increases the risk of developing chronic disease. Despite this, a substantial proportion of children in developed nations, including Australia, do not consume sufficient quantities of fruits and vegetables. Parents are influential in the development of dietary habits of young children but often lack the necessary knowledge and skills to promote healthy eating in their children. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of a telephone-based intervention for parents to increase the fruit and vegetable consumption of their 3- to 5-year-old children. Methods/Design The study, conducted in the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia, employs a cluster randomised controlled trial design. Two hundred parents from 15 randomly selected preschools will be randomised to receive the intervention, which consists of print resources and four weekly 30-minute telephone support calls delivered by trained telephone interviewers. The calls will assist parents to increase the availability and accessibility of fruit and vegetables in the home, create supportive family eating routines and role-model fruit and vegetable consumption. A further two hundred parents will be randomly allocated to the control group and will receive printed nutrition information only. The primary outcome of the trial will be the change in the child's consumption of fruit and vegetables as measured by the fruit and vegetable subscale of the Children's Dietary Questionnaire. Pre-intervention and post-intervention parent surveys will be administered over the telephone. Baseline surveys will occur one to two weeks prior to intervention delivery, with follow-up data collection calls occurring two, six, 12 and 18 months following baseline data collection. Discussion If effective, this telephone-based intervention may represent a promising public health strategy to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in

  13. Randomized clinical trials in orthodontics are rarely registered a priori and often published late or not at all

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonoglou, Georgios N.; Sándor, George K.; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    A priori registration of randomized clinical trials is crucial to the transparency and credibility of their findings. Aim of this study was to assess the frequency with which registered and completed randomized trials in orthodontics are published. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and ISRCTN for registered randomized clinical trials in orthodontics that had been completed up to January 2017 and judged the publication status and date of registered trials using a systematic protocol. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher exact tests, and Kaplan-Meier survival estimates. From the 266 orthodontic trials registered up to January 2017, 80 trials had been completed and included in the present study. Among these 80 included trials, the majority (76%) were registered retrospectively, while only 33 (41%) were published at the time. The median time from completion to publication was 20.1 months (interquartile range: 9.1 to 31.6 months), while survival analysis indicated that less than 10% of the trials were published after 5 years from their completion. Finally, 22 (28%) of completed trials remain unpublished even after 5 years from their completion. Publication rates of registered randomized trials in orthodontics remained low, even 5 years after their completion date. PMID:28777820

  14. Randomized clinical trials in orthodontics are rarely registered a priori and often published late or not at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Antonoglou, Georgios N; Sándor, George K; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    A priori registration of randomized clinical trials is crucial to the transparency and credibility of their findings. Aim of this study was to assess the frequency with which registered and completed randomized trials in orthodontics are published. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and ISRCTN for registered randomized clinical trials in orthodontics that had been completed up to January 2017 and judged the publication status and date of registered trials using a systematic protocol. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher exact tests, and Kaplan-Meier survival estimates. From the 266 orthodontic trials registered up to January 2017, 80 trials had been completed and included in the present study. Among these 80 included trials, the majority (76%) were registered retrospectively, while only 33 (41%) were published at the time. The median time from completion to publication was 20.1 months (interquartile range: 9.1 to 31.6 months), while survival analysis indicated that less than 10% of the trials were published after 5 years from their completion. Finally, 22 (28%) of completed trials remain unpublished even after 5 years from their completion. Publication rates of registered randomized trials in orthodontics remained low, even 5 years after their completion date.

  15. Randomized controlled trials - a matter of design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial.

  16. Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair with and without Concomitant Burch Colposuspension in Incontinent Women: A Randomised Controlled Trial with at Least 5-Year Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Costantini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reevaluate and update the followup of a previously published randomized controlled trial (RCT on the impact of Burch Colposuspension (BC, as an anti-incontinence procedure, in patients with UI and POP, who underwent POP repair. Forty-seven women were randomly assigned to abdominal POP repair and concomitant BC (24 patients; group A or POP repair alone without any anti-incontinence procedure (23 patients; group B. Median followup was 82 months (range 60–107; from over 47 patients, 30 reached 6-year followup. Two patients were lost at followup. In group A, 2 patients showed a stage I rectocele. In group B, 2 patients had a stage I rectocele and 1 a stage II rectocele. In group A, 13/23 (56.5% were still incontinent after surgery compared with 9/22 patients (40.9% in group B (P=0.298. No significant changes were observed between the first and the current followup. The update of long-term followup confirmed that BC did not improve outcome significantly in incontinent women when they undergo POP repair.

  17. [Ethical aspects of randomized clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, E; Sorrentino, D; Trevisi, A

    1997-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials represent the final, essential link between basic medical research and human health. However, their conduction presents very complex ethical problems, since the patient is the actual target of the experiment. Proper randomization, informed consent, and preliminary disclosure of results create deep ethical conflicts between the role of caretaker and that of impartial observer, both played by the same doctor. The dilemma reproduces the conflict between two different ethics. One is based on the inalienable individual rights stemming from the concept of man as an end in himself and not a means to an end. The other, derived from utilitarian philosophies, is based on the benefit for society as a whole. If we agree that randomized clinical trials represent the best method to test the validity of a new treatment, there is no easy solution. The dilemma could be solved by separating the role of the family doctor, committed to the best treatment possible for his patient, from the role of the scientist, committed to the progress of science and humanity. The former is involved in the treatment of individual patients, the latter in clinical and scientific experiments of a therapeutic nature. The patient may trade his rights to the best possible cure for the safety and the efficiency guaranteed by the scientific institution conducting the trial. Trials on relevant issues--expected to produce important results and impeccably designed scientifically--could be endowed with the ethics of science per se and this could be considered equivalent to the individual rights waived by the patient.

  18. Control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Yunnan province, People's Republic of China: experiences and lessons from a 5-year multi-intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Peter; Yap, Peiling; Utzinger, Jürg; Du, Zun-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Yong; Chen, Ran; Wu, Fang-Wei; Chen, Jia-Xu; Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-01-01

    The current global strategy for the control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis emphasises periodic administration of anthelminthic drugs to at-risk populations. However, this approach fails to address the root social and ecological causes of soil-transmitted helminthiasis. For sustainable control, it has been suggested that improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene behaviour are required. We designed a 5-year multi-intervention trial in Menghai county, Yunnan province, People's Republic of China. Three different interventions were implemented, each covering a village inhabited by 200-350 people. The interventions consisted of (i) initial health education at study inception and systematic treatment of all individuals aged ≥2 years once every year with a single dose of albendazole; (ii) initial health education and bi-annual albendazole administration; and (iii) bi-annual treatment coupled with latrine construction at family level and regular health education. Interventions were rigorously implemented for 3 years, whilst the follow-up, which included annual albendazole distribution, lasted for 2 more years. Before the third round of treatment, the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides was reduced by only 2.8% in the annual treatment arm, whilst bi-annual deworming combined with latrine construction and health education resulted in a prevalence reduction of 53.3% (p<0.001). All three control approaches significantly reduced the prevalence of Trichuris trichiura and hookworm, with the highest reductions achieved when chemotherapy was combined with sanitation and health education. The prevalence of T. trichiura remained at 30% and above regardless of the intervention. Only bi-annual treatment combined with latrine construction and health education significantly impacted on the prevalence of Taenia spp., but none of the interventions significantly reduced the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis. Our findings support the notion that in high-endemicity areas

  19. Recent randomized controlled trials in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banglawala, Sarfaraz M; Lawrence, Lauren A; Franko-Tobin, Emily; Soler, Zachary M; Schlosser, Rodney J; Ioannidis, John

    2015-03-01

    To assess recent trends in the prevalence and quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in 4 otolaryngology journals. Methodology and reporting analysis. Randomized controlled trials in 4 otolaryngology journals. All RCTs published from 2011 to 2013 in 4 major otolaryngology journals were examined for characteristics of study design, quality of design and reporting, and funding. Of 5279 articles published in 4 leading otolaryngology journals from 2011 to 2013, 189 (3.3%) were RCTs. The majority of RCTs were clinical studies (86%), with the largest proportion consisting of sinonasal topics (31%). Most interventions were medical (46%), followed by surgical (38%) and mixed (16%). In terms of quality, randomization method was reported in 54% of RCTs, blinding in 33%, and adverse events in 65%. Intention-to-treat analysis was used in 32%; P values were reported in 87% and confidence intervals in 10%. Research funding was most often absent or not reported (55%), followed by not-for-profit (25%). Based on review of 4 otolaryngology journals, RCTs are still a small proportion of all published studies in the field of otolaryngology. There seem to be trends toward improvement in quality of design and reporting of RCTs, although many quality features remain suboptimal. Practitioners both designing and interpreting RCTs should critically evaluate RCTs for quality. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  20. Dosage of estradiol, bone and body composition in Turner syndrome: a 5-year randomized controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Line; Holm, Kirsten; Kobbernagel, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Reduced bone mineral density (BMD) is seen in Turner syndrome (TS) with an increased risk of fractures, and body composition is characterized by increased body fat and decreased lean body mass. To evaluate the effect of two different doses of oral 17ß-estradiol in young TS women on bone...

  1. Long-term effect of early treatment with interferon beta-1b after a first clinical event suggestive of multiple sclerosis: 5-year active treatment extension of the phase 3 BENEFIT trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappos, Ludwig; Freedman, Mark S; Polman, Chris H;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Betaferon/Betaseron in newly emerging multiple sclerosis for initial treatment (BENEFIT) trial investigated the effect of treatment with interferon beta-1b after a clinically isolated syndrome. The 5-year active treatment extension compares the effects of early and delayed treatme...

  2. Diagnostic randomized controlled trials: the final frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Marc; Ramsay, Tim; Fergusson, Dean

    2012-08-16

    Clinicians, patients, governments, third-party payers, and the public take for granted that diagnostic tests are accurate, safe and effective. However, we may be seriously misled if we are relying on robust study design to ensure accurate, safe, and effective diagnostic tests. Properly conducted, randomized controlled trials are the gold standard for assessing the effectiveness and safety of interventions, yet are rarely conducted in the assessment of diagnostic tests. Instead, diagnostic cohort studies are commonly performed to assess the characteristics of a diagnostic test including sensitivity and specificity. While diagnostic cohort studies can inform us about the relative accuracy of an experimental diagnostic intervention compared to a reference standard, they do not inform us about whether the differences in accuracy are clinically important, or the degree of clinical importance (in other words, the impact on patient outcomes). In this commentary we provide the advantages of the diagnostic randomized controlled trial and suggest a greater awareness and uptake in their conduct. Doing so will better ensure that patients are offered diagnostic procedures that will make a clinical difference.

  3. Subgroup identification from randomized clinical trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jared C; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Ruberg, Stephen J

    2011-10-30

    We consider the problem of identifying a subgroup of patients who may have an enhanced treatment effect in a randomized clinical trial, and it is desirable that the subgroup be defined by a limited number of covariates. For this problem, the development of a standard, pre-determined strategy may help to avoid the well-known dangers of subgroup analysis. We present a method developed to find subgroups of enhanced treatment effect. This method, referred to as 'Virtual Twins', involves predicting response probabilities for treatment and control 'twins' for each subject. The difference in these probabilities is then used as the outcome in a classification or regression tree, which can potentially include any set of the covariates. We define a measure Q(Â) to be the difference between the treatment effect in estimated subgroup  and the marginal treatment effect. We present several methods developed to obtain an estimate of Q(Â), including estimation of Q(Â) using estimated probabilities in the original data, using estimated probabilities in newly simulated data, two cross-validation-based approaches, and a bootstrap-based bias-corrected approach. Results of a simulation study indicate that the Virtual Twins method noticeably outperforms logistic regression with forward selection when a true subgroup of enhanced treatment effect exists. Generally, large sample sizes or strong enhanced treatment effects are needed for subgroup estimation. As an illustration, we apply the proposed methods to data from a randomized clinical trial.

  4. Perspectives on randomized clinical trials : the case for albuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo Jan

    2008-01-01

    Large scale randomized clinical trials are needed to detect small but meaningful effects of new drugs. However, large scale randomized clinical trials are expensive undertakings and they are in imbalance with the scientific output. As a consequence there is a strong voice for more efficacious random

  5. Mobile access to virtual randomization for investigator-initiated trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno, Thomas M; Keszei, András P

    2017-08-01

    Background/aims Randomization is indispensable in clinical trials in order to provide unbiased treatment allocation and a valid statistical inference. Improper handling of allocation lists can be avoided using central systems, for example, human-based services. However, central systems are unaffordable for investigator-initiated trials and might be inaccessible from some places, where study subjects need allocations. We propose mobile access to virtual randomization, where the randomization lists are non-existent and the appropriate allocation is computed on demand. Methods The core of the system architecture is an electronic data capture system or a clinical trial management system, which is extended by an R interface connecting the R server using the Java R Interface. Mobile devices communicate via the representational state transfer web services. Furthermore, a simple web-based setup allows configuring the appropriate statistics by non-statisticians. Our comprehensive R script supports simple randomization, restricted randomization using a random allocation rule, block randomization, and stratified randomization for un-blinded, single-blinded, and double-blinded trials. For each trial, the electronic data capture system or the clinical trial management system stores the randomization parameters and the subject assignments. Results Apps are provided for iOS and Android and subjects are randomized using smartphones. After logging onto the system, the user selects the trial and the subject, and the allocation number and treatment arm are displayed instantaneously and stored in the core system. So far, 156 subjects have been allocated from mobile devices serving five investigator-initiated trials. Conclusion Transforming pre-printed allocation lists into virtual ones ensures the correct conduct of trials and guarantees a strictly sequential processing in all trial sites. Covering 88% of all randomization models that are used in recent trials, virtual randomization

  6. Randomized intervention study of solar disinfection of drinking water in the prevention of dysentery in Kenyan children aged under 5 years

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the results of a randomized controlled intervention study (September 2007 to March 2009) investigating the effect of solar disinfection (SODIS) of drinking water on the incidence of dysentery, nondysentery diarrhea...

  7. Randomized controlled trials of COX-2 inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansdottir, Gudrun; De Bruin, Marie L; Knol, Mirjam J

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Naproxen, ibuprofen and diclofenac are frequently used as comparators in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the safety and efficacy of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors. Different comparator doses may influence the results of RCTs. It has been hypothesized that RCTs of COX-2...... 1995 and 2009 in which celecoxib or rofecoxib were compared with naproxen, ibuprofen or diclofenac. All articles labelled as RCTs mentioning rofecoxib or celecoxib and one or more of the comparator drugs in the title and/or abstract were included. We extracted information on doses of both non...... dose trends in the case of rofecoxib. CONCLUSIONS: Although the dose trends over time differed for RCTs comparing rofecoxib and celecoxib with diclofenac, ibuprofen or naproxen, the results of our study do not support the hypothesis that dose trends influenced the decision to continue marketing...

  8. Addition of rituximab to chlorambucil produces superior event-free survival in the treatment of patients with extranodal marginal-zone B-cell lymphoma: 5-year analysis of the IELSG-19 Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Emanuele; Conconi, Annarita; Laszlo, Daniele; López-Guillermo, Armando; Bouabdallah, Reda; Coiffier, Bertrand; Sebban, Catherine; Jardin, Fabrice; Vitolo, Umberto; Morschhauser, Franck; Pileri, Stefano A; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Campo, Elias; Jack, Andrew; Floriani, Irene; Johnson, Peter; Martelli, Maurizio; Cavalli, Franco; Martinelli, Giovanni; Thieblemont, Catherine

    2013-02-10

    Apart from localized gastric disease, there is no consensus on standard initial treatment of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The IELSG-19 study (Randomized Trial of Chlorambucil Versus Chlorambucil Plus Rituximab Versus Rituximab in MALT Lymphoma) was launched to compare chlorambucil alone versus chlorambucil plus rituximab in patients not previously given systemic anticancer therapy. Patients not responding to or not suitable for local therapy were eligible. In arm A, chlorambucil was given daily 6 mg/m(2) orally (PO) for 6 weeks. Responding patients and those with stable disease continued to be given daily chlorambucil 6 mg/m(2) PO for 14 consecutive days every 28 days for four cycles. In arm B, intravenous rituximab 375 mg/m(2) per day was added on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 56, 84, 112, and 140. After completion of the planned accrual, the protocol was amended to introduce a third arm with rituximab alone. We report the planned final analysis of the first two arms (113 patients in arm A and 114 in arm B). At a median follow-up of 62 months, the 5-year event-free survival (EFS) was significantly better for the patients treated in arm B (68% v 50%; P = .002) who, despite similar overall response rates (90% v 87%), achieved a higher complete remission rate (78% v 65%; P = .025). Progression-free survival was also improved but it did not reach statistical significance (P = .057). Five-year overall survival (OS) was 89% in both arms. Both treatments were well tolerated without unexpected toxicities. Both treatments were active; the better response rate and EFS obtained with the addition of rituximab did not translate into improved OS.

  9. Enhancing adoptive parenting: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Alan; Monck, Elizabeth; Leese, Morven; McCrone, Paul; Sharac, Jessica

    2010-10-01

    The aim was to conduct a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate two parenting programmes designed for adopters of children late placed from care. Adoptive parents, with children between 3 and 8 years who were screened to have serious behavioural problems early in the placement, participated in home-based, manualized, parenting programmes delivered by trained and supervised family social workers. The adopters who agreed to join the study were randomly allocated to one of two parenting interventions or to a "services as usual" group. Baseline, immediate post-intervention and six-month follow-ups were assessed using questionnaires and adopter interviews. No cases were lost to follow-up at any point and satisfaction was high with both parenting interventions. At the six-month follow-up, a significant difference (p parenting" in favour of the intervention group (Effect Size d = 0.7). Negative parenting approaches were reduced in the intervention group. However, no significant differences in child problems were found between the intervention groups and control group, adjusting for baseline scores. Costs analysis showed that a relatively modest investment in post-adoption support would be well spent in improving adopters' satisfaction with parenting in the intervention group compared to the routine service group.

  10. The clinically-integrated randomized trial: proposed novel method for conducting large trials at low cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scardino Peter T

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Randomized controlled trials provide the best method of determining which of two comparable treatments is preferable. Unfortunately, contemporary randomized trials have become increasingly expensive, complex and burdened by regulation, so much so that many trials are of doubtful feasibility. Discussion Here we present a proposal for a novel, streamlined approach to randomized trials: the "clinically-integrated randomized trial". The key aspect of our methodology is that the clinical experience of the patient and doctor is virtually indistinguishable whether or not the patient is randomized, primarily because outcome data are obtained from routine clinical data, or from short, web-based questionnaires. Integration of a randomized trial into routine clinical practice also implies that there should be an attempt to randomize every patient, a corollary of which is that eligibility criteria are minimized. The similar clinical experience of patients on- and off-study also entails that the marginal cost of putting an additional patient on trial is negligible. We propose examples of how the clinically-integrated randomized trial might be applied in four distinct areas of medicine: comparisons of surgical techniques, "me too" drugs, rare diseases and lifestyle interventions. Barriers to implementing clinically-integrated randomized trials are discussed. Conclusion The proposed clinically-integrated randomized trial may allow us to enlarge dramatically the number of clinical questions that can be addressed by randomization.

  11. Sustained improvements in handwashing indicators more than 5 years after a cluster-randomised, community-based trial of handwashing promotion in Karachi, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anna; Agboatwalla, Mubina; Ayers, Tracy; Tobery, Timothy; Tariq, Maria; Luby, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate handwashing behaviour 5 years after a handwashing intervention in Karachi, Pakistan. METHODS In 2003, we randomised neighbourhoods to control, handwashing promotion, or handwashing promotion and water treatment. Intervention households were given soap +/− water treatment product and weekly handwashing education for 9 months. In 2009, we re-enrolled 461 households from the three study groups: control (160), handwashing (141), and handwashing + water treatment (160) and assessed hygiene-related outcomes, accounting for clustering. RESULTS Intervention households were 3.4 times more likely than controls to have soap at their handwashing stations during the study visit [293/301 (97%) vs. 45/159 (28%), P soap/person/month (P soap at the household handwashing station, know key times to wash hands and report purchasing more soap than controls, suggesting habituation of improved handwashing practices in this population. Intensive handwashing promotion may be an effective strategy for habituating hygiene behaviours and improving health. PMID:23294343

  12. Promoting Self-Regulation and Cooperation in Pre-Kindergarten Children with Conduct Problems: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somech, Lior Y.; Elizur, Yoel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness and mechanisms of "Hitkashrut", a "common elements" co-parent training (PT) program for early intervention with preschoolers (3-5 years of age) at risk for conduct problems (CP). Method: A randomized controlled trial with 140 participants in PT and 69 in a minimal intervention control…

  13. A Framework for Designing Cluster Randomized Trials with Binary Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Martinez, Andres

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a frame work for approaching a power analysis for a CRT (cluster randomized trial) with a binary outcome. The authors suggest a framework in the context of a simple CRT and then extend it to a blocked design, or a multi-site cluster randomized trial (MSCRT). The framework is based on proportions, an…

  14. Sample size calculations for 3-level cluster randomized trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerenstra, S.; Moerbeek, M.; Achterberg, T. van; Pelzer, B.J.; Borm, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The first applications of cluster randomized trials with three instead of two levels are beginning to appear in health research, for instance, in trials where different strategies to implement best-practice guidelines are compared. In such trials, the strategy is implemented in health

  15. Sample size calculations for 3-level cluster randomized trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerenstra, S.; Moerbeek, M.; Achterberg, T. van; Pelzer, B.J.; Borm, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Background The first applications of cluster randomized trials with three instead of two levels are beginning to appear in health research, for instance, in trials where different strategies to implement best-practice guidelines are compared. In such trials, the strategy is implemented in health

  16. Sample size calculations for 3-level cluster randomized trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerenstra, S.; Moerbeek, M.; Achterberg, T. van; Pelzer, B.J.; Borm, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The first applications of cluster randomized trials with three instead of two levels are beginning to appear in health research, for instance, in trials where different strategies to implement best-practice guidelines are compared. In such trials, the strategy is implemented in health ca

  17. Sample size calculations for 3-level cluster randomized trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerenstra, S.; Moerbeek, M.; Achterberg, T. van; Pelzer, B.J.; Borm, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Background The first applications of cluster randomized trials with three instead of two levels are beginning to appear in health research, for instance, in trials where different strategies to implement best-practice guidelines are compared. In such trials, the strategy is implemented in health car

  18. Challenges of randomized controlled trial design in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Aladdin H; Herrera, Fernando A; Hassanein, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials are the gold standard of evidence-based medicine. In the field of plastic surgery, designing these studies is much more challenging than in pharmaceutical medicine. Randomized trials in plastic surgery encompass several road blocks including problems shared with other surgical trials: equipoise, high cost, placebo issues and learning curves following the establishment of a novel approach. In addition, plastic surgery has more subjective outcomes, thus making study design even more difficult in assessing the end result.

  19. Nutrition and Oxidative Parameters in Pregnancy, Size at Birth and Metabolic Status of the Offspring at 4.5 Years : The MINIMat Trial in Rural Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Undernutrition and oxidative stress in fetal life and infancy may lead to adverse health outcomes in the offspring. We studied nutrition and oxidative parameters in pregnancy and their associations with birth anthropometry and metabolic status in the children. In Matlab in rural Bangladesh, women were randomized to either early (Early) invitation to food supplementation or to start at their own liking (Usual). Women were also allocated to either; 1) 60 mg iron and 400 µg folic acid (Fe60F), 2...

  20. Randomized Trial of Benznidazole for Chronic Chagas' Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo, Carlos A; Marin-Neto, Jose Antonio; Avezum, Alvaro; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Rassi, Anis; Rosas, Fernando; Villena, Erick; Quiroz, Roberto; Bonilla, Rina; Britto, Constança; Guhl, Felipe; Velazquez, Elsa; Bonilla, Laura; Meeks, Brandi; Rao-Melacini, Purnima; Pogue, Janice; Mattos, Antonio; Lazdins, Janis; Rassi, Anis; Connolly, Stuart J; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-10-01

    The role of trypanocidal therapy in patients with established Chagas' cardiomyopathy is unproven. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, randomized study involving 2854 patients with Chagas' cardiomyopathy who received benznidazole or placebo for up to 80 days and were followed for a mean of 5.4 years. The primary outcome in the time-to-event analysis was the first event of any of the components of the composite outcome of death, resuscitated cardiac arrest, sustained ventricular tachycardia, insertion of a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, cardiac transplantation, new heart failure, stroke, or other thromboembolic event. The primary outcome occurred in 394 patients (27.5%) in the benznidazole group and in 414 (29.1%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81 to 1.07; P=0.31). At baseline, a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay was performed on blood samples obtained from 1896 patients; 60.5% had positive results for Trypanosoma cruzi on PCR. The rates of conversion to negative PCR results (PCR conversion) were 66.2% in the benznidazole group and 33.5% in the placebo group at the end of treatment, 55.4% and 35.3%, respectively, at 2 years, and 46.7% and 33.1%, respectively, at 5 years or more (P<0.001 for all comparisons). The effect of treatment on PCR conversion varied according to geographic region: in Brazil, the odds ratio for PCR conversion was 3.03 (95% CI, 2.12 to 4.34) at 2 years and 1.87 (95% CI, 1.33 to 2.63) at 5 or more years; in Colombia and El Salvador, the odds ratio was 1.33 (95% CI, 0.90 to 1.98) at 2 years and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.63 to 1.45) at 5 or more years; and in Argentina and Bolivia, the odds ratio was 2.63 (95% CI, 1.89 to 3.66) at 2 years and 2.79 (95% CI, 1.99 to 3.92) at 5 or more years (P<0.001 for interaction). However, the rates of PCR conversion did not correspond to effects on clinical outcome (P=0.16 for interaction). Trypanocidal therapy with benznidazole in patients with

  1. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS......:We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two......%). Heterogeneity was moderate (I(2) = 46%, p = 0.02) and unexplained by metaregression. INTERPRETATION:We provide empirical evidence for observer bias in randomized clinical trials with subjective measurement scale outcomes. A failure to blind assessors of outcomes in such trials results in a high risk...

  2. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Updated Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Combined Modality Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed, E-mail: asemuddin@gmail.com [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Paulus, Rebecca [RTOG Statistical Department, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mitchell, Edith [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hanna, Nader [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yuen, Albert [Reading Hospital and Medical Center, Reading, Pennsylvania (United States); Nichols, Romaine [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Yalavarthi, Salochna [Ingalls Memorial Hospital, Harvey, Illinois (United States); Hayostek, Cherie [Santa Fe Cancer Center, Santa Fe, New Mexico (United States); Willett, Christopher [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 2 different approaches to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for distal rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: One hundred six patients with T3/T4 distal rectal cancers were randomized in a phase 2 study. Patients received either continuous venous infusion (CVI) of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week plus pelvic hyperfractionated radiation (HRT), 45.6 Gy at 1.2 Gy twice daily plus a boost of 9.6 to 14.4 Gy for T3 or T4 cancers (Arm 1), or CVI of 5-FU, 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, Monday to Friday, plus irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly × 4, plus pelvic radiation therapy (RT), 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day and a boost of 5.4 Gy for T3 and 9 Gy for T4 cancers (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4 to 10 weeks later. Results: All eligible patients (n=103) are included in this analysis; 2 ineligible patients were excluded, and 1 patient withdrew consent. Ninety-eight of 103 patients (95%) underwent resection. Four patients did not undergo surgery for either disease progression or patient refusal, and 1 patient died during induction chemotherapy. The median time of follow-up was 6.4 years in Arm 1 and 7.0 years in Arm 2. The pathological complete response (pCR) rates were 30% in Arm 1 and 26% in Arm 2. Locoregional recurrence rates were 16% in Arm 1 and 17% in Arm 2. Five-year survival rates were 61% and 75% and Disease-specific survival rates were 78% and 85% for Arm1 and Arm 2, respectively. Five second primaries occurred in patients on Arm 1, and 1 second primary occurred in Arm 2. Conclusions: High rates of disease-specific survival were seen in each arm. Overall survival appears affected by the development of unrelated second cancers. The high pCR rates with 5-FU and higher dose radiation in T4 cancers provide opportunity for increased R0 resections and improved survival.

  3. Reported methodologic quality and discrepancies between large and small randomized trials in meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, L L; Villumsen, J; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    To explore whether reported methodologic quality affects estimated intervention effects in randomized trials and contributes to discrepancies between the results of large randomized trials and small randomized trials in meta-analyses....

  4. RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL IN CHIKUNGUNYA ARTHRITIS CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Chikungunya virus is no stranger to the Indian sub- continent. Since its first isolation in Calcutta [1] in 1963, there have been several reports of chikung unya virus infection in different parts of India [2], [3], [4]. The last outbreak of chikungunya virus infection o ccurred in India in 1971. Subsequently there has been no activ e or passive surveillance carried out in the country and therefore, it ‘seemed’ that the virus h ad ‘disappeared’ from the subcontinent [5] However, recent reports of large scale outbreaks of fever caused by chikungunya virus infection in several parts of Southern India have confirmed th e re-emergence of this virus. It has been estimated that over 1,80,000 cases have occurred in India since December 2005 [6] Andhra Pradesh (AP was the first state to report this dise ase in December 2005, and one of the worst affected (over 80,000 suspected cases . Over 12% of patients who contract chikungunya virus infection develop chronic joint symptoms [7] . OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of chloroquine in reducing the pain of chikungunya induced arthritis a s compared to paracetamol. METHODOLOGY: A Randomized Clinical Trial was carried out in a c ommunity attached to urban health centre of PESIMSR, Kuppam during August 2006. Among the 132 cases of arthritis, 86 persons were selected based on their availability and consent to participate. They were divided into two randomly assigned groups namely Cat egory–1(Chloroquine group and Category–2 ( Paracetamol group. Chloroquine tablet -155 mg and Paracetamol tablet - 500 mg were administered as a single dose to the two groups respectively. The groups were followed up for 8 days and the results were analyzed. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Analysis was carried out by using S.P.S.S. package. Asymptoic test statistic an d X 2 MH (Chi square test were used to evaluate the effect of the drugs. RESULTS OF THE STUDY: The decrease of pain in chikungunya arthritis cases was

  5. Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic versus open appendicectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Gorm; Petersen, O B; Wara, P;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopy in patients with a clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis has not gained wide acceptance, and its use remains controversial. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open appendicectomy, 583 of 828 consecutive patients consented to participate...

  6. Hallucination focused integrative treatment : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, JA; Nienhuis, FJ; Wiersma, D; van de Willige, G

    2004-01-01

    Improvements in psychopathology, subjective burden, and coping with voices after hallucination focused integrative treatment (HIT) were studied in chronic schizophrenic patients with persistent (> 10 years), drug-refractory auditory hallucinations. In a randomized controlled trial, routine care was

  7. A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy, Safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy, Safety and Cost Effectiveness of ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Pharmacological control of pain is the mainstay of management of osteoarthritis.

  8. INvestigational Vertebroplasty Efficacy and Safety Trial (INVEST: a randomized controlled trial of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stout Lydia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures has historically been limited to several weeks of bed rest, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications, calcitonin injections, or external bracing. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (the injection of bone cement into the fractured vertebral body is a relatively new procedure used to treat these fractures. There is increasing interest to examine the efficacy and safety of percutaneous vertebroplasty and to study the possibility of a placebo effect or whether the pain relief is from local anesthetics placed directly on the bone during the vertebroplasty procedure. Methods/Designs Our goal is to test the hypothesis that patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures who undergo vertebroplasty have less disability and pain at 1 month than patients who undergo a control intervention. The control intervention is placement of local anesthesia near the fracture, without placement of cement. One hundred sixty-six patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures will be recruited over 5 years from US and foreign sites performing the vertebroplasty procedure. We will exclude patients with malignant tumor deposit (multiple myeloma, tumor mass or tumor extension into the epidural space at the level of the fracture. We will randomly assign participants to receive either vertebroplasty or the control intervention. Subjects will complete a battery of validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health related quality of life at baseline and at post-randomization time points (days 1, 2, 3, and 14, and months 1, 3, 6, and 12. Both subjects and research interviewers performing the follow-up assessments will be blinded to the randomization assignment. Subjects will have a clinic visit at months 1 and 12. Spine X-rays will be obtained at the end of the study (month 12 to determine subsequent fracture rates. Our co

  9. Pragmatic design in randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgato, M; Barbui, C; Stroup, S; Adams, C

    2015-01-01

    At more than 10 years after the paper by Hotopf and colleagues regarding pragmatic trials in psychiatry, the field has evolved and is evolving further. There have been many developments in our understanding of what pragmatism really means, and excellent examples of truly pragmatic trials in psychiatry are currently available. Funders have helped encourage more emphasis on the need for such studies, but 'local' and trans-national regulations could help more. Consumers of the evidence should have a greater voice in generating the research agenda and, as this happens, the questions generated are more likely to be answered by a pragmatic approach to trials.

  10. European randomized lung cancer screening trials: Post NLST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, JK; Klaveren, R; Pedersen, JH;

    2013-01-01

    Overview of the European randomized lung cancer CT screening trials (EUCT) is presented with regard to the implementation of CT screening in Europe; post NLST. All seven principal investigators completed a questionnaire on the epidemiological, radiological, and nodule management aspects of their ......Overview of the European randomized lung cancer CT screening trials (EUCT) is presented with regard to the implementation of CT screening in Europe; post NLST. All seven principal investigators completed a questionnaire on the epidemiological, radiological, and nodule management aspects...

  11. Effect of etanercept in polymyalgia rheumatica: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Frederik; Galbo, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-α receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR.......To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-α receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR....

  12. Effect of etanercept in polymyalgia rheumatica: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Frederik; Galbo, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) a and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-a receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR.......To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) a and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-a receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR....

  13. Quality assessment of randomized clinical trial in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Giulliano Peixoto; Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Barbosa, Luciano Timbó; Duarte, José Lira

    2009-03-01

    A randomized clinical trial is a prospective study that compares the effect and value of interventions in human beings, of one or more groups vs. a control group. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of published randomized clinical trials in Intensive care in Brazil. All randomized clinical trials in intensive care found by manual search in Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva from January 2001 to March 2008 were assessed to evaluate their description by the quality scale. Descriptive statistics and a 95 % confidence interval were used for the primary outcome. Our primary outcome was the randomized clinical trial quality. Our search found 185 original articles, of which 14 were randomized clinical trials. Only one original article (7.1%) showed good quality. There was no statistical significance between the collected data and the data shown in the hypothesis of this search. It can be concluded that in the sample of assessed articles 7% of the randomized clinical trials in intensive care published in a single intensive care journal in Brazil, present good methodological quality.

  14. European randomized lung cancer screening trials: Post NLST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, John K; van Klaveren, Rob; Pedersen, Jesper H; Pastorino, Ugo; Paci, Eugino; Becker, Nikolauss; Infante, Maurizo; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Koning, Harry J

    2013-10-01

    Overview of the European randomized lung cancer CT screening trials (EUCT) is presented with regard to the implementation of CT screening in Europe; post NLST. All seven principal investigators completed a questionnaire on the epidemiological, radiological, and nodule management aspects of their trials at August 2010, which included 32,000 people, inclusion of UKLS pilot trial will reach 36,000. An interim analysis is planned, but the final mortality data testing is scheduled for 2015.

  15. 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical study comparing everolimus plus reduced-dose cyclosporine with mycophenolate mofetil plus standard-dose cyclosporine in de novo kidney transplantation: Retrospective single center assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramitsu, Takahisa; Okada, Manabu; Futamura, Kenta; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Tsujita, Makoto; Goto, Norihiko; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Asami; Iwasaki, Kenta; Uchida, Kazuharu; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of everolimus plus reduced-dose cyclosporine compared with mycophenolate mofetil plus standard-dose cyclosporine 5years after living donor kidney transplantation. Between March 2008 and August 2009, 24 living donor kidney transplantations were enrolled in a 2-year, multicenter, randomized phase 3 study (RAD001A1202 study). 24 recipients were randomly classified into two groups and closely observed for 5years. 13 recipients were administered steroid, reduced-dose cyclosporine, everolimus and basiliximab (EVR group). 11 recipients were administered steroid, standard-dose cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and basiliximab (STD group). Two groups were compared not only in graft function including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and proteinuria, but also in adverse events such as de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) production, rejection, new-onset diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. No graft loss was identified in 5years. The incidences of acute T cell rejection, de novo DSA production, hyperlipidemia, and new-onset diabetes were similar. eGFR levels throughout the observation periods were similar. Three cases of proteinuria were identified in STD group. One case of proteinuria observed in EVR group was well controlled with angiotensin receptor blocker. Incidence of CMV infection in CMV antibody-positive recipients was significantly lower in EVR group. The safety and efficacy of reduced-dose cyclosporine and everolimus protocol were similar to those of standard-dose cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil other than for superior prevention of CMV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Estimating the Causal Effect of Randomization versus Treatment Preference in a Doubly Randomized Preference Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sue M.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Wang, Pei; Shadish, William R.; Steiner, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Although randomized studies have high internal validity, generalizability of the estimated causal effect from randomized clinical trials to real-world clinical or educational practice may be limited. We consider the implication of randomized assignment to treatment, as compared with choice of preferred treatment as it occurs in real-world…

  17. Confirmation of the protective effect of Ascaris lumbricoides on Plasmodium falciparum infection: results of a randomized trial in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutus, Laurent; Watier, Laurence; Hanitrasoamampionona, Virginie; Razanatsoarilala, Hélène; Cot, Michel

    2007-12-01

    A controlled randomized trial of anti-helminthic treatment was undertaken in 1996-1997 in a rural area of Madagascar where populations were simultaneously infected with Ascaris lumbricoides, Plasmodium falciparum, and Schistosoma mansoni. Levamisole was administered bimonthly to 107 subjects, whereas 105 were controls. Levamisole was highly effective in reducing Ascaris egg loads in the treated group (P 15 years of age. This study confirms the results of a randomized trial, which showed a negative interaction in those > 5 years of age between Ascaris and malaria parasite density in another Malagasy population, submitted to a higher malaria transmission.

  18. Power Calculations for Binary Moderator in Cluster Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Kelcey, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs), or studies in which intact groups of individuals are randomly assigned to a condition, are becoming more common in the evaluation of educational programs, policies, and practices. The website for the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance (NCEE) reveals they have launched over 30…

  19. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskes, Anne M; Brölmann, Fleur E; Sumpio, Bauer E;

    2012-01-01

    The care for chronic and acute wounds is a substantial problem around the world. This has led to a plethora of products to accelerate healing. Unfortunately, the quality of studies evaluating the efficacy of such wound care products is frequently low. Randomized clinical trials are universally...... acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects, as they eliminate several sources of bias. We propose a framework for the design and conduct of future randomized clinical trials that will offer strong scientific evidence for the effectiveness of wound care interventions. While...... randomization is a necessary feature of a robust comparative study, it is not sufficient to ensure a study at low risk of bias. Randomized clinical trials should also ensure adequate allocation concealment and blinding of outcome assessors, apply intention-to-treat analysis, and use patient-oriented outcomes...

  20. The Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Eric J; Bristow, Michael R

    2001-01-01

    Previous trials (Metoprolol CR/XL Randomised Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure [MERIT-HF], Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Study [CIBIS] II) have demonstrated a mortality benefit of beta-adrenergic blockade in patients with mild to moderate heart failure. The recent Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS) trial has extended these results to a more advanced patient population. This trial did not, however, include patients who could not reach compensation, patients with far advanced heart failure symptoms, or a significant number of black patients. Future studies of beta-blockade may focus on these patients or patients with asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction.

  1. The Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bristow Michael R

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous trials (Metoprolol CR/XL Randomised Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure [MERIT-HF], Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Study [CIBIS] II have demonstrated a mortality benefit of β-adrenergic blockade in patients with mild to moderate heart failure. The recent Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS trial has extended these results to a more advanced patient population. This trial did not, however, include patients who could not reach compensation, patients with far advanced heart failure symptoms, or a significant number of black patients. Future studies of β-blockade may focus on these patients or patients with asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction.

  2. Adjuvant radiotherapy of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer - a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy (RT) improves overall survival (OS) of breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery and after mastectomy in patients with involved lymph nodes (LN). The contribution of RT to the regional LN to this survival benefit was poorly understood. Recently, the results of three large randomized trials addressing this question have become available. Material and methods The published abstracts (full publication pending) of the MA.20 (n=1832) and the EORTC 22922–10925 (EORTC) (n=4004) trial and the full publication of the French trial (n=1334) were basis of the meta-analysis. Main eligibility criteria were positive axillary LN (all trials), LN negative disease with high risk for recurrence (MA.20), and medial/central tumor location (French, EORTC). The MA.20 and the EORTC trial tested the effect of additional regional RT to the internal mammary (IM) LN and medial supraclavicular (MS) LN, whereas in the French trial all patients received RT to the MS-LN and solely RT to the IM-LN was randomized. Primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Results Regional RT of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) resulted in a significant improvement of OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.85 (95% CL 0.75 - 0.96)). Adding the results of the French trial and using the random effects model to respect the different design of the French trial, the effect on OS of regional radiotherapy was still significant (HR 0.88 (95% CL 0.80 - 0.97)). The absolute benefits in OS were 1.6% in the MA.20 trial at 5 years, 1.6% in the EORTC trial at 10 years, and 3.3% in the French trial at 10 years (not significant in single trials). Regional radiotherapy of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) was associated with a significant improvement of DFS (HR 0.85 (95% CL 0.77 - 0.94)) and DMFS (HR 0.82 (95% CL 0.73 - 0.92)). The effect sizes were not significantly different between trials for any end point

  3. Design and Validity of Randomized Controlled Dental Restorative Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Göstemeyer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evidence stemming from trials on restorative materials is shaped not only by trial findings, but also trial design and validity. We aimed to evaluate both aspects in randomized controlled dental restorative trials published from 2005–2015. Methods: Using systematic review methodology, we retrieved trials comparing restorative or adhesive dental materials. Two authors independently assessed design, risk of bias, registration status, and findings of trials. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: 114 studies on 15,321 restorations placed mainly in permanent teeth of 5232 patients were included. Per trial, the median number of patients was 37 (25th/75th percentiles: 30/51. Follow-up was 24 (20/48 months. Seventeen percent of trials reported on sample size calculations, 2% had been registered. Most trials (90% used US Public Health Service (USPHS criteria, and had a high risk of bias. More recent trials were more likely to have been registered, to have reported on sample size calculations, to be of low risk of bias, and to use other than USPHS-criteria. Twenty-three percent of trials yielded significant differences between groups. The likelihood of such differences was significantly increased in older studies, studies with potential reporting bias, published in journals with high impact factor (>2, longer follow-up periods, and not using USPHS-criteria. Conclusions: The majority of dental restorative trials published from 2005–2015 had limited validity. Risk of bias decreased in more recent trials. Future trials should aim for high validity, be registered, and use defined and appropriate sample sizes, follow-up periods, and outcome measures.

  4. Canadian Optically-guided approach for Oral Lesions Surgical (COOLS trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poh Catherine F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The 5-year survival rate ranges from 30-60%, and has remained unchanged in the past few decades. This is mainly due to late diagnosis and high recurrence of the disease. Of the patients who receive treatment, up to one third suffer from a recurrence or a second primary tumor. It is apparent that one major cause of disease recurrence is clinically unrecognized field changes which extend beyond the visible tumor boundary. We have previously developed an approach using fluorescence visualization (FV technology to improve the recognition of the field at risk surrounding a visible oral cancer that needs to be removed and preliminary results have shown a significant reduction in recurrence rates. Method/Design This paper describes the study design of a randomized, multi-centre, double blind, controlled surgical trial, the COOLS trial. Nine institutions across Canada will recruit a total of 400 patients with oral severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (N = 160 and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (N = 240. Patients will be stratified by participating institution and histology grade and randomized equally into FV-guided surgery (experimental arm or white light-guided surgery (control arm. The primary endpoint is a composite of recurrence at or 1 cm within the previous surgery site with 1 the same or higher grade histology compared to the initial diagnosis (i.e., the diagnosis used for randomization; or 2 further treatment due to the presence of severe dysplasia or higher degree of change at follow-up. This is the first randomized, multi-centre trial to validate the effectiveness of the FV-guided surgery. Discussion In this paper we described the strategies, novelty, and challenges of this unique trial involving a surgical approach guided by the FV technology. The success of the trial requires training, coordination, and quality assurance across multiple sites within Canada. The COOLS

  5. Citation bias of hepato-biliary randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    -1996. From each trial, we extracted the statistical significance of the primary study outcome (positive or negative), the disease area, and methodological quality (randomization and double blinding). The number of citations during two calendar years after publication was obtained from Science Citation Index......The objective of this study was to assess whether trials with a positive (i.e., statistically significant) outcome are cited more often than negative trials. We reviewed 530 randomized clinical trials on hepato-biliary diseases published in 11 English-language journals indexed in MEDLINE from 1985....... There was a significant positive association between a statistically significant study outcome and the citation frequency (beta, 0.55, 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.72). The disease area and adequate generation of the allocation sequence were also significant predictors of the citation frequency. We concluded...

  6. Sexual assault resistance education for university women: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (SARE trial)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Senn, Charlene Y; Eliasziw, Misha; Barata, Paula C; Thurston, Wilfreda E; Newby-Clark, Ian R; Radtke, H Lorraine; Hobden, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    .... The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether a novel, small-group sexual assault resistance education program can reduce the incidence of sexual assault among university...

  7. Design of a cluster-randomized minority recruitment trial: RECRUIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Barbara C; Mainous, Arch G; Smith, Daniel W; McKee, M Diane; Amorrortu, Rossybelle P; Alvidrez, Jennifer; Diaz, Vanessa; Ford, Marvella E; Fernandez, Maria E; Hauser, Robert A; Singer, Carlos; Landa, Veronica; Trevino, Aron; DeSantis, Stacia M; Zhang, Yefei; Daniels, Elvan; Tabor, Derrick; Vernon, Sally W

    2017-06-01

    Racial/ethnic minority groups remain underrepresented in clinical trials. Many strategies to increase minority recruitment focus on minority communities and emphasize common diseases such as hypertension. Scant literature focuses on minority recruitment to trials of less common conditions, often conducted in specialty clinics and dependent on physician referrals. We identified trust/mistrust of specialist physician investigators and institutions conducting medical research and consequent participant reluctance to participate in clinical trials as key-shared barriers across racial/ethnic groups. We developed a trust-based continuous quality improvement intervention to build trust between specialist physician investigators and community minority-serving physicians and ultimately potential trial participants. To avoid the inherent biases of non-randomized studies, we evaluated the intervention in the national Randomized Recruitment Intervention Trial (RECRUIT). This report presents the design of RECRUIT. Specialty clinic follow-up continues through April 2017. We hypothesized that specialist physician investigators and coordinators trained in the trust-based continuous quality improvement intervention would enroll a greater proportion of minority participants in their specialty clinics than specialist physician investigators in control specialty clinics. Specialty clinic was the unit of randomization. Using continuous quality improvement, the specialist physician investigators and coordinators tailored recruitment approaches to their specialty clinic characteristics and populations. Primary analyses were adjusted for clustering by specialty clinic within parent trial and matching covariates. RECRUIT was implemented in four multi-site clinical trials (parent trials) supported by three National Institutes of Health institutes and included 50 associated specialty clinics from these parent trials. Using current data, we have 88% power or greater to detect a 0.15 or

  8. Randomized Clinical Trials of Constitutional Acupuncture: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Myeong Soo Lee; Byung-Cheul Shin; Sun-Mi Choi; Jong Yeol Kim

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to compile and critically evaluate the evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for the effectiveness of acupuncture using constitutional medicine compared to standard acupuncture. Ten databases were searched through to December 2008 without language restrictions. We also hand-searched nine Korean journals of oriental medicine. We included prospective RCTs of any form of acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation. The included trials had to ...

  9. Qigong and Fibromyalgia: Randomized Controlled Trials and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Sawynok; Mary Lynch

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Qigong is currently considered as meditative movement, mindful exercise, or complementary exercise and is being explored for relief of symptoms in fibromyalgia. Aim. This narrative review summarizes randomized controlled trials, as well as additional studies, of qigong published to the end of 2013 and discusses relevant methodological issues. Results. Controlled trials indicate regular qigong practice (daily, 6–8 weeks) produces improvements in core domains for fibromyalgia (pai...

  10. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  11. The Danish randomized lung cancer CT screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper H; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer screening with low dose computed tomography (CT) has not yet been evaluated in randomized clinical trials, although several are underway. METHODS: In The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 4104 smokers and previous smokers from 2004 to 2006 were randomized to either...... lung cancer. Ten of these had stage I disease. Eleven of 17 lung cancers at baseline were treated surgically, eight of these by video assisted thoracic surgery resection. CONCLUSIONS: Screening may facilitate minimal invasive treatment and can be performed with a relatively low rate of false......-positive screen results compared with previous studies on lung cancer screening....

  12. The design of the run Clever randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, Daniel; Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Sørensen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    evidence-based running schedules to minimize the risk of injury. The existing literature on running volume and running intensity and the development of injuries show conflicting results. This may be related to previously applied study designs, methods used to quantify the performed running...... and the statistical analysis of the collected data. The aim of the Run Clever trial is to investigate if a focus on running intensity compared with a focus on running volume in a running schedule influences the overall injury risk differently. METHODS/DESIGN: The Run Clever trial is a randomized trial with a 24-week...

  13. The conduct and principles of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1981-05-01

    Some of the guiding principles as well as the pitfall of long-term randomized clinical trials are presented. Examples have been chosen from trials in the cardiovascular field. A typical long-term clinical trial is divided into five phases: planning, preparation, recruitment, clinical follow-up and termination, and finally analysis. Administrative, legal, and ethical aspects of a trial are discussed, as well as the cost of clinical trials. Organization patterns are described and some prevalent ones are criticized. Further, practical matters such as recruitment techniques, obtaining informed consent from the patients, determining drug dosage and formulation as well as the problem of interaction with nonstudy drugs are referred to. Adherence testing remains a problem, because of our inability to test for placebo adherence.

  14. Five-year outcomes following a randomized trial of femorofemoral and femoropopliteal bypass grafting with heparin-bonded or standard polytetrafluoroethylene grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J S; Houlind, K; Gottschalksen, B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cohort studies suggest superior long-term patency of luminal heparin-bonded polytetrafluoroethylene (Hb-PTFE) bypass grafts compared with standard PTFE grafts. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of Hb-PTFE grafts with those of standard PTFE grafts 5 years after...... a randomized trial. METHODS: Patients with intermittent claudication or critical limb ischaemia requiring femorofemoral or femoropopliteal bypass grafting were randomized in a clinical trial of Hb-PTFE versus standard PTFE in 11 Scandinavian centres between 2005 and 2009. Patients were followed up for 5 years...... of the primary outcome. Use of Hb-PTFE significantly improved patency by 37 per cent at 2 years, but 5 years after randomization there was no difference in primary patency (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0·95, 95 per cent c.i. 0·71 to 1·28; P = 0·748). In patients with critical limb ischaemia the use of Hb-PTFE...

  15. Optimal medical therapy improves clinical outcomes in patients undergoing revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting: insights from the Synergy Between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with TAXUS and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX) trial at the 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javaid; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Holmes, David R; Morice, Marie-Claude; Mack, Michael J; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Feldman, Ted; Stahle, Elizabeth; Escaned, Javier; Banning, Adrian P; Gunn, Julian P; Colombo, Antonio; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Mohr, Friedrich W; Serruys, Patrick W

    2015-04-07

    There is a paucity of data on the use of optimal medical therapy (OMT) in patients with complex coronary artery disease undergoing revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and its long-term prognostic significance. The Synergy Between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With TAXUS and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX) trial is a multicenter, randomized, clinical trial of patients (n=1800) with complex coronary disease randomized to revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention or CABG. Detailed drug history was collected for all patients at discharge and at the 1-month, 6-month, 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year follow-ups. OMT was defined as the combination of at least 1 antiplatelet drug, statin, β-blocker, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker. Five-year clinical outcomes were stratified by OMT and non-OMT. OMT was underused in patients treated with coronary revascularization, especially CABG. OMT was an independent predictor of survival. OMT was associated with a significant reduction in mortality (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.85; P=0.002) and composite end point of death/myocardial infarction/stroke (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.92; P=0.007) at the 5-year follow-up. The treatment effect with OMT (36% relative reduction in mortality over 5 years) was greater than the treatment effect of revascularization strategy (26% relative reduction in mortality with CABG versus percutaneous coronary intervention over 5 years). On stratified analysis, all the components of OMT were important for reducing adverse outcomes regardless of revascularization strategy. The use of OMT remains low in patients with complex coronary disease requiring coronary intervention with percutaneous coronary intervention and even lower in patients treated with CABG. Lack of OMT is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Targeted strategies to improve OMT use

  16. Impact of a cancer clinical trials web site on discussions about trial participation: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, R F; Barratt, A L; Askie, L M; Butow, P N; McGeechan, K; Crossing, S; Currow, D C; Tattersall, M H N

    2012-07-01

    Cancer patients want access to reliable information about currently recruiting clinical trials. Oncologists and their patients were randomly assigned to access a consumer-friendly cancer clinical trials web site [Australian Cancer Trials (ACT), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au] or to usual care in a cluster randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome, measured from audio recordings of oncologist-patient consultations, was the proportion of patients with whom participation in any clinical trial was discussed. Analysis was by intention-to-treat accounting for clustering and stratification. Thirty medical oncologists and 493 patients were recruited. Overall, 46% of consultations in the intervention group compared with 34% in the control group contained a discussion about clinical trials (P=0.08). The mean consultation length in both groups was 29 min (P=0.69). The proportion consenting to a trial was 10% in both groups (P=0.65). Patients' knowledge about randomized trials was lower in the intervention than the control group (mean score 3.0 versus 3.3, P=0.03) but decisional conflict scores were similar (mean score 42 versus 43, P=0.83). Good communication between patients and physicians is essential. Within this context, a web site such as Australian Cancer Trials may be an important tool to encourage discussion about clinical trial participation.

