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Sample records for 5-kinases mediate arabidopsis

  1. The alkaline tolerance in Arabidopsis requires stabilizing microfilament partially through inactivation of PKS5 kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juntao Liu; Yan Guo

    2011-01-01

    High soil pH is harmful to plant growth and development. The organization and dynamics of microfilament (MF) cytoskeleton play important roles in the plant anti-alkaline process. In the previous study, we determined that alkaline stress induces a signal that triggers MF dynamicsdependent root growth. In this study we identified that PKS5 kinase involves in this regulatory process to facilitate the signal to reach the downstream target MF. Under pH 8.3 treatment, the depolymerization of MF was faster in pks5-4 (PKS5 kinase constitutively activated) than that in wild-type plants. The inhibition of wild-type, pks5-1, and pks5-4 root growth by pH 8.3 was correlated to their MF depolymerization rate.When the plants were treated with phalioidin to stabilize MF, the high pH sensitive phenotype of pks5-4 can be partially rescued. When the plants were treated with a kinase inhibitor Staurosporine, the MF depolymerization rate in pks5-4 was similar as that in wild-type under pH 8.3 treatment and the sensitivity of root growth was also rescued. However, when the plants were treated with LaCl3, a calcium channel blocker, the root growth sensitivity ofpks5-4 under pH 8.3 was rescued but MF depolymerization was even faster than that of plants without LaCl3 treatment.These results suggest that the PKS5 involves in external high pH signal mediated MF depolymerization, and that may be independent of calcium signal.

  2. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase 2 is involved in root gravitropism through regulation of polar auxin transport by affecting the cycling of PIN proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Mei; Wen-Jing Jia; Yu-Jia Chu; Hong-Wei Xue

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase(PIP5K)catalyzes the synthesis of PI-4,5-bisphosphate(PtdIns(4,5)P2)by phosphorylation of PI-4-phosphate at the 5 position of the inositol ring,and is involved in regulating multiple developmental processes and stress responses.We here report on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis PIP5K2,which is expressed during lateral root initiation and elongation,and whose expression is enhanced by exogenous auxin.The knockout mutant pip5k2 shows reduced lateral root formation,which could be recovered with exogenous auxin,and interestingly,delayed root gravity response that could not be recovered with exogenous auxin.Crossing with the DR5-GUS marker line and measurement of free IAA content confirmed the reduced auxin accumulation in pip5k2.In addition,analysis using the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 revealed the decelerated vesicle trafficking caused by PtdIns(4,5)P2 reduction,which hence results in suppressed cycling of PIN proteins(PIN2 and 3),and delayed redistribution of PIN2 and auxin under gravistimulation in pipSk2 roots.On the contrary,PtdIns(4,5)P2 significantly enhanced the vesicle trafficking and cycling of PIN proteins.These results demonstrate that PIP5K2 is involved in regulating lateral root formation and root gravity response,and reveal a critical role of PIP5K2/Ptdlns(4,5)P2 in root development through regulation of PIN proteins,providing direct evidence of crosstalk between the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway and auxin response,and new insights into the control of polar auxin transport.

  3. High temperature promotes auxin-mediated hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, William M; Östin, Anders; Sandberg, Göran; Romano, Charles P.; Estelle, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Physiological studies with excised stem segments have implicated the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA or auxin) in the regulation of cell elongation. Supporting evidence from intact plants has been somewhat more difficult to obtain, however. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an auxin-mediated cell elongation growth response in Arabidopsis thaliana. When grown in the light at high temperature (29°C), Arabidopsis seedlings exhibit dramatic hypocotyl elongation co...

  4. HAL1 mediate salt adaptation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The yeast HAL1 gene was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation with vacuum infiltration under the control of CaMV 35S promoter.Thirty-three individual kanamycin resistant plants were obtained from 75,000 seeds.Southern blotting analysis indicated that HAL1 gene had been integrated into all of the transgenic plants' genomes.The copy number of HAL1 gene in transgenic plants was mostly 1 to 3 by Southern analysis.Phenotypes of transgenic plants have no differences with wild type plants.Several samples of transformants were self-pollinated,and progenies from transformed and non-transformed plants(controls)were evaluated for salt tolerance and gene expression.Measurement of concentrations of intracellular K+ and Na+ showed that transgenic lines were able to retain less Na+ than that of the control under salt stress.Results from different tests indicated the expression of HAL1 gene promotes a higher level of salt tolerance in vivo in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  5. In vitro expression and determination of phosphorylation activity of point mutants of the PKS5 kinase in Arabidopsis%拟南芥 PKS5激酶点突变体外表达与磷酸化测试

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵菲佚; 焦成瑾; 陈荃; 马伟超; 安建平; 呼丽萍

    2015-01-01

    PKS5(protein kinase SOS2-like 5)虽为拟南芥(Arabidopsis thaliana )中介导植物响应外界高 pH的蛋白激酶,但其关键功能结构域尚未被确定.该研究用 PCR 对 PKS5不同位置点突变形式进行克隆,并在原核系统中进行表达,得到 PKS5不同的点突变蛋白;使用激酶通用底物 MBP(myelin basic protein)及 PKS5体内特异底物 AHA2(A .thaliana isoform of the PM H +-ATPase,拟南芥质膜质子泵等位形式之一)对 PKS5点突变蛋白磷酸化活性进行了测试.结果表明:点突变 PKS5-2失去了激酶活性,PKS5-4、PKS5-5、PKS5-9自磷酸化与 MBP 磷酸化活性与 PKS5相比无差异;而与 PKS5相比,点突变 PKS5-6和 PKS5-7自磷酸化及对AHA2的磷酸化活性升高,且 PKS5-7活性高于 PKS5-6.说明 PKS5特定位置点突变改变 PKS5的自磷酸化及底物磷酸化活性水平,不同位置的点突变对其磷酸化活性的影响存在差异.研究结果可为确定 PKS5功能结构域及体内作用机理提供依据.%In Arabidopsis ,PKS5 (protein kinase SOS2-like 5),a serine-threonine kinase,involves in the response to the external high pH stress based on the study of its loss-of-function mutant.Whereas,the fine functions of the do-mains resided in PKS5 are not currently well determined.We report here the dissection of domains of PKS5 in the ac-tivity of phosphorylation against MBP(myelin basic protein)and AHA2(one of the Arabidopsis thaliana isoform of PM H+-ATPases ),which is the specific substrate of PKS5 in vivo ,using the assay of phosphorlation in vitro via expressing the distinct PKS5 mutant versions in bacteria using the PKS5 cloning from plants employing PCR ap-proach.The results showed that the point mutated PKS5-2 lost its activity,PKS5-4,PKS5-5 and PKS5-9 displayed no difference in autophosphorylation and the MBP phosphorylation.Moreover,autophosphorylation and the AHA2 phosphorylation of the point mutated PKS5-6 and PKS5-7 increased compared with PKS5 and the PKS5

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

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    Jianming eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis-folded ones in the ER for additional folding attempts, marking and removing terminally-misfolded ones via a unique multiple-step degradation process known as ER-associate degradation (ERAD. Most of our current knowledge on ERQC and ERAD came from genetic and biochemical investigations in yeast and mammalian cells. Recent studies in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana uncovered homologous components and similar mechanisms in plants for monitoring protein folding and for retaining, repairing, and removing misfolded proteins. These studies also revealed critical roles of the plant ERQC/ERAD systems in regulating important biochemical/physiological processes, such as abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense. In this review, we discuss our current understanding about the molecular components and biochemical mechanisms of the plant ERQC/ERAD system in comparison to yeast and mammalian systems.

  7. Heritability of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance and basal resistance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, J.; Davison, S.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Selected strains of non-pathogenic rhizobacteria have the ability to trigger an induced systemic resistance (ISR) response in plants. In Arabidopsis, rhizobacteria-mediated ISR has been extensively studied, using Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r as the inducing agent and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000

  8. Two kinesin-like proteins mediate actin-based chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Yamada, Noboru; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Yonekura, Hisashi; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.; Kadota, Akeo; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-01-01

    Organelle movement is essential for efficient cellular function in eukaryotes. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is important for plant survival as well as for efficient photosynthesis. Chloroplast movement generally is actin dependent and mediated by blue light receptor phototropins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropins mediate chloroplast movement by regulating short actin filaments on chloroplasts (cp-actin filaments), and the chloroplast outer envelope protein CHUP1 is necessary for c...

  9. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouget, A.; Senchou, V.; Govers, F.; Sanson, A.; Barre, A.; Rougé, P.; Pont-Lezica, R.; Canut, H.

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsi

  10. Overexpression of several Arabidopsis histone genes increases agrobacterium-mediated transformation and transgene expression in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenea, Gabriela N; Spantzel, Joerg; Lee, Lan-Ying; Zhu, Yanmin; Lin, Kui; Johnson, Susan J; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2009-10-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana histone H2A-1 is important for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated plant transformation. Mutation of HTA1, the gene encoding histone H2A-1, results in decreased T-DNA integration into the genome of Arabidopsis roots, whereas overexpression of HTA1 increases transformation frequency. To understand the mechanism by which HTA1 enhances transformation, we investigated the effects of overexpression of numerous Arabidopsis histones on transformation and transgene expression. Transgenic Arabidopsis containing cDNAs encoding histone H2A (HTA), histone H4 (HFO), and histone H3-11 (HTR11) displayed increased transformation susceptibility, whereas histone H2B (HTB) and most histone H3 (HTR) cDNAs did not increase transformation. A parallel increase in transient gene expression was observed when histone HTA, HFO, or HTR11 overexpression constructs were cotransfected with double- or single-stranded forms of a gusA gene into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts. However, these cDNAs did not increase expression of a previously integrated transgene. We identified the N-terminal 39 amino acids of H2A-1 as sufficient to increase transient transgene expression in plants. After transfection, transgene DNA accumulates more rapidly in the presence of HTA1 than with a control construction. Our results suggest that certain histones enhance transgene expression, protect incoming transgene DNA during the initial stages of transformation, and subsequently increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

  11. Arabidopsis D6PK is a lipid domain-dependent mediator of root epidermal planar polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislas, Thomas; Hüser, Anke; Barbosa, Inês C R; Kiefer, Christian S; Brackmann, Klaus; Pietra, Stefano; Gustavsson, Anna; Zourelidou, Melina; Schwechheimer, Claus; Grebe, Markus

    2015-11-02

    Development of diverse multicellular organisms relies on coordination of single-cell polarities within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity). Cell polarity often involves plasma membrane heterogeneity generated by accumulation of specific lipids and proteins into membrane subdomains. Coordinated hair positioning along Arabidopsis root epidermal cells provides a planar polarity model in plants, but knowledge about the functions of proteo-lipid domains in planar polarity signalling remains limited. Here we show that Rho-of-plant (ROP) 2 and 6, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase 3 (PIP5K3), DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) 1A and DRP2B accumulate in a sterol-enriched, polar membrane domain during root hair initiation. DRP1A, DRP2B, PIP5K3 and sterols are required for planar polarity and the AGCVIII kinase D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) is a modulator of this process. D6PK undergoes phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate- and sterol-dependent basal-to-planar polarity switching into the polar, lipid-enriched domain just before hair formation, unravelling lipid-dependent D6PK localization during late planar polarity signalling.

  12. Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Ton, J.; Wees, A.C.M. van; Hase, S.; Léon-Kloosterziel, K.M.; Verhagen, B.W.M.; Pelt, J.A. van; Loon, L.C. van

    2002-01-01

    Selected strains of rhizosphere bacteria have been shown to reduce disease by activating a resistance mechanism in the plant called rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR). ISR resembles pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR), in that both types of induced resistance re

  13. Mediator subunit18 controls flowering time and floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengui Zheng

    Full Text Available Mediator is a conserved multi-protein complex that plays an important role in regulating transcription by mediating interactions between transcriptional activator proteins and RNA polymerase II. Much evidence exists that Mediator plays a constitutive role in the transcription of all genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. However, evidence is mounting that specific Mediator subunits may control the developmental regulation of specific subsets of RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. Although the Mediator complex has been extensively studied in yeast and mammals, only a few reports on Mediator function in flowering time control of plants, little is known about Mediator function in floral organ identity. Here we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, MEDIATOR SUBUNIT 18 (MED18 affects flowering time and floral organ formation through FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and AGAMOUS (AG. A MED18 loss-of-function mutant showed a remarkable syndrome of later flowering and altered floral organ number. We show that FLC and AG mRNA levels and AG expression patterns are altered in the mutant. Our results support parallels between the regulation of FLC and AG and demonstrate a developmental role for Mediator in plants.

  14. The Arabidopsis ISR1 locus is required for rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance against different pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Ton, J.; Pelt, J.A. van; Loon, L. C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, non-pathogenic, root-colonizing Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r bacteria trigger an induced systemic resistance (ISR) that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In contrast to SAR, WCS417r-mediated ISR is controlled by a salicylic acid (SA)-independent signalling pathway that requires an intact response to the plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET). Arabidopsis accessions RLD1 and Ws-0 fail to express ISR agains...

  15. HOPM1 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sheng Yang [Okemos, MI; Nomura, Kinya [East Lansing, MI

    2011-11-15

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein HopM1.sub.1-300 mediated protection is enhanced, such as increased protection to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1 and/or there is an increase in activity of an ATMIN associated plant protection protein, such as ATMIN7. Reagents of the present invention further provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  16. NCP1/AtMOB1A Plays Key Roles in Auxin-Mediated Arabidopsis Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaona; Guo, Zhiai; Song, Lizhen; Wang, Yanli; Cheng, Youfa

    2016-03-01

    MOB1 protein is a core component of the Hippo signaling pathway in animals where it is involved in controlling tissue growth and tumor suppression. Plant MOB1 proteins display high sequence homology to animal MOB1 proteins, but little is known regarding their role in plant growth and development. Herein we report the critical roles of Arabidopsis MOB1 (AtMOB1A) in auxin-mediated development in Arabidopsis. We found that loss-of-function mutations in AtMOB1A completely eliminated the formation of cotyledons when combined with mutations in PINOID (PID), which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase that participates in auxin signaling and transport. We showed that atmob1a was fully rescued by its Drosophila counterpart, suggesting functional conservation. The atmob1a pid double mutants phenocopied several well-characterized mutant combinations that are defective in auxin biosynthesis or transport. Moreover, we demonstrated that atmob1a greatly enhanced several other known auxin mutants, suggesting that AtMOB1A plays a key role in auxin-mediated plant development. The atmob1a single mutant displayed defects in early embryogenesis and had shorter root and smaller flowers than wild type plants. AtMOB1A is uniformly expressed in embryos and suspensor cells during embryogenesis, consistent with its role in embryo development. AtMOB1A protein is localized to nucleus, cytoplasm, and associated to plasma membrane, suggesting that it plays roles in these subcellular localizations. Furthermore, we showed that disruption of AtMOB1A led to a reduced sensitivity to exogenous auxin. Our results demonstrated that AtMOB1A plays an important role in Arabidopsis development by promoting auxin signaling.

  17. Transcriptional and metabolomic analysis of Ascophyllum nodosum mediated freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Prasanth

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that lipophilic components (LPC of the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (ANE improved freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanism(s of this induced freezing stress tolerance is largely unknown. Here, we investigated LPC induced changes in the transcriptome and metabolome of A. thaliana undergoing freezing stress. Results Gene expression studies revealed that the accumulation of proline was mediated by an increase in the expression of the proline synthesis genes P5CS1 and P5CS2 and a marginal reduction in the expression of the proline dehydrogenase (ProDH gene. Moreover, LPC application significantly increased the concentration of total soluble sugars in the cytosol in response to freezing stress. Arabidopsis sfr4 mutant plants, defective in the accumulation of free sugars, treated with LPC, exhibited freezing sensitivity similar to that of untreated controls. The 1H NMR metabolite profile of LPC-treated Arabidopsis plants exposed to freezing stress revealed a spectrum dominated by chemical shifts (δ representing soluble sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids and lipophilic components like fatty acids, as compared to control plants. Additionally, 2D NMR spectra suggested an increase in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids in LPC treated plants under freezing stress. These results were supported by global transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis revealed that LPC treatment altered the expression of 1113 genes (5% in comparison with untreated plants. A total of 463 genes (2% were up regulated while 650 genes (3% were down regulated. Conclusion Taken together, the results of the experiments presented in this paper provide evidence to support LPC mediated freezing tolerance enhancement through a combination of the priming of plants for the increased accumulation of osmoprotectants and alteration of cellular fatty acid composition.

  18. GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis links growth regulation with stress adaptation response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Eun; Park, Ju-Young; Kim, Youn-Sung; Staswick, Paul E; Jeon, Jin; Yun, Ju; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Jungmook; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Park, Chung-Mo

    2007-03-30

    Plants constantly monitor environmental fluctuations to optimize their growth and metabolism. One example is adaptive growth occurring in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we demonstrate that GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis is an essential constituent of the complex network of auxin actions that regulates stress adaptation responses in Arabidopsis. Endogenous auxin pool is regulated, at least in part, through negative feedback by a group of auxin-inducible GH3 genes encoding auxin-conjugating enzymes. An Arabidopsis mutant, wes1-D, in which a GH3 gene WES1 is activated by nearby insertion of the (35)S enhancer, exhibited auxin-deficient traits, including reduced growth and altered leaf shape. Interestingly, WES1 is also induced by various stress conditions as well as by salicylic acid and abscisic acid. Accordingly, wes1-D was resistant to both biotic and abiotic stresses, and stress-responsive genes, such as pathogenesis-related genes and CBF genes, were upregulated in this mutant. In contrast, a T-DNA insertional mutant showed reduced stress resistance. We therefore propose that GH3-mediated growth suppression directs reallocation of metabolic resources to resistance establishment and represents the fitness costs of induced resistance.

  19. A MYB-domain protein EFM mediates flowering responses to environmental cues in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuanyuan; Shen, Lisha; Chen, Ying; Bao, Shengjie; Thong, Zhonghui; Yu, Hao

    2014-08-25

    Plants adjust the timing of the transition to flowering to ensure their reproductive success in changing environments. Temperature and light are major environmental signals that affect flowering time through converging on the transcriptional regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) encoding the florigen in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that a MYB transcription factor EARLY FLOWERING MYB PROTEIN (EFM) plays an important role in directly repressing FT expression in the leaf vasculature. EFM mediates the effect of ambient temperature on flowering and is directly promoted by another major FT repressor, SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE. EFM interacts with an H3K36me2 demethylase JMJ30, which forms a negative feedback regulatory loop with the light-responsive circadian clock, to specifically demethylate an active mark H3K36me2 at FT. Our results suggest that EFM is an important convergence point that mediates plant responses to temperature and light to determine the timing of reproduction.

  20. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

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    Ishihama Nobuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1 in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13 in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses.

  1. Arabidopsis and Tobacco superman regulate hormone signalling and mediate cell proliferation and differentiation.

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    Nibau, Candida; Di Stilio, Verónica S; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana superman (SUP) plays an important role during flower development by maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels in the inner two whorls. It was proposed that SUP maintains this boundary by regulating cell proliferation in both whorls, as loss-of-function superman mutants produce more stamens at the expense of carpels. However, the cellular mechanism that underlies SUP function remains unknown. Here Arabidopsis or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SUP was overexpressed in tobacco plants to substantiate SUP's role as a regulator of cell proliferation and boundary definition and provide evidence that its biological role may be mediated via hormonal changes. It was found that moderate levels of SUP stimulated cell growth and proliferation, whereas high levels were inhibitory. SUP stimulated auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes, and cells overexpressing SUP displayed reduced hormone dependency for proliferation and regeneration into plants. SUP also induced proliferation of female traits in the second and third flower whorls and promoted differentiation of petaloid properties in sepals, further supporting a role for SUP as a boundary regulator. Moreover, cytokinin suppressed stamen development and promoted differentiation of carpeloid tissues, suggesting that SUP may regulate male and female development via its effect on cytokinin signalling. Taken together, these observations suggest a model whereby the effect of SUP on cell growth and proliferation involves the modulation of auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes. Furthermore, differential SUP expression or different sensitivities of different cell types to SUP may determine whether SUP stimulates or suppresses their proliferation.

  2. Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis acd11 Is Mediated by Epigenetic Regulation of an Immune Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palma, K.; Thorgrimsen, S.; Malinovsky, F.G.;

    2010-01-01

    . In a screen for lazarus (laz) mutants that suppress acd11 death we identified two genes, LAZ2 and LAZ5. LAZ2 encodes the histone lysine methyltransferase SDG8, previously shown to epigenetically regulate flowering time via modification of histone 3 (H3). LAZ5 encodes an RPS4-like R-protein, defined by several...... dominant negative alleles. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that LAZ2/SDG8 is required for LAZ5 expression and H3 lysine 36 trimethylation at LAZ5 chromatin to maintain a transcriptionally active state. We hypothesize that LAZ5 triggers cell death in the absence of ACD11......, and that cell death in other lesion mimic mutants may also be caused by inappropriate activation of R genes. Moreover, SDG8 is required for basal and R protein-mediated pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis, revealing the importance of chromatin remodeling as a key process in plant innate immunity....

  3. Host-induced bacterial cell wall decomposition mediates pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis.

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    Liu, Xiaokun; Grabherr, Heini M; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Brunner, Frédéric; Bertsche, Ute; Kühner, Daniel; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Amin, Bushra; Felix, Georg; Ongena, Marc; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2014-06-23

    Peptidoglycans (PGNs) are immunogenic bacterial surface patterns that trigger immune activation in metazoans and plants. It is generally unknown how complex bacterial structures such as PGNs are perceived by plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and whether host hydrolytic activities facilitate decomposition of bacterial matrices and generation of soluble PRR ligands. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana, upon bacterial infection or exposure to microbial patterns, produces a metazoan lysozyme-like hydrolase (lysozyme 1, LYS1). LYS1 activity releases soluble PGN fragments from insoluble bacterial cell walls and cleavage products are able to trigger responses typically associated with plant immunity. Importantly, LYS1 mutant genotypes exhibit super-susceptibility to bacterial infections similar to that observed on PGN receptor mutants. We propose that plants employ hydrolytic activities for the decomposition of complex bacterial structures, and that soluble pattern generation might aid PRR-mediated immune activation in cell layers adjacent to infection sites.

  4. Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis acd11 Is Mediated by Epigenetic Regulation of an Immune Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palma, K.; Thorgrimsen, S.; Malinovsky, F.G.;

    2010-01-01

    Certain pathogens deliver effectors into plant cells to modify host protein targets and thereby suppress immunity. These target modifications can be detected by intracellular immune receptors, or Resistance (R) proteins, that trigger strong immune responses including localized host cell death....... In a screen for lazarus (laz) mutants that suppress acd11 death we identified two genes, LAZ2 and LAZ5. LAZ2 encodes the histone lysine methyltransferase SDG8, previously shown to epigenetically regulate flowering time via modification of histone 3 (H3). LAZ5 encodes an RPS4-like R-protein, defined by several......, and that cell death in other lesion mimic mutants may also be caused by inappropriate activation of R genes. Moreover, SDG8 is required for basal and R protein-mediated pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis, revealing the importance of chromatin remodeling as a key process in plant innate immunity....

  5. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants.

  6. TOC1–PIF4 interaction mediates the circadian gating of thermoresponsive growth in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Oh, Eunkyoo; Wang, Tina; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis adapts to elevated temperature by promoting stem elongation and hyponastic growth through a temperature-responsive transcription factor PIF4. Here we show that the evening-expressed clock component TOC1 interacts with and inactivates PIF4, thereby suppressing thermoresponsive growth in the evening. We find that the expression of PIF4 target genes show circadian rhythms of thermosensitivity, with minimum responsiveness in the evening when TOC1 level is high. Loss of function of TOC1 and its close homologue PRR5 restores thermosensitivity in the evening, whereas TOC1 overexpression causes thermo insensitivity, demonstrating that TOC1 mediates the evening-specific inhibition of thermoresponses. We further show that PIF4 is required for thermoadaptation mediated by moderately elevated temperature. Our results demonstrate that the interaction between TOC1 and PIF4 mediates the circadian gating of thermoresponsive growth, which may serve to increase fitness by matching thermoresponsiveness with the day–night cycles of fluctuating temperature and light conditions. PMID:27966533

  7. Two kinesin-like proteins mediate actin-based chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Yamada, Noboru; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Yonekura, Hisashi; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Kadota, Akeo; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-05-11

    Organelle movement is essential for efficient cellular function in eukaryotes. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is important for plant survival as well as for efficient photosynthesis. Chloroplast movement generally is actin dependent and mediated by blue light receptor phototropins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropins mediate chloroplast movement by regulating short actin filaments on chloroplasts (cp-actin filaments), and the chloroplast outer envelope protein CHUP1 is necessary for cp-actin filament accumulation. However, other factors involved in cp-actin filament regulation during chloroplast movement remain to be determined. Here, we report that two kinesin-like proteins, KAC1 and KAC2, are essential for chloroplasts to move and anchor to the plasma membrane. A kac1 mutant showed severely impaired chloroplast accumulation and slow avoidance movement. A kac1kac2 double mutant completely lacked chloroplast photorelocation movement and showed detachment of chloroplasts from the plasma membrane. KAC motor domains are similar to those of the kinesin-14 subfamily (such as Ncd and Kar3) but do not have detectable microtubule-binding activity. The C-terminal domain of KAC1 could interact with F-actin in vitro. Instead of regulating microtubules, KAC proteins mediate chloroplast movement via cp-actin filaments. We conclude that plants have evolved a unique mechanism to regulate actin-based organelle movement using kinesin-like proteins.

  8. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non-cell autonomous effects on gene regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different classes of small RNAs (sRNAs refine the expression of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes by directing protein partners to complementary nucleic acids, where they mediate gene silencing. Plants encode a unique class of sRNAs, called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate protein-coding transcripts, as do microRNAs (miRNAs, and both sRNA classes control development through their targets. TasiRNA biogenesis requires multiple components of the siRNA pathway and also miRNAs. But while 21mer siRNAs originating from transgenes can mediate silencing across several cell layers, miRNA action seems spatially restricted to the producing or closely surrounding cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have previously described the isolation of a genetrap reporter line for TAS3a, the major locus producing AUXIN RESPONS FACTOR (ARF-regulating tasiRNAs in the Arabidopsis shoot. Its activity is limited to the adaxial (upper side of leaf primordia, thus spatially isolated from ARF-activities, which are located in the abaxial (lower side. We show here by in situ hybridization and reporter fusions that the silencing activities of ARF-regulating tasiRNAs are indeed manifested non-cell autonomously to spatially control ARF activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous tasiRNAs are thus mediators of a mobile developmental signal and might provide effective gene silencing at a distance beyond the reach of most miRNAs.

  9. An auxilin-like J-domain protein, JAC1, regulates phototropin-mediated chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2005-09-01

    The ambient-light conditions mediate chloroplast relocation in plant cells. Under the low-light conditions, chloroplasts accumulate in the light (accumulation response), while under the high-light conditions, they avoid the light (avoidance response). In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the accumulation response is mediated by two blue-light receptors, termed phototropins (phot1 and phot2) that act redundantly, and the avoidance response is mediated by phot2 alone. A mutant, J-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1 (jac1), lacks the accumulation response under weak blue light but shows a normal avoidance response under strong blue light. In dark-adapted wild-type cells, chloroplasts accumulate on the bottom of cells. Both the jac1 and phot2 mutants are defective in this chloroplast movement in darkness. Positional cloning of JAC1 reveals that this gene encodes a J-domain protein, resembling clathrin-uncoating factor auxilin at its C terminus. The amounts of JAC1 transcripts and JAC1 proteins are not regulated by light and by phototropins. A green fluorescent protein-JAC1 fusion protein showed a similar localization pattern to green fluorescent protein alone in a transient expression assay using Arabidopsis mesophyll cells and onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells, suggesting that the JAC1 protein may be a soluble cytosolic protein. Together, these results suggest that JAC1 is an essential component of phototropin-mediated chloroplast movement.

  10. Heterotrimeric G-protein is involved in phytochrome A-mediated cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wei; Wenbin Zhou; Guangzhen Hu; Jiamian Wei; Hongquan Yang; Jirong Huang

    2008-01-01

    The heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein) has been demonstrated to mediate various signaling pathways in plants. However,its role in phytochrome A (phyA) signaling remains elusive. In this study,we discover a new phyA-mediated phenotype designated far-red irradiation (FR) preconditioned cell death,which occurs only in the hypocotyls of FR-grown seedlings following exposure to white light (WL). The cell death is mitigated in the Ga mutant gpal but aggravated in the Gβ mutant agbl in comparison with the wild type (WT),indicative of antagonistic roles of GPAI and AGB1 in the phyA-mediated cell-death pathway. Further investigation indicates that FR-induced accumulation of nonphotoconvertible protochlorophyllide (Pchlide633),which generates reactive oxygen species (ROS)on exposure to WL,is required for FR-preconditioned cell death. Moreover,ROS is mainly detected in chloroplasts using the fluorescent probe. Interestingly,the application of H2O2 to dark-grown seedlings results in a phenotype similar to FR-preconditioned cell death. This reveals that ROS is a critical mediator for the cell death. In addition,we observe that agbl is more sensitive to H2O2 than WT seedlings,indicating that the G-protein may also modify the sensitivity of the seedlings to ROS stress. Taking these results together,we infer that the G-protein may be involved in the phyA signaling pathway to regulate FR-preconditioned cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls.Apossible mechanism underlying the involvement of the G-protein in phyA signaling is discussed in this study.

  11. Phosphoinositides play differential roles in regulating phototropin1- and phototropin2-mediated chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhavi Aggarwal

    Full Text Available Phototropins are UVA/blue-light receptors involved in controlling the light-dependent physiological responses which serve to optimize the photosynthetic activity of plants and promote growth. The phototropin-induced phosphoinositide (PI metabolism has been shown to be essential for stomatal opening and phototropism. However, the role of PIs in phototropin-induced chloroplast movements remains poorly understood. The aim of this work is to determine which PI species are involved in the control of chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis and the nature of their involvement. We present the effects of the inactivation of phospholipase C (PLC, PI3-kinase (PI3K and PI4-kinase (PI4K on chloroplast relocations in Arabidopsis. The inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphospahte [PI(4,5P2]-PLC pathway, using neomycin and U73122, suppressed the phot2-mediated chloroplast accumulation and avoidance responses, without affecting movement responses controlled by phot1. On the other hand, PI3K and PI4K activities are more restricted to phot1- and phot2-induced weak-light responses. The inactivation of PI3K and PI4K by wortmannin and LY294002 severely affected the weak blue-light-activated accumulation response but had little effect on the strong blue-light-activated avoidance response. The inhibitory effect observed with PI metabolism inhibitors is, at least partly, due to a disturbance in Ca(2+ ((c signaling. Using the transgenic aequorin system, we show that the application of these inhibitors suppresses the blue-light-induced transient Ca(2+ ((c rise. These results demonstrate the importance of PIs in chloroplast movements, with the PI(4,5P2-PLC pathway involved in phot2 signaling while PI3K and PI4K are required for the phot1- and phot2-induced accumulation response. Our results suggest that these PIs modulate cytosolic Ca(2+ signaling during movements.