  17. Biased safety reporting in blinded randomized clinical trials: meta-analysis of angiotensin receptor blocker trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Takabayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cough is listed as an adverse drug reaction (ADR on the labels of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB. However, a causal association with cough has also been reported for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, which have frequently been used as comparator drugs in the registration clinical trials of ARBs. This prompted us to examine the possible influence of using comparator drugs with well-known ADRs on the safety reporting of investigational drugs in blinded randomized clinical trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The double-blinded, randomized clinical trials with comparator drugs were identified in the Japanese dossiers for the new drug applications of ARBs. The risk ratios (RR of reporting cough and headache in ARB arms were calculated for each ARB by comparing trials using ACEIs and trials using non-ACEIs, were then combined with a meta-analysis. 23 trials with a total of 6643 patients were identified, consisting 6 trials using an ACEI comparator including 819 ARB patients and 17 trials using a non-ACEI comparator including 5824 ARB patients. The combined RR of cough reporting was significantly elevated (20.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.47 to 57.76, indicating more frequent reporting of cough in clinical trials using an ACEI comparator. In contrast, the combined RR of headache, a negative control, was insignificant (1.45; 95% CI, 0.34 to 6.22. CONCLUSION: The use of comparators with well-known ADRs in blinded randomized trials produces potential bias in the reporting frequency of ADRs for investigational drugs. The selection of appropriate comparator drugs should be critical in unbiased safety assessment in double-blinded, randomized clinical trials and thus have relevance in reviewing the safety results from a regulatory point of view.

  18. Rain dance: the role of randomization in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diniz JB

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Juliana Belo Diniz,1 Victor Fossaluza,2 Carlos Alberto de Bragança Pereira,1,2 Sergio Wechsler2 1Institute of Psychiatry, Clinics Hospital University of São Paulo Medical School, 2Department of Statistics, Institute of Mathematics and Statistics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Randomized clinical trials are the gold standard for testing efficacy of treatment interventions. However, although randomization protects against deliberately biased samples, it does not guarantee random imbalances will not occur. Methods of intentional allocation that can overcome such deficiency of randomization have been developed, but are less frequently applied than randomization. Initially, we introduce a fictitious case example to revise and discuss the reasons of researchers' resistance to intentionally allocate instead of simply randomizing. We then introduce a real case example to evaluate the performance of an intentional protocol for allocation based on compositional data balance. A real case of allocation of 50 patients in two arms was compared with an optimal allocation of global instead of sequential arrivals. Performance was measured by a weighted average of Aitchison distances, between arms, of prognostic factors. To compare the intentional allocation with simple random allocation, 50,000 arrival orderings of 50 patients were simulated. To each one of the orders, both kinds of allocations into two arms were considered. Intentional allocation performed as well as optimal allocation in the case considered. In addition, out of the 50,000 simulated orders, 61% of them performed better with intentional allocation than random allocation. Hence, we conclude that intentional allocation should be encouraged in the design of future interventional clinical trials as a way to prevent unbalanced samples. Our sequential method is a viable alternative to overcome technical difficulties for study designs that require sequential inclusion of

  19. Inadequate description of educational interventions in ongoing randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pino Cécile

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The registration of clinical trials has been promoted to prevent publication bias and increase research transparency. Despite general agreement about the minimum amount of information needed for trial registration, we lack clear guidance on descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions in trial registries. We aimed to evaluate the quality of registry descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions assessed in ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs of patient education. Methods On 6 May 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the 10 trial registries accessible through the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We included trials evaluating an educational intervention (that is, designed to teach or train patients about their own health and dedicated to participants, their family members or home caregivers. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data related to the description of the experimental intervention, the centers, and the caregivers. Results We selected 268 of 642 potentially eligible studies and appraised a random sample of 150 records. All selected trials were registered in 4 registers, mainly ClinicalTrials.gov (61%. The median [interquartile range] target sample size was 205 [100 to 400] patients. The comparator was mainly usual care (47% or active treatment (47%. A minority of records (17%, 95% CI 11 to 23% reported an overall adequate description of the intervention (that is, description that reported the content, mode of delivery, number, frequency, duration of sessions and overall duration of the intervention. Further, for most reports (59%, important information about the content of the intervention was missing. The description of the mode of delivery of the intervention was reported for 52% of studies, the number of sessions for 74%, the frequency of sessions for 58%, the duration of each session for 45% and the overall duration for 63

  20. The SafeBoosC II randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Anne M; van Oeveren, Wim; Petersen, Tue Hvass

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SafeBoosC phase II multicentre randomized clinical trial investigated the benefits and harms of monitoring cerebral oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with an evidence-based treatment guideline vs. no NIRS data and treatment as usual in the control group...

  1. Randomization Methods in Emergency Setting Trials: A Descriptive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark Stephen; Moe-Byrne, Thirimon; Oddie, Sam; McGuire, William

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quasi-randomization might expedite recruitment into trials in emergency care settings but may also introduce selection bias. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Library and other databases for systematic reviews of interventions in emergency medicine or urgent care settings. We assessed selection bias (baseline imbalances) in prognostic…

  2. Promoting Healthy Weight with "Stability Skills First": A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Michaela; Brown, Susan D.; Schoffman, Danielle E.; Lee, Katherine; King, Abby C.; Taylor, C. Barr; Schleicher, Nina C.; Perri, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although behavioral weight-loss interventions produce short-term weight loss, long-term maintenance remains elusive. This randomized trial examined whether learning a novel set of "stability skills" before losing weight improved long-term weight management. Stability skills were designed to optimize individuals' current satisfaction…

  3. Pragmatic randomized trials with new interventions : An ethical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, Shona

    2017-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered fundamental to the optimization of health care decision-making. Today, the drug development and evaluation process is dominated by so-called explanatory RCTs. Such RCTs are carried out in highly-controlled conditions to deliver the best evi

  4. Empirical evidence of study design biases in randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Page, Matthew J.; Higgins, Julian P. T.; Clayton, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To synthesise evidence on the average bias and heterogeneity associated with reported methodological features of randomized trials. Design: Systematic review of meta-epidemiological studies. Methods: We retrieved eligible studies included in a recent AHRQ-EPC review on this topic (late...

  5. Randomized Trial of Drug Abuse Treatment-Linkage Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, James L.; Masson, Carmen L.; Delucchi, Kevin; Sporer, Karl; Barnett, Paul G.; Mitsuishi, Fumi; Lin, Christine; Song, Yong; Chen, TeChieh; Hall, Sharon M.

    2005-01-01

    A clinical trial contrasted 2 interventions designed to link opioid-dependent hospital patients to drug abuse treatment. The 126 out-of-treatment participants were randomly assigned to (a) case management, (b) voucher for free methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), (c) case management plus voucher, or (d) usual care. Services were provided for 6…

  6. Promoting Healthy Weight with "Stability Skills First": A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Michaela; Brown, Susan D.; Schoffman, Danielle E.; Lee, Katherine; King, Abby C.; Taylor, C. Barr; Schleicher, Nina C.; Perri, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although behavioral weight-loss interventions produce short-term weight loss, long-term maintenance remains elusive. This randomized trial examined whether learning a novel set of "stability skills" before losing weight improved long-term weight management. Stability skills were designed to optimize individuals' current…

  7. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  8. Survival analysis of the CEAwatch multicentre clustered randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, C. J.; Zhan, Z.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Oppers, F.; de Jong, A. M.; Grossmann, Irene; Klaase, J. M.; de Bock, G. H.; Wiggers, T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The CEAwatch randomized trial showed that follow-up with intensive carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monitoring (CEAwatch protocol) was better than care as usual (CAU) for early postoperative detection of colorectal cancer recurrence. The aim of this study was to calculate overall survival

  9. Asthma Self-Management Model: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Carolina M. X.; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C.; de Menezes, Marcelo B.; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A.; Valdevite, Laura M.; Almeida, Gustavo A.; Araujo, Ana S.; Simoneti, Christian S.; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A.; Borges, Marcos C.; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by…

  10. European Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trials : Post NLST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, John K.; van Klaveren, Rob; Pedersen, Jesper H.; Pastorino, Ugo; Paci, Eugino; Becker, Nikolauss; Infante, Maurizo; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Koning, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    Overview of the European randomized lung cancer CT screening trials (EUCT) is presented with regard to the implementation of CT screening in Europe; post NLST. All seven principal investigators completed a questionnaire on the epidemiological, radiological, and nodule management aspects of their tri

  11. Methods for analyzing cost effectiveness data from cluster randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Allan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of individuals' costs and outcomes in randomized trials allows uncertainty about cost effectiveness to be quantified. Uncertainty is expressed as probabilities that an intervention is cost effective, and confidence intervals of incremental cost effectiveness ratios. Randomizing clusters instead of individuals tends to increase uncertainty but such data are often analysed incorrectly in published studies. Methods We used data from a cluster randomized trial to demonstrate five appropriate analytic methods: 1 joint modeling of costs and effects with two-stage non-parametric bootstrap sampling of clusters then individuals, 2 joint modeling of costs and effects with Bayesian hierarchical models and 3 linear regression of net benefits at different willingness to pay levels using a least squares regression with Huber-White robust adjustment of errors, b a least squares hierarchical model and c a Bayesian hierarchical model. Results All five methods produced similar results, with greater uncertainty than if cluster randomization was not accounted for. Conclusion Cost effectiveness analyses alongside cluster randomized trials need to account for study design. Several theoretically coherent methods can be implemented with common statistical software.

  12. Differences in Blood Pressure in Infants After General Anesthesia Compared to Awake Regional Anesthesia (GAS Study-A Prospective Randomized Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Mary Ellen; Withington, D E; Arnup, S J; Davidson, A J; Disma, N; Frawley, G; Morton, N S; Bell, G; Hunt, R W; Bellinger, D C; Polaner, D M; Leo, A; Absalom, A R; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Izzo, F; Szmuk, P; Young, V; Soriano, S G; de Graaff, J C

    BACKGROUND: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a prospective randomized, controlled, multisite, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment at 5 years of age. A secondary aim obtained from the blood pressure data of the GAS

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, Hugo; Gustafsson, Tore; Lunden, Charlotte; Henrikson, Oskar; Fattahi, Kidjan; Johnsson, Erik; Westin, Vendela Zetterqvist; Carlbring, Per; Maki-Torkko, Elina; Kaldo, Viktor; Andersson, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were…

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, Hugo; Gustafsson, Tore; Lunden, Charlotte; Henrikson, Oskar; Fattahi, Kidjan; Johnsson, Erik; Westin, Vendela Zetterqvist; Carlbring, Per; Maki-Torkko, Elina; Kaldo, Viktor; Andersson, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were…

  15. Sequential monitoring of response-adaptive randomized clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hongjian; 10.1214/10-AOS796

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials are complex and usually involve multiple objectives such as controlling type I error rate, increasing power to detect treatment difference, assigning more patients to better treatment, and more. In literature, both response-adaptive randomization (RAR) procedures (by changing randomization procedure sequentially) and sequential monitoring (by changing analysis procedure sequentially) have been proposed to achieve these objectives to some degree. In this paper, we propose to sequentially monitor response-adaptive randomized clinical trial and study it's properties. We prove that the sequential test statistics of the new procedure converge to a Brownian motion in distribution. Further, we show that the sequential test statistics asymptotically satisfy the canonical joint distribution defined in Jennison and Turnbull (\\citeyearJT00). Therefore, type I error and other objectives can be achieved theoretically by selecting appropriate boundaries. These results open a door to sequentially monitor res...

  16. The Move from Accuracy Studies to Randomized Trials in PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siepe, Bettina; Hoilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Gerke, Oke

    2014-01-01

    Since the influential study by van Tinteren et al. published in The Lancet in 2002, there have been an increasing number of diagnostic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the benefit of PET. If they provide valid and useful information on the benefit, these studies can play an impor......Since the influential study by van Tinteren et al. published in The Lancet in 2002, there have been an increasing number of diagnostic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the benefit of PET. If they provide valid and useful information on the benefit, these studies can play...... of diagnostic randomized trials, in which PET was applied in only one arm. We covered published studies as well as registered unpublished and planned studies. We considered 3 quality indicators related to the usefulness of a trial to generate evidence for a clinical benefit: use of patient-important outcome...... only under the assumption of a substantial reduction in the event rate. Comparators typically reflected the current standard. CONCLUSION: If we consider the traditional areas of primary diagnosis, staging, and follow-up, then the number and quality of RCTs on PET is currently not sufficient to provide...

  17. Randomization in clinical trials in orthodontics: its significance in research design and methods to achieve it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Eliades, Theodore

    2011-12-01

    Randomization is a key step in reducing selection bias during the treatment allocation phase in randomized clinical trials. The process of randomization follows specific steps, which include generation of the randomization list, allocation concealment, and implementation of randomization. The phenomenon in the dental and orthodontic literature of characterizing treatment allocation as random is frequent; however, often the randomization procedures followed are not appropriate. Randomization methods assign, at random, treatment to the trial arms without foreknowledge of allocation by either the participants or the investigators thus reducing selection bias. Randomization entails generation of random allocation, allocation concealment, and the actual methodology of implementing treatment allocation randomly and unpredictably. Most popular randomization methods include some form of restricted and/or stratified randomization. This article introduces the reasons, which make randomization an integral part of solid clinical trial methodology, and presents the main randomization schemes applicable to clinical trials in orthodontics.

  18. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-05-19

    Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors' efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups--plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen the course of psychosis. Better designed

  19. Ethical issues posed by cluster randomized trials in health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donner Allan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cluster randomized trial (CRT is used increasingly in knowledge translation research, quality improvement research, community based intervention studies, public health research, and research in developing countries. However, cluster trials raise difficult ethical issues that challenge researchers, research ethics committees, regulators, and sponsors as they seek to fulfill responsibly their respective roles. Our project will provide a systematic analysis of the ethics of cluster trials. Here we have outlined a series of six areas of inquiry that must be addressed if the cluster trial is to be set on a firm ethical foundation: 1. Who is a research subject? 2. From whom, how, and when must informed consent be obtained? 3. Does clinical equipoise apply to CRTs? 4. How do we determine if the benefits outweigh the risks of CRTs? 5. How ought vulnerable groups be protected in CRTs? 6. Who are gatekeepers and what are their responsibilities? Subsequent papers in this series will address each of these areas, clarifying the ethical issues at stake and, where possible, arguing for a preferred solution. Our hope is that these papers will serve as the basis for the creation of international ethical guidelines for the design and conduct of cluster randomized trials.

  20. Preference in random assignment: implications for the interpretation of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Cathaleene; Gold, Paul B; Hargreaves, William A; Aronson, Elliot; Bickman, Leonard; Barreira, Paul J; Jones, Danson R; Rodican, Charles F; Fisher, William H

    2009-09-01

    Random assignment to a preferred experimental condition can increase service engagement and enhance outcomes, while assignment to a less-preferred condition can discourage service receipt and limit outcome attainment. We examined randomized trials for one prominent psychiatric rehabilitation intervention, supported employment, to gauge how often assignment preference might have complicated the interpretation of findings. Condition descriptions, and greater early attrition from services-as-usual comparison conditions, suggest that many study enrollees favored assignment to new rapid-job-placement supported employment, but no study took this possibility into account. Reviews of trials in other service fields are needed to determine whether this design problem is widespread.

  1. Antibiotics for human toxoplasmosis: a systematic review of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Chrishan Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan; Samaranayake, Nilakshi; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Deepika Fernando, Sumadhya

    2013-06-01

    The efficacy of different treatment regimens in clinical syndromes of toxoplasmosis were assessed by conducting a systematic review of published randomized clinical trials through extensive searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SCOPUS with no date limits, as well as manual review of journals. Outcome measures varied depending on the clinical entity of toxoplasmosis. Risk of bias was evaluated and quality of evidence was graded. Fourteen randomized trials were included of which one was a non-comparative study. One well-designed trial showed that trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole was more effective than placebo for clinical recovery of toxoplasmic lymphadenopathy in immunocompetent hosts. For toxoplasmic encephalopathy, efficacy of pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine and trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole were similar, whereas pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine versus pyrimathamine+clindamycin showed no difference, irrespective of the outcome. Intravitreal clindamycin+dexamethasone and conventional treatment with oral pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine had similar efficacy with regard to all outcome measures in ocular toxoplasmosis, and intravitreal therapy was found to be safe. Adverse effects seemed more common with pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine. Most trials for encephalitis and ocular manifestations had a high risk of bias and were of poor methodological quality. There were no trials evaluating drugs for toxoplasmosis in pregnancy, or for congenital toxoplasmosis. Pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine is an effective therapy for treatment of toxoplasmic encephalitis; trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole and pyrimethamine+clindamycin are possible alternatives. Treatment with either oral or intravitreal antibiotics seems reasonable for ocular toxoplasmosis. Overall, trial evidence for the efficacy of these drugs for toxoplasmosis is poor, and further well-designed trials are needed.

  2. Complementary feeding: a Global Network cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasha Omrana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate and inappropriate complementary feeding are major factors contributing to excess morbidity and mortality in young children in low resource settings. Animal source foods in particular are cited as essential to achieve micronutrient requirements. The efficacy of the recommendation for regular meat consumption, however, has not been systematically evaluated. Methods/Design A cluster randomized efficacy trial was designed to test the hypothesis that 12 months of daily intake of beef added as a complementary food would result in greater linear growth velocity than a micronutrient fortified equi-caloric rice-soy cereal supplement. The study is being conducted in 4 sites of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research located in Guatemala, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC and Zambia in communities with toddler stunting rates of at least 20%. Five clusters per country were randomized to each of the food arms, with 30 infants in each cluster. The daily meat or cereal supplement was delivered to the home by community coordinators, starting when the infants were 6 months of age and continuing through 18 months. All participating mothers received nutrition education messages to enhance complementary feeding practices delivered by study coordinators and through posters at the local health center. Outcome measures, obtained at 6, 9, 12, and 18 months by a separate assessment team, included anthropometry; dietary variety and diversity scores; biomarkers of iron, zinc and Vitamin B12 status (18 months; neurocognitive development (12 and 18 months; and incidence of infectious morbidity throughout the trial. The trial was supervised by a trial steering committee, and an independent data monitoring committee provided oversight for the safety and conduct of the trial. Discussion Findings from this trial will test the efficacy of daily intake of meat commencing at age 6 months and, if beneficial, will

  3. Antibiotics for human toxoplasmosis: a systematic review of randomized trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Chrishan Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan; Samaranayake, Nilakshi; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Deepika Fernando, Sumadhya

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of different treatment regimens in clinical syndromes of toxoplasmosis were assessed by conducting a systematic review of published randomized clinical trials through extensive searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SCOPUS with no date limits, as well as manual review of journals. Outcome measures varied depending on the clinical entity of toxoplasmosis. Risk of bias was evaluated and quality of evidence was graded. Fourteen randomized trials were included of which one was a non-comparative study. One well-designed trial showed that trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole was more effective than placebo for clinical recovery of toxoplasmic lymphadenopathy in immunocompetent hosts. For toxoplasmic encephalopathy, efficacy of pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine and trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole were similar, whereas pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine versus pyrimathamine+clindamycin showed no difference, irrespective of the outcome. Intravitreal clindamycin+dexamethasone and conventional treatment with oral pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine had similar efficacy with regard to all outcome measures in ocular toxoplasmosis, and intravitreal therapy was found to be safe. Adverse effects seemed more common with pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine. Most trials for encephalitis and ocular manifestations had a high risk of bias and were of poor methodological quality. There were no trials evaluating drugs for toxoplasmosis in pregnancy, or for congenital toxoplasmosis. Pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine is an effective therapy for treatment of toxoplasmic encephalitis; trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole and pyrimethamine+clindamycin are possible alternatives. Treatment with either oral or intravitreal antibiotics seems reasonable for ocular toxoplasmosis. Overall, trial evidence for the efficacy of these drugs for toxoplasmosis is poor, and further well-designed trials are needed. PMID:23816507

  4. Randomized controlled trials – a matter of design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial. PMID:27354804

  5. Randomized trial on fluorides and sealants for fissure caries prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, HC; Liu, BY; Lo, ECM; Chu, CH

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of topical fluorides in preventing fissure caries, we conducted a randomized controlled trial with parallel groups. In total, 501 children (1,539 molars, 3,078 sites), mean age 9.1 years, who had at least one sound permanent first molar with deep fissures or fissures with signs of early caries were recruited. They were randomly allocated among four groups: (1) resin sealant, single placement; (2) 5% NaF varnish, semi-annual application; (3) 38% silver diamine ...

  6. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Speyer, James [Department of Medical Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: Silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  7. Randomized Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Address Barriers to Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Wong, Yu-Ning; Albrecht, Terrance; Manne, Sharon; Miller, Suzanne M; Flamm, Anne Lederman; Benson, Al Bowen; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael; Egleston, Brian; Fleisher, Linda; Katz, Michael; Kinzy, Tyler G; Liu, Tasnuva M; Margevicius, Seunghee; Miller, Dawn M; Poole, David; Roach, Nancy; Ross, Eric; Schluchter, Mark D

    2016-02-10

    Lack of knowledge and negative attitudes have been identified as barriers to participation in clinical trials by patients with cancer. We developed Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials (PRE-ACT), a theory-guided, Web-based, interactive computer program, to deliver tailored video educational content to patients in an effort to overcome barriers to considering clinical trials as a treatment option. A prospective, randomized clinical trial compared PRE-ACT with a control condition that provided general clinical trials information produced by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in text format. One thousand two hundred fifty-five patients with cancer were randomly allocated before their initial visit with an oncologist to PRE-ACT (n = 623) or control (n = 632). PRE-ACT had three main components: assessment of clinical trials knowledge and attitudinal barriers, values assessment with clarification back to patients, and provision of a video library tailored to address each patient's barriers. Outcomes included knowledge and attitudes and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both PRE-ACT and control interventions improved knowledge and attitudes (all P < .001) compared with baseline. Patients randomly allocated to PRE-ACT showed a significantly greater increase in knowledge (P < .001) and a significantly greater decrease in attitudinal barriers (P < .001) than did their control (text-only) counterparts. Participants in both arms significantly increased their preparedness to consider clinical trials (P < .001), and there was a trend favoring the PRE-ACT group (P < .09). PRE-ACT was also associated with greater patient satisfaction than was NCI text alone. These data show that patient education before the first oncologist visit improves knowledge, attitudes, and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both text and tailored video were effective. The PRE-ACT interactive video program was more effective than NCI text in improving

  8. Bayesian population finding with biomarkers in a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Satoshi; Müller, Peter

    2017-03-03

    The identification of good predictive biomarkers allows investigators to optimize the target population for a new treatment. We propose a novel utility-based Bayesian population finding (BaPoFi) method to analyze data from a randomized clinical trial with the aim of finding a sensitive patient population. Our approach is based on casting the population finding process as a formal decision problem together with a flexible probability model, Bayesian additive regression trees (BART), to summarize observed data. The proposed method evaluates enhanced treatment effects in patient subpopulations based on counter-factual modeling of responses to new treatment and control for each patient. In extensive simulation studies, we examine the operating characteristics of the proposed method. We compare with a Bayesian regression-based method that implements shrinkage estimates of subgroup-specific treatment effects. For illustration, we apply the proposed method to data from a randomized clinical trial.

  9. Clinical outcomes in randomized trials of off- vs. on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Penninga, Luit; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes of off- vs. on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in randomized trials.......To assess the clinical outcomes of off- vs. on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in randomized trials....

  10. Electrocardiogram ST Analysis During Labor : A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Schuit, Ewoud; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis; Xodo, Serena; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of cardiotocography plus ST analysis with cardiotocography alone during labor. DATA SOURCES: Randomized controlled trials were identified by searching electronic databases. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: We included all randomized controlled trials comparing intr

  11. Electrocardiogram ST Analysis During Labor : A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Schuit, Ewoud; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis; Xodo, Serena; Berghella, Vincenzo

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of cardiotocography plus ST analysis with cardiotocography alone during labor. DATA SOURCES: Randomized controlled trials were identified by searching electronic databases. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: We included all randomized controlled trials comparing

  12. Randomized controlled trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction for prehypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joel W; Fresco, David M; Myerscough, Rodney; van Dulmen, Manfred H M; Carlson, Linda E; Josephson, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is an increasingly popular practice demonstrated to alleviate stress and treat certain health conditions. MBSR may reduce elevated blood pressure (BP). Treatment guidelines recommend life-style modifications for BP in the prehypertensive range (systolic BP [SBP] 120-139 mm Hg or diastolic BP [DBP] 80-89 mm Hg), followed by antihypertensives if BP reaches hypertensive levels. MBSR has not been thoroughly evaluated as a treatment of prehypertension. A randomized clinical trial of MBSR for high BP was conducted to determine whether BP reductions associated with MBSR exceed those observed for an active control condition consisting of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training. Fifty-six men (43%) and women (57%) averaging (standard deviation) 50.3 (6.5) years of age (91% white) with unmedicated BP in the prehypertensive range were randomized to 8 weeks of MBSR or PMR delivered in a group format. Treatment sessions were administered by one treatment provider and lasted approximately 2.5 hours each week. Clinic BP was the primary outcome measure. Ambulatory BP was a secondary outcome measure. Analyses were based on intent to treat. Patients randomized to MBSR exhibited a 4.8-mm Hg reduction in clinic SBP, which was larger than the 0.7-mm Hg reduction observed for PMR (p = .016). Those randomized to MBSR exhibited a 1.9-mm Hg reduction in DBP compared with a 1.2-mm Hg increase for PMR (p = .008). MBSR did not result in larger decreases in ambulatory BP than in PMR. MBSR resulted in a reduction in clinic SBP and DBP compared with PMR. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00440596.

  13. Ear Acupuncture for Acute Sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ear acupuncture for acute sore throat. A randomized controlled trial...Auncular Acupuncture is a low risk option for acute pain control •Battlefield acupuncture (BFA) IS a specific auncular acupuncture technique •BFA IS...Strengths: Prospect1ve RCT •Weaknesses Small sample stze. no sham acupuncture performed, patients not blinded to treatment •Th1s study represents an

  14. Randomized clinical trials in orthodontics: reality, dream, or nightmare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccati, Giliana; Clauser, Carlo; Giorgetti, Roberto

    2009-11-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the highest level in the hierarchy of evidence for treatment effectiveness. However, RCTs have also been criticized for various shortcomings. The purpose of this article was to review the most common criticisms against RCTs and answer them based on the principles of scientific inquiry, so that orthodontists can build their evidence-based practice on the best scientific research. In the era of evidence-based medicine, designing RCTs is the challenge for researchers in orthodontics.

  15. Dietary Fiber Supplementation for Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fiber supplements are used to manage fecal incontinence (FI), but little is known about the fiber type to recommend or the level of effectiveness of such supplements, which appear related to the fermentability of the fiber. The aim of this single-blind, randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of three dietary fiber supplements (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC], gum arabic [GA], or psyllium) with differing levels of fermentability to a placebo in community-living individuals...

  16. The design of the run Clever randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, Daniel; Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Sørensen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injury incidence and prevalence in running populations have been investigated and documented in several studies. However, knowledge about injury etiology and prevention is needed. Training errors in running are modifiable risk factors and people engaged in recreational running need...... evidence-based running schedules to minimize the risk of injury. The existing literature on running volume and running intensity and the development of injuries show conflicting results. This may be related to previously applied study designs, methods used to quantify the performed running...... and the statistical analysis of the collected data. The aim of the Run Clever trial is to investigate if a focus on running intensity compared with a focus on running volume in a running schedule influences the overall injury risk differently. METHODS/DESIGN: The Run Clever trial is a randomized trial with a 24-week...

  17. Methodological survey of designed uneven randomization trials (DU-RANDOM): a protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Darong; Akl, Elie A; Guyatt, Gordon H; Devereaux, Philip J; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Prediger, Barbara; Patel, Krupesh; Patel, Namrata; Lu, Taoying; Zhang, Yuan; Falavigna, Maicon; Santesso, Nancy; Mustafa, Reem A; Zhou, Qi; Briel, Matthias; Schünemann, Holger J

    2014-01-23

    Although even randomization (that is, approximately 1:1 randomization ratio in study arms) provides the greatest statistical power, designed uneven randomization (DUR), (for example, 1:2 or 1:3) is used to increase participation rates. Until now, no convincing data exists addressing the impact of DUR on participation rates in trials. The objective of this study is to evaluate the epidemiology and to explore factors associated with DUR. We will search for reports of RCTs published within two years in 25 general medical journals with the highest impact factor according to the Journal Citation Report (JCR)-2010. Teams of two reviewers will determine eligibility and extract relevant information from eligible RCTs in duplicate and using standardized forms. We will report the prevalence of DUR trials, the reported reasons for using DUR, and perform a linear regression analysis to estimate the association between the randomization ratio and the associated factors, including participation rate, type of informed consent, clinical area, and so on. A clearer understanding of RCTs with DUR and its association with factors in trials, for example, participation rate, can optimize trial design and may have important implications for both researchers and users of the medical literature.

  18. Reporting methods of blinding in randomized trials assessing nonpharmacological treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Boutron

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blinding is a cornerstone of treatment evaluation. Blinding is more difficult to obtain in trials assessing nonpharmacological treatment and frequently relies on "creative" (nonstandard methods. The purpose of this study was to systematically describe the strategies used to obtain blinding in a sample of randomized controlled trials of nonpharmacological treatment. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We systematically searched in Medline and the Cochrane Methodology Register for randomized controlled trials (RCTs assessing nonpharmacological treatment with blinding, published during 2004 in high-impact-factor journals. Data were extracted using a standardized extraction form. We identified 145 articles, with the method of blinding described in 123 of the reports. Methods of blinding of participants and/or health care providers and/or other caregivers concerned mainly use of sham procedures such as simulation of surgical procedures, similar attention-control interventions, or a placebo with a different mode of administration for rehabilitation or psychotherapy. Trials assessing devices reported various placebo interventions such as use of sham prosthesis, identical apparatus (e.g., identical but inactivated machine or use of activated machine with a barrier to block the treatment, or simulation of using a device. Blinding participants to the study hypothesis was also an important method of blinding. The methods reported for blinding outcome assessors relied mainly on centralized assessment of paraclinical examinations, clinical examinations (i.e., use of video, audiotape, photography, or adjudications of clinical events. CONCLUSIONS: This study classifies blinding methods and provides a detailed description of methods that could overcome some barriers of blinding in clinical trials assessing nonpharmacological treatment, and provides information for readers assessing the quality of results of such trials.

  19. A systematic review of reporting in randomized controlled trials in Dermatologic Surgery: Jadad scores, power analysis, and sample size determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad; Rauf, Mutahir; Ali, Sana; Nodzenski, Michael; Minkis, Kira

    2014-12-01

    Dermatologic surgery is a fruitful research area that has spawned numerous randomized control trials (RCTs). To assess the quality of reporting of randomization, blinding, sample size, and power analysis in RCTs published in the journal Dermatologic Surgery. Randomized control trials published in Dermatologic Surgery between 1995 and 2012 were assessed regarding the quality of trial reporting. Data extraction performed independently by 2 data extractors. Dramatic increases in the numbers of RCTs in dermatologic surgery were noted in successive 5-year periods, from 39 in 1995 to 1999 to 66 in 2000 to 2004 and 131 in 2005 to 2009. The median Jadad score for articles from 1995 to 1999 was 1 and was 2 for articles since 2000. Subjects per study were 20 during 1995 to 1999, 25.5 from 2000 to 2004, and over 30 since 2005. Power analysis with sample size determination was reported in 0 articles during 1995 to 1999; greater than 13% of articles since 2005. Alpha level was specified for 37% of RCTs from 1995 to 1999 and 64% to 70% since 2005. During the last 20 years, the number of RCTs in Dermatologic Surgery has grown rapidly, almost doubling every 5 years, because the number of subjects per study has also increased and the quality of reporting has significantly improved.

  20. Postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy: a randomized controlled trial (E.O.R.T.C. trial 22911)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolla, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire A Michallon, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, 38 - Grenoble (France); Van Poppel, H. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Gasthuisberg, Dept. of Urology, Leuven (Belgium); Collette, L.; Haustermans, K. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Gasthuisberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Collette, L. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) data Center, Brussels (Belgium); Van Cangh, P. [Hopital Saint Luc, Dept. of Urology, Brussels (Belgium); Vekemans, K. [Virga Jesse Ziekenhuis, Dept. of Urology, Hasselt (Belgium); Da Pozzo, L. [Ospedale San Rafaele, Dept. of Urology, Milano (Italy); Reijke, T.M. de [Academisch Medisch Centrum, Dept. of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbaeys, A. [University Hospital, Dept. of Urology, Gent (Belgium); Bosset, J.F. [Hopital Jean Minjoz, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, 25 - Besancon (France); Van Velthoven, R. [Institut Jules Bordet, Dept. Urology, Brussels (Belgium); Marechal, J.M. [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Dept. of Urology, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2008-01-15

    Background - Local failure after prostatectomy can arise in patients with cancer extending beyond the capsule. We did a randomized controlled trial to compare radical prostatectomy followed by immediate external irradiation with prostatectomy alone for patients with positive surgical margin or pT3 prostate cancer. Methods - After undergoing radical retro-pubic prostatectomy, 503 patients were randomly assigned to a wait-and-see policy, and 502 to immediate postoperative radiotherapy (60 Gy conventional irradiation delivered over 6 weeks). Eligible patients had pNOMO tumours and one or more pathological risk factors: capsule perforation, positive surgical margins, invasion of seminal vesicles. Our revised primary endpoint was biochemical progression-free survival. Analysis was by intention to treat. bindings - The median age was 65 years (1QR 61-69). After a median follow-up of 5 years, biochemical progression-free survival was significantly improved in the irradiated group (74.0%, 98% CI 68.7-79.3 vs 52.6%, 46.6-58.5: p0.0001). Clinical progression-free survival was also significantly improved (p=0.0009). The cumulative rate of locoregional failure was significantly lower in the irradiated group (p<0.0001). Grade 2 or 3 late effects were significantly more frequent in the postoperative irradiation group (p=0.0005), but severe toxic toxicity (grade 3 or higher) were rare, with a 5-year rate of 2.6% in the wait-and-see group and 4.2% in the postoperative irradiation group (p=00726). Interpretation: Immediate external irradiation after radical prostatectomy improves biochemical progression-free survival and local control in patients with positive surgical margins or pT3 prostate cancer who are at high risk of progression. Further follow-up is needed to assess the effect on overall survival. (authors)

  1. Blinding in randomized control trials: the enigma unraveled.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vartika Saxena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for new treatments and testing of new ideas begins in the laboratory and then established in clinical research settings. Studies addressing the same therapeutic problem may produce conflicting results hence Randomised Clinical Trial is regarded as the most valid method for assessing the benefits and harms of healthcare interventions. The next challenge face by the medical community is the validity of such trials as theses tend to deviate from the truth because of various biases. For the avoidance of the same it has been suggested that the validity or quality of primary trials should be assessed under blind conditions. Thus blinding, is a crucial method for reducing bias in randomized clinical trials. Blinding can be defined as withholding information about the assigned interventions from people involved in the trial who may potentially be prejudiced by this knowledge. In this article we make an effort to define blinding, explain its chronology, hierarchy and discuss methods of blinding, its assessment, its possibility, un-blinding and finally the latest guidelines.

  2. Preventing diabetes in primary care: a feasibility cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Diana; Ashe, Maureen; Campbell, Kristin; Cave, Douglas; Elley, C Raina; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Sohal, Parmjit; Ur, Ehud; Dawes, Martin

    2015-04-01

    To determine the feasibility of implementing a large-scale primary care-based diabetes prevention trial. A feasibility cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted in British Columbia, Canada, amongst adults with prediabetes using the Facilitated Lifestyle Intervention Prescription (FLIP) vs. usual care. FLIP included lifestyle advice, a pedometer, and telephone support from a lifestyle facilitator for 6 months. Indicators of feasibility included recruitment rates of family practices, participants and facilitators, as well as feasibility and retention rates in the FLIP program and study protocols. Six family practices participated; 59 patients were enrolled between October 2012 and March 2013. The trial protocol was acceptable to practices and participants and had a 95% participant retention rate over the 6 months (56/59). Adherence to the intervention was high (97%), with 34 of 35 patients continuing to receive telephone calls from the facilitator for 6 months. The mean cost of the intervention was C$144 per person. Compared with control, intervention participants significantly reduced weight by 3.2 kg (95% CI, 1.7 to 4.6); body mass index by 1.2 (95% CI, 0.7 to 1.7) and waist circumference by 3 cm (95% CI, 0.3 to 5.7). It is feasible to implement FLIP and to conduct a trial to assess effectiveness. A larger trial with longer follow up to assess progression to diabetes is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative effectiveness of topical drugs in dermatologic priority diseases: geometry of randomized trial networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruani, Annabel; Samimi, Mahtab; Lorette, Gérard; le Cleach, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Among the 100 initial priority topics for comparative effectiveness research, three concern topical drugs in the following dermatologic diseases: psoriasis, chronic lower-extremity wounds (CLEWs), and acne vulgaris (AV). Our objective was to explore the geometry of the corresponding networks of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We performed a review of RCTs on topical drugs in psoriasis, CLEWs, and AV. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and CENTRAL for published trials from 2007 to 2012 and ClinicalTrials.gov for unpublished trials registered since 2011. RCTs comparing at least one topical treatment with any active or inactive comparator, regardless of RCT design and outcomes, were eligible. We produced network graphs (each node representing a treatment and links between nodes representing trials) and tested for co-occurrence (preference or avoidance of specific comparisons). We included 60 RCTs on psoriasis (14,255 patients) and 19 registered RCTs, 50 of CLEWs (5,916 patients) and 7 registered RCTs, and 90 of AV (22,984 patients) and 21 registered RCTs. Head-to-head comparisons were made in 78%, 32%, and 57% of published RCTs of these conditions, respectively. The co-occurrence test suggested that no specific head-to-head comparison was significantly preferred or avoided (P-value=0.53, 0.20, and 0.57, respectively). This study has limitations, the main being that the search period was restricted to 5 years. In conclusion, more comparative effectiveness trials are needed for CLEWs, for which head-to-head comparisons are fewer than those for psoriasis and AV.

  4. Outcomes in registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials of patient education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Pino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life. METHODS: On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1 patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2 surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333 of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623 of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150 used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150 as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150, primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61 of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59 in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22 in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs.

  5. Efficacy and effectiveness as aspects of cluster randomized trials with nursing home residents: Methodological insights from a pneumonia prevention trial

    OpenAIRE

    Van Ness, Peter H.; Peduzzi, Peter N.; Quagliarello, Vincent J.

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses how methodological aspects of study efficacy and effectiveness combine in cluster randomized trials in nursing homes. Discussion focuses on the relationships between these study aspects in the Pneumonia Reduction in Institutionalized Disabled Elders (PRIDE) trial, an ongoing cluster randomized clinical trial of pneumonia prevention among nursing home residents launched in October 2009 in Greater New Haven, Connecticut. This clinical trial has enrolled long-term care nurs...

  6. Power Calculations for Moderators in Multi-Site Cluster Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Kelcey, Ben; Dong, Nianbo

    2016-01-01

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs), or studies in which intact groups of individuals are randomly assigned to a condition, are becoming more common in evaluation studies of educational programs. A specific type of CRT in which clusters are randomly assigned to treatment within blocks or sites, known as multisite cluster randomized trials (MSCRTs),…

  7. Randomized Clinical Trial of Interceptive and Comprehensive Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G.J.; Spiekerman, C.F.; Greenlee, G.M.; Huang, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Focusing public insurance programs on interceptive orthodontics (IO) may increase access for low-income children. This report presents outcomes from a randomized clinical trial (RCT) comparing IO with comprehensive orthodontics (CO) in Medicaid patients. One hundred seventy pre-adolescents with Medicaid-eligible malocclusions were randomized to IO (n = 86) followed by observation (OBS) or OBS followed by CO (n = 84). One hundred thirty-four completed the trial. Models at pre-treatment (baseline) and following ≤ 2 years of intervention and 2 years of OBS (48 mos) were scored by calibrated examiners using the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) and Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need (ICON). Overall outcomes and clinically meaningful categorical ICON data on need/acceptability, complexity, and improvement were compared. At baseline, groups were balanced by age, gender, ethnicity, and PAR/ICON scores. Most were minorities. Most (77%) were rated as difficult-to-very difficult. Scores improved significantly for both groups, but CO more than IO (PAR, 18.6 [95%CI 15.1, 22.1] vs.10.1 [95%CI 6.7, 13.4]; ICON, 44.8 [95% CI 39.7, 49.9] vs. 35.2 [95%CI 29.7, 40.6], respectively). On average, IO is effective at reducing malocclusions in Medicaid patients, but less than CO. (ClinicalTrials.gov number CT00067379) PMID:22699670

  8. Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Massage in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Kaisa Niemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth affects about 10% of infants born in the United States. Massage therapy is being used in some neonatal intensive care units for its potential beneficial effects on preterm infants. This article reviews published randomized controlled trials on the effects of massage in preterm infants. Most studies evaluating the effect of massage in weight gain in premature infants suggest a positive effect on weight gain. Increase in vagal tone has been reported in infants who receive massage and has been suggested as a possible mechanism for improved weight gain. More studies are needed on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of massage therapy on weight gain in preterm infants. While some trials suggest improvements in developmental scores, decreased stress behavior, positive effects on immune system, improved pain tolerance and earlier discharge from the hospital, the number of such studies is small and further evidence is needed. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed on the effects of massage in preterm infants.

  9. Randomized clinical trial of interceptive and comprehensive orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G J; Spiekerman, C F; Greenlee, G M; Huang, G J

    2012-07-01

    Focusing public insurance programs on interceptive orthodontics (IO) may increase access for low-income children. This report presents outcomes from a randomized clinical trial (RCT) comparing IO with comprehensive orthodontics (CO) in Medicaid patients. One hundred seventy pre-adolescents with Medicaid-eligible malocclusions were randomized to IO (n = 86) followed by observation (OBS) or OBS followed by CO (n = 84). One hundred thirty-four completed the trial. Models at pre-treatment (baseline) and following ≤ 2 years of intervention and 2 years of OBS (48 mos) were scored by calibrated examiners using the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) and Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need (ICON). Overall outcomes and clinically meaningful categorical ICON data on need/acceptability, complexity, and improvement were compared. At baseline, groups were balanced by age, gender, ethnicity, and PAR/ICON scores. Most were minorities. Most (77%) were rated as difficult-to-very difficult. Scores improved significantly for both groups, but CO more than IO (PAR, 18.6 [95%CI 15.1, 22.1] vs.10.1 [95%CI 6.7, 13.4]; ICON, 44.8 [95% CI 39.7, 49.9] vs. 35.2 [95%CI 29.7, 40.6], respectively). On average, IO is effective at reducing malocclusions in Medicaid patients, but less than CO. (ClinicalTrials.gov number CT00067379).

  10. Randomized trial of tapas acupressure technique for weight loss maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Charles R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is an urgent public health problem, yet only a few clinical trials have systematically tested the efficacy of long-term weight-loss maintenance interventions. This randomized clinical trial tested the efficacy of a novel mind and body technique for weight-loss maintenance. Methods Participants were obese adults who had completed a six-month behavioral weight-loss program prior to randomization. Those who successfully lost weight were randomized into either an experimental weight-loss maintenance intervention, Tapas Acupressure Technique (TAT®, or a control intervention comprised of social-support group meetings (SS led by professional facilitators. TAT combines self-applied light pressure to specific acupressure points accompanied by a prescribed sequence of mental steps. Participants in both maintenance conditions attended eight group sessions over six months of active weight loss maintenance intervention, followed by an additional 6 months of no intervention. The main outcome measure was change in weight from the beginning of the weight loss maintenance intervention to 12 months later. Secondary outcomes were change in depression, stress, insomnia, and quality of life. We used analysis of covariance as the primary analysis method. Missing values were replaced using multiple imputation. Results Among 285 randomized participants, 79% were female, mean age was 56 (standard deviation (sd = 11, mean BMI at randomization was 34 (sd = 5, and mean initial weight loss was 9.8 kg (sd = 5. In the primary outcome model, there was no significant difference in weight regain between the two arms (1.72 kg (se 0.85 weight regain for TAT and 2.96 kg (se 0.96 weight regain for SS, p post hoc tests showing that greater initial weight loss was associated with more weight regain for SS but less weight regain for TAT. Conclusions The primary analysis showed no significant difference in weight regain between TAT and SS, while secondary

  11. The Sexunzipped trial: optimizing the design of online randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Julia V; Pavlou, Menelaos; Copas, Andrew; McCarthy, Ona; Carswell, Ken; Rait, Greta; Hart, Graham; Nazareth, Irwin; Free, Caroline; French, Rebecca; Murray, Elizabeth

    2013-12-11

    Sexual health problems such as unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection are important public health concerns and there is huge potential for health promotion using digital interventions. Evaluations of digital interventions are increasingly conducted online. Trial administration and data collection online offers many advantages, but concerns remain over fraudulent registration to obtain compensation, the quality of self-reported data, and high attrition. This study addresses the feasibility of several dimensions of online trial design-recruitment, online consent, participant identity verification, randomization and concealment of allocation, online data collection, data quality, and retention at 3-month follow-up. Young people aged 16 to 20 years and resident in the United Kingdom were recruited to the "Sexunzipped" online trial between November 2010 and March 2011 (n=2036). Participants filled in baseline demographic and sexual health questionnaires online and were randomized to the Sexunzipped interactive intervention website or to an information-only control website. Participants were also randomly allocated to a postal request (or no request) for a urine sample for genital chlamydia testing and receipt of a lower (£10/US$16) or higher (£20/US$32) value shopping voucher compensation for 3-month outcome data. The majority of the 2006 valid participants (90.98%, 1825/2006) were aged between 18 and 20 years at enrolment, from all four countries in the United Kingdom. Most were white (89.98%, 1805/2006), most were in school or training (77.48%, 1545/1994), and 62.81% (1260/2006) of the sample were female. In total, 3.88% (79/2036) of registrations appeared to be invalid and another 4.00% (81/2006) of participants gave inconsistent responses within the questionnaire. The higher value compensation (£20/US$32) increased response rates by 6-10%, boosting retention at 3 months to 77.2% (166/215) for submission of online self-reported sexual health

  12. Results of the Randomized Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial with Focus on High-Risk Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Mathilde M W; Dirksen, Asger; Ashraf, Haseem; Saghir, Zaigham; Bach, Karen S; Brodersen, John; Clementsen, Paul F; Hansen, Hanne; Larsen, Klaus R; Mortensen, Jann; Rasmussen, Jakob F; Seersholm, Niels; Skov, Birgit G; Thomsen, Laura H; Tønnesen, Philip; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2016-03-01

    As of April 2015, participants in the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial had been followed for at least 5 years since their last screening. Mortality, causes of death, and lung cancer findings are reported to explore the effect of computed tomography (CT) screening. A total of 4,104 participants aged 50-70 years at the time of inclusion and with a minimum 20 pack-years of smoking were randomized to have five annual low-dose CT scans (study group) or no screening (control group). Follow-up information regarding date and cause of death, lung cancer diagnosis, cancer stage, and histology was obtained from national registries. No differences between the two groups in lung cancer mortality (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.6; P = 0.888) or all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-1.27; P = 0.867) were observed. More cancers were found in the screening group than in the no-screening group (100 vs. 53, respectively; P risk of death due to lung cancer, with nonsignificantly fewer deaths in the screening group. No statistically significant effects of CT screening on lung cancer mortality were found, but the results of post hoc high-risk subgroup analyses showed nonsignificant trends that seem to be in good agreement with the results of the National Lung Screening Trial. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00496977).

  13. Randomized controlled trials – a matter of design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spieth PM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peter Markus Spieth,1,2 Anne Sophie Kubasch,3 Ana Isabel Penzlin,4 Ben Min-Woo Illigens,2,5 Kristian Barlinn,6 Timo Siepmann2,6,7 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, 2Center for Clinical Research and Management Education, Division of Health Care Sciences, Dresden International University, 3Pediatric Rheumatology and Immunology, Children’s Hospital, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, 4Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany; 5Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 6Department of Neurology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany; 7Radcliffe Department of Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK Abstract: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1 clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2 both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively

  14. Choice of Moisturiser for Eczema Treatment (COMET): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridd, Matthew J; Redmond, Niamh M; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Ball, Nicola; Shaw, Lindsay; Guy, Richard; Wilson, Victoria; Metcalfe, Chris; Purdy, Sarah

    2015-07-15

    Eczema is common in children and in the UK most cases are managed in primary care. The foundation of all treatment is the regular use of leave-on emollients to preserve and restore moisture to the skin. This not only improves comfort but may also reduce the need for rescue treatment for 'flares', such as topical corticosteroids. However, clinicians can prescribe many different types of emollient and there is a paucity of evidence to guide this choice. One reason for this may be the challenges of conducting a clinical trial: are parents or carers of young children willing to be randomly allocated an emollient and followed up for a meaningful amount of time? This is a single-centre feasibility study of a pragmatic, four-arm, single-masked, randomized trial. Children with eczema who are eligible (from 1 month to less than 5 years of age, not known to be sensitive or allergic to any of study emollients or their constituents) are recruited via their general practices. Participants are allocated Aveeno® lotion, Diprobase® cream, Doublebase® gel or Hydromol® ointment via a web-based system, using a simple randomization process in a 1:1:1:1 fashion. Researchers are masked to the study emollient. Participants are assessed at baseline and followed up for 3 months. Data are collected by daily diaries, monthly researcher visits and review of electronic medical records. Because this is a feasibility study, a formal sample size calculation for the estimation of treatment effectiveness has not be made but we aim to recruit 160 participants. Recruitment is on-going. At the end of the study, as well as being able to answer the question, 'Is it is possible to recruit and retain children with eczema from primary care into a four-arm randomized trial of emollients?', we will also have collected important data on the acceptability and effectiveness of four commonly used emollients. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN21828118 and Clinical Trials Register EudraCT2013-003001-26.

  15. Qigong and Fibromyalgia: Randomized Controlled Trials and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Sawynok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Qigong is currently considered as meditative movement, mindful exercise, or complementary exercise and is being explored for relief of symptoms in fibromyalgia. Aim. This narrative review summarizes randomized controlled trials, as well as additional studies, of qigong published to the end of 2013 and discusses relevant methodological issues. Results. Controlled trials indicate regular qigong practice (daily, 6–8 weeks produces improvements in core domains for fibromyalgia (pain, sleep, impact, and physical and mental function that are maintained at 4–6 months compared to wait-list subjects or baselines. Comparisons with active controls show little difference, but compared to baseline there are significant and comparable effects in both groups. Open-label studies provide information that supports benefit but remain exploratory. An extension trial and case studies involving extended practice (daily, 6–12 months indicate marked benefits but are limited by the number of participants. Benefit appears to be related to amount of practice. Conclusions. There is considerable potential for qigong to be a useful complementary practice for the management of fibromyalgia. However, there are unique methodological challenges, and exploration of its clinical potential will need to focus on pragmatic issues and consider a spectrum of trial designs. Mechanistic considerations need to consider both system-wide and more specific effects.

  16. First-line randomized trials: revisiting the Ptolemaic universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, M A

    2008-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is initially a chemosensitive neoplasm, with overall response rates to systemic platinum-based therapy exceeding 80% in conjunction with cytoreductive surgery. However, long-term survival remains poor due to eventual tumor recurrence and emergence of drug resistance. While platinum (cisplatin or carboplatin) and taxanes remain at the core of primary treatment, there has been increased interest in the evaluation of doublet and triplet combinations with diverse cytotoxic agents, including docetaxel, topotecan, gemcitabine, and PEG-liposomal doxorubicin. This has been prompted by single-agent activity in the setting of recurrent platinum-resistant disease and encouraging data from nonrandomized phase I-II trials. As a result, beginning in 1998, the international cooperative groups collaborated on a series of phase III trials to improve long-term outcomes through the development of new platinum-based combinations. More than 10,000 women have been randomized on these trials, and preliminary data from several studies have been reported. Although final data are pending, there is not currently any evidence to recommend adopting a new two- or three-drug combination, and carboplatin with paclitaxel remains the standard regimen of choice. Rapid developments in molecular-targeted therapy are challenging our paradigm for future clinical trials, and our priorities need to be carefully considered.

  17. Randomized controlled trials for Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Teresi, Giulio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-06-01

    The continuous increase in elderly and oldest-old population, and subsequent rise in prevalence of chronic neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), are a major challenge for healthcare systems. These two conditions are the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in older persons and physicians should engage treatment for these patients. In this field, Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) specifically focused on elderly populations are still lacking. The aim of this study was to identify RCTs conducted among AD and PD and to examine the difference between mean age of enrollment and incidence of these two neurodegenerative diseases. We found that the scenario is different between PD and AD. In particular, the enrollment for PD trials seems to include younger persons than AD, although the incidence of both diseases is similar and highest after 80 years old. The consequence of these results could influence conclusive guidelines of treatment in older parkinsonian patients.

  18. A randomized trial of coenzyme Q10 in mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Elisa I; Martin, Joan; Maher, Amy; Thornhill, Rebecca E; Moran, Gerald R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    Case reports and open-label studies suggest that coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) treatment may have beneficial effects in mitochondrial disease patients; however, controlled trials are warranted to clinically prove its effectiveness. Thirty patients with mitochondrial cytopathy received 1200 mg/day CoQ(10) for 60 days in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. Blood lactate, urinary markers of oxidative stress, body composition, activities of daily living, quality of life, forearm handgrip strength and oxygen desaturation, cycle exercise cardiorespiratory variables, and brain metabolites were measured. CoQ(10) treatment attenuated the rise in lactate after cycle ergometry, increased (∽1.93 ml) VO(2)/kg lean mass after 5 minutes of cycling (P exercise aerobic capacity and post-exercise lactate but did not affect other clinically relevant variables such as strength or resting lactate.

  19. Effect of Playful Balancing Training - A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Jessen, Jari Due

    2013-01-01

    We used the modular playware in the form of modular interactive tiles for playful training of community-dwelling elderly with balancing problem. During short-term play on the modular interactive tiles, the elderly were playing physical, interactive games that were challenging their dynamic balance......, agility, endurance, and sensor-motoric reaction. A population of 12 elderly (average age: 79) with balancing problems (DGI average score: 18.7) was randomly assigned to control group or tiles training group, and tested before and after intervention. The tiles training group had statistical significant...... increase in balancing performance (DGI score: 21.3) after short-term playful training with the modular interactive tiles, whereas the control group remained with a score indicating balancing problems and risk of falling (DGI score: 16.6). The small pilot randomized controlled trial suggests...

  20. Drug versus placebo randomized controlled trials in neonates: A review of ClinicalTrials.gov registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselas, Emilie; Pansieri, Claudia; Leroux, Stephanie; Bonati, Maurizio; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Despite specific initiatives and identified needs, most neonatal drugs are still used off-label, with variable dosage administrations and schedules. In high risk preterm and term neonates, drug evaluation is challenging and randomized controlled trials (RCT) are difficult to conduct and even more is the use of a placebo, required in the absence of a reference validated drug to be used as comparator. We analyzed the complete ClinicalTrials.gov registry 1) to describe neonatal RCT involving a placebo, 2) to report on the medical context and ethical aspects of placebo use. Placebo versus drug RCT (n = 146), either prevention trials (n = 57, 39%) or therapeutic interventions (n = 89, 61%), represent more than a third of neonatal trials registered in the National Institute of Health clinical trial database (USA) since 1999. They mainly concerned preterm infants, evaluating complications of prematurity. Most trials were conducted in the USA, were single centered, and funded by non-profit organizations. For the three top drug trials evaluating steroids (n = 13, 9.6%), erythropoietin (EPO, n = 10, 6.8%) and nitric oxide (NO, n = 9, 6.2%), the objectives of the trial and follow-up were analyzed in more details. Although a matter of debate, the use of placebo should be promoted in neonates to evaluate a potential new treatment, in the absence of reference drug. Analysis of the trials evaluating steroids showed that long-term follow-up of exposed patients, although required by international guidelines, is frequently missing and should be planned to collect additional information and optimize drug evaluation in these high-risk patients.

  1. Drug versus placebo randomized controlled trials in neonates: A review of ClinicalTrials.gov registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselas, Emilie; Pansieri, Claudia; Leroux, Stephanie; Bonati, Maurizio; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite specific initiatives and identified needs, most neonatal drugs are still used off-label, with variable dosage administrations and schedules. In high risk preterm and term neonates, drug evaluation is challenging and randomized controlled trials (RCT) are difficult to conduct and even more is the use of a placebo, required in the absence of a reference validated drug to be used as comparator. Methods We analyzed the complete ClinicalTrials.gov registry 1) to describe neonatal RCT involving a placebo, 2) to report on the medical context and ethical aspects of placebo use. Results Placebo versus drug RCT (n = 146), either prevention trials (n = 57, 39%) or therapeutic interventions (n = 89, 61%), represent more than a third of neonatal trials registered in the National Institute of Health clinical trial database (USA) since 1999. They mainly concerned preterm infants, evaluating complications of prematurity. Most trials were conducted in the USA, were single centered, and funded by non-profit organizations. For the three top drug trials evaluating steroids (n = 13, 9.6%), erythropoietin (EPO, n = 10, 6.8%) and nitric oxide (NO, n = 9, 6.2%), the objectives of the trial and follow-up were analyzed in more details. Conclusion Although a matter of debate, the use of placebo should be promoted in neonates to evaluate a potential new treatment, in the absence of reference drug. Analysis of the trials evaluating steroids showed that long-term follow-up of exposed patients, although required by international guidelines, is frequently missing and should be planned to collect additional information and optimize drug evaluation in these high-risk patients. PMID:28192509

  2. Prospective randomized clinical evaluation of conventional single-bundle, anatomic single-bundle, and anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 281 cases with 3- to 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohsen; van Eck, Carola F; Cretnik, Andrej; Dinevski, Dejan; Fu, Freddie H

    2012-03-01

    Three different techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction--conventional (transtibial) single bundle (CSB), anatomic single bundle (ASB), and anatomic double bundle (ADB)--have been described. To determine if double-bundle reconstruction is needed to restore rotational stability or if anatomic placement of a single bundle can yield similar results. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. From December 2005 to December 2007, 320 patients were prospectively randomized into 3 groups: ADB, ASB, and CSB reconstruction. The average follow-up was 51.15 months (range, 39-63 months). At the final follow-up, 281 patients were available. In all groups, hamstring tendons were used with suspensory fixation on the femoral side and bioabsorbable interference screw fixation on the tibial side. The outcomes were evaluated by an independent blinded observer using the Lysholm score and subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) form. The KT-1000 arthrometer was used to evaluate anteroposterior stability, and the pivot-shift test was used to determine rotational stability. Anatomic single-bundle reconstruction resulted in better anteroposterior and rotational stability than CSB reconstruction (average side-to-side difference for anterior tibial translation was 1.6 mm in the ASB group vs 2.0 mm in the CSB group; P = .002). Negative pivot shift was 66.7% vs 41.7% (P = .003). In other parameters, the differences between groups were not statistically significant. The results of the ADB group were also superior to the ASB group for anteroposterior and rotational stability (average side-to-side difference for anterior tibial translation was 1.2 mm in the ADB group vs 1.6 mm in the ASB group; P = .002). Negative pivot shift was 93.1% vs 66.7%, respectively (P ADB groups, respectively. The difference was significant only when we compared ADB and CSB (P = .025). Subjective IKDC scores were 90.2, 90.6, and 92.1 in the CSB, ASB, and ADB groups

  3. Difficulties in recruitment for a randomized controlled trial involving hysterosalpingography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmerhorst Frans M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The usefulness of hysterosalpingography (HSG as routine investigation in the fertility work-up prior to laparoscopy and dye had been assessed in a randomized controlled trial. Recruiting subjects to the study was more difficult than anticipated. The objective of this study was to explore possible reasons for non-participation in the trial. Methods All newly referred subfertile women admitted to the Reproductive Medicine Clinic of Leiden University Medical Centre between 1 April 1997 and 31 December 1999, were eligible for the study. The reasons for non-participation were evaluated by scrutinizing the medical records. Results Out of 759 women, a total of 127 (17% agreed to participate in the trial. The most important reason for non-participation was because of exclusion criteria (73%. Other reasons were inattentive clinicians (3% and patient-associated reasons (24%. Patient refusal and indecisiveness to enroll in the study were the most common patient-associated reasons. The most frequently stated reason for trial refusal was reluctance to undergo laparoscopy and dye mainly due to issues related to anesthesia and scheduling of procedure. Conclusion Almost three-quarters of recruitment difficulties in this study were due to unavoidable reasons. To overcome the remaining avoidable reasons for non-participation, attention should be paid to appropriate instruction of the study protocol to the participating doctors and to provide adequate information, in layman's terms, to the patients. Reminding patients by notes or telephone calls for attending the clinic are helpful. It may be contingent upon tracing the reasons of clinicians and patients for non-participation to improve enrollment during a trial.

  4. Sample size in orthodontic randomized controlled trials: are numbers justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsi, Despina; Pandis, Nikolaos; Fleming, Padhraig S

    2014-02-01

    Sample size calculations are advocated by the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) group to justify sample sizes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study aimed to analyse the reporting of sample size calculations in trials published as RCTs in orthodontic speciality journals. The performance of sample size calculations was assessed and calculations verified where possible. Related aspects, including number of authors; parallel, split-mouth, or other design; single- or multi-centre study; region of publication; type of data analysis (intention-to-treat or per-protocol basis); and number of participants recruited and lost to follow-up, were considered. Of 139 RCTs identified, complete sample size calculations were reported in 41 studies (29.5 per cent). Parallel designs were typically adopted (n = 113; 81 per cent), with 80 per cent (n = 111) involving two arms and 16 per cent having three arms. Data analysis was conducted on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis in a small minority of studies (n = 18; 13 per cent). According to the calculations presented, overall, a median of 46 participants were required to demonstrate sufficient power to highlight meaningful differences (typically at a power of 80 per cent). The median number of participants recruited was 60, with a median of 4 participants being lost to follow-up. Our finding indicates good agreement between projected numbers required and those verified (median discrepancy: 5.3 per cent), although only a minority of trials (29.5 per cent) could be examined. Although sample size calculations are often reported in trials published as RCTs in orthodontic speciality journals, presentation is suboptimal and in need of significant improvement.

  5. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials of dichlorphenamide in periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Valeria A; Burge, James; McDermott, Michael P; Smith, Patty C; Herr, Barbara; Tawil, Rabi; Pandya, Shree; Kissel, John; Ciafaloni, Emma; Shieh, Perry; Ralph, Jeffrey W; Amato, Antony; Cannon, Steve C; Trivedi, Jaya; Barohn, Richard; Crum, Brian; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Pestronk, Alan; Meola, Giovanni; Conwit, Robin; Hanna, Michael G; Griggs, Robert C

    2016-04-12

    To determine the short-term and long-term effects of dichlorphenamide (DCP) on attack frequency and quality of life in hyperkalemic (HYP) and hypokalemic (HOP) periodic paralysis. Two multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials lasted 9 weeks (Class I evidence), followed by a 1-year extension phase in which all participants received DCP. Forty-four HOP and 21 HYP participants participated. The primary outcome variable was the average number of attacks per week over the final 8 weeks of the double-blind phase. The median attack rate was lower in HOP participants on DCP than in participants on placebo (0.3 vs 2.4, p = 0.02). The 9-week mean change in the Physical Component Summary score of the Short Form-36 was also better in HOP participants receiving DCP (treatment effect = 7.29 points, 95% confidence interval 2.26 to 12.32, p = 0.006). The median attack rate was also lower in HYP participants on DCP (0.9 vs 4.8) than in participants on placebo, but the difference in median attack rate was not significant (p = 0.10). There were no significant effects of DCP on muscle strength or muscle mass in either trial. The most common adverse events in both trials were paresthesia (47% DCP vs 14% placebo, both trials combined) and confusion (19% DCP vs 7% placebo, both trials combined). DCP is effective in reducing the attack frequency, is safe, and improves quality of life in HOP periodic paralysis. These studies provide Class I evidence that DCP significantly reduces attack frequency in HOP but lacked the precision to support either efficacy or lack of efficacy of DCP in HYP. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Making birthing safe for Pakistan women: a cluster randomized trial

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    Khan Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two out of three neonatal deaths occur in just 10 countries and Pakistan stands third among them. Maternal mortality is also high with most deaths occurring during labor, birth, and first few hours after birth. Enhanced access and utilization of skilled delivery and emergency obstetric care is the demonstrated strategy in reducing maternal and neonatal mortality. This trial aims to compare reduction in neonate mortality and utilization of available safe birthing and Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care services among pregnant mothers receiving ‘structured birth planning’, and/or ‘transport facilitation’ compared to routine care. Methods A pragmatic cluster randomized trial, with qualitative and economic studies, will be conducted in Jhang, Chiniot and Khanewal districts of Punjab, Pakistan, from February 2011 to May 2013. At least 29,295 pregnancies will be registered in the three arms, seven clusters per arm; 1 structured birth planning and travel facilitation, 2 structured birth planning, and 3 control arm. Trial will be conducted through the Lady Health Worker program. Main outcomes are difference in neonatal mortality and service utilization; maternal mortality being the secondary outcome. Cluster level analysis will be done according to intention-to-treat. Discussion A nationwide network of about 100,000 lady health workers is already involved in antenatal and postnatal care of pregnant women. They also act as “gatekeepers” for the child birthing services. This gate keeping role mainly includes counseling and referral for skill birth attendance and travel arrangements for emergency obstetric care (if required. The review of current arrangements and practices show that the care delivery process needs enhancement to include adequate information provision as well as informed “decision” making and planned “action” by the pregnant women. The proposed three-year research is to develop, through national

  7. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials of dichlorphenamide in periodic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, James; McDermott, Michael P.; Smith, Patty C.; Herr, Barbara; Tawil, Rabi; Pandya, Shree; Kissel, John; Ciafaloni, Emma; Shieh, Perry; Ralph, Jeffrey W.; Amato, Antony; Cannon, Steve C.; Trivedi, Jaya; Barohn, Richard; Crum, Brian; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Pestronk, Alan; Meola, Giovanni; Conwit, Robin; Hanna, Michael G.; Griggs, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the short-term and long-term effects of dichlorphenamide (DCP) on attack frequency and quality of life in hyperkalemic (HYP) and hypokalemic (HOP) periodic paralysis. Methods: Two multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials lasted 9 weeks (Class I evidence), followed by a 1-year extension phase in which all participants received DCP. Forty-four HOP and 21 HYP participants participated. The primary outcome variable was the average number of attacks per week over the final 8 weeks of the double-blind phase. Results: The median attack rate was lower in HOP participants on DCP than in participants on placebo (0.3 vs 2.4, p = 0.02). The 9-week mean change in the Physical Component Summary score of the Short Form–36 was also better in HOP participants receiving DCP (treatment effect = 7.29 points, 95% confidence interval 2.26 to 12.32, p = 0.006). The median attack rate was also lower in HYP participants on DCP (0.9 vs 4.8) than in participants on placebo, but the difference in median attack rate was not significant (p = 0.10). There were no significant effects of DCP on muscle strength or muscle mass in either trial. The most common adverse events in both trials were paresthesia (47% DCP vs 14% placebo, both trials combined) and confusion (19% DCP vs 7% placebo, both trials combined). Conclusions: DCP is effective in reducing the attack frequency, is safe, and improves quality of life in HOP periodic paralysis. Classification of evidence: These studies provide Class I evidence that DCP significantly reduces attack frequency in HOP but lacked the precision to support either efficacy or lack of efficacy of DCP in HYP. PMID:26865514

  8. Clinical Outcome of Double Kissing Crush Versus Provisional Stenting of Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions: The 5-Year Follow-Up Results From a Randomized and Multicenter DKCRUSH-II Study (Randomized Study on Double Kissing Crush Technique Versus Provisional Stenting Technique for Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Liang; Santoso, Teguh; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Ye, Fei; Xu, Ya-Wei; Fu, Qiang; Kan, Jing; Zhang, Feng-Fu; Zhou, Yong; Xie, Du-Jiang; Kwan, Tak W

    2017-02-01

    Provisional stenting is effective for anatomic simple bifurcation lesions. Double kissing crush stenting reduces the 1-year rate of target lesion revascularization. This study aimed to investigate the 5-year clinical results of the DKCRUSH-II study (Randomized Study on Double Kissing Crush Technique Versus Provisional Stenting Technique for Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions). A total of 370 patients with coronary bifurcation lesions who were randomly assigned to either the double kissing crush or provisional stenting group in the DKCRUSH-II study were followed for 5 years. The primary end point was the occurrence of a major adverse cardiac event at 5 years. Patients were classified by simple and complex bifurcation lesions according to the DEFINITION criteria (Definitions and Impact of Complex Bifurcation Lesions on Clinical Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Using Drug-Eluting Stents). At 5 years, the major adverse cardiac event rate (23.8%) in the provisional stenting group was insignificantly different to that of the double kissing group (15.7%; P=0.051). However, the difference in the target lesion revascularization rate between 2 groups was sustained through the 5-year follow-up (16.2% versus 8.6%; P=0.027). The definite and probable stent thrombosis rate was 2.7% in each group (P=1.0). Complex bifurcation was associated with a higher rate of target lesion revascularization (21.6%) at 5 years compared with 11.1% in patients with a simple bifurcation (P=0.037), with an extremely high rate in the provisional stenting group (36.8% versus 12.5%, P=0.005) mainly because of final kissing balloon inflation (19.4% versus 5.2%; P=0.036). The double kissing crush stenting technique for coronary bifurcation lesions is associated with a lower rate of target lesion revascularization. The optimal stenting approach based on the lesions' complexity may improve the revascularization for patients with complex bifurcations. URL: http://www.chictr.org. Unique

  9. Impact of Length or Relevance of Questionnaires on Attrition in Online Trials: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; White, Ian R; Khadjesari, Zarnie; Murray, Elizabeth; Linke, Stuart; Thompson, Simon G; Godfrey, Christine; Wallace, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been limited study of factors influencing response rates and attrition in online research. Online experiments were nested within the pilot (study 1, n = 3780) and main trial (study 2, n = 2667) phases of an evaluation of a Web-based intervention for hazardous drinkers: the Down Your Drink randomized controlled trial (DYD-RCT). Objectives The objective was to determine whether differences in the length and relevance of questionnaires can impact upon loss to follow-up in online trials. Methods A randomized controlled trial design was used. All participants who consented to enter DYD-RCT and completed the primary outcome questionnaires were randomized to complete one of four secondary outcome questionnaires at baseline and at follow-up. These questionnaires varied in length (additional 23 or 34 versus 10 items) and relevance (alcohol problems versus mental health). The outcome measure was the proportion of participants who completed follow-up at each of two follow-up intervals: study 1 after 1 and 3 months and study 2 after 3 and 12 months. Results At all four follow-up intervals there were no significant effects of additional questionnaire length on follow-up. Randomization to the less relevant questionnaire resulted in significantly lower rates of follow-up in two of the four assessments made (absolute difference of 4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0%-8%, in both study 1 after 1 month and in study 2 after 12 months). A post hoc pooled analysis across all four follow-up intervals found this effect of marginal statistical significance (unadjusted difference, 3%, range 1%-5%, P = .01; difference adjusted for prespecified covariates, 3%, range 0%-5%, P = .05). Conclusions Apparently minor differences in study design decisions may have a measurable impact on attrition in trials. Further investigation is warranted of the impact of the relevance of outcome measures on follow-up rates and, more broadly, of the consequences of what we ask participants to

  10. Imputation strategies for missing binary outcomes in cluster randomized trials

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    Akhtar-Danesh Noori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attrition, which leads to missing data, is a common problem in cluster randomized trials (CRTs, where groups of patients rather than individuals are randomized. Standard multiple imputation (MI strategies may not be appropriate to impute missing data from CRTs since they assume independent data. In this paper, under the assumption of missing completely at random and covariate dependent missing, we compared six MI strategies which account for the intra-cluster correlation for missing binary outcomes in CRTs with the standard imputation strategies and complete case analysis approach using a simulation study. Method We considered three within-cluster and three across-cluster MI strategies for missing binary outcomes in CRTs. The three within-cluster MI strategies are logistic regression method, propensity score method, and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method, which apply standard MI strategies within each cluster. The three across-cluster MI strategies are propensity score method, random-effects (RE logistic regression approach, and logistic regression with cluster as a fixed effect. Based on the community hypertension assessment trial (CHAT which has complete data, we designed a simulation study to investigate the performance of above MI strategies. Results The estimated treatment effect and its 95% confidence interval (CI from generalized estimating equations (GEE model based on the CHAT complete dataset are 1.14 (0.76 1.70. When 30% of binary outcome are missing completely at random, a simulation study shows that the estimated treatment effects and the corresponding 95% CIs from GEE model are 1.15 (0.76 1.75 if complete case analysis is used, 1.12 (0.72 1.73 if within-cluster MCMC method is used, 1.21 (0.80 1.81 if across-cluster RE logistic regression is used, and 1.16 (0.82 1.64 if standard logistic regression which does not account for clustering is used. Conclusion When the percentage of missing data is low or intra

  11. A quality assessment of randomized clinical trials in pediatric orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulai, Sukhdeep K; Slobogean, Bronwyn L T; Beauchamp, Richard D; Mulpuri, Kishore

    2007-01-01

    The promotion and practice of evidence-based medicine necessitates a critical evaluation of medical literature, including the criterion standard of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Recent studies have examined the quality of RCTs in various surgical specialties, but no study has focused on pediatric orthopaedics. The purpose of this study was to assess and describe the quality of RCTs published in the last 10 years in journals with high clinical impact in pediatric orthopaedics. All of the RCTs in pediatric orthopaedics published in 5 well-recognized journals between 1995 and 2005 were reviewed using the Detsky Quality Assessment Scale. The mean percentage score on the Detsky scale was 53% (95% confidence interval, 46%-60%). Only 7 (19%) of the articles satisfied the threshold for a satisfactory level of methodological quality (Detsky >75%). Most RCTs in pediatric orthopaedics that are published in well-recognized peer-reviewed journals demonstrate substantial deficiencies in methodological quality. Particular areas of weakness include inadequate rigor and reporting of randomization methods, use of inappropriate or poorly described outcome measures, inadequate description of inclusion and exclusion criteria, and inappropriate statistical analysis. Further efforts are necessary to improve the conduct and reporting of clinical trials in this field to avoid inadvertent misinformation of the clinical community.

  12. Do Implant Overdentures Improve Dietary Intake? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, N.M.; Gray-Donald, K.; Awad, M.A.; Johnson-Down, L.; Wollin, S.; Feine, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    People wearing mandibular two-implant overdentures (IOD) chew food with less difficulty than those wearing conventional complete dentures (CD). However, there is still controversy over whether or not this results in better dietary intake. In this randomized clinical trials (RCT), the amounts of total dietary fiber (TDF), macronutrients, 9 micronutrients, and energy in diets consumed by persons with IOD and CD were compared. Male and female edentate patients ≥ 65 yrs (n = 255) were randomly divided into 2 groups and assigned to receive a maxillary CD and either a mandibular IOD or a CD. One year following prosthesis delivery, 217 participants (CD = 114, IOD = 103) reported the food and quantities they consumed to a registered dietician through a standard 24-hour dietary recall method. The mean and median values of TDF, macro- and micronutrients, and energy consumed by both groups were calculated and compared analytically. No significant between-group differences were found (ps > .05). Despite quality-of-life benefits from IODs, this adequately powered study reveals no evidence of nutritional advantages for independently living medically healthy edentate elders wearing two-implant mandibular overdentures over those wearing conventional complete dentures in their dietary intake at one year following prosthesis delivery (International Clinical Trials ISRCTN24273915). PMID:24158335

  13. Acupuncture for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials and Prospective Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Dae Kim; In Heo; Byung-Cheul Shin; Cindy Crawford; Hyung-Won Kang; Jung-Hwa Lim

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the current evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the form of a systematic review, a systematic literature search was conducted in 23 electronic databases. Grey literature was also searched. The key search terms were “acupuncture” and “PTSD.” No language restrictions were imposed. We included all randomized or prospective clinical trials that evaluated acupuncture and its variants against a waitlist, sham acupuncture, conventional th...

  14. Efficacy of antiplatelet therapy in secondary prevention following lacunar stroke: pooled analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chun Shing; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Copley, Hannah Charlotte; Myint, Phyo Kyaw; Loke, Yoon K; Benavente, Oscar R

    2015-04-01

    Lacunar stroke accounts for ≈25% of ischemic stroke, but optimal antiplatelet regimen to prevent stroke recurrence remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents in secondary stroke prevention after a lacunar stroke. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane library for randomized controlled trials that reported risk of recurrent stroke or death with antiplatelet therapy in patients with lacunar stroke. We used random effects meta-analysis and evaluated heterogeneity with I(2). We included 17 trials with 42,234 participants (mean age 64.4 years, 65% male) and follow up ranging from 4 weeks to 3.5 years. Compared with placebo, any single antiplatelet agent was associated with a significant reduction in recurrence of any stroke (risk ratio [RR] 0.77, 0.62-0.97, 2 studies) and ischemic stroke (RR 0.48, 0.30-0.78, 2 studies), but not for the composite outcome of any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death (RR 0.89, 0.75-1.05, 2 studies). When other antiplatelet agents (ticlodipine, cilostazol, and dipyridamole) were compared with aspirin, there was no consistent reduction in stroke recurrence (RR 0.91, 0.75-1.10, 3 studies). Dual antiplatelet therapy did not confer clear benefit over monotherapy (any stroke RR 0.83, 0.68-1.00, 3 studies; ischemic stroke RR 0.80, 0.62-1.02, 3 studies; composite outcome RR 0.90, 0.80-1.02, 3 studies). Our results suggest that any of the single antiplatelet agents compared with placebo in the included trials is adequate for secondary stroke prevention after lacunar stroke. Dual antiplatelet therapy should not be used for long-term stroke prevention in this stroke subtype. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Research in Nursing and Nutrition: Is Randomized Clinical Trial the Actual Gold Standard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Ileana; Soriani, Nicola; Lorenzoni, Giulia; Azzolina, Danila; Dal Lago, Elisa; De Bardi, Sara; Verduci, Elvira; Zanotti, Renzo; Gregori, Dario

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of reporting of nurse-driven randomized controlled trials involving a direct nutritional intervention. A bibliometric search for randomized controlled trials involving a direct nutritional intervention from 1991 to 2011 in nursing research was conducted. Both quality of the study and design aspects were evaluated. The prevalent randomized controlled trial design used is 2-arm parallel, individual, and randomized with a continuous primary endpoint. Global numbers of randomized controlled trials and the proportion of good-quality randomized controlled trials began a steady and marked rise, more than doubling, from the 1990s to about 2001 and increased slowly thereafter. Studies are overall sufficiently well designed, although there is still room for quality improvement. Additionally, implementation of new randomized controlled trial designs exists and should be advocated.

  16. Randomized clinical trials of constitutional acupuncture: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Choi, Sun-Mi; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to compile and critically evaluate the evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for the effectiveness of acupuncture using constitutional medicine compared to standard acupuncture. Ten databases were searched through to December 2008 without language restrictions. We also hand-searched nine Korean journals of oriental medicine. We included prospective RCTs of any form of acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation. The included trials had to investigate constitutional medicine. There were no restrictions on population characteristics. Forty-one relevant studies were identified, and three RCTs were included. The methodological quality of the trials was variable. One RCT found Sasang constitutional acupuncture to be superior to standard acupuncture in terms of the Unified PD Rating Scale and freezing gate in Parkinson's disease (PD). Another two RCTs reported favorable effects of eight constitutional acupuncture on pain reduction in patients with herniated nucleus pulposi and knee osteoarthritis. Meta-analysis demonstrated positive results for eight constitutional acupuncture compared to standard acupuncture on pain reduction (weighted mean difference: 10 cm VAS, 1.69, 95% CI 0.85-2.54, P acupuncture in treating pain conditions compared to standard acupuncture. However, the total number of RCTs and the total sample size included in our analysis were too small to draw definite conclusions. Future RCTs should assess larger patient samples with longer treatment periods and appropriate controls.

  17. Targeting Prodromal Alzheimer Disease With Avagacestat: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coric, Vladimir; Salloway, Stephen; van Dyck, Christopher H; Dubois, Bruno; Andreasen, Niels; Brody, Mark; Curtis, Craig; Soininen, Hilkka; Thein, Stephen; Shiovitz, Thomas; Pilcher, Gary; Ferris, Steven; Colby, Susan; Kerselaers, Wendy; Dockens, Randy; Soares, Holly; Kaplita, Stephen; Luo, Feng; Pachai, Chahin; Bracoud, Luc; Mintun, Mark; Grill, Joshua D; Marek, Ken; Seibyl, John; Cedarbaum, Jesse M; Albright, Charles; Feldman, Howard H; Berman, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    Early identification of Alzheimer disease (AD) is important for clinical management and affords the opportunity to assess potential disease-modifying agents in clinical trials. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a randomized trial to prospectively enrich a study population with prodromal AD (PDAD) defined by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker criteria and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) symptoms. To assess the safety of the γ-secretase inhibitor avagacestat in PDAD and to determine whether CSF biomarkers can identify this patient population prior to clinical diagnosis of dementia. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase 2 clinical trial with a parallel, untreated, nonrandomized observational cohort of CSF biomarker-negative participants was conducted May 26, 2009, to July 9, 2013, in a multicenter global population. Of 1358 outpatients screened, 263 met MCI and CSF biomarker criteria for randomization into the treatment phase. One hundred two observational cohort participants who met MCI criteria but were CSF biomarker-negative were observed during the same study period to evaluate biomarker assay sensitivity. Oral avagacestat or placebo daily. Safety and tolerability of avagacestat. Of the 263 participants in the treatment phase, 132 were randomized to avagacestat and 131 to placebo; an additional 102 participants were observed in an untreated observational cohort. Avagacestat was relatively well tolerated with low discontinuation rates (19.6%) at a dose of 50 mg/d, whereas the dose of 125 mg/d had higher discontinuation rates (43%), primarily attributable to gastrointestinal tract adverse events. Increases in nonmelanoma skin cancer and nonprogressive, reversible renal tubule effects were observed with avagacestat. Serious adverse event rates were higher with avagacestat (49 participants [37.1%]) vs placebo (31 [23.7%]), attributable to the higher incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer. At 2 years, progression to dementia was more frequent in the PDAD

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Caries Prevention in Dental Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, M; O'Neill, C; Donaldson, M; Birch, S; Noble, S; Killough, S; Murphy, L; Greer, M; Brodison, J; Verghis, R; Worthington, H V

    2017-07-01

    We conducted a parallel group randomized controlled trial of children initially aged 2 to 3 y who were caries free, to prevent the children becoming caries active over the subsequent 36 mo. The setting was 22 dental practices in Northern Ireland, and children were randomly assigned by a clinical trials unit (CTU) (using computer-generated random numbers, with allocation concealed from the dental practice until each child was recruited) to the intervention (22,600-ppm fluoride varnish, toothbrush, 50-mL tube of 1,450 ppm fluoride toothpaste, and standardized, evidence-based prevention advice) or advice-only control at 6-monthly intervals. The primary outcome measure was conversion from caries-free to caries-active states. Secondary outcome measures were number of decayed, missing, or filled teeth (dmfs) in caries-active children, number of episodes of pain, and number of extracted teeth. Adverse reactions were recorded. Calibrated external examiners, blinded to the child's study group, assessed the status of the children at baseline and after 3 y. In total, 1,248 children (624 randomized to each group) were recruited, and 1,096 (549 intervention, 547 control) were included in the final analyses. Eighty-seven percent of intervention and 86% of control children attended every 6-mo visit ( P = 0.77). A total of 187 (34%) in the intervention group converted to caries active compared to 213 (39%) in the control group (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-1.04; P = 0.11). Mean dmfs of those with caries in the intervention group was 7.2 compared to 9.6 in the control group ( P = 0.007). There was no significant difference in the number of episodes of pain between groups ( P = 0.81) or in the number of teeth extracted in caries-active children ( P = 0.95). Ten children in the intervention group had adverse reactions of a minor nature. This well-conducted trial failed to demonstrate that the intervention kept children caries free, but there was evidence that once

  19. Amantadine for dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Hideyuki Sawada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dyskinesias are some of the major motor complications that impair quality of life for patients with Parkinson's disease. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of amantadine in Parkinson's disease patients suffering from dyskinesias. METHODS: In this multi-center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial, 36 patients with Parkinson's disease and dyskinesias were randomized, and 62 interventions, which included amantadine (300 mg/day or placebo treatment for 27 days, were analyzed. At 15 days after washout, the treatments were crossed over. The primary outcome measure was the changes in the Rush Dyskinesia Rating Scale (RDRS during each treatment period. The secondary outcome measures were changes in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part IVa (UPDRS-IVa, dyskinesias, part IVb (motor fluctuations, and part III (motor function. RESULTS: RDRS improved in 64% and 16% of patients treated with amantadine or placebo, respectively, with significant differences between treatments. The adjusted odds-ratio for improvement by amantadine was 6.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 31.5. UPDRS-IVa was improved to a significantly greater degree in amantadine-treated patients [mean (SD of 1.83 (1.56] compared with placebo-treated patients [0.03 (1.51]. However, there were no significant effects on UPDRS-IVb or III scores. CONCLUSIONS: Results from the present study demonstrated that amantadine exhibited efficacious effects against dyskinesias in 60-70% of patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000000780.

  20. Randomized Polypill crossover trial in people aged 50 and over.

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    David S Wald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A Polypill is proposed for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in people judged to be at risk on account of their age alone. Its efficacy in reducing cholesterol and blood pressure is uncertain. METHODS: We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial of a Polypill among individuals aged 50+ without a history of cardiovascular disease and compared the reductions with those predicted from published estimates of the effects of the individual drugs. Participants took the Polypill (amlodipine 2.5 mg, losartan 25 mg, hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 mg and simvastatin 40 mg each evening for 12 weeks and a placebo each evening for 12 weeks in random sequence. The mean within-person differences in blood pressure and low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol at the end of each 12 week period were determined. RESULTS: 84 out of 86 participants completed both treatment periods. The mean systolic blood pressure was reduced by 17.9 mmHg (95% CI, 15.7-20.1 on the Polypill, diastolic blood pressure by 9.8 mmHg (8.1-11.5, and LDL cholesterol by 1.4 mmol/L (1.2-1.6, reductions of 12%, 11%, and 39% respectively. The results were almost identical to those predicted; 18.4 mmHg, 9.7 mmHg, and 1.4 mmol/L respectively. CONCLUSION: The Polypill resulted in the predicted reductions in blood pressure and LDL cholesterol. Long term reductions of this magnitude would have a substantial effect in preventing heart attacks and strokes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN36672232.

  1. Magnesium treatment in alcoholics: A randomized clinical trial

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    Poikolainen Kari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnesium (Mg deficiency is common among alcoholics. Earlier research suggests that Mg treatment may help to normalize elevated enzyme activities and some other clinically relevant parameters among alcoholics but the evidence is weak. Methods The effect of Mg was studied in a randomized, parallel group, double-blind trial. The patients were first treated for alcohol withdrawal symptoms and then received for 8 weeks either 500 mg of Mg divided into two tablets or matching placebo. Measurements were made at the beginning and in the end of the Mg treatment period. The primary outcome was serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (S-GGT activity; secondary outcomes included aspartate-aminotransferase (S-AST and alanine-aminotransferase (S-ALT activity. Results The number of randomized patients (completers was 64 (27 in the treatment and 54 (31 in the control group. In intention-to-treat-analyses and in most analyses of study completers, there were no significant differences between the Mg-treated and placebo groups in the outcome variables. When baseline serum Mg level, coffee intake, and the number of unused Mg tablets were controlled for in a multivariate regression model, after-treatment serum Mg levels were found to be higher among the Mg-treated group than in the placebo group (t-test 3.334, df = 53, p = 0.002. After controlling for age, body weight, baseline alcohol intake, subsequent change in alcohol intake and baseline S-AST, the after-treatment S-AST levels were found to be lower among the Mg-treated group than in the placebo group (t-test 2.061, df = 49, p = 0.045. Conclusion Mg treatment may speed up the S-AST decrease in compliant patients. This might decrease the risk of death from alcoholic liver disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT00325299

  2. Acupuncture for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials and Prospective Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Dae Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the current evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in the form of a systematic review, a systematic literature search was conducted in 23 electronic databases. Grey literature was also searched. The key search terms were “acupuncture” and “PTSD.” No language restrictions were imposed. We included all randomized or prospective clinical trials that evaluated acupuncture and its variants against a waitlist, sham acupuncture, conventional therapy control for PTSD, or without control. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs and 2 uncontrolled clinical trials (UCTs out of 136 articles in total were systematically reviewed. One high-quality RCT reported that acupuncture was superior to waitlist control and therapeutic effects of acupuncture and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT were similar based on the effect sizes. One RCT showed no statistical difference between acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. One RCT reported a favorable effect of acupoint stimulation plus CBT against CBT alone. A meta-analysis of acupuncture plus moxibustion versus SSRI favored acupuncture plus moxibustion in three outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the evidence of effectiveness of acupuncture for PTSD is encouraging but not cogent. Further qualified trials are needed to confirm whether acupuncture is effective for PTSD.

  3. Acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and prospective clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Dae; Heo, In; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Crawford, Cindy; Kang, Hyung-Won; Lim, Jung-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the current evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the form of a systematic review, a systematic literature search was conducted in 23 electronic databases. Grey literature was also searched. The key search terms were "acupuncture" and "PTSD." No language restrictions were imposed. We included all randomized or prospective clinical trials that evaluated acupuncture and its variants against a waitlist, sham acupuncture, conventional therapy control for PTSD, or without control. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 uncontrolled clinical trials (UCTs) out of 136 articles in total were systematically reviewed. One high-quality RCT reported that acupuncture was superior to waitlist control and therapeutic effects of acupuncture and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) were similar based on the effect sizes. One RCT showed no statistical difference between acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). One RCT reported a favorable effect of acupoint stimulation plus CBT against CBT alone. A meta-analysis of acupuncture plus moxibustion versus SSRI favored acupuncture plus moxibustion in three outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the evidence of effectiveness of acupuncture for PTSD is encouraging but not cogent. Further qualified trials are needed to confirm whether acupuncture is effective for PTSD.

  4. Laparoscopic versus open gastrectomy for gastric cancer, a multicenter prospectively randomized controlled trial (LOGICA-trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Leonie; Brenkman, Hylke J F; Seesing, Maarten F J; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Luyer, Misha D P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; van Lanschot, Jan J B; de Steur, Wobbe O; Hartgrink, Henk H; Stoot, Jan H M B; Hulsewé, Karel W E; Spillenaar Bilgen, Ernst J; Rütter, Jeroen E; Kouwenhoven, Ewout A; van Det, Marc J; van der Peet, Donald L; Daams, Freek; Draaisma, Werner A; Broeders, Ivo A M J; van Stel, Henk F; Lacle, Miangela M; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2015-07-29

    For gastric cancer patients, surgical resection with en-bloc lymphadenectomy is the cornerstone of curative treatment. Open gastrectomy has long been the preferred surgical approach worldwide. However, this procedure is associated with considerable morbidity. Several meta-analyses have shown an advantage in short-term outcomes of laparoscopic gastrectomy compared to open procedures, with similar oncologic outcomes. However, it remains unclear whether the results of these Asian studies can be extrapolated to the Western population. In this trial from the Netherlands, patients with resectable gastric cancer will be randomized to laparoscopic or open gastrectomy. The study is a non-blinded, multicenter, prospectively randomized controlled superiority trial. Patients (≥18 years) with histologically proven, surgically resectable (cT1-4a, N0-3b, M0) gastric adenocarcinoma and European Clinical Oncology Group performance status 0, 1 or 2 are eligible to participate in the study after obtaining informed consent. Patients (n = 210) will be included in one of the ten participating Dutch centers and are randomized to either laparoscopic or open gastrectomy. The primary outcome is postoperative hospital stay (days). Secondary outcome parameters include postoperative morbidity and mortality, oncologic outcomes, readmissions, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. In this randomized controlled trial laparoscopic and open gastrectomy are compared in patients with resectable gastric cancer. It is expected that laparoscopic gastrectomy will result in a faster recovery of the patient and a shorter hospital stay. Secondly, it is expected that laparoscopic gastrectomy will be associated with a lower postoperative morbidity, less readmissions, higher cost-effectiveness, better postoperative quality of life, but with similar mortality and oncologic outcomes, compared to open gastrectomy. The study started on 1 December 2014. Inclusion and follow-up will take 3 and 5

  5. A randomized trial of doxycycline for Mansonella perstans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, Yaya I; Dembele, Benoit; Diallo, Abdallah A; Lipner, Ettie M; Doumbia, Salif S; Coulibaly, Siaka Y; Konate, Siaka; Diallo, Dapa A; Yalcouye, Daniel; Kubofcik, Joseph; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Traore, Abdel K; Keita, Adama D; Fay, Michael P; Traore, Sekou F; Nutman, Thomas B; Klion, Amy D

    2009-10-08

    Mansonella perstans infection is common in areas of Africa where Wuchereria bancrofti, a causative agent of lymphatic filariasis, is endemic. M. perstans is refractory to standard antifilarial therapies. The recent discovery of bacterial endosymbionts (e.g., wolbachia) in most filarial species, including M. perstans, provides new therapeutic options for reducing microfilaremia. In an open-label, randomized trial, we recruited subjects with M. perstans microfilaremia, with or without concomitant W. bancrofti infection, from four villages in Mali and randomly assigned them to receive doxycycline, at a dose of 200 mg daily for 6 weeks (106 subjects), or no treatment (110). At 6 months, subjects who were coinfected with W. bancrofti underwent a second random assignment, to treatment with a single dose of albendazole (400 mg) and ivermectin (150 microg per kilogram of body weight) or no treatment. Subjects were monitored daily during the first 6-week study period for adverse events. M. perstans and W. bancrofti microfilarial levels were assessed at 6, 12, and 36 months. At 12 months, 67 of 69 subjects who had received treatment with doxycycline only (97%) had no detectable M. perstans microfilariae per 60 microl of blood, as compared with 10 of 63 subjects who had received no treatment (16%) (relative risk, 6.18; 95% confidence interval, 3.63 to 11.89; Pperstans microfilaremia remained suppressed in 48 of 64 subjects who had received treatment with doxycycline only (75%), a finding that was consistent with a macrofilaricidal effect of doxycycline. Vomiting was more frequent in the doxycycline-treated group than in the untreated group (17% vs. 4%). These results are consistent with previous findings that M. perstans harbors the intracellular endosymbiont, wolbachia, and suggest that doxycycline is an effective therapy for M. perstans infection. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00340691.) 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  6. Challenges in randomized controlled trials and emerging multiple sclerosis therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, DeRen

    2015-12-01

    The remarkable global development of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) specific for multiple sclerosis (MS) has significantly reduced the frequency of relapse, slowed the progression of disability, and improved the quality of life in patients with MS. With increasing numbers of approved DMTs, neurologists in North America and Europe are able to present multiple treatment options to their patients to achieve a better therapeutic outcome, and in many cases, no evidence of disease activity. MS patients have improved accessibility to various DMTs at no or minimal out-of-pocket cost. The ethical guidelines defined by the Edinburgh revision of the Declaration of Helsinki strongly discourage the use of placebo control groups in modern MS clinical trials. The use of an active comparator control group increases the number of participants in each group that is essential to achieve statistical significance, thus further increasing the difficulty of completing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for the development of new MS therapies. There is evidence of a high prevalence of MS and a large number of patients in Asia. The belief of the existence of Asian types of MS that are distinct from Western types, and regulatory policies are among the reasons why DMTs are limited in most Asian countries. Lack of access to approved DMTs provides a good opportunity for clinical trials that are designed for the development of new MS therapies. Recently, data from RCTs have demonstrated excellent recruitment of participants and the completion of multi-nation and single-nation MS trials within this region. Recent studies using the McDonald MS diagnostic criteria carefully excluded patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum disorder, and demonstrated that patients with MS in Asia have clinical characteristics and treatment responses similar to those in Western countries.

  7. Targeting Functional Decline in Alzheimer Disease: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Christopher M; Boustani, Malaz A; Schmid, Arlene A; LaMantia, Michael A; Austrom, Mary G; Miller, Douglas K; Gao, Sujuan; Ferguson, Denisha Y; Lane, Kathleen A; Hendrie, Hugh C

    2017-02-07

    Alzheimer disease results in progressive functional decline, leading to loss of independence. To determine whether collaborative care plus 2 years of home-based occupational therapy delays functional decline. Randomized, controlled clinical trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01314950). Urban public health system. 180 community-dwelling participants with Alzheimer disease and their informal caregivers. All participants received collaborative care for dementia. Patients in the intervention group also received in-home occupational therapy delivered in 24 sessions over 2 years. The primary outcome measure was the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Group Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADCS ADL); performance-based measures included the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and Short Portable Sarcopenia Measure (SPSM). At baseline, clinical characteristics did not differ significantly between groups; the mean Mini-Mental State Examination score for both groups was 19 (SD, 7). The intervention group received a median of 18 home visits from the study occupational therapists. In both groups, ADCS ADL scores declined over 24 months. At the primary end point of 24 months, ADCS ADL scores did not differ between groups (mean difference, 2.34 [95% CI, -5.27 to 9.96]). We also could not definitively demonstrate between-group differences in mean SPPB or SPSM values. The results of this trial are indeterminate and do not rule out potential clinically important effects of the intervention. The authors could not definitively demonstrate whether the addition of 2 years of in-home occupational therapy to a collaborative care management model slowed the rate of functional decline among persons with Alzheimer disease. This trial underscores the burden undertaken by caregivers as they provide care for family members with Alzheimer disease and the difficulty in slowing functional decline. National Institute on Aging.

  8. Randomized clinical trial comparing abluminal biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents with durable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Xiangfei; Deng, Wei; Wang, Shenguo; Ge, Junbo; Toft, Egon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents (DES) were developed to improve vascular healing. However, further data and longer-term follow-up are needed to confirm safety and efficacy of these stents. This randomized clinical trial aimed to compare safety and efficacy of 2 sirolimus-eluting stents (SES): Cordimax—a novel abluminal biodegradable polymer SES and Cypher Select—a durable polymer SES, at 9 months angiographic and 5-year clinical follow-up. Methods: We randomized 402 patients with coronary artery disease to percutaneous coronary intervention with Cordimax (n = 202) or Cypher select (n = 200). Angiographic follow-up was performed at 9 months after the index procedure and clinical follow-up annually up to 5 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss (LLL). Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, target vessel revascularization (TVR), and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or TVR) at 5-year follow-up. Results: Cordimax was noninferior to Cypher select for in-stent LLL (0.25 ± 0.47 vs 0.18 ± 0.49 mm; P = 0.587) and in-stent mean diameter stenosis (22.19 ± 12.21% vs 19.89 ± 10.79%; P = 0.064) at 9 months angiographic follow-up. The MACE rates were not different at 1 year (5.9% vs 4.0%, P = 0.376); however, MACE rates from 2 to 5 years were lower in the Cordimax group (6.8% vs 13.1%; P = 0.039). Conclusion: Abluminal biodegradable polymer SES is noninferior to durable polymer SES at 9-month angiographic and 1-year clinical follow-up. However, MACE rates from 2 to 5 years were less in the abluminal biodegradable polymer group. PMID:27661023

  9. Randomized trial of achieving healthy lifestyles in psychiatric rehabilitation: the ACHIEVE trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guallar Eliseo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overweight and obesity are highly prevalent among persons with serious mental illness. These conditions likely contribute to premature cardiovascular disease and a 20 to 30 percent shortened life expectancy in this vulnerable population. Persons with serious mental illness need effective, appropriately tailored behavioral interventions to achieve and maintain weight loss. Psychiatric rehabilitation day programs provide logical intervention settings because mental health consumers often attend regularly and exercise can take place on-site. This paper describes the Randomized Trial of Achieving Healthy Lifestyles in Psychiatric Rehabilitation (ACHIEVE. The goal of the study is to determine the effectiveness of a behavioral weight loss intervention among persons with serious mental illness that attend psychiatric rehabilitation programs. Participants randomized to the intervention arm of the study are hypothesized to have greater weight loss than the control group. Methods/Design A targeted 320 men and women with serious mental illness and overweight or obesity (body mass index ≥ 25.0 kg/m2 will be recruited from 10 psychiatric rehabilitation programs across Maryland. The core design is a randomized, two-arm, parallel, multi-site clinical trial to compare the effectiveness of an 18-month behavioral weight loss intervention to usual care. Active intervention participants receive weight management sessions and physical activity classes on-site led by study interventionists. The intervention incorporates cognitive adaptations for persons with serious mental illness attending psychiatric rehabilitation programs. The initial intensive intervention period is six months, followed by a twelve-month maintenance period in which trained rehabilitation program staff assume responsibility for delivering parts of the intervention. Primary outcomes are weight loss at six and 18 months. Discussion Evidence-based approaches to the high burden

  10. Alzheimer’s disease multiple intervention trial (ADMIT: study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callahan Christopher M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the current lack of disease-modifying therapies, it is important to explore new models of longitudinal care for older adults with dementia that focus on improving quality of life and delaying functional decline. In a previous clinical trial, we demonstrated that collaborative care for Alzheimer’s disease reduces patients’ neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as caregiver stress. However, these improvements in quality of life were not associated with delays in subjects’ functional decline. Trial design Parallel randomized controlled clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Participants A total of 180 community-dwelling patients aged ≥45 years who are diagnosed with possible or probable Alzheimer’s disease; subjects must also have a caregiver willing to participate in the study and be willing to accept home visits. Subjects and their caregivers are enrolled from the primary care and geriatric medicine practices of an urban public health system serving Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Interventions All patients receive best practices primary care including collaborative care by a dementia care manager over two years; this best practices primary care program represents the local adaptation and implementation of our prior collaborative care intervention in the urban public health system. Intervention patients also receive in-home occupational therapy delivered in twenty-four sessions over two years in addition to best practices primary care. The focus of the occupational therapy intervention is delaying functional decline and helping both subjects and caregivers adapt to functional impairments. The in-home sessions are tailored to the specific needs and goals of each patient-caregiver dyad; these needs are expected to change over the course of the study. Objective To determine whether best practices primary care plus home-based occupational therapy delays functional decline among patients with Alzheimer’s disease compared

  11. The Cessation in Pregnancy Incentives Trial (CPIT: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tappin David M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seventy percent of women in Scotland have at least one baby, making pregnancy an opportunity to help most young women quit smoking before their own health is irreparably compromised. By quitting during pregnancy their infants will be protected from miscarriage and still birth as well as low birth weight, asthma, attention deficit disorder and adult cardiovascular disease. In the UK, the NICE guidelines: ‘How to stop smoking in pregnancy and following childbirth’ (June 2010 highlighted that little evidence exists in the literature to confirm the efficacy of financial incentives to help pregnant smokers to quit. Its first research recommendation was to determine: Within a UK context, are incentives an acceptable, effective and cost-effective way to help pregnant women who smoke to quit? Design and methods This study is a phase II exploratory individually randomized controlled trial comparing standard care for pregnant smokers with standard care plus the additional offer of financial voucher incentives to engage with specialist cessation services and/or to quit smoking during pregnancy. Participants (n = 600 will be pregnant smokers identified at maternity booking who, when contacted by specialist cessation services, agree to having their details passed to the NHS Smokefree Pregnancy Study Helpline to discuss the trial. The NHS Smokefree Pregnancy Study Helpline will be responsible for telephone consent and follow-up in late pregnancy. The primary outcome will be self reported smoking in late pregnancy verified by cotinine measurement. An economic evaluation will refine cost data collection and assess potential cost-effectiveness while qualitative research interviews with clients and health professionals will assess the level of acceptance of this form of incentive payment. The research questions are: What is the likely therapeutic efficacy? Are incentives potentially cost-effective? Is individual randomization an

  12. ORCHIDS: an Observational Randomized Controlled Trial on Childhood Differential Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhangur Rabia R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children’s development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes. However, our understanding of the differential impact of parenting is limited at best. Specifically, more experimental research is needed. The ORCHIDS study will investigate gene-(gene-environment interactions to obtain more insight into a moderating effects of polymorphisms on the link between parenting and child behavior, and b behavioral mechanisms that underlie these gene-(gene-environment interactions in an experimental design. Methods/Design The ORCHIDS study is a randomized controlled trial, in which the environment will be manipulated with an intervention (i.e., Incredible Years parent training. In a screening, families with children aged 4–8 who show mild to (subclinical behavior problems will be targeted through community records via two Dutch regional healthcare organizations. Assessments in both the intervention and control condition will be conducted at baseline (i.e., pretest, after 6 months (i.e., posttest, and after 10 months (i.e., follow-up. Discussion This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial that investigates gene-(gene-environment interactions in the development of child behavior. Two hypotheses will be tested. First, we expect that children in the intervention condition who carry one or more susceptibility genes will show significantly lower levels of problem behavior and higher levels of prosocial behavior after their parent(s received the Incredible Years training, compared to children without these genes, or children in the control group. Second, we expect that children carrying one or more susceptibility genes will show a heightened sensitivity to changes in parenting behaviors, and

  13. Naturopathic care for chronic low back pain: a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orest Szczurko

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic low back pain represents a substantial cost to employers through benefits coverage and days missed due to incapacity. We sought to explore the effectiveness of Naturopathic care on chronic low back pain. METHODS: This study was a randomized clinical trial. We randomized 75 postal employees with low back pain of longer than six weeks duration to receive Naturopathic care (n = 39 or standardized physiotherapy (n = 36 over a period of 12 weeks. The study was conducted in clinics on-site in postal outlets. Participants in the Naturopathic care group received dietary counseling, deep breathing relaxation techniques and acupuncture. The control intervention received education and instruction on physiotherapy exercises using an approved education booklet. We measured low back pain using the Oswestry disability questionnaire as the primary outcome measure, and quality of life using the SF-36 in addition to low back range of motion, weight loss, and Body Mass Index as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Sixty-nine participants (92% completed eight weeks or greater of the trial. Participants in the Naturopathic care group reported significantly lower back pain (-6.89, 95% CI. -9.23 to -3.54, p = <0.0001 as measured by the Oswestry questionnaire. Quality of life was also significantly improved in the group receiving Naturopathic care in all domains except for vitality. Differences for the aggregate physical component of the SF-36 was 8.47 (95% CI, 5.05 to 11.87, p = <0.0001 and for the aggregate mental component was 7.0 (95% CI, 2.25 to 11.75, p = 0.0045. All secondary outcomes were also significantly improved in the group receiving Naturopathic care: spinal flexion (p<0.0001, weight-loss (p = 0.0052 and Body Mass Index (-0.52, 95% CI, -0.96 to -0.08, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Naturopathic care provided significantly greater improvement than physiotherapy advice for patients with chronic low back pain. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials

  14. Partner randomized controlled trial: study protocol and coaching intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbutt Jane M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many children with asthma live with frequent symptoms and activity limitations, and visits for urgent care are common. Many pediatricians do not regularly meet with families to monitor asthma control, identify concerns or problems with management, or provide self-management education. Effective interventions to improve asthma care such as small group training and care redesign have been difficult to disseminate into office practice. Methods and design This paper describes the protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate a 12-month telephone-coaching program designed to support primary care management of children with persistent asthma and subsequently to improve asthma control and disease-related quality of life and reduce urgent care events for asthma care. Randomization occurred at the practice level with eligible families within a practice having access to the coaching program or to usual care. The coaching intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. Targeted behaviors included 1 effective use of controller medications, 2 effective use of rescue medications and 3 monitoring to ensure optimal control. Trained lay coaches provided parents with education and support for asthma care, tailoring the information provided and frequency of contact to the parent's readiness to change their child's day-to-day asthma management. Coaching calls varied in frequency from weekly to monthly. For each participating family, follow-up measurements were obtained at 12- and 24-months after enrollment in the study during a telephone interview. The primary outcomes were the mean change in 1 the child's asthma control score, 2 the parent's quality of life score, and 3 the number of urgent care events assessed at 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes reflected adherence to guideline recommendations by the primary care pediatricians and included the proportion of children prescribed controller medications

  15. Supplemental vibrational force during orthodontic alignment: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, N R; DiBiase, A T; Johnson, N; Slipper, C; Grant, J; Alsaleh, M; Donaldson, A N A; Cobourne, M T

    2015-05-01

    This prospective 3-arm parallel-group randomized clinical trial investigated the effect of supplemental vibrational force on rate of orthodontic tooth alignment with fixed appliances. Eighty-one subjects (40 males, 41 females; mean age, 14.1 y) undergoing first premolar extraction-based fixed appliance treatment were randomly allocated to treatment supplemented with daily use (20 min) of a removable intraoral vibrational device (AcceleDent; OrthoAccel Technologies Inc.; n = 29), an identical nonfunctional (sham) device (n = 25), or fixed appliances only (n = 27). Mandibular study casts were taken at baseline (treatment start: placement of 0.014-in. nickel-titanium arch wire), initial alignment (0.018-in. nickel-titanium arch wire), and final alignment (0.019 x 0.025-in. stainless steel arch wire). Overall mean irregularity index in the mandibular arch at baseline was 8.5 ± 3.8 mm (95% CI, 7.6 to 9.3) with no significant difference between groups (P = 0.73). For the total sample, mean irregularity index at initial alignment was 2.7 ± 2.8 mm (95% CI, 2.2 to 3.4) with no significant difference between groups (P = 0.40). Mean time from baseline to initial alignment was 59 ± 25 d (95% CI, 54.5 to 65.6); from initial to final alignment, 150 ± 62.5 d (95% CI, 136 to 165); and baseline to final alignment, 209 ± 65 d (95% CI, 195 to 224). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patterns of alignment were not significantly different among the 3 groups (P = 0.66). Multivariate linear regression for initial and overall alignment rates using initial irregularity index as the covariate showed no significant differences among groups. The most important influence on both initial and overall rates of alignment was initial irregularity (P = 0.1 × 10(-4)). This prospective randomized clinical trial found no evidence that supplemental vibrational force can significantly increase the rate of initial tooth movement or reduce the amount of time required to achieve final alignment

  16. Long-term effect of early treatment with interferon beta-1b after a first clinical event suggestive of multiple sclerosis: 5-year active treatment extension of the phase 3 BENEFIT trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappos, Ludwig; Freedman, Mark S; Polman, Chris H;

    2009-01-01

    beta-1b 250 microg (n=292; early treatment) or placebo (n=176; delayed treatment) subcutaneously every other day for 2 years, or until diagnosis of CDMS. All patients were then eligible to enter a prospectively planned follow-up phase with open-label interferon beta-1b up to a maximum of 5 years after...