  12. Phosphoinositides play differential roles in regulating phototropin1- and phototropin2-mediated chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Chhavi; Labuz, Justyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins are UVA/blue-light receptors involved in controlling the light-dependent physiological responses which serve to optimize the photosynthetic activity of plants and promote growth. The phototropin-induced phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism has been shown to be essential for stomatal opening and phototropism. However, the role of PIs in phototropin-induced chloroplast movements remains poorly understood. The aim of this work is to determine which PI species are involved in the control of chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis and the nature of their involvement. We present the effects of the inactivation of phospholipase C (PLC), PI3-kinase (PI3K) and PI4-kinase (PI4K) on chloroplast relocations in Arabidopsis. The inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphospahte [PI(4,5)P2]-PLC pathway, using neomycin and U73122, suppressed the phot2-mediated chloroplast accumulation and avoidance responses, without affecting movement responses controlled by phot1. On the other hand, PI3K and PI4K activities are more restricted to phot1- and phot2-induced weak-light responses. The inactivation of PI3K and PI4K by wortmannin and LY294002 severely affected the weak blue-light-activated accumulation response but had little effect on the strong blue-light-activated avoidance response. The inhibitory effect observed with PI metabolism inhibitors is, at least partly, due to a disturbance in Ca(2+) ((c)) signaling. Using the transgenic aequorin system, we show that the application of these inhibitors suppresses the blue-light-induced transient Ca(2+) ((c)) rise. These results demonstrate the importance of PIs in chloroplast movements, with the PI(4,5)P2-PLC pathway involved in phot2 signaling while PI3K and PI4K are required for the phot1- and phot2-induced accumulation response. Our results suggest that these PIs modulate cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling during movements.

  13. PHABULOSA Mediates an Auxin Signaling Loop to Regulate Vascular Patterning in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina Joy; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Wang, Guodong; Ramachandran, Prashanth; Beste, Lisa; Uddenberg, Daniel; Carlsbecker, Annelie

    2016-02-01

    Plant vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, differentiate in distinct patterns from procambial cells as an integral transport system for water, sugars, and signaling molecules. Procambium formation is promoted by high auxin levels activating class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIP III) transcription factors (TFs). In the root of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), HD-ZIP III TFs dose-dependently govern the patterning of the xylem axis, with higher levels promoting metaxylem cell identity in the central axis and lower levels promoting protoxylem at its flanks. It is unclear, however, by what mechanisms the HD-ZIP III TFs control xylem axis patterning. Here, we present data suggesting that an important mechanism is their ability to moderate the auxin response. We found that changes in HD-ZIP III TF levels affect the expression of genes encoding core auxin response molecules. We show that one of the HD-ZIP III TFs, PHABULOSA, directly binds the promoter of both MONOPTEROS (MP)/AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR5, a key factor in vascular formation, and IAA20, encoding an auxin/indole acetic acid protein that is stable in the presence of auxin and able to interact with and repress MP activity. The double mutant of IAA20 and its closest homolog IAA30 forms ectopic protoxylem, while overexpression of IAA30 causes discontinuous protoxylem and occasional ectopic metaxylem, similar to a weak loss-of-function mp mutant. Our results provide evidence that HD-ZIP III TFs directly affect the auxin response and mediate a feed-forward loop formed by MP and IAA20 that may focus and stabilize the auxin response during vascular patterning and the differentiation of xylem cell types.

  14. DEWAX-mediated transcriptional repression of cuticular wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mi Chung; Go, Young Sam

    2014-06-06

    The aerial parts of plants are covered with a cuticular wax layer, which is the first barrier between a plant and its environment. Although cuticular wax deposition increases more in the light than in the dark, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cuticular wax biosynthesis. Recently DEWAX (Decrease Wax Biosynthesis) encoding an AP2/ERF transcription factor was found to be preferentially expressed in the epidermis and induced by darkness. Wax analysis of the dewax knockout mutant, wild type, and DEWAX overexpression lines (OX) indicates that DEWAX is a negative regulator of cuticular wax biosynthesis. DEWAX represses the expression of wax biosynthetic genes CER1, LACS2, ACLA2, and ECR via direct interaction with their promoters. Cuticular wax biosynthesis is negatively regulated twice a day by the expression of DEWAX; throughout the night and another for stomata closing. Taken together, it is evident that DEWAX-mediated negative regulation of the wax biosynthetic genes plays role in determining the total wax loads produced in Arabidopsis during daily dark and light cycles. In addition, significantly higher levels of DEWAX transcripts in leaves than stems suggest that DEWAX-mediated transcriptional repression might be involved in the organ-specific regulation of total wax amounts on plant surfaces.

  15. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunit16 Is a Key Component of Basal Resistance against the Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Yao, Jin; Du, Xuezhu; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Mou, Zhonglin

    2015-09-01

    Although Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a devastating necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen in agriculture, the virulence mechanisms utilized by S. sclerotiorum and the host defense mechanisms against this pathogen have not been fully understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mediator complex subunit MED16 is a key component of basal resistance against S. sclerotiorum. Mutants of MED16 are markedly more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than mutants of 13 other Mediator subunits, and med16 has a much stronger effect on S. sclerotiorum-induced transcriptome changes compared with med8, a mutation not altering susceptibility to S. sclerotiorum. Interestingly, med16 is also more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than coronatine-insensitive1-1 (coi1-1), which is the most susceptible mutant reported so far. Although the jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) defense pathway marker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) cannot be induced in either med16 or coi1-1, basal transcript levels of PDF1.2 in med16 are significantly lower than in coi1-1. Furthermore, ET-induced suppression of JA-activated wound responses is compromised in med16, suggesting a role for MED16 in JA-ET cross talk. Additionally, MED16 is required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to PDF1.2 and OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS ETHYLENE/ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE FACTOR59 (ORA59), two target genes of both JA/ET-mediated and the transcription factor WRKY33-activated defense pathways. Finally, MED16 is physically associated with WRKY33 in yeast and in planta, and WRKY33-activated transcription of PDF1.2 and ORA59 as well as resistance to S. sclerotiorum depends on MED16. Taken together, these results indicate that MED16 regulates resistance to S. sclerotiorum by governing both JA/ET-mediated and WRKY33-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

  16. ZFN-mediated gene targeting of the Arabidopsis protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene through Agrobacterium-mediated floral dip transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Sylvia; Pinas, Johan E; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2013-05-01

    Previously, we showed that ZFN-mediated induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the intended recombination site enhanced the frequency of gene targeting (GT) at an artificial target locus using Agrobacterium-mediated floral dip transformation. Here, we designed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for induction of DSBs in the natural protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) gene, which can be conveniently utilized for GT experiments. Wild-type Arabidopsis plants and plants expressing the ZFNs were transformed via floral dip transformation with a repair T-DNA with an incomplete PPO gene, missing the 5' coding region but containing two mutations rendering the enzyme insensitive to the herbicide butafenacil as well as an extra KpnI site for molecular analysis of GT events. Selection on butafenacil yielded 2 GT events for the wild type with a frequency of 0.8 × 10⁻³ per transformation event and 8 GT events for the ZFNs expressing plant line with a frequency of 3.1 × 10⁻³ per transformation event. Molecular analysis using PCR and Southern blot analysis showed that 9 of the GT events were so-called true GT events, repaired via homologous recombination (HR) at the 5' and the 3' end of the gene. One plant line contained a PPO gene repaired only at the 5' end via HR. Most plant lines contained extra randomly integrated T-DNA copies. Two plant lines did not contain extra T-DNAs, and the repaired PPO genes in these lines were transmitted to the next generation in a Mendelian fashion.

  17. Involvement of Arabidopsis Hexokinase1 in Cell Death Mediated by Myo -Inositol Accumulation

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2015-06-05

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for several aspects of plant life, including development and stress responses. We recently identified the mips1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which is deficient for the enzyme catalyzing the limiting step of myo-inositol (MI) synthesis. One of the most striking features of mips1 is the light-dependent formation of lesions on leaves due to salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PCD. Here, we identified a suppressor of PCD by screening for mutations that abolish the mips1 cell death phenotype. Our screen identified the hxk1 mutant, mutated in the gene encoding the hexokinase1 (HXK1) enzyme that catalyzes sugar phosphorylation and acts as a genuine glucose sensor. We show that HXK1 is required for lesion formation in mips1 due to alterations in MI content, via SA-dependant signaling. Using two catalytically inactive HXK1 mutants, we also show that hexokinase catalytic activity is necessary for the establishment of lesions in mips1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed a restoration of the MI content in mips1 hxk1 that it is due to the activity of the MIPS2 isoform, while MIPS3 is not involved. Our work defines a pathway of HXK1-mediated cell death in plants and demonstrates that two MIPS enzymes act cooperatively under a particular metabolic status, highlighting a novel checkpoint of MI homeostasis in plants. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA replication factor C1 mediates genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qian

    2010-07-01

    Genetic screening identified a suppressor of ros1-1, a mutant of REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1; encoding a DNA demethylation protein). The suppressor is a mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of replication factor C (RFC1). This mutation of RFC1 reactivates the unlinked 35S-NPTII transgene, which is silenced in ros1 and also increases expression of the pericentromeric Athila retrotransposons named transcriptional silent information in a DNA methylationindependent manner. rfc1 is more sensitive than the wild type to the DNA-damaging agent methylmethane sulphonate and to the DNA inter- and intra- cross-linking agent cisplatin. The rfc1 mutant constitutively expresses the G2/M-specific cyclin CycB1;1 and other DNA repair-related genes. Treatment with DNA-damaging agents mimics the rfc1 mutation in releasing the silenced 35S-NPTII, suggesting that spontaneously induced genomic instability caused by the rfc1 mutation might partially contribute to the released transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The frequency of somatic homologous recombination is significantly increased in the rfc1 mutant. Interestingly, ros1 mutants show increased telomere length, but rfc1 mutants show decreased telomere length and reduced expression of telomerase. Our results suggest that RFC1 helps mediate genomic stability and TGS in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of LUX by CBF1 mediates cold input to the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Brenda Y; Sanchez, Sabrina E; Breton, Ghislain; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Krogan, Naden T; Kay, Steve A

    2014-07-07

    Circadian clocks allow organisms to anticipate daily changes in the environment to enhance overall fitness. Transcription factors (TFs) play a prominent role in the molecular mechanism but are incompletely described possibly due to functional redundancy, gene family proliferation, and/or lack of context-specific assays. To overcome these, we performed a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid screen using the LUX ARRYHTHMO (LUX) gene promoter as bait against an Arabidopsis TF library. LUX is a unique gene because its mutation causes severe clock defects and transcript maintains high-amplitude cycling in the cold. We report the well-characterized cold-inducible C-repeat (CRT)/drought-responsive element (DRE) binding factor CBF1/DREB1b is a transcriptional regulator of LUX. We show that CBF1 binds the CRT in the LUX promoter, and both genes overlap in temporal and spatial expression. CBF1 overexpression causes upregulation of LUX and also alters other clock gene transcripts. LUX promoter regions including the CRT and Evening Element (EE) are sufficient for high-amplitude transcriptional cycling in the cold, and cold-acclimated lux seedlings are sensitive to freezing stress. Our data show cold signaling is integrated into the clock by CBF-mediated regulation of LUX expression, thereby defining a new transcriptional mechanism for temperature input to the circadian clock.

  20. ROP GTPase-mediated auxin signaling regulates pavement cell interdigitation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deshu Lin; Huibo Ren; Ying Fu

    2015-01-01

    In multicel ular plant organs, cel shape formation depends on molecular switches to transduce developmental or environmental signals and to coordinate cel‐to‐cel communi-cation. Plants have a specific subfamily of the Rho GTPase family, usual y cal ed Rho of Plants (ROP), which serve as a critical signal transducer involved in many cel ular processes. In the last decade, important advances in the ROP‐mediated regulation of plant cel morphogenesis have been made by using Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and cotyledon pavement cel s. Especial y, the auxin‐ROP signaling networks have been demonstrated to control interdigitated growth of pavement cel s to form jigsaw‐puzzle shapes. Here, we review findings related to the discovery of this novel auxin‐signaling mecha-nism at the cel surface. This signaling pathway is to a large extent independent of the wel‐known Transport Inhibitor Response (TIR)–Auxin Signaling F‐Box (AFB) pathway, and instead requires Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) interaction with the plasma membrane‐localized, transmembrane kinase (TMK) receptor‐like kinase to regulate ROP proteins. Once activated, ROP influences cytoskeletal organization and inhibits endocytosis of the auxin transporter PIN1. The present review focuses on ROP signaling and its self‐organizing feature al owing ROP proteins to serve as a bustling signal decoder and integrator for plant cel morphogenesis.

  1. Arabidopsis FORGETTER1 mediates stress-induced chromatin memory through nucleosome remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinka, Krzysztof; Altmann, Simone; Czesnick, Hjördis; Nicolas, Philippe; Gorka, Michal; Benke, Eileen; Kabelitz, Tina; Jähne, Felix; Graf, Alexander; Kappel, Christian; Bäurle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Plants as sessile organisms can adapt to environmental stress to mitigate its adverse effects. As part of such adaptation they maintain an active memory of heat stress for several days that promotes a more efficient response to recurring stress. We show that this heat stress memory requires the activity of the FORGETTER1 (FGT1) locus, with fgt1 mutants displaying reduced maintenance of heat-induced gene expression. FGT1 encodes the Arabidopsis thaliana orthologue of Strawberry notch (Sno), and the protein globally associates with the promoter regions of actively expressed genes in a heat-dependent fashion. FGT1 interacts with chromatin remodelers of the SWI/SNF and ISWI families, which also display reduced heat stress memory. Genomic targets of the BRM remodeler overlap significantly with FGT1 targets. Accordingly, nucleosome dynamics at loci with altered maintenance of heat-induced expression are affected in fgt1. Together, our results suggest that by modulating nucleosome occupancy, FGT1 mediates stress-induced chromatin memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17061.001 PMID:27680998

  2. Raphanusanin-mediated resistance to pathogens is light dependent in radish and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehninsi; Miura, Kenji; Yamada, Kosumi; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    Raphanusanin (Ra) is a light-induced inhibitor of hypocotyl growth that responds to unilateral blue light illumination in radish seedlings. We have previously shown that Ra regulates genes that are involved in common defense mechanisms. Many genes that are induced by Ra are also positively regulated by early blue light. To extend the understanding of the role of Ra in pathogen defense, we evaluated the effects of Ra on radish and Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) infected with the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea) and biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (P. syringae). Radish and A. thaliana were found to be resistant to both pathogens when treated with Ra, depending on the concentration used. Interestingly, Ra-mediated resistance to P. syringae is dependent on light because Ra-treated seedlings exhibited enhanced susceptibility to P. syringae infection when grown in the dark. In addition to regulating the biotic defense response, Ra inhibited seed germination and root elongation and enhanced the growth of root hairs in the presence of light in radish and A. thaliana. Our data suggest that Ra regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in defense signaling pathways and plays a role in pathogen defense and plant development. Our results show that light may be generally required not only for the accumulation of Ra but also for its activation during the pathogen defense response.

  3. Arabidopsis AIP1-2 restricted by WER-mediated patterning modulates planar polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Christian S; Claes, Andrea R; Nzayisenga, Jean-Claude; Pietra, Stefano; Stanislas, Thomas; Hüser, Anke; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Grebe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) is crucial for the development of diverse multicellular organisms. Small Rac/Rho-family GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton contribute to planar polarity formation at sites of polarity establishment in animals and plants. Yet, upstream pathways coordinating planar polarity differ strikingly between kingdoms. In the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, a concentration gradient of the phytohormone auxin coordinates polar recruitment of Rho-of-plant (ROP) to sites of polar epidermal hair initiation. However, little is known about cytoskeletal components and interactions that contribute to this planar polarity or about their relation to the patterning machinery. Here, we show that ACTIN7 (ACT7) represents a main actin isoform required for planar polarity of root hair positioning, interacting with the negative modulator ACTIN-INTERACTING PROTEIN1-2 (AIP1-2). ACT7, AIP1-2 and their genetic interaction are required for coordinated planar polarity of ROP downstream of ethylene signalling. Strikingly, AIP1-2 displays hair cell file-enriched expression, restricted by WEREWOLF (WER)-dependent patterning and modified by ethylene and auxin action. Hence, our findings reveal AIP1-2, expressed under control of the WER-dependent patterning machinery and the ethylene signalling pathway, as a modulator of actin-mediated planar polarity.

  4. ERECTA signaling controls Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture through chromatin-mediated activation of PRE1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hanyang; Zhao, Lihua; Wang, Lulu; Zhang, Man; Su, Zhenxia; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Heming; Qin, Yuan

    2017-03-13

    Flowering plants display a remarkable diversity in inflorescence architecture, and pedicel length is one of the key contributors to this diversity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the receptor-like kinase ERECTA (ER) mediated signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating inflorescence architecture by promoting cell proliferation. However, the regulating mechanism remains elusive in the pedicel. Genetic interactions between ERECTA signaling and the chromatin remodeling complex SWR1 in the control of inflorescence architecture were studied. Comparative transcriptome analysis was applied to identify downstream components. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and nucleosome occupancy was further investigated. The results indicated that the chromatin remodeler SWR1 coordinates with ERECTA signaling in regulating inflorescence architecture by activating the expression of PRE1 family genes and promoting pedicel elongation. It was found that SWR1 is required for the incorporation of the H2A.Z histone variant into nucleosomes of the whole PRE1 gene family and the ERECTA controlled expression of PRE1 gene family through regulating nucleosome dynamics. We propose that utilization of a chromatin remodeling complex to regulate gene expression is a common theme in developmental control across kingdoms. These findings shed light on the mechanisms through which chromatin remodelers orchestrate complex transcriptional regulation of gene expression in coordination with a developmental cue.

  5. Agrobacterium-Mediated Transfer of Arabidopsis ICE1 Gene into Lemon (Citrus Limon (L.) Burm. F. cv. Eureka)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jia-quan; SUN Zhong-hai

    2005-01-01

    The Arabidopsis ICE1 (inducer of CBF expression 1) gene was cloned through RT-PCR of Arabidopsis cDNAs and introduced into the lemon (Citrus Limon (L.) Burm. F. cv. Eureka) genome using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. Epicotyl segments from in vitro grown lemon seedlings were co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens strain EHA 105 carrying the binary plasmid pMVICE1, whose T-DNA region contain ICE1 gene driven by 35S CaMV promoter. Among 320 epicotyl segments inoculated, 71 explants responded and regenerated 51 elongated shoots. These shoots were subjected to an extra month of kanamycin exposure. In this way, the number of escapes reduced. Thirteen of 31 survived shoots formed roots and 7 were tested positive using PCR technique. Southern blot analyses confirmed PCR results and demonstrated that more than two copies of the ICE1 gene were integrated into the lemon genome.

  6. Role of the Arabidopsis PIN6 Auxin Transporter in Auxin Homeostasis and Auxin-Mediated Development

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Plant-specific PIN-formed (PIN) efflux transporters for the plant hormone auxin are required for tissue-specific directional auxin transport and cellular auxin homeostasis. The Arabidopsis PIN protein family has been shown to play important roles in developmental processes such as embryogenesis, organogenesis, vascular tissue differentiation, root meristem patterning and tropic growth. Here we analyzed roles of the less characterised Arabidopsis PIN6 auxin transporter. PIN6 is auxin-inducible...

  7. Mitochondrial Porin Isoform AtVDAC1 Regulates the Competence of Arabidopsis thaliana to Agrobacterium-Mediated Genetic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tackmin

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in plants depends on the virulence of Agrobacterium strains, the plant tissue culture conditions, and the susceptibility of host plants. Understanding the molecular interactions between Agrobacterium and host plant cells is crucial when manipulating the susceptibility of recalcitrant crop plants and protecting orchard trees from crown gall disease. It was discovered that Arabidopsis voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (atvdac1) mutant has drastic effects on Agrobacterium-mediated tumorigenesis and growth developmental phenotypes, and that these effects are dependent on a Ws-0 genetic background. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis vdac1 mutants and yeast porin1-deficient strain with members of the AtVDAC gene family revealed that AtVDAC1 is required for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and there is weak functional redundancy between AtVDAC1 and AtVDAC3, which is independent of porin activity. Furthermore, atvdac1 mutants were deficient in transient and stable transformation by Agrobacterium, suggesting that AtVDAC1 is involved in the early stages of Agrobacterium infection prior to transferred-DNA (T-DNA) integration. Transgenic plants overexpressing AtVDAC1 not only complemented the phenotypes of the atvdac1 mutant, but also showed high efficiency of transient T-DNA gene expression; however, the efficiency of stable transformation was not affected. Moreover, the effect of phytohormone treatment on competence to Agrobacterium was compromised in atvdac1 mutants. These data indicate that AtVDAC1 regulates the competence of Arabidopsis to Agrobacterium infection. PMID:27643450

  8. Iron Availability Affects Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Responses, and Evidence of Cross-Talk with Auxin and Zinc in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vandna; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Sinilal, Bhaskaran; Yadav, Sandeep; Sarkar, Ananda K; Dantu, Prem Kumar; Jain, Ajay

    2015-06-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is pivotal for plant growth and development. Pi deficiency triggers local and systemically regulated adaptive responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Inhibition of primary root growth (PRG) and retarded development of lateral roots (LRs) are typical local Pi deficiency-mediated responses of the root system. Expression of Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes is regulated systemically. Here, we report the differential influence of iron (Fe) availability on local and systemic sensing of Pi by Arabidopsis. P-Fe- condition disrupted local Pi sensing, resulting in an elongated primary root (PR). Altered Fe homeostasis in the lpsi mutant with aberration in local Pi sensing provided circumstantial evidence towards the role of Fe in the maintenance of Pi homeostasis. Reporter gene assays, expression analysis of auxin-responsive genes (ARGs) and root phenotyping of the arf7arf19 mutant demonstrated the role of Fe availability on local Pi deficiency-mediated LR development. In addition, Fe availability also exerted a significant influence on PSR genes belonging to different functional categories. Together, these results demonstrated a substantial influence of Fe availability on Pi deficiency-mediated responses of ontogenetically distinct traits of the root system and PSR genes. The study also provided evidence of cross-talk between Pi, Fe and Zn, highlighting a complex tripartite interaction amongst them for maintaining Pi homeostasis.

  9. Nitric oxide accumulation is required to protect against iron-mediated oxidative stress in frataxin-deficient Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mariana; Colman, María José Rodríguez; Gómez-Casati, Diego F; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián

    2009-02-04

    Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that is conserved throughout evolution. In yeast and mammals, frataxin is essential for cellular iron (Fe) homeostasis and survival during oxidative stress. In plants, frataxin deficiency causes increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and high sensitivity to oxidative stress. In this work we show that a knock-down T-DNA frataxin-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (atfh-1) contains increased total and organellar Fe levels. Frataxin deficiency leads also to nitric oxide (NO) accumulation in both, atfh-1 roots and frataxin null mutant yeast. Abnormally high NO production might be part of the defence mechanism against Fe-mediated oxidative stress.

  10. Arabidopsis lysin-motif proteins LYM1 LYM3 CERK1 mediate bacterial peptidoglycan sensing and immunity to bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Roland; Lajunen, Heini M.; Erbs, Gitte; Newman, Mari-Anne; Kolb, Dagmar; Tsuda, Kenichi; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Fliegmann, Judith; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Cullimore, Julie V.; Jehle, Anna K.; Götz, Friedrich; Kulik, Andreas; Molinaro, Antonio; Lipka, Volker; Gust, Andrea A.; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of microbial patterns by host pattern recognition receptors is a key step in immune activation in multicellular eukaryotes. Peptidoglycans (PGNs) are major components of bacterial cell walls that possess immunity-stimulating activities in metazoans and plants. Here we show that PGN sensing and immunity to bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana requires three lysin-motif (LysM) domain proteins. LYM1 and LYM3 are plasma membrane proteins that physically interact with PGNs and mediate Arabidopsis sensitivity to structurally different PGNs from Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. lym1 and lym3 mutants lack PGN-induced changes in transcriptome activity patterns, but respond to fungus-derived chitin, a pattern structurally related to PGNs, in a wild-type manner. Notably, lym1, lym3, and lym3 lym1 mutant genotypes exhibit supersusceptibility to infection with virulent Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000. Defects in basal immunity in lym3 lym1 double mutants resemble those observed in lym1 and lym3 single mutants, suggesting that both proteins are part of the same recognition system. We further show that deletion of CERK1, a LysM receptor kinase that had previously been implicated in chitin perception and immunity to fungal infection in Arabidopsis, phenocopies defects observed in lym1 and lym3 mutants, such as peptidoglycan insensitivity and enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infection. Altogether, our findings suggest that plants share with metazoans the ability to recognize bacterial PGNs. However, as Arabidopsis LysM domain proteins LYM1, LYM3, and CERK1 form a PGN recognition system that is unrelated to metazoan PGN receptors, we propose that lineage-specific PGN perception systems have arisen through convergent evolution. PMID:22106285

  11. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces.

  12. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  13. ZFN-induced mutagenesis and gene-targeting in Arabidopsis through Agrobacterium-mediated floral dip transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Sylvia; Neuteboom, Leon W; Pinas, Johan E; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2009-10-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are artificial restriction enzymes, custom designed for induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) at a specific locus. These DSBs may result in site-specific mutagenesis or homologous recombination at the repair site, depending on the DNA repair pathway that is used. These promising techniques for genome engineering were evaluated in Arabidopsis plants using Agrobacterium-mediated floral dip transformation. A T-DNA containing the target site for a ZFN pair, that was shown to be active in yeast, was integrated in the Arabidopsis genome. Subsequently, the corresponding pair of ZFN genes was stably integrated in the Arabidopsis genome and ZFN activity was determined by PCR and sequence analysis of the target site. Footprints were obtained in up to 2% of the PCR products, consisting of deletions ranging between 1 and 200 bp and insertions ranging between 1 and 14 bp. We did not observe any toxicity from expression of the ZFNs. In order to obtain ZFN-induced gene-targeting (GT), Arabidopsis plants containing the target site and expressing the ZFN pair were transformed with a T-DNA GT construct. Three GT plants were obtained from approximately 3000 transformants. Two of these represent heritable true GT events, as determined by PCR, Southern blot analysis and sequencing of the resulting recombined locus. The third plant showed an ectopic GT event. No GT plants were obtained in a comparable number of transformants that did not contain the ZFNs. Our results demonstrate that ZFNs enhance site-specific mutagenesis and gene-targeting of Agrobacterium T-DNA constructs delivered through floral dip transformation.

  14. UDP-glucosyltransferase71c5, a major glucosyltransferase, mediates abscisic acid homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Yan, Jin-Ping; Li, De-Kuan; Luo, Qin; Yan, Qiujie; Liu, Zhi-Bin; Ye, Li-Ming; Wang, Jian-Mei; Li, Xu-Feng; Yang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in plant growth and development. The effect of ABA in plants mainly depends on its concentration, which is determined by a balance between biosynthesis and catabolism of ABA. In this study, we characterize a unique UDP-glucosyltransferase (UGT), UGT71C5, which plays an important role in ABA homeostasis by glucosylating ABA to abscisic acid -: glucose ester (GE) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Biochemical analyses show that UGT71C5 glucosylates ABA in vitro and in vivo. Mutation of UGT71C5 and down-expression of UGT71C5 in Arabidopsis cause delay in seed germination and enhanced drought tolerance. In contrast, overexpression of UGT71C5 accelerates seed germination and reduces drought tolerance. Determination of the content of ABA and ABA-GE in Arabidopsis revealed that mutation in UGT71C5 and down-expression of UGT71C5 resulted in increased level of ABA and reduced level of ABA-GE, whereas overexpression of UGT71C5 resulted in reduced level of ABA and increased level of ABA-GE. Furthermore, altered levels of ABA in plants lead to changes in transcript abundance of ABA-responsive genes, correlating with the concentration of ABA regulated by UGT71C5 in Arabidopsis. Our work shows that UGT71C5 plays a major role in ABA glucosylation for ABA homeostasis.

  15. Efficient and high-throughput vector construction and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells for functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yoichi; Dansako, Tomoko; Yano, Kentaro; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aoki, Koh; Noji, Masaaki; Saito, Kazuki; Shibata, Daisuke

    2008-02-01

    We established a large-scale, high-throughput protocol to construct Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cell lines, each of which carries a single transgene, using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We took advantage of RIKEN Arabidopsis full-length (RAFL) cDNA clones and the Gateway cloning system for high-throughput preparation of binary vectors carrying individual full-length cDNA sequences. Throughout all cloning steps, multiple-well plates were used to treat 96 samples simultaneously in a high-throughput manner. The optimal conditions for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of 96 independent binary vector constructs were established to obtain transgenic cell lines efficiently. We evaluated the protocol by generating transgenic Arabidopsis T87 cell lines carrying individual 96 metabolism-related RAFL cDNA fragments, and showed that the protocol was useful for high-throughput and large-scale production of gain-of-function lines for functional genomics.

  16. SUPERKILLER Complex Components Are Required for the RNA Exosome-Mediated Control of Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Inflorescence Stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lifang; Kunst, Ljerka

    2016-06-01

    ECERIFERUM7 (CER7)/AtRRP45B core subunit of the exosome, the main cellular 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, is a positive regulator of cuticular wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inflorescence stems. CER7-dependent exosome activity determines stem wax load by controlling transcript levels of the wax-related gene CER3 Characterization of the second-site suppressors of the cer7 mutant revealed that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are direct effectors of CER3 expression. To explore the relationship between the exosome and posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in regulating CER3 transcript levels, we investigated two additional suppressor mutants, wax restorer1 (war1) and war7. We show that WAR1 and WAR7 encode Arabidopsis SUPERKILLER3 (AtSKI3) and AtSKI2, respectively, components of the SKI complex that associates with the exosome during cytoplasmic 3'-to-5' RNA degradation, and that CER7-dependent regulation of wax biosynthesis also requires participation of AtSKI8. Our study further reveals that it is the impairment of the exosome-mediated 3'-5' decay of CER3 transcript in the cer7 mutant that triggers extensive production of siRNAs and efficient PTGS of CER3. This identifies PTGS as a general mechanism for eliminating highly abundant endogenous transcripts that is activated when 3'-to-5' mRNA turnover by the exosome is disrupted. Diminished efficiency of PTGS in ski mutants compared with cer7, as evidenced by lower accumulation of CER3-related siRNAs, suggests that reduced amounts of CER3 transcript are available for siRNA synthesis, possibly because CER3 mRNA that does not interact with SKI is degraded by 5'-to-3' XRN4 exoribonuclease.

  17. AtHKT1;1 mediates nernstian sodium channel transport properties in Arabidopsis root stelar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowu Xue

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis AtHKT1;1 protein was identified as a sodium (Na⁺ transporter by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, direct comparative in vivo electrophysiological analyses of a plant HKT transporter in wild-type and hkt loss-of-function mutants has not yet been reported and it has been recently argued that heterologous expression systems may alter properties of plant transporters, including HKT transporters. In this report, we analyze several key functions of AtHKT1;1-mediated ion currents in their native root stelar cells, including Na⁺ and K⁺ conductances, AtHKT1;1-mediated outward currents, and shifts in reversal potentials in the presence of defined intracellular and extracellular salt concentrations. Enhancer trap Arabidopsis plants with GFP-labeled root stelar cells were used to investigate AtHKT1;1-dependent ion transport properties using patch clamp electrophysiology in wild-type and athkt1;1 mutant plants. AtHKT1;1-dependent currents were carried by sodium ions and these currents were not observed in athkt1;1 mutant stelar cells. However, K⁺ currents in wild-type and athkt1;1 root stelar cell protoplasts were indistinguishable correlating with the Na⁺ over K⁺ selectivity of AtHKT1;1-mediated transport. Moreover, AtHKT1;1-mediated currents did not show a strong voltage dependence in vivo. Unexpectedly, removal of extracellular Na⁺ caused a reduction in AtHKT1;1-mediated outward currents in Columbia root stelar cells and Xenopus oocytes, indicating a role for external Na⁺ in regulation of AtHKT1;1 activity. Shifting the NaCl gradient in root stelar cells showed a Nernstian shift in the reversal potential providing biophysical evidence for the model that AtHKT1;1 mediates passive Na⁺ channel transport properties.