  17. Sleep disorders in patients with depression or schizophrenia: A randomized controlled trial using acupuncture treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Staudte, H.; Lim, S.; Yeo, S.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this preliminary clinical trial was to investigate whether acupuncture has a positive influence on sleep and symptomatology in patients with schizophrenia or depression. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was used. One hundred participants were recruited: 40

  18. Effect of diclofenac suppository on pain control during flexible cystoscopy-A randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadeem, Mehwash; Ather, M Hammad

    2016-01-01

    TRIAL DESIGN: To compare the difference in pain score during flexible cystoscopy between patients undergoing the procedure with plain lubricating gel only and plain gel with diclofenac suppository in a randomized control trial. METHODS...

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Debiasing Improves Assessment and Treatment Selection for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Melissa M.; Youngstrom, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the efficacy of a new cognitive debiasing intervention in reducing decision-making errors in the assessment of pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). Method The study was a randomized controlled trial using case vignette methodology. Participants were 137 mental health professionals working in different regions of the US (M=8.6±7.5 years of experience). Participants were randomly assigned to a (1) brief overview of PBD (control condition), or (2) the same brief overview plus a cognitive debiasing intervention (treatment condition) that educated participants about common cognitive pitfalls (e.g., base-rate neglect; search satisficing) and taught corrective strategies (e.g., mnemonics, Bayesian tools). Both groups evaluated four identical case vignettes. Primary outcome measures were clinicians’ diagnoses and treatment decisions. The vignette characters’ race/ethnicity was experimentally manipulated. Results Participants in the treatment group showed better overall judgment accuracy, p clinical recommendations, particularly in cases where participants missed comorbid conditions, failed to detect the possibility of hypomania or mania in depressed youths, and misdiagnosed classic manic symptoms. In contrast, effects of patient race were negligible. Conclusions The cognitive debiasing intervention outperformed the control condition. Examining specific heuristics in cases of PBD may identify especially problematic mismatches between typical habits of thought and characteristics of the disorder. The debiasing intervention was brief and delivered via the Web; it has the potential to generalize and extend to other diagnoses as well as to various practice and training settings. PMID:26727411

  20. Nitazoxanide in Acute Rotavirus Diarrhea: A Randomized Control Trial from a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatro, Samarendra; Mahilary, Nijwm; Satapathy, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background. Acute diarrhea is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality, with rotavirus being an important pathogen. Nitazoxanide, an antiparasitic agent, has been shown to inhibit rotavirus. Objective. This double-blind, randomized trial was designed to study the role of nitazoxanide in acute rotavirus diarrhea. Methods. Of 174 children (12 months to 5 years) with acute diarrhea, 50 rotavirus positive cases were randomized. The intervention group received syrup nitazoxanide twice daily (100 mg in 12–47 months, 200 mg in ≥4 yr) for 3 days along with standard treatment of diarrhea. Duration of diarrhea was the primary outcome measure. Results. The median duration (hrs) of diarrhea (54 versus 80; 95% CI: –26 [–13.2 to –38.8]) and hospitalization (68 versus 90; 95% CI: –22 [–12.98 to –31.02]) was significantly shorter in the nitazoxanide group. No significant difference was seen in the median duration (hrs) of fever or vomiting or the proportion of children requiring parenteral rehydration. There was no report of any adverse events. Conclusions. Oral nitazoxanide is effective and safe in the management of acute rotavirus diarrhea in Indian children (CTRI REF/2016/10/012507). PMID:28331496

  1. Nitazoxanide in Acute Rotavirus Diarrhea: A Randomized Control Trial from a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarendra Mahapatro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute diarrhea is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality, with rotavirus being an important pathogen. Nitazoxanide, an antiparasitic agent, has been shown to inhibit rotavirus. Objective. This double-blind, randomized trial was designed to study the role of nitazoxanide in acute rotavirus diarrhea. Methods. Of 174 children (12 months to 5 years with acute diarrhea, 50 rotavirus positive cases were randomized. The intervention group received syrup nitazoxanide twice daily (100 mg in 12–47 months, 200 mg in ≥4 yr for 3 days along with standard treatment of diarrhea. Duration of diarrhea was the primary outcome measure. Results. The median duration (hrs of diarrhea (54 versus 80; 95% CI: –26 [–13.2 to –38.8] and hospitalization (68 versus 90; 95% CI: –22 [–12.98 to –31.02] was significantly shorter in the nitazoxanide group. No significant difference was seen in the median duration (hrs of fever or vomiting or the proportion of children requiring parenteral rehydration. There was no report of any adverse events. Conclusions. Oral nitazoxanide is effective and safe in the management of acute rotavirus diarrhea in Indian children (CTRI REF/2016/10/012507.

  2. Validity of randomized clinical trials in gastroenterology from 1964-2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, Lise L; Frederiksen, Sarah L; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The internal validity of clinical trials depends on the adequacy of the reported methodological quality. We assessed the methodological quality of all 383 randomized clinical trials published in GASTROENTEROLOGY as original articles from 1964 to 2000.......The internal validity of clinical trials depends on the adequacy of the reported methodological quality. We assessed the methodological quality of all 383 randomized clinical trials published in GASTROENTEROLOGY as original articles from 1964 to 2000....

  3. The conflict between randomized clinical trials and the therapeutic obligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, F

    1986-11-01

    The central dilemma concerning randomized clinical trials (RCTs) arises out of some simple facts about causal methodology (RCTs are the best way to generate the reliable causal knowledge necessary for optimally-informed action) and a prima facie plausible principle concerning how physicians should treat their patients (always do what it is most reasonable to believe will be best for the patient). A number of arguments related to this in the literature are considered. Attempts to avoid the dilemma fail. Appeals to informed consent and mechanisms for minimizing the resulting harm are important for policy, but informed consent is problematic and mechanisms for minimization of harm do not address the dilemma. Appeals to some sort of contract model of justification are promising and illuminating.

  4. A randomized controlled trial to promote volunteering in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Lisa M; Wolff, Julia K; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Wurm, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    Volunteering is presumed to confer health benefits, but interventions to encourage older adults to volunteer are sparse. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial with 280 community-dwelling older German adults was conducted to test the effects of a theory-based social-cognitive intervention against a passive waiting-list control group and an active control intervention designed to motivate physical activity. Self-reports of weekly volunteering minutes were assessed at baseline (5 weeks before the intervention) as well as 2 and 6 weeks after the intervention. Participants in the treatment group increased their weekly volunteering minutes to a greater extent than participants in the control groups 6 weeks after the intervention. We conclude that a single, face-to-face group session can increase volunteering among older community-dwelling adults. However, the effects need some time to unfold because changes in volunteering were not apparent 2 weeks after the intervention.

  5. Incorporating Contact Network Structure in Cluster Randomized Trials

    CERN Document Server

    Staples, Patrick C; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Whenever possible, the efficacy of a new treatment, such as a drug or behavioral intervention, is investigated by randomly assigning some individuals to a treatment condition and others to a control condition, and comparing the outcomes between the two groups. Often, when the treatment aims to slow an infectious disease, groups or clusters of individuals are assigned en masse to each treatment arm. The structure of interactions within and between clusters can reduce the power of the trial, i.e. the probability of correctly detecting a real treatment effect. We investigate the relationships among power, within-cluster structure, between-cluster mixing, and infectivity by simulating an infectious process on a collection of clusters. We demonstrate that current power calculations may be conservative for low levels of between-cluster mixing, but failing to account for moderate or high amounts can result in severely underpowered studies. Power also depends on within-cluster network structure for certain kinds of i...

  6. Acupucture as pain relief during delivery - a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Lissa; Wurlitzer, Winnie; Hedegaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many women need some kind of analgesic treatment to relieve pain during childbirth. The objective of our study was to compare the effect of acupuncture with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) and traditional analgesics for pain relief and relaxation during delivery...... with respect to pain intensity, birth experience, and obstetric outcome. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 607 healthy women in labor at term who received acupuncture, TENS, or traditional analgesics. Primary outcomes were the need for pharmacological and invasive methods, level of pain...... with the intention-to-treat principle. Results: Use of pharmacological and invasive methods was significantly lower in the acupuncture group (acupuncture vs traditional, p acupuncture vs TENS, p = 0.031). Pain scores were comparable. Acupuncture did not influence the duration of labor or the use of oxytocin...

  7. Acupuncture as pain relief during delivery: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Lissa; Wurlitzer, Winnie; Hedegaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many women need some kind of analgesic treatment to relieve pain during childbirth. The objective of our study was to compare the effect of acupuncture with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) and traditional analgesics for pain relief and relaxation during delivery...... with respect to pain intensity, birth experience, and obstetric outcome. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 607 healthy women in labor at term who received acupuncture, TENS, or traditional analgesics. Primary outcomes were the need for pharmacological and invasive methods, level of pain...... with the intention-to-treat principle. RESULTS: Use of pharmacological and invasive methods was significantly lower in the acupuncture group (acupuncture vs traditional, p acupuncture vs TENS, p = 0.031). Pain scores were comparable. Acupuncture did not influence the duration of labor or the use of oxytocin...

  8. Coblation versus traditional tonsillectomy: A double blind randomized ontrolled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Omrani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coblation tonsillectomy is a new surgical technique and demands further research to be proven as a suitable and standard method of tonsillectomy. This study compares coblation and traditional tonsillectomy techniques in view of their advantages and complications. Methods: In a prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial information on operation time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative pain, time needed to regain the normal diet and activity and post-operative hemorrhage were gathered and compared between two groups containing 47 patients in each group. Results: We found statistically significant differences in operation time (p 0.5 was not significantly different between two groups. Conclusions: This study revealed a significantly less intraoperative or postoperative complications and morbidity in coblation tonsillectomy in comparison with traditional method. Coblation was associated with less pain and quick return to normal diet and daily activity. These findings addressed coblation tonsillectomy as an advanced method.

  9. Cognitive Stimulation in Patients with Dementia: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mapelli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study explores the effective outcomes of a structured cognitive stimulation treatment to improve cognition and behavioral symptoms in people with dementia (PWDs, using a randomized controlled clinical trial. Methods: Thirty PWDs were divided into three groups: experimental (treated with cognitive stimulation, placebo (treated with occupational therapy, and control (continuing with the usual activities of the nursing home. Assessment, at baseline and after a period of 8 weeks, was performed using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, activities of daily living, Mini-Mental State Examination, Esame Neuropsicologico Breve 2, Geriatric Depression Scale and Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Scale. Results: Only the experimental group improved its performance in cognitive tests (p Conclusions: The results suggest that a cognitive stimulation treatment for PWDs would improve not only their cognition, but also behavioral symptoms.

  10. Philosophers assess randomized clinical trials: the need for dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miké, V

    1989-09-01

    In recent years a growing number of professional philosophers have joined in the controversy over ethical aspects of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Morally questionable in their utilitarian approach, RCTs are claimed by some to be in direct violation of the second form of Kant's Categorical Imperative. But the arguments used in these critiques at times derive from a lack of insight into basic statistical procedures and the realities of the biomedical research process. Presented to physicians and other nonspecialists, including the lay public, such distortions can be harmful. Given the great complexity of statistical methodology and the anomalous nature of concepts of evidence, more sustained input into the interdisciplinary dialogue is needed from the statistical profession.

  11. Randomized trial of a patient-centered hospital unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D P; Diehr, P; Conrad, D A; Davis, J H; Leickly, R; Perrin, E B

    1998-06-01

    Patient-centered hospital units have grown out of the national trend to greater consumerism, but few of these units have been evaluated rigorously. We used a randomized controlled trial to compare patient outcomes on the Planetree Model Hospital Unit with other medical-surgical units in the hospital. Planetree patients were significantly more satisfied than controls with their hospital stay, the unit's environment and nursing care, but did not differ in ratings of physician care. Planetree patients reported more involvement in their care while hospitalized and higher satisfaction with the education they received. There were few differences between Planetree and controls in health behaviors. While Planetree patients reported better mental health status and role functioning after discharge, their health status was similar to controls after 3 to 6 months. There were no differences in length of stay and charges for the index hospitalization, readmissions or outpatient care during the following year.

  12. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect.

  13. Music intervention during daily weaning trials-A 6 day prospective randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhan; Ren, Dianxu; Choi, JiYeon; Happ, Mary Beth; Hravnak, Marylyn; Hoffman, Leslie A

    2016-12-01

    To examine the effect of patient-selected music intervention during daily weaning trials for patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation. Using a crossover repeated measures design, patients were randomized to music vs no music on the first intervention day. Provision of music was alternated for 6 days, resulting in 3 music and 3 no music days. During weaning trials on music days, data were obtained for 30min prior to music listening and continued for 60min while patients listened to selected music (total 90min). On no music days, data were collected for 90min. Outcome measures were heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), oxygen saturation (SpO2), blood pressure (BP), dyspnea and anxiety assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS-D, VAS-A) and weaning duration (meanh per day on music and non-music days). Of 31 patients randomized, 23 completed the 6-day intervention. When comparisons were made between the 3 music and 3 no music days, there were significant decreases in RR and VAS-D and a significant increase in daily weaning duration on music days (pmusic days (pmusic during daily weaning trials is a simple, low-cost, potentially beneficial intervention for patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation. Further study is indicated to test ability of this intervention to promote weaning success and benefits earlier in the weaning process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of Primary Care Pediatric Parenting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A.; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B.; Huberman, Harris S.; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether pediatric primary care–based programs to enhance parenting and early child development reduce media exposure and whether enhanced parenting mediates the effects. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Urban public hospital pediatric primary care clinic. Participants A total of 410 mother-newborn dyads enrolled after childbirth. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions, the Video Interaction Project (VIP) and Building Blocks (BB) interventions, or to a control group. The VIP intervention comprised 1-on-1 sessions with a child development specialist who facilitated interactions in play and shared reading through review of videotapes made of the parent and child on primary care visit days; learning materials and parenting pamphlets were also provided. The BB intervention mailed parenting materials, including age-specific newsletters suggesting activities to facilitate interactions, learning materials, and parent-completed developmental questionnaires (Ages and Stages questionnaires). Outcome Measures Electronic media exposure in the home using a 24-hour recall diary. Results The mean (SD) exposure at 6 months was 146.5 (125.0) min/d. Exposure to VIP was associated with reduced total duration of media exposure compared with the BB and control groups (mean [SD] min/d for VIP, 131.6 [118.7]; BB, 151.2 [116.7]; control, 155.4 [138.7]; P=.009). Enhanced parent-child interactions were found to partially mediate relations between VIP and media exposure for families with a ninth grade or higher literacy level (Sobel statistic=2.49; P=.01). Conclusion Pediatric primary care may represent an important venue for addressing the public health problem of media exposure in young children at a population level. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00212576 PMID:21199979

  15. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stupp, R.; Hegi, M.E.; Mason, W.P.; Bent, M.J. van den; Taphoorn, M.J.B.; Janzer, R.C.; Ludwin, S.K.; Allgeier, A.; Fisher, B.; Belanger, K.; Hau, P.; Brandes, A.A.; Gijtenbeek, J.M.M.; Marosi, C.; Vecht, C.J.; Mokhtari, K.; Wesseling, P.; Villa, S.; Eisenhauer, E.; Gorlia, T.; Weller, M.; Lacombe, D.; Cairncross, J.G.; Mirimanoff, R.O.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2004, a randomised phase III trial by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (NCIC) reported improved median and 2-year survival for patients with glioblastoma treated with concomitant and ad

  16. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study : 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stupp, Roger; Hegi, Monika E.; Mason, Warren P.; van den Bent, Martin J.; Taphoorn, Martin J. B.; Janzer, Robert C.; Ludwin, Samuel K.; Allgeier, Anouk; Fisher, Barbara; Belanger, Karl; Hau, Peter; Brandes, Alba A.; Gijtenbeek, Johanna; Marosi, Christine; Vecht, Charles J.; Mokhtari, Karima; Wesseling, Pieter; Villa, Salvador; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Gorlia, Thierry; Weller, Michael; Lacombe, Denis; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Background In 2004, a randomised phase III trial by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (NCIC) reported improved median and 2-year survival for patients with glioblastoma treated with concomitant and adj

  17. What device should be used for telementoring? Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budrionis, Andrius; Hartvigsen, Gunnar; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole; Bellika, Johan Gustav

    2015-09-01

    The paper analyzes behavioral patterns of mentors while using different mentoring devices to demonstrate the feasibility of multi-platform mentoring. The fundamental differences of devices supporting telementoring create threats for the perception and interpretation of the transmitted video, highlighting the necessity of exploring hardware usability aspects in a safety critical surgical mentoring scenario. Three types of devices, based on the screen size, formed the arms for the randomized controlled trial. Streaming video recordings of a laparoscopic procedure to the mentors imitated the mentoring scenario. User preferences and response times were recorded while participating in a session performed on all devices. Median response to a mentoring request times were similar for mobile platforms; expected durations were considerably longer for stationary computer. Ability to perceive and identify anatomical structures was insignificantly lower on small sized devices. Stationary and tablet platforms were nearly equally preferred by the most of participants as default telementoring hardware. As a side effect, incompatibility of daily duties of the surgeons in the hospital and telementoring responsibilities while implementing systems locally was identified. Scaling up the use of the service in combination with the organizational changes of clinical staff looks like a promising solution. The trial demonstrated the feasibility of using all three types of devices for the purpose of mentoring, allowing users to choose the preferred platform. The paper provided initial results on the quality assurance of telementoring systems imposed by the regulatory documents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anethum graveolens and hyperlipidemia: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mirhosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been established that hyperlipidemia increases the incidence and mortality associated with coronary heart disease. In this study, the effects of Dill (Anethum graveolens were evaluated on lipid profile of hypercholesterolemic patients. Materials and Methods: In this clinical study, 91 hyperlipidemic patients were randomly designated into two groups. One group received gemfibrozil (900 mg daily and the other group received Dill tablet (six tablets daily for 2 months. The blood lipids including total cholesterol, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol from each group were assessed at the beginning and end of the trial. Results: Use of gemfibrozil brought about increased HDL-cholesterol by 3.91% (P < 0.05 and reduced triglyceride and total cholesterol by 32.7% (P < 0.05 and 9.41% (P < 0.05, respectively. Applying Dill tablet for 2 months resulted in reduction of total cholesterol up to 18% (P < 0.05 and triglyceride by 7.38% (P < 0.05. However, circulating HDL-cholesterol was not affected by this treatment. In this study, gemfibrozil decreased triglyceride and increased HDL-cholesterol more than anethum (P < 0.05. Anethum decreased total cholesterol more than gemfibrozil (P < 0.05. Patients treated with anethum did not report any side effects. Conclusion: The results of this trial indicate that Dill might be beneficial for hypercholesterolemic and hypertriglycemic patients.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation support application on a smartphone - randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tomohiko; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Nishiyama, Chika; Murakami, Yukiko; Ando, Masahiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Tasaki, Osamu; Kuwagata, Yasuyuki; Shimazu, Takeshi; Iwami, Taku

    2015-01-01

    This simulation trial aimed to compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with and without the newly-developed CPR support application on smartphones. In this trial, participants were randomly assigned to either the CPR support application group or the control group, stratified by sex and previous CPR training. Participants' CPR skills were evaluated by a 2-min case-based scenario test using the Leardal Resusci Anne PC Skill reporting Manikin System(®). The outcome measures were the proportion of chest compressions performed in each group and the number of total chest compressions and appropriate chest compressions performed during the 2-min test period. A total of 84 participants were enrolled and completed the protocol. All participants in the CPR support application group performed chest compressions, compared with only 31 (75.6%) in the control group (Psmartphones contributed to increasing the implementation rate and the number of total chest compressions performed and may assist in improving the survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (UMIN000004740).

  20. Randomized Clinical Trials of Constitutional Acupuncture: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong Soo Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review is to compile and critically evaluate the evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs for the effectiveness of acupuncture using constitutional medicine compared to standard acupuncture. Ten databases were searched through to December 2008 without language restrictions. We also hand-searched nine Korean journals of oriental medicine. We included prospective RCTs of any form of acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation. The included trials had to investigate constitutional medicine. There were no restrictions on population characteristics. Forty-one relevant studies were identified, and three RCTs were included. The methodological quality of the trials was variable. One RCT found Sasang constitutional acupuncture to be superior to standard acupuncture in terms of the Unified PD Rating Scale and freezing gate in Parkinson's disease (PD. Another two RCTs reported favorable effects of eight constitutional acupuncture on pain reduction in patients with herniated nucleus pulposi and knee osteoarthritis. Meta-analysis demonstrated positive results for eight constitutional acupuncture compared to standard acupuncture on pain reduction (weighted mean difference: 10 cm VAS, 1.69, 95% CI 0.85–2.54, P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: τ2 = 0.00, Χ2 = 0.00, P = 0.96, I2 = 0%. Our results provide suggestive evidence for the effectiveness of constitutional acupuncture in treating pain conditions compared to standard acupuncture. However, the total number of RCTs and the total sample size included in our analysis were too small to draw definite conclusions. Future RCTs should assess larger patient samples with longer treatment periods and appropriate controls.

  1. Aerobic exercise for Alzheimer's disease: A randomized controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sciver, Angela; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Honea, Robyn A.; Brooks, William M.; Billinger, Sandra A.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the role of physical exercise as a therapeutic strategy for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We assessed the effect of 26 weeks (6 months) of a supervised aerobic exercise program on memory, executive function, functional ability and depression in early AD. Methods and findings This study was a 26-week randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of 150 minutes per week of aerobic exercise vs. non-aerobic stretching and toning control intervention in individuals with early AD. A total of 76 well-characterized older adults with probable AD (mean age 72.9 [7.7]) were enrolled and 68 participants completed the study. Exercise was conducted with supervision and monitoring by trained exercise specialists. Neuropsychological tests and surveys were conducted at baseline,13, and 26 weeks to assess memory and executive function composite scores, functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia), and depressive symptoms (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia). Cardiorespiratory fitness testing and brain MRI was performed at baseline and 26 weeks. Aerobic exercise was associated with a modest gain in functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia) compared to individuals in the ST group (X2 = 8.2, p = 0.02). There was no clear effect of intervention on other primary outcome measures of Memory, Executive Function, or depressive symptoms. However, secondary analyses revealed that change in cardiorespiratory fitness was positively correlated with change in memory performance and bilateral hippocampal volume. Conclusions Aerobic exercise in early AD is associated with benefits in functional ability. Exercise-related gains in cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with improved memory performance and reduced hippocampal atrophy, suggesting cardiorespiratory fitness gains may be important in driving brain benefits. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01128361 PMID:28187125

  2. Randomized trial of TAS-102 for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Robert J; Van Cutsem, Eric; Falcone, Alfredo; Yoshino, Takayuki; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Tabernero, Josep; Komatsu, Yoshito; Sobrero, Alberto; Boucher, Eveline; Peeters, Marc; Tran, Ben; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Zaniboni, Alberto; Hochster, Howard; Cleary, James M; Prenen, Hans; Benedetti, Fabio; Mizuguchi, Hirokazu; Makris, Lukas; Ito, Masanobu; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-05-14

    Early clinical trials conducted primarily in Japan have shown that TAS-102, an oral agent that combines trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride, was effective in the treatment of refractory colorectal cancer. We conducted a phase 3 trial to further assess the efficacy and safety of TAS-102 in a global population of such patients. In this double-blind study, we randomly assigned 800 patients, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive TAS-102 or placebo. The primary end point was overall survival. The median overall survival improved from 5.3 months with placebo to 7.1 months with TAS-102, and the hazard ratio for death in the TAS-102 group versus the placebo group was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58 to 0.81; P<0.001). The most frequently observed clinically significant adverse events associated with TAS-102 were neutropenia, which occurred in 38% of those treated, and leukopenia, which occurred in 21%; 4% of the patients who received TAS-102 had febrile neutropenia, and one death related to TAS-102 was reported. The median time to worsening performance status (a change in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status [on a scale of 0 to 5, with 0 indicating no symptoms and higher numbers indicating increasing degrees of disability] from 0 or 1 to 2 or more) was 5.7 months with TAS-102 versus 4.0 months with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.78; P<0.001). In patients with refractory colorectal cancer, TAS-102, as compared with placebo, was associated with a significant improvement in overall survival. (Funded by Taiho Oncology-Taiho Pharmaceutical; RECOURSE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01607957.).

  3. Electrosurgical bipolar vessel sealing versus conventional clamping and suturing for total abdominal hysterectomy: a randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, M.; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Vos, M.C.; Roovers, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of bipolar vessel sealing versus conventional clamping and suturing in women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial was performed. Patients were randomized to vessel sealing or conventional surgery. Postoperative pain wa

  4. Effects of auriculotherapy on labour pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafetoni, Reginaldo Roque; Shimo, Antonieta Keiko Kakuda

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the effects of auriculotherapy in pain control and its outcomes on the duration of labour. This is a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial with preliminary data. Thirty pregnant women with gestational age ≥ 37 weeks, cervical dilatation ≥ 4 cm and two or more contractions in 10 minutes were selected and randomly divided into three groups: auriculotherapy, placebo and control. Auriculotherapy was applied using crystal beads on four strategic points. No statistical significance was found between the groups with regard to pain; however, the women from the auriculotherapy group had lower intensity and less perception of pain at 30, 60 and 120 minutes of treatment. The average duration of labour was shorter in the auriculotherapy group (248.7 versus placebo 414.8 versus control 296.3 minutes); caesarean section rates were higher in the placebo group (50%) and the same in the other groups (10%). Mothers who received auriculotherapy presented a tendency for greater pain control and shorter labour duration; however, caesarean section rates in this group were similar to the control group. This trial precedes a larger study in progress. Registration of Brazilian Clinical Trials: RBR-47hhbj. Avaliar os efeitos da auriculoterapia no controle da dor e seus desfechos na duração do trabalho de parto. Trata-se de um ensaio controlado, randomizado e duplo-cego, com dados preliminares. Foram selecionadas 30 parturientes com idade gestacional ≥ 37 semanas, dilatação cervical ≥ 4 cm e duas ou mais contrações em 10 minutos, divididas aleatoriamente em três grupos: auriculoterapia, placebo ou controle. A auriculoterapia foi aplicada com microesferas de cristais em quatro pontos estratégicos. Não houve significância estatística entre os grupos com relação à dor; no entanto, as mulheres do grupo de auriculoterapia, apresentaram menor intensidade e menor percepção da dor aos 30, 60 e 120 minutos do tratamento. A média de duração do trabalho de

  5. Design of Sequentially Randomized Trials for Testing Adaptive Treatment Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbagaber, Semhar B.; Karp, Jordan; Wahed, Abdus S.

    2016-01-01

    An adaptive treatment strategy (ATS) is an outcome-guided algorithm that allows personalized treatment of complex diseases based on patients’ disease status and treatment history. Conditions such as AIDS, depression, and cancer usually require several stages of treatment due to the chronic, multifactorial nature of illness progression and management. Sequential multiple assignment randomized (SMAR) designs permit simultaneous inference about multiple ATSs, where patients are sequentially randomized to treatments at different stages depending upon response status. The purpose of the article is to develop a sample size formula to ensure adequate power for comparing two or more ATSs. Based on a Wald-type statistic for comparing multiple ATSs with a continuous endpoint, we develop a sample size formula and test it through simulation studies. We show via simulation that the proposed sample size formula maintains the nominal power. The proposed sample size formula is not applicable to designs with time-to-event endpoints but the formula will be useful for practitioners while designing SMAR trials to compare adaptive treatment strategies. PMID:26412033

  6. Improving pediatric prevention via the internet: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Zimmerman, Frederick J; Rivara, Frederick P; Ebel, Beth

    2006-09-01

    Innovations to improve the delivery of pediatric preventive care are needed. We enrolled children, 0 to 11 years of age, into a factorial, randomized, controlled trial of a tailored, evidence-based, Web site (MyHealthyChild) that provided information on prevention topics before a scheduled well-child visit. There were 2 components of the intervention, namely, parental Web content and provider notification. Parental Web content provided information to parents about prevention topics; provider notification communicated to physicians topics that were of interest to parents. We assigned 887 children randomly to 4 groups (usual care, content only, content and notification, or notification only). Outcomes were determined with telephone follow-up surveys conducted 2 to 4 weeks after the visit. Poisson regression analysis was used to determine the independent effects of each intervention on the number of topics discussed and the number of preventive practices implemented. Parents in the notification/content group and in the notification-only group reported discussing more MyHealthyChild topics with their provider. Parents in the notification/content group and in the content-only group reported implementing more MyHealthyChild topic suggestions (such as use of a safety device). A Web-based intervention can activate parents to discuss prevention topics with their child's provider. Delivery of tailored content can promote preventive practices.

  7. Sexual Absorption of Vaginal Progesterone: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. Merriam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if sexual intercourse reduces absorption of vaginal progesterone gel in women and to determine if progesterone is absorbed by the male during intercourse. Study Design. Prospective, randomized, cross over, controlled study of 20 reproductive-aged women and their male sexual partners randomized to receive vaginal progesterone gel (Crinone 8% gel, Actavis Inc., USA or placebo cream. Serum progesterone for both male and female partners were measured 10 hours after intercourse. One week later, subjects were crossed over to receive the opposite formulation. In the third week, women used progesterone gel at night and abstained from intercourse. Results. Serum progesterone was significantly reduced with vaginal progesterone gel + intercourse compared with vaginal progesterone gel + abstinence (P=0.0075. Men absorbed significant progesterone during intercourse with a female partner using vaginal progesterone gel compared to placebo (P=0.0008. Conclusion(s. Vaginal progesterone gel is reduced in women after intercourse which may decrease drug efficacy during luteal phase support. Because men absorb low levels of progesterone during intercourse, exposure could cause adverse effects such as decreased libido. This study is registered under Clinical Trial number NCT01959464.

  8. Results of a randomized controlled trial on statin use in dialysis patients had no influence on statin prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ngan N; Jain, Arsh K; Hackam, Dan G; Cuerden, Meaghan S; Suri, Rita S; Huo, Cindy Y; Li, Ping; Clark, William F; Garg, Amit X

    2009-12-01

    Randomized trials provide high-quality evidence for patient care. The Der Deutsche Diabetes Dialyse Studie (4D), a randomized study which demonstrated no benefit of statins among diabetic patients receiving hemodialysis, was published in July 2005. To determine effects of this study we conducted a retrospective, population-based, time series analysis with change-point regression to see if the rate of statin prescription to dialysis patients had been modified. We linked health administrative data for all diabetic hemodialysis patients living in Ontario, Canada, with similar characteristics to the 4D patient cohort. During the nearly 11-year period prior to study publication, the rate of statin use increased almost 14-fold, from 43 to 597 per 1000 patients. For 2.5 years after study publication, rather than diminish, statin use continued to rise to an absolute rate of 676 per 1000 patients. These temporal patterns in statin use closely mimicked trends in the diabetic population not receiving dialysis. The 4D trial had no impact on statin use when we restricted the analysis to incident statin prescriptions or expanded the characteristics of the dialysis patients considered for study. Thus, we found that publication of a large, expensive, randomized controlled trial in patients receiving hemodialysis had no immediate impact on clinical practice. The use of a common cardiovascular medication in this patient population appears to be influenced by other factors.

  9. Extended treatment for cigarette smoking cessation: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laude, Jennifer R; Bailey, Steffani R; Crew, Erin; Varady, Ann; Lembke, Anna; McFall, Danielle; Jeon, Anna; Killen, Diana; Killen, Joel D; David, Sean P

    2017-08-01

    To test the potential benefit of extending cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) relative to not extending CBT on long-term abstinence from smoking. Two-group parallel randomized controlled trial. Patients were randomized to receive non-extended CBT (n = 111) or extended CBT (n = 112) following a 26-week open-label treatment. Community clinic in the United States. A total of 219 smokers (mean age: 43 years; mean cigarettes/day: 18). All participants received 10 weeks of combined CBT + bupropion sustained release (bupropion SR) + nicotine patch and were continued on CBT and either no medications if abstinent, continued bupropion + nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) if increased craving or depression scores, or varenicline if still smoking at 10 weeks. Half the participants were randomized at 26 weeks to extended CBT (E-CBT) to week 48 and half to non-extended CBT (no additional CBT sessions). The primary outcome was expired CO-confirmed, 7-day point-prevalence (PP) at 52- and 104-week follow-up. Analyses were based on intention-to-treat. PP abstinence rates at the 52-week follow-up were comparable across non-extended CBT (40%) and E-CBT (39%) groups [odds ratio (OR) = 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.55, 1.78]. A similar pattern was observed across non-extended CBT (39%) and E-CBT (33%) groups at the 104-week follow-up (OR = 0.79; 95% CI= 0.44, 1.40). Prolonging cognitive-behavioral therapy from 26 to 48 weeks does not appear to improve long-term abstinence from smoking. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. Randomized clinical trial of deep brain stimulation for poststroke pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempka, Scott F; Malone, Donald A; Hu, Bo; Baker, Kenneth B; Wyant, Alexandria; Ozinga, John G; Plow, Ela B; Pandya, Mayur; Kubu, Cynthia S; Ford, Paul J; Machado, Andre G

    2017-05-01

    The experience with deep brain stimulation (DBS) for pain is largely based on uncontrolled studies targeting the somatosensory pathways, with mixed results. We hypothesized that targeting limbic neural pathways would modulate the affective sphere of pain and alleviate suffering. We conducted a prospective, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study of DBS targeting the ventral striatum/anterior limb of the internal capsule (VS/ALIC) in 10 patients with poststroke pain syndrome. One month after bilateral DBS, patients were randomized to active DBS or sham for 3 months, followed by crossover for another 3-month period. The primary endpoint was a ≥50% improvement on the Pain Disability Index in 50% of patients with active DBS compared to sham. This 6-month blinded phase was followed by an 18-month open stimulation phase. Nine participants completed randomization. Although this trial was negative for its primary and secondary endpoints, we did observe significant differences in multiple outcome measures related to the affective sphere of pain (eg, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Affective Pain Rating Index of the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire). Fourteen serious adverse events were recorded and resolved. VS/ALIC DBS to modulate the affective sphere of pain represents a paradigm shift in chronic pain management. Although this exploratory study was negative for its primary endpoint, VS/ALIC DBS demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and statistically significant improvements on multiple outcome measures related to the affective sphere of pain. Therefore, we believe these results justify further work on neuromodulation therapies targeting the affective sphere of pain. Ann Neurol 2017;81:653-663. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  11. Surgical trial in traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (STITCH(Trauma: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregson Barbara A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracranial hemorrhage occurs in over 60% of severe head injuries in one of three types: extradural (EDH; subdural (SDH; and intraparenchymal (TICH. Prompt surgical removal of significant SDH and EDH is established and widely accepted. However, TICH is more common and is found in more than 40% of severe head injuries. It is associated with a worse outcome but the role for surgical removal remains undefined. Surgical practice in the treatment of TICHs differs widely around the world. The aim of early surgery in TICH removal is to prevent secondary brain injury. There have been trials of surgery for spontaneous ICH (including the STICH II trial, but none so far of surgery for TICH. Methods/Design The UK National Institutes of Health Research has funded STITCH(Trauma to determine whether a policy of early surgery in patients with TICH improves outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It will include a health economics component and carry out a subgroup analysis of patients undergoing invasive monitoring. This is an international multicenter pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Patients are eligible if: they are within 48 h of injury; they have evidence of TICH on CT scan with a confluent volume of attenuation significantly raised above that of the background white and grey matter that has a total volume >10 mL; and their treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise. Patients will be ineligible if they have: a significant surface hematoma (EDH or SDH requiring surgery; a hemorrhage/contusion located in the cerebellum; three or more separate hematomas fulfilling inclusion criteria; or severe pre-existing physical or mental disability or severe co-morbidity which would lead to poor outcome even if the patient made a full recovery from the head injury. Patients will be randomized via an independent service. Patients randomized to surgery receive surgery within 12 h. Both groups will be monitored according to

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy with sequential or concurrent anthracycline and docetaxel: Breast International Group 02-98 randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, P.; Crown, J.; Di, Leo A.

    2008-01-01

    ). Docetaxel and control treatment groups were compared by log-rank tests, and hazard ratios (HR) of DFS events were calculated by Cox modeling. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Due to a lower-than-anticipated rate of relapse, this analysis was performed after 5 years with 732 events. Patients......BACKGROUND: Docetaxel is more effective than doxorubicin for patients with advanced breast cancer. The Breast International Group 02-98 randomized trial tested the effect of incorporating docetaxel into anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy and compared sequential vs concurrent administration...... of doxorubicin and docetaxel. METHODS: Patients with lymph node-positive breast cancer (n = 2887) were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: 1) sequential control (four cycles of doxorubicin at 75 mg/m2, followed by three cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil [CMF]); 2) concurrent...

  13. Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET – rationale and design: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Magnusson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pacemaker system consists of one or two leads connected to a device that is implanted into a pocket formed just below the collarbone. This pocket is typically subcutaneous, that is, located just above the pectoral fascia. Even though the size of pacemakers has decreased markedly, complications due to superficial implants do occur. An alternative technique would be intramuscular placement of the pacemaker device, but there are no randomized controlled trials (RCTs to support this approach, which is the rationale for the Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET. The aim is to study if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a pacemaker pocket. Methods: In October 2016, we started to enroll 200 consecutive patients with an indication for bradycardia pacemaker implantation. Patients are randomized to random block sizes, stratified by age group (cut-off: 65 years and sex, and then randomized to either subcutaneous or intramuscular implant. A concealed allocation procedure is employed, using sequentially numbered, sealed envelopes. Pocket site is blinded to the patient and in all subsequent care. The primary endpoint is patient overall satisfaction with the pocket location at 24 months as measured using a visual analog scale (VAS 0-10. Secondary endpoints are: complications, patient-reported satisfaction at 1, 12, and 24 months (overall satisfaction, pain, discomfort, degree of unsightly appearance, movement problems, and sleep problems due to device. Conclusions: POCKET is a prospective interventional RCT designed to evaluate if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a bradycardia pacemaker during a two-year follow-up.

  14. Novel Simulation Model of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Platform for a Virtual Randomized Trial of Conservative Therapy vs. Cystectomy in BCG Refractory Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay; Dinh, Tuan; Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce; Rengarajan, Badri; Mayo, Kevin; Clark, Peter E; Kamat, Ashish M; Lee, Cheryl T; Sexton, Wade J; Steinberg, Gary D

    2015-10-26

    Introduction: There have been no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the clinical or economic benefit of mitomycin C intravesical therapy vs. radical cystectomy in patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We used the Archimedes computational model to simulate RCT comparing radical cystectomy versus intravesical mitomycin C (MMC) therapy to evaluate the clinical and economic outcomes for BCG-refractory NMIBC as well demonstrate the utility of computer based models to simulate a clinical trial. Methods: The Archimedes model was developed to generate a virtual population using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, other clinical trials, and expert opinions. Patients selected were diagnosed with NMIBC (virtual patients were evaluation. Progression to MIBC in the MMC treatment arm was 30% over the lifetime. Disease specific death at 5 years was 1.6% and 8.7% for the immediate cystectomy and MMC treatment arms respectively; while, overall death was 17.8% and 23.8% at 5 years. Over a 5-year period the average cost of immediate cystectomy was $64,675 vs $68,517 in the MMC arm. Conclusion: Immediate radical cystectomy after BCG failure for NMIBC has improved survival and is more cost-effective when compared to those undergoing MMC. Simulation of clinical trials using computational models similar to the Archimedes model can overcome shortcomings of real-world clinical trials and may prove useful in the face of current medical cost-conscious era.

  15. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazeen H Jafar

    Full Text Available Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE and trained general practitioner (GP intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up.A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes.After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1-0.1] mm Hg compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04. Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl.The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still evident at 7- year follow-up. These

  16. A randomized trial comparing concise and standard consent forms in the START trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Christine; Touloumi, Giota; Walker, A Sarah; Smolskis, Mary; Sharma, Shweta; Babiker, Abdel G; Pantazis, Nikos; Tavel, Jorge; Florence, Eric; Sanchez, Adriana; Hudson, Fleur; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Emanuel, Ezekiel; Clewett, Megan; Munroe, David; Denning, Eileen

    2017-01-01

    Improving the effectiveness and efficiency of research informed consent is a high priority. Some express concern about longer, more complex, written consent forms creating barriers to participant understanding. A recent meta-analysis concluded that randomized comparisons were needed. We conducted a cluster-randomized non-inferiority comparison of a standard versus concise consent form within a multinational trial studying the timing of starting antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ adults (START). Interested sites were randomized to standard or concise consent forms for all individuals signing START consent. Participants completed a survey measuring comprehension of study information and satisfaction with the consent process. Site personnel reported usual site consent practices. The primary outcome was comprehension of the purpose of randomization (pre-specified 7.5% non-inferiority margin). 77 sites (2429 participants) were randomly allocated to use standard consent and 77 sites (2000 participants) concise consent, for an evaluable cohort of 4229. Site and participant characteristics were similar for the two groups. The concise consent was non-inferior to the standard consent on comprehension of randomization (80.2% versus 82%, site adjusted difference: 0.75% (95% CI -3.8%, +5.2%)); and the two groups did not differ significantly on total comprehension score, satisfaction, or voluntariness (p>0.1). Certain independent factors, such as education, influenced comprehension and satisfaction but not differences between consent groups. An easier to read, more concise consent form neither hindered nor improved comprehension of study information nor satisfaction with the consent process among a large number of participants. This supports continued efforts to make consent forms more efficient. Informed consent substudy was registered as part of START study in clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00867048, and EudraCT # 2008-006439-12.

  17. Secnidazole Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Sharon L; Nyirjesy, Paul; Waldbaum, Arthur S; Schwebke, Jane R; Morgan, Franklin G; Adetoro, Nikki A; Braun, Carol J

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate secnidazole as a single oral dose treatment for bacterial vaginosis in a phase 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. In a phase 2, randomized, double-blind, dose-ranging, placebo-controlled study, women with bacterial vaginosis who met all Amsel criteria (discharge; pH 4.7 or greater; 20% or greater clue cells; positive whiff test) were randomized one to one to one at 24 U.S. centers to 1 or 2 g secnidazole compared with placebo. The primary endpoint was clinical cure (normalization of discharge, amine odor, and clue cells) 21-30 days after treatment. Secondary endpoints included microbiologic cure, defined as a Nugent score of 0-3, and therapeutic cure, defined as meeting criteria for both clinical and microbiologic cure. The modified intent to treat was used for efficacy analyses and included all randomized patients who met the enrollment criteria. Assuming a clinical cure rate of 40% in the active groups and 15% in the placebo group, a sample size of 52 patients per group provided approximately 80% power to detect a significant difference between groups (.05 level [two-sided]) using a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. Between May and September 2014, 215 patients were enrolled. In the intent-to-treat population, the clinical cure rate was 65.3% for the 2-g group, 49.3% for the 1-g group, and 19.4% for the placebo group. The modified intent-to-treat population included 188 women (median age 33 years; 32% with four or more bacterial vaginosis episodes in the previous year; 54% black) with baseline Nugent scores 4 or greater. Clinical, microbiologic, and therapeutic cure rates were 67.7%, 40.3%, and 40.3% for 2 g secnidazole and 51.6%, 23.4%, and 21.9% for 1 g secnidazole compared with 17.7%, 6.5%, and 6.5% for placebo, respectively (Pbacterial vaginosis treatment (Pbacterial vaginosis treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02147899.

  18. Long-term safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting and coronary artery bypass surgery for multivessel coronary artery disease: A meta-analysis with 5-year patient-level data from the ARTS, ERACI-II, MASS-II, and SoS trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Daemen (Joost); H. Boersma (Eric); M. Flather (Marcus); J. Booth (Jean); R.H. Stables (Rodney); A. Rodriguez (Alfredo Chapin); G.A. Rodriguez-Granillo (Gaston); W.A. Hueb (Whady Armindo); P.A. Lemos Neto (Pedro); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground - Randomized trials that studied clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with bare metal stenting versus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are underpowered to properly assess safety end points like death, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Pooling

  19. Randomized clinical trial comparing percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO using the Amplatzer PFO Occluder with medical treatment in patients with cryptogenic embolism (PC-Trial: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuler Gerhard

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have shown an association of cryptogenic stroke and embolism with patent foramen ovale (PFO, but the question how to prevent further events in such patients is unresolved. Options include antithrombotic treatment with warfarin or antiplatelet agents or surgical or endovascular closure of the PFO. The PC-Trial was set up to compare endovascular closure and best medical treatment for prevention of recurrent events. Methods The PC-Trial is a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of percutaneous closure of the PFO using the Amplatzer PFO occluder with best medical treatment in patients with cryptogenic embolism, i.e. mostly cryptogenic stroke. Warfarin for 6 months followed by antiplatelet agents is recommended as medical treatment. Randomization is stratified according to patients age ( Discussion patients were randomized in 29 centers of Europe, Canada, and Australia. Randomization started February 2000. Enrollment of 414 patients was completed in February 2009. All patients will be followed-up longitudinally. Follow-up is maintained until the last enrolled patient is beyond 2.5 years of follow-up (expected in 2011. Trial Registration Trial listed in ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00166257 and sponsored by AGA Medical, Plymouth, MN, USA

  20. Randomized trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in oropharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenge, C; Hill, C; Lefebvre, J L; De Raucourt, D; Rhein, B; Wibault, P; Marandas, P; Coche-Dequeant, B; Stromboni-Luboinski, M; Sancho-Garnier, H; Luboinski, B

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Patients with a squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx for whom curative radiotherapy or surgery was considered feasible were entered in a multicentric randomized trial comparing neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by loco-regional treatment to the same loco-regional treatment without chemotherapy. The loco-regional treatment consisted either of surgery plus radiotherapy or of radiotherapy alone. Three cycles of chemotherapy consisting of Cisplatin (100 mg/m2) on day 1 followed by a 24-hour i.v. infusion of fluorouracil (1000 mg/m2/day) for 5 days were delivered every 21 days. 2–3 weeks after the end of chemotherapy, local treatment was performed. The trial was conducted by the Groupe d'Etude des Tumeurs de la Tête Et du Cou (GETTEC). A total of 318 patients were enrolled in the study between 1986 and 1992. Overall survival was significantly better (P = 0.03) in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy group than in the control group, with a median survival of 5.1 years versus 3.3 years in the no chemotherapy group. The effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on event-free survival was smaller and of borderline significance (P = 0.11). Stratification of the results on the type of local treatment, surgery plus radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone, did not reveal any heterogeneity in the effect of chemotherapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11189100

  1. Steroid treatment of acute graft versus host disease grade I: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Milone, Giuseppe; Crupi, Alessandra; Severino, Alessandro; Fagioli, Franca; Berger, Massimo; Santarone, Stella; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Sica, Simona; Mammoliti, Sonia; Sorasio, Roberto; Massi, Daniela; van Lint, Maria Teresa; Raiola, Anna Maria; Gualandi, Francesca; Selleri, Carmine; Sormani, Maria Pia; Signori, Alessio; Risitano, Antonio; Bonifazi, Francesca

    2017-09-29

    Patients with acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) grade I, were randomized, to an observation arm (n=85) or to a treatment arm (n=86), consisting of 6-methylprednisolone 1 mg/kg/day , after stratification for age and donor type. The primary end point was development of grade II-IV GvHD. The cumulative incidence of GvHD grade II-IV, was 50% in the observation and 33% in the treatment arm (p=0.005). However, grade III-IV GvHD was comparable (13% vs 10% respectively; p=0.6), and this was true for sibling and alternative donor transplants. Moderate/severe chronic GvHD was also comparable (17% vs 19%). In multivariate analysis, an early interval between transplant and randomization (< day +20) , was the only negative predictor of GvHD grade III-IV .Patients in the observation arm had less infectious bacterial episodes (12 vs 25, p=0.04), less severe infectious fungal episodes (0 vs 3; p=0.04), and less severe adverse events (3 vs 11 p=0.07). At 5 years, non relapse mortality was 20% (observation) vs 26% (treatment) (p=0.2), relapse related death 25% vs 21%, and actuarial survival was 51% vs 41% respectively (p=0.3). In multivariate analysis, advanced disease phase, older age and an early onset of GvHD, were significant negative predictors of survival, independent of the randomization arm. In conclusion, steroids treatment of acute GvHD grade I prevents progression to grade II but not to grade III-IV GvHD, and there is no effect on non relapse mortality and survival; patients treated with steroids, are at a higher risk of develping infections and have more adverse events. (This trial is registered as EUDTRACT 2008-000413-29). Copyright © 2017, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. Focus on Function – a randomized controlled trial comparing two rehabilitation interventions for young children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Dianne

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with cerebral palsy receive a variety of long-term physical and occupational therapy interventions to facilitate development and to enhance functional independence in movement, self-care, play, school activities and leisure. Considerable human and financial resources are directed at the "intervention" of the problems of cerebral palsy, although the available evidence supporting current interventions is inconclusive. A considerable degree of uncertainty remains about the appropriate therapeutic approaches to manage the habilitation of children with cerebral palsy. The primary objective of this project is to conduct a multi-site randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a task/context-focused approach compared to a child-focused remediation approach in improving performance of functional tasks and mobility, increasing participation in everyday activities, and improving quality of life in children 12 months to 5 years of age who have cerebral palsy. Method/Design A multi-centred randomized controlled trial research design will be used. Children will be recruited from a representative sample of children attending publicly-funded regional children's rehabilitation centers serving children with disabilities in Ontario and Alberta in Canada. Target sample size is 220 children with cerebral palsy aged 12 months to 5 years at recruitment date. Therapists are randomly assigned to deliver either a context-focused approach or a child-focused approach. Children follow their therapist into their treatment arm. Outcomes will be evaluated at baseline, after 6 months of treatment and at a 3-month follow-up period. Outcomes represent the components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, including body function and structure (range of motion, activities (performance of functional tasks, motor function, participation (involvement in formal and informal activities, and environment (parent

  3. Ipsilateral transversus abdominis plane block provides effective analgesia after appendectomy in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carney, John

    2010-10-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block provides effective postoperative analgesia in adults undergoing major abdominal surgery. Its efficacy in children remains unclear, with no randomized clinical trials in this population. In this study, we evaluated its analgesic efficacy over the first 48 postoperative hours after appendectomy performed through an open abdominal incision, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  4. Funding, disease area, and internal validity of hepatobiliary randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, Lise Lotte; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether funding and the disease area are related to the internal validity of hepatobiliary randomized clinical trials.......The aim of this study was to assess whether funding and the disease area are related to the internal validity of hepatobiliary randomized clinical trials....