  18. High lipid order of Arabidopsis cell-plate membranes mediated by sterol and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN1A function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frescatada-Rosa, Márcia; Stanislas, Thomas; Backues, Steven K; Reichardt, Ilka; Men, Shuzhen; Boutté, Yohann; Jürgens, Gerd; Moritz, Thomas; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Grebe, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Membranes of eukaryotic cells contain high lipid-order sterol-rich domains that are thought to mediate temporal and spatial organization of cellular processes. Sterols are crucial for execution of cytokinesis, the last stage of cell division, in diverse eukaryotes. The cell plate of higher-plant cells is the membrane structure that separates daughter cells during somatic cytokinesis. Cell-plate formation in Arabidopsis relies on sterol- and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN1A (DRP1A)-dependent endocytosis. However, functional relationships between lipid membrane order or lipid packing and endocytic machinery components during eukaryotic cytokinesis have not been elucidated. Using ratiometric live imaging of lipid order-sensitive fluorescent probes, we show that the cell plate of Arabidopsis thaliana represents a dynamic, high lipid-order membrane domain. The cell-plate lipid order was found to be sensitive to pharmacological and genetic alterations of sterol composition. Sterols co-localize with DRP1A at the cell plate, and DRP1A accumulates in detergent-resistant membrane fractions. Modifications of sterol concentration or composition reduce cell-plate membrane order and affect DRP1A localization. Strikingly, DRP1A function itself is essential for high lipid order at the cell plate. Our findings provide evidence that the cell plate represents a high lipid-order domain, and pave the way to explore potential feedback between lipid order and function of dynamin-related proteins during cytokinesis.

  19. AGO6 functions in RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changho Eun

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM is a small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated epigenetic modification that contributes to transposon silencing in plants. RdDM requires a complex transcriptional machinery that includes specialized RNA polymerases, named Pol IV and Pol V, as well as chromatin remodelling proteins, transcription factors, RNA binding proteins, and other plant-specific proteins whose functions are not yet clarified. In Arabidopsis thaliana, DICER-LIKE3 and members of the ARGONAUTE4 group of ARGONAUTE (AGO proteins are involved, respectively, in generating and using 24-nt siRNAs that trigger methylation and transcriptional gene silencing of homologous promoter sequences. AGO4 is the main AGO protein implicated in the RdDM pathway. Here we report the identification of the related AGO6 in a forward genetic screen for mutants defective in RdDM and transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root apical meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identification of AGO6, and not AGO4, in our screen is consistent with the primary expression of AGO6 in shoot and root growing points.

  20. An Arabidopsis ABC Transporter Mediates Phosphate Deficiency-Induced Remodeling of Root Architecture by Modulating Iron Homeostasis in Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinsong; Piñeros, Miguel A; Li, Xiaoxuan; Yang, Haibing; Liu, Yu; Murphy, Angus S; Kochian, Leon V; Liu, Dong

    2017-02-13

    The remodeling of root architecture is a major developmental response of plants to phosphate (Pi) deficiency and is thought to enhance a plant's ability to forage for the available Pi in topsoil. The underlying mechanism controlling this response, however, is poorly understood. In this study, we identified an Arabidopsis mutant, hps10 (hypersensitive to Pi starvation 10), which is morphologically normal under Pi sufficient condition but shows increased inhibition of primary root growth and enhanced production of lateral roots under Pi deficiency. hps10 is a previously identified allele (als3-3) of the ALUMINUM SENSITIVE3 (ALS3) gene, which is involved in plant tolerance to aluminum toxicity. Our results show that ALS3 and its interacting protein AtSTAR1 form an ABC transporter complex in the tonoplast. This protein complex mediates a highly electrogenic transport in Xenopus oocytes. Under Pi deficiency, als3 accumulates higher levels of Fe(3+) in its roots than the wild type does. In Arabidopsis, LPR1 (LOW PHOSPHATE ROOT1) and LPR2 encode ferroxidases, which when mutated, reduce Fe(3+) accumulation in roots and cause root growth to be insensitive to Pi deficiency. Here, we provide compelling evidence showing that ALS3 cooperates with LPR1/2 to regulate Pi deficiency-induced remodeling of root architecture by modulating Fe homeostasis in roots.

  1. Phytochrome mediates red-light-based positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, M.; Mullen, J.; Hangarter, R.; Kiss, J.

    Plants rely on sophisticated mechanisms to interpret the constant bombardment of incoming signals so they can adjust their growth accordingly. The environmental cues of gravity and light are particularly important for plant growth and development. While gravitropism has been extensively studied in roots, there has been increased emphasis on understanding the cellular and molecular basis of root phototropism. In addition to the blue-light-based negative phototropism, roots also exhibit a recently discovered positive phototropism in response to red light. In this paper, we characterize this red-light-based phototropism in roots of Arabidopsis.

  2. Anthocyanin Accumulation Mediated by Blue Light and Cytokinin in Arabidopsis Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    It has been reported that pigmentation in plants is stimulated by light and cytokinin (CTK); however, the signaling pathways and the relationship between light and CTK involved in the regulation of anthocyanin accumulation remain to be elucidated. We investigated (i) the role of blue light (BL) and CTK in anthocyanin accumulation; and (ii) the relationship between BL and CTK in wild type (WT) and hy4 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Two-d-old seedlings grown on medium with or without kinetin (KT) or zeatin (ZT) in darkness were irradiated using BL at different fluence rates for 3 d before the anthocyanin content was determined using a spectrophotometric method. Anthocyanin accumulation was strongly induced by BL in WT seedlings but not in hy4 seedlings, which demonstrated that CRY1 is the main photoreceptor for BL. Both KT and ZT enhanced the response of the WT seedlings to BL in a dose-dependent manner, whereas they were not sufficient to promote anthocyanin accumulation in darkness. In addition, data from experiments using the hy4 mutant showed that the CTK effect of BL was also CRY1-dependent. The results from experiments with three different treatment programs showed that the relationship between BL and KT in anthocyanin accumulation of Arabidopsis seedlings seems neither multiplicative nor additive coaction, but rather interaction. BL is necessary for anthocyanin accumulation, and KT might be involved in the BL signaling pathway.

  3. The BIG gene is required for auxin-mediated organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaola; Lu, Wenwen; Ma, Yurong; Qin, Qianqian; Hou, Suiwen

    2013-04-01

    Control of organ size by cell expansion and cell proliferation is a fundamental process during development, but the importance of BIG in this process is still poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new allele mutant of BIG in Arabidopsis: big-j588. The mutant displayed small aerial organs that were characterized by reduced cell size in the epidermis and short roots with decreased cell numbers. The big-j588 axr1 double and big-j588 arf7 arf19 triple mutants displayed more severe defects in leaf expansion and root elongation than their parents, implying BIG is involved in auxin-dependent organ growth. Genetic analysis suggests that BIG may act synergistically with PIN1 to affect leaf growth. The PIN1 protein level decreased in both the root cells and the tips of leaf pavement cell lobes of big-j588. Further analysis showed that the auxin maxima in the roots and the leaves of big-j588 decreased. Therefore, we concluded that the small leaves and the short roots of big-j588 were associated with reduction of auxin maxima. Overall, our study suggested that BIG is required for Arabidopsis organ growth via auxin action.

  4. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunit16 positively regulates salicylate-mediated systemic acquired resistance and jasmonate/ethylene-induced defense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a long-lasting plant immunity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Biological induction of SAR requires the signal molecule salicylic acid (SA) and involves profound transcriptional changes that are largely controlled by the transcription coactivator nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1 (NPR1). However, it is unclear how SAR signals are transduced from the NPR1 signaling node to the general transcription machinery. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana Mediator subunit16 (MED16) is an essential positive regulator of SAR. Mutations in MED16 reduced NPR1 protein levels and completely compromised biological induction of SAR. These mutations also significantly suppressed SA-induced defense responses, altered the transcriptional changes induced by the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000/avrRpt2, and rendered plants susceptible to both Pst DC3000/avrRpt2 and Pst DC3000. In addition, mutations in MED16 blocked the induction of several jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-responsive genes and compromised resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. The Mediator complex acts as a bridge between specific transcriptional activators and the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery; therefore, our data suggest that MED16 may be a signaling component in the gap between the NPR1 signaling node and the general transcription machinery and may relay signals from both the SA and the JA/ET pathways.

  5. Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 mediates biotic defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galon, Yael; Nave, Roy; Boyce, Joy M; Nachmias, Dikla; Knight, Marc R; Fromm, Hillel

    2008-03-19

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 (also called SR1) is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor in Arabidopsis. Two homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants (camta3-1, camta3-2) showed enhanced spontaneous lesions. Transcriptome analysis of both mutants revealed 6 genes with attenuated expression and 99 genes with elevated expression. Of the latter, 32 genes are related to defense against pathogens (e.g. WRKY33, PR1 and chitinase). Propagation of a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea were attenuated in both mutants. Moreover, both mutants accumulated high levels of H2O2. We suggest that CAMTA3 regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in biotic defense responses.

  6. Positional signaling mediated by a receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Shen, Ronglai; Schiefelbein, John

    2005-02-18

    The position-dependent specification of root epidermal cells in Arabidopsis provides an elegant paradigm for cell patterning during development. Here, we describe a new gene, SCRAMBLED (SCM), required for cells to appropriately interpret their location within the developing root epidermis. SCM encodes a receptor-like kinase protein with a predicted extracellular domain of six leucine-rich repeats and an intracellular serine-threonine kinase domain. SCM regulates the expression of the GLABRA2, CAPRICE, WEREWOLF, and ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 transcription factor genes that define the cell fates. Further, the SCM gene is expressed throughout the developing root. Therefore, SCM likely enables developing epidermal cells to detect positional cues and establish an appropriate cell-type pattern.

  7. Involvement of sphingoid bases in mediating reactive oxygen intermediate production and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Shi; Yusuf A Hannun; Jianru Zuo; Jacek Bielawski; Jinye Mu; Haili Dong; Chong Teng; Jian Zhang; Xiaohui Yang; Nario Tomishige; Kentaro Hanada

    2007-01-01

    Sphingolipids have been suggested to act as second messengers for an array of cellular signaling activities in plant cells, including stress responses and programmed cell death (PCD). However, the mechanisms underpinning these processes are not well understood. Here, we report that an Arabidopsis mutant, fumonisin Bl resistant11-1 (fbr11-1), which fails to generate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), is incapable of initiating PCD when the mutant is challenged by fumonisin B1 (FB1), a specific inhibitor of ceramide synthase. Molecular analysis indicated that FBR11 encodes a long-chain basel (LCB1) subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), which catalyzes the first rate-limiting step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. Mass spectrometric analysis of the sphingolipid concentrations revealed that whereas the fbrll-1 mutation did not affect basal levels of sphingoid bases, the mutant showed attenuated formation of sphingoid bases in response to FB1 By a direct feeding experiment, we show that the free sphingoid bases dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine and sphingosine efficiently induce ROI generation followed by cell death. Conversely, ROI generation and cell death induced by dihydrosphingosine were specifically blocked by its phosphorylated form dihydrosphingosine-1 -phosphate in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the maintenance of homeostasis between a free sphingoid base and its phosphorylated derivative is critical to determining the cell fate. Because alterations of the sphingolipid level occur prior to the ROI production, we propose that the free sphingoid bases are involved in the control of PCD in Arabidopsis, presumably through the regulation of the ROI level upon receiving different developmental or environmental cues.

  8. Vacuolar-Iron-Transporter1-Like proteins mediate iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollhofer, Julia; Timofeev, Roman; Lan, Ping; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Buckhout, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a nutritional problem in plants and reduces crop productivity, quality and yield. With the goal of improving the iron (Fe) storage properties of plants, we have investigated the function of three Arabidopsis proteins with homology to Vacuolar Iron Transporter1 (AtVIT1). Heterologous expression of Vacuolar Iron Transporter-Like1 (AtVTL1; At1g21140), AtVTL2 (At1g76800) or AtVTL5 (At3g25190) in the yeast vacuolar Fe transport mutant, Δccc1, restored growth in the presence of 4 mM Fe. Isolated vacuoles from yeast expressing either of the VTL genes in the Δccc1 background had a three- to four-fold increase in Fe concentration compared to vacuoles isolated from the untransformed mutant. Transiently expressed GFP-tagged AtVTL1 was localized exclusively and AtVTL2 was localized primarily to the vacuolar membrane of onion epidermis cells. Seedling root growth of the Arabidopsis nramp3/nramp4 and vit1-1 mutants was decreased compared to the wild type when seedlings were grown under Fe deficiency. When expressed under the 35S promoter in the nramp3/nramp4 or vit1-1 backgrounds, AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 restored root growth in both mutants. The seed Fe concentration in the nramp3/nramp4 mutant overexpressing AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 was between 50 and 60% higher than in non-transformed double mutants or wild-type plants. We conclude that the VTL proteins catalyze Fe transport into vacuoles and thus contribute to the regulation of Fe homeostasis in planta.

  9. Vacuolar-Iron-Transporter1-Like proteins mediate iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gollhofer

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is a nutritional problem in plants and reduces crop productivity, quality and yield. With the goal of improving the iron (Fe storage properties of plants, we have investigated the function of three Arabidopsis proteins with homology to Vacuolar Iron Transporter1 (AtVIT1. Heterologous expression of Vacuolar Iron Transporter-Like1 (AtVTL1; At1g21140, AtVTL2 (At1g76800 or AtVTL5 (At3g25190 in the yeast vacuolar Fe transport mutant, Δccc1, restored growth in the presence of 4 mM Fe. Isolated vacuoles from yeast expressing either of the VTL genes in the Δccc1 background had a three- to four-fold increase in Fe concentration compared to vacuoles isolated from the untransformed mutant. Transiently expressed GFP-tagged AtVTL1 was localized exclusively and AtVTL2 was localized primarily to the vacuolar membrane of onion epidermis cells. Seedling root growth of the Arabidopsis nramp3/nramp4 and vit1-1 mutants was decreased compared to the wild type when seedlings were grown under Fe deficiency. When expressed under the 35S promoter in the nramp3/nramp4 or vit1-1 backgrounds, AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 restored root growth in both mutants. The seed Fe concentration in the nramp3/nramp4 mutant overexpressing AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 was between 50 and 60% higher than in non-transformed double mutants or wild-type plants. We conclude that the VTL proteins catalyze Fe transport into vacuoles and thus contribute to the regulation of Fe homeostasis in planta.

  10. UVR8 Mediates UV-B-Induced Arabidopsis Defense Responses against Botrytis cinerea by Controlling Sinapate Accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia V. Demkura; Carlos L. Ballaré

    2012-01-01

    Light is emerging as a central regulator of plant immune responses against herbivores and pathogens.Solar UV-B radiation plays an important role as a positive modulator of plant defense.However,since UV-B photons can interact with a wide spectrum of molecular targets in plant tissues,the mechanisms that mediate their effects on plant defense have remained elusive.Here,we show that ecologically meaningful doses of UV-B radiation increase Arabidopsis resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and that this effect is mediated by the photoreceptor UVR8.The UV-B effect on plant resistance was conserved in mutants impaired in jasmonate (JA) signaling (jar1-1 and P35S:JAZ10.4) or metabolism of tryptophan-derived defense compounds (pen2-1,pad3-1,pen2 pad3),suggesting that neither regulation of the JA pathway nor changes in levels of indolic glucosinolates (iGS) or camalexin are involved in this response.UV-B radiation,acting through UVR8,increased the levels of flavonoids and sinapates in leaf tissue.The UV-B effect on pathogen resistance was still detectable in tt4-f,a mutant deficient in chalcone synthase and therefore impaired in the synthesis of flavonoids,but was absent in fah1-7,a mutant deficient in ferulic acid 5-hydroxylase,which is essential for sinapate biosynthesis.Collectively,these results indicate that UVR8 plays an important role in mediating the effects of UV-B radiation on pathogen resistance by controlling the expression of the sinapate biosynthetic pathway.

  11. ATM-mediated transcriptional and developmental responses to gamma-rays in Arabidopsis.

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    Lilian Ricaud

    Full Text Available ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated is an essential checkpoint kinase that signals DNA double-strand breaks in eukaryotes. Its depletion causes meiotic and somatic defects in Arabidopsis and progressive motor impairment accompanied by several cell deficiencies in patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT. To obtain a comprehensive view of the ATM pathway in plants, we performed a time-course analysis of seedling responses by combining confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of root development and genome-wide expression profiling of wild-type (WT and homozygous ATM-deficient mutants challenged with a dose of gamma-rays (IR that is sublethal for WT plants. Early morphologic defects in meristematic stem cells indicated that AtATM, an Arabidopsis homolog of the human ATM gene, is essential for maintaining the quiescent center and controlling the differentiation of initial cells after exposure to IR. Results of several microarray experiments performed with whole seedlings and roots up to 5 h post-IR were compiled in a single table, which was used to import gene information and extract gene sets. Sequence and function homology searches; import of spatio-temporal, cell cycling, and mutant-constitutive expression characteristics; and a simplified functional classification system were used to identify novel genes in all functional classes. The hundreds of radiomodulated genes identified were not a random collection, but belonged to functional pathways such as those of the cell cycle; cell death and repair; DNA replication, repair, and recombination; and transcription; translation; and signaling, indicating the strong cell reprogramming and double-strand break abrogation functions of ATM checkpoints. Accordingly, genes in all functional classes were either down or up-regulated concomitantly with downregulation of chromatin deacetylases or upregulation of acetylases and methylases, respectively. Determining the early transcriptional indicators of

  12. Ectopically expressed sweet pepper ferredoxin PFLP enhances disease resistance to Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum affected by harpin and protease-mediated hypersensitive response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ger, Mang-Jye; Louh, Guan-Yu; Lin, Yi-Hsien; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Hsiang-En

    2014-12-01

    Plant ferredoxin-like protein (PFLP) is a photosynthesis-type ferredoxin (Fd) found in sweet pepper. It contains an iron-sulphur cluster that receives and delivers electrons between enzymes involved in many fundamental metabolic processes. It has been demonstrated that transgenic plants overexpressing PFLP show a high resistance to many bacterial pathogens, although the mechanism remains unclear. In this investigation, the PFLP gene was transferred into Arabidopsis and its defective derivatives, such as npr1 (nonexpresser of pathogenesis-related gene 1) and eds1 (enhanced disease susceptibility 1) mutants and NAHG-transgenic plants. These transgenic plants were then infected with the soft-rot bacterial pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora, ECC) to investigate the mechanism behind PFLP-mediated resistance. The results revealed that, instead of showing soft-rot symptoms, ECC activated hypersensitive response (HR)-associated events, such as the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), electrical conductivity leakage and expression of the HR marker genes (ATHSR2 and ATHSR3) in PFLP-transgenic Arabidopsis. This PFLP-mediated resistance could be abolished by inhibitors, such as diphenylene iodonium (DPI), 1-l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)-butane (E64) and benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk), but not by myriocin and fumonisin. The PFLP-transgenic plants were resistant to ECC, but not to its harpin mutant strain ECCAC5082. In the npr1 mutant and NAHG-transgenic Arabidopsis, but not in the eds1 mutant, overexpression of the PFLP gene increased resistance to ECC. Based on these results, we suggest that transgenic Arabidopsis contains high levels of ectopic PFLP; this may lead to the recognition of the harpin and to the activation of the HR and other resistance mechanisms, and is dependent on the protease-mediated pathway.

  13. MicroProtein-mediated recruitment of CONSTANS into a TOPLESS trimeric complex represses flowering in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeff, Moritz; Straub, Daniel; Eguen, Tenai E.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana microProteins, miP1a and miP1b, physically interact with CONSTANS (CO) a potent regulator of flowering time. The miP1a/b-type microProteins evolved in dicotyledonous plants and have an additional carboxy-terminal PF(V/L)FL motif. This motif enables miP1a/b microProteins to interact......MicroProteins are short, single domain proteins that act by sequestering larger, multi-domain proteins into non-functional complexes. MicroProteins have been identified in plants and animals, where they are mostly involved in the regulation of developmental processes. Here we show that two...... with TOPLESS/TOPLESS-RELATED (TPL/TPR) proteins. Interaction of CO with miP1a/b/TPL causes late flowering due to a failure in the induction of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) expression under inductive long day conditions. Both miP1a and miP1b are expressed in vascular tissue, where CO and FT are active. Genetically...

  14. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN Gene Mediates Asymmetric Growth of the Outer Integument of Ovules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiser, J. C.; Robinson-Beers, K.; Gasser, C. S.

    1995-03-01

    Arabidopsis superman (sup, also referred to as floral mutant10) mutants have previously been shown to have flowers with supernumerary stamens and reduced carpels as a result of ectopic expression of the floral homeotic gene APETALA3 (AP3). Here, we report that sup mutations also cause specific alterations in ovule development. Growth of the outer integument of wild-type ovules occurs almost exclusively on the abaxial side of the ovule, resulting in a bilaterally symmetrical hoodlike structure. In contrast, the outer integument of sup mutant ovules grows equally on all sides of the ovule, resulting in a nearly radially symmetrical tubular shape. Thus, one role of SUP is to suppress growth of the outer integument on the adaxial side of the ovule. Genetic analyses showed that the effects of sup mutations on ovule development are independent of the presence or absence of AP3 activity. Thus, SUP acts through different mechanisms in its early role in ensuring proper determination of carpel identity and in its later role in asymmetric suppression of outer integument growth.

  15. Nuclear Targeting of Methyl-Recycling Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana Is Mediated by Specific Protein Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanghyun Lee; Andrew C. Doxey; Brendan J. McConkey; Barbara A. Moffatt

    2012-01-01

    Numerous transmethylation reactions are required for normal plant growth and development.S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) and adenosine kinase (ADK) act coordinately to recycle the by-product of these reactions,S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) that would otherwise competitively inhibit methyltransferase (MT) activities.Here,we report on investigations to understand how the SAH produced in the nucleus is metabolized by SAHH and ADK.Localization analyses using green fluorescent fusion proteins demonstrated that both enzymes are capable of localizing to the cytoplasm and the nucleus,although no obvious nuclear localization signal was found in their sequences.Deletion analysis revealed that a 41-amino-acid segment of SAHH (Gly1 50-Lys190) is required for nuclear targeting of this enzyme.This segment is surface exposed,shows unique sequence conservation patterns in plant SAHHs,and possesses additional features of protein-protein interaction motifs.ADK and SAHH interact in Arabidopsis via this segment and also interact with an mRNA cap MT.We propose that the targeting of this complex is directed by the nuclear localization signal of the MT; other MTs may similarly target SAHH/ADK to other subcellular compartments to ensure uninterrupted transmethylation.

  16. H2O2 mediates the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis seed dormancy and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinggao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Chen, Moxian; Zhang, Jianhua

    2010-06-01

    H(2)O(2) is known as a signal molecule in plant cells, but its role in the regulation of aqbscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) metabolism and hormonal balance is not yet clear. In this study it was found that H(2)O(2) affected the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis during seed imbibition and thus exerted control over seed dormancy and germination. As seen by quantitative RT-PCR (QRT-PCR), H(2)O(2) up-regulated ABA catabolism genes (e.g. CYP707A genes), resulting in a decreased ABA content during imbibition. This action required the participation of nitric oxide (NO), another signal molecule. At the same time, H(2)O(2) also up-regulated GA biosynthesis, as shown by QRT-PCR. When an ABA catabolism mutant, cyp707a2, and an overexpressing plant, CYP707A2-OE, were tested, ABA content was negatively correlated with GA biosynthesis. Exogenously applied GA was able to over-ride the inhibition of germination at low concentrations of ABA, but had no obvious effect when ABA concentrations were high. It is concluded that H(2)O(2) mediates the up-regulation of ABA catabolism, probably through an NO signal, and also promotes GA biosynthesis. High concentrations of ABA inhibit GA biosynthesis but a balance of these two hormones can jointly control the dormancy and germination of Arabidopsis seeds.

  17. Syntaxin of plant proteins SYP123 and SYP132 mediate root hair tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Mie; Hirano, Tomoko; Enami, Kazuhiko; Fuselier, Taylor; Kato, Naohiro; Kwon, Chian; Voigt, Boris; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Baluška, František; Sato, Masa H

    2014-04-01

    Root hairs are fast-growing tubular protrusions on root epidermal cells that play important roles in water and nutrient uptake in plants. The tip-focused polarized growth of root hairs is accomplished by the secretion of newly synthesized materials to the tip via the polarized membrane trafficking mechanism. Here, we report the function of two different types of plasma membrane (PM) Qa-SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors), SYP123 and SYP132, in the growth of root hair in Arabidopsis. We found that SYP123, but not SYP132, localizes in the tip region of root hairs by recycling between the brefeldin A (BFA)-sensitive endosomes and the PM of the expanding tip in an F-actin-dependent manner. The vesicle-associated membrane proteins VAMP721/722/724 also exhibited tip-focused localization in root hairs and formed ternary SNARE complexes with both SYP123 and SYP132. These results demonstrate that SYP123 and SYP132 act in a coordinated fashion to mediate tip-focused membrane trafficking for root hair tip growth.

  18. Clathrin-Mediated Auxin Efflux and Maxima Regulate Hypocotyl Hook Formation and Light-Stimulated Hook Opening in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinqin; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Juan; Yan, Xu; Wang, Chao; Xu, Jian; Pan, Jianwei

    2016-01-04

    The establishment of auxin maxima by PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3)- and AUXIN RESISTANT 1/LIKE AUX1 (LAX) 3 (AUX1/LAX3)-mediated auxin transport is essential for hook formation in Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Until now, however, the underlying regulatory mechanism has remained poorly understood. Here, we show that loss of function of clathrin light chain CLC2 and CLC3 genes enhanced auxin maxima and thereby hook curvature, alleviated the inhibitory effect of auxin overproduction on auxin maxima and hook curvature, and delayed blue light-stimulated auxin maxima reduction and hook opening. Moreover, pharmacological experiments revealed that auxin maxima formation and hook curvature in clc2 clc3 were sensitive to auxin efflux inhibitors 1-naphthylphthalamic acid and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid but not to the auxin influx inhibitor 1-naphthoxyacetic acid. Live-cell imaging analysis further uncovered that loss of CLC2 and CLC3 function impaired PIN3 endocytosis and promoted its lateralization in the cortical cells but did not affect AUX1 localization. Taken together, these results suggest that clathrin regulates auxin maxima and thereby hook formation through modulating PIN3 localization and auxin efflux, providing a novel mechanism that integrates developmental signals and environmental cues to regulate plant skotomorphogenesis and photomorphogenesis.

  19. An interaction between BZR1 and DELLAs mediates direct signaling crosstalk between brassinosteroids and gibberellins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian-Feng; Wang, Chunming; Jiang, Lei; Li, Shuo; Sun, Samuel S M; He, Jun-Xian

    2012-10-02

    Plant growth and development are coordinated by several groups of small-molecule hormones, including brassinosteroids (BRs) and gibberellins (GAs). Physiological and molecular studies have suggested the existence of crosstalk between BR and GA signaling. We report that BZR1, a key transcription factor activated by BR signaling, interacts in vitro and in vivo with REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA), a member of the DELLA family of transcriptional regulators that inhibits the GA signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic analyses of plants with mutations in the genes encoding RGA and BZR1 revealed that RGA suppressed root and hypocotyl elongation of the gain-of-function mutant bzr1-1D. Ectopic expression of proteins of the DELLA family reduced the abundance and transcriptional activity of BZR1. Reporter gene analyses further indicated that BZR1 and RGA antagonize each other's transcriptional activity. Our data indicated that BZR1 and RGA served as positive and negative regulators, respectively, of both the BR and the GA signaling pathways and establish DELLAs as mediators of signaling crosstalk between BRs and GAs in controlling cell elongation and regulation of plant growth.

  20. Transient down-regulation of the RNA silencing machinery increases efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilichak, Andriy; Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2014-06-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen that is widely used in plant transformation. As the process of transgenesis includes the delivery of single-stranded T-DNA molecule, we hypothesized that transformation rate may negatively correlate with the efficiency of the RNA-silencing machinery. Using mutants compromised in either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional gene-silencing pathways, two inhibitors of stable transformation were revealed-AGO2 and NRPD1a. Furthermore, an immunoprecipitation experiment has shown that NRPD1, a subunit of Pol IV, directly interacts with Agrobacterium T-DNA in planta. Using the Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)--based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technique, we demonstrated that the transient down-regulation of the expression of either AGO2 or NRPD1a genes in reproductive organs of Arabidopsis, leads to an increase in transformation rate. We observed a 6.0- and 3.5-fold increase in transformation rate upon transient downregulation of either AGO2 or NRPD1a genes, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the increase in the plant transformation rate via VIGS-mediated transient down-regulation of the components of epigenetic machinery in reproductive tissue.

  1. Genome Wide Transcriptome Analysis reveals ABA mediated response in Arabidopsis during Gold (AuCl4- treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh eShukla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The unique physico-chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs find manifold applications in diagnostics, medicine and catalysis. Chemical synthesis produces reactive AuNPs and generates hazardous by-products. Alternatively, plants can be utilized to produce AuNPs in an eco-friendly manner. To better control the biosynthesis of AuNPs, we need to first understand the detailed molecular response induced by AuCl4- In this study, we carried out global transcriptome analysis in root tissue of Arabidopsis grown for 12- hours in presence of gold solution (HAuCl4 using the novel unbiased Affymetrix exon array. Transcriptomics analysis revealed differential regulation of a total of 704 genes and 4900 exons. Of these, 492 and 212 genes were up- and downregulated, respectively. The validation of the expressed key genes, such as glutathione-S-transferases, auxin responsive genes, cytochrome P450 82C2, methyl transferases, transducin (G protein beta subunit, ERF transcription factor, ABC, and MATE transporters, was carried out through quantitative RT-PCR. These key genes demonstrated specific induction under AuCl4- treatment relative to other heavy metals, suggesting a unique plant-gold interaction. GO enrichment analysis reveals the upregulation of processes like oxidative stress, glutathione binding, metal binding, transport, and plant hormonal responses. Changes predicted in biochemical pathways indicated major modulation in glutathione mediated detoxification, flavones and derivatives, and plant hormone biosynthesis. Motif search analysis identified a highly significant enriched motif, ACGT, which is an abscisic acid responsive core element (ABRE, suggesting the possibility of ABA- mediated signaling. Identification of abscisic acid response element (ABRE points to the operation of a predominant signaling mechanism in response to AuCl4- exposure. Overall, this study presents a useful picture of plant-gold interaction with an identification of

  2. Anaerobiosis induced state transition: a non photochemical reduction of PQ pool mediated by NDH in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedhar Nellaepalli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non photochemical reduction of PQ pool and mobilization of LHCII between PSII and PSI are found to be linked under abiotic stress conditions. The interaction of non photochemical reduction of PQ pool and state transitions associated physiological changes are critically important under anaerobic condition in higher plants. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: The present study focused on the effect of anaerobiosis on non-photochemical reduction of PQ pool which trigger state II transition in Arabidopsis thaliana. Upon exposure to dark-anaerobic condition the shape of the OJIP transient rise is completely altered where as in aerobic treated leaves the rise is unaltered. Rise in F(o and F(J was due to the loss of oxidized PQ pool as the PQ pool becomes more reduced. The increase in F(o' was due to the non photochemical reduction of PQ pool which activated STN7 kinase and induced LHCII phosphorylation under anaerobic condition. Further, it was observed that the phosphorylated LHCII is migrated and associated with PSI supercomplex increasing its absorption cross-section. Furthermore, evidences from crr2-2 (NDH mutant and pgr5 mutants (deficient in non NDH pathway of cyclic electron transport have indicated that NDH is responsible for non photochemical reduction of the PQ pool. We propose that dark anaerobic condition accelerates production of reducing equivalents (such as NADPH by various metabolic pathways which reduce PQ pool and is mediated by NDH leading to state II transition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Anaerobic condition triggers non photochemical reduction of PQ pool mediated by NDH complex. The reduced PQ pool activates STN7 kinase leading to state II transition in A. thaliana.