  5. Is the randomized controlled drug trial in Europe lagging behind the USA?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.; Knol, Mirjam J.; Tijssen, Robert J. W.; van Leeuwen, Thed N.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT? center dot The USA, UK and Germany have a strong position in performance of drug and nondrug randomized controlled trials. center dot Europe's position in the quantitative and qualitative performance in drug randomized controlled trials in particular, and fa

  6. The reporting quality of randomized controlled trials in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempesi, Evangelia; Koletsi, Despina; Fleming, Padhraig S; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2014-06-01

    Accurate trial reporting facilitates evaluation and better use of study results. The objective of this article is to investigate the quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in leading orthodontic journals, and to explore potential predictors of improved reporting. The 50 most recent issues of 4 leading orthodontic journals until November 2013 were electronically searched. Reporting quality assessment was conducted using the modified CONSORT statement checklist. The relationship between potential predictors and the modified CONSORT score was assessed using linear regression modeling. 128 RCTs were identified with a mean modified CONSORT score of 68.97% (SD = 11.09). The Journal of Orthodontics (JO) ranked first in terms of completeness of reporting (modified CONSORT score 76.21%, SD = 10.1), followed by American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO) (73.05%, SD = 10.1). Journal of publication (AJODO: β = 10.08, 95% CI: 5.78, 14.38; JO: β = 16.82, 95% CI: 11.70, 21.94; EJO: β = 7.21, 95% CI: 2.69, 11.72 compared to Angle), year of publication (β = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.67 for each additional year), region of authorship (Europe: β = 5.19, 95% CI: 1.30, 9.09 compared to Asia/other), statistical significance (significant: β = 3.10, 95% CI: 0.11, 6.10 compared to non-significant) and methodologist involvement (involvement: β = 5.60, 95% CI: 1.66, 9.54 compared to non-involvement) were all significant predictors of improved modified CONSORT scores in the multivariable model. Additionally, median overall Jadad score was 2 (IQR = 2) across journals, with JO (median = 3, IQR = 1) and AJODO (median = 3, IQR = 2) presenting the highest score values. The reporting quality of RCTs published in leading orthodontic journals is considered suboptimal in various CONSORT areas. This may have a bearing in trial result interpretation and use in clinical decision making and evidence- based orthodontic treatment interventions. Copyright

  7. Physician Communication Training and Parental Vaccine Hesitancy: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrikson, Nora B; Opel, Douglas J; Grothaus, Lou; Nelson, Jennifer; Scrol, Aaron; Dunn, John; Faubion, Todd; Roberts, Michele; Marcuse, Edgar K; Grossman, David C

    2015-07-01

    Physicians have a major influence on parental vaccine decisions. We tested a physician-targeted communication intervention designed to (1) reduce vaccine hesitancy in mothers of infants seen by trained physicians and (2) increase physician confidence in communicating about vaccines. We conducted a community-based, clinic-level, 2-arm cluster randomized trial in Washington State. Intervention clinics received physician-targeted communications training. We enrolled mothers of healthy newborns from these clinics at the hospital of birth. Mothers and physicians were surveyed at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome was maternal vaccine hesitancy measured by Parental Attitudes on Childhood Vaccines score; secondary outcome was physician self-efficacy in communicating with parents by using 3 vaccine communication domains. We enrolled 56 clinics and 347 mothers. We conducted intervention trainings at 30 clinics, reaching 67% of eligible physicians; 26 clinics were randomized to the control group. Maternal vaccine hesitancy at baseline and follow-up changed from 9.8% to 7.5% in the intervention group and 12.6% to 8.0% in the control group. At baseline, groups were similar on all variables except maternal race and ethnicity. The intervention had no detectable effect on maternal vaccine hesitancy (adjusted odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 0.47-2.68). At follow-up, physician self-efficacy in communicating with parents was not significantly different between intervention and control groups. This physician-targeted communication intervention did not reduce maternal vaccine hesitancy or improve physician self-efficacy. Research is needed to identify physician communication strategies effective at reducing parental vaccine hesitancy in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. School-Located Influenza Vaccinations: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Peter G; Schaffer, Stanley; Rand, Cynthia M; Vincelli, Phyllis; Eagan, Ashley; Goldstein, Nicolas P N; Hightower, A Dirk; Younge, Mary; Blumkin, Aaron; Albertin, Christina S; Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Humiston, Sharon G

    2016-11-01

    Assess impact of offering school-located influenza vaccination (SLIV) clinics using both Web-based and paper consent upon overall influenza vaccination rates among elementary school children. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial (stratified by suburban/urban districts) in upstate New York in 2014-2015. We randomized 44 elementary schools, selected similar pairs of schools within districts, and allocated schools to SLIV versus usual care (control). Parents of children at SLIV schools were sent information and vaccination consent forms via e-mail, backpack fliers, or both (depending on school preferences) regarding school vaccine clinics. Health department nurses conducted vaccine clinics and billed insurers. For all children registered at SLIV/control schools, we compared receipt of influenza vaccination anywhere (primary outcome). The 44 schools served 19 776 eligible children in 2014-2015. Children in SLIV schools had higher influenza vaccination rates than children in control schools county-wide (54.1% vs 47.4%, P vaccination in previous season) confirmed bivariate findings. Among parents who consented for SLIV, nearly half of those notified by backpack fliers and four-fifths of those notified by e-mail consented online. In suburban districts, SLIV did not substitute for primary care influenza vaccination. In urban schools, some substitution occurred. SLIV raised seasonal influenza vaccination rates county-wide and in both suburban and urban settings. SLIV did not substitute for primary care vaccinations in suburban settings where pediatricians often preorder influenza vaccine but did substitute somewhat in urban settings. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Myopia Control with Bifocal Contact Lenses: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Thomas A; Liu, Maria; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2016-04-01

    Most studies have reported only minimal reductions in myopia progression with bifocal or progressive multifocal spectacles, although somewhat larger, although mostly still clinically insignificant, effects have been reported in children with nearpoint esophoria and/or accommodative dysfunctions. The CONTROL study was a 1-year, prospective, randomized, clinical trial of bifocal contact lenses for control of myopia in children with eso fixation disparities at near. Eighty-six myopic subjects, aged 8 to 18 years, were enrolled in the study after passing the screening examination. Of these, 79 completed lens assignment and 78 completed the study. The mean refractive error of these 79 subjects was -2.69 ± 1.40D (SD), and all had progressed by -0.50D or more since their last examination. All subjects also had eso fixation disparity at near. Subjects were randomly assigned to wear either Vistakon Acuvue 2 (single-vision soft contact lenses [SVSCLs]) or Vistakon Acuvue Bifocal (bifocal soft contact lenses [BFSCLs]). Bifocal adds were selected to neutralize the associated phoria. Treatment outcomes included cycloplegic autorefraction and axial length, assessed in terms of changes after 6 and 12 months of treatment from pretreatment baseline values. The BFSCLs significantly slowed myopia progression, with statistically significant differences between the treatment groups after 6 months. After 12 months of treatment, the SVSCL group had progressed by -0.79 ± 0.43D compared with -0.22 ± 0.34D for the BFSCL group (cycloplegic objective spherical equivalent, average of two eyes). Corresponding axial length changes were 0.24 ± 0.17 mm and 0.05 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. All of these differences were found to be statistically significant (unpaired t-tests, p 70%) compared with most published results with multifocal spectacles. Further studies are warranted to identify the critical factors and mechanisms underlying this myopia control effect.

  10. Preventing deformational plagiocephaly through parent guidance: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnivala, Henri; Vuollo, Ville; Harila, Virpi; Heikkinen, Tuomo; Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Valkama, A Marita

    2015-09-01

    Deformational plagiocephaly (DP) occurs frequently in otherwise healthy infants. Many infants with DP undergo physiotherapy or helmet therapy, and ample treatment-related research is available. However, the possibility of preventing DP has been left with little attention. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention in the newborn's environment, positioning, and handling on the prevalence of DP at 3 months and to investigate the causal relationship between DP and cervical imbalance. We carried out a randomized controlled trial, with healthy newborns randomized into two groups at birth. All families received standard positioning instructions to prevent SIDS. Additionally, the intervention group received detailed instructions regarding the infant's environment, positioning, and handling, with the goal of creating a nonrestrictive environment that promotes spontaneous physical movement and symmetrical motor development. Two- and three-dimensional photogrammetry served to assess cranial shape and goniometry to measure cervical motion. At 3 months, the prevalence of DP was lower in the intervention group in both 2D (11 vs 31 %) and 3D analyses (15 vs 33 %), and the asymmetry was milder in the intervention group. Infants with DP at follow-up had also developed more torticollis. An early educational intervention reduces the prevalence and severity of DP at 3 months. •Deformational plagiocephaly, often with associated torticollis, is common in healthy infants. •Parental education is frequently recommended for preventing deformational plagiocephaly, although information regarding the effectiveness of preventive strategies is scarce. •Early parent guidance effectively reduces the prevalence and severity of DP and improves the cervical range of motion at three months. •Educating both parents and professionals about proper infant positioning on a national scale could help minimize public healthcare costs.

  11. Randomized clinical trial of chewing gum after laparoscopic colorectal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, N F; Choi, H K; Mak, J C K; Foo, D C C; Li, W C; Law, W L

    2016-10-01

    Chewing gum may enhance intestinal motility after surgery. This trial studied whether chewing gum could lead to a further reduction in ileus in patients who had a laparoscopic colorectal resection and followed an enhanced recovery programme. Patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection were randomized to a control or intervention group. Patients in the control group received a standardized recovery programme. Patients in the intervention group were, in addition, given chewing gum three times daily from day 1 until discharge. Primary outcome measures were time to first flatus and first bowel motion. Time to feeling hungry and hospital stay were secondary outcome measures. Forty-one patients were randomized into each group. Thirty-seven patients underwent rectal resection and 45 had a colonic resection. Time to passage of flatus was shorter (18 versus 34 h; P = 0·007), first bowel motion occurred earlier (19 versus 44 h; P = 0·001) and time to feeling hungry was earlier (16 versus 25 h; P = 0·001) in the intervention group. There was no difference in the duration of hospital stay (5 days in the intervention group versus 5·5 days in the control group). Subgroup analyses revealed that the benefits of chewing gum were clearer in patients who had a colonic resection, with a shorter time to first flatus (20 versus 35 h; P = 0·043), first bowel motion (19 versus 53 h; P = 0·014) and feeling hungry (14 versus 40 h; P = 0·001). No adverse events were attributed to chewing gum. Chewing gum is a simple intervention that speeds intestinal transit in patients managed with a recovery programme after laparoscopic colorectal resection. NCT02419586 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/). © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Treatment of occult bacteremia: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, W L; Farrell, M K; Singer, J I; Jackson, M A; Lobel, J S; Lewis, E D

    1983-11-01

    Antibiotic therapy for children without foci of infection and at risk for bacteremia is controversial. A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted using expectant antibiotic therapy in children at risk for bacteremia. A total of 96 children (aged 6 to 24 months) with temperature of more than 40 degrees C, no identifiable source of infection, and a leukocyte count greater than or equal to 15,000/microL and/or sedimentation rate greater than or equal to 30 were enrolled. The following tests were performed on all children: blood culture, chest roentgenogram, urinalysis, and urine culture. A lumbar puncture was performed if a child was 12 months or less. Patients were randomized to receive either no antibiotic therapy or Bicillin C-R, 50,000 U/kg intramuscularly, followed by penicillin V, 100 mg/kg/d, orally four times a day for three days. Patients were examined at 24 and 72 hours. Fifty patients were treated expectantly and 46 received no antimicrobial therapy. Ten of the 96 patients were bacteremic (nine had Streptococcus pneumoniae, one had Haemophilus influenzae). Four of the five children treated for bacteremia showed improvement at the first follow-up visit (afebrile and no obvious focus of infection). The five untreated patients showed no improvement; four patients developed focal infections (two had meningitis, two had otitis media) (P less than or equal to .05, Fisher exact test). No complications of expectant therapy were detected. Thus, expectant antibiotic therapy for children who have no obvious source of infection and who meet these criteria associated with occult bacteremia is warranted.

  13. Sentence retrieval for abstracts of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Grace Y

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM requires clinicians to integrate their expertise with the latest scientific research. But this is becoming increasingly difficult with the growing numbers of published articles. There is a clear need for better tools to improve clinician's ability to search the primary literature. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs are the most reliable source of evidence documenting the efficacy of treatment options. This paper describes the retrieval of key sentences from abstracts of RCTs as a step towards helping users find relevant facts about the experimental design of clinical studies. Method Using Conditional Random Fields (CRFs, a popular and successful method for natural language processing problems, sentences referring to Intervention, Participants and Outcome Measures are automatically categorized. This is done by extending a previous approach for labeling sentences in an abstract for general categories associated with scientific argumentation or rhetorical roles: Aim, Method, Results and Conclusion. Methods are tested on several corpora of RCT abstracts. First structured abstracts with headings specifically indicating Intervention, Participant and Outcome Measures are used. Also a manually annotated corpus of structured and unstructured abstracts is prepared for testing a classifier that identifies sentences belonging to each category. Results Using CRFs, sentences can be labeled for the four rhetorical roles with F-scores from 0.93–0.98. This outperforms the use of Support Vector Machines. Furthermore, sentences can be automatically labeled for Intervention, Participant and Outcome Measures, in unstructured and structured abstracts where the section headings do not specifically indicate these three topics. F-scores of up to 0.83 and 0.84 are obtained for Intervention and Outcome Measure sentences. Conclusion Results indicate that some of the methodological elements of RCTs are

  14. Pregnant womens' concerns when invited to a randomized trial : a qualitative case control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Logtenberg, Sabine; Hooft, Lotty; Bossuyt, Patrick M; Mol, Ben Willem; Oude Rengerink, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant women were excluded from clinical trials until the 1990s, but the Food and Drug Administration nowadays allows--and even encourages--responsible inclusion of pregnant women in trials with adequate safety monitoring. Still, randomized trials in pregnant women face specific enrolm

  15. Rapid Extremity Pain Relief by Battlefield Acupuncture after Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    FINAL REPORT Project Title: Rapid Extremity Pain Relief by Battlefield Acupuncture after Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial...prevent adverse effects of sedation and decreased job performance. Auricular acupuncture has been evaluated in multiple trials, and although...generally proven to be useful, these trials were not rigorous. This study seeks to determine if modified Battlefield Acupuncture is more effective at

  16. The chronic care for wet age related macular degeneration (CHARMED) study: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Markun, Stefan; Dishy, Avraham; Neuner-Jehle, Stefan; Rosemann, Thomas; Frei, Anja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In real life, outcomes in wet age related macular degeneration (W-AMD) continue to fall behind the results from randomized controlled trials. The aim of this trial was to assess if outcomes can be improved by an intervention in healthcare organization following recommendations of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). METHODS: Multi-centered randomized controlled clinical trial. The multifaceted intervention consisted in reorganization of care (delivery by trained chronic care coaches, ...

  17. The Chronic Care for Wet Age Related Macular Degeneration (CHARMED) Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Markun; Avraham Dishy; Stefan Neuner-Jehle; Thomas Rosemann; Anja Frei

    2015-01-01

    Background In real life, outcomes in wet age related macular degeneration (W-AMD) continue to fall behind the results from randomized controlled trials. The aim of this trial was to assess if outcomes can be improved by an intervention in healthcare organization following recommendations of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). Methods Multi-centered randomized controlled clinical trial. The multifaceted intervention consisted in reorganization of care (delivery by trained chronic care coaches, using...

  18. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care: reporting standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brölmann, Fleur E; Eskes, Anne M; Sumpio, Bauer E; Mayer, Dieter O; Moore, Zena; Agren, Magnus S; Hermans, Michel; Cutting, Keith; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2013-01-01

    In wound care research, available high-level evidence according to the evidence pyramid is rare, and is threatened by a poor study design and reporting. Without comprehensive and transparent reporting, readers will not be able to assess the strengths and limitations of the research performed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are universally acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects. To give high-level evidence the appreciation it deserves in wound care, we propose a step-by-step reporting standard for comprehensive and transparent reporting of RCTs in wound care. Critical reporting issues (e.g., wound care terminology, blinding, predefined outcome measures, and a priori sample size calculation) and wound-specific barriers (e.g., large diversity of etiologies and comorbidities of patients with wounds) that may prevent uniform implementation of reporting standards in wound care research are addressed in this article. The proposed reporting standards can be used as guidance for authors who write their RCT, as well as for peer reviewers of journals. Endorsement and application of these reporting standards may help achieve a higher standard of evidence and allow meta-analysis of reported wound care data. The ultimate goal is to help wound care professionals make better decisions for their patients in clinical practice.

  19. Evaluating cognitive effort in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis H; Renfroe, Jenna B; Morella, Kristen; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2016-09-01

    Many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropsychiatric conditions involve cognitive outcome measures; however, validity of cognitive data relies on adequate effort during testing, and such screening is seldom performed. Given well-established rates of 10 to 30% poor effort in clinical settings, this is not a trivial concern. This preliminary study evaluated effort during cognitive testing in an RCT of omega-3 supplementation to reduce suicidality in a high-risk psychiatric population. An interim analysis of sustained attentions measures from the Connors Performance Test (CPT-2) at baseline for the first 60 participants was conducted. Previously validated cut points to detect insufficient effort on the CPT-2 were applied. At baseline, 12% (7) were identified as giving poor effort. Follow-up analyses indicated less psychiatric distress and suicidality among those who gave poor effort. Results suggest comparable likelihood of a poor effort on cognitive testing in clinical and RCT participation. Reduced psychiatric distress in the poor effort group raises concern regarding interpretation of other measures. The importance of screening cognitive data for effort in RCTs is highlighted. Future studies will examine effort at follow-up visits, and explore relationships to attrition, adherence, and response to treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Clinical randomized controlled trial of chemomechanical caries removal (Carisolv).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Chourio, M A; Zambrano, O; González, H; Quero, M

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the chemomechanical caries-removal system (Carisolv) with high-speed excavation in cavitated occlusal caries of primary molars. Design and setting. The study was a randomized controlled, clinical trial in which the two techniques were compared in each subject. Participants were chosen from public schools, in Maracaibo County, Zulia State, Venezuela. The sample consisted of 80 primary molars selected from 40 children (mean age 7.7+/-0.7 years). Each patient had at least two contralateral primary molars with cavitated occlusal caries and approximately equal-size access to lesions. The outcome variables were: clinically complete caries removal, size of the opening of the cavity, volume of carious tissue removed, pain during caries removal, anaesthesia requested by the patient, caries-removal time, and behaviour and preference of patients. All treated molars were clinically caries free whichever caries-removal procedure was used. When Carisolv' was used the final cavity entrance sizes were smaller (Premoved was less (Premoval was three times longer (7.51+/-1.83 min, Premoval of occlusal dentinal caries in cavitated primary molars; it is more conservative of dental tissue and appeared to be more comfortable for most patients, although the clinical time spent is longer than when using high-speed excavation.

  1. A randomized trial of dietary sodium restriction in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Emma J; Bauer, Judith D; Hawley, Carmel M; Isbel, Nicole M; Stowasser, Michael; Johnson, David W; Campbell, Katrina L

    2013-12-01

    There is a paucity of quality evidence regarding the effects of sodium restriction in patients with CKD, particularly in patients with pre-end stage CKD, where controlling modifiable risk factors may be especially important for delaying CKD progression and cardiovascular events. We conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized crossover trial assessing the effects of high versus low sodium intake on ambulatory BP, 24-hour protein and albumin excretion, fluid status (body composition monitor), renin and aldosterone levels, and arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity and augmentation index) in 20 adult patients with hypertensive stage 3-4 CKD as phase 1 of the LowSALT CKD study. Overall, salt restriction resulted in statistically significant and clinically important reductions in BP (mean reduction of systolic/diastolic BP, 10/4 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 5 to 15 /1 to 6 mm Hg), extracellular fluid volume, albuminuria, and proteinuria in patients with moderate-to-severe CKD. The magnitude of change was more pronounced than the magnitude reported in patients without CKD, suggesting that patients with CKD are particularly salt sensitive. Although studies with longer intervention times and larger sample sizes are needed to confirm these benefits, this study indicates that sodium restriction should be emphasized in the management of patients with CKD as a means to reduce cardiovascular risk and risk for CKD progression.

  2. Biofeedback treatment for Tourette syndrome: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko; Cavanna, Andrea E; Critchley, Hugo D; Stern, Jeremy J; Robertson, Mary M; Joyce, Eileen M

    2014-03-01

    To study the clinical effectiveness of biofeedback treatment in reducing tics in patients with Tourette syndrome. Despite advances in the pharmacologic treatment of patients with Tourette syndrome, many remain troubled by their tics, which may be resistant to multiple medications at tolerable doses. Electrodermal biofeedback is a noninvasive biobehavioral intervention that can be useful in managing neuropsychiatric and neurologic conditions. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of electrodermal biofeedback training in 21 patients with Tourette syndrome. After training the patients for 3 sessions a week over 4 weeks, we observed a significant reduction in tic frequency and improved indices of subjective well-being in both the active-biofeedback and sham-feedback (control) groups, but there was no difference between the groups in these measurements. Furthermore, the active-treatment group did not demonstrably learn to reduce their sympathetic electrodermal tone using biofeedback. Our findings indicate that this form of biofeedback training was unable to produce a clinical effect greater than placebo. The main confounding factor appeared to be the 30-minute duration of the training sessions, which made it difficult for patients to sustain a reduction in sympathetic tone when their tics themselves were generating competing phasic electrodermal arousal responses. Despite a negative finding in this study, electrodermal biofeedback training may have a role in managing tics if optimal training schedules can be identified.

  3. Childhood Fruit and Vegetable Intake: A Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Rosário

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study aimed to assess the impact of a six-months nutrition program, taught by trained teachers, on fruit and vegetable consumption among children in grades 1 to 4. Four hundred and sixty-four children (239 female, 6 to 12 years old, from seven elementary schools were assigned to this randomized trial. Teachers were trained by researchers over six months, according to the following topics: nutrition, healthy eating, and strategies to increase physical activity. After each session, teachers were encouraged to develop activities in the classroom on the topics learned. Children's sociodemographic, anthropometric, dietary, and physical activity data were assessed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. The effect sizes ranged between small (Cohen's d=0.12 on “other vegetables” to medium (0.56 on “fruit and vegetable”, and intervened children reported a significantly higher consumption of vegetables and fruit. Interventions involving trained teachers offer promise to increase consumption of fruit and vegetable in children.

  4. Reducing mucus production after urinary reconstruction: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Dow, J; Robson, C N; Matthews, J N; Neal, D E; Pearson, J P

    2001-05-01

    After transposition into the urinary tract, intestinal segments continue to produce mucus. We determine the effectiveness of muco-regulatory drugs, including N-acetylcysteine, aspirin and ranitidine, in reducing mucus secretion and urine viscosity in patients with transposed segments. Our trial was a prospective randomized, double-blind placebo controlled crossover study involving 12 patients who underwent ileal conduit and 31 who underwent bladder reconstruction. Each treatment lasted 3 weeks with a 2-week washout. Pretreatment and posttreatment 24-hour urine samples were analyzed for mucin and viscosity after papain digestion, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and periodic acid-Schiff assay. A disease specific questionnaire and SF-36 quality of life survey were completed. According to the questionnaire, mucus production did not decrease with time in 67% of patients. Mucin comprised 3% of the total nondialyzable material in urine (65 mg./24-hour for ileal conduit and 60 mg./24-hour for bladder reconstruction). Analysis of questionnaires and laboratory results failed to demonstrate any benefit of taking muco-regulatory agents compared with placebo. The use of N-acetylcysteine, aspirin and ranitidine did not result in a reduction in mucin production, urine viscosity or improvement in quality of life.

  5. Comparison of two interdental cleaning aids: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlmann, L; Frentzen, M; Schroeder, J; Fimmers, R

    2017-07-13

    The aim of this study was a comparison of the handling and acceptance of two kinds of interdental brushes (interdental brush with a handle [HB] and a newly invented interdental cleaning device [NB]). In a randomized crossover trial, 40 test subjects with an average number of 23.5 interdental areas were examined. At two appointments with a "washout" period of one week, the volunteers tried out both cleaning tools (HB and NB). They were asked to clean as many interdental spaces as possible. The percentage of spaces, which could be reached, is the IRI (Interdental Reachability Index). Furthermore, subjective impressions were determined. The average IRI using HB was 64% compared to 80% using of NB (Psubjective feeling after cleaning was 1.75 with NB compared to 2.2 with HB (P=.015), grading the feeling, from 1 for "very good" to 5 for "poor." The acceptance of regular interdental hygiene was rated 1.95 in the case of the NB and 2.85 in the case of the HB. After both appointments, the test subjects declared that they would use the NB 3.05 times and the HB 1.78 times a week. This study shows that the test subjects reached more interdental spaces with NB than with the HB. NB can improve the usage of interdental brushes. Regarding subjective comfort, participants also favoured NB over HB. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Validating Obstetric Emergency Checklists using Simulation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Komal; Rivera-Chiauzzi, Enid Y; Lee, Colleen; Shepard, Cynthia; Bernstein, Peter S; Moore-Murray, Tanya; Smith, Heather; Nathan, Lisa; Walker, Katie; Chazotte, Cynthia; Goffman, Dena

    2016-10-01

    Background The World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist has demonstrated significant reduction in surgical morbidity. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists District II Safe Motherhood Initiative (SMI) safety bundles include eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) checklists. Objective To determine whether use of the SMI checklists during simulated obstetric emergencies improved completion of critical actions and to elicit feedback to facilitate checklist revision. Study Design During this randomized controlled trial, teams were assigned to use a checklist during one of two emergencies: eclampsia and PPH. Raters scored teams on critical step completion. Feedback was elicited through structured debriefing. Results In total, 30 teams completed 60 scenarios. For eclampsia, trends toward higher completion were noted for blood pressure and airway management. For PPH, trends toward higher completion rates were noted for PPH stage assessment and fundal massage. Feedback resulted in substantial checklist revision. Participants were enthusiastic about using checklists in a clinical emergency. Conclusion Despite trends toward higher rates of completion of critical tasks, teams using checklists did not approach 100% task completion. Teams were interested in the application of checklists and provided feedback necessary to substantially revise the checklists. Intensive implementation planning and training in use of the revised checklists will result in improved patient outcomes.

  7. Hypnosis for Smoking Relapse Prevention: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Timothy P; Duncan, Carol L; Solkowitz, Sharon N; Huggins, Joy; Simon, Joel A

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether hypnosis would be more effective than standard behavioral counseling in helping smokers to remain abstinent. A total of 140 current smokers were enrolled in a randomized controlled smoking cessation trial at an urban Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants (n = 102) who were able to quit for at least 3 days received either a hypnosis or behavioral relapse prevention intervention. Both relapse prevention interventions consisted of two 60 min face-to-face sessions and four 20 min follow-up phone calls (two phone calls per week). At 26 weeks, the validate\\d point-prevalence quit rate was 35% for the hypnosis group and 42% for the behavioral counseling group (relative risk = 0.85; 95% confidence interval: 0.52-1.40). At 52 weeks, the validated quit rate was 29% for the hypnosis group and 28% for the behavioral group (relative risk  = 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.56-1.91). It was concluded that hypnosis warrants further investigation as an intervention for facilitating maintenance of quitting.

  8. Rosuvastatin vs. protease inhibitor switching for hypercholesterolaemia: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, F J; Monteiro, P; Baker, D; Bloch, M; Roth, N; Finlayson, R; Moore, R; Hoy, J; Martinez, E; Carr, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin initiation with those of switching of ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/rs) in HIV-1-infected adults with hypercholesterolaemia and increased cardiovascular risk scores. In this open-label, multicentre study, HIV-1-infected adults on PI/r-based therapy with viral load < 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, fasting total cholesterol ≥ 5.5 mmol/L (both for ≥ 6 months) and elevated cardiovascular risk (Framingham score ≥ 8% or diabetes or family history), and not on lipid-lowering therapy, were randomized to open-label rosuvastatin 10 mg/day or to PI/r switching, both with standardized diet/exercise advice. The primary endpoint was change in total cholesterol at week 12 (intention to treat). There were 43 participants (23 on rosuvastatin). Baseline characteristics were: mean [± standard deviation (SD)] age 55 (8.5) years, 42 (98%) male, 41 (95%) white race, and mean (± SD) total cholesterol 6.2 (1.2) mmol/L. At enrolment, PI/rs were lopinavir/ritonavir (n = 22; 51%), atazanavir/ritonavir (n = 12; 28%) and darunavir/ritonavir (n = 9; 21%). The commonest PI/r substitutes were raltegravir (n = 9; 45%) and rilpivirine (n = 4; 20%). All participants were adherent through to week 12. Rosuvastatin yielded greater declines than PI/r switching in total (- 21.4% vs. - 8.7%, respectively; P = 0.003) and low-density lipoprotein (- 29.9% vs. - 1.0%, respectively; P < 0.001) cholesterol, but smaller declines in very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (P < 0.01). Cholesterol lowering was greater in participants on atazanavir/ritonavir or once-daily darunavir/ritonavir (vs. lopinavir/ritonavir). More study drug-related adverse events (mostly grade 1 nausea/diarrhoea; 10 vs. one, respectively; P = 0.001) occurred with PI/r switching than with rosuvastatin. In adults receiving a PI/r, rosuvastatin 10 mg/day for 12 weeks yielded larger decreases in total and low-density lipoprotein

  9. Estimation of treatment efficacy with complier average causal effects (CACE) in a randomized stepped wedge trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Joshua S; Arnold, Benjamin F; Reygadas, Fermin; Hubbard, Alan E; Colford, John M

    2014-05-01

    Complier average causal effects (CACE) estimate the impact of an intervention among treatment compliers in randomized trials. Methods used to estimate CACE have been outlined for parallel-arm trials (e.g., using an instrumental variables (IV) estimator) but not for other randomized study designs. Here, we propose a method for estimating CACE in randomized stepped wedge trials, where experimental units cross over from control conditions to intervention conditions in a randomized sequence. We illustrate the approach with a cluster-randomized drinking water trial conducted in rural Mexico from 2009 to 2011. Additionally, we evaluated the plausibility of assumptions required to estimate CACE using the IV approach, which are testable in stepped wedge trials but not in parallel-arm trials. We observed small increases in the magnitude of CACE risk differences compared with intention-to-treat estimates for drinking water contamination (risk difference (RD) = -22% (95% confidence interval (CI): -33, -11) vs. RD = -19% (95% CI: -26, -12)) and diarrhea (RD = -0.8% (95% CI: -2.1, 0.4) vs. RD = -0.1% (95% CI: -1.1, 0.9)). Assumptions required for IV analysis were probably violated. Stepped wedge trials allow investigators to estimate CACE with an approach that avoids the stronger assumptions required for CACE estimation in parallel-arm trials. Inclusion of CACE estimates in stepped wedge trials with imperfect compliance could enhance reporting and interpretation of the results of such trials.

  10. A Double Blind Randomized Clinical Trial of Remote Ischemic Conditioning in Live Donor Renal Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, Michael L; Pattenden, Clare J.; Barlow, Adam D.; Hunter, James P.; Lee, Gwyn; Hosgood, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ischemic conditioning involves the delivery of short cycles of reversible ischemic injury in order to induce protection against subsequent more prolonged ischemia. This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine the safety and efficacy of remote ischemic conditioning (RC) in live donor kidney transplantation. This prospective randomized clinical trial, 80 patients undergoing live donor kidney transplantation were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either RC or to a contro...

  11. Five-year postretention outcomes of three retention methods--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edman Tynelius, Gudrun; Petrén, Sofia; Bondemark, Lars; Lilja-Karlander, Eva

    2015-08-01

    Comparison of three different retention strategies 5 years or more postretention. Randomized, prospective, single-centre controlled trial. Forty-nine patients (33 girls and 16 boys) were randomly assigned to one of three retention methods during 2 years by picking a ballot shortly before start of retention treatment. Inclusion criteria were no previous orthodontics, permanent dentition, normal skeletal sagittal, vertical, and transversal relationships, Class I dental relationship, space deficiencies, treatment plan with extractions of four premolars followed by fixed straight-wire appliance. Maxillary and mandibular Little's irregularity index (LII), intercanine and intermolar width, arch length, and overbite/overjet were recorded in a blinded manner, altogether 10 measurements on each patient. Significant differences in means within groups assessed by t-test and between groups by one-way analysis of variance. Retention methods: removable vacuum-formed retainer (VFR) covering the palate and the maxillary anterior teeth from canine-to-canine and bonded canine-to-canine retainer in the lower arch (group V-CTC); maxillary VFR combined with stripping of the lower anterior teeth (group V-S); and prefabricated positioner (group P). Maxillary mean LII ranged from 1.8 to 2.6mm, mean intercanine width 33.6-35.3mm with a significant difference between groups V-S and P, mean intermolar width 46.8-47.4mm and mean arch length 21.8-22.8mm. Mandibular mean LII ranged from 2.0 to 3.4mm with a significant difference between groups V-S and P, mean intercanine width from 25.4 to 26.6mm, mean intermolar width from 40.8 to 40.9mm and mean arch length from 16.9 to 17.3mm. Mean overbite ranged from 1.8 to 2.7mm and mean overjet from 3.7 to 4.1mm. A single centre study could be less generalizable. The three retention methods disclosed equally favourable clinical results. This trial was not registered. The protocol was not published before trial commencement. © The Author 2014. Published

  12. Echinacea for treating the common cold: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Bruce; Brown, Roger; Rakel, Dave; Mundt, Marlon; Bone, Kerry; Barlow, Shari; Ewers, Tola

    2011-01-01

    Background Echinacea is widely used to treat common cold. Objective To assess potential benefits of echinacea as common cold treatment. Design Randomized controlled trial with four parallel groups: 1) no pills, 2) placebo pills (blinded), 3) echinacea pills (blinded), or 4) echinacea pills (open-label). (NCT00065715) Setting Community-based trial. Participants People aged 12 to 80 years with new onset common cold. Interventions Extracts of Echinacea purpurea and E. angustifolia root were used to make tablets standardized to alkamide content. Indistinguishable placebo tablets contained only inert ingredients. Measurements The primary outcome was area-under-the-curve global severity, with severity assessed twice daily by self report on the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21). Secondary outcomes included interleukin-8 and neutrophil count from nasal wash assessed at intake and two days later. Results Of 719 enrolled, 713 completed the protocol. Participants were 64% female and 88% white, with mean age 33.7 years. Mean global severity was 236 and 258 for blinded and unblinded echinacea, 264 for blinded placebo, and 286 for those without pills. Contrasting the two blinded groups yields a 28 point (95% CI = −69 to 13) trend toward benefit for echinacea (p=0.089). Mean illness duration for the blinded and unblinded echinacea groups was 6.34 and 6.76 days, respectively, compared to 6.87 days for blinded placebo and 7.03 for no pills. Contrasting blinded groups yields a 0.53 day (95% CI = −1.25 to 0.19) trend toward benefit (p = 0.075). Median change interleukin-8 (pg/mL) and neutrophil cell count were: no pills (30, 1), blinded placebo (39, 1), blinded echinacea (58, 2), and open-label echinacea (70, 1), also not statistically significant. Limitations Higher-than-expected variability limited power to detect small-but-potentially-important benefits. Conclusions The observed shorter illness duration and lower severity seen in the echinacea groups were

  13. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Powell (Janet); Sweeting, M.J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; F.A. Lederle (Frank); Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; J. Beard (James); M. Buxton (M.); Brown, L.C.; Harris, P.L.; Powell, J.T.; Rose, J.D.G.; Russell, I.T.; Sculpher, M.J.; S.G. Thompson (Simon); Lilford, R.J.; Bell, P.R.F.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Whitaker, S.C.; Poole-Wilson, P.A.; Ruckley, C.V.; Campbell, W.B.; Dean, M.R.E.; Ruttley, M.S.T.; Coles, E.C.; Powell, J.T.; A. Halliday (A.); Gibbs, S.J.; Brown, L.C.; Epstein, D.; M. Sculpher (Mark); Thompson, S.G.; Hannon, R.J.; Johnston, L.; L.A. Bradbury (Linda); Henderson, M.J.; Parvin, S.D.; Shepherd, D.F.C.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Mitchell, A.W.; Edwards, P.R.; Abbott, G.T.; Higman, D.J.; Vohra, A.; Ashley, S.; Robottom, C.; M. Wyatt (M.); Rose, J.D.G.; Byrne, D.; Edwards, R.; Leiberman, D.P.; McCarter, D.H.; Taylor, P.R.; Reidy, J.F.; Wilkinson, A.R.; D. Ettles (D.); Clason, A.E.; Leen, G.L.S.; Wilson, N.V.; Downes, M.; S. Walker (S.); Lavelle, J.M.; Gough, M.J.; McPherson, S.; D.J.A. Scott (D Julian); Kessell, D.O.; C.D. Naylor; I. Sayers (Ian); Fishwick, N.G.; Harris, P.L.; Gould, D.A.; Walker, M.G.; Chalmers, N.C.; Garnham, A.; Collins, M.A.; Beard, J.D.; P.A. Gaines (Peter); Ashour, M.Y.; Uberoi, R.; Braithwaite, B.; Whitaker, S.C.; Davies, J.N.; Travis, S.; Hamilton, G.; A. Platts (A.); Shandall, A.; Sullivan, B.A.; Sobeh, M.; Matson, M.; Fox, A.D.; Orme, R.; Yusef, W.; Doyle, T.; Horrocks, M.; Hardman, J.; Blair, P.H.B.; Ellis, P.K.; Morris, G.; Odurny, A.; Vohra, R.; Duddy, M.; M.J. Thompson (Matthew); Loosemore, T.M.L.; Belli, A.M.; Morgan, R.; Adiseshiah, M.; J. Brookes (J.); McCollum, C.N.; R. Ashleigh (R.); Aukett, M.; Baker, S.; Barbe, E.; Batson, N.; J.L. Bell (Jocelyn); Blundell, J.; Boardley, D.; Boyes, S.; Brown, O.; Bryce, J.; Carmichael, M.; Chance, T.; Coleman, J.; Cosgrove, C.; Curran, G.; Dennison, T.; Devine, C.; Dewhirst, N.; Errington, B.; Farrell, H.; Fisher, C.; Fulford, P.; Gough, M.; Graham, C.; Hooper, R.; Horne, G.; Horrocks, L.; Hughes, B.; Hutchings, T.; Ireland, M.; Judge, C.; Kelly, L.; Kemp, J.; Kite, A.; Kivela, M.; Lapworth, M.; Lee, C.; Linekar, L.; Mahmood, A.; March, L.; Martin, J.; Matharu, N.; McGuigen, K.; Morris-Vincent, P.; Murray, S.; Murtagh, A.; Owen, G.; Ramoutar, V.; Rippin, C.; Rowley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Spencer, S.; Taylor, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wealleans, V.; West, J.; White, K.; Williams, J.; Wilson, L.; D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); Blankensteijn, J.D.; Bak, A.A.A.; Buth, J.; P.M.T. Pattynama (Peter M.T.); Verhoeven, E.L.G.; van Voorthuisen, A.E.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Balm, R.; Buth, J.; P.M.W. Cuypers (Philippe); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); Prinssen, M.; M.H.R.M. van Sambeek (Marc H. R.); Verhoeven, E.L.G.; A.F. Baas (Annette); Hunink, M.G.; J.M. Engelshoven (Jos); M. Jacobs (Michael); B.A.J.M. de Mol; J.H. van Bockel; Balm, R.; J.A. Reekers (Jim); X. Tielbeek; E.L.G. Verhoeven (Eric); W. Wisselink; N. Boekema; Heuveling, L.M.; I. Sikking; M. Prinssen (Monique); R. Balm (Ron); J.D. Blankensteijn (Jan); J. Buth (Jaap); P.M.W. Cuypers (Philippe); van Sambeek, M.R.H.M.; Verhoeven, E.L.G.; J.L. de Bruin (Jorg); A.F. Baas (Annette); Blankensteijn, J.D.; Prinssen, M.; J. Buth (Jacob); A.V. Tielbeek (Alexander); J.D. Blankensteijn (Jan); R. Balm (Ron); Reekers, J.A.; M.R.H.M. van Sambeek (M. R H M); P.M.T. Pattynama (Peter); E.L.G. Verhoeven (Eric); T. Prins (T.); A.C. van der Ham (Arie); van der Velden, J.J.I.M.; S.M.M. van Sterkenburg (S. M M); G.B. ten Haken (G.); C.M.A. Bruijninckx; H. van Overhagen (H.); R.P. Tutein Nolthenius; C. Hendriksz (Chris); J.A.W. Teijink (J. A W); H.F. Odink (H.); A.A. de Smet (André); D. Vroegindeweij (Dammis); R.M.M. van Loenhout (R. M M); M.J. Rutten (M.); J.F. Hamming (Jaap); L.E.H. Lampmann (L. E H); M.H.M. Bender (M. H M); S.G.M.A. Pasmans (Suzanne); A. Vahl (Anco); C. de Vries (Cees); A.J. Mackaay (Albert); L. van Dortmont (Laura); van der Vliet, A.J.; L.J. Schultze Kool (L.); J.B.B. Boomsma (J. B B); H.R. van Dop (H.); J.C.A. de Mol van Otterloo (J. C A); T.P.W. de Rooij (T. P W); T.M. Smits (T.); P. Yilmaz (Pinar); Wisselink, W.; F.G. van den Berg (Fred); M.J.T. Visser (M. J T); E. van der Linden (Edwin); G.W. Schurink; M.G. Haan (Michiel); H.J. Smeets (Harm); Stabel, P.; F. van Elst (F.); J. Poniewierski (J.); F. Vermassen (Frank); Lederle, F.A.; Freischlag, J.A.; Kohler, T.R.; Latts, E.; Matsumura, J.; Padberg, F.T.; Kyriakides, T.C.; Swanson, K.M.; Guarino, P.; Peduzzi, P.; Antonelli, M.; Cushing, C.; Davis, E.; Durant, L.; Joyner, S.; Kossack, A.; Kyriakides, T.C.; LeGwin, M. (Mary); McBride, V.; O'Connor, T.; Poulton, J.; Stratton, S.; Zellner, S.; Snodgrass, A.J.; Thornton, J.; Swanson, K.M.; Haakenson, C.M.; Stroupe, K.T.; Jonk, Y.; Hallett, J.W.; Hertzer, N.; Towne, J.; Katz, D.A.; Karrison, T.; Matts, J.P.; Marottoli, R.; Kasl, S.; Mehta, R.; Feldman, R.; Farrell, W.; Allore, H.; Perry, E.; Niederman, J.; Randall, F.; Zeman, M.; Beckwith, D.; O'Leary, T.J.; Huang, G.D.; Latts, E.; Bader, M.; Ketteler, E.R.; Kingsley, D.D.; Marek, J.M.; Massen, R.J.; Matteson, B.D.; Pitcher, J.D.; Langsfeld, M.; Corson, J.D.; Goff, J.M.; Kasirajan, K.; Paap, C.; Robertson, D.C.; Salam, A.; Veeraswamy, R.; Milner, R.; Kasirajan, K.; Guidot, J.; Lal, B.K.; Busuttil, S.J.; Lilly, M.P.; Braganza, M.; Ellis, K.; Patterson, M.A.; Jordan, W.D.; Whitley, D.; Taylor, S.; Passman, M.; Kerns, D.; Inman, C.; Poirier, J.; Ebaugh, J.; Raffetto, J.; Chew, D.; Lathi, S.; Owens, C.; Hickson, K.; Dosluoglu, H.H.; Eschberger, K.; Kibbe, M.R.; Baraniewski, H.M.; Matsumura, J.; Endo, M.; Busman, A.; Meadows, W.; Evans, M.; Giglia, J.S.; El Sayed, H.; Reed, A.B.; Ruf, M.; Ross, S.; Jean-Claude, J.M.; Pinault, G.; Kang, P.; White, N.; Eiseman, M.; Jones, R.; Timaran, C.H.; Modrall, J.G.; Welborn, M.B.; Lopez, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chacko, J.K.Y.; Granke, K.; Vouyouka, A.G.; Olgren, E.; Chand, P.; Allende, B.; Ranella, M.; Yales, C.; Whitehill, T.A.; Krupski, W.C.; Nehler, M.R.; Johnson, S.P.; Jones, D.N.; Strecker, P.; Bhola, M.A.; Shortell, C.K.; Gray, J.L.; Lawson, J.H.; McCann, R.; Sebastian, M.W.; Kistler Tetterton, J.; Blackwell, C.; Prinzo, P.A.; Lee, N.; Padberg, F.T.; Cerveira, J.J.; Lal, B.K.; Zickler, R.W.; Hauck, K.A.; Berceli, S.A.; Lee, W.A.; Ozaki, C.K.; Nelson, P.R.; Irwin, A.S.; Baum, R.; Aulivola, B.; Rodriguez, H.; Littooy, F.N.; Greisler, H.; O'Sullivan, M.T.; Kougias, P.; Lin, P.H.; Bush, R.L.; Guinn, G.; Bechara, C.; Cagiannos, C.; Pisimisis, G.; Barshes, N.; Pillack, S.; Guillory, B.; Cikrit, D.; Lalka, S.G.; Lemmon, G.; Nachreiner, R.; Rusomaroff, M.; O'Brien, E.; Cullen, J.J.; Hoballah, J.; Sharp, W.J.; McCandless, J.L.; Beach, V.; Minion, D.; Schwarcz, T.H.; Kimbrough, J.; Ashe, L.; Rockich, A.; Warner-Carpenter, J.; Moursi, M.; Eidt, J.F.; Brock, S.; Bianchi, C.; Bishop, V.; Gordon, I.L.; Fujitani, R.; Kubaska, S.M.; Behdad, M.; Azadegan, R.; Ma Agas, C.; Zalecki, K.; Hoch, J.R.; Carr, S.C.; Acher, C.; Schwarze, M.; Tefera, G.; Mell, M.; Dunlap, B.; Rieder, J.; Stuart, J.M.; Weiman, D.S.; Abul-Khoudoud, O.; Garrett, H.E.; Walsh, S.M.; Wilson, K.L.; Seabrook, G.R.; Cambria, R.A.; Brown, K.R.; Lewis, B.D.; Framberg, S.; Kallio, C.; Barke, R.A.; Santilli, S.M.; d'Audiffret, A.C.; Oberle, N.; Proebstle, C.; Johnson, L.L.; Jacobowitz, G.R.; Cayne, N.; Rockman, C.; Adelman, M.; P.J. Gagne (Paul); Nalbandian, M.; Caropolo, L.J.; Pipinos, I.I.; Johanning, J.; Lynch, T.; DeSpiegelaere, H.; Purviance, G.; Zhou, W.; Dalman, R.; Lee, J.T.; Safadi, B.; Coogan, S.M.; Wren, S.M.; Bahmani, D.D.; Maples, D.; Thunen, S.; Golden, M.A.; Mitchell, M.E.; Fairman, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Wilson, M.A.; Tzeng, E.; Muluk, S.; Peterson, N.M.; Foster, M.; Edwards, J.; G. Moneta (Greg); Landry, G.; Taylor, L.; Yeager, R.; Cannady, E.; Treiman, G.; Hatton-Ward, S.; Salabsky, B.; Kansal, N.; Owens, E.; Estes, M.; Forbes, B.A.; Sobotta, C.; Rapp, J.H.; Reilly, L.M.; Perez, S.L.; Yan, K.; Sarkar, R.; Dwyer, S.S.; Perez, S.; Chong, K.; Kohler, T.R.; Hatsukami, T.S.; Glickerman, D.G.; Sobel, M.; Burdick, T.S.; Pedersen, K.; Cleary, P.; Back, M.; Bandyk, D.; Johnson, B.; Shames, M.; Reinhard, R.L.; Thomas, S.C.; Hunter, G.C.; Leon, L.R.; Westerband, A.; Guerra, R.J.; Riveros, M.; Mills, J.L.; Hughes, J.D.; Escalante, A.M.; Psalms, S.B.; Day, N.N.; Macsata, R.; Sidawy, A.; Weiswasser, J.; Arora, S.; Jasper, B.J.; A. Dardik; Gahtan, V.; B.E. Muhs (Bart); B.E. Sumpio (Bauer); R.J. Gusberg (Richard Jefferson); Spector, M.; Pollak, J.; Aruny, J.; Kelly, E.L.; Wong, J.; Vasilas, P.; Joncas, C.; Gelabert, H.A.; DeVirgillio, C.; Rigberg, D.A.; Cole, L.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Marzelle, J.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Sapoval, M.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Favre, J.-P.; Watelet, J.; Lermusiaux, P.; Sapoval, M.; Lepage, E.; Hemery, F.; Dolbeau, G.; Hawajry, N.; Cunin, P.; Harris, P.; L. Stockx (Luc); Chatellier, G.; Mialhe, C.; Fiessinger, J.-N.; Pagny, L.; Kobeiter, H.; Boissier, C.; Lacroix, P.; Ledru, F.; Pinot, J.-J.; Deux, J.-F.; Tzvetkov, B.; Duvaldestin, P.; Watelet, J.; Jourdain, C.; David, V.; Enouf, D.; Ady, N.; Krimi, A.; Boudjema, N.; Jousset, Y.; Enon, B.; Blin, V.; Picquet, J.; L'Hoste, P.; Thouveny, F.; Borie, H.; Kowarski, S.; Pernes, J.-M.; Auguste, M.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Desgranges, P.; Allaire, E.; Marzelle, J.; H. Kobeiter (Hicham); Meaulle, P.-Y.; Chaix, D.; Juliae, P.; Fabiani, J.N.; Chevalier, P.; Combes, M.; Seguin, A.; Belhomme, D.; M. Sapoval; Baque, J.; Pellerin, O.; Favre, J.P.; Barral, X.; Veyret, C.; Watelet, J.; Peillon, C.; Plissonier, D.; Thomas, P.; Clavier, E.; Lermusiaux, P.; Martinez, R.; Bleuet, F.; Dupreix, C.; Verhoye, J.P.; Langanay, T.; Heautot, J.F.; Koussa, M.; Haulon, S.; Halna, P.; Destrieux, L.; Lions, C.; Wiloteaux, S.; J.P. Beregi (Jean Paul); Bergeron, P.; Pinot, J.-J.; Patra, P.; Costargent, A.; Chaillou, P.; D'Alicourt, A.; Goueffic, Y.; Cheysson, E.; Parrot, A.; Garance, P.; Demon, A.; Tyazi, A.; Pillet, J.-C.; Lescalie, F.; Tilly, G.; Steinmetz, E.; Favier, C.; Brenot, R.; Krause, D.; Cercueil, J.P.; O. Vahdat (Olivier); Sauer, M.; Soula, P.; Querian, A.; Garcia, O.; Levade, M.; Colombier, D.; Cardon, J.-M.; Joyeux, A.; Borrelly, P.; Dogas, G.; Magnan, P.-É.; Branchereau, A.; Bartoli, J.-M.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Planchard, P.-F.; Bouillanne, P.-J.; Haudebourg, P.; Bayne, J.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Nonent, M.; Lucas, A.; Cardon, A.; Kerdiles, Y.; Rolland, Y.; Kassab, M.; Brillu, C.; Goubault, F.; Tailboux, L.; Darrieux, H.; Briand, O.; Maillard, J.-C.; Varty, K.; Cousins, C.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. Methods: An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized tri