  3. Arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis is mediated by two ABCC-type phytochelatin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Yong; Park, Jiyoung; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Suter-Grotemeyer, Marianne; Shim, Donghwan; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Geisler, Markus; Weder, Barbara; Rea, Philip A; Rentsch, Doris; Schroeder, Julian I; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2010-12-01

    Arsenic is an extremely toxic metalloid causing serious health problems. In Southeast Asia, aquifers providing drinking and agricultural water for tens of millions of people are contaminated with arsenic. To reduce nutritional arsenic intake through the consumption of contaminated plants, identification of the mechanisms for arsenic accumulation and detoxification in plants is a prerequisite. Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that chelate heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic, thereby functioning as the first step in their detoxification. Plant vacuoles act as final detoxification stores for heavy metals and arsenic. The essential PC-metal(loid) transporters that sequester toxic metal(loid)s in plant vacuoles have long been sought but remain unidentified in plants. Here we show that in the absence of two ABCC-type transporters, AtABCC1 and AtABCC2, Arabidopsis thaliana is extremely sensitive to arsenic and arsenic-based herbicides. Heterologous expression of these ABCC transporters in phytochelatin-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhanced arsenic tolerance and accumulation. Furthermore, membrane vesicles isolated from these yeasts exhibited a pronounced arsenite [As(III)]-PC(2) transport activity. Vacuoles isolated from atabcc1 atabcc2 double knockout plants exhibited a very low residual As(III)-PC(2) transport activity, and interestingly, less PC was produced in mutant plants when exposed to arsenic. Overexpression of AtPCS1 and AtABCC1 resulted in plants exhibiting increased arsenic tolerance. Our findings demonstrate that AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 are the long-sought and major vacuolar PC transporters. Modulation of vacuolar PC transporters in other plants may allow engineering of plants suited either for phytoremediation or reduced accumulation of arsenic in edible organs.

  4. Modification of seed oil composition in Arabidopsis by artificial microRNA-mediated gene silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas eBelide

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Various post transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS strategies have been developed and exploited to study gene function or engineer disease resistance. The recently-developed artificial microRNA (amiRNA strategy is an alternative method of effectively silencing target genes. The ∆12-desaturase (FAD2, Fatty acid elongase (FAE1 and Fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase B (FATB were targeted with amiR159b-based constructs in Arabidopsis thaliana to evaluate changes in oil composition when expressed with the seed-specific Brassica napus truncated napin (FP1 promoter. Fatty acid profiles from transgenic homozygous seeds reveal that the targeted genes were silenced. The down-regulation of the AtFAD-2 gene substantially increased oleic acid from the normal levels of ~15% to as high as 63.3% and reduced total PUFA content (18:2∆9,12+18:3∆9,12,15 from 44.8% to 4.7%. ∆12-desaturase activity was reduced to levels as low as those in the null fad-2-1 and fad-2-2 mutants. Silencing of the FAE-1 gene resulted in the reduction of eicosenoic acid (20:1∆11 to 1.9+1.0% from 15% and silencing of FATB resulted in the reduction of palmitic acid (16:0 to 4.4+0.5% from 8.0%. Reduction in FATB activity is comparable with a FATB-knock out mutant. These results demonstrate for the first time amiR159b constructs targeted against three endogenous seed-expressed genes are clearly able to down regulate and generate genotypic changes that are inherited stably over three generations.

  5. A Golgi-localized MATE transporter mediates iron homoeostasis under osmotic stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Jungmin; Park, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Youn-Sung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2012-03-15

    Iron is an essential micronutrient that acts as a cofactor in a wide variety of pivotal metabolic processes, such as the electron transport chain of respiration, photosynthesis and redox reactions, in plants. However, its overload exceeding the cellular capacity of iron binding and storage is potentially toxic to plant cells by causing oxidative stress and cell death. Consequently, plants have developed versatile mechanisms to maintain iron homoeostasis. Organismal iron content is tightly regulated at the steps of uptake, translocation and compartmentalization. Whereas iron uptake is fairly well understood at the cellular and organismal levels, intracellular and intercellular transport is only poorly understood. In the present study, we show that a MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, designated BCD1 (BUSH-AND-CHLOROTIC-DWARF 1), contributes to iron homoeostasis during stress responses and senescence in Arabidopsis. The BCD1 gene is induced by excessive iron, but repressed by iron deficiency. It is also induced by cellular and tissue damage occurring under osmotic stress. The activation-tagged mutant bcd1-1D exhibits leaf chlorosis, a typical symptom of iron deficiency. The chlorotic lesion of the mutant was partially recovered by iron feeding. Whereas the bcd1-1D mutant accumulated a lower amount of iron, the iron level was elevated in the knockout mutant bcd1-1. The BCD1 protein is localized to the Golgi complex. We propose that the BCD1 transporter plays a role in sustaining iron homoeostasis by reallocating excess iron released from stress-induced cellular damage.

  6. Insights into the molecular mechanism of RGL2-mediated inhibition of seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamm Petra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed germination is of immense significance for agriculture and has been studied for centuries. Yet, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of dormancy and germination is still in its infancy. Gibberellins are the key phytohormones that promote germination, and the DELLA protein RGL2 is the main signalling intermediate involved in this response. Germination is completely inhibited if functional RGL2 is overexpressed and/or stabilized; however, the molecular mechanisms of RGL2 function are still largely unknown. We therefore attempted to shed light onto some of the genetic events downstream of RGL2. Results Gene ontology of the transcriptome differentially regulated by RGL2, as well as extensive cross-comparison with other available microarray data indicates that RGL2-mediated inhibition of germination causes seeds to enter a state of dormancy. RGL2 also appears to differentially regulate a number of transcription factors, many of which are known to be involved in light- or phytohormone-mediated aspects of germination. A promoter analysis of differentially expressed genes identified an enrichment of several motifs that can be bound by specific transcription factors, for example GAMYB, ARF1, or Dof-type zinc fingers. We show that Dof-binding motifs indeed play a role in RGL2-mediated transcription. Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP, we show that RGL2 directly downregulates at least one cell wall modifying enzyme, which is predicted to constrain cell growth thereby leading to inhibition of seed germination. Conclusions Our results reveal that RGL2 controls various aspects of germination. Through the repression of cell wall modifying enzymes, cell growth is directly constrained to inhibit germination. Furthermore, RGL2 likely interacts with various types of proteins to regulate transcription, and differentially regulates several transcription factors. Collectively, our data indicate that

  7. AtMIN7 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sheng Yang; Nomura, Kinya

    2011-07-26

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein AtMIN7 mediated protection is enhanced and/or there is a decrease in activity of an AtMIN7 associated virulence protein such as a Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1. Reagents of the present invention provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  8. Osmotic Stress Modulates the Balance between Exocytosis and Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiewka, Marta; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Robert, Stéphanie; Vanneste, Steffen; Friml, Jiří

    2015-08-01

    The sessile life style of plants creates the need to deal with an often adverse environment, in which water availability can change on a daily basis, challenging the cellular physiology and integrity. Changes in osmotic conditions disrupt the equilibrium of the plasma membrane: hypoosmotic conditions increase and hyperosmotic environment decrease the cell volume. Here, we show that short-term extracellular osmotic treatments are closely followed by a shift in the balance between endocytosis and exocytosis in root meristem cells. Acute hyperosmotic treatments (ionic and nonionic) enhance clathrin-mediated endocytosis simultaneously attenuating exocytosis, whereas hypoosmotic treatments have the opposite effects. In addition to clathrin recruitment to the plasma membrane, components of early endocytic trafficking are essential during hyperosmotic stress responses. Consequently, growth of seedlings defective in elements of clathrin or early endocytic machinery is more sensitive to hyperosmotic treatments. We also found that the endocytotic response to a change of osmotic status in the environment is dominant over the presumably evolutionary more recent regulatory effect of plant hormones, such as auxin. These results imply that osmotic perturbation influences the balance between endocytosis and exocytosis acting through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We propose that tension on the plasma membrane determines the addition or removal of membranes at the cell surface, thus preserving cell integrity.

  9. The role of EDS1 (enhanced disease susceptibility) during singlet oxygen-mediated stress responses of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsenbein, Christian; Przybyla, Dominika; Danon, Antoine; Landgraf, Frank; Göbel, Cornelia; Imboden, André; Feussner, Ivo; Apel, Klaus

    2006-08-01

    Upon a dark/light shift the conditional flu mutant of Arabidopsis starts to generate singlet oxygen (1O2) that is restricted to the plastid compartment. Distinct sets of genes are activated that are different from those induced by hydrogen peroxide/superoxide. One of the genes that is rapidly upregulated is EDS1 (enhanced disease susceptibility). The EDS1 protein has been shown to be required for the resistance to biotrophic pathogens and the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) that enhances the defenses of a plant by inducing the synthesis of pathogen-related (PR) proteins. Because of the similarity of its N-terminal portion to the catalytic site of lipases, EDS1 has also been implicated with the release of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the subsequent formation of various oxylipins. The release of singlet oxygen in the flu mutant triggers a drastic increase in the concentration of free SA and activates the expression of PR1 and PR5 genes. These changes depend on the activity of EDS1 and are suppressed in flu/eds1 double mutants. Soon after the beginning of singlet oxygen production, the synthesis of oxylipins such as jasmonic acid (JA) and 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) also start and plants stop growing and induce a cell-death response. The inactivation of EDS1 does not affect oxylipin synthesis, growth inhibition and the initiation of cell death, but it does allow plants to recover much faster from singlet oxygen-mediated growth inhibition and it also suppresses the spread of necrotic lesions in leaves. Hence, singlet oxygen activates a complex stress-response program with EDS1 playing a key role in initiating and modulating several steps of it. This program includes not only responses to oxidative stress, but also responses known to be activated during plant-pathogen interactions and wounding.

  10. KAI2-and MAX2-Mediated Responses to Karrikins and Strigolactones Are Largely Independent of HY5 in Arabidopsis Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark T. Waters; Steven M. Smith

    2013-01-01

    Karrikins are butenolide compounds released from burning vegetation that stimulate seed germination and enhance seedling photomorphogenesis.Strigolactones are structurally similar plant hormones that regulate shoot and root development,and promote the germination of parasitic weed seeds.In Arabidopsis,the F-box protein MAX2 is required for responses to karrikins and strigolactones,and the α/β hydrolase KAI2 is necessary for responses to karrikins.Both MAX2 and KAI2 are essential for normal light-dependent seedling development.The bZlP transcription factor HY5 acts downstream of multiple photoreceptors and promotes photomorphogenesis,but its relationship with MAX2 and KAI2 in terms of seedling development and responses to karrikins and strigolactones is poorly defined.Here,we demonstrate that HY5 action is genetically separable from that of MAX2 and KAI2.While hy5 mutants have weak hypocotyl elongation responses to karrikins and the artificial strigolactone GR24,they have normal transcriptional responses,suggesting that HY5 is not involved in perception or action of karrikins or strigolactones.Furthermore,we show that overexpression of KAI2 is sufficient to enhance responses to both karrikins and GR24 in wild-type seedlings,and that KAI2 overexpression partially suppresses the hy5 long hypocotyl phenotype.These results suggest that KAI2 and MAX2 define a regulatory pathway that largely operates independently of HY5 to mediate seedling responses to abiotic signals such as smoke and light.

  11. Multi-omics analysis identifies genes mediating the extension of cell walls in the Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Wilson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell wall composition is important for regulating growth rates, especially in roots. However, neither analyses of cell wall composition nor transcriptomes on their own can comprehensively reveal which genes and processes are mediating growth and cell elongation rates. This study reveals the benefits of carrying out multiple analyses in combination. Sections of roots from five anatomically and functionally defined zones in Arabidopsis thaliana were prepared and divided into three biological replicates. We used glycan microarrays and antibodies to identify the major classes of glycans and glycoproteins present in the cell walls of these sections, and identified the expected decrease in pectin and increase in xylan from the meristematic zone (MS, through the rapid and late elongation zones (REZ, LEZ to the maturation zone and the rest of the root, including the emerging lateral roots. Other compositional changes included extensin and xyloglucan levels peaking in the REZ and increasing levels of arabinogalactan-proteins (AGP epitopes from the MS to the LEZ, which remained high through the subsequent mature zones. Immuno-staining using the same antibodies identified the tissue and (subcellular localization of many epitopes. Extensins were localized in epidermal and cortex cell walls, while AGP glycans were specific to different tissues from root-hair cells to the stele. The transcriptome analysis found several gene families peaking in the REZ. These included a large family of peroxidases (which produce the reactive oxygen species needed for cell expansion, and three xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase/hydrolase genes (XTH17, XTH18 and XTH19. The significance of the latter may be related to a role in breaking and re-joining xyloglucan cross-bridges between cellulose microfibrils, a process which is required for wall expansion. Knockdowns of these XTHs resulted in shorter root lengths, confirming a role of the corresponding proteins in root

  12. Dissection of the complex phenotype in cuticular mutants of Arabidopsis reveals a role of SERRATE as a mediator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derry Voisin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LACERATA (LCR, FIDDLEHEAD (FDH, and BODYGUARD (BDG cause a complex developmental syndrome that is consistent with an important role for these Arabidopsis genes in cuticle biogenesis. The genesis of their pleiotropic phenotypes is, however, poorly understood. We provide evidence that neither distorted depositions of cutin, nor deficiencies in the chemical composition of cuticular lipids, account for these features, instead suggesting that the mutants alleviate the functional disorder of the cuticle by reinforcing their defenses. To better understand how plants adapt to these mutations, we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis. We found that apparent compensatory transcriptional responses in these mutants involve the induction of wax, cutin, cell wall, and defense genes. To gain greater insight into the mechanism by which cuticular mutations trigger this response in the plants, we performed an overlap meta-analysis, which is termed MASTA (MicroArray overlap Search Tool and Analysis, of differentially expressed genes. This suggested that different cell integrity pathways are recruited in cesA cellulose synthase and cuticular mutants. Using MASTA for an in silico suppressor/enhancer screen, we identified SERRATE (SE, which encodes a protein of RNA-processing multi-protein complexes, as a likely enhancer. In confirmation of this notion, the se lcr and se bdg double mutants eradicate severe leaf deformations as well as the organ fusions that are typical of lcr and bdg and other cuticular mutants. Also, lcr does not confer resistance to Botrytis cinerea in a se mutant background. We propose that there is a role for SERRATE-mediated RNA signaling in the cuticle integrity pathway.

  13. The Arabidopsis ISR1 locus controlling rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance is involved in ethylene signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ton, J.; Davison, S; Wees, A.C.M. van; Loon, L. C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the rhizobacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r triggers an induced systemic resistance (ISR) response that is effective against different types of pathogens. The ISR signaling pathway functions independent of salicylic acid, but requires responsiveness to jasmonate (JA) and ethylene. Using the genetic variability of ISR inducibility between Arabidopsis accessions, we recently identified a locus (ISR1) on chromosome III that is involved in ISR signaling. Accessions R...

  14. Mutations in the GW-repeat protein SUO reveal a developmental function for microRNA-mediated translational repression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wu, Gang; Poethig, R Scott

    2012-01-03

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) typically mediate RNA cleavage, but examples of miRNA-mediated translational repression have also been reported. However, the functional significance of this latter process is unknown. We identified SUO in a screen for Arabidopsis mutations that increase the accumulation of the miR156-regulated gene SPL3. suo has a loss-of-function phenotype characteristic of plants with reduced Argonaute (AGO)1 activity. An analysis of RNA and protein levels in suo mutants demonstrated that this phenotype is a consequence of a defect in miRNA-mediated translational repression; the effect of suo on vegetative phase change is attributable to a reduction in miR156/miR157 activity. SUO encodes a large protein with N-terminal bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) and transcription elongation factor S-II (TFS2N) domains and two C-terminal GW (glycine and tryptophan) repeats. SUO is present in the nucleus, and colocalizes with the processing-body component DCP1 in the cytoplasm. Our results reveal that SOU is a component of the miRNA pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that translational repression is a functionally important aspect of miRNA activity in plants.

  15. Function of type-2 Arabidopsis hemoglobin in the auxin-mediated formation of embryogenic cells during morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhiti, Mohamed; Hebelstrup, Kim; Wang, Aiming;

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of the Arabidopsis GLB2, a type-2 nonsymbiotic hemoglobin, enhances somatic embryogenesis by increasing auxin production. In the glb2 knock-out line (GLB2 -/-) polarization of PIN1 proteins and auxin maxima occurred at the base of the cotyledons of the zygotic explants, which are the ...

  16. Silicon-mediated resistance of Arabidopsis against powdery mildew involves mechanisms other than the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defence pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Julien; Labbé, Caroline; Menzies, James G; Bélanger, Richard R

    2015-08-01

    On absorption by plants, silicon (Si) offers protection against many fungal pathogens, including powdery mildews. The mechanisms by which Si exerts its prophylactic role remain enigmatic, although a prevailing hypothesis suggests that Si positively influences priming. Attempts to decipher Si properties have been limited to plants able to absorb Si, which excludes the model plant Arabidopsis because it lacks Si influx transporters. In this work, we were able to engineer Arabidopsis plants with an Si transporter from wheat (TaLsi1) and to exploit mutants (pad4 and sid2) deficient in salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defence responses to study their phenotypic response and changes in defence expression against Golovinomyces cichoracearum (Gc) following Si treatment. Our results showed that TaLsi1 plants contained significantly more Si and were significantly more resistant to Gc infection than control plants when treated with Si, the first such demonstration in a plant transformed with a heterologous Si transporter. The resistant plants accumulated higher levels of SA and expressed higher levels of transcripts encoding defence genes, thus suggesting a role for Si in the process. However, TaLsi1 pad4 and TaLsi1 sid2 plants were also more resistant to Gc than were pad4 and sid2 plants following Si treatment. Analysis of the resistant phenotypes revealed a significantly reduced production of SA and expression of defence genes comparable with susceptible controls. These results indicate that Si contributes to Arabidopsis defence priming following pathogen infection, but highlight that Si will confer protection even when priming is altered. We conclude that Si-mediated protection involves mechanisms other than SA-dependent defence responses.

  17. BRAHMA ATPase of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex acts as a positive regulator of gibberellin-mediated responses in arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Archacki

    Full Text Available SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes perform a pivotal function in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in major SWI/SNF subunits display embryo-lethal or dwarf phenotypes, indicating their critical role in molecular pathways controlling development and growth. As gibberellins (GA are major positive regulators of plant growth, we wanted to establish whether there is a link between SWI/SNF and GA signaling in Arabidopsis. This study revealed that in brm-1 plants, depleted in SWI/SNF BRAHMA (BRM ATPase, a number of GA-related phenotypic traits are GA-sensitive and that the loss of BRM results in markedly decreased level of endogenous bioactive GA. Transcriptional profiling of brm-1 and the GA biosynthesis mutant ga1-3, as well as the ga1-3/brm-1 double mutant demonstrated that BRM affects the expression of a large set of GA-responsive genes including genes responsible for GA biosynthesis and signaling. Furthermore, we found that BRM acts as an activator and directly associates with promoters of GA3ox1, a GA biosynthetic gene, and SCL3, implicated in positive regulation of the GA pathway. Many GA-responsive gene expression alterations in the brm-1 mutant are likely due to depleted levels of active GAs. However, the analysis of genetic interactions between BRM and the DELLA GA pathway repressors, revealed that BRM also acts on GA-responsive genes independently of its effect on GA level. Given the central position occupied by SWI/SNF complexes within regulatory networks controlling fundamental biological processes, the identification of diverse functional intersections of BRM with GA-dependent processes in this study suggests a role for SWI/SNF in facilitating crosstalk between GA-mediated regulation and other cellular pathways.

  18. Arabidopsis COMPASS-like complexes mediate histone H3 lysine-4 trimethylation to control floral transition and plant development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danhua Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4 methylation is associated with transcribed genes in eukaryotes. In Drosophila and mammals, both di- and tri-methylation of H3K4 are associated with gene activation. In contrast to animals, in Arabidopsis H3K4 trimethylation, but not mono- or di-methylation of H3K4, has been implicated in transcriptional activation. H3K4 methylation is catalyzed by the H3K4 methyltransferase complexes known as COMPASS or COMPASS-like in yeast and mammals. Here, we report that Arabidopsis homologs of the COMPASS and COMPASS-like complex core components known as Ash2, RbBP5, and WDR5 in humans form a nuclear subcomplex during vegetative and reproductive development, which can associate with multiple putative H3K4 methyltransferases. Loss of function of ARABIDOPSIS Ash2 RELATIVE (ASH2R causes a great decrease in genome-wide H3K4 trimethylation, but not in di- or mono-methylation. Knockdown of ASH2R or the RbBP5 homolog suppresses the expression of a crucial Arabidopsis floral repressor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, and FLC homologs resulting in accelerated floral transition. ASH2R binds to the chromatin of FLC and FLC homologs in vivo and is required for H3K4 trimethylation, but not for H3K4 dimethylation in these loci; overexpression of ASH2R causes elevated H3K4 trimethylation, but not H3K4 dimethylation, in its target genes FLC and FLC homologs, resulting in activation of these gene expression and consequent late flowering. These results strongly suggest that H3K4 trimethylation in FLC and its homologs can activate their expression, providing concrete evidence that H3K4 trimethylation accumulation can activate eukaryotic gene expression. Furthermore, our findings suggest that there are multiple COMPASS-like complexes in Arabidopsis and that these complexes deposit trimethyl but not di- or mono-methyl H3K4 in target genes to promote their expression, providing a molecular explanation for the observed coupling of H3K4 trimethylation (but not H3

  19. Complex regulation of Arabidopsis AGR1/PIN2-mediated root gravitropic response and basipetal auxin transport by cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Heungsop; Shin, Hwa-Soo; Guo, Zibiao; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Masson, Patrick H.; Chen, Rujin

    2005-01-01

    Polar auxin transport, mediated by two distinct plasma membrane-localized auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins/complexes, plays an important role in many plant growth and developmental processes including tropic responses to gravity and light, development of lateral roots and patterning in embryogenesis. We have previously shown that the Arabidopsis AGRAVITROPIC 1/PIN2 gene encodes an auxin efflux component regulating root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying the function of AGR1/PIN2 is largely unknown. Recently, protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases, respectively, have been implicated in regulating polar auxin transport and root gravitropism. Here, we examined the effects of chemical inhibitors of protein phosphatases on root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport, as well as the expression pattern of AGR1/PIN2 gene and the localization of AGR1/PIN2 protein. We also examined the effects of inhibitors of vesicle trafficking and protein kinases. Our data suggest that protein phosphatases, sensitive to cantharidin and okadaic acid, are likely involved in regulating AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and gravitropism, as well as auxin response in the root central elongation zone (CEZ). BFA-sensitive vesicle trafficking may be required for the cycling of AGR1/PIN2 between plasma membrane and the BFA compartment, but not for the AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and auxin response in CEZ cells.

  20. Nonsense-Mediated Decay of Alternative Precursor mRNA Splicing Variants Is a Major Determinant of the Arabidopsis Steady State Transcriptome[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsel, Gabriele; Kahles, André; Kesarwani, Anil K.; Stauffer, Eva; Behr, Jonas; Drewe, Philipp; Rätsch, Gunnar; Wachter, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) surveillance pathway can recognize erroneous transcripts and physiological mRNAs, such as precursor mRNA alternative splicing (AS) variants. Currently, information on the global extent of coupled AS and NMD remains scarce and even absent for any plant species. To address this, we conducted transcriptome-wide splicing studies using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in the NMD factor homologs UP FRAMESHIFT1 (UPF1) and UPF3 as well as wild-type samples treated with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide. Our analyses revealed that at least 17.4% of all multi-exon, protein-coding genes produce splicing variants that are targeted by NMD. Moreover, we provide evidence that UPF1 and UPF3 act in a translation-independent mRNA decay pathway. Importantly, 92.3% of the NMD-responsive mRNAs exhibit classical NMD-eliciting features, supporting their authenticity as direct targets. Genes generating NMD-sensitive AS variants function in diverse biological processes, including signaling and protein modification, for which NaCl stress–modulated AS-NMD was found. Besides mRNAs, numerous noncoding RNAs and transcripts derived from intergenic regions were shown to be NMD responsive. In summary, we provide evidence for a major function of AS-coupled NMD in shaping the Arabidopsis transcriptome, having fundamental implications in gene regulation and quality control of transcript processing. PMID:24163313

  1. The Arabidopsis Mediator CDK8 module genes CCT (MED12) and GCT (MED13) are global regulators of developmental phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmor, C Stewart; Silva-Ortega, Claudia O; Willmann, Matthew R; Buendía-Monreal, Manuel; Poethig, R Scott

    2014-12-01

    Temporal coordination of developmental programs is necessary for normal ontogeny, but the mechanism by which this is accomplished is still poorly understood. We have previously shown that two components of the Mediator CDK8 module encoded by CENTER CITY (CCT; Arabidopsis MED12) and GRAND CENTRAL (GCT; Arabidopsis MED13) are required for timing of pattern formation during embryogenesis. A morphological, molecular and genomic analysis of the post-embryonic phenotype of gct and cct mutants demonstrated that these genes also promote at least three subsequent developmental transitions: germination, vegetative phase change, and flowering. Genetic and molecular analyses indicate that GCT and CCT operate in parallel to gibberellic acid, a phytohormone known to regulate these same three transitions. We demonstrate that the delay in vegetative phase change in gct and cct is largely due to overexpression of miR156, and that the delay in flowering is due in part to upregulation of FLC. Thus, GCT and CCT coordinate vegetative and floral transitions by repressing the repressors miR156 and FLC. Our results suggest that MED12 and MED13 act as global regulators of developmental timing by fine-tuning the expression of temporal regulatory genes.

  2. Multi-omics analysis identifies genes mediating the extension of cell walls in the Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Michael H; Holman, Tara J; Sørensen, Iben;

    2015-01-01

    Plant cell wall composition is important for regulating growth rates, especially in roots. However, neither analyses of cell wall composition nor transcriptomes on their own can comprehensively reveal which genes and processes are mediating growth and cell elongation rates. This study reveals...... the benefits of carrying out multiple analyses in combination. Sections of roots from five anatomically and functionally defined zones in Arabidopsis thaliana were prepared and divided into three biological replicates. We used glycan microarrays and antibodies to identify the major classes of glycans...... and glycoproteins present in the cell walls of these sections, and identified the expected decrease in pectin and increase in xylan from the meristematic zone (MS), through the rapid and late elongation zones (REZ, LEZ) to the maturation zone and the rest of the root, including the emerging lateral roots. Other...

  3. Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura 78 (AtATL78) mediates ABA-dependent ROS signaling in response to drought stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suh, Ji Yeon; Kim, Soo Jin; Oh, Tae Rin

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed a variety of complicated responses to cope with drought, one of the most challenging environmental stresses. As a quick response, plants rapidly inhibit stomatal opening under the control of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway, in order to preserve water. Here, we report...... that Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase, mediates the ABA-dependent stomatal closure. In contrast to wild-type plants, the stomatal closure was fully impaired in atatl78 mutant plants even in the presence of exogenous ABA and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Besides, under high...... concentrations of Ca(2+), a down-stream signaling molecule of ABA signaling pathway, atatl78 mutant plants successfully closed the pores. Furthermore, AtATL78 protein indirectly associated with catalases and the deficiency of AtATL78 led the reduction of catalase activity and H2O2, implying the function of At...

  4. Suppression of edr2-mediated powdery mildew resistance, cell death and ethylene-induced senescence by mutations in ALD1 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haozhen Nie; Yingying Wu; Chunpeng Yao; Dingzhong Tang

    2011-01-01

    EDR2 is a negative regulator of the defense response and cell death in Arabidopsis. Loss-of-function of EDR2 leads to enhanced resistance to powdery mildew. To identify new components in the EDR2 signal transduction pathway, mutations that suppress edr2 resistant phenotypes were screened. Three mutants, edts5-1, edts5-2 and edts5-3 (edr (t)wo (s)uppressor 5), were identified. The EDTS5 gene was identified by map-based cloning and previously was shown to encode an aminotransferase (ALD1). Therefore we renamed these three alleles ald1-10, ald1-11 and ald1-12, respectively. Mutations in ALD1 suppressed all edr2-mediated phenotypes, including powdery mildew resistance, programmed cell death and ethylene-induced senescence. Accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in edr2 was also suppressed by ald1 mutation. The expression of defense-related genes was up-regulated in the edr2 mutant, and the up-regulation of those genes in edr2 was suppressed in the edr2/ald1 double mutant. The ald1 single mutant displayed delayed ethylene-induced senescence. In addition, ald1 mutation suppressed edr1-mediated powdery mildew resistance, but could not suppress the edr1/edr2 double-mutant phenotype. These data demonstrate that ALD1 plays important roles in edr2-mediated defense responses and senescence, and revealed a crosstalk between ethylene and salicylic acid signaling mediated by ALD1 and EDR2.

  5. Role of Arabidopsis RAP2.4 in Regulating Light-and Ethylene-Mediated Developmental Processes and Drought Stress Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Cheng Lin; Hee-Jin Park; Hai-Yang Wang

    2008-01-01

    Light and the plant hormone ethylene regulate many aspects of plant growth and development in an overlapping and interdependent fashion. Little is known regarding how their signal transduction pathways cross-talk to regulate plant development in a coordinated manner. Here, we report functional characterization of an AP2/DREB-type transcription factor, Arabidopsis RAP2.4, in mediating light and ethylene signaling. Expression of the RAP2.4 gene is down-regulated by light but up-regulated by salt and drought stresses. RAP2.4 protein is constitutively targeted to the nucleus and it can bind to both the ethylene-responsive GCC-box and the dehydration-responsive element (DRE).We show that RAP2.4 protein possesses an intrinsic transcriptional activation activity in yeast cells and that it can activate a reporter gene driven by the DRE cis-element in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Overexpression of RAP2.4 or mutation in RAP2.4 cause altered expression of representative light-, ethylene-, and drought-responsive genes. Although no salient phenotype was observed with a rap2.4 loss-of-function mutant, constitutive overexpression of RAP2.4 results in defects in multiple developmental processes regulated by light and ethylene, including hypocotyl elongation and gravitropism, apical hook formation and cotyledon expansion, flowering time, root elongation, root hair formation, and drought tolerance.Based on these observations, we propose that RAP2.4 acts at or downstream of a converging point of light and ethylene signaling pathways to coordinately regulate multiple developmental processes and stress responses.