  14. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Powell (Janet); Sweeting, M.J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; F.A. Lederle (Frank); Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; J. Beard (James); M. Buxton (M.); Brown, L.C.; Harris, P.L.; Powell, J.T.; Rose, J.D.G.; Russell, I.T.; Sculpher, M.J.; S.G. Thompson (Simon); Lilford, R.J.; Bell, P.R.F.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Whitaker, S.C.; Poole-Wilson, P.A.; Ruckley, C.V.; Campbell, W.B.; Dean, M.R.E.; Ruttley, M.S.T.; Coles, E.C.; Powell, J.T.; A. Halliday (A.); Gibbs, S.J.; Brown, L.C.; Epstein, D.; M. Sculpher (Mark); Thompson, S.G.; Hannon, R.J.; Johnston, L.; L.A. Bradbury (Linda); Henderson, M.J.; Parvin, S.D.; Shepherd, D.F.C.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Mitchell, A.W.; Edwards, P.R.; Abbott, G.T.; Higman, D.J.; Vohra, A.; Ashley, S.; Robottom, C.; M. Wyatt (M.); Rose, J.D.G.; Byrne, D.; Edwards, R.; Leiberman, D.P.; McCarter, D.H.; Taylor, P.R.; Reidy, J.F.; Wilkinson, A.R.; D. Ettles (D.); Clason, A.E.; Leen, G.L.S.; Wilson, N.V.; Downes, M.; S. Walker (S.); Lavelle, J.M.; Gough, M.J.; McPherson, S.; D.J.A. Scott (D Julian); Kessell, D.O.; C.D. Naylor; I. Sayers (Ian); Fishwick, N.G.; Harris, P.L.; Gould, D.A.; Walker, M.G.; Chalmers, N.C.; Garnham, A.; Collins, M.A.; Beard, J.D.; P.A. Gaines (Peter); Ashour, M.Y.; Uberoi, R.; Braithwaite, B.; Whitaker, S.C.; Davies, J.N.; Travis, S.; Hamilton, G.; A. Platts (A.); Shandall, A.; Sullivan, B.A.; Sobeh, M.; Matson, M.; Fox, A.D.; Orme, R.; Yusef, W.; Doyle, T.; Horrocks, M.; Hardman, J.; Blair, P.H.B.; Ellis, P.K.; Morris, G.; Odurny, A.; Vohra, R.; Duddy, M.; M.J. Thompson (Matthew); Loosemore, T.M.L.; Belli, A.M.; Morgan, R.; Adiseshiah, M.; J. Brookes (J.); McCollum, C.N.; R. Ashleigh (R.); Aukett, M.; Baker, S.; Barbe, E.; Batson, N.; J.L. Bell (Jocelyn); Blundell, J.; Boardley, D.; Boyes, S.; Brown, O.; Bryce, J.; Carmichael, M.; Chance, T.; Coleman, J.; Cosgrove, C.; Curran, G.; Dennison, T.; Devine, C.; Dewhirst, N.; Errington, B.; Farrell, H.; Fisher, C.; Fulford, P.; Gough, M.; Graham, C.; Hooper, R.; Horne, G.; Horrocks, L.; Hughes, B.; Hutchings, T.; Ireland, M.; Judge, C.; Kelly, L.; Kemp, J.; Kite, A.; Kivela, M.; Lapworth, M.; Lee, C.; Linekar, L.; Mahmood, A.; March, L.; Martin, J.; Matharu, N.; McGuigen, K.; Morris-Vincent, P.; Murray, S.; Murtagh, A.; Owen, G.; Ramoutar, V.; Rippin, C.; Rowley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Spencer, S.; Taylor, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wealleans, V.; West, J.; White, K.; Williams, J.; Wilson, L.; D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); Blankensteijn, J.D.; Bak, A.A.A.; Buth, J.; P.M.T. Pattynama (Peter M.T.); Verhoeven, E.L.G.; van Voorthuisen, A.E.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Balm, R.; Buth, J.; P.M.W. Cuypers (Philippe); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); Prinssen, M.; M.H.R.M. van Sambeek (Marc H. R.); Verhoeven, E.L.G.; A.F. Baas (Annette); Hunink, M.G.; J.M. Engelshoven (Jos); M. Jacobs (Michael); B.A.J.M. de Mol; J.H. van Bockel; Balm, R.; J.A. Reekers (Jim); X. Tielbeek; E.L.G. Verhoeven (Eric); W. Wisselink; N. Boekema; Heuveling, L.M.; I. Sikking; M. Prinssen (Monique); R. Balm (Ron); J.D. Blankensteijn (Jan); J. Buth (Jaap); P.M.W. Cuypers (Philippe); van Sambeek, M.R.H.M.; Verhoeven, E.L.G.; J.L. de Bruin (Jorg); A.F. Baas (Annette); Blankensteijn, J.D.; Prinssen, M.; J. Buth (Jacob); A.V. Tielbeek (Alexander); J.D. Blankensteijn (Jan); R. Balm (Ron); Reekers, J.A.; M.R.H.M. van Sambeek (M. R H M); P.M.T. Pattynama (Peter); E.L.G. Verhoeven (Eric); T. Prins (T.); A.C. van der Ham; van der Velden, J.J.I.M.; S.M.M. van Sterkenburg (S. M M); G.B. ten Haken (G.); C.M.A. Bruijninckx; H. van Overhagen (H.); R.P. Tutein Nolthenius; C. Hendriksz (Chris); J.A.W. Teijink (J. A W); H.F. Odink (H.); A.A. de Smet (André); D. Vroegindeweij (Dammis); R.M.M. van Loenhout (R. M M); M.J. Rutten (M.); J.F. Hamming (Jaap); L.E.H. Lampmann (L. E H); M.H.M. Bender (M. H M); S.G.M.A. Pasmans (Suzanne); A. Vahl (Anco); C. de Vries (Cees); A.J. Mackaay (Albert); L. van Dortmont (Laura); van der Vliet, A.J.; L.J. Schultze Kool (L.); J.B.B. Boomsma (J. B B); H.R. van Dop (H.); J.C.A. de Mol van Otterloo (J. C A); T.P.W. de Rooij (T. P W); T.M. Smits (T.); P. Yilmaz (Pinar); Wisselink, W.; F.G. van den Berg (Fred); M.J.T. Visser (M. J T); E. van der Linden (Edwin); G.W. Schurink; M.G. Haan (Michiel); H.J. Smeets (Harm); Stabel, P.; F. van Elst (F.); J. Poniewierski (J.); F. Vermassen (Frank); Lederle, F.A.; Freischlag, J.A.; Kohler, T.R.; Latts, E.; Matsumura, J.; Padberg, F.T.; Kyriakides, T.C.; Swanson, K.M.; Guarino, P.; Peduzzi, P.; Antonelli, M.; Cushing, C.; Davis, E.; Durant, L.; Joyner, S.; Kossack, A.; Kyriakides, T.C.; LeGwin, M. (Mary); McBride, V.; O'Connor, T.; Poulton, J.; Stratton, S.; Zellner, S.; Snodgrass, A.J.; Thornton, J.; Swanson, K.M.; Haakenson, C.M.; Stroupe, K.T.; Jonk, Y.; Hallett, J.W.; Hertzer, N.; Towne, J.; Katz, D.A.; Karrison, T.; Matts, J.P.; Marottoli, R.; Kasl, S.; Mehta, R.; Feldman, R.; Farrell, W.; Allore, H.; Perry, E.; Niederman, J.; Randall, F.; Zeman, M.; Beckwith, D.; O'Leary, T.J.; Huang, G.D.; Latts, E.; Bader, M.; Ketteler, E.R.; Kingsley, D.D.; Marek, J.M.; Massen, R.J.; Matteson, B.D.; Pitcher, J.D.; Langsfeld, M.; Corson, J.D.; Goff, J.M.; Kasirajan, K.; Paap, C.; Robertson, D.C.; Salam, A.; Veeraswamy, R.; Milner, R.; Kasirajan, K.; Guidot, J.; Lal, B.K.; Busuttil, S.J.; Lilly, M.P.; Braganza, M.; Ellis, K.; Patterson, M.A.; Jordan, W.D.; Whitley, D.; Taylor, S.; Passman, M.; Kerns, D.; Inman, C.; Poirier, J.; Ebaugh, J.; Raffetto, J.; Chew, D.; Lathi, S.; Owens, C.; Hickson, K.; Dosluoglu, H.H.; Eschberger, K.; Kibbe, M.R.; Baraniewski, H.M.; Matsumura, J.; Endo, M.; Busman, A.; Meadows, W.; Evans, M.; Giglia, J.S.; El Sayed, H.; Reed, A.B.; Ruf, M.; Ross, S.; Jean-Claude, J.M.; Pinault, G.; Kang, P.; White, N.; Eiseman, M.; Jones, R.; Timaran, C.H.; Modrall, J.G.; Welborn, M.B.; Lopez, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chacko, J.K.Y.; Granke, K.; Vouyouka, A.G.; Olgren, E.; Chand, P.; Allende, B.; Ranella, M.; Yales, C.; Whitehill, T.A.; Krupski, W.C.; Nehler, M.R.; Johnson, S.P.; Jones, D.N.; Strecker, P.; Bhola, M.A.; Shortell, C.K.; Gray, J.L.; Lawson, J.H.; McCann, R.; Sebastian, M.W.; Kistler Tetterton, J.; Blackwell, C.; Prinzo, P.A.; Lee, N.; Padberg, F.T.; Cerveira, J.J.; Lal, B.K.; Zickler, R.W.; Hauck, K.A.; Berceli, S.A.; Lee, W.A.; Ozaki, C.K.; Nelson, P.R.; Irwin, A.S.; Baum, R.; Aulivola, B.; Rodriguez, H.; Littooy, F.N.; Greisler, H.; O'Sullivan, M.T.; Kougias, P.; Lin, P.H.; Bush, R.L.; Guinn, G.; Bechara, C.; Cagiannos, C.; Pisimisis, G.; Barshes, N.; Pillack, S.; Guillory, B.; Cikrit, D.; Lalka, S.G.; Lemmon, G.; Nachreiner, R.; Rusomaroff, M.; O'Brien, E.; Cullen, J.J.; Hoballah, J.; Sharp, W.J.; McCandless, J.L.; Beach, V.; Minion, D.; Schwarcz, T.H.; Kimbrough, J.; Ashe, L.; Rockich, A.; Warner-Carpenter, J.; Moursi, M.; Eidt, J.F.; Brock, S.; Bianchi, C.; Bishop, V.; Gordon, I.L.; Fujitani, R.; Kubaska, S.M.; Behdad, M.; Azadegan, R.; Ma Agas, C.; Zalecki, K.; Hoch, J.R.; Carr, S.C.; Acher, C.; Schwarze, M.; Tefera, G.; Mell, M.; Dunlap, B.; Rieder, J.; Stuart, J.M.; Weiman, D.S.; Abul-Khoudoud, O.; Garrett, H.E.; Walsh, S.M.; Wilson, K.L.; Seabrook, G.R.; Cambria, R.A.; Brown, K.R.; Lewis, B.D.; Framberg, S.; Kallio, C.; Barke, R.A.; Santilli, S.M.; d'Audiffret, A.C.; Oberle, N.; Proebstle, C.; Johnson, L.L.; Jacobowitz, G.R.; Cayne, N.; Rockman, C.; Adelman, M.; P.J. Gagne (Paul); Nalbandian, M.; Caropolo, L.J.; Pipinos, I.I.; Johanning, J.; Lynch, T.; DeSpiegelaere, H.; Purviance, G.; Zhou, W.; Dalman, R.; Lee, J.T.; Safadi, B.; Coogan, S.M.; Wren, S.M.; Bahmani, D.D.; Maples, D.; Thunen, S.; Golden, M.A.; Mitchell, M.E.; Fairman, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Wilson, M.A.; Tzeng, E.; Muluk, S.; Peterson, N.M.; Foster, M.; Edwards, J.; G. Moneta (Greg); Landry, G.; Taylor, L.; Yeager, R.; Cannady, E.; Treiman, G.; Hatton-Ward, S.; Salabsky, B.; Kansal, N.; Owens, E.; Estes, M.; Forbes, B.A.; Sobotta, C.; Rapp, J.H.; Reilly, L.M.; Perez, S.L.; Yan, K.; Sarkar, R.; Dwyer, S.S.; Perez, S.; Chong, K.; Kohler, T.R.; Hatsukami, T.S.; Glickerman, D.G.; Sobel, M.; Burdick, T.S.; Pedersen, K.; Cleary, P.; Back, M.; Bandyk, D.; Johnson, B.; Shames, M.; Reinhard, R.L.; Thomas, S.C.; Hunter, G.C.; Leon, L.R.; Westerband, A.; Guerra, R.J.; Riveros, M.; Mills, J.L.; Hughes, J.D.; Escalante, A.M.; Psalms, S.B.; Day, N.N.; Macsata, R.; Sidawy, A.; Weiswasser, J.; Arora, S.; Jasper, B.J.; A. Dardik; Gahtan, V.; B.E. Muhs (Bart); B.E. Sumpio (Bauer); R.J. Gusberg (Richard Jefferson); Spector, M.; Pollak, J.; Aruny, J.; Kelly, E.L.; Wong, J.; Vasilas, P.; Joncas, C.; Gelabert, H.A.; DeVirgillio, C.; Rigberg, D.A.; Cole, L.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Marzelle, J.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Sapoval, M.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Favre, J.-P.; Watelet, J.; Lermusiaux, P.; Sapoval, M.; Lepage, E.; Hemery, F.; Dolbeau, G.; Hawajry, N.; Cunin, P.; Harris, P.; L. Stockx (Luc); Chatellier, G.; Mialhe, C.; Fiessinger, J.-N.; Pagny, L.; Kobeiter, H.; Boissier, C.; Lacroix, P.; Ledru, F.; Pinot, J.-J.; Deux, J.-F.; Tzvetkov, B.; Duvaldestin, P.; Watelet, J.; Jourdain, C.; David, V.; Enouf, D.; Ady, N.; Krimi, A.; Boudjema, N.; Jousset, Y.; Enon, B.; Blin, V.; Picquet, J.; L'Hoste, P.; Thouveny, F.; Borie, H.; Kowarski, S.; Pernes, J.-M.; Auguste, M.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Desgranges, P.; Allaire, E.; Marzelle, J.; H. Kobeiter (Hicham); Meaulle, P.-Y.; Chaix, D.; Juliae, P.; Fabiani, J.N.; Chevalier, P.; Combes, M.; Seguin, A.; Belhomme, D.; M. Sapoval; Baque, J.; Pellerin, O.; Favre, J.P.; Barral, X.; Veyret, C.; Watelet, J.; Peillon, C.; Plissonier, D.; Thomas, P.; Clavier, E.; Lermusiaux, P.; Martinez, R.; Bleuet, F.; Dupreix, C.; Verhoye, J.P.; Langanay, T.; Heautot, J.F.; Koussa, M.; Haulon, S.; Halna, P.; Destrieux, L.; Lions, C.; Wiloteaux, S.; J.P. Beregi (Jean Paul); Bergeron, P.; Pinot, J.-J.; Patra, P.; Costargent, A.; Chaillou, P.; D'Alicourt, A.; Goueffic, Y.; Cheysson, E.; Parrot, A.; Garance, P.; Demon, A.; Tyazi, A.; Pillet, J.-C.; Lescalie, F.; Tilly, G.; Steinmetz, E.; Favier, C.; Brenot, R.; Krause, D.; Cercueil, J.P.; O. Vahdat (Olivier); Sauer, M.; Soula, P.; Querian, A.; Garcia, O.; Levade, M.; Colombier, D.; Cardon, J.-M.; Joyeux, A.; Borrelly, P.; Dogas, G.; Magnan, P.-É.; Branchereau, A.; Bartoli, J.-M.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Planchard, P.-F.; Bouillanne, P.-J.; Haudebourg, P.; Bayne, J.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Nonent, M.; Lucas, A.; Cardon, A.; Kerdiles, Y.; Rolland, Y.; Kassab, M.; Brillu, C.; Goubault, F.; Tailboux, L.; Darrieux, H.; Briand, O.; Maillard, J.-C.; Varty, K.; Cousins, C.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. Methods: An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized tri

  15. Random assignment in clinical trials: issues in planning (Infant Health and Development Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, H C; Fendt, K H

    1990-01-01

    Various options available for the randomization of subjects into groups in a clinical trial are discussed, emphasizing the issues of logistics given less focus in more mathematical treatments. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of total randomization, of Zelen-type randomization procedures, of Efron-type procedures vs more classical blocking procedures to control the balance between groups, and of Simon-Pocock-type procedures vs more classical stratification for controlling possible biases in prognostic factors. Finally, we discuss issues related to choice and implementation of randomization procedures. The discussion is illustrated with the processes of decision-making in a national collaborative randomized clinical trial, the Infant Health and Development Program.

  16. Interventions for the prevention of overweight and obesity in preschool children: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monasta, L; Batty, G D; Macaluso, A; Ronfani, L; Lutje, V; Bavcar, A; van Lenthe, F J; Brug, J; Cattaneo, A

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse interventions for the prevention of overweight and obesity in children under 5 years of age. We carried out a systematic review focusing exclusively on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Data sources include Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CINHAL, PsychInfo and Web of Science. Data were extracted from seventeen articles describing seven RCTs identified through electronic search, screening of references in systematic reviews, own files and contact with authors. RCTs were assessed with the Jadad scale. Four trials were carried out in preschool settings, one with an exclusive educational component, two with an exclusive physical activity component and one with both. Two trials were family-based, with education and counselling for parents and children. The remaining trial was carried out in maternity hospitals, with a training intervention on breastfeeding. None of the interventions had an effect in preventing overweight and obesity. The failure to show an effect may be due to the choice of outcomes, the quality of the RCTs, the suboptimal implementation of the interventions, the lack of focus on social and environmental determinants. More rigorous research is needed on interventions and on social and environmental factors that could impact on lifestyle.

  17. Safety and preliminary immunogenicity of Cuban pneumococcal conjugate vaccine candidate in healthy children: a randomized phase I clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotres, Carlos P; Puga, Rinaldo; Ricardo, Yariset; Broño, Carmen R; Paredes, Beatriz; Echemendía, Vladimir; Rosell, Sandra; González, Nadezhda; García-Rivera, Dagmar; Valdés, Yury; Goldblatt, David; Vérez-Bencomo, Vicente

    2014-09-15

    A new heptavalent conjugate vaccine (PCV7-TT) is under development in Cuba. PCV7-TT contains 2 μg of serotypes 1, 5, 14, 18C, 19F, 23F and 4 μg of 6B, each one conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT). This vaccine was designed with the serotypes that cause most invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) worldwide. In the present study, we investigated the safety and explored the immunogenicity of PCV7-TT during a controlled, randomized and double blind clinical trial phase I in 4-5-year-old children. PCV7-TT was well tolerated and as safe as Synflorix used as control vaccine. Following a single-dose vaccination, all individual serotypes included in PCV7-TT induced statistically significant increase of IgG GMC and OPA GMT. These are the first clinical results of PCV7-TT in children and they pave the way toward next clinical trials in children and infants. This clinical trial was published in the Cuban Public Register of Clinical Trials with code RPCEC00000173.

  18. Eliminating bias in randomized controlled trials: importance of allocation concealment and masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera, Anthony J; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I

    2007-02-01

    Randomization in randomized controlled trials involves more than generation of a random sequence by which to assign subjects. For randomization to be successfully implemented, the randomization sequence must be adequately protected (concealed) so that investigators, involved health care providers, and subjects are not aware of the upcoming assignment. The absence of adequate allocation concealment can lead to selection bias, one of the very problems that randomization was supposed to eliminate. Authors of reports of randomized trials should provide enough details on how allocation concealment was achieved so the reader can determine the likelihood of success. Fortunately, a plan of allocation concealment can always be incorporated into the design of a randomized trial. Certain methods minimize the risk of concealment failing more than others. Keeping knowledge of subjects' assignment after allocation from subjects, investigators/health care providers, or those assessing outcomes is referred to as masking (also known as blinding). The goal of masking is to prevent ascertainment bias. In contrast to allocation concealment, masking cannot always be incorporated into a randomized controlled trial. Both allocation concealment and masking add to the elimination of bias in randomized controlled trials.

  19. Celecoxib-related gastroduodenal ulcer and cardiovascular events in a randomized trial for gastric cancer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Shuang Feng; Harry HX Xia; Ji-You Li; Shiu Kum Lam; Wei-Cheng You; Jun-Ling Ma; Benjamin CY Wong; Lian Zhang; Wei-Dong Liu; Kai-Feng Pan; Lin Shen; Xiao-Dong Zhang; Jie Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term risk of gastroduodenal ulcer and cardiovascular events induced by celecoxib in a population-based, randomized, double-blind,placebo-controlled study.METHODS: From 2004 to 2006, a total of 1024 Chinese patients (aged 35 to 64 years) with severe chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia were randomly assigned to receive 200 mg of celecoxib twice daily or placebo in Linqu County (Shandong Province, China), a high-risk area of gastric cancer. All gastroduodenal ulcer and cardiovascular events occurred were recorded and the patients were followed up for 1.5 years after treatment. At the end of the trial, a systematic interview survey about other adverse events was conducted.RESULTS: Gastroduodenal ulcer was detected in 19 of 463 (3.72%) patients who Received: celecoxib and 17 of 473 (3.31%) patients who Received placebo,respectively (odds ratio = 1.13, 95% CI = 0.58-2.19).Cardiovascular (CV) events occurred in 4 patients who received celecoxib and in 5 patients who received placebo,respectively.Compared with those who received placebo,patients who received celecoxib had no significant increase in occurrence of Cvevents (hazard ratio = 0.84,95% CI =0.23-3.15).Among the adverse events acquired by interview survey,only the frequency of bloating was significantly higher in patients treated with celecoxib than in those treated with placebo.CONCLUSION:Treatment of gastric cancer with celecoxib is not associated with increased risk of gastroduodenal ulcer and cardiovascular events.

  20. Can Early Intervention Improve Maternal Well-Being? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Orla; Delaney, Liam; O’Farrelly, Christine; Fitzpatrick, Nick; Daly, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study estimates the effect of a targeted early childhood intervention program on global and experienced measures of maternal well-being utilizing a randomized controlled trial design. The primary aim of the intervention is to improve children’s school readiness skills by working directly with parents to improve their knowledge of child development and parenting behavior. One potential externality of the program is well-being benefits for parents given its direct focus on improving parental coping, self-efficacy, and problem solving skills, as well as generating an indirect effect on parental well-being by targeting child developmental problems. Methods Participants from a socio-economically disadvantaged community are randomly assigned during pregnancy to an intensive 5-year home visiting parenting program or a control group. We estimate and compare treatment effects on multiple measures of global and experienced well-being using permutation testing to account for small sample size and a stepdown procedure to account for multiple testing. Results The intervention has no impact on global well-being as measured by life satisfaction and parenting stress or experienced negative affect using episodic reports derived from the Day Reconstruction Method (DRM). Treatment effects are observed on measures of experienced positive affect derived from the DRM and a measure of mood yesterday. Conclusion The limited treatment effects suggest that early intervention programs may produce some improvements in experienced positive well-being, but no effects on negative aspects of well-being. Different findings across measures may result as experienced measures of well-being avoid the cognitive biases that impinge upon global assessments. PMID:28095505

  1. Dilatation or no dilatation of the cervix during cesarean section (Dondi Trial): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirscht, Jade; Weiss, Christel; Nickol, Jana; Berlit, Sebastian; Tuschy, Benjamin; Hoch, Benjamin; Trebin, Amelie-Verena; Große-Steffen, Thomas; Sütterlin, Marc; Kehl, Sven

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effects of mechanical dilatation of the cervix during cesarean section on postoperative morbidity. A total of 447 women with elective cesarean section were included in the Dondi trial (Dilatation or no dilatation of the cervix during cesarean section). The primary outcome measure of this randomized controlled trial was postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) within 6 weeks. Infectious morbidity (puerperal fever, endometritis, wound infection, and urinary tract infection), blood loss (need for blood transfusion or change in hemoglobin levels), and operating time were also evaluated. The rate of PPH within 6 weeks was not different between the two groups [dilatation group: 5 (2.4 %), no dilatation group: 3 (1.2 %), p = 0.479]. Infectious morbidity, blood loss, and operating time were not diverse as well. The only significant difference between the two groups was the rate of retained products of conception with fewer cases after cervical dilatation (0 versus 6.2 %, p cesarean section compared with no dilatation of the cervix did not influence the risk of postpartum hemorrhage. However, there were fewer cases with retained products of conception after dilatation.

  2. Acceptance and commitment therapy for fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicksell, R K; Kemani, M; Jensen, K; Kosek, E; Kadetoff, D; Sorjonen, K; Ingvar, M; Olsson, G L

    2013-04-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by widespread pain and co-morbid symptoms such as fatigue and depression. For FM, medical treatments alone appear insufficient. Recent meta-analyses point to the utility of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), but effects are moderate. Within the continuous development of CBT, the empirical support for acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has increased rapidly. ACT focuses on improving functioning by increasing the patient's ability to act in accordance with personal values also in the presence of pain and distress (i.e., psychological flexibility). However, no study has yet explored the utility of ACT in FM. To evaluate the efficacy of ACT for FM and the role of psychological inflexibility as a mediator of improvement. In this randomized controlled trial, ACT was evaluated in comparison to a waiting list control condition. Forty women diagnosed with FM participated in the study. Assessments were made pre- and post-treatment and at 3 months of follow-up. The ACT intervention consisted of 12 weekly group sessions. Significant differences in favour of ACT were seen in pain-related functioning, FM impact, mental health-related quality of life, self-efficacy, depression, anxiety and psychological inflexibility. Changes in psychological inflexibility during the course of treatment were found to mediate pre- to follow-up improvements in outcome variables. The results correspond with previous studies on ACT for chronic pain and suggest the utility of ACT for FM as well as the role of psychological inflexibility as a mediator of improvement. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  3. Dietary fiber supplementation for fecal incontinence: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z; Savik, Kay; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Whitebird, Robin; Lowry, Ann; Sheng, Xiaoyan

    2014-10-01

    Dietary fiber supplements are used to manage fecal incontinence (FI), but little is known about the fiber type to recommend or the level of effectiveness of such supplements, which appears related to the fermentability of the fiber. The aim of this single-blind, randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of three dietary fiber supplements (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC], gum arabic [GA], or psyllium) with differing levels of fermentability to a placebo in community-living individuals incontinent of loose/liquid feces. The primary outcome was FI frequency; secondary outcomes included FI amount and consistency, supplement intolerance, and quality of life (QoL). Possible mechanisms underlying supplement effects were also examined. After a 14-day baseline, 189 subjects consumed a placebo or 16 g total fiber/day of one of the fiber supplements for 32 days. FI frequency significantly decreased after psyllium supplementation versus placebo, in both intent-to-treat and per-protocol mixed model analyses. CMC increased FI frequency. In intent-to-treat analysis, the number of FI episodes/week after supplementation was estimated to be 5.5 for Placebo, 2.5 for Psyllium, 4.3 for GA, and 6.2 for CMC. Only psyllium consumption resulted in a gel in feces. Supplement intolerance was low. QoL scores did not differ among groups. Patients with FI may experience a reduction in FI frequency after psyllium supplementation, and decreased FI frequency has been shown to be an important personal goal of treatment for patients with FI. Formation of a gel in feces appears to be a mechanism by which residual psyllium improved FI.

  4. Randomized Controlled Trials of Pediatric Massage: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shay Beider

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing reviews of massage therapy (MT research are either limited to infants, adults, or were conducted prior to the publication of the most recent studies using pediatric samples. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of pediatric MT are reviewed. A literature search yielded 24 RCTs of pediatric MT, defined as the manual manipulation of soft tissue intended to promote health and well-being in recipients between 2 and 19 years of age. Because RCTs of pediatric MT varied considerably in the amount and types of data reported, quantitative and narrative review methods were both used. Single-dose and multiple-dose effects were examined separately. Among single-dose effects, significant reductions of state anxiety were observed at the first session (g = 0.59, P < 0.05 and the last session (g = 1.10, P < 0.01 of a course of treatment. Effects for salivary cortisol (g = 0.28, negative mood (g = 0.52 and behavior (g = 0.37 were non-significant. Three of eleven multiple-dose effects were statistically significant. These were trait anxiety (g = 0.94, P < 0.05, muscle tone (g = 0.90, P < 0.01 and arthritis pain (g = 1.33, P < 0.01. Results of studies not permitting effect size calculation were judged to be generally consistent with quantitative results. MT benefits pediatric recipients, though not as universally as sometimes reported. Numerous weaknesses endemic to MT research (e.g. low statistical power, frequent failure to report basic descriptive statistics are identified, and recommendations for future pediatric MT research are discussed.

  5. Randomized trial comparing office flexible to rigid cystoscopy in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Lieschen H; Shobeiri, S Abbas; Nihira, Mikio A; Brady, Jordan; Wild, Robert A

    2012-11-01

    The objective of the study was to compare office rigid cystoscopy (RC) versus flexible cystoscopy (FC) in women. This was a prospective randomized trial comparing FC to RC. Aims were to assess 1-week post-procedural complications, compare procedure pain scores, and to assess physician perception of patient discomfort. Pain scores were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) and 5-point verbal descriptor scale (VDS). Chi-square was used for categorical comparison and t tests or Wilcoxon test for continuous variables. One hundred women were enrolled. The mean age of participants was 59.7 years (± SD 14.6), and 91 % were Caucasian. This was the first cystoscopy for 86 % of participants. On the 1-week post-procedure questionnaire (85 % response rate), participants in the FC group reported urinary frequency more often than in the RC group (p = 0.041). The FC group reported urgency with urination lasting 1-2 days (p = 0.030) and burning with urination lasting >3 days (p = 0.026), more than the RC group. These symptoms did not persist at 7 days. The duration of the procedure was slightly faster for the FC group (4.6 ± 1.8 min vs 5.7 ± 3.4 min, p = 0.046). Median VAS scores were 0.9 (0.1-2.72) for the FC group and 0.5 (0-2.4) for the RC group (p = 0.505). There were no significant differences between patient or physician perception of pain in either group. Urinary frequency and duration of urinary burning post procedure occurred more frequently in the FC group, although these symptoms were transient. Both office FC and RC are generally well tolerated in women with overall low morbidity.

  6. Phytothermotherapy in osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Bellisai, Barbara; Iacoponi, Francesca; Manica, Patrizia; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of adding a cycle of phytothermotherapy (a traditional treatment with fermenting grass used in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy) to the usual drug treatment, in patients with primary symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, hip, or lumbar spine. In this randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, 218 outpatients were enrolled; 109 patients were treated with a cycle of phytothermotherapy at the thermal resort of Garniga Terme (Trento, Italy) for 10 days; the other 109 patients continued regular outpatient care. Patients were assessed at baseline, after 2 weeks, and after 3 months from the beginning of the study and were evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) for spontaneous pain, a Health Assessment Questionnaire, the Lequesne index for hip and knee osteoarthritis, and the Rolland Morris Questionnaire for lumbar spine OA and symptomatic drug consumption. In patients treated with phytothermotherapy, a significant improvement of VAS and a reduction of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug consumption at the end of treatment and 3 months later were observed. In the control group, no significant differences were noted. The analyses performed separately for each subgroup for OA localization showed that the best results were evident in lumbar spine OA. Concerning tolerability, in the group treated with phytothermotherapy 10% of patients presented side-effects due to treatment, but these were of low intensity and did not interrupt the therapy. In conclusion, the results show beneficial effects of a cycle of phytothermotherapy in patients with OA of the hip, knee, or lumbar spine. Phytothermotherapy may therefore be a useful aid alongside the usual pharmacologic and physiokinesic therapies, or may be used as a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacologic treatments.

  7. Exercise training and habitual physical activity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Earnest, Conrad P; Johnson, William D; Blair, Steven N; Sénéchal, Martin; Church, Timothy S

    2012-12-01

    Exercise training reduces adiposity and risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the combined effects of habitual free-living physical activity and aerobic training on waist circumference, weight, fitness, and blood pressure in postmenopausal women are unknown. To evaluate the effects of habitual physical activity levels during aerobic training on weight, waist circumference, fitness, and blood pressure. Secondary analysis of an RCT. Original data collected April 2001 to June 2005 and analyzed in 2012. Postmenopausal women in a supervised exercise trial. Women (n=325) were randomized to 4, 8, or 12 kcal/kg per week of aerobic training or a control group for 6 months. All outcome measures were collected at baseline and follow-up. Changes in dependent variables within each training group were evaluated across tertiles of pedometer-determined habitual physical activity outside exercise training sessions. Changes in waist circumference and weight. Reductions in waist circumference were significantly greater with higher steps/day accumulated outside exercise training compared to lower levels in the 4 (high: -4.8 cm vs low: -1.4 cm, p=0.03); 8 (high: -4.2 cm vs low: -0.4 cm, p=0.03), and 12 kcal/kg per week groups (high: -4.1 cm vs low: -0.7 cm, p=0.05). For all groups, p-trend≤0.03. A trend was observed for greater weight reduction with higher steps/day in the 4 kcal/kg per week group (p-trend=0.04) but not for the other exercise doses. No effects were observed for blood pressure or fitness measures (all p>0.05). In postmenopausal women, higher habitual physical activity while participating in aerobic training was associated with greater reductions in central adiposity, and was supportive of weight loss compared to lower levels. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transdermal Estradiol Treatment for Postpartum Depression: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, Katherine L.; Sit, Dorothy K.Y.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Driscoll, Kara E.; Prairie, Beth; Stika, Catherine S.; Eng, Heather F.; Dills, John L; Luther, James F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression occurs in 14.5% of women in the first three months after birth. This study was an 8 week acute phase randomized trial with three cells (transdermal estradiol (E2), sertraline, and placebo) for the treatment of postpartum major depressive disorder. However, the study was stopped after batch analysis revealed that the E2 serum concentrations were lower than pre-study projections. This paper explores our experiences that will inform future investigations of therapeutic E2 use. Explanations for the low E2 concentrations were: 1) Study patch non-adhesion, which did not explain the low concentrations across the entire sample. 2) Ineffective transdermal patch preparations, although two different patch preparations were used and no significant main effect of patch type on E2 concentrations was found. 3) Obesity, at study entry, E2-treated women had mean ± SD BMI=32.9 ±7.4. No pharmacokinetic data comparing E2 concentrations from transdermal patches in obese women vs. normal weight controls are available. 4) Induction of Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) 3A4 and other E2 elimination pathways in pregnancy. CYP4503A4 is induced in pregnancy and is a pathway for the metabolism of E2. Conversion to estrone and Phase II metabolism via glucuronidation and sulfation, which also increase in pregnancy, are routes of E2 elimination. The time required for these pathways to normalize after delivery has not been elucidated. The observation that transdermal E2 doses greater than 100 mcg/day did not increase serum concentrations was unexpected. Another hypothesis consistent with this observation is suppression of endogenous E2 secretion with increasing exogenous E2 dosing. PMID:26061609

  9. Identifying randomized clinical trials in Spanish-language dermatology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclemente, G; Pardo, H; Sánchez, S; Bonfill, X

    2015-06-01

    The necessary foundation for good clinical practice lies in knowledge derived from clinical research. Evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is the pillar on which decisions about therapy are based. To search exhaustively and rigorously to identify RCTs in dermatology journals published in Spanish. We located dermatology journals through the following search engines and indexes: PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, Periódica, Latindex, Índice Médico Español, C-17, IBECS, EMBASE, and IMBIOMED. We also sought information through dermatology associations and dermatologists in countries where Spanish was the usual language of publication, and we searched the Internet (Google). Afterwards we searched the journals electronically and manually to identify RCTs in all available volumes and issues, checking from the year publication started through 2012. Of 28 journals identified, we included 21 in the search. We found a total of 144 RCTs published since 1969; 78 (54%) were in Latin American journals and 66 (46%) were in Spanish journals. The most frequent disease contexts for RCTs in Spanish journals were psoriasis, mycoses, and acne vulgaris. In Latin American journals, the most frequent disease contexts were common warts, mycoses, acne vulgaris, and skin ulcers on the lower limbs. Manual searches identified more RCTs than electronic searches. Manual searches found a larger number of RCTs. Relatively fewer RCTs are published in Spanish and Latin American journals than in English-language journals. Internet facilitated access to full texts published by many journals; however, free open access to these texts is still unavailable and a large number of journal issues are still not posted online. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  10. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of telmisartan for flow-mediated dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2014-09-01

    There have been a number of small-sized underpowered randomized controlled trials to assess effects of telmisartan on flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). To determine whether telmisartan increases FMD, we performed a meta-analysis of these trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through December 2013. Eligible studies were prospective randomized controlled trials of telmisartan reporting FMD as an outcome. Search terms included: telmisartan; endothelial function/dysfunction; flow-mediated dilation/dilatation/vasodilation/vasodilatation; and randomized, randomly or randomization. Included studies were reviewed to determine the number of patients randomized, mean duration of treatment and percent changes of FMD. Of 25 potentially relevant articles screened initially, seven reports of randomized trials enrolling a total of 398 patients were identified and included. A pooled analysis of the seven trials demonstrated a statistically significant increase in FMD by 48.7%, with telmisartan relative to control in the random-effects model (mean difference, 48.72%; 95% confidence interval, 15.37-82.08%; P for effect=0.004; P for heterogeneity telmisartan, which suggests that telmisartan may improve endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Anaesthesiological strategies in elective craniotomy: randomized, equivalence, open trial – The NeuroMorfeo trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzzetti Stefano

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have attempted to determine the "best" anaesthetic technique for neurosurgical procedures in patients without intracranial hypertension. So far, no study comparing intravenous (IA with volatile-based neuroanaesthesia (VA has been able to demonstrate major outcome differences nor a superiority of one of the two strategies in patients undergoing elective supratentorial neurosurgery. Therefore, current practice varies and includes the use of either volatile or intravenous anaesthetics in addition to narcotics. Actually the choice of the anaestesiological strategy depends only on the anaesthetists' preferences or institutional policies. This trial, named NeuroMorfeo, aims to assess the equivalence between volatile and intravenous anaesthetics for neurosurgical procedures. Methods/Design NeuroMorfeo is a multicenter, randomized, open label, controlled trial, based on an equivalence design. Patients aged between 18 and 75 years, scheduled for elective craniotomy for supratentorial lesion without signs of intracranial hypertension, in good physical state (ASA I-III and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS equal to 15, are randomly assigned to one of three anaesthesiological strategies (two VA arms, sevoflurane + fentanyl or sevoflurane + remifentanil, and one IA, propofol + remifentanil. The equivalence between intravenous and volatile-based neuroanaesthesia will be evaluated by comparing the intervals required to reach, after anaesthesia discontinuation, a modified Aldrete score ≥ 9 (primary end-point. Two statistical comparisons have been planned: 1 sevoflurane + fentanyl vs. propofol + remifentanil; 2 sevoflurane + remifentanil vs. propofol + remifentanil. Secondary end-points include: an assessment of neurovegetative stress based on (a measurement of urinary catecholamines and plasma and urinary cortisol and (b estimate of sympathetic/parasympathetic balance by power spectrum analyses of electrocardiographic tracings recorded

  12. Effects of the Finnish Alzheimer disease exercise trial (FINALEX): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkälä, Kaisu H; Pöysti, Minna M; Laakkonen, Marja-Liisa; Tilvis, Reijo S; Savikko, Niina; Kautiainen, Hannu; Strandberg, Timo E

    2013-05-27

    Few rigorous clinical trials have investigated the effectiveness of exercise on the physical functioning of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). To investigate the effects of intense and long-term exercise on the physical functioning and mobility of home-dwelling patients with AD and to explore its effects on the use and costs of health and social services. A randomized controlled trial. A total of 210 home-dwelling patients with AD living with their spousal caregiver. The 3 trial arms included (1) group-based exercise (GE; 4-hour sessions with approximately 1-hour training) and (2) tailored home-based exercise (HE; 1-hour training), both twice a week for 1 year, and (3) a control group (CG) receiving the usual community care. The Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Short Physical Performance Battery, and information on the use and costs of social and health care services. All groups deteriorated in functioning during the year after randomization, but deterioration was significantly faster in the CG than in the HE or GE group at 6 (P = .003) and 12 (P = .015) months. The FIM changes at 12 months were -7.1 (95% CI, -3.7 to -10.5), -10.3 (95% CI, -6.7 to -13.9), and -14.4 (95% CI, -10.9 to -18.0) in the HE group, GE group, and CG, respectively. The HE and GE groups had significantly fewer falls than the CG during the follow-up year. The total costs of health and social services for the HE patient-caregiver dyads (in US dollars per dyad per year) were $25,112 (95% CI, $17,642 to $32,581) (P = .13 for comparison with the CG), $22,066 in the GE group ($15,931 to $28,199; P = .03 vs CG), and $34,121 ($24,559 to $43,681) in the CG. An intensive and long-term exercise program had beneficial effects on the physical functioning of patients with AD without increasing the total costs of health and social services or causing any significant adverse effects. anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12608000037303.

  13. Anaesthesiological strategies in elective craniotomy: randomized, equivalence, open trial – The NeuroMorfeo trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citerio, Giuseppe; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Latini, Roberto; Masson, Serge; Barlera, Simona; Guzzetti, Stefano; Pesenti, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background Many studies have attempted to determine the "best" anaesthetic technique for neurosurgical procedures in patients without intracranial hypertension. So far, no study comparing intravenous (IA) with volatile-based neuroanaesthesia (VA) has been able to demonstrate major outcome differences nor a superiority of one of the two strategies in patients undergoing elective supratentorial neurosurgery. Therefore, current practice varies and includes the use of either volatile or intravenous anaesthetics in addition to narcotics. Actually the choice of the anaestesiological strategy depends only on the anaesthetists' preferences or institutional policies. This trial, named NeuroMorfeo, aims to assess the equivalence between volatile and intravenous anaesthetics for neurosurgical procedures. Methods/Design NeuroMorfeo is a multicenter, randomized, open label, controlled trial, based on an equivalence design. Patients aged between 18 and 75 years, scheduled for elective craniotomy for supratentorial lesion without signs of intracranial hypertension, in good physical state (ASA I-III) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) equal to 15, are randomly assigned to one of three anaesthesiological strategies (two VA arms, sevoflurane + fentanyl or sevoflurane + remifentanil, and one IA, propofol + remifentanil). The equivalence between intravenous and volatile-based neuroanaesthesia will be evaluated by comparing the intervals required to reach, after anaesthesia discontinuation, a modified Aldrete score ≥ 9 (primary end-point). Two statistical comparisons have been planned: 1) sevoflurane + fentanyl vs. propofol + remifentanil; 2) sevoflurane + remifentanil vs. propofol + remifentanil. Secondary end-points include: an assessment of neurovegetative stress based on (a) measurement of urinary catecholamines and plasma and urinary cortisol and (b) estimate of sympathetic/parasympathetic balance by power spectrum analyses of electrocardiographic tracings recorded during anaesthesia

  14. Randomized cluster crossover trials for reliable, efficient, comparative effectiveness testing: design of the Prevention of Arrhythmia Device Infection Trial (PADIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Philippon, Francois; Longtin, Yves; Casanova, Amparo; Birnie, David H; Exner, Derek V; Dorian, Paul; Prakash, Ratika; Alings, Marco; Krahn, Andrew D

    2013-06-01

    Randomized clinical trials are a major advance in clinical research methodology. However, there are myriad important questions about the effectiveness of treatments used in daily practice that are not informed by the results of randomized trials. This is in part because of important limitations inherent in the methodology of randomized efficacy trials which are performed with tight control of inclusion, exclusion, treatment, and follow-up. This approach enhances evaluation of clinical efficacy (performance in controlled situations) but increases complexity and is not well suited to test clinical effectiveness (performance under conditions of actual use). The cluster crossover trial is a new concept for efficient comparative effectiveness testing. Deep tissue infection occurs in 2% of patients after arrhythmia device implantation, usually requires system extraction, and increases mortality. There is variation in antibiotic prophylaxis used to reduce implanted device infections. To efficiently evaluate the comparative effectiveness of antibiotic strategies now in use, we designed a cluster crossover clinical trial, which randomized implanting centres to 1 of 2 prophylactic antibiotic strategies, which became the standard care at the centre for 6 months, followed by crossover to the other strategy, rerandomization, and second crossover. This method greatly reduces trial complexity because it aligns study procedures with usual clinical care and increases generalizability. Pilot studies have tested the feasibility and an 10,800-patient trial, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, is now under way. The cluster crossover randomized trial design is well suited to efficiently test comparative effectiveness of existing treatments where there is variability of practice, clinical equipoise, and minimal risk.

  15. Handsearching the EMHJ for reports of randomized controlled trials by U.K. Cochrane Centre (Bahrain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hajeri, A; Al Sayyad, J; Eisinga, A

    2006-01-01

    This study used handsearching to find reports of randomized controlled trials in the Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal (EMHJ). EMBASE and MEDLINE were also searched electronically to identify if the reports found by the handsearch were already included in either of these databases. Nine reports were identified: 7 randomized controlled trials and 2 controlled clinical trials. The added value of the handsearch over EMBASE was 6 additional reports and over MEDLINE was 4. Reports identified were sent to the UK Cochrane Centre for verification and publication in The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL).

  16. Randomized control trial of computer-based rehabilitation of spatial neglect syndrome: the RESPONSE trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleet, Thomas Van; DeGutis, Joseph; Dabit, Sawsan; Chiu, Christopher

    2014-02-07

    Spatial neglect is a frequent and debilitating consequence of acquired brain injury and currently has no widely accepted standard of care. While previous interventions for spatial neglect have targeted patients' overt spatial deficits (e.g., reduced contralesional visual scanning), far fewer have directly targeted patients' non-spatial deficits (e.g., sustained attention deficits). Considering that non-spatial deficits have shown to be highly predictive of long-term disability, we developed a novel computer based training program that targets both sustained (tonic) and moment-to-moment (phasic) aspects of non-spatial attention (Tonic and Phasic Alertness Training, TAPAT). Preliminary studies demonstrate that TAPAT is safe and effective in improving both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits in the post-acute recovery phase in neglect patients. The purpose of the current trial (referred to as the REmediation of SPatial Neglect or RESPONSE trial) is to compare TAPAT to an active control training condition, include a larger sample of patients, and assess both cognitive and functional outcomes. We will employ a multi-site, longitudinal, blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) design with a target sample of 114 patients with spatial neglect. Patients will either perform, at their home, the experimental TAPAT training program or an active control computer games condition for thirty minutes/day, five days a week, over three months. Patients will be assessed on a battery of cognitive and functional outcomes on three occasions: a) immediately before training, b) within forty-eight hours post completion of total training, and c) after a three-month no-contact period post completion of total training, to assess the longevity of potential training effects. The strengths of this protocol are that it tests an innovative, in-home administered treatment that targets a fundamental deficit in neglect, employs highly sensitive computer-based assessments of cognition as well as

  17. A Data Management System Integrating Web-based Training and Randomized Trials: Requirements, Experiences and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroff, Jordana; Amodeo, Maryann; Larson, Mary Jo; Carey, Margaret; Loftin, Ralph D

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a data management system (DMS) developed to support a large-scale randomized study of an innovative web-course that was designed to improve substance abuse counselors' knowledge and skills in applying a substance abuse treatment method (i.e., cognitive behavioral therapy; CBT). The randomized trial compared the performance of web-course-trained participants (intervention group) and printed-manual-trained participants (comparison group) to determine the effectiveness of the web-course in teaching CBT skills. A single DMS was needed to support all aspects of the study: web-course delivery and management, as well as randomized trial management. The authors briefly reviewed several other systems that were described as built either to handle randomized trials or to deliver and evaluate web-based training. However it was clear that these systems fell short of meeting our needs for simultaneous, coordinated management of the web-course and the randomized trial. New England Research Institute's (NERI) proprietary Advanced Data Entry and Protocol Tracking (ADEPT) system was coupled with the web-programmed course and customized for our purposes. This article highlights the requirements for a DMS that operates at the intersection of web-based course management systems and randomized clinical trial systems, and the extent to which the coupled, customized ADEPT satisfied those requirements. Recommendations are included for institutions and individuals considering conducting randomized trials and web-based training programs, and seeking a DMS that can meet similar requirements.