  6. Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura 78 (AtATL78) mediates ABA-dependent ROS signaling in response to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Ji Yeon; Kim, Soo Jin; Oh, Tae Rin; Cho, Seok Keun; Yang, Seong Wook; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed a variety of complicated responses to cope with drought, one of the most challenging environmental stresses. As a quick response, plants rapidly inhibit stomatal opening under the control of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway, in order to preserve water. Here, we report that Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase, mediates the ABA-dependent stomatal closure. In contrast to wild-type plants, the stomatal closure was fully impaired in atatl78 mutant plants even in the presence of exogenous ABA and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Besides, under high concentrations of Ca(2+), a down-stream signaling molecule of ABA signaling pathway, atatl78 mutant plants successfully closed the pores. Furthermore, AtATL78 protein indirectly associated with catalases and the deficiency of AtATL78 led the reduction of catalase activity and H2O2, implying the function of AtATL78 in the modulation of ROS activity. Based on these results, we suggest that AtATL78 possibly plays a role in promoting ROS-mediated ABA signaling pathway during drought stress.

  7. Possible Involvement of MYB44-Mediated Stomatal Regulation in Systemic Resistance Induced by Penicillium simplicissimum GP17-2 in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieno, Ayaka; Naznin, Hushna Ara; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro; Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Matsui, Minami; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y.

    2016-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting fungus (PGPF), Penicillium simplicissimum GP17-2 (GP17-2), induces systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular mechanisms underlying induced systemic resistance (ISR) by GP17-2 were investigated in the present study. Microscopic observations revealed that stomatal reopening by Pst was restricted by elicitation with the culture filtrate (CF) from GP17-2. A gene expression analysis of MYB44, which enhances abscisic acid signaling and consequently closes stomata, revealed that the gene was activated by CF. CF-elicited myb44 mutant plants failed to restrict stomatal reopening and showed lower resistance to Pst than wild-type plants. These results indicate that stomatal resistance by GP17-2 is mediated by the gene activation of MYB44. We herein revealed that the MYB44-mediated prevention of penetration through the stomata is one of the components responsible for GP17-2-elicited ISR. PMID:27301421

  8. Stress responsive gene CIPK14 is involved in phytochrome A-mediated far-red light inhibition of greening in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we show that CIPK14,a stress responsive CBL-interacting protein kinase gene,is involved in phytochrome A-mediated far-red light inhibition of greening in Arabidopsis seedlings. The CIPK14-impairment mutant cipk14 grown in continuous far-red (FR) light did not show greening when exposed to white light illumination for 15 h. By contrast, the FR-grown phytochrome A null mutant phyA greened within 0.5 h of exposure to white light. Although greening of Col-4 (wild-type) was not completely abolished by FR, it exhibited a significantly decreased greening capacity compared with that of phyA. Further analyses demonstrated that the expression of protochlorophyllide reductase (POR) genes was correlated with the greening ability of the genotypes. In addition, CIPK14 appeared to be regulated by both the circadian clock and PhyA. Taken together, these results suggest that CIPK14 plays a role in PhyA-mediated FR inhibition of seedling greening, and that a Ca-related kinase may be involved in a previously undefined branch point in the phytochrome A signaling pathway.

  9. Possible Involvement of MYB44-Mediated Stomatal Regulation in Systemic Resistance Induced by Penicillium simplicissimum GP17-2 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieno, Ayaka; Naznin, Hushna Ara; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro; Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Matsui, Minami; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y

    2016-06-25

    The plant growth-promoting fungus (PGPF), Penicillium simplicissimum GP17-2 (GP17-2), induces systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular mechanisms underlying induced systemic resistance (ISR) by GP17-2 were investigated in the present study. Microscopic observations revealed that stomatal reopening by Pst was restricted by elicitation with the culture filtrate (CF) from GP17-2. A gene expression analysis of MYB44, which enhances abscisic acid signaling and consequently closes stomata, revealed that the gene was activated by CF. CF-elicited myb44 mutant plants failed to restrict stomatal reopening and showed lower resistance to Pst than wild-type plants. These results indicate that stomatal resistance by GP17-2 is mediated by the gene activation of MYB44. We herein revealed that the MYB44-mediated prevention of penetration through the stomata is one of the components responsible for GP17-2-elicited ISR.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5)-mediated signalling cascade regulates expression of iron superoxide dismutase gene in Arabidopsis under salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yu; Chen, Wei-hua; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are involved in plant adaptive responses to biotic and abiotic stresses but the upstream signalling process that modulates their expression is not clear. Expression of two iron SODs, FSD2 and FSD3, was significantly increased in Arabidopsis in response to NaCl treatment but blocked in transgenic MKK5-RNAi plant, mkk5. Using an assay system for transient expression in protoplasts, it was found that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5) was also activated in response to salt stress. Overexpression of MKK5 in wild-type plants enhanced their tolerance to salt treatments, while mkk5 mutant exhibited hypersensitivity to salt stress in germination on salt-containing media. Moreover, another kinase, MPK6, was also involved in the MKK5-mediated iron superoxide dismutase (FSD) signalling pathway in salt stress. The kinase activity of MPK6 was totally turned off in mkk5, whereas the activity of MPK3 was only partially blocked. MKK5 interacted with the MEKK1 protein that was also involved in the salt-induced FSD signalling pathway. These data suggest that salt-induced FSD2 and FSD3 expressions are influenced by MEKK1 via MKK5-MPK6-coupled signalling. This MAP kinase cascade (MEKK1, MKK5, and MPK6) mediates the salt-induced expression of iron superoxide dismutases.

  11. GBF1, a transcription factor of blue light signaling in Arabidopsis, is degraded in the dark by a proteasome-mediated pathway independent of COP1 and SPA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallappa, Chandrashekara; Singh, Aparna; Ram, Hathi; Chattopadhyay, Sudip

    2008-12-19

    Arabidopsis GBF1/ZBF2 is a bZIP transcription factor that plays dual but opposite regulatory roles in cryptochrome-mediated blue light signaling. Here, we show the genetic and molecular interrelation of GBF1 with two well characterized negative regulators of light signaling, COP1 and SPA1, in photomorphogenic growth and light-regulated gene expression. Our results further reveal that GBF1 protein is less abundant in the dark-grown seedlings and is degraded by a proteasome-mediated pathway independent of COP1 and SPA1. Furthermore, COP1 physically interacts with GBF1 and is required for the optimum accumulation of GBF1 protein in light-grown seedlings. Taken together, this study provides a mechanistic view of concerted function of three important regulators in Arabidopsis seedling development.

  12. Role of intron-mediated enhancement on accumulation of an Arabidopsis NB-LRR class R-protein that confers resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus.

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    Yukiyo Sato

    Full Text Available The accumulation of RCY1 protein, which is encoded by RESISTANCE TO CMV(Y (RCY1, a CC-NB-LRR class R-gene, is tightly correlated with the strength of the resistance to a yellow strain of Cucumber mosaic virus [CMV(Y] in Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to enhance resistance to CMV by overexpression of RCY1, A. thaliana was transformed with intron-less RCY1 cDNA construct under the control of strong CaMV35S promoter. Remarkably, a relative amount of RCY1 protein accumulation in the transformants was much lower than that in plants expressing genomic RCY1 under the control of its native promoter. To identify a regulatory element of RCY1 that could cause such differential levels of RCY1 accumulation, a series of RCY1 cDNA and genomic RCY1 constructs were transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves by the Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration method. Comparative analysis of the level of RCY1 accumulation in the leaf tissues transiently expressing each construct indicated that the intron located in the RCY1-coding region of genomic RCY1, but not the native RCY1 genomic promoter or the 5'-and 3'-untranslated regions of RCY1, was indispensable for high level RCY1 accumulation. The increased levels of RCY1 accelerated plant disease defense reactions. Interestingly, such intron-mediated enhancement of RCY1 accumulation depended neither on the abundance of the RCY1 transcript nor on the RCY1 specific-intron sequence. Taken together, intron-mediated RCY1 expression seems to play a key role in the expression of complete resistance to CMV(Y by maintaining RCY1 accumulation at high levels.

  13. Identification of genes involved in the ACC-mediated control of root cell elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markakis Marios

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along the root axis of Arabidopsis thaliana, cells pass through different developmental stages. In the apical meristem repeated cycles of division increase the numbers of cells. Upon leaving the meristem, these cells pass the transition zone where they are physiologically and mechanically prepared to undergo subsequent rapid elongation. During the process of elongation epidermal cells increase their length by 300% in a couple of hours. When elongation ceases, the cells acquire their final size, shape and functions (in the differentiation zone. Ethylene administered as its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC is capable of inhibiting elongation in a concentration-dependent way. Using a microarray analysis, genes and/or processes involved in this elongation arrest are identified. Results Using a CATMA-microarray analysis performed on control and 3h ACC-treated roots, 240 differentially expressed genes were identified. Quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR analysis of the 10 most up and down regulated genes combined with literature search confirmed the accurateness of the analysis. This revealed that inhibition of cell elongation is, at least partly, caused by restricting the events that under normal growth conditions initiate elongation and by increasing the processes that normally stop cellular elongation at the end of the elongation/onset of differentiation zone. Conclusions ACC interferes with cell elongation in the Arabidopsis thaliana roots by inhibiting cells from entering the elongation process and by immediately stimulating the formation of cross-links in cell wall components, diminishing the remaining elongation capacity. From the analysis of the differentially expressed genes, it becomes clear that many genes identified in this response, are also involved in several other kind of stress responses. This suggests that many responses originate from individual elicitors, but that somewhere in the downstream

  14. The Arabidopsis B-box protein BZS1/BBX20 interacts with HY5 and mediates strigolactone regulation of photomorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chuang-Qi; Chien, Chih-Wei; Ai, Lian-Feng; Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Li, Kathy H; Burlingame, Alma L; Sun, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-09-20

    Plant growth is controlled by integration of hormonal and light-signaling pathways. BZS1 is a B-box zinc finger protein previously characterized as a negative regulator in the brassinosteroid (BR)-signaling pathway and a positive regulator in the light-signaling pathway. However, the mechanisms by which BZS1/BBX20 integrates light and hormonal pathways are not fully understood. Here, using a quantitative proteomic workflow, we identified several BZS1-associated proteins, including light-signaling components COP1 and HY5. Direct interactions of BZS1 with COP1 and HY5 were verified by yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Overexpression of BZS1 causes a dwarf phenotype that is suppressed by the hy5 mutation, while overexpression of BZS1 fused with the SRDX transcription repressor domain (BZS1-SRDX) causes a long-hypocotyl phenotype similar to hy5, indicating that BZS1's function requires HY5. BZS1 positively regulates HY5 expression, whereas HY5 negatively regulates BZS1 protein level, forming a feedback loop that potentially contributes to signaling dynamics. In contrast to BR, strigolactone (SL) increases BZS1 level, whereas the SL responses of hypocotyl elongation, chlorophyll and HY5 accumulation are diminished in the BZS1-SRDX seedlings, indicating that BZS1 is involved in these SL responses. These results demonstrate that BZS1 interacts with HY5 and plays a central role in integrating light and multiple hormone signals for photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

  15. EDS1, an essential component of R gene-mediated disease resistance in Arabidopsis has homology to eukaryotic lipases.

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    Falk, A; Feys, B J; Frost, L N; Jones, J D; Daniels, M J; Parker, J E

    1999-03-16

    A major class of plant disease resistance (R) genes encodes leucine-rich-repeat proteins that possess a nucleotide binding site and amino-terminal similarity to the cytoplasmic domains of the Drosophila Toll and human IL-1 receptors. In Arabidopsis thaliana, EDS1 is indispensable for the function of these R genes. The EDS1 gene was cloned by targeted transposon tagging and found to encode a protein that has similarity in its amino-terminal portion to the catalytic site of eukaryotic lipases. Thus, hydrolase activity, possibly on a lipid-based substrate, is anticipated to be central to EDS1 function. The predicted EDS1 carboxyl terminus has no significant sequence homologies, although analysis of eight defective eds1 alleles reveals it to be essential for EDS1 function. Two plant defense pathways have been defined previously that depend on salicylic acid, a phenolic compound, or jasmonic acid, a lipid-derived molecule. We examined the expression of EDS1 mRNA and marker mRNAs (PR1 and PDF1.2, respectively) for these two pathways in wild-type and eds1 mutant plants after different challenges. The results suggest that EDS1 functions upstream of salicylic acid-dependent PR1 mRNA accumulation and is not required for jasmonic acid-induced PDF1.2 mRNA expression.

  16. Engineering of CRISPR/Cas9‐mediated potyvirus resistance in transgene‐free Arabidopsis plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyott, Douglas E.; Sheehan, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Summary Members of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) gene family, including eIF4E and its paralogue eIF(iso)4E, have previously been identified as recessive resistance alleles against various potyviruses in a range of different hosts. However, the identification and introgression of these alleles into important crop species is often limited. In this study, we utilise CRISPR/Cas9 technology to introduce sequence‐specific deleterious point mutations at the eIF(iso)4E locus in Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully engineer complete resistance to Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), a major pathogen in field‐grown vegetable crops. By segregating the induced mutation from the CRISPR/Cas9 transgene, we outline a framework for the production of heritable, homozygous mutations in the transgene‐free T2 generation in self‐pollinating species. Analysis of dry weights and flowering times for four independent T3 lines revealed no differences from wild‐type plants under standard growth conditions, suggesting that homozygous mutations in eIF(iso)4E do not affect plant vigour. Thus, the established CRISPR/Cas9 technology provides a new approach for the generation of Potyvirus resistance alleles in important crops without the use of persistent transgenes. PMID:27103354

  17. Whorl-specific expression of the SUPERMAN gene of Arabidopsis is mediated by cis elements in the transcribed region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshiro; Sakai, Hajime; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2003-09-02

    The SUPERMAN (SUP) gene of Arabidopsis is involved in controlling cell proliferation in stamen and carpel primordia and in ovules during flower development. The SUP gene encodes a transcription factor with a C2H2-type zinc finger motif, a serine/proline-rich domain, a basic domain, and a leucine-zipper-like domain and is expressed in a very limited region in stamen primordia and in the developing ovary during flower development. The SUP gene is susceptible to methylation, resulting in epigenetic gene silencing. To understand how the SUP gene is expressed spatially and temporally in its restricted domain, and why methylation of the transcribed region affects early-stage SUP expression, we have identified the SUP cis regulatory elements by characterizing SUP gene fusions. These studies show that the SUP gene has discrete upstream promoter elements required for expression in stamen primordia in early stages and in the ovary in later stages. The promoter activity for stamen primordia is modulated by several positive and negative elements located in the transcribed and translated regions. Several regulatory elements in the transcribed region correlate with the areas of the gene that are heavily methylated in epigenetic alleles; these data provide a possible explanation of how methylation of the transcribed region represses transcription.

  18. Sucrose Production Mediated by Lipid Metabolism Suppresses the Physical Interaction of Peroxisomes and Oil Bodies during Germination of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Songkui; Hayashi, Yasuko; Otomo, Masayoshi; Mano, Shoji; Oikawa, Kazusato; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-09-16

    Physical interaction between organelles is a flexible event and essential for cells to adapt rapidly to environmental stimuli. Germinating plants utilize oil bodies and peroxisomes to mobilize storage lipids for the generation of sucrose as the main energy source. Although membrane interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes has been widely observed, its underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we present genetic evidence for control of the physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes. We identified alleles of the sdp1 mutant altered in oil body morphology. This mutant accumulates bigger and more oil body aggregates compared with the wild type and showed defects in lipid mobilization during germination. SUGAR DEPENDENT 1 (SDP1) encodes major triacylglycerol lipase in Arabidopsis Interestingly, sdp1 seedlings show enhanced physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes compared with the wild type, whereas exogenous sucrose supplementation greatly suppresses the interaction. The same phenomenon occurs in the peroxisomal defective 1 (ped1) mutant, defective in lipid mobilization because of impaired peroxisomal β-oxidation, indicating that sucrose production is a key factor for oil body-peroxisomal dissociation. Peroxisomal dissociation and subsequent release from oil bodies is dependent on actin filaments. We also show that a peroxisomal ATP binding cassette transporter, PED3, is the potential anchor protein to the membranes of these organelles. Our results provide novel components linking lipid metabolism and oil body-peroxisome interaction whereby sucrose may act as a negative signal for the interaction of oil bodies and peroxisomes to fine-tune lipolysis.

  19. Effects of polyamines and calcium and sodium ions on smooth muscle cytoskeleton-associated phosphatidylinositol (4)-phosphate 5-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Baron, C B; Griffiths, T; Greeley, P; Coburn, R F

    1998-10-01

    In many different cell types, including smooth muscle cells (Baron et al., 1989, Am. J. Physiol., 256: C375-383; Baron et al., J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 266: 8-15), phosphatidylinositol (4)-phosphate 5-kinase plays a critical role in the regulation of membrane concentrations of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate and formation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate. In unstimulated porcine trachealis smooth muscle, 70% of total cellular phosphatidylinositol (4)-phosphate 5-kinase activity was associated with cytoskeletal proteins and only trace activity was detectable in isolated sarcolemma. Using two different preparations, we studied cytoskeleton-associated phosphatidyl inositol (4)-phosphate 5-kinase under conditions that attempted to mimic the ionic and thermal cytoplasmic environment of living cells. The cytoskeleton-associated enzyme, studied using phosphatidylinositol (4)-phosphate substrate concentrations that produced phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate at about 10% of the maximal rate, was sensitive to free [Mg2+], had an absolute requirement for phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, or phosphatidylinositol, and included type I isoforms. At 0.5 mM free [Mg2+], physiological spermine concentrations, 0.2-0.4 mM, increased phosphatidylinositol (4)-phosphate 5-kinase activity two to four times compared to controls run without spermine. The EC50 for spermine-evoked increases in activity was 0.17 +/- 0.02 mM. Spermine-evoked enzyme activity was a function of both free [Mg2+] and substrate concentration. Cytoskeleton-associated phosphatidylinositol (4)-phosphate 5-kinase was inhibited by free [Ca2+] over a physiological range for cytoplasm--10(-8) to 10(-5) M, an effect independent of the presence of calmodulin. Na+ over the range 20 to 50 mM also inhibited this enzyme activated by 5 mM Mg2+ but had no effect on spermine-activated enzyme. Na+, Ca2+, and spermine appear to be physiological modulators of smooth muscle cytoskeleton-bound phosphatidylinositol (4

  20. Glutathione plays an essential role in nitric oxide-mediated iron-deficiency signaling and iron-deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Varanavasiappan; Wang, Yi-Wen; Tsednee, Munkhtsetseg; Karunakaran, Krithika; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a common agricultural problem that affects both the productivity and nutritional quality of plants. Thus, identifying the key factors involved in the tolerance of Fe deficiency is important. In the present study, the zir1 mutant, which is glutathione deficient, was found to be more sensitive to Fe deficiency than the wild type, and grew poorly in alkaline soil. Other glutathione-deficient mutants also showed various degrees of sensitivity to Fe-limited conditions. Interestingly, we found that the glutathione level was increased under Fe deficiency in the wild type. By contrast, blocking glutathione biosynthesis led to increased physiological sensitivity to Fe deficiency. On the other hand, overexpressing glutathione enhanced the tolerance to Fe deficiency. Under Fe-limited conditions, glutathione-deficient mutants, zir1, pad2 and cad2 accumulated lower levels of Fe than the wild type. The key genes involved in Fe uptake, including IRT1, FRO2 and FIT, are expressed at low levels in zir1; however, a split-root experiment suggested that the systemic signals that govern the expression of Fe uptake-related genes are still active in zir1. Furthermore, we found that zir1 had a lower accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) and NO reservoir S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Although NO is a signaling molecule involved in the induction of Fe uptake-related genes during Fe deficiency, the NO-mediated induction of Fe-uptake genes is dependent on glutathione supply in the zir1 mutant. These results provide direct evidence that glutathione plays an essential role in Fe-deficiency tolerance and NO-mediated Fe-deficiency signaling in Arabidopsis.

  1. XBAT35, a Novel Arabidopsis RING E3 Ligase Exhibiting Dual Targeting of Its Splice Isoforms,Is Involved in Ethylene-Mediated Regulation of Apical Hook Curvature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sofia D.Carvalho; Rita Saraiva; Teresa M.Maia; Isabel A.Abreu; Paula Duque

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis XBAT35 is one of five structurally related ankyrin repeat-containing Really interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ligases involved in ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation,which plays key roles in a wide range of cellular processes.Here,we show that the XBAT35 gene undergoes alternative splicing,generating two transcripts that are constitutively expressed in all plant tissues.The two splice variants derive from an exon skipping event that excludes an in-frame segment from the XBAT35 precursor mRNA,giving rise to two protein isoforms that differ solely in the presence of a nuclear localization signal (NLS).Transient expression assays indicate that the isoform lacking the NLS localizes in the cytoplasm of plant cells,whereas the other is targeted to the nucleus,accumulating in nuclear speckles.Both isoforms are functional E3 ligases,as assessed by in vitro ubiquitination assays.Two insertion mutant alleles and RNA-interference (RNAi) silencing lines for XBAT35 display no evident phenotypes under normal growth conditions,but exhibit hypersensitivity to the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) during apical hook exaggeration in the dark,which is rescued by an inhibitor of ethylene perception.Independent expression of each XBAT35 splice variant in the mutant background indicates that the two isoforms may differentially contribute to apical hook formation but are both functional in this ethylene-mediated response.Thus,XBAT35 defines a novel player in ethylene signaling involved in negatively regulating apical hook curvature,with alternative splicing controlling dual targeting of this E3 ubiquitin ligase to the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments.

  2. CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 Are Two bHLH Transcription Factors Participating in Synergistic Regulation of AtCFL1-Mediated Cuticle Development in Arabidopsis.

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    Shibai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cuticle is a hydrophobic lipid layer covering the epidermal cells of terrestrial plants. Although many genes involved in Arabidopsis cuticle development have been identified, the transcriptional regulation of these genes is largely unknown. Previously, we demonstrated that AtCFL1 negatively regulates cuticle development by interacting with the HD-ZIP IV transcription factor HDG1. Here, we report that two bHLH transcription factors, AtCFL1 associated protein 1 (CFLAP1 and CFLAP2, are also involved in AtCFL1-mediated regulation of cuticle development. CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 interact with AtCFL1 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of either CFLAP1 or CFLAP2 led to expressional changes of genes involved in fatty acids, cutin and wax biosynthesis pathways and caused multiple cuticle defective phenotypes such as organ fusion, breakage of the cuticle layer and decreased epicuticular wax crystal loading. Functional inactivation of CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 by chimeric repression technology caused opposite phenotypes to the CFLAP1 overexpressor plants. Interestingly, we find that, similar to the transcription factor HDG1, the function of CFLAP1 in cuticle development is dependent on the presence of AtCFL1. Furthermore, both HDG1 and CFLAP1/2 interact with the same C-terminal C4 zinc finger domain of AtCFL1, a domain that is essential for AtCFL1 function. These results suggest that AtCFL1 may serve as a master regulator in the transcriptional regulation of cuticle development, and that CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 are involved in the AtCFL1-mediated regulation pathway, probably through competing with HDG1 to bind to AtCFL1.

  3. ERF5 and ERF6 play redundant roles as positive regulators of JA/Et-mediated defense against Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline S Moffat

    Full Text Available The ethylene response factor (ERF family in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises 122 members in 12 groups, yet the biological functions of the majority remain unknown. Of the group IX ERFs, the IXc subgroup has been studied the most, and includes ERF1, ERF14 and ORA59, which play roles in plant innate immunity. Here we investigate the biological functions of two members of the less studied IXb subgroup: ERF5 and ERF6. In order to identify potential targets of these transcription factors, microarray analyses were performed on plants constitutively expressing either ERF5 or ERF6. Expression of defense genes, JA/Et-responsive genes and genes containing the GCC box promoter motif were significantly upregulated in both ERF5 and ERF6 transgenic plants, suggesting that ERF5 and ERF6 may act as positive regulators of JA-mediated defense and potentially overlap in their function. Since defense against necrotrophic pathogens is generally mediated through JA/Et-signalling, resistance against the fungal necrotroph Botrytis cinerea was examined. Constitutive expression of ERF5 or ERF6 resulted in significantly increased resistance. Although no significant difference in susceptibility to B. cinerea was observed in either erf5 or erf6 mutants, the erf5 erf6 double mutant showed a significant increase in susceptibility, which was likely due to compromised JA-mediated gene expression, since JA-induced gene expression was reduced in the double mutant. Taken together these data suggest that ERF5 and ERF6 play positive but redundant roles in defense against B. cinerea. Since mutual antagonism between JA/Et and salicylic acid (SA signalling is well known, the UV-C inducibility of an SA-inducible gene, PR-1, was examined. Reduced inducibilty in both ERF5 and ERF6 constitutive overexepressors was consistent with suppression of SA-mediated signalling, as was an increased susceptibility to avirulent Pseudomonas syringae. These data suggest that ERF5 and ERF6 may also play a

  4. Functional and transcriptome analysis reveals an acclimatization strategy for abiotic stress tolerance mediated by Arabidopsis NF-YA family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) is a heterotrimeric complex formed by NF-YA/NF-YB/NF-YC subunits that binds to the CCAAT-box in eukaryotic promoters. In contrast to other organisms, in which a single gene encodes each subunit, in plants gene families of over 10 members encode each of the subunits. Here we report that five members of the Arabidopsis thaliana NF-YA family are strongly induced by several stress conditions via transcriptional and miR169-related post-transcriptional mechanisms. Overexpression of NF-YA2, 7 and 10 resulted in dwarf late-senescent plants with enhanced tolerance to several types of abiotic stress. These phenotypes are related to alterations in sucrose/starch balance and cell elongation observed in NF-YA overexpressing plants. The use of transcriptomic analysis of transgenic plants that express miR169-resistant versions of NF-YA2, 3, 7, and 10 under an estradiol inducible system, as well as a dominant-repressor version of NF-YA2 revealed a set of genes, whose promoters are enriched in NF-Y binding sites (CCAAT-box) and that may be directly regulated by the NF-Y complex. This analysis also suggests that NF-YAs could participate in modulating gene regulation through positive and negative mechanisms. We propose a model in which the increase in NF-YA transcript levels in response to abiotic stress is part of an adaptive response to adverse environmental conditions in which a reduction in plant growth rate plays a key role.

  5. Reference: 711 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of the RLK signaling pathway, which also mediates adaptation to Na(+) stress. RLK pathway components, known... The Arabidopsis kinase-associated protein phosphatase regulates adaptation to Na+ stress. 2 612-22 18162596

  6. Reference: 724 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is required in the roots during early signaling steps of rhizobacteria-mediated ...ISR. MYB72 is required in early signaling steps of rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis.

  7. AtPEPTIDE RECEPTOR2 mediates the AtPEPTIDE1-induced cytosolic Ca2þ rise, which is required for the suppression of Glutamine Dumper gene expression in Arabidopsis roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunli Ma; Jie Guo; Yan Kang; Kohei Doman; Anthony C.Bryan; Frans E.Tax; Yube Yamaguchi; Zhi Qi

    2014-01-01

    AtPEPTIDE RECEPTOR2 (AtPEPR2) is a member of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase family and binds to a group of AtPROPEP gene-encoded endogenous peptides, AtPeps. Previously, we found that AtPEPR2 plays a moderate role in the AtPep1-mediated innate immunity responses in Arabidopsis leaf. In this study, we found that AtPEPR2 promoter has strong activity in the vascular tissues of the roots and the atpepr2 mutants showed a moderate but significantly shorter root phenotype. AtPEPR2 partial y mediated AtPep1-induced root elongation inhibition. AtPep1-triggered cytosolic Ca2þ transient rise in roots showed partial dependence on AtPEPR2 and ful y on extracellular Ca2þ ([Ca2þ]ext). Transcriptional profiling analysis found that expression of 75% of AtPep1-modulated genes in roots was ful y dependent on AtPEPR2, of which two dramatical y induced genes showed partial dependence on the [Ca2þ]ext. Arabidopsis genome contains seven Glutamine Dumpers genes (AtGDUs), encoding amino acid exporters. Three of them (AtGDU2, 3, 5) were among the top 10 genes that were downregulated by AtPep1 through AtPEPR2 ful y dependent pathway. Treatment with AtPep1 strongly suppressed pro-moter activity of AtGDU3 in roots, which was relieved by chelating [Ca2þ]ext. Arabidopsis overexpressing AtGDU3 showed a shorter root phenotype and decreased sensitivity to the AtPep1-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, this study demonstrated a significant role of AtPEPR2 in the AtPep1-mediated signaling in the roots.

  8. Overexpression of a novel activator of PAK4, the CDK5 kinase-associated protein CDK5RAP3, promotes hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Grace Wing-Yan; Chan, Mandy Man-Lok; Leong, Veronica Yee-Law; Lee, Joyce Man-Fong; Yau, Tai-On; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Ching, Yick-Pang

    2011-04-15

    The CDK5 kinase regulatory subunit-associated protein 3 (CDK5RAP3 or C53/LZAP) regulates apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. Although CDK5RAP3 has been implicated in cancer progression, its exact role in carcinogenesis is not well established. In this article, we report that CDK5RAP3 has an important prometastatic function in hepatocarcinogenesis. An examination of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples revealed at least twofold overexpression of CDK5RAP3 transcripts in 58% (39/67) of HCC specimens when compared with corresponding nontumorous livers. CDK5RAP3 overexpression was associated with more aggressive biological behavior. In HCC cell lines, stable overexpression of CDK5RAP3 promoted, and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown inhibited, tumorigenic activity and metastatic potential. We found that overexpression of CDK5RAP3 and p21-activated protein kinase 4 (PAK4) correlated in human HCCs, and that CDK5RAP3 was a novel binding partner of PAK4, and this binding enhanced PAK4 activity. siRNA-mediated knockdown of PAK4 in CDK5RAP3-expressing HCC cells reversed the enhanced cell invasiveness mediated by CDK5RAP3 overexpression, implying that PAK4 is essential for CDK5RAP3 function. Taken together, our findings reveal that CDK5RAP3 is widely overexpressed in HCC and that overexpression of CDK5RAP3 promotes HCC metastasis through PAK4 activation.

  9. Urea retranslocation from senescing Arabidopsis leaves is promoted by DUR3-mediated urea retrieval from leaf apoplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Anne; Kojima, Soichi; Hajirezaei, Mohammad; Melzer, Michael; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2015-02-01

    In plants, urea derives either from root uptake or protein degradation. Although large quantities of urea are released during senescence, urea is mainly seen as a short-lived nitrogen (N) catabolite serving urease-mediated hydrolysis to ammonium. Here, we investigated the roles of DUR3 and of urea in N remobilization. During natural leaf senescence urea concentrations and DUR3 transcript levels showed a parallel increase with senescence markers like ORE1 in a plant age- and leaf age-dependent manner. Deletion of DUR3 decreased urea accumulation in leaves, whereas the fraction of urea lost to the leaf apoplast was enhanced. Under natural and N deficiency-induced senescence DUR3 promoter activity was highest in the vasculature, but was also found in surrounding bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. An analysis of petiole exudates from wild-type leaves revealed that N from urea accounted for >13% of amino acid N. Urea export from senescent leaves further increased in ureG-2 deletion mutants lacking urease activity. In the dur3 ureG double insertion line the absence of DUR3 reduced urea export from leaf petioles. These results indicate that urea can serve as an early metabolic marker for leaf senescence, and that DUR3-mediated urea retrieval contributes to the retranslocation of N from urea during leaf senescence.