  18. Impact of an integrated intervention program on atorvastatin adherence: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami NJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nilesh J Goswami,1 Mitch DeKoven,2 Andreas Kuznik,3 Jack Mardekian,3 Michelle R Krukas,2 Larry Z Liu,3,4 Patrick Bailey,1 Cynthia Deitrick,5 John Vincent3 1Prairie Heart Cardiovascular Consultants, Springfield, IL, USA; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, IMS Health, Alexandria, VA, USA; 3Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA; 4Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY, USA; 5Prairie Heart Education and Research Cooperative, Springfield, IL, USA Background: This trial evaluated the effectiveness of an integrated intervention program that included a 3-to-5-minute nurse counseling session, copay relief cards, and a monthly newsletter on adherence to atorvastatin treatment. Methods and results: A prospective, integrated (composed of nurse counseling, adherence tip sheet, copay relief card, opportunity to enroll in 12-week cholesterol management program randomized interventional study was designed involving patients >21 years of age who were prescribed atorvastatin at a large single-specialty cardiovascular physician practice in Illinois from March 2010 to May 2011. Data from the practice's electronic medical record were matched/merged to IMS Health's longitudinal data. A total of 500 patients were enrolled (125 in the control arm; 375 in the intervention arm. After data linkage, 53 control patients and 155 intervention patients were included in the analysis. Results: Mean age was 67.8 years (control and 69.5 years (intervention; 67.9% and 58.7%, respectively, were male. The mean 6-month adherence rate was 0.82 in both arms. The mean proportion of days covered for both the new-user control and intervention groups was the same, averaging 0.70 day (standard deviation [SD], 0.27 day; for continuing users, the proportion of days covered for the control group was 0.83 (SD, 0.24 and for the intervention group was 0.84 (SD, 0.22. For continuing users, the control group had mean persistent days of 151.6 (SD, 50.2 compared with 150.9 days

  19. A Phase 3 Randomized Trial of Nicotinamide for Skin-Cancer Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew C; Martin, Andrew J; Choy, Bonita; Fernández-Peñas, Pablo; Dalziell, Robyn A; McKenzie, Catriona A; Scolyer, Richard A; Dhillon, Haryana M; Vardy, Janette L; Kricker, Anne; St George, Gayathri; Chinniah, Niranthari; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-10-22

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers, such as basal-cell carcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma, are common cancers that are caused principally by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) has been shown to have protective effects against damage caused by UV radiation and to reduce the rate of new premalignant actinic keratoses. In this phase 3, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial, we randomly assigned, in a 1:1 ratio, 386 participants who had had at least two nonmelanoma skin cancers in the previous 5 years to receive 500 mg of nicotinamide twice daily or placebo for 12 months. Participants were evaluated by dermatologists at 3-month intervals for 18 months. The primary end point was the number of new nonmelanoma skin cancers (i.e., basal-cell carcinomas plus squamous-cell carcinomas) during the 12-month intervention period. Secondary end points included the number of new squamous-cell carcinomas and basal-cell carcinomas and the number of actinic keratoses during the 12-month intervention period, the number of nonmelanoma skin cancers in the 6-month postintervention period, and the safety of nicotinamide. At 12 months, the rate of new nonmelanoma skin cancers was lower by 23% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4 to 38) in the nicotinamide group than in the placebo group (P=0.02). Similar differences were found between the nicotinamide group and the placebo group with respect to new basal-cell carcinomas (20% [95% CI, -6 to 39] lower rate with nicotinamide, P=0.12) and new squamous-cell carcinomas (30% [95% CI, 0 to 51] lower rate, P=0.05). The number of actinic keratoses was 11% lower in the nicotinamide group than in the placebo group at 3 months (P=0.01), 14% lower at 6 months (Pnicotinamide was discontinued. Oral nicotinamide was safe and effective in reducing the rates of new nonmelanoma skin cancers and actinic keratoses in high-risk patients. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council; ONTRAC Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials

  20. Cognitive benefits of social dancing and walking in old age: the Dancing Mind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna eMerom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A physically active lifestyle has the potential to prevent cognitive decline and dementia, yet the optimal type of physical activity/exercise remains unclear. Dance is of special interest as it complex sensorimotor rhythmic activity with additional cognitive, social and affective dimensions. Objectives: to determine whether dance benefits executive function more than walking, an activity that is simple and functional. Methods: Two-arm randomised controlled trial among community-dwelling older adults. The intervention group received 1 hour of ballroom dancing twice weekly over 8 months (~69sessions in local community dance studios. The control group received a combination of a home walking program with a pedometer and optional biweekly group-based walking in local community park to facilitate socialisation. Main outcomes: Main outcomes: executive function tests: processing speed and task shift by the Trail Making Tests (TMT, response inhibition by the Stroop Colour-Word Test (SCWT, working memory by the Digit Span Backwards (DSB test, immediate and delayed verbal recall by the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT and visuospatial recall by the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test (BVST. Results: One hundred and fifteen adults (69.5 years, SD6.4 completed baseline and delayed baseline (3 weeks apart before being randomised to either dance (n=60 or walking (n=55. Of those randomized, 79 (68% completed the follow-up measurements (32 weeks from baseline. In the dance group only, ‘non-completers’ had significant lower baseline scores on all executive function tests than those completed the full program. Intention-to-treat analyses showed no group effect. In a random effects model including participants who completed all measurements, adjusted for baseline score and covariates (age, education, estimated verbal intelligence, community, a between group effect in favour of dance was noted only for BVST total learning (Cohen’s D Effect size

  1. Massage Therapy and Labor Outcomes: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Patricia; Shroff, Farah; Jaspar, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Massage is a time-honored method by which women have received comfort throughout the millennia, yet it has not been rigorously evaluated in the modern day delivery suite. No study to date that we are aware of has evaluated the effect of massage therapy by a regulated massage therapist on labor pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of massage therapy provided by registered massage therapists in managing pain among women in active labor. Methods BC Women’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Research Design: a randomized controlled trial. Participants: 77 healthy nulliparous women presenting in spontaneous labor. Intervention: Swedish massage administered for up to five hours by a registered massage therapist during labor vs. standard care. Main outcome measures include: cervical dilation at the time of administration of epidural, compared using estimated marginal means in an analysis of covariance. We also compared perception of pain at three time periods during labor according to cervical dilation at 3–4 cm, 5–7 cm, and 8–10 cm using the McGill Present Pain Intensity Scale. Results The mean cervical dilation at the time of epidural insertion after adjustment for station of the presenting part, cervical dilation, and status of membranes on admission to hospital was 5.9 cm (95% CI 5.2–6.7) compared to 4.9 in the control group (95% CI 4.2–5.8). Scores on the McGill Pain Scale were consistently lower in the massage therapy group (13.3 vs. 16.9 at 3–4 cm, 13.3 vs. 15.8 at 5–6 cm, and 19.4 vs. 28.3 at 7–8 cm), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Our findings from this pilot study suggest that massage therapy by a registered massage therapist has the potential to be an effective means of pain management that may be associated with delayed use of epidural analgesia. It may therefore have the potential to reduce exposure to epidural analgesia during labor and decrease rates of associated

  2. Porcine collagen matrix for treating gingival recession. Randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Castro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Achieving root coverage after exposure caused by gingival recession is one of the main goals of reconstructive periodontal surgery. Even though a large variety of techniques and mucogingival grafting procedures are available, their long-term results are not clear yet. Therefore, this study aimed to compare clinical effectiveness of the porcine collagen matrix with subepithelial connective graft for treating Miller class I and II gingival recessions. Materials and methods: The randomized clinical trial included twelve patients assigned to two groups. In the first group (experimental, six patients were treated using collagen matrix (mean age, 54.3±5.6 years; mean recession 2. 67±1.03mm. Another group (control of six patients was treated using connective grafts (mean age, 57.1± 2.7 years; mean recession 4.33±1.03mm. All patients underwent periodontal evaluation and pre-surgical preparation including oral hygiene instruction and supragingival scaling. Gingival recessions were exposed through partial thickness flaps where the grafts and matrices were placed. Patients were assessed periodically until complete healing of tissue. Results: Root coverage parameters, amount of keratinized gingiva, gingival biotype and clinical attachment level were evaluated. The root coverage percentage for the group using connective graft was 24.7±13.5% and 16.6±26.8% for the one treated with the matrix. The amount of increased keratinized tissue was 4.33±2.06mm and 4.5±0.83mm for the control and experimental group respectively. Both groups increased gingival biotypes from thin to thick at 100%. The final clinical attachment level was 4.17±3.17±04mm for the control group and 0.98mm for the experimental group. There were significant differences between the outcome of gingival recession and clinical attachment. Conclusion: Results indicate both techniques, besides being predictable, are useful for improving clinical parameters when treating gingival recessions

  3. Evaluation of Kilifi Epilepsy Education Programme: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibinda, Fredrick; Mbuba, Caroline K; Kariuki, Symon M; Chengo, Eddie; Ngugi, Anthony K; Odhiambo, Rachael; Lowe, Brett; Fegan, Greg; Carter, Julie A; Newton, Charles R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The epilepsy treatment gap is largest in resource-poor countries. We evaluated the efficacy of a 1-day health education program in a rural area of Kenya. The primary outcome was adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as measured by drug levels in the blood, and the secondary outcomes were seizure frequency and Kilifi Epilepsy Beliefs and Attitudes Scores (KEBAS). Methods Seven hundred thirty-eight people with epilepsy (PWE) and their designated supporter were randomized to either the intervention (education) or nonintervention group. Data were collected at baseline and 1 year after the education intervention was administered to the intervention group. There were 581 PWE assessed at both time points. At the end of the study, 105 PWE from the intervention group and 86 from the nonintervention group gave blood samples, which were assayed for the most commonly used AEDs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine). The proportions of PWE with detectable AED levels were determined using a standard blood assay method. The laboratory technicians conducting the assays were blinded to the randomization. Secondary outcomes were evaluated using questionnaires administered by trained field staff. Modified Poisson regression was used to investigate the factors associated with improved adherence (transition from nonoptimal AED level in blood at baseline to optimal levels at follow-up), reduced seizures, and improved KEBAS, which was done as a post hoc analysis. This trial is registered in ISRCTN register under ISRCTN35680481. Results There was no significant difference in adherence to AEDs based on detectable drug levels (odds ratio [OR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.74–2.90, p = 0.28) or by self-reports (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.71–1.40, p = 1.00) between the intervention and nonintervention group. The intervention group had significantly fewer beliefs about traditional causes of epilepsy, cultural treatment, and negative stereotypes than the

  4. Efficacy and effectiveness as aspects of cluster randomized trials with nursing home residents: methodological insights from a pneumonia prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ness, Peter H; Peduzzi, Peter N; Quagliarello, Vincent J

    2012-11-01

    This report discusses how methodological aspects of study efficacy and effectiveness combine in cluster randomized trials in nursing homes. Discussion focuses on the relationships between these study aspects in the Pneumonia Reduction in Institutionalized Disabled Elders (PRIDE) trial, an ongoing cluster randomized clinical trial of pneumonia prevention among nursing home residents launched in October 2009 in Greater New Haven, Connecticut. This clinical trial has enrolled long-term care nursing home residents, over 65years in age, who have either inadequate oral care or swallowing difficulty, previously identified risk factors for pneumonia. It has used a multicomponent intervention consisting of manual tooth/gum brushing, 0.12% chlorhexidine oral rinse administered twice daily by nurses, and upright feeding positioning at meals to reduce rates of radiographically documented pneumonia. Cluster randomization is attractive for nursing home intervention studies because physical proximity and administrative arrangements make it difficult to deliver different interventions to residents of the same nursing home. Implementing an intervention in an entire home requires integration into the daily life of residents and into the administrative procedures of the nursing home. This characteristic of nursing home cluster randomized trials makes them approximate "real-world" research contexts, but implementation can be challenging. The PRIDE trial of pneumonia prevention utilized specific methodological choices that include both efficacy and effectiveness elements. Cluster randomized trials in nursing homes having elements of both efficacy and effectiveness (i.e., hybrid designs) can address some of the methodological challenges of conducting clinical research in nursing homes; they have distinctive advantages and some limitations.

  5. Evaluation of cluster-randomized trials on maternal and child health research in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Sen, Pranab Kumar

    2009-01-01

    To summarize and evaluate all publications including cluster-randomized trials used for maternal and child health research in developing countries during the last 10 years. METHODS: All cluster-randomized trials published between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed, and those that met our criteria...... for inclusion were evaluated further. The criteria for inclusion were that the trial should have been conducted in maternal and child health care in a developing country and that the conclusions should have been made on an individual level. Methods of accounting for clustering in design and analysis were......, and the trials generally improved in quality. CONCLUSIONS: Shortcomings exist in the sample-size calculations and in the analysis of cluster-randomized trials conducted during maternal and child health research in developing countries. Even though there has been improvement over time, further progress in the way...

  6. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer has been proven efficacious but morbidity and oncological outcome need to be investigated in a randomized clinical trial. Trial design: Non-inferiority randomized clinical trial. METHODS: The COLOR II trial is an ongoing international randomized...... clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...... analysis. RESULTS: By July 2008, 27 hospitals from the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Denmark, South Korea and Canada had included 739 patients. The intra-operative conversion rate in the laparoscopic group was 17%. Distribution of age, location of the tumor and radiotherapy were equal...

  7. Evaluation of cluster-randomized trials on maternal and child health research in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Sen, Pranab Kumar

    2009-01-01

    To summarize and evaluate all publications including cluster-randomized trials used for maternal and child health research in developing countries during the last 10 years. METHODS: All cluster-randomized trials published between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed, and those that met our criteria...... for inclusion were evaluated further. The criteria for inclusion were that the trial should have been conducted in maternal and child health care in a developing country and that the conclusions should have been made on an individual level. Methods of accounting for clustering in design and analysis were......, and the trials generally improved in quality. CONCLUSIONS: Shortcomings exist in the sample-size calculations and in the analysis of cluster-randomized trials conducted during maternal and child health research in developing countries. Even though there has been improvement over time, further progress in the way...

  8. Systematic care for caregivers of patients with dementia: a multicenter, cluster-randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, A.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Teerenstra, S.; Graff, M.J.L.; Adang, E.M.M.; Verhey, F.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Systematic Care Program for Dementia (SCPD) on patient institutionalization and to determine the predictors of institutionalization. DESIGN: Single-blind, multicenter, cluster-randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: Six community mental health services

  9. School snacks decrease morbidity in Kenyan schoolchildren: a cluster randomized, controlled feeding intervention trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neumann, Charlotte G; Bwibo, Nimrod O; Jiang, Luohua; Weiss, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    .... There were three schools per group in this cluster randomized trial. Children in feeding group schools received school snacks of a local plant-based dish, githeri, with meat, milk or extra oil added...

  10. Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venekamp, R.P.; Bonten, M.J.; Rovers, M.M.; Verheij, T.J.; Sachs, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with acute rhinosinusitis are frequently encountered in primary care. Although corticosteroids are being increasingly used for symptom control, evidence supporting their use is inconclusive. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of systemic cort

  11. Evaluation of occupational health interventions using a randomized controlled trial: challenges and alternative research designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelvis, R.M; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Burdorf, A.; Blatter, B.M.; Strijk, J.E.; Beek, A.J. van

    2015-01-01

    Occupational health researchers regularly conduct evaluative intervention research for which a randomized controlled trial (RCT) may not be the most appropriate design (eg, effects of policy measures, organizational interventions on work schedules). This article demonstrates the appropriateness of a

  12. A randomized trial on folic acid supplementation and risk of recurrent colorectal adenoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Evidence from observational studies suggests that inadequate folate status enhances colorectal carcinogenesis, but results from some randomized trials do not support this hypothesis. Objective: To assess the effect of folic acid supplementation on recurrent colorectal adenoma, we conduc...

  13. Fewer intraperitoneal adhesions with use of hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose membrane: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. Vrijland (Wietske); J. Jeekel (Hans); L.N. Tseng; H.J. Eijkman; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.J. Jakimowicz; P. Leguit; L.P. Stassen (Laurents); D.J. Swank; R. Haverlag (Robert); H.J. Bonjer (Jaap)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of bioresorbable Seprafilm membrane in preventing abdominal adhesions in a prospective clinical randomized multicenter trial. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Adhesions occur frequently after abdominal operations and are a common cause of

  14. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in euthymic bipolar disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steinan, Mette Kvisten; Krane-Gartiser, Karoline; Langsrud, Knut; Sand, Trond; Kallestad, Håvard; Morken, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    .... In this randomized controlled trial, we wish to compare CBT-I and treatment as usual with treatment as usual alone to determine its effect in improving quality of sleep, stabilizing minor mood...

  15. Augmented cognitive behavioral therapy for poststroke depressive symptoms: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.C.; Lem, F.C.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of individually tailored cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for reducing depressive symptoms with or without anxiety poststroke. DESIGN: Multicenter, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Ambulatory rehabilitation setting. PARTICIPANTS:

  16. Development of early mathematical skills with a tablet intervention: a randomized control trial in Malawi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pitchford, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    .... This study reports a randomized control trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a tablet intervention for supporting the development of early mathematical skills in primary school children in Malawi...

  17. Predictors of Missed Research Appointments in a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie J.E. Becker

    2014-09-01

     Younger patients with no college education, who believe their health can be controlled, are more likely to miss a research appointment when enrolled in a randomized placebo injection-controlled trial

  18. Whole Animal Experiments Should Be More Like Human Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The quality of reporting of animal studies lags behind that of human randomized controlled trials but a series of additions to the ARRIVE guidelines will help ensure that the standards are comparable.

  19. Augmented cognitive behavioral therapy for post stroke depressive symptoms : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, Joyce A; Rasquin, Sascha Mc; Lem, Frederik C; van Heugten, Caroline M; Fasotti, Luciano; Geurts, Alexander C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of individually tailored cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for reducing depressive symptoms with or without anxiety post stroke. DESIGN: Multi-center, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Six ambulatory rehabilitation settings in The Nethe

  20. Yoga for persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bower, Julienne E; Garet, Deborah; Sternlieb, Beth; Ganz, Patricia A; Irwin, Michael R; Olmstead, Richard; Greendale, Gail

    2012-01-01

    .... The authors conducted a 2-group randomized controlled trial to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an Iyengar yoga intervention for breast cancer survivors with persistent post-treatment fatigue...

  1. Arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthropathy : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L. M.; Huddleston Slater, J. J. R.; Stegenga, B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of arthrocentesis compared to conservative treatment as initial treatment with regard to temporomandibular joint pain and mandibular movement. Patients and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 80 patients with arthralgia of the TMJ (classified accor

  2. Client attachment security predicts alliance in a randomized controlled trial of two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Sofie; Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the relation between clients’ attachment patterns and the therapeutic alliance in two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa. Method: Data derive from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoanalytic psychotherapy for bulimia...

  3. Randomized trial to examine procedure-to-procedure transfer in laparoscopic simulator training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, F; Sorensen, J L; Konge, L

    2016-01-01

    -centre educational superiority trial. Surgical novices practised basic skills on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator. On reaching proficiency, participants were randomized to proficiency-based training. The intervention group practised two procedures on the simulator (appendicectomy followed by salpingectomy...

  4. Randomized controlled trial of the Pentax AWS, Glidescope, and Macintosh laryngoscopes in predicted difficult intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential for the Pentax AWS and the Glidescope to reduce the difficulty of tracheal intubation in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation, in a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  5. Sodium Restriction in Patients With CKD : A Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-management Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W.; Navis, Gerjan; Vogt, Liffert; van der Boog, Paul J. M.; Bos, Willem Jan W.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; van Dijk, Sandra

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of self-managed sodium restriction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Study Design: Open randomized controlled trial. Setting & Participants: Patients with moderately decreased kidney function from 4 hospitals in the Netherlands.

  6. Subjective and objective outcomes in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moustgaard, Helene; Bello, Segun; Miller, Franklin G

    2014-01-01

    providing a classification of clinical trial outcomes and a descriptive study of how outcomes were classified in 200 PubMed indexed clinical trial reports published in 2012. RESULTS: We identified 90 methodological publications with some form of a classification of outcomes. Three distinct definitions were...... "subjective outcome" and "objective outcome" are defined in methodological publications and clinical trial reports. To put this examination into perspective, we also provide an overview of how outcomes are classified more broadly. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A systematic review of methodological publications...

  7. A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial of a Multicomponent Intervention Protocol for Pneumonia Prevention Among Nursing Home Elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Van Ness, Peter H.; McGloin, Joanne; Argraves, Stephanie; Chen, Shu; Charpentier, Peter; Miller, Laura; Williams, Kathleen; Wall, Diane; Baker, Dorothy; Tinetti, Mary; Peduzzi, Peter; Quagliarello, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pneumonia remains an important public health problem among elderly nursing home residents. This clinical trial sought to determine if a multicomponent intervention protocol, including manual tooth/gum brushing plus 0.12% chlorhexidine oral rinse, twice per day, plus upright positioning during feeding, could reduce the incidence of radiographically documented pneumonia among nursing home residents, compared with usual care. Methods. This cluster-randomized clinical trial was conducted in 36 nursing homes in Connecticut. Eligible residents >65 years with at least 1 of 2 modifiable risk factors for pneumonia (ie, impaired oral hygiene, swallowing difficulty) were enrolled. Nursing homes were randomized to the multicomponent intervention protocol or usual care. Participants were followed for up to 2.5 years for development of the primary outcome, a radiographically documented pneumonia, and secondary outcome, a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) without radiographic documentation. Results. A total of 834 participants were enrolled: 434 to intervention and 400 to usual care. The trial was terminated for futility. The number of participants in the intervention vs control arms with first pneumonia was 119 (27.4%) vs 94 (23.5%), respectively, and with first LRTI, 125 (28.8%) vs 100 (25.0%), respectively. In a multivariable Cox regression model, the hazard ratio in the intervention vs control arms, respectively, was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI], .84–1.50; P = .44) for first pneumonia and 1.07 (95% CI, .79–1.46, P = .65) for first LRTI. Conclusions. The multicomponent intervention protocol did not significantly reduce the incidence of first radiographically confirmed pneumonia or LRTI compared with usual care in nursing home residents. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00975780. PMID:25520333

  8. Transparency of Outcome Reporting and Trial Registration of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleine Azar

    Full Text Available Confidence that randomized controlled trial (RCT results accurately reflect intervention effectiveness depends on proper trial conduct and the accuracy and completeness of published trial reports. The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP is the primary trials journal amongst American Psychological Association (APA journals. The objectives of this study were to review RCTs recently published in JCCP to evaluate (1 adequacy of primary outcome analysis definitions; (2 registration status; and, (3 among registered trials, adequacy of outcome registrations. Additionally, we compared results from JCCP to findings from a recent study of top psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals.Eligible RCTs were published in JCCP in 2013-2014. For each RCT, two investigators independently extracted data on (1 adequacy of outcome analysis definitions in the published report, (2 whether the RCT was registered prior to enrolling patients, and (3 adequacy of outcome registration.Of 70 RCTs reviewed, 12 (17.1% adequately defined primary or secondary outcome analyses, whereas 58 (82.3% had multiple primary outcome analyses without statistical adjustment or undefined outcome analyses. There were 39 (55.7% registered trials. Only two trials registered prior to patient enrollment with a single primary outcome variable and time point of assessment. However, in one of the two trials, registered and published outcomes were discrepant. No studies were adequately registered as per Standard Protocol Items: Recommendation for Interventional Trials guidelines. Compared to psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals, the proportion of published trials with adequate outcome analysis declarations was significantly lower in JCCP (17.1% versus 32.9%; p = 0.029. The proportion of registered trials in JCCP (55.7% was comparable to behavioral medicine journals (52.6%; p = 0.709.The quality of published outcome analysis definitions and trial registrations in JCCP is

  9. Transparency of Outcome Reporting and Trial Registration of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Marleine; Riehm, Kira E; McKay, Dean; Thombs, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Confidence that randomized controlled trial (RCT) results accurately reflect intervention effectiveness depends on proper trial conduct and the accuracy and completeness of published trial reports. The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) is the primary trials journal amongst American Psychological Association (APA) journals. The objectives of this study were to review RCTs recently published in JCCP to evaluate (1) adequacy of primary outcome analysis definitions; (2) registration status; and, (3) among registered trials, adequacy of outcome registrations. Additionally, we compared results from JCCP to findings from a recent study of top psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals. Eligible RCTs were published in JCCP in 2013-2014. For each RCT, two investigators independently extracted data on (1) adequacy of outcome analysis definitions in the published report, (2) whether the RCT was registered prior to enrolling patients, and (3) adequacy of outcome registration. Of 70 RCTs reviewed, 12 (17.1%) adequately defined primary or secondary outcome analyses, whereas 58 (82.3%) had multiple primary outcome analyses without statistical adjustment or undefined outcome analyses. There were 39 (55.7%) registered trials. Only two trials registered prior to patient enrollment with a single primary outcome variable and time point of assessment. However, in one of the two trials, registered and published outcomes were discrepant. No studies were adequately registered as per Standard Protocol Items: Recommendation for Interventional Trials guidelines. Compared to psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals, the proportion of published trials with adequate outcome analysis declarations was significantly lower in JCCP (17.1% versus 32.9%; p = 0.029). The proportion of registered trials in JCCP (55.7%) was comparable to behavioral medicine journals (52.6%; p = 0.709). The quality of published outcome analysis definitions and trial registrations in JCCP is

  10. Systematic review: The relation between nutrition and nosocomial pneumonia: randomized trials in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Deborah; De Jonghe, Bernard; Heyland, Daren

    1997-01-01

    Objective To review the effect of enteral nutrition on nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients as summarized in randomized clinical trials. Study identification and selection Studies were identified through MEDLINE, SCISEARCH, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, bibliographies of primary and review articles, and personal files. Through duplicate independent review, we selected randomized trials evaluating approaches to nutrition and their relation to nosocomial pneumonia. Data abstraction I...

  11. Comparison of Topical Nifedipine With Oral Nifedipine for Treatment of Anal Fissure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Golfam, Farzaneh; Golfam, Parisa; Golfam, Babak; Pahlevani, Puyan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical sphincterotomy has gained popularity as a treatment for anal fissure. Calcium channel blockers in topical forms could also be appropriate with low adverse effects. Objectives: This was a prospective randomized controlled trial to compare topical and oral nifedipine in the treatment of chronic anal fissure. Patients and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted at two centers of Shahed University. One hundred and thirty patients with chronic anal fiss...

  12. Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    physiotherapists, general prac- titioners, chiropractors ) for acute low back pain . At the initial consul- tation clinicians recorded responses to 25...TITLE: Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military: A Randomized Clinical Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven Z. George PT, Ph.D...Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military: 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0564 A Randomized Clinical Trial 5b. GRANT NUMBER PR054098 5c

  13. Platelet-rich fibrin versus albumin in surgical wound repair: a randomized trial with paired design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2010-01-01

    To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial.......To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial....

  14. Literature review of vaccine-related adverse events reported from HPV vaccination in randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Macki, Mohamed; Dabaja, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The human papilloma virus (HPV) infections were addressed with two FDA-approved HPV vaccines: quadrivalent and bivalent vaccine. The objective of this manuscript is to determine the safety of the HPV vaccine. Results A search of PubMed articles for “human papillomavirus vaccine” was used to identify all-type HPV clinical studies prior to October 2014. A refined search of clinical trials, multicenter studies, and randomized studies were screened for only randomized controlled trials...

  15. Platelet-rich fibrin versus albumin in surgical wound repair: a randomized trial with paired design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2010-01-01

    To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial.......To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial....

  16. A randomized trial of Foley balloon induction of labor trial in nulliparas (FIAT-N).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Katherine A; Kohari, Katherine S; Rekawek, Patricia; Smilen, Brooke S; Miller, Meredith R; Moshier, Erin; Factor, Stephanie H; Stone, Joanne L; Bianco, Angela T

    2016-09-01

    With an increasing rate of induction of labor, it is important to choose induction methods that are safe and efficient in achieving a vaginal delivery. The optimal method for inducing nulliparous women with an unfavorable cervix is not known. We sought to determine if induction of labor with simultaneous use of oxytocin and Foley balloon vs sequential use of Foley balloon followed by oxytocin decreases the time to delivery in nulliparous women. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of nulliparous women presenting for induction at a single institution from December 2013 through March 2015. After decision for induction was made by their primary provider, women with gestational age ≥24 weeks with a nonanomalous, singleton fetus in vertex presentation with intact membranes were offered participation. Exclusion criteria included history of uterine surgery, unexplained vaginal bleeding, latex allergy, or contraindication to vaginal delivery. Participants were randomized to either simultaneous (oxytocin and Foley balloon) or sequential (oxytocin after expulsion of Foley balloon) induction group. The primary outcome was time from induction to delivery. Secondary outcomes included mode of delivery, estimated blood loss, postpartum hemorrhage, chorioamnionitis, and composite neonatal outcome. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were collected via chart review. Analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. A total of 166 patients were enrolled; 82 in the simultaneous and 84 in the sequential group. There were no differences in baseline characteristics in the 2 groups. Patients who received simultaneous oxytocin with insertion of a Foley balloon delivered significantly earlier (15.92 vs 18.87 hours, P = .004) than those in the sequential group. There was no difference in rate of cesarean delivery, estimated blood loss, postpartum hemorrhage, chorioamnionitis, or composite neonatal outcome. Simultaneous use of oxytocin and Foley balloon for induction of labor results

  17. A descriptive analysis of a representative sample of pediatric randomized controlled trials published in 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomson Denise

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs are the gold standard for trials assessing the effects of therapeutic interventions; therefore it is important to understand how they are conducted. Our objectives were to provide an overview of a representative sample of pediatric RCTs published in 2007 and assess the validity of their results. Methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials using a pediatric filter and randomly selected 300 RCTs published in 2007. We extracted data on trial characteristics; outcomes; methodological quality; reporting; and registration and protocol characteristics. Trial registration and protocol availability were determined for each study based on the publication, an Internet search and an author survey. Results Most studies (83% were efficacy trials, 40% evaluated drugs, and 30% were placebo-controlled. Primary outcomes were specified in 41%; 43% reported on adverse events. At least one statistically significant outcome was reported in 77% of trials; 63% favored the treatment group. Trial registration was declared in 12% of publications and 23% were found through an Internet search. Risk of bias (ROB was high in 59% of trials, unclear in 33%, and low in 8%. Registered trials were more likely to have low ROB than non-registered trials (16% vs. 5%; p = 0.008. Effect sizes tended to be larger for trials at high vs. low ROB (0.28, 95% CI 0.21,0.35 vs. 0.16, 95% CI 0.07,0.25. Among survey respondents (50% response rate, the most common reason for trial registration was a publication requirement and for non-registration, a lack of familiarity with the process. Conclusions More than half of this random sample of pediatric RCTs published in 2007 was at high ROB and three quarters of trials were not registered. There is an urgent need to improve the design, conduct, and reporting of child health research.

  18. Representation of women in randomized clinical trials of cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloni, Chiara; Berger, Jeffrey S; Wang, Tracy Y; Gunes, Funda; Stebbins, Amanda; Pieper, Karen S; Dolor, Rowena J; Douglas, Pamela S; Mark, Daniel B; Newby, L Kristin

    2010-03-01

    The 2007 American Heart Association guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention in women drew heavily on results from randomized clinical trials; however, representation of women in trials of cardiovascular disease prevention has not been systematically assessed. We abstracted 156 randomized clinical trials cited by the 2007 women's prevention guidelines to determine female representation over time and by clinical indication, prevention type, location of trial conduct, and funding source. Both women and men were represented in 135 of 156 (86.5%) trials; 20 trials enrolled only men; 1 enrolled only women. Among all trials, the proportion of women increased significantly over time, from 9% in 1970 to 41% in 2006. Considering only trials that enrolled both women and men, female enrollment was 18% in 1970 and increased to 34% in 2006. Female representation was higher in international versus United States-only trials (32.7% versus 26.7%) and primary versus secondary prevention trials (42.6% versus 26.6%). Female enrollment was comparable in government/foundation-funded versus industry-funded trials (31.9% versus 31.5%). Representation of women was highest among trials in hypertension (44%), diabetes (40%), and stroke (38%) and lowest for heart failure (29%), coronary artery disease (25%), and hyperlipidemia (28%). By contrast, women accounted for 53% of all individuals with hypertension, 50% with diabetes, 51% with heart failure, 49% with hyperlipidemia, and 46% with coronary artery disease. Sex-specific results were discussed in only 31% of primary trial publications. Enrollment of women in randomized clinical trials has increased over time but remains low relative to their overall representation in disease populations. Efforts are needed to reach a level of representation that is adequate to ensure evidence-based sex-specific recommendations.

  19. Reporting of positive results in randomized controlled trials of mindfulness-based mental health interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coronado-Montoya, S.; Levis, A.W.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Steele, R.J.; Turner, E.H.; Thombs, B.D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A large proportion of mindfulness-based therapy trials report statistically significant results, even in the context of very low statistical power. The objective of the present study was to characterize the reporting of "positive" results in randomized controlled trials of mindfulness-bas

  20. The morbidity of treatment for patients with stage I endometrial cancer : Results from a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creutzberg, CL; van Putten, WLJ; Koper, PC; Lybeert, MLM; Jobsen, JJ; Warlam-Rodenhuis, CC; De Winter, KAJ; Lutgens, LCHW; van den Bergh, ACM; van der Steen-Banasik, E; Beerman, H; van Lent, M

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the treatment complications for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer treated with surgery and pelvic radiotherapy (RT) or surgery alone in a multicenter randomized trial. Methods and Materials: The Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma (PORTEC) trial includ

  1. Survey and Practice of Reporting Quality of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ting-qian; MAO Bing; WANG Gang; CHANG Jing; WANG Lei

    2008-01-01

    @@ Evidence obtained from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been generally accepted as the gold standard in the evaluation of clinical effectiveness. Readers need to understand the trial design, implementation, results, analysis and interpretation, so as to fully understand the results of RCTs. Thus, the investigators of RCTs have to report these items in a complete, accurate and clear manner.

  2. Oral Prednisolone in the Treatment of Acute Gout: A Pragmatic, Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rainer, T.H.; Cheng, C.H.; Janssens, H.J.; Man, C.Y.; Tam, L.S.; Choi, Y.F.; Yau, W.H.; Lee, K.H.; Graham, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two recent double-blind, randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) showed that oral steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have similar analgesic effectiveness for management of gout, but the trials had small sample sizes and other methodological limitations. OBJECTIVE: To compare

  3. A Multisite Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Spanish-Speaking Substance Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Martino, Steve; Ball, Samuel A.; Nich, Charla; Frankforter, Tami; Anez, Luis M.; Paris, Manuel; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Szapocznik, Jose; Miller, William R.; Rosa, Carmen; Matthews, Julie; Farentinos, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Hispanic individuals are underrepresented in clinical and research populations and are often excluded from clinical trials in the United States. Hence, there are few data on the effectiveness of most empirically validated therapies for Hispanic substance users. The authors conducted a multisite randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of 3…

  4. Survival after relapse in patients with endometrial cancer : results from a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creutzberg, CL; van Putten, WLJ; Koper, PC; Lybeert, MLM; Jobsen, JJ; Warlam-Rodenhuis, CC; De Winter, KAJ; Lutgens, LCHW; van den Bergh, ACM; van der Steen-Banasik, E; Beerman, H; van Lent, M

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the rates of local control and survival after relapse in patients with stage I endometrial cancer treated in the multicenter randomized PORTEC trial. Methods, The PORTEC trial included 715 patients with stage I endometrial cancer, either grade I or 2

  5. Variations in reporting of outcomes in randomized trials on diet and physical activity in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogozińska, Ewelina; Marlin, Nadine; Yang, Fen

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Trials on diet and physical activity in pregnancy report on various outcomes. We aimed to assess the variations in outcomes reported and their quality in trials on lifestyle interventions in pregnancy. METHODS: We searched major databases without language restrictions for randomized controll...

  6. Covariate Adjustment Strategy Increases Power in the Randomized Controlled Trial With Discrete-Time Survival Endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarkhani, Maryam; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, a decision needs to be made about the total number of subjects for adequate statistical power. One way to increase the power of a trial is by including a predictive covariate in the model. In this article, the effects of various covariate adjustment strategies on increasing the power is studied for discrete-time…

  7. Getting added value from using qualitative research with randomized controlled trials: a qualitative interview study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Qualitative research is undertaken with randomized controlled trials of health interventions. Our aim was to explore the perceptions of researchers with experience of this endeavour to understand the added value of qualitative research to the trial in practice. Methods A telephone semi-structured interview study with 18 researchers with experience of undertaking the trial and/or the qualitative research. Results Interviewees described the added value of qualitative research for the...

  8. Parents' and Adolescents' Preferences for Intensified or Reduced Treatment in Randomized Lymphoblastic Leukemia Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulstrup, Morten; Larsen, Hanne Bækgaard; Castor, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When offered participation in clinical trials, families of children with cancer face a delicate balance between cure and toxicity. Since parents and children may perceive this balance differently, this paper explores whether adolescent patients have different enrollment patterns...... compared to younger children in trials with different toxicity profiles. PROCEDURE: Age-dependent participation rates in three consecutive, randomized childhood leukemia trials conducted by the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology were evaluated. The ALL2000 dexamethasone/vincristine (Dx...

  9. Fluoxetine for poststroke depression A randomized placebo controlled clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Kong; Wanli Dong; Chunfeng Liu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that poststroke depression(PSD) may be related with the disequilibrium between noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused by cerebral injury. The injured regions involve noradrenergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neurons as well as conduction pathway.The levels of noradrenaline and 5-HT would be decreased.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of fluoxetine on preventing against PSD and recovery of neurologic function, and analyze the relationship of fluoxetine and the 5-HT level.DESIGN: A randomized controlled clinical trial.SETTING: Department of Neurology, First Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University.PARTICIPANTS: Ninety consecutive patients, 47 female and 43 male, were recruited who admitted to hospital for recent stroke in the Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University between September 2003 and February 2005. Subjects were aged (64±7) years, ranging from 47 to 79 years old. They all met the diagnosis criteria of various cerebrovascular diseases formulated in the 4th National Cerebrovascular Disease Conference and confirmed as stroke by skull CT or MRI; The time from onset to tentative administration was less than 7 days; The patients had clear consciousness, without obvious language disorder. They were randomized into treatment group (n =48) and placebo group (n =42).METHODS: ①All the patients were given routine treatment according to treatment guideline of cerebrovascular disease after admission. Patients in the treatment group and placebo group received 20 mg/d fluoxetine and placebo (component: vitamin C) for 8 weeks, respectively. ② Neurologic deficit was assessed according to 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) and Activity of Daily Living Scale (ADL) before and at 2,4 and 8 weeks after test, separately; Meanwhile, the levels of platelet 5-HT and plasma 5-HT were determined. Grading criteria of HAMD intergral depression: non-depression < 8 points

  10. Low vision depression prevention trial in age-related macular degeneration: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Massof, Robert W; Leiby, Benjamin E; Ho, Allen C; Tasman, William S

    2014-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of behavior activation (BA) + low vision rehabilitation (LVR) with supportive therapy (ST) + LVR to prevent depressive disorders in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Single-masked, attention-controlled, randomized, clinical trial with outcome assessment at 4 months. Patients with AMD and subsyndromal depressive symptoms attending retina practices (n = 188). Before randomization, all subjects had 2 outpatient LVR visits, and were then randomized to in-home BA+LVR or ST+LVR. Behavior activation is a structured behavioral treatment that aims to increase adaptive behaviors and achieve valued goals. Supportive therapy is a nondirective, psychological treatment that provides emotional support and controls for attention. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV defined depressive disorder based on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (primary outcome), Activities Inventory, National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire-25 plus Supplement (NEI-VFQ), and NEI-VFQ quality of life (secondary outcomes). At 4 months, 11 BA+LVR subjects (12.6%) and 18 ST+LVR subjects (23.4%) developed a depressive disorder (relative risk [RR], 0.54; 95% CI, 0.27-1.06; P = 0.067). In planned adjusted analyses the RR was 0.51 (95% CI, 0.27-0.98; P = 0.04). A mediational analysis suggested that BA+LVR prevented depression to the extent that it enabled subjects to remain socially engaged. In addition, BA+LVR was associated with greater improvements in functional vision than ST+LVR, although there was no significant between-group difference. There was no significant change or between-group difference in quality of life. An integrated mental health and low vision intervention halved the incidence of depressive disorders relative to standard outpatient LVR in patients with AMD. As the population ages, the number of persons with AMD and the adverse effects of comorbid depression will increase. Promoting interactions between ophthalmology, optometry

  11. Exercise Training and Weight Gain in Obese Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial (ETIP Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Krohn Garnæs

    2016-07-01

    .04. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the exercise group (mean 120.4 mm Hg compared to the control group (mean 128.1 mm Hg, with a mean difference of -7.73 mm Hg (95% CI -13.23, -2.22; p = 0.006. No significant between-group differences were seen in diastolic blood pressure, blood measurements, skinfold thickness, or body composition in late pregnancy. In per protocol analyses, late pregnancy systolic blood pressure was 115.7 (95% CI 110.0, 121.5 mm Hg in the exercise group (significant between-group difference, p = 0.001, and diastolic blood pressure was 75.1 (95% CI 71.6, 78.7 mm Hg (significant between-group difference, p = 0.02. We had planned to recruit 150 women into the trial; hence, under-recruitment represents a major limitation of our results. Another limitation to our study was the low adherence to the exercise program, with only 50% of the women included in the intention-to-treat analysis adhering as described in the study protocol.In this trial we did not observe a reduction in GWG among overweight/obese women who received a supervised exercise training program during their pregnancy. The incidence of GDM in late pregnancy seemed to be lower in the women randomized to exercise training than in the women receiving standard maternity care only. Systolic blood pressure in late pregnancy was also apparently lower in the exercise group than in the control group. These results indicate that supervised exercise training might be beneficial as a part of standard pregnancy care for overweight/obese women.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01243554.

  12. Multilevel Analysis Methods for Partially Nested Cluster Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores multilevel modeling approaches for 2-group randomized experiments in which a treatment condition involving clusters of individuals is compared to a control condition involving only ungrouped individuals, otherwise known as partially nested cluster randomized designs (PNCRTs). Strategies for comparing groups from a PNCRT in the…

  13. Phase III randomized trial of toremifene versus tamoxifen for Japanese postmenopausal patients with early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Morihiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Kimijima, Izo; Takatsuka, Yuichi; Takashima, Shigemitsu; Nomura, Yasuo; Kasumi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Masuda, Norikazu; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Eshima, Nobuoki

    2014-05-01

    Toremifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is used as adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal patients with breast cancer in Japan. For Japanese patients, however, only limited data are available on the efficacy and safety profile of toremifene. To establish the long term efficacy and safety of toremifene for Japanese patients, we conducted a prospective, multicenter, randomized phase III trial comparing toremifene and tamoxifen. The subjects were postmenopausal Japanese patients who had undergone surgery for node-negative breast cancer. Toremifene or tamoxifen was administered for 2 years. The primary endpoint was demonstration of the non-inferiority of toremifene compared with tamoxifen in respect of 5-year survival. Secondary endpoints were cumulative overall survival, cumulative disease-free survival, effects on lipid profiles, and adverse events. A total of 253 patients were enrolled. The baseline characteristics of the two treatment groups were well-balanced. Median follow-up was 66.5 months. Five-year survival was similar for toremifene and tamoxifen (97.0 vs. 96.9 %; 90 % confidence interval -3.9 to 4.1), indicating that toremifene is not inferior to tamoxifen for postmenopausal Japanese patients with early breast cancer. Cumulative overall survival and cumulative disease-free survival were also very similar for toremifene and tamoxifen (97.5 vs. 97.3 %, log-rank test P = 0.9458; 88.4 vs. 90.6 %, log-rank test P = 0.3359, respectively). Adverse events in both groups were similar and mostly mild or moderate. Thus, both are equally effective and well tolerated. Our results suggest that the efficacy and safety of toremifene and tamoxifen are equivalent for postmenopausal Japanese patients with early breast cancer.

  14. Effects of a Video on Organ Donation Consent Among Primary Care Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J Daryl; Sullivan, Catherine; Albert, Jeffrey M; Cedeño, Maria; Patrick, Bridget; Pencak, Julie; Wong, Kristine A; Allen, Margaret D; Kimble, Linda; Mekesa, Heather; Bowen, Gordon; Sehgal, Ashwini R

    2016-08-01

    Low organ donation rates remain a major barrier to organ transplantation. We aimed to determine the effect of a video and patient cueing on organ donation consent among patients meeting with their primary care provider. This was a randomized controlled trial between February 2013 and May 2014. The waiting rooms of 18 primary care clinics of a medical system in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The study included 915 patients over 15.5 years of age who had not previously consented to organ donation. Just prior to their clinical encounter, intervention patients (n = 456) watched a 5-minute organ donation video on iPads and then choose a question regarding organ donation to ask their provider. Control patients (n = 459) visited their provider per usual routine. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who consented for organ donation. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of patients who discussed organ donation with their provider and the proportion who were satisfied with the time spent with their provider during the clinical encounter. Intervention patients were more likely than control patients to consent to donate organs (22 % vs. 15 %, OR 1.50, 95%CI 1.10-2.13). Intervention patients were also more likely to have donation discussions with their provider (77 % vs. 18 %, OR 15.1, 95%CI 11.1-20.6). Intervention and control patients were similarly satisfied with the time they spent with their provider (83 % vs. 86 %, OR 0.87, 95%CI 0.61-1.25). How the observed increases in organ donation consent might translate into a greater organ supply is unclear. Watching a brief video regarding organ donation and being cued to ask a primary care provider a question about donation resulted in more organ donation discussions and an increase in organ donation consent. Satisfaction with the time spent during the clinical encounter was not affected. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01697137.

  15. What's in a title? An assessment of whether randomized controlled trial in a title means that it is one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsi, Despina; Pandis, Nikolaos; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Eliades, Theodore

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate whether studies published in orthodontic journals and titled as randomized clinical trials are truly randomized clinical trials. A second objective was to explore the association of journal type and other publication characteristics on correct classification. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, European Journal of Orthodontics, Angle Orthodontist, Journal of Orthodontics, Orthodontics and Craniofacial Research, World Journal of Orthodontics, Australian Orthodontic Journal, and Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics were hand searched for clinical trials labeled in the title as randomized from 1979 to July 2011. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, and univariable and multivariable examinations of statistical associations via ordinal logistic regression modeling (proportional odds model). One hundred twelve trials were identified. Of the included trials, 33 (29.5%) were randomized clinical trials, 52 (46.4%) had an unclear status, and 27 (24.1%) were not randomized clinical trials. In the multivariable analysis among the included journal types, year of publication, number of authors, multicenter trial, and involvement of statistician were significant predictors of correctly classifying a study as a randomized clinical trial vs unclear and not a randomized clinical trial. From 112 clinical trials in the orthodontic literature labeled as randomized clinical trials, only 29.5% were identified as randomized clinical trials based on clear descriptions of appropriate random number generation and allocation concealment. The type of journal, involvement of a statistician, multicenter trials, greater numbers of authors, and publication year were associated with correct clinical trial classification. This study indicates the need of clear and accurate reporting of clinical trials and the need for educating investigators on randomized clinical trial methodology. Copyright © 2012 American Association

  16. Randomized controlled trials in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Police, Rachel L; Trask, Peter C; Wang, Jianmin; Olivares, Robert; Khan, Shahnaz; Abbe, Adeline; Colosia, Ann; Njue, Annete; Sherril, Beth; Ruiz-Soto, Rodrigo; Kaye, James A; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    This systematic literature review evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of interventions used in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Primary efficacy outcomes were objective response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival. Safety endpoints were grade 3/4 toxicities, serious adverse events and withdrawals or deaths due to toxicity. Studies were selected if they were randomized controlled trials reporting on the efficacy or safety of treatments for relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma, and if outcomes were reported separately from trials that included other lymphoid neoplasms. We used the Bucher method for conducting adjusted indirect comparisons within a meta-analysis. We identified 10 randomized controlled trials of treatments for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. The most prominent drug investigated (alone or in combination) was rituximab. Most trials did not report median overall survival. Two trials reported median event-free survival (range, 1.2-23.2 months). Six of ten trials reported objective response rate (range, 9-93%). Meta-analysis showed only one statistically significant result: rituximab + bortezomib yielded a significantly higher objective response rate than rituximab monotherapy (relative risk, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.47). Otherwise, there were no discernable differences in overall survival or progression-free survival, partly due to insufficient reporting of results in the clinical trials. The relatively small number of randomized controlled trials, few overlapping treatment arms, and variability in the randomized controlled trial features and in the endpoints studied complicate the formal comparison of therapies for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Additional well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to fully understand the relative outcomes of older and more recently developed therapies.

  17. A Data Management System Integrating Web-Based Training and Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroff, Jordana; Amodeo, Maryann; Larson, Mary Jo; Carey, Margaret; Loftin, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a data management system (DMS) developed to support a large-scale randomized study of an innovative web-course that was designed to improve substance abuse counselors' knowledge and skills in applying a substance abuse treatment method (i.e., cognitive behavioral therapy; CBT). The randomized trial compared the performance…

  18. Effects of Check and Connect on Attendance, Behavior, and Academics: A Randomized Effectiveness Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Kjellstrand, Elizabeth K.; Thompson, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the effects of Check & Connect (C&C) on the attendance, behavior, and academic outcomes of at-risk youth in a field-based effectiveness trial. Method: A multisite randomized block design was used, wherein 260 primarily Hispanic (89%) and economically disadvantaged (74%) students were randomized to treatment…

  19. Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese ADHD Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Ng, Gene S. H.; Choi, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Chinese children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or ADHD features. Methods: This study adopted a randomized controlled trial design without blinding. Participants were randomized into either the intervention group (n = 32) and…

  20. Randomized clinical trial of single- versus multi-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad; Rosenberg, J; Al-Tayar, H;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are no randomized studies that compare outcomes after single-incision (SLC) and conventional multi-incision (MLC) laparoscopic cholecystectomy under an optimized perioperative analgesic regimen. METHODS: This patient- and assessor-blinded randomized three-centre clinical trial c...

  1. Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese ADHD Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Ng, Gene S. H.; Choi, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Chinese children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or ADHD features. Methods: This study adopted a randomized controlled trial design without blinding. Participants were randomized into either the intervention group (n = 32) and…

  2. The Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese Families: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Sin, Tammy C. S.; Choi, Siu-yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Hong Kong Chinese families, using randomized controlled trial design. Methods: The participants included 111 Hong Kong Chinese parents with children aged 2--7 years old, who were randomized into the intervention group (n = 54) and control group (n…

  3. Efficacy of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach: Results from a 3-Year, Longitudinal Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Larsen, Ross A. A.; Baroody, Alison E.; Curby, Timothy W.; Ko, Michelle; Thomas, Julia B.; Merritt, Eileen G.; Abry, Tashia; DeCoster, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled field trial examined the efficacy of the Responsive Classroom (RC) approach on student achievement. Schools (n = 24) were randomized into intervention and control conditions; 2,904 children were studied from end of second to fifth grade. Students at schools assigned to the RC condition did not outperform students at…

  4. Intention-to-Treat Analysis in Partially Nested Randomized Controlled Trials with Real-World Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweig, Jonathan David; Pane, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Demands for scientific knowledge of what works in educational policy and practice has driven interest in quantitative investigations of educational outcomes, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have proliferated under these conditions. In educational settings, even when individuals are randomized, both experimental and control students are…

  5. Understanding Statistical Power in Cluster Randomized Trials: Challenges Posed by Differences in Notation and Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Hedges, Larry; Borenstein, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Research designs in which clusters are the unit of randomization are quite common in the social sciences. Given the multilevel nature of these studies, the power analyses for these studies are more complex than in a simple individually randomized trial. Tools are now available to help researchers conduct power analyses for cluster randomized…

  6. A Data Management System Integrating Web-Based Training and Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroff, Jordana; Amodeo, Maryann; Larson, Mary Jo; Carey, Margaret; Loftin, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a data management system (DMS) developed to support a large-scale randomized study of an innovative web-course that was designed to improve substance abuse counselors' knowledge and skills in applying a substance abuse treatment method (i.e., cognitive behavioral therapy; CBT). The randomized trial compared the performance…

  7. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Chloe E.; Robbins, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Art therapists have long held that art production causes reductions in stress and elevations in mood (Rubin, 1999). The authors examined this claim in a randomized, controlled trial. Fifty adults between the ages of 18 and 30 were randomly assigned to either create an art work or to view and sort a series of art prints. Three measures of overall…

  8. Randomized Controlled Trial of the Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI) with Undergraduate University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, J. Brian; First, Jennifer; Spialek, Matthew L.; Sorenson, Mary E.; Mills-Sandoval, Toby; Lockett, McKenzie; First, Nathan L.; Nitiéma, Pascal; Allen, Sandra F.; Pfefferbaum, Betty

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI) with college students. Participants: College students (aged 18-23) from a large Midwest US university who volunteered for a randomized controlled trial during the 2015 spring semester. Methods: College students were randomly assigned to an…

  9. Art Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Melissa; Decker, Kathleen P.; Kruk, Kerry; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2016-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine if art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was more effective for reducing symptoms of combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than CPT alone. Veterans (N = 11) were randomized to receive either individual CPT, or individual CPT in conjunction with individual…

  10. Outcomes from a School-Randomized Controlled Trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric C.; Low, Sabina; Smith, Brian H.; Haggerty, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program conducted in 33 California elementary schools. Schools were matched on school demographic characteristics and assigned randomly to intervention or waitlisted control conditions. Outcome measures were obtained from (a) all school…

  11. Randomized Controlled Trial of the Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI) with Undergraduate University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, J. Brian; First, Jennifer; Spialek, Matthew L.; Sorenson, Mary E.; Mills-Sandoval, Toby; Lockett, McKenzie; First, Nathan L.; Nitiéma, Pascal; Allen, Sandra F.; Pfefferbaum, Betty

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI) with college students. Participants: College students (aged 18-23) from a large Midwest US university who volunteered for a randomized controlled trial during the 2015 spring semester. Methods: College students were randomly assigned to an…

  12. Maternal Dietary Counseling Reduces Consumption of Energy-Dense Foods among Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitolo, Marcia Regina; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bo; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a dietary counseling in reducing the intake of energy-dense foods by infants. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting and Participants: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. Mothers and infants of a low-income-group population were randomized into intervention (n = 163) and received dietary counseling during 10 home…

  13. Randomized clinical trial of symptom control after stapled anopexy or diathermy excision for haemorrhoid prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyström, P-O; Qvist, N; Raahave, D;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: : This multicentre randomized clinical trial studied how symptoms improved after either stapled anopexy or diathermy excision of haemorrhoids. METHODS: : The study involved 18 hospitals in Sweden, Denmark and the UK. Some 207 patients were randomized to either anopexy or Milligan-Morg...

  14. Art Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Melissa; Decker, Kathleen P.; Kruk, Kerry; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2016-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine if art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was more effective for reducing symptoms of combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than CPT alone. Veterans (N = 11) were randomized to receive either individual CPT, or individual CPT in conjunction with individual…

  15. Maternal Dietary Counseling Reduces Consumption of Energy-Dense Foods among Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitolo, Marcia Regina; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bo; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a dietary counseling in reducing the intake of energy-dense foods by infants. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting and Participants: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. Mothers and infants of a low-income-group population were randomized into intervention (n = 163) and received dietary counseling during 10 home…

  16. Unilateral pallidotomy versus bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in PD - A randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, RAJ; de Bie, RMA; de Haan, RJ; Lenders, MWPM; Nijssen, PCG; Staal, MJ; Smeding, HMM; Schuurman, PR; Bosch, DA; Speelman, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of unilateral pallidotomy and bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation in patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) in a randomized, observer-blind, multicenter trial. Methods: Thirty-four patients with advanced PD were randomly assigned to have unilater

  17. Unilateral pallidotomy versus bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in PD: a randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, R.A.J.; Bie, R.M. de; Haan, R.J. de; Lenders, M.W.; Nijssen, P.C.; Staal, M.J.; Smeding, H.M.; Schuurman, P.R.; Bosch, D.A.; Speelman, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of unilateral pallidotomy and bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation in patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) in a randomized, observer-blind, multicenter trial. METHODS: Thirty-four patients with advanced PD were randomly assigned to have unilater

  18. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Preventive Intervention for Perinatal Depression in High-Risk Latinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral (CBT) intervention to prevent perinatal depression in high-risk Latinas. Method: A sample of 217 participants, predominantly low-income Central American immigrants who met demographic and depression risk criteria, were randomized into usual…

  19. The Sonoma Water Evaluation Trial (SWET): A randomized drinking water intervention trial to reduce gastrointestinal illness in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives. We estimate the risk of highly credible gastrointestinal illness (HCGI) among adults 55 and older in a community drinking tap water meeting current U.S. standards. Methods. We conducted a randomized, triple-blinded, crossover trial in 714 households (988 indiv...

  20. Prevention of Preterm Birth with Pessary in Singletons (PoPPS): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugoff, Lorraine; Berghella, Vincenzo; Sehdev, Harish; Mackeen, A Dhanya; Goetzl, Laura; Ludmir, Jack

    2017-09-20

    To determine if pessary use prevents preterm birth in singleton gestations with a short transvaginal ultrasound cervical length and without a prior spontaneous preterm birth. In this open-label multicenter randomized trial we enrolled asymptomatic women with singleton gestations with a transvaginal ultrasound cervical length ≤ 25 mm at 18(0) -23(6) weeks and no prior spontaneous preterm birth. Subjects were randomized to receive the Bioteque cup pessary or no pessary. Pessaries were inserted by trained maternal fetal medicine staff.. Vaginal progesterone was recommended to women with a cervical length ≤20mm. The primary outcome was preterm birth preterm birth preterm birth preterm birth preterm birth in women with singleton gestations with a short transvaginal ultrasound cervical length and without a prior spontaneous preterm birth in this small underpowered randomized controlled trial. This trial was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT 02056652. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Psychological treatment of late-life depression:a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Older meta-analyses of the effects of psychological treatments for depression in older adults have found that these treatments have large effects. However, these earlier meta-analyses also included non-randomized studies, and did not include newer high-quality randomized controlled trials. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized studies on psychological treatments for depression in older adults. Results Twenty-five studies were included, of which 17 compared a ps...