  10. Identification of a locus in Arabidopsis controlling both the expression of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) and basal resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, J.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    1999-01-01

    Selected nonpathogenic rhizobacteria with biological disease control activity are able to elicit an induced systemic resistance (ISR) response that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Ten ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana were screened for their potential

  11. The Arabidopsis KINβγ Subunit of the SnRK1 Complex Regulates Pollen Hydration on the Stigma by Mediating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-Qi; Liu, Chang Zhen; Li, Dan Dan; Zhao, Ting Ting; Li, Fei; Jia, Xiao Na; Zhao, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Pollen-stigma interactions are essential for pollen germination. The highly regulated process of pollen germination includes pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination on the stigma. However, the internal signaling of pollen that regulates pollen-stigma interactions is poorly understood. KINβγ is a plant-specific subunit of the SNF1-related protein kinase 1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of plant development. Here, we showed that KINβγ was a cytoplasm- and nucleus-localized protein in the vegetative cells of pollen grains in Arabidopsis. The pollen of the Arabidopsis kinβγ mutant could not germinate on stigma, although it germinated normally in vitro. Further analysis revealed the hydration of kinβγ mutant pollen on the stigma was compromised. However, adding water to the stigma promoted the germination of the mutant pollen in vivo, suggesting that the compromised hydration of the mutant pollen led to its defective germination. In kinβγ mutant pollen, the structure of the mitochondria and peroxisomes was destroyed, and their numbers were significantly reduced compared with those in the wild type. Furthermore, we found that the kinβγ mutant exhibited reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pollen. The addition of H2O2 in vitro partially compensated for the reduced water absorption of the mutant pollen, and reducing ROS levels in pollen by overexpressing Arabidopsis CATALASE 3 resulted in compromised hydration of pollen on the stigma. These results indicate that Arabidopsis KINβγ is critical for the regulation of ROS levels by mediating the biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes in pollen, which is required for pollen-stigma interactions during pollination.

  12. An Effective Strategy for Reliably Isolating Heritable and Cas9-Free Arabidopsis Mutants Generated by CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiuhua; Chen, Jilin; Dai, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Zhao, Yunde

    2016-07-01

    Mutations generated by CRISPR/Cas9 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are often somatic and are rarely heritable. Isolation of mutations in Cas9-free Arabidopsis plants can ensure the stable transmission of the identified mutations to next generations, but the process is laborious and inefficient. Here, we present a simple visual screen for Cas9-free T2 seeds, allowing us to quickly obtain Cas9-free Arabidopsis mutants in the T2 generation. To demonstrate this in principle, we targeted two sites in the AUXIN-BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) gene, whose function as a membrane-associated auxin receptor has been challenged recently. We obtained many T1 plants with detectable mutations near the target sites, but only a small fraction of T1 plants yielded Cas9-free abp1 mutations in the T2 generation. Moreover, the mutations did not segregate in Mendelian fashion in the T2 generation. However, mutations identified in the Cas9-free T2 plants were stably transmitted to the T3 generation following Mendelian genetics. To further simplify the screening procedure, we simultaneously targeted two sites in ABP1 to generate large deletions, which can be easily identified by PCR. We successfully generated two abp1 alleles that contained 1,141- and 711-bp deletions in the ABP1 gene. All of the Cas9-free abp1 alleles we generated were stable and heritable. The method described here allows for effectively isolating Cas9-free heritable CRISPR mutants in Arabidopsis.

  13. Arabidopsis Plants Having Defects in Nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay Factors UPF1,UPF2, and UPF3 Show Photoperiod-dependent Phenotypes in Development and Stress Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan Shi; lan T. Baldwin; Jianqiang Wu

    2012-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is an important mRNA quality surveillance pathway in all eukaryotes that eliminates aberrant mRNAs derived from various sources.Three NMD factor proteins,UPF1,UPF2,and UPF3 are required for the NMD process and were found to be also involved in certain stress responses in mammalian and yeast cells.Using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants of UPF1 and UPF3 and UPF2-silenced lines (irUPF2),we examined the involvement of UPF1,UPF2,and UPF3 in development and in response to stresses,wounding and infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv.tomato strain DC3000.Under the long (16 h) photoperiod condition,Arabidopsis having a defect in NMD factors exhibited altered morphologies of various organs,disturbed homeostasis of wounding-induced jasmonic acid and pathogen-elicited salicylic acid,and abnormal wounding- and methyl jasmonate-induced changes in the transcript levels of two defense-related genes,LOX2 and VSP2.Importantly,when plants were cultivated under the short (10 h) photoperiod condition,mutants of UPF1 and UPF3 and irUPF2 showed smaller differences from the wild-type plants in growth and stress-induced responses.These data suggest a complex regulatory network,likely composed of light signaling and NMD factor-mediated pathways,in influencing plant development and adaption to environmental stresses.

  14. Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) in Arabidopsis requires sensitivity to jasmonate and ethylene but is not accompanied by an increase in their production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Pelt, J.A. van; Ton, J.; Parchmann, S.; Mueller, M.J.; Buchala, A.J.; Métraux, J.P.; Loon, L.C. van

    2000-01-01

    Plants develop an enhanced defensive capacity against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens after colonization of the roots by selected strains of nonpathogenic biocontrol bacteria. In Arabidopsis thaliana, this induced systemic resistance (ISR) functions independently of salicylic acid but requires a

  15. Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases MKK1 and MKK2 have overlapping functions in defense signaling mediated by MEKK1, MPK4, and MKS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Zhou, Lu; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana MKK1 and MKK2 MAP kinase kinases have been implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses as part of a signalling cascade including MEKK1 and MPK4. Here, the double loss-of-function mutant (mkk1/2) of MKK1 and MKK2 is shown to have marked phenotypes in development...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100613 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100613 J023107M18 At4g10180.1 light-mediated development protein 1 / deetiolated1... (DET1) identical to Light-mediated development protein DET1 (Deetiolated1) (Swiss-Prot:P48732) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058683 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058683 001-019-A06 At4g10180.1 light-mediated development protein 1 / deetiolated...1 (DET1) identical to Light-mediated development protein DET1 (Deetiolated1) (Swiss-Prot:P48732) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  18. Ste12/Fab1 phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate 5-kinase is required for nitrogen-regulated mitotic commitment and cell size control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauries, Marie; Kaczmarek, Adrian; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Du, Wei; Krug, Karsten; Maček, Boris; Petersen, Janni

    2017-01-01

    Tight coupling of cell growth and cell cycle progression enable cells to adjust their rate of division, and therefore size, to the demands of proliferation in varying nutritional environments. Nutrient stress promotes inhibition of Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (TORC1) activity. In fission yeast, reduced TORC1 activity advances mitotic onset and switches growth to a sustained proliferation at reduced cell size. A screen for mutants, that failed to advance mitosis upon nitrogen stress, identified a mutant in the PIKFYVE 1-phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate 5-kinase fission yeast homolog Ste12. Ste12PIKFYVE deficient mutants were unable to advance the cell cycle to reduce cell size after a nitrogen downshift to poor nitrogen (proline) growth conditions. While it is well established that PI(3,5)P2 signalling is required for autophagy and that Ste12PIKFYVE mutants have enlarged vacuoles (yeast lysosomes), neither a block to autophagy or mutants that independently have enlarged vacuoles had any impact upon nitrogen control of mitotic commitment. The addition of rapamycin to Ste12PIKFYVE deficient mutants reduced cell size at division to suggest that Ste12PIKFYVE possibly functions upstream of TORC1. ste12 mutants display increased Torin1 (TOR inhibitor) sensitivity. However, no major impact on TORC1 or TORC2 activity was observed in the ste12 deficient mutants. In summary, Ste12PIKFYVE is required for nitrogen-stress mediated advancement of mitosis to reduce cell size at division. PMID:28273166

  19. Different requirements for EDS1 and NDR1 by disease resistance genes define at least two R gene-mediated signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, N; Metz, M; Holub, E; Staskawicz, B J; Daniels, M J; Parker, J E

    1998-08-18

    The Arabidopsis genes EDS1 and NDR1 were shown previously by mutational analysis to encode essential components of race-specific disease resistance. Here, we examined the relative requirements for EDS1 and NDR1 by a broad spectrum of Resistance (R) genes present in three Arabidopsis accessions (Columbia, Landsberg-erecta, and Wassilewskija). We show that there is a strong requirement for EDS1 by a subset of R loci (RPP2, RPP4, RPP5, RPP21, and RPS4), conferring resistance to the biotrophic oomycete Peronospora parasitica, and to Pseudomonas bacteria expressing the avirulence gene avrRps4. The requirement for NDR1 by these EDS1-dependent R loci is either weak or not measurable. Conversely, three NDR1-dependent R loci, RPS2, RPM1, and RPS5, operate independently of EDS1. Another RPP locus, RPP8, exhibits no strong exclusive requirement for EDS1 or NDR1 in isolate-specific resistance to P. parasitica, although resistance is compromised weakly by eds1. Similarly, resistance conditioned by two EDS1-dependent RPP genes, RPP4 and RPP5, is impaired partially by ndr1, implicating a degree of pathway cross-talk. Our results provide compelling evidence for the preferential utilization of either signaling component by particular R genes and thus define at least two disease resistance pathways. The data also suggest that strong dependence on EDS1 or NDR1 is governed by R protein structural type rather than pathogen class.

  20. A mutation in negative regulator of basal resistance WRKY17 of Arabidopsis increases susceptibility to Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/no

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Lacroix

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium is a phytopathogenic bacterium that induces crown gall disease in many plant species by transferring and integrating a segment of its own DNA (T-DNA into its host genome. Whereas Agrobacterium usually does not trigger an extensive defense response in its host plants, it induces the expression of several defense-related genes and activates plant stress reactions. In the complex interplay between Agrobacterium and its host plant, Agrobacterium has evolved to take advantage of these plant defense pathways for its own purpose of advancement of the infection process. For example, Agrobacterium utilizes the host stress response transcriptional regulator VIP1 to facilitate nuclear import and proteasomal uncoating of its T-DNA during genetic transformation of the host cell. In Arabidopsis, the VIP1 gene expression is repressed by WRKY17, a negative regulator of basal resistance to Pseudomonas. Thus, we examined whether WRKY17 is also involved in plant susceptibility to genetic transformation by Agrobacterium. Using reverse genetics, we showed that a wrky17 mutant displays higher expression of the VIP1 gene in roots, but not in shoots. In a root infection assay, the wrky17 mutant plants were hyper-susceptible to Agrobacterium compared to wild type plants. WRKY17, therefore, may act as a positive regulator of Arabidopsis resistance to Agrobacterium. This notion is important for understanding the complex regulation of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation; thus, although this paper reports a relatively small set of data that we do not plan to pursue further in our lab, we believe it might be useful for the broad community of plant pathologists and plant biotechnologists.

  1. Assays of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and co-contaminated heavy metals in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying the recombinant guinea pig aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated β-glucuronidase reporter gene expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Sayuri; Ohta, Masaya; Ohkawa, Hideo; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    The transgenic Arabidopsis plant XgD2V11-6 carrying the recombinant guinea pig (g) aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene expression system was examined for assay of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and co-contaminated heavy metals. When the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were treated with PCB126 (toxic equivalency factor; TEF: 0.1) and PCB169 (TEF: 0.03), the GUS activity of the whole plants was increased significantly. After treatment with PCB80 (TEF: 0), the GUS activity was nearly the same level as that treated with 0.1% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as a vehicle control. After exposure to a 1:1 mixture of PCB126 and PCB169, the GUS activity was increased additively. However, after exposure to a mixture of PCB126 and PCB80, the GUS activity was lower than that of the treatment with PCB126 alone. Thus, PCB80 seemed to be an antagonist towards AhR. When the transgenic plants were treated with each of the heavy metals Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb together with PCB126, Cd and Pb increased the PCB126-induced GUS activity. On the other hand, Fe, Cu and Zn did not affect the PCB126-induced GUS activity. In the presence of the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-B (MEL-B) and the carrier protein bovine serum albumin (BSA), the PCB126-induced GUS activity was increased, but the Cd-assisted PCB126-induced GUS activity was not affected. Thus, MEL-B and BSA seemed to increase uptake and transport of PCB126, respectively.

  2. Blocking the QB-binding site of photosystem II by tenuazonic acid, a non-host-specific toxin of Alternaria alternata, activates singlet oxygen-mediated and EXECUTER-dependent signalling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiguo; Kim, Chanhong; Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Liangsheng; Apel, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Necrotrophic fungal pathogens produce toxic compounds that induce cell death in infected plants. Often, the primary targets of these toxins and the way a plant responds to them are not known. In the present work, the effect of tenuazonic acid (TeA), a non-host-specific toxin of Alternaria alternata, on Arabidopsis thaliana has been analysed. TeA blocks the QB -binding site at the acceptor side of photosystem II (PSII). As a result, charge recombination at the reaction centre (RC) of PSII is expected to enhance the formation of the excited triplet state of the RC chlorophyll that promotes generation of singlet oxygen ((1)O₂). (1)O₂ activates a signalling pathway that depends on the two EXECUTER (EX) proteins EX1 and EX2 and triggers a programmed cell death response. In seedlings treated with TeA at half-inhibition concentration (1)O₂-mediated and EX-dependent signalling is activated as indicated by the rapid and transient up-regulation of (1)O₂-responsive genes in wild type, and its suppression in ex1/ex2 mutants. Lesion formation occurs when seedlings are exposed to higher concentrations of TeA for a longer period of time. Under these conditions, the programmed cell death response triggered by (1)O₂-mediated and EX-dependent signalling is superimposed by other events that also contribute to lesion formation.

  3. Reference: 412 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the tobacco arcA gene, mediates hormone responses and plays a regulatory role in multiple developmental processes...in RACK1A confer defects in multiple developmental processes including seed germination, leaf production, an...ltiple hormone responsiveness and developmental processes in Arabidopsis. 11 2697-708 16829549 2006 Journal

  4. Reference: 356 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 006 Mar Plant molecular biology Deng Xingwang|Dong Li|Wang Lei|Xue Yongbiao|Zhang Yansheng|Zhang Yu'e ...ein CEGENDUO negatively regulates auxin-mediated lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. 4 599-615 16525894 2

  5. Reference: 632 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ludmila et al. 2007 Sep. Plant J. 51(5):874-85. One of the earliest responses of plants to environmental str...elopment in reaction to adverse environmental conditions. We show that the AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene...R12 mediates temporary growth arrest in Arabidopsis thaliana upon perceiving environmental

  6. ECHIDNA protein impacts on male fertility in Arabidopsis by mediating trans-Golgi network secretory trafficking during anther and pollen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinping; Yang, Caiyun; Klisch, Doris; Ferguson, Alison; Bhaellero, Rishi P; Niu, Xiwu; Wilson, Zoe A

    2014-03-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) plays a central role in cellular secretion and has been implicated in sorting cargo destined for the plasma membrane. Previously, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) echidna (ech) mutant was shown to exhibit a dwarf phenotype due to impaired cell expansion. However, ech also has a previously uncharacterized phenotype of reduced male fertility. This semisterility is due to decreased anther size and reduced amounts of pollen but also to decreased pollen viability, impaired anther opening, and pollen tube growth. An ECH translational fusion (ECHPro:ECH-yellow fluorescent protein) revealed developmentally regulated tissue-specific expression, with expression in the tapetum during early anther development and microspore release and subsequent expression in the pollen, pollen tube, and stylar tissues. Pollen viability and production, along with germination and pollen tube growth, were all impaired. The ech anther endothecium secondary wall thickening also appeared reduced and disorganized, resulting in incomplete anther opening. This did not appear to be due to anther secondary thickening regulatory genes but perhaps to altered secretion of wall materials through the TGN as a consequence of the absence of the ECH protein. ECH expression is critical for a variety of aspects of male reproduction, including the production of functional pollen grains, their effective release, germination, and tube formation. These stages of pollen development are fundamentally influenced by TGN trafficking of hormones and wall components. Overall, this suggests that the fertility defect is multifaceted, with the TGN trafficking playing a significant role in the process of both pollen formation and subsequent fertilization.

  7. Association of protein kinase Cmu with type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K; Toker, A; Wong, K; Marignani, P A; Johannes, F J; Cantley, L C

    1998-09-04

    Protein kinase Cmu (PKCmu), also named protein kinase D, is an unusual member of the PKC family that has a putative transmembrane domain and pleckstrin homology domain. This enzyme has a substrate specificity distinct from other PKC isoforms (Nishikawa, K., Toker, A., Johannes, F. J., Songyang, Z., and Cantley, L. C. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 952-960), and its mechanism of regulation is not yet clear. Here we show that PKCmu forms a complex in vivo with a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. A region of PKCmu between the amino-terminal transmembrane domain and the pleckstrin homology domain is shown to be involved in the association with the lipid kinases. Interestingly, a kinase-dead point mutant of PKCmu failed to associate with either lipid kinase activity, indicating that autophosphorylation may be required to expose the lipid kinase interaction domain. Furthermore, the subcellular distribution of the PKCmu-associated lipid kinases to the particulate fraction depends on the presence of the amino-terminal region of PKCmu including the predicted transmembrane region. These results suggest a novel model in which the non-catalytic region of PKCmu acts as a scaffold for assembly of enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis at specific membrane locations.

  8. Reference: 640 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available er Alois et al. 2007 Jul. Plant Cell 19(7):2213-24. Wound signaling pathways in plants are mediated by mitog...en-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and stress hormones, such as ethylene and jasmonates. In Arabidopsis th...ed investigations; however, the involvement of specific phosphatases in wound signaling is not known. Here, ...we show that AP2C1, an Arabidopsis Ser/Thr phosphatase of type 2C, is a novel stress signal regulator that inactivates the stress-re... significantly higher amounts of jasmonate upon wounding and are more resistant to phytophagous mites (Tetra

  9. Reference: 457 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n et al. 2006 Oct. Plant J. 48(2):238-48. The Arabidopsis BAP1 gene encodes a small protein with a C2-like domain. Here...er and is associated with membranes in vivo. We identify multiple roles of BAP1 in negatively re...gulating defense responses and cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana. The loss of BAP1 function ...confers an enhanced disease resistance to virulent bacterial and oomycete pathogens. The enhanced resistance... is mediated by salicylic acid, PAD4 and a disease resistance gene SNC1. BAP1 is

  10. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing in Arabidopsis thaliana and inheritance of modified genes in the T2 and T3 generations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenZhi Jiang

    Full Text Available The newly developed CRISPR/Cas9 system for targeted gene knockout or editing has recently been shown to function in plants in both transient expression systems as well as in primary T1 transgenic plants. However, stable transmission of genes modified by the Cas9/single guide RNA (sgRNA system to the T2 generation and beyond has not been demonstrated. Here we provide extensive data demonstrating the efficiency of Cas9/sgRNA in causing modification of a chromosomally integrated target reporter gene during early development of transgenic Arabidopsis plants and inheritance of the modified gene in T2 and T3 progeny. Efficient conversion of a nonfunctional, out-of-frame GFP gene to a functional GFP gene was confirmed in T1 plants by the observation of green fluorescent signals in leaf tissues as well as the presence of mutagenized DNA sequences at the sgRNA target site within the GFP gene. All GFP-positive T1 transgenic plants and nearly all GFP-negative plants examined contained mutagenized GFP genes. Analyses of 42 individual T2 generation plants derived from 6 different T1 progenitor plants showed that 50% of T2 plants inherited a single T-DNA insert. The efficiency of the Cas9/sgRNA system and stable inheritance of edited genes point to the promise of this system for facile editing of plant genes.

  11. INCURVATA2 Encodes the Catalytic Subunit of DNA Polymerase α and Interacts with Genes Involved in Chromatin-Mediated Cellular Memory in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, José María; González-Bayón, Rebeca; del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2007-01-01

    Cell type–specific gene expression patterns are maintained by the stable inheritance of transcriptional states through mitosis, requiring the action of multiprotein complexes that remodel chromatin structure. Genetic and molecular interactions between chromatin remodeling factors and components of the DNA replication machinery have been identified in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, indicating that some epigenetic marks are replicated simultaneously to DNA with the participation of the DNA replication complexes. This model of epigenetic inheritance might be extended to the plant kingdom, as we report here with the positional cloning and characterization of INCURVATA2 (ICU2), which encodes the putative catalytic subunit of the DNA polymerase α of Arabidopsis thaliana. The strong icu2-2 and icu2-3 insertional alleles caused fully penetrant zygotic lethality when homozygous and incompletely penetrant gametophytic lethality, probably because of loss of DNA polymerase activity. The weak icu2-1 allele carried a point mutation and caused early flowering, leaf incurvature, and homeotic transformations of sepals into carpels and of petals into stamens. Further genetic analyses indicated that ICU2 interacts with TERMINAL FLOWER2, the ortholog of HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 of animals and yeasts, and with the Polycomb group (PcG) gene CURLY LEAF. Another PcG gene, EMBRYONIC FLOWER2, was found to be epistatic to ICU2. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses indicated that a number of regulatory genes were derepressed in the icu2-1 mutant, including genes associated with flowering time, floral meristem, and floral organ identity. PMID:17873092

  12. INCURVATA2 encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA Polymerase alpha and interacts with genes involved in chromatin-mediated cellular memory in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, José María; González-Bayón, Rebeca; del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2007-09-01

    Cell type-specific gene expression patterns are maintained by the stable inheritance of transcriptional states through mitosis, requiring the action of multiprotein complexes that remodel chromatin structure. Genetic and molecular interactions between chromatin remodeling factors and components of the DNA replication machinery have been identified in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, indicating that some epigenetic marks are replicated simultaneously to DNA with the participation of the DNA replication complexes. This model of epigenetic inheritance might be extended to the plant kingdom, as we report here with the positional cloning and characterization of INCURVATA2 (ICU2), which encodes the putative catalytic subunit of the DNA polymerase alpha of Arabidopsis thaliana. The strong icu2-2 and icu2-3 insertional alleles caused fully penetrant zygotic lethality when homozygous and incompletely penetrant gametophytic lethality, probably because of loss of DNA polymerase activity. The weak icu2-1 allele carried a point mutation and caused early flowering, leaf incurvature, and homeotic transformations of sepals into carpels and of petals into stamens. Further genetic analyses indicated that ICU2 interacts with TERMINAL FLOWER2, the ortholog of HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 of animals and yeasts, and with the Polycomb group (PcG) gene CURLY LEAF. Another PcG gene, EMBRYONIC FLOWER2, was found to be epistatic to ICU2. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses indicated that a number of regulatory genes were derepressed in the icu2-1 mutant, including genes associated with flowering time, floral meristem, and floral organ identity.

  13. Nuclear ribosome biogenesis mediated by the DIM1A rRNA dimethylase is required for organized root growth and epidermal patterning in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieckowski, Yana; Schiefelbein, John

    2012-07-01

    Position-dependent patterning of hair and non-hair cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is a powerful system to study the molecular basis of cell fate specification. Here, we report an epidermal patterning mutant affecting the ADENOSINE DIMETHYL TRANSFERASE 1A (DIM1A) rRNA dimethylase gene, predicted to participate in rRNA posttranscriptional processing and base modification. Consistent with a role in ribosome biogenesis, DIM1A is preferentially expressed in regions of rapid growth, and its product is nuclear localized with nucleolus enrichment. Furthermore, DIM1A preferentially accumulates in the developing hair cells, and the dim1A point mutant alters the cell-specific expression of the transcriptional regulators GLABRA2, CAPRICE, and WEREWOLF. Together, these findings suggest that establishment of cell-specific gene expression during root epidermis development is dependent upon proper ribosome biogenesis, possibly due to the sensitivity of the cell fate decision to relatively small differences in gene regulatory activities. Consistent with its effect on the predicted S-adenosyl-l-Met binding site, dim1A plants lack the two 18S rRNA base modifications but exhibit normal pre-rRNA processing. In addition to root epidermal defects, the dim1A mutant exhibits abnormal root meristem division, leaf development, and trichome branching. Together, these findings provide new insights into the importance of rRNA base modifications and translation regulation for plant growth and development.

  14. A small RNA mediated regulation of a stress-activated retrotransposon and the tissue specific transposition during the reproductive period in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eMatsunaga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are key elements that facilitate genome evolution of the host organism. A number of studies have assessed the functions of TEs, which change gene expression in the host genome. Activation of TEs is controlled by epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. Several recent studies have reported that TEs can also be activated by biotic or abiotic stress in some plants. We focused on a Ty1/copia retrotransposon, ONSEN, that is activated by heat stress in Arabidopsis. We found that transcriptional activation of ONSEN was regulated by an siRNA-related pathway, and the activation could also be induced by oxidative stress. Mutants deficient in small interfering RNA (siRNA biogenesis that were exposed to heat stress at the initial stages of vegetative growth showed transgenerational transposition. The transposition was also detected in the progeny, which originated from tissue that had differentiated after exposure to the heat stress. The results indicated that in some undifferentiated cells, transpositional activity could be maintained quite long after exposure to the heat stress.

  15. Jasmonate Signal Pathway in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yi Shan; Zhi-Long Wang; Daoxin Xie

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs), which include jasmonic acid and its cyclopentane derivatives are synthesized from the octadecanoid pathway and widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. JAs modulate the expression of numerous genes and mediate responses to stress, wounding, insect attack, pathogen infection, and UV damage. They also affect a variety of processes in many plant developmental processes. The JA signal pathway involves two important events: the biosynthesis of JA and the transduction of JA signal. Several important Arabidopsis mutants in jasmonate signal pathway were described in this review.

  16. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2016-02-18

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  17. Circadian clock and PIF4-mediated external coincidence mechanism coordinately integrates both of the cues from seasonal changes in photoperiod and temperature to regulate plant growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Yuji; Kubozono, Saori; Miyachi, Miki; Yamashino, Takafumi; Nakamichi, Norihito; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the circadian clock regulates the photoperiodic plant growth including the elongation of hypocotyls in a short-days (SDs)-specific manner. The clock-controlled PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) gene encoding a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor plays crucial roles in this regulation. The SDs-specific elongation of hypocotyls is best explained by accumulation of the active PIF4 proteins at the end of night specifically in SDs due to coincidence between internal (circadian clock) and external (photoperiod) cues. However, this external coincidence model was challenged with the recent finding that the elongation of hypocotyls is markedly promoted at high growth temperature (28˚C) even in long-days (LDs), implying that the model to explain the photoperiodic response of plant architecture appears to be conditional on ambient temperature. With regard to this problem, the results of this and previous studies showed that the model holds under a wide range of ambient temperature conditions (16˚C to 28˚C). We propose that the circadian clock and PIF4-mediated external coincidence mechanism coordinately integrates both of the cues from seasonal changes in photoperiod and temperature to regulate plant growth in natural habitats.

  18. Profiling the dynamics of abscisic acid and ABA-glucose ester after using the glucosyltransferase UGT71C5 to mediate abscisic acid homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Mei Xiong; Zhen Liu; Han Chen; Jin-Tao Xue; Yi Yang; Cong Chen; Li-Ming Ye

    2014-01-01

    The HPLC-MS/MS method was developed to profile the dynamics of abscisic acid (ABA) and ABA-glucose ester (ABA-GE) after cloning glycosyltransferase enzyme family gene AtUGT71C5 into Arabidopsis thaliana. By constructing over-expression lines (OE) and down-expression lines (DN), we acquired mutant strains to analyze the function of AtUGT71C5. The multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) was used for quantitative determination in negative mode. The transition was m/z 263.1-153.0 for ABA ([M-H]þ), m/z 425.1-263.0 for ABA-GE ([M-H]þ), and m/z 321.0-152.0 for chloramphe-nicol. The linear range was 0.8684-217.1 ng/mL for ABA and 0.3920-196.0 ng/mL for ABA-GE. The accuracy was 88.0-109.0% for ABA and 86.6-113.0% for ABA-GE; the inter-day and intra-day precisions were less than 5.4%for ABA and 8.9%for ABA-GE, respectively. This method is simple and sensitive enough for determination of ABA and ABA-GE in A. thaliana leaves. All the evidence confirmed the speculation that AtUGT71C5 can mediate abscisic acid homeostasis.

  19. IAA-Ala Resistant3, an evolutionarily conserved target of miR167, mediates Arabidopsis root architecture changes during high osmotic stress

    KAUST Repository

    Kinoshita, Natsuko

    2012-09-01

    The functions of microRNAs and their target mRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana development have been widely documented; however, roles of stress-responsive microRNAs and their targets are not as well understood. Using small RNA deep sequencing and ATH1 microarrays to profile mRNAs, we identified IAA-Ala Resistant3 (IAR3) as a new target of miR167a. As expected, IAR3 mRNA was cleaved at the miR167a complementary site and under high osmotic stress miR167a levels decreased, whereas IAR3 mRNA levels increased. IAR3 hydrolyzes an inactive form of auxin (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]-alanine) and releases bioactive auxin (IAA), a central phytohormone for root development. In contrast with the wild type, iar3 mutants accumulated reduced IAA levels and did not display high osmotic stress-induced root architecture changes. Transgenic plants expressing a cleavage-resistant form of IAR3 mRNA accumulated high levels of IAR3 mRNAs and showed increased lateral root development compared with transgenic plants expressing wild-type IAR3. Expression of an inducible noncoding RNA to sequester miR167a by target mimicry led to an increase in IAR3 mRNA levels, further confirming the inverse relationship between the two partners. Sequence comparison revealed the miR167 target site on IAR3 mRNA is conserved in evolutionarily distant plant species. Finally, we showed that IAR3 is required for drought tolerance. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Cadmium-inducible expression of the ABC-type transporter AtABCC3 increases phytochelatin-mediated cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Patrizia; Zanella, Letizia; De Paolis, Angelo; Di Litta, Davide; Cecchetti, Valentina; Falasca, Giuseppina; Barbieri, Maurizio; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Costantino, Paolo; Cardarelli, Maura

    2015-07-01

    The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental contaminant with harmful effects on living cells. In plants, phytochelatin (PC)-dependent Cd detoxification requires that PC-Cd complexes are transported into vacuoles. Here, it is shown that Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings defective in the ABCC transporter AtABCC3 (abcc3) have an increased sensitivity to different Cd concentrations, and that seedlings overexpressing AtABCC3 (AtABCC3ox) have an increased Cd tolerance. The cellular distribution of Cd was analysed in protoplasts from abcc3 mutants and AtABCC3 overexpressors grown in the presence of Cd, by means of the Cd-specific fluorochromes 5-nitrobenzothiazole coumarin (BTC-5N) and Leadmium™ Green AM dye. This analysis revealed that Cd is mostly localized in the cytosol of abcc3 mutant protoplasts whereas there is an increase in vacuolar Cd in protoplasts from AtABCC3ox plants. Overexpression of AtABCC3 in cad1-3 mutant seedlings defective in PC production and in plants treated with l-buthionine sulphoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of PC biosynthesis, had no effect on Cd tolerance, suggesting that AtABCC3 acts via PCs. In addition, overexpression of AtABCC3 in atabcc1 atabcc2 mutant seedlings defective in the Cd transporters AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 complements the Cd sensitivity of double mutants, but not in the presence of BSO. Accordingly, the level of AtABCC3 transcript in wild type seedlings was lower than that of AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 in the absence of Cd but higher after Cd exposure, and even higher in atabcc1 atabcc2 mutants. The results point to AtABCC3 as a transporter of PC-Cd complexes, and suggest that its activity is regulated by Cd and is co-ordinated with the activity of AtABCC1/AtABCC2.