  2. Bayesian network meta-analysis for cluster randomized trials with binary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Lorenz; Jensen, Katrin; Kieser, Meinhard

    2017-06-01

    Network meta-analysis is becoming a common approach to combine direct and indirect comparisons of several treatment arms. In recent research, there have been various developments and extensions of the standard methodology. Simultaneously, cluster randomized trials are experiencing an increased popularity, especially in the field of health services research, where, for example, medical practices are the units of randomization but the outcome is measured at the patient level. Combination of the results of cluster randomized trials is challenging. In this tutorial, we examine and compare different approaches for the incorporation of cluster randomized trials in a (network) meta-analysis. Furthermore, we provide practical insight on the implementation of the models. In simulation studies, it is shown that some of the examined approaches lead to unsatisfying results. However, there are alternatives which are suitable to combine cluster randomized trials in a network meta-analysis as they are unbiased and reach accurate coverage rates. In conclusion, the methodology can be extended in such a way that an adequate inclusion of the results obtained in cluster randomized trials becomes feasible. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Micro-Randomized Trials: An Experimental Design for Developing Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hekler, Eric B.; Shiffman, Saul; Boruvka, Audrey; Almirall, Daniel; Tewari, Ambuj; Murphy, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper presents an experimental design, the micro-randomized trial, developed to support optimization of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). JITAIs are mHealth technologies that aim to deliver the right intervention components at the right times and locations to optimally support individuals’ health behaviors. Micro-randomized trials offer a way to optimize such interventions by enabling modeling of causal effects and time-varying effect moderation for individual intervention components within a JITAI. Methods The paper describes the micro-randomized trial design, enumerates research questions that this experimental design can help answer, and provides an overview of the data analyses that can be used to assess the causal effects of studied intervention components and investigate time-varying moderation of those effects. Results Micro-randomized trials enable causal modeling of proximal effects of the randomized intervention components and assessment of time-varying moderation of those effects. Conclusions Micro-randomized trials can help researchers understand whether their interventions are having intended effects, when and for whom they are effective, and what factors moderate the interventions’ effects, enabling creation of more effective JITAIs. PMID:26651463

  4. Blinding Techniques in Randomized Controlled Trials of Laser Therapy: An Overview and Possible Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Relf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy has evidence accumulating about its effectiveness in a variety of medical conditions. We reviewed 51 double blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs of laser treatment. Analysis revealed 58% of trials showed benefit of laser over placebo. However, less than 5% of the trials had addressed beam disguise or allocation concealment in the laser machines used. Many of the trials used blinding methods that rely on staff cooperation and are therefore open to interference or bias. This indicates significant deficiencies in laser trial methodology. We report the development and preliminary testing of a novel laser machine that can blind both patient and operator to treatment allocation without staff participation. The new laser machine combines sealed preset and non-bypassable randomization codes, decoy lights and sound, and a conical perspex tip to overcome laser diode glow detection.

  5. Acupuncture as a treatment for functional dyspepsia: design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acupuncture is widely used in China to treat functional dyspepsia (FD. However, its effectiveness in the treatment of FD, and whether FD-specific acupoints exist, are controversial. So this study aims to determine if acupuncture is an effective treatment for FD and if acupoint specificity exists according to traditional acupuncture meridians and acupoint theories. Design This multicenter randomized controlled trial will include four acupoint treatment groups, one non-acupoint control group and one drug (positive control group. The four acupoint treatment groups will focus on: (1 specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; (2 non-specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; (3 specific acupoints of alarm and transport points; and (4 acupoints of the gallbladder meridian. These four groups of acupoints are thought to differ in terms of clinical efficacy, according to traditional acupuncture meridians and acupoint theories. A total of 120 FD patients will be included in each group. Each patient will receive 20 sessions of acupuncture treatment over 4 weeks. The trial will be conducted in eight hospitals located in three centers of China. The primary outcomes in this trial will include differences in Nepean Dyspepsia Index scores and differences in the Symptom Index of Dyspepsia before randomization, 2 weeks and 4 weeks after randomization, and 1 month and 3 months after completing treatment. Discussion The important features of this trial include the randomization procedures (controlled by a central randomization system, a standardized protocol of acupuncture manipulation, and the fact that this is the first multicenter randomized trial of FD and acupuncture to be performed in China. The results of this trial will determine whether acupuncture is an effective treatment for FD and whether using different acupoints or different meridians leads to differences in clinical efficacy. Trial registration number Clinical Trials

  6. Beyond Randomized Controlled Trials in Attempted Suicide Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Simon; Sharon, Cynthia; Coggan, Carol

    2009-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence about what is the best treatment for people who present to hospital after self harm. Most treatment trials have been small and involved unrepresentative groups of patients which result in inconclusive findings. Here we note some of the characteristics of attempted suicide which make it a difficult subject to study. We…

  7. Beyond Randomized Controlled Trials in Attempted Suicide Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Simon; Sharon, Cynthia; Coggan, Carol

    2009-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence about what is the best treatment for people who present to hospital after self harm. Most treatment trials have been small and involved unrepresentative groups of patients which result in inconclusive findings. Here we note some of the characteristics of attempted suicide which make it a difficult subject to study. We…

  8. Randomized controlled trials in frontotemporal dementia: cognitive and behavioral outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Justin B. Miller; Banks, Sarah J.; Léger, Gabriel C; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Progress has been made in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Targets for intervention have been identified, therapies are being developed, and clinical trials are advancing. A major challenge for FTD research is that multiple underlying pathologies can be associated with heterogeneous phenotypes. The neuropsychological profiles associated with FTD spectrum disorders often include executive dysfunction, language impairments and behavioral disturb...

  9. Implementing randomized effectiveness trials in large insurance systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Niteesh K; Shrank, William H

    2013-08-01

    The need to identify how best to structure health insurance and to deliver health care services is a central priority for comparative effectiveness research. Studies designed to evaluate these issues are frequently conducted in large insurance systems. We sought to describe the challenges faced when conducting trials in this context. Using the Post-Myocardial Infarction Free Rx Event and Economic Evaluation (MI FREEE) trial as an example, we describe the methodological and practical challenges of conducting trials in large insurance systems. We encountered six key challenges while conducting MI FREEE trial, namely the need to obtain plan sponsor permission to experiment, the desire of plan sponsors to have all of their beneficiaries receive the same intervention, the inaccuracy of claims-based identification methods and the impact of claims lag on the timely enrollment of potentially eligible patients, the reluctance of patients to participate in insurance-based interventions and the potential need for informed consent, the frequent introduction of new cointerventions in real-world delivery systems, and the high rates of loss to follow-up because of insurance "churn." We describe the approaches we used to overcome these challenges. Studies in insurance settings are a powerful and necessary design for evaluating comparative effectiveness interventions. There are numerous strategies to address the potential logistical and methodological challenges that this research environment uniquely creates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The B-VITAGE trial: A randomized trial of homocysteine lowering treatment of depression in later life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bockxmeer Frank

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and depressive symptoms are common in later life. Observational evidence suggests that depression is more prevalent among people with high plasma homocysteine (tHcy, but the results of randomized trials to date have been unable to show that lowering tHcy through the supplementation of vitamins B6, B12 and folate benefits depressive symptoms. We designed the B-VITAGE trial to determine whether adjunctive treatment with vitamins B6, B12 and folate increases the efficacy of standard antidepressant treatment. Methods/Design The B-VITAGE trial is a 12-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of daily citalopram (20 to 40 mg plus B12(0.4 mg, B6 (25 mg and folic acid (2 mg or citalopram (20 to 40 mg plus placebo for the treatment of depression in later life. The trial aims to recruit over 300 older adults with major depression (DSM-IV and has been powered to detect the impact of an intervention associated with moderate effect size. Depressive symptoms will be rated with the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS. The trial has two main outcomes of interest: a reduction of 50% or more in the MADRS total score between baseline and week 12 and the remission of the depressive episode at weeks 12, 26 and 52 according to DSM-IV criteria. We hypothesize that subjects randomly allocated to the vitamin arm of the study will be more likely to show a clinically significant improvement and achieve and maintain remission of symptoms at 12, 26 and 52 weeks. Secondary outcomes of interest include compliance with treatment, reduction in the severity of depressive symptoms, switching to different antidepressants, the use of non-pharmacological antidepressant treatments, response to treatment according to MTHFRC677T genotype, and changes in cognitive function over 52 weeks. Conclusions The results of this trial will clarify whether the systematic use of B

  11. Intravenous transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells preconditioned with early phase stroke serum: current evidence and study protocol for a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suk Jae; Moon, Gyeong Joon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee; Bang, Oh Young

    2013-10-01

    Recovery after a major stroke is usually limited, but cell therapy for patients with fixed neurologic deficits is emerging. Several recent clinical trials have investigated mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy for patients with ischemic stroke. We previously reported the results of a controlled trial on the application of autologous MSCs in patients with ischemic stroke with a long-term follow-up of up to 5 years (the 'STem cell Application Researches and Trials In NeuroloGy' (STARTING) study). The results from this pilot trial are challenging, but also raise important issues. In addition, there have been recent efforts to improve the safety and efficacy of MSC therapy for stroke. The clinical and preclinical background and the STARTING-2 study protocol are provided. The trial is a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint (PROBE) clinical trial. Both acute and chronic stroke patients will be selected based on clinical and radiological features and followed for 3 months after MSC treatment. The subjects will be randomized into one of two groups: (A) a MSC group (n = 40) or (B) a control group (n = 20). Autologous MSCs will be intravenously administered after ex vivo culture expansion with autologous ischemic serum obtained as early as possible, to enhance the therapeutic efficacy (ischemic preconditioning). Objective outcome measurements will be performed using multimodal MRI and detailed functional assessments by blinded observers. This trial is the first to evaluate the efficacy of MSCs in patients with ischemic stroke. The results may provide better evidence for the effectiveness of MSC therapy in patients with ischemic stroke. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01716481.

  12. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials on Chemomechanical Caries Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, H H H; Yiu, C K Y; Burrow, M F; King, N M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the methodologies used in previously published prospective randomized clinical trials on chemomechanical caries removal and to conduct a meta-analysis to quantify the differences in the excavation time between chemomechanical and conventional caries removal methods. An electronic search was performed using Scopus, PubMed, EBSCO host, and Cochrane Library databases. The following categories were excluded during the assessment process: non-English studies published before 2000, animal studies, review articles, laboratory studies, case reports, and nonrandomized or retrospective clinical trials. The methodologies of the selected clinical trials were assessed. Furthermore, the reviewed clinical trials were subjected to meta-analysis for quantifying the differences in excavation time between the chemomechanical and the conventional caries removal techniques. Only 19 randomized clinical trials fit the inclusion criteria of this systematic review. None of the 19 reviewed trials completely fulfilled Delphi's ideal criteria for quality assessment of randomized clinical trials. The meta-analysis results revealed that the shortest mean excavation time was recorded for rotary caries excavation (2.99±0.001 minutes), followed by the enzyme-based chemomechanical caries removal method (6.36±0.08 minutes) and the the hand excavation method (atraumatic restorative technique; 6.98±0.17 minutes). The longest caries excavation time was recorded for the sodium hypochlorite-based chemomechanical caries removal method (8.12±0.02 minutes). It was found that none of the current reviewed trials fulfilled all the ideal requirements of clinical trials. Furthermore, the current scientific evidence shows that the sodium hypochlorite-based (Carisolv) chemomechanical caries removal method was more time consuming when compared to the enzyme-based (Papacarie) chemomechanical and the conventional caries removal methods. Further prospective randomized

  13. The transitive fallacy for randomized trials: If A bests B and B bests C in separate trials, is A better than C?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Barnett S

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If intervention A bests B in one randomized trial, and B bests C in another randomized trial, can one conclude that A is better than C? The problem was motivated by the planning of a randomized trial, where A is spiral-CT screening, B is x-ray screening, and C is no screening. On its surface, this would appear to be a straightforward application of the transitive principle of logic. Methods We extended the graphical approach for omitted binary variables that was originally developed to illustrate Simpson's paradox, applying it to hypothetical, but plausible scenarios involving lung cancer screening, treatment for gastric cancer, and antibiotic therapy for clinical pneumonia. Results Graphical illustrations of the three examples show different ways the transitive fallacy for randomized trials can arise due to changes in an unobserved or unadjusted binary variable. In the most dramatic scenario, B bests C in the first trial, A bests B in the second trial, but C bests A at the time of the second trial. Conclusion Even with large sample sizes, combining results from a previous randomized trial of B versus C with results from a new randomized trial of A versus B will not guarantee correct inference about A versus C. A three-arm trial of A, B, and C would protect against this problem and should be considered when the sequential trials are performed in the context of changing secular trends in important omitted variables such as therapy in cancer screening trials.

  14. Open-label randomized trial of titrated disease management for patients with hypertension: Study design and baseline sample characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, George L; Weinberger, Morris; Kirshner, Miriam A; Stechuchak, Karen M; Melnyk, Stephanie D; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Neelon, Brian; Van Houtven, Courtney; Gentry, Pamela W; Morris, Isis J; Rose, Cynthia M; Taylor, Jennifer P; May, Carrie L; Han, Byungjoo; Wainwright, Christi; Alkon, Aviel; Powell, Lesa; Edelman, David

    2016-09-01

    Despite the availability of efficacious treatments, only half of patients with hypertension achieve adequate blood pressure (BP) control. This paper describes the protocol and baseline subject characteristics of a 2-arm, 18-month randomized clinical trial of titrated disease management (TDM) for patients with pharmaceutically-treated hypertension for whom systolic blood pressure (SBP) is not controlled (≥140mmHg for non-diabetic or ≥130mmHg for diabetic patients). The trial is being conducted among patients of four clinic locations associated with a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. An intervention arm has a TDM strategy in which patients' hypertension control at baseline, 6, and 12months determines the resource intensity of disease management. Intensity levels include: a low-intensity strategy utilizing a licensed practical nurse to provide bi-monthly, non-tailored behavioral support calls to patients whose SBP comes under control; medium-intensity strategy utilizing a registered nurse to provide monthly tailored behavioral support telephone calls plus home BP monitoring; and high-intensity strategy utilizing a pharmacist to provide monthly tailored behavioral support telephone calls, home BP monitoring, and pharmacist-directed medication management. Control arm patients receive the low-intensity strategy regardless of BP control. The primary outcome is SBP. There are 385 randomized (192 intervention; 193 control) veterans that are predominately older (mean age 63.5years) men (92.5%). 61.8% are African American, and the mean baseline SBP for all subjects is 143.6mmHg. This trial will determine if a disease management program that is titrated by matching the intensity of resources to patients' BP control leads to superior outcomes compared to a low-intensity management strategy.

  15. Randomized trial of medroxyprogesterone acetate for the prevention of endometrial pathology from adjuvant tamoxifen for breast cancer: SWOG S9630.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potkul, Ronald K; Unger, Joseph M; Livingston, Robert B; Crew, Katherine D; Wilczynski, Sharon P; Salomon, Caryl G; Smith, Barbara L; Wong, Lucas; Campbell, David L; Einspahr, David E; Anderson, Garnet L; Hershman, Dawn; Goodman, Gary E; Brown, Powel H; Meyskens, Frank L; Albain, Kathy S

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative effect of adjuvant tamoxifen on the endometrium can potentially result in endometrial abnormalities, including cancer in postmenopausal women. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial to assess endometrial pathological diagnoses in postmenopausal women with early stage, ER-positive breast cancer without endometrial pathology at baseline. They were assigned to tamoxifen alone versus tamoxifen plus cyclical medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA 10 mg for 14 days every 3 months) for 5 years. Endovaginal sonograms (EVS) +/- endometrial biopsies (EMB) were required at baseline, 2 and 5 years. Of 313 patients registered, 296 were eligible and 169 (57%; 89, tamoxifen; 80, tamoxifen+MPA) were evaluable (completed year-2 EVS, with an EMB if stripe width was ⩾5 mm). Sixty (67%) of these in the tamoxifen arm had an endometrial stripe width ⩾5 mm (and underwent subsequent EMB) compared with 48 (60%) in the tamoxifen+MPA arm (P=0.40). There were four cases of proliferative endometrium and one simple hyperplasia on the tamoxifen arm (6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2-13%) among evaluable patients and one proliferative endometrium on the tamoxifen+MPA arm (P=0.11). The overall fraction with benign endometrial abnormalities at year 2 was 3.6% (6/169; 95% CI: 1.3-7.6%), with only 1 (of 102) new benign proliferative event at year 5. The event rate in both arms was much lower than projected, making treatment arm comparisons less informative. A normal endometrium prior to tamoxifen may provide reassurance regarding future endometrial events. However, validation in a larger trial is needed before changing practice in asymptomatic, postmenopausal women.

  16. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis: What we can learn from the next generation of randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark N Rubin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke remains an exceedingly incident and prevalent public health burden across the globe, with an estimated 16 million new strokes per annum and prevalence over 60 million, and extracranial internal carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is an important risk factor for stroke. Randomized trials of surgical treatment were conducted (North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial, European Carotid Surgery Trial and demonstrated efficacy of carotid endarterectomy for secondary prevention of stroke in patients with cerebrovascular events (e.g. ipsilateral stroke, transient ischemic attack, and/or amaurosis fugax attributable to a diseased artery with 50–99% stenosis. Therapeutic clarity, however, proved elusive with asymptomatic carotid artery disease. Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis Study (ACAS, Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial, and Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study (VACS suggested only modest benefit from surgical intervention for primary stroke prevention and the best medical therapy at the time of these trials is not comparable to modern medical therapy. ACT-1, Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial-2, Stent-Protected Angioplasty in asymptomatic Carotid artery stenosis versus Endarterectomy Trial-2, European Carotid Surgery Trial-2, Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy Versus Stenting Trial-2 are trials that are recent, ongoing, or in development that include diverse populations across Europe and North America, complementary trial designs, and a collaborative spirit that should provide clinicians with evidence that informs best clinical practice for asymptomatic carotid artery disease.

  17. N-acetylcysteine and contrast-induced nephropathy: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagler, Axel; Azadpour, Maziar; Mercado, Carlos; Hennekens, Charles H

    2006-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) following coronary angiography increases morbidity and mortality. Randomized trials of small sample size have evaluated whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevents CIN in patients with renal dysfunction. To conduct a meta-analysis of the randomized trials the following databases were searched: MEDLINE (1966-2003), Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, ACP Journal Club online, published abstracts presented at the major cardiology and nephrology meetings, references from reviews. Two authors independently evaluated all relevant randomized trials. Eligibility criteria were (1) randomized placebo controlled trials of NAC, (2) patients with impaired renal function (creatinine >1.2 mg/dL) undergoing coronary angiography, (3) patients receiving intravenous fluids and low-osmolarity nonionic contrast media, (4) the primary outcome was CIN (increases in creatinine of either at least 0.5 mg/dL or 25% from baseline to 48 hours). Of 589 trials reviewed 3 disagreements were easily resolved by mutual discussion and 13 were selected. Data extraction included patient characteristics, intravenous fluid regimen, type and dose of contrast media, dosing regimen, creatinine at baseline and 48 hours and CIN requiring dialysis. Four of the 13 trials reported statistically significant results. In meta-analysis of the 13 trials, which included 1892 patients, the RR was 0.68 (95%CI, 0.46-1.01). The addition of the trial of patients undergoing computerized tomography, which had formulated the hypothesis, yielded a statistically significant reduction (RR 0.64 [95%CI 0.42-0.96]) as did an earlier meta-analysis of 7 trials. Our meta-analysis of the most currently available randomized data concerning NAC before coronary angiography to prevent CIN in patients with impaired renal function is neither conclusive nor provides proof beyond a reasonable doubt to influence clinical practice and public policy. The intervention has minimal toxicity but the width of the 95% CI

  18. Radonexposure with the treatment of rheumatic diseases - randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenbach, A. [Krankenanstalt Gasteiner Heilstollen, Bad Gastein-Boeckstein (Austria)]|[Forschungsinstitut Gastein, Bad Gastein (Austria); Kovac, J.; Brandmaier, P. [Krankenanstalt Gasteiner Heilstollen, Bad Gastein-Boeckstein (Austria); Soto, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Univ. of Cantabria (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    The objective was to investigate whether there is evidence for the effectiveness of radon therapy in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Method: Medline and MedKur databases were searched for randomised controlled clinical trials. Radon therapy centres and experts in the field were contacted, proceedings were hand-searched and bibliographies were checked for references of potential impact. Four clinical trials evaluating the effect of radon in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases with no or only a small number of drop-outs met the inclusion criteria. In patients with degenerative disease of the spine and large joints, two trials [1,2] reported less pain on pressure of painful paraspinal muscle points after a series of radon baths at a concentration of 0.8 kBq/L and 3 kBq/L, respectively. The alleviation of pain was most pronounced in the weeks following the treatment period. [3]. At six months follow-up serial immersion in combined radon and CO{sub 2} baths reduced pain and functional restrictions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n=60) more effectively than bathing in CO{sub 2} only. [4] In 130 patients with ankylosing spondylitis a complex rehabilitation program at a health resort (group 1 and 2) showed greater and longer-lasting differences to a control group staying at home (group 3), if speleotherapeutic radon exposure (group 1) was added (as compared to an added sauna treatment, group 2). Conclusion: The four trials meeting the inclusion criteria showed beneficial effects of radon therapy compared to interventions without radon exposure. Up to nine months after the treatment period significantly better results were observed, if radon therapy is added. (orig.)

  19. Acute migraine therapy: recent evidence from randomized comparative trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mett, A.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.

    2008-01-01

    (1) A wide array of data regarding acute migraine treatment are available, but few trials strictly adhere to International Headache Society guidelines for patient inclusion criteria. (2) Triptans appear to have similar efficacy profiles, but among newer triptans, almotriptan offers improved...... tolerability over sumatriptan. (3) Combination indomethacin/caffeine/prochlorperazine most likely has similar therapeutic efficacy to triptan therapy, with further research needed to complete understanding of any potential differences between these treatments. (4) Multi-targeted combination therapy...

  20. Randomized trials and quality assurance in gastric cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, Johan L; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2013-03-01

    A D2 lymphadenectomy can be considered standard of surgical care for advanced resectable gastric cancer. Currently, several multimodality strategies are used, including postoperative monochemotherapy in Asia, postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the United States, and perioperative chemotherapy in Europe. As the majority of gastric cancer patients are treated outside the framework of clinical trials, quality assurance programs, including referral to high-volume centers and clinical auditing are needed to improve gastric cancer care on a nationwide level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Randomized controlled trial of the CGRP receptor antagonist telcagepant for migraine prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Tony W; Connor, Kathryn M; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant might be effective for migraine prevention. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00797667), patients experiencing 3-14 migra......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant might be effective for migraine prevention. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00797667), patients experiencing 3......-14 migraine days during a 4-week baseline were randomized to telcagepant 140 mg, telcagepant 280 mg, or placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by mean monthly headache days and migraine/probable migraine days (headache plus ≥ 1 associated symptom). RESULTS: The trial was terminated following...... a recommendation from the Safety Monitoring Board due to hepatotoxicity concerns. At termination, the planned 660 patients had been randomized, 656 had been treated with ≥ 1 dose of study medication, and 14 had completed the trial. The mean treatment duration was 48-50 days. Thirteen patients, all...

  2. 17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate for maintenance tocolysis: a systematic review and metaanalysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Suhag, Anju; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2015-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of maintenance tocolysis with 17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17P) compared to control (either placebo or no treatment) in singleton gestations with arrested preterm labor (PTL), in a metaanalysis of randomized trials. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, OVID, Scopus, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched from 1966 through July 2014. Key words included "progesterone," "tocolysis," "preterm labor," and "17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate." We performed a metaanalysis of randomized trials of singleton gestations with arrested PTL and treated with maintenance tocolysis with either 17P or control. Primary outcome was preterm birth (PTB) metaanalysis was performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Metaanalyses (PRISMA) statement. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO (registration no: CRD42014013473). Five randomized trials met inclusion criteria, including 426 women. Women with a singleton gestation who received 17P maintenance tocolysis for arrested PTL had a similar rate of PTB metaanalysis of the available randomized trials. As 17P for maintenance tocolysis is associated with a significant prolongation of pregnancy, and significantly higher birthweight, further research is suggested.

  3. A randomized controlled multicenter trial of post-suicide attempt case management for the prevention of further attempts in Japan (ACTION-J

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamijo Yoshito

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A previous suicide attempt is a potent risk factor for suicide later on. Crisis intervention, psychiatric and psychosocial evaluation at emergency medical facilities, and follow-up care for suicide attempters are considered important components for suicide prevention. The Japanese Multimodal Intervention Trials for Suicide Prevention (J-MISP includes a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial of post-suicide attempt case management for the prevention of further attempts (ACTION-J to address the continuing increase in suicides in Japan. The primary aim of ACTION-J is to examine the effectiveness of an extensive intervention for suicide attempters in prevention of recurrent suicidal behavior, as compared with standard intervention. This paper describes the rationale and protocol of the ACTION-J trial. Methods/Design In this clinical trial, case management intervention will be provided at 19 emergency medical facilities in Japan. After crisis intervention including psychiatric evaluation, psychosocial assessment, and psychological education, subjects will be randomly assigned to either a group receiving continuous case management or a control group receiving standard care. Suicidal ideation, depressive symptoms, and general health condition will be evaluated as secondary measures. The intervention was initiated in July 2006. By December, 2009, 842 subjects will be randomized. Subject follow-up will continue for 1.5 to 5 years. Discussion Suicide is a complex phenomenon that encompasses multiple factors. Case management by multi-sector collaboration is needed. ACTION-J may provide valuable information on suicide attempters and may develop effective case management to reduce future risk for suicide attempters. Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry number, UMIN000000444. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00736918.

  4. Randomized Trial on the Effectiveness of Dexamethasone in TMJ Arthrocentesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huddleston-Slater, J.J.R.; Vos, L.M.; Stroy, L.P.P.; Stegenga, B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of dexamethasone administration following arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with a placebo (saline). Twenty-eight participants with TMJ arthralgia were randomly assigned to two groups of a parallel double-blind RCT. In both gro

  5. Randomized Trial of Suicide Gatekeeper Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jodi M.; Osteen, Phillip J.; Sharpe, Tanya L.; Pastoor, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Problem: Education and research on social work's role in preventing client suicide is limited. Method: Seventy advanced master of social work students were randomly assigned to either the training group (Question, Persuade, and Referral suicide gatekeeper training) or the control group. Outcomes measured over time included suicide knowledge,…

  6. Randomized Trial of Tocilizumab in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Brunner, Hermine I.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Kenwright, Andrew; Wright, Stephen; Calvo, Inmaculada; Cuttica, Ruben; Ravelli, Angelo; Schneider, Rayfel; Woo, Patricia; Wouters, Carine; Xavier, Ricardo; Zemel, Lawrence; Baildam, Eileen; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Dolezalova, Pavla; Garay, Stella M.; Merino, Rosa; Joos, Rik; Grom, Alexei; Wulffraat, Nico; Zuber, Zbigniew; Zulian, Francesco; Lovell, Daniel; Martini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most severe subtype of JIA; treatment options are limited. Interleukin-6 plays a pathogenic role in systemic JIA. METHODS We randomly assigned 112 children, 2 to 17 years of age, with active systemic JIA (duration of >= 6 months and inad

  7. Randomized Controlled Trial on Physical Therapy for TMJ Closed Lock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craane, B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Stappaerts, K.; De Laat, A.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the one-year effect of physical therapy on pain and mandibular dysfunction associated with anterior disc displacement without reduction of the temporomandibular joint (closed lock). Forty-nine individuals were randomly assigned to either a physical therapy group [n = 23, mean ag

  8. How large are the nonspecific effects of acupuncture? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Antonius

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While several recent large randomized trials found clinically relevant effects of acupuncture over no treatment or routine care, blinded trials comparing acupuncture to sham interventions often reported only minor or no differences. This raises the question whether (sham acupuncture is associated with particularly potent nonspecific effects. We aimed to investigate the size of nonspecific effects associated with acupuncture interventions. Methods MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials and reference lists were searched up to April 2010 to identify randomized trials of acupuncture for any condition, including both sham and no acupuncture control groups. Data were extracted by one reviewer and verified by a second. Pooled standardized mean differences were calculated using a random effects model with the inverse variance method. Results Thirty-seven trials with a total of 5754 patients met the inclusion criteria. The included studies varied strongly regarding patients, interventions, outcome measures, methodological quality and effect sizes reported. Among the 32 trials reporting a continuous outcome measure, the random effects standardized mean difference between sham acupuncture and no acupuncture groups was -0.45 (95% confidence interval, -0.57, -0.34; I2 = 54%; Egger's test for funnel plot asymmetry, P = 0.25. Trials with larger effects of sham over no acupuncture reported smaller effects of acupuncture over sham intervention than trials with smaller nonspecific effects (β = -0.39, P = 0.029. Conclusions Sham acupuncture interventions are often associated with moderately large nonspecific effects which could make it difficult to detect small additional specific effects. Compared to inert placebo interventions, effects associated with sham acupuncture might be larger, which would have considerable implications for the design and interpretation of clinical trials.

  9. Pancreatitis of biliary origin, optimal timing of cholecystectomy (PONCHO trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwense Stefan A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After an initial attack of biliary pancreatitis, cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis and other gallstone-related complications. Guidelines advocate performing cholecystectomy within 2 to 4 weeks after discharge for mild biliary pancreatitis. During this waiting period, the patient is at risk of recurrent biliary events. In current clinical practice, surgeons usually postpone cholecystectomy for 6 weeks due to a perceived risk of a more difficult dissection in the early days following pancreatitis and for logistical reasons. We hypothesize that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis or other complications of gallstone disease in patients with mild biliary pancreatitis without increasing the difficulty of dissection and the surgical complication rate compared with interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods/Design PONCHO is a randomized controlled, parallel-group, assessor-blinded, superiority multicenter trial. Patients are randomly allocated to undergo early laparoscopic cholecystectomy, within 72 hours after randomization, or interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 25 to 30 days after randomization. During a 30-month period, 266 patients will be enrolled from 18 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint of mortality and acute re-admissions for biliary events (that is, recurrent biliary pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, symptomatic/obstructive choledocholithiasis requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography including cholangitis (with/without endoscopic sphincterotomy, and uncomplicated biliary colics occurring within 6 months following randomization. Secondary endpoints include the individual endpoints of the composite endpoint, surgical and other complications, technical difficulty of cholecystectomy and costs. Discussion The PONCHO trial is designed to show that early

  10. Preventing dental caries in children <5 years: systematic review updating USPSTF recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Cantor, Amy; Zakher, Bernadette; Mitchell, Jennifer Priest; Pappas, Miranda

    2013-08-01

    Screening and preventive interventions by primary care providers could improve outcomes related to early childhood caries. The objective of this study was to update the 2004 US Preventive Services Task Force systematic review on prevention of caries in children younger than 5 years of age. Searching Medline and the Cochrane Library (through March 2013) and reference lists, we included trials and controlled observational studies on the effectiveness and harms of screening and treatments. One author extracted study characteristics and results, which were checked for accuracy by a second author. Two authors independently assessed study quality. No study evaluated effects of screening by primary care providers on clinical outcomes. One good-quality cohort study found pediatrician examination associated with a sensitivity of 0.76 for identifying a child with cavities. No new trials evaluated oral fluoride supplementation. Three new randomized trials were consistent with previous studies in finding fluoride varnish more effective than no varnish (reduction in caries increment 18% to 59%). Three trials of xylitol were inconclusive regarding effects on caries. New observational studies were consistent with previous evidence showing an association between early childhood fluoride use and enamel fluorosis. Evidence on the accuracy of risk prediction instruments in primary care settings is not available. There is no direct evidence that screening by primary care clinicians reduces early childhood caries. Evidence previously reviewed by the US Preventive Services Task Force found oral fluoride supplementation effective at reducing caries incidence, and new evidence supports the effectiveness of fluoride varnish in higher-risk children.

  11. Altering school climate through school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: findings from a group-randomized effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Koth, Christine W; Thornton, Leslie A; Leaf, Philip J

    2009-06-01

    Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a universal, school-wide prevention strategy that is currently implemented in over 7,500 schools to reduce disruptive behavior problems. The present study examines the impact of PBIS on staff reports of school organizational health using data from a group-randomized controlled effectiveness trial of PBIS conducted in 37 elementary schools. Longitudinal multilevel analyses on data from 2,596 staff revealed a significant effect of PBIS on the schools' overall organizational health, resource influence, staff affiliation, and academic emphasis over the 5-year trial; the effects on collegial leadership and institutional integrity were significant when implementation fidelity was included in the model. Trained schools that adopted PBIS the fastest tended to have higher levels of organizational health at baseline, but the later-implementing schools tended to experience the greatest improvements in organizational health after implementing PBIS. This study indicated that changes in school organizational health are important consequences of the PBIS whole-school prevention model, and may in turn be a potential contextual mediator of the effect of PBIS on student performance.

  12. Effects of Testosterone Replacement on Electrocardiographic Parameters in Men: Findings From Two Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; Içli, Tevhide Betül; Pencina, Karol M; Li, Zhuoying; Tapper, John; Huang, Grace; Travison, Thomas G; Tsitouras, Panayiotis; Harman, S Mitchell; Storer, Thomas W; Bhasin, Shalender; Basaria, Shehzad

    2017-05-01

    Endogenous testosterone levels have been negatively associated with QTc interval in small case series; the effects of testosterone therapy on electrocardiographic parameters have not been evaluated in randomized trials. To evaluate the effects of testosterone replacement on corrected QT interval (QTcF) in two randomized controlled trials. Men with pre- and postrandomization electrocardiograms (ECGs) from the Testosterone and Pain (TAP) and the Testosterone Effects on Atherosclerosis in Aging Men (TEAAM) Trials. Participants were randomized to either placebo or testosterone gel for 14 weeks (TAP) or 36 months (TEAAM). ECGs were performed at baseline and at the end of interventions in both trials; in the TEAAM trial ECGs were also obtained at 12 and 24 months. Difference in change in the QTcF between testosterone and placebo groups was assessed in each trial. Association of changes in testosterone levels with changes in QTcF was analyzed in men assigned to the testosterone group of each trial. Mean total testosterone levels increased in the testosterone group of both trials. In the TAP trial, there was a nonsignificant reduction in mean QTcF in the testosterone group compared with placebo (effect size = -4.72 ms; P = 0.228) and the changes in QTcF were negatively associated to changes in circulating testosterone (P = 0.036). In the TEAAM trial, testosterone attenuated the age-related increase in QTcF seen in the placebo group (effect size= -6.30 ms; P Testosterone replacement attenuated the age-related increase in QTcF duration in men. The clinical implications of these findings require further investigation.

  13. Oral and written instruction of oral hygiene: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnacke, Daniela; Beldoch, Magdalena; Bohn, Gertrude-Heidi; Seghaoui, Ouarda; Hegel, Nicole; Deinzer, Renate

    2012-10-01

    This randomized, evaluator-masked, controlled study evaluates the effectiveness of oral in contrast to written instruction of oral hygiene. Eighty-three students without clinical signs of periodontitis were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of three experimental conditions: 1) written instruction, 2) standardized oral instruction, or 3) individualized oral instruction. Plaque and bleeding indices were assessed to analyze intervention effects on oral health and oral hygiene skills. Measurements took place at baseline and 4 weeks after intervention. Groups differed significantly with respect to gingival bleeding and were tentatively significant with respect to oral hygiene skills. Participants who had received oral individualized instructions showed the best results. A gradient of effectiveness of the instruction methods was observed with most favorable results for the individualized instruction.

  14. A randomized trial of preoperative oral carbohydrates in abdominal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sada, Fatos; Krasniqi, Avdyl; Hamza, Astrit; Gecaj-Gashi, Agreta; Bicaj, Besnik; Kavaja, Floren

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate-rich liquid drinks (CRLDs) have been recommended to attenuate insulin resistance by shortening the preoperative fasting interval. The aim of our study the effect of preoperative oral administration of CRLDs on the well-being and clinical status of patients. Methods A randomized, double blind, prospective study of patients undergoing open colorectal operations (CR) and open cholecyctectomy (CH) was conducted. Patients were divided into three groups: study, placebo, and ...

  15. Remediating Computational Deficits at Third Grade: A Randomized Field Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Powell, Sarah R.; Hamlett, Carol L.; Fuchs, Douglas; Cirino, Paul T.; FLETCHER, JACK M.

    2008-01-01

    The major purposes of this study were to assess the efficacy of tutoring to remediate 3rd-grade computational deficits and to explore whether remediation is differentially efficacious depending on whether students experience mathematics difficulty alone or concomitantly with reading difficulty. At 2 sites, 127 students were stratified on mathematics difficulty status and randomly assigned to 4 conditions: word recognition (control) tutoring or 1 of 3 computation tutoring conditions: fact retr...

  16. Mindful Walking in Psychologically Distressed Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this randomized, controlled study was to investigate the effectiveness of a mindful walking program in patients with high levels of perceived psychological distress. Methods. Participants aged between 18 and 65 years with moderate to high levels of perceived psychological distress were randomized to 8 sessions of mindful walking in 4 weeks (each 40 minutes walking, 10 minutes mindful walking, 10 minutes discussion or to no study intervention (waiting group. Primary outcome parameter was the difference to baseline on Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale (CPSS after 4 weeks between intervention and control. Results. Seventy-four participants were randomized in the study; 36 (32 female, 52.3 ± 8.6 years were allocated to the intervention and 38 (35 female, 49.5 ± 8.8 years to the control group. Adjusted CPSS differences after 4 weeks were −8.8 [95% CI: −10.8; −6.8] (mean 24.2 [22.2; 26.2] in the intervention group and −1.0 [−2.9; 0.9] (mean 32.0 [30.1; 33.9] in the control group, resulting in a highly significant group difference (. Conclusion. Patients participating in a mindful walking program showed reduced psychological stress symptoms and improved quality of life compared to no study intervention. Further studies should include an active treatment group and a long-term follow-up.

  17. A MultiCenter Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Major Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, D A; Boyle, E; McCartan, D; Bourke, M; Medani, M; Ferguson, J; Yagoub, H; Bashar, K; O'Donnell, M; Newell, J; Canning, C; McMonagle, M; Dowdall, J; Cross, S; O'Daly, S; Manning, B; Fulton, G; Kavanagh, E G; Burke, P; Grace, P A; Moloney, M Clarke; Walsh, S R

    2015-11-01

    A pilot randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effect of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) on clinical outcomes following major vascular surgery was performed. Eligible patients were those scheduled to undergo open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower limb revascularization procedures. Patients were randomized to RIPC or to control groups. The primary outcome was a composite clinical end point comprising any of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, new-onset arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, congestive cardiac failure, cerebrovascular accident, renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy, mesenteric ischemia, and urgent cardiac revascularization. Secondary outcomes were components of the primary outcome and myocardial injury as assessed by serum troponin values. The primary outcome occurred in 19 (19.2%) of 99 controls and 14 (14.1%) of 99 RIPC group patients (P = .446). There were no significant differences in secondary outcomes. Our trial generated data that will guide future trials. Further trials are urgently needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Hyperoncotic colloids and acute kidney injury: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been hypothesized that hyperoncotic colloids might contribute to acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the validity of this hypothesis remains unclear. Methods A meta-analysis was conducted of randomized controlled trials evaluating AKI after infusion of hyperoncotic albumin and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions. Mortality was a secondary endpoint. Eligible trials were sought by multiple methods, and the pooled odds ratios (OR) for AKI and death and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed under a random effects model. Results Eleven randomized trials with a total of 1220 patients were included: 7 evaluating hyperoncotic albumin and 4 hyperoncotic HES. Clinical indications were ascites, surgery, sepsis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Hyperoncotic albumin decreased the odds of AKI by 76% (OR, 0.24; CI, 0.12-0.48; P colloid solutions per se injure the kidney. Renal effects appear instead to be colloid-specific, with albumin displaying renoprotection and HES showing nephrotoxicity. PMID:21029460

  19. Recommending Oral Probiotics to Reduce Winter Antibiotic Prescriptions in People With Asthma: A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D H; Watt, Hilary; Gunn, Laura; Car, Josip; Boyle, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    Evidence from studies mainly in children has shown that orally administered probiotics may prevent respiratory tract infections and associated antibiotic use. We evaluated whether advice to take daily probiotics can reduce antibiotic prescribing for winter respiratory tract infections in people with asthma. We conducted a randomized controlled, parallel-group pragmatic study for participants aged 5 years and older with asthma in a UK primary care setting. The intervention was a postal leaflet with advice to take daily probiotics from October 2013 to March 2014, compared with a standard winter advice leaflet. Primary outcome was the proportion of participants prescribed antibiotics for respiratory tract infections. There were 1,302 participants randomly assigned to a control group (n = 650) or intervention group (n = 652). There was no significant difference in the primary outcome measure, with 27.7% receiving antibiotics in the intervention group and 26.9% receiving antibiotics in the control group (odds ratio = 1.04; 95% CI, 0.82-1.34). Uptake of probiotics was low, but outcomes were similar in those who accessed probiotics (adjusted odds ratio = 1.08; 95% CI, 0.69-1.69, compared with controls). We also found no evidence of an effect on respiratory tract infections or asthma exacerbations. In this pragmatic community-based trial in people with asthma, we found no evidence that advising use of winter probiotics reduces antibiotic prescribing. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  20. Sham Acupressure Controls Used in Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review and Critique

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-Yu Tan; Suen, Lorna K P; Tao Wang; Alexander Molassiotis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the commonly utilized sham acupressure procedures in existing acupressure trials, and to assess whether different types of sham interventions yield different therapeutic outcomes, and, as far as possible, to identify directions for the future development of an adequate sham acupressure method. Methods Randomized controlled trials comparing true acupressure with sham interventions were included. Thirteen electronic databases were adopted to locate relevant studies from in...

  1. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This project is focused on conducting the first randomized-controlled trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) in 54 verbal adults with autism...spectrum disorders, and assessing the efficacy of this approach in comparison to an active Enriched Supportive Therapy (EST) intervention. Major...findings to date include: 1) considerable and broad cognitive impairments prior to treatment in the ASD adults enrolled in this trial (n = 54), 2

  2. Acupoints Stimulation for Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients: A Quantitative Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at concluding the current evidence on the therapeutic effects of acupoints stimulation for cancer patients with anxiety and depression. Randomized controlled trials using acupoints stimulation for relieving anxiety and/or depression in cancer patients were searched, and 11 studies were finally included, of which eight trials compared acupoints stimulation with standard methods of treatment/care, and acupoints stimulation showed significantly better effects in improving depress...

  3. A randomized trial of laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonjer, H Jaap; Deijen, Charlotte L; Abis, Gabor A;

    2015-01-01

    (locoregional recurrence) and survival after laparoscopic and open resection of rectal cancer. METHODS: In this international trial conducted in 30 hospitals, we randomly assigned patients with a solitary adenocarcinoma of the rectum within 15 cm of the anal verge, not invading adjacent tissues, and without...... of locoregional recurrence and disease-free and overall survival similar to those for open surgery. (Funded by Ethicon Endo-Surgery Europe and others; COLOR II ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00297791.)....

  4. Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert Alan Bonakdar MD FAAFP University of California La Jolla, CA. 92093-0804 CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: REPORT DATE...October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012...Randomized Trial fdfdf 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER Robert Alan Bonakdar MD 5f

  5. Changes Within Clinical Practice After a Randomized Controlled Trial of Knee Arthroscopy for Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Nirav H; Hussain, Waqas; Ryan, John; Morrison, Shannon; Miniaci, Anthony; Jones, Morgan H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In 2002, Moseley et al published a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that showed no difference between knee arthroscopy and placebo for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). We wanted to assess the impact of the trial on clinical practice in the United States. Purpose/Hypothesis: To evaluate changes in knee arthroscopy practice before and after publication of the article by Moseley et al and to assess the effect of this landmark RCT on the behavior of practicing orthopaedic surgeons....

  6. Validity and reliability of patient reported outcomes used in Psoriasis: results from two randomized clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Koo John; Thompson Christine; Stone Stephen P; Bresnahan Brian W; Shikiar Richard; Revicki Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Two Phase III randomized controlled clinical trials were conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of weekly subcutaneous administration of efalizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. Patient reported measures of psoriasis-related functionality and health-related quality of life and of psoriasis-related symptom assessments were included as part of the trials. Objective To assess the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the patient reported outcome m...

  7. Effect of prenatal DHA supplementation on the infant epigenome: results from a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Susan J.; Zhou, Jing; Peters, Timothy J; Buckley, Michael; Sutcliffe, Brodie; Oytam, Yalchin; Robert A Gibson; McPhee, Andrew; Yelland, Lisa N; Makrides, Maria; Molloy, Peter L.; Beverly S Muhlhausler

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence is accumulating that nutritional exposures in utero can influence health outcomes in later life. Animal studies and human epidemiological studies have implicated epigenetic modifications as playing a key role in this process, but there are limited data from large well-controlled human intervention trials. This study utilized a large double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial to test whether a defined nutritional exposure in utero, in this case docosahexaenoic acid (D...

  8. Pragmatic consideration of recent randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials for treatment of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Andrew J

    2008-12-01

    A flurry of recent randomized, placebo-controlled trials assessing dissimilar pharmacotherapeutic treatment options for fibromyalgia (FM) have been presented in the past few years. This review evaluates these trials in light of recent pathophysiological concepts germane to FM, including mood disorders, autonomic dysregulation, altered sleep stage architecture, and the diagnostic tender point controversy. Studies with gabapentin, pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran, sodium oxybate, and pramipexole for treatment of FM are discussed.

  9. Impact of icodextrin on clinical outcomes in peritoneal dialysis: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yeoungjee; Johnson, David W; Badve, Sunil; Craig, Jonathan C; Strippoli, Giovanni F K; Wiggins, Kathryn J

    2013-07-01

    Although icodextrin has been shown to augment peritoneal ultrafiltration in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, its impact upon other clinical end points, such as technique survival, remains uncertain. This systematic review evaluated the effect of icodextrin use on patient level clinical outcomes. The Cochrane CENTRAL Registry, MEDLINE, Embase and reference lists were searched (last search 13 September 2012) for randomized controlled trials of icodextrin versus glucose in the long dwell exchange. Summary estimates of effect were obtained using a random effects model. Eleven eligible trials (1222 patients) were identified. There was a significant reduction in episodes of uncontrolled fluid overload [two trials; 100 patients; relative risk (RR) 0.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15-0.59] and improvement in peritoneal ultrafiltration [four trials; 102 patients; mean difference (MD) 448.54 mL/day, 95% CI 289.28-607.80] without compromising residual renal function [four trials; 114 patients; standardized MD (SMD) 0.12, 95% CI -0.26 to 0.49] or urine output (three trials; 69 patients; MD -88.88, 95% CI -356.88 to 179.12) with icodextrin use for up to 2 years. There was no significant effect on peritonitis incidence (five trials; 607 patients; RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.76-1.23), peritoneal creatinine clearance (three trials; 237 patients; SMD 0.36, 95% CI -0.24 to 0.96), technique failure (three trials; 290 patients; RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.28-1.20), patient survival (six trials; 816 patients; RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.32-2.13) or adverse events. Icodextrin prescription improved peritoneal ultrafiltration, mitigated uncontrolled fluid overload and was not associated with increased risk of adverse events. No effects of icodextrin on technique or patient survival were observed, although trial sample sizes and follow-up durations were limited.

  10. Comparative efficacy of Lamivudine and emtricitabine: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Ford

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Lamivudine and emtricitabine are considered equivalent by several guidelines, but evidence of comparable efficacy is conflicting. METHODS: We searched two databases up to June 30 2013 to identify randomized and quasi-randomized trials in which lamivudine and emtricitabine were used as part of combination antiretroviral therapy for treatment-naïve or experienced HIV-positive adult patients. We only included trials where partner drugs in the regimen were identical or could be considered to be comparable. We allowed for comparisons between tenofovir and abacavir provided the study population did not begin treatment with a viral load >100,000 copies/ml. RESULTS: 12 trials contributed 15 different randomized comparisons providing data on 2251 patients receiving lamivudine and 2662 patients receiving emtricitabine. Treatment success was not significantly different in any of the 12 trials. In the three trials that directly compared lamivudine and emtricitabine, the relative risk for achieving treatment success was non-significant (RR 1.03 95%CI 0.96-1.10. For all trials combined, the pooled relative risk for treatment success was not significantly different (RR 1.00, 95%CI 0.97-1.02. No heterogeneity was observed (I (2 = 0. Similarly, there was no difference in the pooled relative risk for treatment failure (RR 1.08, 95%CI 0.94-1.22, I (2 = 3.4%. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this systematic review suggest that lamivudine and emtricitabine are clinically equivalent.

  11. Application of dietary fiber in clinical enteral nutrition: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Yang; Xiao-Ting Wu; Yong Zhou; Ying-Li Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of dietary fiber (DF) as a part of enteral nutrition (EN) formula on diarrhea, infection, and length of hospital stay.METHODS: Following electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials about DF: Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. RevMan 4.1 was used for statistical analysis.RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials with 400pat-ients were included. The supplement of DF in EN was compared with standard enteral formula in five trials.Combined analysis did not show a significant reduction in occurrence of diarrhea, but there were valuable results for non-critically iii patients. Combined analysis of two trials observing the infection also did not show any valid evidence that DF could decrease the infection rate, though the length of hospital stay was reduced significantly.CONCLUSION: Based on the current eligible randomized controlled trials, there is no evidence that the value of DF in the diarrhea can be proved. Though length of hospital stay was shortened by the use of DF, there is no available evidence in preventing infection by DF. Further studies are needed for evaluating the value of DF in EN.

  12. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Perraton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Luke Perraton, Zuzana Machotka, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAim: Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials.Method: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Only trials that have reported significant FMS-related outcomes were included. Data relating to the components of hydrotherapy programs (exercise type, duration, frequency and intensity, environmental factors, and service delivery were analyzed.Results: Eleven randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Overall, the quality of trials was good. Aerobic exercise featured in all 11 trials and the majority of hydrotherapy programs included either a strengthening or flexibility component. Great variability was noted in both the environmental components of hydrotherapy programs and service delivery.Conclusions: Aerobic exercise, warm up and cool-down periods and relaxation exercises are common features of hydrotherapy programs that report significant FMS-related outcomes. Treatment duration of 60 minutes, frequency of three sessions per week and an intensity equivalent to 60%–80% maximum heart rate were the most commonly reported exercise components. Exercise appears to be the most important component of an effective hydrotherapy program for FMS, particularly when considering mental health-related outcomes.Keywords: hydrotherapy, fibromyalgia syndrome, exercise, effective, components

  13. Evidence for non-random sampling in randomised, controlled trials by Yuhji Saitoh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, J B; Loadsman, J A

    2017-01-01

    A large number of randomised trials authored by Yoshitaka Fujii have been retracted, in part as a consequence of a previous analysis finding a very low probability of random sampling. Dr Yuhji Saitoh co-authored 34 of those trials and he was corresponding author for eight of them. We found a number of additional randomised, controlled trials that included baseline data, with Saitoh as corresponding author, that Fujii did not co-author. We used Monte Carlo simulations to analyse the baseline data from 32 relevant trials in total as well as an outcome (muscle twitch recovery ratios) reported in several. We also compared a series of muscle twitch recovery graphs appearing in a number of Saitoh's publications. The baseline data in 14/32 randomised, controlled trials had p sampling. Combining the continuous and categorical probabilities of the 32 included trials, we found a very low likelihood of random sampling: p = 1.27 × 10(-8) (1 in 100,000,000). The high probability of non-random sampling and the repetition of lines in multiple graphs suggest that further scrutiny of Saitoh's work is warranted. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Primary outcomes in two randomized controlled trials of treatments for cannabis use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Erica N; Nich, Charla; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2011-11-01

    While several randomized controlled trials evaluating a range of treatments for cannabis use disorders have appeared in recent years, these have been marked by inconsistency in selection of primary outcomes, making it difficult to compare outcomes across studies. With the aim of identifying meaningful and reliable outcome domains in treatment studies of cannabis use disorders, we evaluated multiple indicators of marijuana use, marijuana problems, and psychosocial functioning from two independent randomized controlled trials of behavioral treatments for cannabis use disorders (Ns=450 and 136). Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the best-fitting model of outcomes in both trials encompassed three distinct factors: frequency of marijuana use, severity of marijuana use, and psychosocial functioning. In both trials, frequency of marijuana use and longest period of abstinence during treatment were most strongly associated with outcome during follow-up. Using two categorical definitions of "clinically significant improvement," individuals who demonstrated improvement differed on most end-of-treatment and long-term outcomes from those who did not improve. Results may guide future randomized controlled trials of treatments for cannabis use disorders in the collection of relevant end-of-treatment outcomes and encourage consistency in the reporting of outcomes across trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Randomized trial of BCG vaccination at birth to low-birth-weight children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Roth, Adam Anders Edvin; Ravn, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Observational studies have suggested that BCG may have nonspecific beneficial effects on survival. Low-birth-weight (LBW) children are not given BCG at birth in Guinea-Bissau; we conducted a randomized trial of BCG at birth (early BCG) vs delayed BCG.......Observational studies have suggested that BCG may have nonspecific beneficial effects on survival. Low-birth-weight (LBW) children are not given BCG at birth in Guinea-Bissau; we conducted a randomized trial of BCG at birth (early BCG) vs delayed BCG....