  1. DETORQUEO, QUIRKY, and ZERZAUST represent novel components involved in organ development mediated by the receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Fulton

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular signaling plays an important role in controlling cellular behavior in apical meristems and developing organs in plants. One prominent example in Arabidopsis is the regulation of floral organ shape, ovule integument morphogenesis, the cell division plane, and root hair patterning by the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG (SUB. Interestingly, kinase activity of SUB is not essential for its in vivo function, indicating that SUB may be an atypical or inactive receptor-like kinase. Since little is known about signaling by atypical receptor-like kinases, we used forward genetics to identify genes that potentially function in SUB-dependent processes and found recessive mutations in three genes that result in a sub-like phenotype. Plants with a defect in DETORQEO (DOQ, QUIRKY (QKY, and ZERZAUST (ZET show corresponding defects in outer integument development, floral organ shape, and stem twisting. The mutants also show sub-like cellular defects in the floral meristem and in root hair patterning. Thus, SUB, DOQ, QKY, and ZET define the STRUBBELIG-LIKE MUTANT (SLM class of genes. Molecular cloning of QKY identified a putative transmembrane protein carrying four C(2 domains, suggesting that QKY may function in membrane trafficking in a Ca(2+-dependent fashion. Morphological analysis of single and all pair-wise double-mutant combinations indicated that SLM genes have overlapping, but also distinct, functions in plant organogenesis. This notion was supported by a systematic comparison of whole-genome transcript profiles during floral development, which molecularly defined common and distinct sets of affected processes in slm mutants. Further analysis indicated that many SLM-responsive genes have functions in cell wall biology, hormone signaling, and various stress responses. Taken together, our data suggest that DOQ, QKY, and ZET contribute to SUB-dependent organogenesis and shed light on the mechanisms, which are dependent on

  2. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A

    2011-08-23

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation.

  3. The Combined Action of ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1, PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4, and SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED101 Promotes Salicylic Acid-Mediated Defenses to Limit Fusarium graminearum Infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makandar, Ragiba; Nalam, Vamsi J; Chowdhury, Zulkarnain; Sarowar, Sujon; Klossner, Guy; Lee, Hyeonju; Burdan, Dehlia; Trick, Harold N; Gobbato, Enrico; Parker, Jane E; Shah, Jyoti

    2015-08-01

    Fusarium graminearum causes Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease in wheat and other cereals. F. graminearum also causes disease in Arabidopsis thaliana. In both Arabidopsis and wheat, F. graminearum infection is limited by salicylic acid (SA) signaling. Here, we show that, in Arabidopsis, the defense regulator EDS1 (ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1) and its interacting partners, PAD4 (PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4) and SAG101 (SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE101), promote SA accumulation to curtail F. graminearum infection. Characterization of plants expressing the PAD4 noninteracting eds1(L262P) indicated that interaction between EDS1 and PAD4 is critical for limiting F. graminearum infection. A conserved serine in the predicted acyl hydrolase catalytic triad of PAD4, which is not required for defense against bacterial and oomycete pathogens, is necessary for limiting F. graminearum infection. These results suggest a molecular configuration of PAD4 in Arabidopsis defense against F. graminearum that is different from its defense contribution against other pathogens. We further show that constitutive expression of Arabidopsis PAD4 can enhance FHB resistance in Arabidopsis and wheat. Taken together with previous studies of wheat and Arabidopsis expressing salicylate hydroxylase or the SA-response regulator NPR1 (NON-EXPRESSER OF PR GENES1), our results show that exploring fundamental processes in a model plant provides important leads to manipulating crops for improved disease resistance.

  4. WOX5-1AA17 Feedback Circuit-Mediated CellularAuxin Response Is Crucial for the Patterning ofRoot Stem Cell Niches in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the patterning of stem cell-enriched meristems requires a graded auxin response maximum thatemerges from the concerted action of polar auxin transport, auxin biosynthesis, auxin metabolism, and cellular auxinresponse machinery. However, mechanisms underlying this auxin response maximum-mediated root stem cell mainte-nance are not fully understood. Here, we present unexpected evidence that WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 5 (WOX5)transcription factor modulates expression of auxin biosynthetic genes in the quiescent center (QC) of the root and thusprovides a robust mechanism for the maintenance of auxin response maximum in the root tip. This WOX5 action is bal-anced through the activity of indole-3-acetic acid 17 (IAA17) auxin response repressor. Our combined genetic, cell biol-ogy, and computational modeling studies revealed a previously uncharacterized feedback loop linking WOX5-mediatedauxin production to IAA17-dependent repression of auxin responses. This WOX5-1AA17 feedback circuit further assuresthe maintenance of auxin response maximum in the root tip and thereby contributes to the maintenance of distal stemcell (DSC) populations. Our experimental studies and in silico computer simulations both demonstrate that the WOX5-iAA17 feedback circuit is essential for the maintenance of auxin gradient in the root tip and the auxin-mediated root DSCdifferentiation.

  5. Bioinformatic cis-element analyses performed in Arabidopsis and rice disclose bZIP- and MYB-related binding sites as potential AuxRE-coupling elements in auxin-mediated transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berendzen Kenneth W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In higher plants, a diverse array of developmental and growth-related processes is regulated by the plant hormone auxin. Recent publications have proposed that besides the well-characterized Auxin Response Factors (ARFs that bind Auxin Response Elements (AuxREs, also members of the bZIP- and MYB-transcription factor (TF families participate in transcriptional control of auxin-regulated genes via bZIP Response Elements (ZREs or Myb Response Elements (MREs, respectively. Results Applying a novel bioinformatic algorithm, we demonstrate on a genome-wide scale that singular motifs or composite modules of AuxREs, ZREs, MREs but also of MYC2 related elements are significantly enriched in promoters of auxin-inducible genes. Despite considerable, species-specific differences in the genome structure in terms of the GC content, this enrichment is generally conserved in dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana and monocot (Oryza sativa model plants. Moreover, an enrichment of defined composite modules has been observed in selected auxin-related gene families. Consistently, a bipartite module, which encompasses a bZIP-associated G-box Related Element (GRE and an AuxRE motif, has been found to be highly enriched. Making use of transient reporter studies in protoplasts, these findings were experimentally confirmed, demonstrating that GREs functionally interact with AuxREs in regulating auxin-mediated transcription. Conclusions Using genome-wide bioinformatic analyses, evolutionary conserved motifs have been defined which potentially function as AuxRE-dependent coupling elements to establish auxin-specific expression patterns. Based on these findings, experimental approaches can be designed to broaden our understanding of combinatorial, auxin-controlled gene regulation.

  6. Heterodimerization and endocytosis of Arabidopsis brassinosteroid receptors BRI1 and AtSERK3 (BAK1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russinova, Eugenia; Borst, Jan-Willem; Kwaaitaal, Mark Adrianus Cornelis J

    2004-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana brassinosteroid (BR), perception is mediated by two Leu-rich repeat receptor-like kinases, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) and BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE1 (BAK1) (Arabidopsis SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-like KINASE3 [AtSERK3]). Genetic, biochemical, and yeast (...

  7. Characterization of Arabidopsis enhanced disease susceptibility mutants that are affected in systemically induced resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, J.; Vos, M. de; Robben, C.; Buchala, Anthony; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the rhizobacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r triggers jasmonate (JA)- and ethylene (ET)-dependent induced systemic resistance (ISR) that is effective against different pathogens. Arabidopsis genotypes unable to express rhizobacteria-mediated ISR against the bacterial pat

  8. Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) in Arabidopsis is not associated with a direct effect on expression of known defense-related genes but stimulates the expression of the jasmonate-inducible gene Atvsp upon challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, A.C.M. van; Luijendijk, M.; Smoorenburg, I.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Selected strains of nonpathogenic rhizobacteria from the genus Pseudomonas are capable of eliciting broadspectrum induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In Arabidopsis, the ISR pathway functions independently

  9. The interaction of Arabidopsis with Piriformospora indica shifts from initial transient stress induced by fungus-released chemical mediators to a mutualistic interaction after physical contact of the two symbionts

    OpenAIRE

    Vahabi, K.; Sherameti, I.; Bakshi, M.; Mrozinska, A.; Ludwig, A.; M. Reichelt; Oelmüller, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Piriformospora indica, an endophytic fungus of Sebacinales, colonizes the roots of many plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana. The symbiotic interaction promotes plant performance, growth and resistance/tolerance against abiotic and biotic stress. Results We demonstrate that exudated compounds from the fungus activate stress and defense responses in the Arabidopsis roots and shoots before the two partners are in physical contact. They induce stomata closure, stimulate reacti...

  10. Reference: 125 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available et al. 2004 Nov. Plant Physiol. 136(3):3616-27. The actin cytoskeleton mediates cellular processes through t...AP and AtPIR participate in a variety of growth and developmental processes. Mutations in AtNAP and AtPIR ca...ting trichome cell growth. Arabidopsis NAP and PIR regulate actin-based cell morphogenesis and multiple developmental processes

  11. Arabidopsis miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins bind to GT cis-elements and mediate gibberellin-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis under light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhaoxue; Hu, Xupeng; Cai, Wenjuan; Huang, Weihua; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Qian; Yang, Hongquan; Wang, Jiawei; Huang, Jirong

    2014-08-01

    An extraordinarily precise regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. However, our knowledge on the complex regulatory mechanisms of chlorophyll biosynthesis is very limited. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins (SCL6/22/27) negatively regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis via an unknown mechanism. Here we showed that SCLs inhibit the expression of the key gene encoding protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) in light-grown plants, but have no significant effect on protochlorophyllide biosynthesis in etiolated seedlings. Histochemical analysis of β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic plants expressing pSCL27::rSCL27-GUS revealed that SCL27-GUS accumulates at high levels and suppresses chlorophyll biosynthesis at the leaf basal proliferation region during leaf development. Transient gene expression assays showed that the promoter activity of PORC is indeed regulated by SCL27. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR assays showed that SCL27 binds to the promoter region of PORC in vivo. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that SCL27 is directly interacted with G(A/G)(A/T)AA(A/T)GT cis-elements of the PORC promoter. Furthermore, genetic analysis showed that gibberellin (GA)-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis is mediated, at least in part, by SCLs. We demonstrated that SCL27 interacts with DELLA proteins in vitro and in vivo by yeast-two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analysis and found that their interaction reduces the binding activity of SCL27 to the PORC promoter. Additionally, we showed that SCL27 activates MIR171 gene expression, forming a feedback regulatory loop. Taken together, our data suggest that the miR171-SCL module is critical for mediating GA-DELLA signaling in the coordinate regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and leaf growth in light.

  12. The Arabidopsis bZIP11 transcription factor links low-energy signalling to auxin-mediated control of primary root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiste, Christoph; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Selvanayagam, Jebasingh; Muralidhara, Prathibha; Fröschel, Christian; Novák, Ondřej; Ljung, Karin; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Plants have to tightly control their energy homeostasis to ensure survival and fitness under constantly changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is stringently required that energy-consuming stress-adaptation and growth-related processes are dynamically tuned according to the prevailing energy availability. The evolutionary conserved SUCROSE NON-FERMENTING1 RELATED KINASES1 (SnRK1) and the downstream group C/S1 basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) are well-characterised central players in plants' low-energy management. Nevertheless, mechanistic insights into plant growth control under energy deprived conditions remains largely elusive. In this work, we disclose the novel function of the low-energy activated group S1 bZIP11-related TFs as regulators of auxin-mediated primary root growth. Whereas transgenic gain-of-function approaches of these bZIPs interfere with the activity of the root apical meristem and result in root growth repression, root growth of loss-of-function plants show a pronounced insensitivity to low-energy conditions. Based on ensuing molecular and biochemical analyses, we propose a mechanistic model, in which bZIP11-related TFs gain control over the root meristem by directly activating IAA3/SHY2 transcription. IAA3/SHY2 is a pivotal negative regulator of root growth, which has been demonstrated to efficiently repress transcription of major auxin transport facilitators of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) gene family, thereby restricting polar auxin transport to the root tip and in consequence auxin-driven primary root growth. Taken together, our results disclose the central low-energy activated SnRK1-C/S1-bZIP signalling module as gateway to integrate information on the plant's energy status into root meristem control, thereby balancing plant growth and cellular energy resources.

  13. Optimal metabolic regulation of the mammalian heart Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger requires a spacial arrangements with a PtdIns(4)-5kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcato, Diego; Posada, Velia; Beaugé, Luis; Berberián, Graciela

    2010-11-05

    In inside-out bovine heart sarcolemmal vesicles, p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonate (PCMBS) and n-ethylmaleimide (NEM) fully inhibited MgATP up-regulation of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1) and abolished the MgATP-dependent PtdIns-4,5P2 increase in the NCX1-PtdIns-4,5P2 complex; in addition, these compounds markedly reduced the activity of the PtdIns(4)-5kinase. After PCMBS or NEM treatment, addition of dithiothreitol (DTT) restored a large fraction of the MgATP stimulation of the exchange fluxes and almost fully restored PtdIns(4)-5kinase activity; however, in contrast to PCMBS, the effects of NEM did not seem related to the alkylation of protein SH groups. By itself DTT had no effect on the synthesis of PtdIns-4,5P2 but affected MgATP stimulation of NCX1: moderate inhibition at 1mM MgATP and 1μM Ca(2+) and full inhibition at 0.25mM MgATP and 0.2μM Ca(2+). In addition, DDT prevented coimmunoprecipitation of NCX1 and PtdIns(4)-5kinase. These results indicate that, for a proper MgATP up-regulation of NCX1, the enzyme responsible for PtdIns-4,5P2 synthesis must be (i) functionally competent and (ii) set in the NCX1 microenvironment closely associated to the exchanger. This kind of supramolecular structure is needed to optimize binding of the newly synthesized PtdIns-4,5P2 to its target region in the exchanger protein.

  14. Activated type I TGFbeta receptor (Alk5) kinase confers enhancedsurvival to mammary epithelial cells and accelerates mammary tumorprogression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka-Cook, Rebecca S.; Shin, Incheol; Yi, Jae Youn; Easterly,Evangeline; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Zent, Roy; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2005-01-02

    The transforming growth factor-betas (TGF{beta}s) are members of a large superfamily of pleiotropic cytokines that also includes the activins and the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Members of the TGF{beta} family regulate complex physiological processes such cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, motility, and cell death, among others (Massague, 1998). Dysregulation of TGF{beta} signaling contributes to several pathological processes including cancer, fibrosis, and auto-immune disorders (Massague et al., 2000). The TGF{beta}s elicit their biological effects by binding to type II and type I transmembrane receptor serine-threonine kinases (T{beta}RII and T{beta}RI) which, in turn, phosphorylated Smad 2 and Smad 3. Phosphorylated Smad 2/3 associate with Smad 4 and, as a heteromeric complex, translocate to the nucleus where they regulate gene transcription. The inhibitory Smad7 down regulates TGF{beta} signaling by binding to activated T{beta}RI and interfering with its ability to phosphorylate Smad 2/3 (Derynck and Zhang, 2003; Shi and Massague, 2003). Signaling is also regulated by Smad proteolysis. TGF{beta} receptor-mediated activation results in multi-ubiquitination of Smad 2 in the nucleus and subsequent degradation of Smad 2 by the proteasome (Lo and Massague, 1999). Activation of TGF{beta} receptors also induces mobilization of a Smad 7-Smurf complex from the nucleus to the cytoplasm; this complex recognizes the activated receptors and mediates their ubiquitination and internalization via caveolin-rich vesicles, leading to termination of TGF{beta} signaling (Di Guglielmo et al., 2003). Other signal transducers/pathways have been implicated in TGF{beta} actions. These include the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (Jnk), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein phosphatase PP2A, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), and the family of Rho GTPases [reviewed in

  15. Identification of a major IP5 kinase in Cryptococcus neoformans confirms that PP-IP5/IP7, not IP6, is essential for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cecilia; Lev, Sophie; Saiardi, Adolfo; Desmarini, Desmarini; Sorrell, Tania C; Djordjevic, Julianne T

    2016-04-01

    Fungal inositol polyphosphate (IP) kinases catalyse phosphorylation of IP3 to inositol pyrophosphate, PP-IP5/IP7, which is essential for virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans. Cryptococcal Kcs1 converts IP6 to PP-IP5/IP7, but the kinase converting IP5 to IP6 is unknown. Deletion of a putative IP5 kinase-encoding gene (IPK1) alone (ipk1Δ), and in combination with KCS1 (ipk1Δkcs1Δ), profoundly reduced virulence in mice. However, deletion of KCS1 and IPK1 had a greater impact on virulence attenuation than that of IPK1 alone. ipk1Δkcs1Δ and kcs1Δ lung burdens were also lower than those of ipk1Δ. Unlike ipk1Δ, ipk1Δkcs1Δ and kcs1Δ failed to disseminate to the brain. IP profiling confirmed Ipk1 as the major IP5 kinase in C. neoformans: ipk1Δ produced no IP6 or PP-IP5/IP7 and, in contrast to ipk1Δkcs1Δ, accumulated IP5 and its pyrophosphorylated PP-IP4 derivative. Kcs1 is therefore a dual specificity (IP5 and IP6) kinase producing PP-IP4 and PP-IP5/IP7. All mutants were similarly attenuated in virulence phenotypes including laccase, urease and growth under oxidative/nitrosative stress. Alternative carbon source utilisation was also reduced significantly in all mutants except ipk1Δ, suggesting that PP-IP4 partially compensates for absent PP-IP5/IP7 in ipk1Δ grown under this condition. In conclusion, PP-IP5/IP7, not IP6, is essential for fungal virulence.

  16. TBP-associated factors in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Clara; Clerici, Elena; Mizzi, Luca; Colombo, Lucia; Kater, Martin M

    2004-11-24

    Initiation of transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II requires a number of transcription factors among which TFIID is the major core promoter recognition factor. TFIID is composed of highly conserved factors which include the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and about 14 TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Since TAFs play important roles in transcription they have been extensively studied in organisms like yeast, Drosophila and human. Surprisingly, TAFs have been poorly characterized in plants. With the completion of the Arabidopsis genome sequence, it is possible to search for TAFs, since many of them have conserved amino acid sequences. Mining the genome of Arabidopsis for TAFs resulted in the identification of 18 putative Arabidopsis TAFs (AtTAFs). We have analyzed their protein structure and their genomic localisation. Expression profiling by RT-PCR showed that these TAFs are expressed in all parts of the plant which is in agreement with their general role in transcription. These analyses in combination with their evolutionary conservation with TAFs of other organisms are discussed.

  17. Reference: 517 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d isolated aleurone layers of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were used in experiments designed to iden...tify components of the Arabidopsis seed that contribute to seed dormancy and to lea

  18. The upregulation of thiamine (vitamin B1) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under salt and osmotic stress conditions is mediated by abscisic acid at the early stages of this stress response

    OpenAIRE

    Rapala-Kozik Maria; Wolak Natalia; Kujda Marta; Banas Agnieszka K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent reports suggest that vitamin B1 (thiamine) participates in the processes underlying plant adaptations to certain types of abiotic and biotic stress, mainly oxidative stress. Most of the genes coding for enzymes involved in thiamine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana have been identified. In our present study, we examined the expression of thiamine biosynthetic genes, of genes encoding thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes and the levels of thiamine compounds duri...

  19. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  20. The upregulation of thiamine (vitamin B1 biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under salt and osmotic stress conditions is mediated by abscisic acid at the early stages of this stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapala-Kozik Maria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent reports suggest that vitamin B1 (thiamine participates in the processes underlying plant adaptations to certain types of abiotic and biotic stress, mainly oxidative stress. Most of the genes coding for enzymes involved in thiamine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana have been identified. In our present study, we examined the expression of thiamine biosynthetic genes, of genes encoding thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes and the levels of thiamine compounds during the early (sensing and late (adaptation responses of Arabidopsis seedlings to oxidative, salinity and osmotic stress. The possible roles of plant hormones in the regulation of the thiamine contribution to stress responses were also explored. Results The expression of Arabidopsis genes involved in the thiamine diphosphate biosynthesis pathway, including that of THI1, THIC, TH1 and TPK, was analyzed for 48 h in seedlings subjected to NaCl or sorbitol treatment. These genes were found to be predominantly up-regulated in the early phase (2-6 h of the stress response. The changes in these gene transcript levels were further found to correlate with increases in thiamine and its diphosphate ester content in seedlings, as well as with the enhancement of gene expression for enzymes which require thiamine diphosphate as a cofactor, mainly α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and transketolase. In the case of the phytohormones including the salicylic, jasmonic and abscisic acids which are known to be involved in plant stress responses, only abscisic acid was found to significantly influence the expression of thiamine biosynthetic genes, the thiamine diphosphate levels, as well as the expression of genes coding for main thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes. Using Arabidopsis mutant plants defective in abscisic acid production, we demonstrate that this phytohormone is important in the regulation of THI1 and THIC gene expression during salt stress

  1. CYP76C1 (Cytochrome P450)-Mediated Linalool Metabolism and the Formation of Volatile and Soluble Linalool Oxides in Arabidopsis Flowers: A Strategy for Defense against Floral Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boachon, Benoît; Junker, Robert R; Miesch, Laurence; Bassard, Jean-Etienne; Höfer, René; Caillieaudeaux, Robin; Seidel, Dana E; Lesot, Agnès; Heinrich, Clément; Ginglinger, Jean-François; Allouche, Lionel; Vincent, Bruno; Wahyuni, Dinar S C; Paetz, Christian; Beran, Franziska; Miesch, Michel; Schneider, Bernd; Leiss, Kirsten; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2015-10-01

    The acyclic monoterpene alcohol linalool is one of the most frequently encountered volatile compounds in floral scents. Various linalool oxides are usually emitted along with linalool, some of which are cyclic, such as the furanoid lilac compounds. Recent work has revealed the coexistence of two flower-expressed linalool synthases that produce the (S)- or (R)-linalool enantiomers and the involvement of two P450 enzymes in the linalool oxidation in the flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana. Partially redundant enzymes may also contribute to floral linalool metabolism. Here, we provide evidence that CYP76C1 is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes a cascade of oxidation reactions and is the major linalool metabolizing oxygenase in Arabidopsis flowers. Based on the activity of the recombinant enzyme and mutant analyses, we demonstrate its prominent role in the formation of most of the linalool oxides identified in vivo, both as volatiles and soluble conjugated compounds, including 8-hydroxy, 8-oxo, and 8-COOH-linalool, as well as lilac aldehydes and alcohols. Analysis of insect behavior on CYP76C1 mutants and in response to linalool and its oxygenated derivatives demonstrates that CYP76C1-dependent modulation of linalool emission and production of linalool oxides contribute to reduced floral attraction and favor protection against visitors and pests.

  2. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole

    2002-01-01

    in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while...... expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant....

  3. Analysis of a transcription factor using transient assay in Arabidopsis protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yuji; Lee, Mi-Hyun; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors is a fundamental mechanism in essentially all aspects of cellular processes. Transient expression assay of a reporter plasmid containing a reporter gene driven by a promoter of interest and an effector plasmid expressing a transcription factor has been a powerful tool for analyzing transcription factors. Here we present a protocol for polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis protoplasts. It details preparation of protoplasts from Arabidopsis suspension cultured cells or leaves of soil-grown Arabidopsis plants and subsequent PEG-mediated transformation with reporter and effector plasmids. This protocol can be completed within 24 h from protoplast preparation to reporter assay. As an example, analysis of the membrane-bound transcription factor AtbZIP60 and its target BiP3 promoter is shown.

  4. Reference: 774 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available an essential gene, the disruption of which causes embryonic lethality. Plants carrying a hypomorphic smg7 mu...e progression from anaphase to telophase in the second meiotic division in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis SMG7 is

  5. Reference: 398 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plays attenuated chloroplast movements under intermediate and high light intensitie...hese movements. In this work, we describe plastid movement impaired 2 (pmi2), a mutant in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that dis

  6. Reference: 173 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mical approaches to elucidate the action mechanisms of sirtinol in Arabidopsis. A...tic and chemical analyses of the action mechanisms of sirtinol in Arabidopsis. 8 3129-34 15710899 2005 Feb P

  7. Reference: 718 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available displayed a moderate but significant decrease in germination in the presence of D...NA damage. This report links Ubc13-Uev with functions in DNA damage response in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis UEV

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068856 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eme oxygenase (HY1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4877362, heme oxygenase 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4530591 GB:AF132475; annotation upd...ated per Seth J. Davis at University of Wisconsin-Madison 3e-90 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104955 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available B:AF132475; annotation updated per Seth J. Davis at University of Wisconsin-Madison 3e-90 ... ...heme oxygenase (HY1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4877362, heme oxygenase 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4530591 G

  10. Reference: 110 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on process. Our study shows that an Arabidopsis SNM protein, although structurally closer to the SNM1/PSO2 members, shares some prope...rties with ARTEMIS but also has novel characteristics. Arabidopsis plants defective

  11. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2016-06-06

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Suppression of Arabidopsis flowering by near-null magnetic field is affected by light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunxiao; Li, Yue; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Yuxia; Wei, Shufeng

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that a near-null magnetic field suppressed Arabidopsis flowering in white light, which might be related to the function modification of cryptochrome (CRY). To further demonstrate that the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering is associated with CRY, Arabidopsis wild type and CRY mutant plants were grown in the near-null magnetic field under blue or red light with different light cycle and photosynthetic photon flux density. We found that Arabidopsis flowering was significantly suppressed by near-null magnetic field in blue light with lower intensity (10 µmol/m(2) /s) and shorter cycle (12 h period: 6 h light/6 h dark). However, flowering time of CRY1/CRY2 mutants did not show any difference between plants grown in near-null magnetic field and in local geomagnetic field under detected light conditions. In red light, no significant difference was shown in Arabidopsis flowering between plants in near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field under detected light cycles and intensities. These results suggest that changes of blue light cycle and intensity alter the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering, which is mediated by CRY.

  13. Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) in Arabidopsis is not associated with a direct effect on expression of known defense-related genes but stimulates the expression of the jasmonate-inducible gene Atvsp upon challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wees, S C; Luijendijk, M; Smoorenburg, I; van Loon, L C; Pieterse, C M

    1999-11-01

    Selected strains of nonpathogenic rhizobacteria from the genus Pseudomonas are capable of eliciting broad-spectrum induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In Arabidopsis, the ISR pathway functions independently of salicylic acid (SA) but requires responsiveness to jasmonate and ethylene. Here, we demonstrate that known defense-related genes, i.e. the SA-responsive genes PR-1, PR-2, and PR-5, the ethylene-inducible gene Hel, the ethylene- and jasmonate-responsive genes ChiB and Pdf1.2, and the jasmonate-inducible genes Atvsp, Lox1, Lox2, Pall, and Pin2, are neither induced locally in the roots nor systemically in the leaves upon induction of ISR by Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r. In contrast, plants infected with the virulent leaf pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) or expressing SAR induced by preinfecting lower leaves with the avirulent pathogen Pst(avrRpt2) exhibit elevated expression levels of most of the defense-related genes studied. Upon challenge inoculation with Pst, PR gene transcripts accumulated to a higher level in SAR-expressing plants than in control-treated and ISR-expressing plants, indicating that SAR involves potentiation of SA-responsive PR gene expression. In contrast, pathogen challenge of ISR-expressing plants led to an enhanced level of Atvsp transcript accumulation. The otherjasmonate-responsive defense-related genes studied were not potentiated during ISR, indicating that ISR is associated with the potentiation of specific jasmonate-responsive genes.

  14. Sucrose regulated translational control of bZip genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahmani, F.

    2007-01-01

    Sucrose can translationally regulate the expression of bZIP11 and four other S-class bZip transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence encoding 28 amino acids (SC-peptide) in the leader of the bZIP11 is sufficient to mediate sucrose induced translational control. A model proposes that suc

  15. An INDEHISCENT-Controlled Auxin Response Specifies the Separation Layer in Early Arabidopsis Fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelderen, Kasper; van Rongen, Martin; Liu, An'an; Otten, Anne; Offringa, Remko

    2016-01-01

    Seed dispersal is an important moment in the life cycle of a plant species. In Arabidopsis thaliana, it is dependent on transcription factor INDEHISCENT (IND)-mediated specification of a separation layer in the dehiscence zone found in the margin between the valves (carpel walls) and the central rep

  16. G-Protein Acts Upstream of H2O2 in Mediating H2S-Induced Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis thaliana%G蛋白位于H2O2上游参与H2S诱导的拟南芥气孔关闭过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丹丹; 车永梅; 侯丽霞; 赵方贵; 刘新

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) induces stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays an important part in this procedure. In this paper, Arabidopsis wide type and its a subunit deficient mutants (Atgpal-3 and Atgpal-4) as well as β subunit deficient mutants (Atagb1-1 and Atagb1-2) were used as materials, the effects of G-protein on H2S-induced stomatal closure and the relationship between G-protein and H2O2 were investigated. The results showed that H2S induced stomatal closure as well as the expression of G-protein a subunit (GPA) and β subunit (AGB) gens in leaves of Arabidopsis wild type, but had no significant effects on stomatal movement in Atgpa1-3, Atgpa1-4, Atagb1-1 and Atagb1-2 mutants. GPA activator cholera toxin (CTX) improved H2S-induced stomatal closure, but its inhibitors pertussis toxin (PTX) showed the opposite effect. These results manifested that G-protein was an signaling intermediate in H2S-induced stomatal closure. H2S induced increase in H2O2 content in leaves and guard cells of A. thaliana wide type, but not in Atgpa1-3, Atgpa1-4, Atagb1-1 and Atagb1-2 mutants. CTX enhanced H2O2 content in leaves and guard cells of Arabidopsis, but its inhibitor PTX was opposite. From these data it could be deduced that G-protein acts upstream of H2O2 in mediating H2S-induce stomatal closure in Arabidopsis.%硫化氢(H2S)可诱导拟南芥气孔关闭.本文以拟南芥野生型及其G蛋白α亚基缺失突变体(Atgpa1-3、Atgpa1-4)和β亚基缺失突变体(Atagb1-1、Atagb1-2)为材料,研究了G蛋白在H2S诱导拟南芥气孔关闭中的作用及其与H2O2的关系.结果表明,H2S可诱导野生型拟南芥气孔关闭及G蛋白α亚基(GPA)和β亚基(AGB)基因表达量增加,但对Atgpa1-3、Atgpa1-4、Atagb1-1和Atagb 1-2叶片气孔运动无显著影响;G蛋白激活剂霍乱毒素(CTX)增强H2S诱导拟南芥气孔关闭的作用,而其抑制剂百日咳毒素(PTX)能够阻断H2S的诱导作用,表明G蛋白参与H2S诱

  17. Vernalization-mediated chromatin changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zografos, Brett R; Sung, Sibum

    2012-07-01

    Proper flowering time is vital for reproductive fitness in flowering plants. In Arabidopsis, vernalization is mediated primarily through the repression of a MADS box transcription factor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). The induction of a plant homeodomain-containing protein, VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3 (VIN3), by vernalizing cold is required for proper repression of FLC. One of a myriad of changes that occurs after VIN3 is induced is the establishment of FLC chromatin at a mitotically repressed state due to the enrichment of repressive histone modifications. VIN3 induction by cold is the earliest known event during the vernalization response and includes changes in histone modifications at its chromatin. Here, the current understanding of the vernalization-mediated chromatin changes in Arabidopsis is discussed, with a focus on the roles of shared chromatin-modifying machineries in regulating VIN3 and FLC gene family expression during the course of vernalization.

  18. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  19. Chromosomal proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehs, C P; McElwain, E F; Spiker, S

    1988-07-01

    In plants with large genomes, each of the classes of the histones (H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4) are not unique polypeptides, but rather families of closely related proteins that are called histone variants. The small genome and preponderance of single-copy DNA in Arabidopsis thaliana has led us to ask if this plant has such families of histone variants. We have thus isolated histones from Arabidopsis and analyzed them on four polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic systems: an SDS system; an acetic acid-urea system; a Triton transverse gradient system; and a two-dimensional system combining SDS and Triton-acetic acid-urea systems. This approach has allowed us to identify all four of the nucleosomal core histones in Arabidopsis and to establish the existence of a set of H2A and H2B variants. Arabidopsis has at least four H2A variants and three H2B variants of distinct molecular weights as assessed by electrophoretic mobility on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Thus, Arabidopsis displays a diversity in these histones similar to the diversity displayed by plants with larger genomes such as wheat.The high mobility group (HMG) non-histone chromatin proteins have attracted considerable attention because of the evidence implicating them as structural proteins of transcriptionally active chromatin. We have isolated a group of non-histone chromatin proteins from Arabidopsis that meet the operational criteria to be classed as HMG proteins and that cross-react with antisera to HMG proteins of wheat.

  20. Exploiting Natural Variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, J.A.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana . This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of

  1. Exploiting natural variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Molenaar; J.J.B. Keurentjes

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana. This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of g

  2. The salty tale of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, D

    2000-06-29

    High concentrations of sodium chloride are toxic to most plant species. New insights into the mechanisms by which plants tolerate salt have emerged from the identification of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that play a critical part in physiological resistance to salt.

  3. In vivo localization in Arabidopsis protoplasts and root tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung Hui; Lee, Yongjik; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, a large number of proteins are transported to their final destination after translation by a process called intracellular trafficking. Transient gene expression, either in plant protoplasts or in specific plant tissues, is a fast, flexible, and reproducible approach to study the cellular function of proteins, protein subcellular localizations, and protein-protein interactions. Here we describe the general method of protoplast isolation, polyethylene glycol-mediated protoplast transformation and immunostaining of protoplast or intact root tissues for studying the localization of protein in Arabidopsis.

  4. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for responsiveness to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermans, Paul C A; Bakker, Peter A H M; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2016-04-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r stimulates lateral root formation and increases shoot growth in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These plant growth-stimulating effects are partly caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the bacterium. Here, we performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study on natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for the ability to profit from rhizobacteria-mediated plant growth-promotion. To this end, 302 Arabidopsis accessions were tested for root architecture characteristics and shoot fresh weight in response to exposure to WCS417r. Although virtually all Arabidopsis accessions tested responded positively to WCS417r, there was a large variation between accessions in the increase in shoot fresh weight, the extra number of lateral roots formed, and the effect on primary root length. Correlation analyses revealed that the bacterially-mediated increase in shoot fresh weight is related to alterations in root architecture. GWA mapping for WCS417r-stimulated changes in root and shoot growth characteristics revealed 10 genetic loci highly associated with the responsiveness of Arabidopsis to the plant growth-promoting activity of WCS417r. Several of the underlying candidate genes have been implicated in important plant growth-related processes. These results demonstrate that plants possess natural genetic variation for the capacity to profit from the plant growth-promoting function of a beneficial rhizobacterium in their rhizosphere. This knowledge is a promising starting point for sustainable breeding strategies for future crops that are better able to maximize profitable functions from their root microbiome.

  5. Unequally redundant RCD1 and SRO1 mediate stress and developmental responses and interact with transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, P.; Blomster, T.; Brosché, M.; Salojärvi, J.; Ahlfors, R.; Vainonen, J.P.; Reddy, R.A.; Immink, G.H.; Angenent, G.C.; Turck, F.; Overmyer, K.; Kangasjärvi, J.

    2009-01-01

    RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) is an important regulator of stress and hormonal and developmental responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Together with its closest homolog, SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE1 (SRO1), it is the only Arabidopsis protein containing the WWE domain, which is known to mediate protein–prot

  6. Environmental History Modulates Arabidopsis Pattern-Triggered Immunity in a HISTONE ACETYLTRANSFERASE1-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Yekondi, Shweta; Chen, Po-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Hong; Yu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Keqiang; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    In nature, plants are exposed to a fluctuating environment, and individuals exposed to contrasting environmental factors develop different environmental histories. Whether different environmental histories alter plant responses to a current stress remains elusive. Here, we show that environmental history modulates the plant response to microbial pathogens. Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to repetitive heat, cold, or salt stress were more resistant to virulent bacteria than Arabidopsis grown in a more stable environment. By contrast, long-term exposure to heat, cold, or exposure to high concentrations of NaCl did not provide enhanced protection against bacteria. Enhanced resistance occurred with priming of Arabidopsis pattern-triggered immunity (PTI)-responsive genes and the potentiation of PTI-mediated callose deposition. In repetitively stress-challenged Arabidopsis, PTI-responsive genes showed enrichment for epigenetic marks associated with transcriptional activation. Upon bacterial infection, enrichment of RNA polymerase II at primed PTI marker genes was observed in environmentally challenged Arabidopsis. Finally, repetitively stress-challenged histone acetyltransferase1-1 (hac1-1) mutants failed to demonstrate enhanced resistance to bacteria, priming of PTI, and increased open chromatin states. These findings reveal that environmental history shapes the plant response to bacteria through the development of a HAC1-dependent epigenetic mark characteristic of a primed PTI response, demonstrating a mechanistic link between the primed state in plants and epigenetics.

  7. Induction of Systemic Resistance against Cucumber mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana by Trichoderma asperellum SKT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mohamed Elsharkawy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Trichoderma asperellum SKT-1 is a microbial pesticide that is very effective against various diseases. Our study was undertaken to evaluate T. asperellum SKT-1 for induction of resistance against yellow strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-Y in Arabidopsis plants. Disease severity was rated at 2 weeks post inoculation (WPI. CMV titre in Arabidopsis leaves was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA at 2 WPI. Our results demonstrated that among all Arabidopsis plants treated with barley grain inoculum (BGI of SKT-1 NahG and npr1 plants showed no significant reduction in disease severity and CMV titre as compared with control plants. In contrast, disease severity and CMV titre were significantly reduced in all Arabidopsis plants treated with culture filtrate (CF of SKT-1 as compared with control plants. RT-PCR results showed increased expression levels of SA-inducible genes, but not JA/ET-inducible genes, in leaves of BGI treated plants. Moreover, expression levels of SA- and JA/ET-inducible genes were increased in leaves of CF treated plants. In conclusion, BGI treatment induced systemic resistance against CMV through SA signaling cascade in Arabidopsis plants. While, treatment with CF of SKT-1 mediated the expression of a majority of the various pathogen related genes, which led to the increased defense mechanism against CMV infection.

  8. Reference: 710 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n factor family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Treatment with abscisic acid (ABA) induced AtMYB44 tr...anscript accumulation within 30 min. The gene was also activated under various abiotic stre...sses, such as dehydration, low temperature, and salinity. In transgenic Arabidopsis carrying an At...MYB44 promoter-driven beta-glucuronidase (GUS) construct, strong GUS activity was observed in the vasculature... and leaf epidermal guard cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing AtMYB44 is more

  9. Is VIP1 important for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yong; Lee, Lan-Ying; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium genetically transforms plants by transferring and integrating T-(transferred) DNA into the host genome. This process requires both Agrobacterium and host proteins. VirE2 interacting protein 1 (VIP1), an Arabidopsis bZIP protein, has been suggested to mediate transformation through interaction with and targeting of VirE2 to nuclei. We examined the susceptibility of Arabidopsis vip1 mutant and VIP1 overexpressing plants to transformation by numerous Agrobacterium strains. In no instance could we detect altered transformation susceptibility. We also used confocal microscopy to examine the subcellular localization of Venus-tagged VirE2 or Venus-tagged VIP1, in the presence or absence of the other untagged protein, in different plant cell systems. We found that VIP1-Venus localized in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus of Arabidopsis roots, agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts and tobacco BY-2 protoplasts, regardless of whether VirE2 was co-expressed. VirE2 localized exclusively to the cytoplasm of tobacco and Arabidopsis protoplasts, whether in the absence or presence of VIP1 overexpression. In transgenic Arabidopsis plants and agroinfiltrated N. benthamina leaves we could occasionally detect small aggregates of the Venus signal in nuclei, but these were likely to be imagining artifacts. The vast majority of VirE2 remained in the cytoplasm. We conclude that VIP1 is not important for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation or VirE2 subcellular localization.

  10. Epigenetic Regulation of Intronic Transgenes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osabe, Kenji; Harukawa, Yoshiko; Miura, Saori; Saze, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Defense mechanisms of plant genomes can epigenetically inactivate repetitive sequences and exogenous transgenes. Loss of mutant phenotypes in intronic T-DNA insertion lines by interaction with another T-DNA locus, termed T-DNA suppression, has been observed in Arabidopsis thaliana, although the molecular basis of establishment and maintenance of T-DNA suppression is poorly understood. Here we show that maintenance of T-DNA suppression requires heterochromatinisation of T-DNA sequences and the nuclear proteins, INCREASED IN BONSAI METHYLATION 2 (IBM2) and ENHANCED DOWNY MILDEW 2 (EDM2), which prevent ectopic 3′ end processing of mRNA in atypically long introns containing T-DNA sequences. Initiation of T-DNA suppression is mediated by the canonical RdDM pathway after hybridisation of two T-DNA strains, accompanied by DNA hypermethylation of T-DNA sequences in the F1 generation. Our results reveal the presence of a genome surveillance mechanism through genome hybridisation that masks repetitive DNAs intruding into transcription units. PMID:28338020

  11. NFXL2 modifies cuticle properties in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisso, Janina; Schröder, Florian; Schippers, Jos H M; Müssig, Carsten

    2012-05-01

    Loss of the Arabidopsis NFX1-LIKE2 (NFXL2) gene (At5g05660) results in elevated ABA levels, elevated hydrogen peroxide levels, reduced stomatal aperture, and enhanced drought stress tolerance. Introduction of the NFXL2-78 isoform into the nfxl2-1 mutant is largely sufficient for complementation of the phenotype. We show here that cuticular properties are altered in the nfxl2-1 mutant. The NFXL2-78 protein binds to the SHINE1 (SHN1), SHN2, SHN3, and BODYGUARD1 (BDG1) promoters and mediates weaker expression of these genes. The SHN AP2 domain transcription factors influence cuticle properties. Stronger SHN1, SHN2, and SHN3 expression in the nfxl2-1 mutant may cause altered cuticle properties including reduced stomatal density, and partly explain the enhanced drought stress tolerance. The BDG1 protein also controls cuticle development and is essential for osmotic stress regulation of ABA biosynthesis. Stronger BDG1 expression in nfxl2-1 plants may allow elevated ABA accumulation under drought stress. We conclude that the NFXL2-78 protein is part of a regulatory network that integrates the biosynthesis and action of ABA, ROS, and cuticle components.

  12. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.2 68418.m07919 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.1 68418.m07918 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.1 68418.m07918 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.4 68418.m07921 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.3 68418.m07920 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.2 68418.m07919 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.4 68418.m07921 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.3 68418.m07920 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105527 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105527 001-127-G05 At5g63090.4 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries prot...ein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-52 ...

  2. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240730 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240730 J043030K09 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 2e-11 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288052 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288052 J075151I09 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 6e-14 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240911 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240911 J065037E05 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 4e-22 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241119 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241119 J065094C22 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 2e-13 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243149 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243149 J100032I21 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 7e-12 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241581 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241581 J065181K09 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 4e-15 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287479 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287479 J043023O14 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 1e-17 ...

  10. Reference: 631 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ggest that atRZ-1a has a negative impact on seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis under salt o...binding protein, atRZ-1a, has a negative impact on seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis thali

  11. Arabidopsis seedling flood-inoculation technique: a rapid and reliable assay for studying plant-bacterial interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppalapati Srinivasa R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Arabidopsis thaliana-Pseudomonas syringae model pathosystem is one of the most widely used systems to understand the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis and plant innate immunity. Several inoculation methods have been used to study plant-pathogen interactions in this model system. However, none of the methods reported to date are similar to those occurring in nature and amicable to large-scale mutant screens. Results In this study, we developed a rapid and reliable seedling flood-inoculation method based on young Arabidopsis seedlings grown on MS medium. This method has several advantages over conventional soil-grown plant inoculation assays, including a shorter growth and incubation period, ease of inoculation and handling, uniform infection and disease development, requires less growth chamber space and is suitable for high-throughput screens. In this study we demonstrated the efficacy of the Arabidopsis seedling assay to study 1 the virulence factors of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, including type III protein secretion system (TTSS and phytotoxin coronatine (COR; 2 the effector-triggered immunity; and 3 Arabidopsis mutants affected in salicylic acid (SA- and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMPs-mediated pathways. Furthermore, we applied this technique to study nonhost resistance (NHR responses in Arabidopsis using nonhost pathogens, such as P. syringae pv. tabaci, pv. glycinea and pv. tomato T1, and confirmed the functional role of FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2 in NHR. Conclusions The Arabidopsis seedling flood-inoculation assay provides a rapid, efficient and economical method for studying Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas interactions with minimal growth chamber space and time. This assay could also provide an excellent system for investigating the virulence mechanisms of P. syringae. Using this method, we demonstrated that FLS2 plays a critical role in conferring NHR against nonhost pathovars of P. syringae, but not to

  12. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin, a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1 contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  13. Reference: 572 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available et al. 2007 May. Plant J. 50(3):439-51. Although glycine-rich RNA-binding protein 2 (GRP2) has been implicated in plant re...sponses to environmental stresses, the function and importance of GRP2 in stress responses are largely unknown. Here...haliana under high-salinity, cold or osmotic stress. GRP2 affects seed germination of Arabidopsis plants under salt stre...ss, but does not influence seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis plants under osmotic stre...ss. GRP2 accelerates seed germination and seedling growth in Arabidopsis plants under cold stre

  14. Reference: 446 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rk E et al. 2006 Nov. Plant Physiol. 142(3):1004-13. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) QUARTET (QRT) genes are require...d for pollen separation during normal floral development. In qrt mutants, the four products of microsporogenesis re...main fused and pollen grains are released as tetrads. In Arabid...opsis, tetrad analysis in qrt mutants has been used to map all five centromeres, easily distinguish sporophy...tic from gametophytic mutations, and accurately assess crossover interference. Using a combination of forward and re

  15. Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistence in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, J.

    2001-01-01

    Upon primary pathogen attack, plants activate a diverse array of defense mechanisms at the site of primary infection. Besides this so-called basal resistance, plants have also the ability to enhance their defensive capacity against future pathogen attack. There are at least two types of biolog

  16. The COP9 signalosome interacts with SCF UFO and participates in Arabidopsis flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiping; Feng, Suhua; Nakayama, Naomi; Crosby, W L; Irish, Vivian; Deng, Xing Wang; Wei, Ning

    2003-05-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is involved in multiple developmental processes. It interacts with SCF ubiquitin ligases and deconjugates Nedd8/Rub1 from cullins (deneddylation). CSN is highly expressed in Arabidopsis floral tissues. To investigate the role of CSN in flower development, we examined the expression pattern of CSN in developing flowers. We report here that two csn1 partially deficient Arabidopsis strains exhibit aberrant development of floral organs, decline of APETALA3 (AP3) expression, and low fertility in addition to defects in shoot and inflorescence meristems. We show that UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) forms a SCF(UFO) complex, which is associated with CSN in vivo. Genetic interaction analysis indicates that CSN is necessary for the gain-of-function activity of the F-box protein UFO in AP3 activation and in floral organ transformation. Compared with the previously reported csn5 antisense and csn1 null mutants, partial deficiency of CSN1 causes a reduction in the level of CUL1 in the mutant flowers without an obvious defect in CUL1 deneddylation. We conclude that CSN is an essential regulator of Arabidopsis flower development and suggest that CSN regulates Arabidopsis flower development in part by modulating SCF(UFO)-mediated AP3 activation.

  17. Target of rapamycin signaling regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Maozhi; Venglat, Prakash; Qiu, Shuqing; Feng, Li; Cao, Yongguo; Wang, Edwin; Xiang, Daoquan; Wang, Jinghe; Alexander, Danny; Chalivendra, Subbaiah; Logan, David; Mattoo, Autar; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2012-12-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) is a major nutrition and energy sensor that regulates growth and life span in yeast and animals. In plants, growth and life span are intertwined not only with nutrient acquisition from the soil and nutrition generation via photosynthesis but also with their unique modes of development and differentiation. How TOR functions in these processes has not yet been determined. To gain further insights, rapamycin-sensitive transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines (BP12) expressing yeast FK506 Binding Protein12 were developed. Inhibition of TOR in BP12 plants by rapamycin resulted in slower overall root, leaf, and shoot growth and development leading to poor nutrient uptake and light energy utilization. Experimental limitation of nutrient availability and light energy supply in wild-type Arabidopsis produced phenotypes observed with TOR knockdown plants, indicating a link between TOR signaling and nutrition/light energy status. Genetic and physiological studies together with RNA sequencing and metabolite analysis of TOR-suppressed lines revealed that TOR regulates development and life span in Arabidopsis by restructuring cell growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, gene expression, and rRNA and protein synthesis. Gain- and loss-of-function Ribosomal Protein S6 (RPS6) mutants additionally show that TOR function involves RPS6-mediated nutrition and light-dependent growth and life span in Arabidopsis.

  18. SHUGOSHINs and PATRONUS protect meiotic centromere cohesion in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamariola, Linda; De Storme, Nico; Vannerum, Katrijn; Vandepoele, Klaas; Armstrong, Susan J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Geelen, Danny

    2014-03-01

    In meiosis, chromosome cohesion is maintained by the cohesin complex, which is released in a two-step manner. At meiosis I, the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit Rec8 is cleaved by the protease Separase along chromosome arms, allowing homologous chromosome segregation. Next, in meiosis II, cleavage of the remaining centromere cohesin results in separation of the sister chromatids. In eukaryotes, protection of centromeric cohesion in meiosis I is mediated by SHUGOSHINs (SGOs). The Arabidopsis genome contains two SGO homologs. Here we demonstrate that Atsgo1 mutants show a premature loss of cohesion of sister chromatid centromeres at anaphase I and that AtSGO2 partially rescues this loss of cohesion. In addition to SGOs, we characterize PATRONUS which is specifically required for the maintenance of cohesion of sister chromatid centromeres in meiosis II. In contrast to the Atsgo1 Atsgo2 double mutant, patronus T-DNA insertion mutants only display loss of sister chromatid cohesion after meiosis I, and additionally show disorganized spindles, resulting in defects in chromosome segregation in meiosis. This leads to reduced fertility and aneuploid offspring. Furthermore, we detect aneuploidy in sporophytic tissue, indicating a role for PATRONUS in chromosome segregation in somatic cells. Thus, ploidy stability is preserved in Arabidopsis by PATRONUS during both meiosis and mitosis.

  19. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  20. Association of flavin adenine dinucleotide with the Arabidopsis blue light receptor CRY1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.; Robertson, D.E.; Ahmad, M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-18

    The Arabidopsis thaliana HY4 gene encodes CRY1, a 75-kilodalton flavoprotein mediating blue light-dependent regulation of seedling development. CRY1 is demonstrated here to noncovalently bind stoichiometric amounts of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). The redox properties of FAD bound by CRY1 include an unexpected stability of the neutral radical flavosemiquinone (FADH{center_dot}). The absorption properties of this flavosemiquinone provide a likely explanation for the additional sensitivity exhibited by CRY1-mediated responses in the green region of the visible spectrum. Despite the sequence homology to microbial DNA photolyases, CRY1 was found to have no detectable photolyase activity. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Tethering complexes in the Arabidopsis endomembrane system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemanja eVukasinovic

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTargeting of endomembrane transport containers is of the utmost importance for proper land plant growth and development. Given the immobility of plant cells, localized membrane vesicle secretion and recycling are amongst the main processes guiding proper cell, tissue and whole plant morphogenesis. Cell wall biogenesis and modification are dependent on vectorial membrane traffic, not only during normal development, but also in stress responses and in plant defence against pathogens and/or symbiosis. It is surprising how little we know about these processes in plants, from small GTPase regulation to the tethering complexes that act as their effectors. Tethering factors are single proteins or protein complexes mediating first contact between the target membrane and arriving membrane vesicles. In this review we focus on the tethering complexes of the best-studied plant model – Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome-based predictions indicate the presence of all major tethering complexes in plants that are known from a hypothetical last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA. The evolutionary multiplication of paralogs of plant tethering complex subunits has produced the massively expanded EXO70 family, indicating a subfunctionalization of the terminal exocytosis machinery in land plants. Interpretation of loss of function (LOF mutant phenotypes has to consider that related, yet clearly functionally-specific complexes often share some common core subunits. It is therefore impossible to conclude with clarity which version of the complex is responsible for the phenotypic deviations observed. Experimental interest in the analysis of plant tethering complexes is growing and we hope to contribute with this review by attracting even more attention to this fascinating field of plant cell biology.

  2. Systemic low temperature signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Peter A; Sargeant, Alexander W; Penfield, Steven D; Quick, W Paul; Atkin, Owen K

    2010-09-01

    When leaves are exposed to low temperature, sugars accumulate and transcription factors in the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) family are expressed, which, together with CBF-independent pathways, are known to contribute to the cold acclimation process and an increase in freezing tolerance. What is not known, however, is whether expression of these cold-regulated genes can be induced systemically in response to a localized cold treatment. To address this, pre-existing, mature leaves of warm-grown Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to a localized cold treatment (near 10 °C) whilst conjoined newly developing leaves continued only to experience warmer temperatures. In initial experiments on wild-type A. thaliana (Col-0) using real-time reverse transcription--PCR (RT-PCR) we observed that some genes--including CBF genes, certain downstream cold-responsive (COR) targets and CBF-independent transcription factors--respond to a direct 9 °C treatment of whole plants. In subsequent experiments, we found that the treatment of expanded leaves with temperatures near 10 °C can induce cold-associated genes in conjoined warm-maintained tissues. CBF1 showed a particularly strong systemic response, although CBF-independent transcription factors also responded. Moreover, the localized cold treatment of A. thaliana (C24) plants with a luciferase reporter fused to the promoter region of KIN2 indicated that in warm-maintained leaves, KIN2 might respond to a systemic signal from remote, directly cold-treated leaves. Collectively, our study provides strong evidence that the processes involved in cold acclimation are partially mediated by a signal that acts systemically. This has the potential to act as an early-warning system to enable developing leaves to cope better with the cold environment in which they are growing.

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065259 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065259 J013002J18 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102134 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102134 J033085F12 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066835 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066835 J013087I16 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-171 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100523 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100523 J023100P04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102695 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102695 J033103F21 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  8. Reference: 488 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Inactivation of ATAB2 strongly affects Arabidopsis development and thylakoid mem...n center subunits is decreased and the association of their mRNAs with polysomes is affected. ATAB2 is a chl

  9. Reference: 212 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available identified in pea (Pisum sativum) using biochemical approaches. The Arabidopsis (...C75-IV, which we studied using a range of molecular, genetic, and biochemical techniques. Expression of atTO

  10. Reference: 480 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available activity was analyzed. Compared to all other Suc transporters, AtSUC9 had an ult...abidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) L. Heynh., was expressed in Xenopus (Xenopus laevis) oocytes, and transport

  11. Reference: 507 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available een them. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the two pathways and the metabolic cro...ss-talk. To identify such regulatory mechanisms, we isolated and characterized the Arabidopsis T-DNA inserti

  12. Reference: 278 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available functional ERA1 gene, which encodes the beta-subunit of protein farnesyltransferase (PFT), exhibit pleiotropic effects...gnaling and meristem development. Here, we report the effects of T-DNA insertion mutations in the Arabidopsi

  13. Reference: 185 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available organisms, we suggest that AtARP4 is likely to exert its effects on plant develop...nuclear actin-related protein AtARP4 in Arabidopsis has multiple effects on plant development, including ear

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069960 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltrans...T1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-60 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK064768 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltrans...T1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-112 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061551 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltran...MT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-67 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104764 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltran...MT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-67 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK098998 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltrans...T1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-57 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061859 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltran...MT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-100 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103387 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ntical to SC35-like splicing factor SCL28, 28 kD [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9843655; contains Pfam profile PF00076: RNA recognition motif. (a.k.a. RRM, RBD, or RNP domain) 2e-34 ...

  1. Reference: 564 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 39-44 17360695 2007 Feb Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the Un...tion in plants. Arabidopsis plasma membrane protein crucial for Ca2+ influx and touch sensing in roots. 9 36

  2. Reference: 796 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America DeBolt...required for normal microtubule dynamics and organization in Arabidopsis. 46 18064-9 19004800 2008 Nov Pro

  3. Reference: 67 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A complete knockout of AGD2 renders embryos inviable. We suggest that AGD2 synthesizes an important amino a...no acid-derived molecule important for activating defense signaling. Divergent roles in Arabidopsis thaliana

  4. Reference: 420 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available are found in various compartments in plant cells. The cytosolic and chloroplast APXs appear to play important...d development, suggesting that APX3 may not be an important antioxidant enzyme in Arabidopsis, at least unde

  5. Reference: 771 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RCADIAN TIMEKEEPER (XCT), an Arabidopsis thaliana gene important for light regula...l elongation in xct is hyposensitive to red light but hypersensitive to blue light. Finally, XCT is important

  6. Reference: 797 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available that the level of GMPase activity regulates Arabidopsis sensitivity to NH(4)(+). Further analysis showed that defective N-glycosylati...on of proteins, unfolded protein response, and cell death in the roots are likely i

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241712 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241712 J065197H24 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-27 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242957 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242957 J090089I15 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-28 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287726 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287726 J065138E17 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242387 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242387 J080051E14 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-45 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK106306 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106306 002-101-C10 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-89 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241272 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241272 J065132I19 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240892 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240892 J065030K10 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-88 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109848 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109848 002-148-F05 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-73 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287673 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287673 J065121E18 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-17 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287621 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287621 J065066I09 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-85 ...

  17. Reference: 142 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te S-glucosyltransferase, UGT74B1, to determine its role in the Arabidopsis glucosinolate pathway. Biochem...ical analyses demonstrate that recombinant UGT74B1 specifically glucosylates the th

  18. Reference: 522 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tol phosphate (InsP) and phosphoinositide phosphate (PtdInsP) substrates. Arabidopsis thaliana has 15 genes encoding 5PTases. Biochem...ical analyses of a subgroup of 5PTase enzymes suggest th

  19. Reference: 459 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plants. These results suggest an additive contribution of AMT1;1 and AMT1;3 to the overall ammonium uptake ...capacity in Arabidopsis roots under nitrogen-deficiency conditions. Additive contribution

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288065 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al to sulfate tansporter Sultr1;3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:10716805; contains Pfam profile PF00916: Sulfate... transporter family; contains Pfam profile PF01740: STAS domain; contains TIGRfam profile TIGR00815: sulfate permease 1e-145 ...

  1. Reference: 645 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rter AtDUR3 in nitrogen nutrition in Arabidopsis. In transgenic lines expressing ... impaired growth on urea as a sole nitrogen source were used to investigate a role of the H+/urea co-transpo

  2. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  3. Reference: 734 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available umi et al. 2008 Apr. Development 135(7):1335-45. CAPRICE (CPC) encodes a small protein with an R3 MYB motif ...doreduplication. Arabidopsis CAPRICE-LIKE MYB 3 (CPL3) controls endoreduplication and flowering development

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101526 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ucosaminyltransferase, putative similar to N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5139335]; contains AT-AC non-consensus splice sites at intron 13 1e-179 ...

  5. Reference: 733 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available role in this transition. Specifically, two autonomous factors in the Arabidopsis...tes FCA alternative polyadenylation and promotes flowering as a novel factor in the autonomous pathway. Firs

  6. Reference: 343 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the characterization of a T-DNA insertion mutant of the Arabidopsis CAP-C gene. Analysis of the progeny of selfe...matin was observed between segregating mitotic chromosomes in pollen produced by selfed heterozygotes. Addit

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241281 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 protein) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; a false single bp exon was added to circumvent a single basepair insertion in the genomic sequence, supported by cDNA/genome alignment. 3e-19 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241243 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 protein) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; a false single bp exon was added to circumvent a single basepair insertion in the genomic sequence, supported by cDNA/genome alignment. 6e-11 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243188 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 protein) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; a false single bp exon was added to circumvent a single basepair insertion in the genomic sequence, supported by cDNA/genome alignment. 8e-23 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242986 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 protein) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; a false single bp exon was added to circumvent a single basepair insertion in the genomic sequence, supported by cDNA/genome alignment. 1e-17 ...

  11. Reference: 30 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ponse to various biotic and abiotic stresses. However the physiological role of t...his pathway remains obscure. To elucidate its role in plants, we analyzed Arabidopsis T-DNA knockout mutants

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062082 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062082 001-044-F11 At3g59970.3 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 1 (MTHFR1) ide...ntical to methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase MTHFR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:5911425 4e-81 ...

  13. Reference: 783 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis ACBP6 was confirmed by analyses of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing autofluorescence-tagged ACBP6 and w... mRNA encoding phospholipase Ddelta. Lipid profiling analyses of rosettes from co

  14. Reference: 789 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ylakoid membranes. Microarray analysis of the chl27-t mutant showed repression of numerous nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis...d CHL27 proteins. Role of Arabidopsis CHL27 protein for photosynthesis, chloroplast development and gene exp

  15. Reference: 352 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available em II and has a specific function distinct from 2-Cys peroxiredoxin in protecting photosynthesis. Its absenc...f Arabidopsis thaliana is attached to the thylakoids and functions in context of photosynthesis

  16. Reference: 21 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ication of a number of mutant lines with altered Chl fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of photosynthesis...cation of mutants of Arabidopsis defective in acclimation of photosynthesis to th

  17. Reference: 413 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ollination and fertilization, and, in the absence of fertilization, flowers senesce. In the Arabidopsis thal...ARF8 acts as an inhibitor to stop further carpel development in the absence of fertilization and the generat

  18. Reference: 405 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available as previously thought. These mutants will prove to be valuable resources for understanding laccase functions in vivo. Mutant identifi...cation and characterization of the laccase gene family in Arabidopsis. 11 2563-9 16

  19. Reference: 263 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available idopsis leaves GLB1 expression and PII protein levels were not significantly affected by either the day/nigh...bolism. Physiological characterisation of Arabidopsis mutants affected in the expression of the putative reg

  20. Reference: 160 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available excessive accumulation of these toxic compounds impairs cell death containment and counteracts the effect...iveness of the plant defenses to restrict pathogen infection. Arabidopsis SHMT1, a

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242550 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242550 J080319D10 At2g35630.1 68415.m04369 microtubule organization 1 protein (MO...R1) identical to microtubule organization 1 protein GI:14317953 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-44 ...

  2. Reference: 301 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n phosphatidylinositol metabolism and is encoded by an At5PTase gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana. A previous study...ntracellular calcium levels. In this study, we provide evidence that At5PTase13 m

  3. Reference: 289 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f flavonoids in Arabidopsis seed coat. 11 2966-80 16243908 2005 Nov The Plant cell Caboche Michel|Debeaujon Isabelle|Kerhoas Lucien|Lepiniec Loïc|Pourcel Lucille|Routaboul Jean-Marc

  4. Reference: 684 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cellular proliferation and expansion at nanomolar concentrations. PSY1 is widely expressed in various Arabi...ulfated glycopeptide involved in cellular proliferation and expansion in Arabidopsis. 46 18333-8 17989228 20

  5. Reference: 147 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the region-specific control of trichome development of Arabidopsis. 3 389-98 15604688 2004 May Plant molecular biology Hulskamp Mart...in|Kirik Victor|Schiefelbein John|Simon Marissa|Wester Katja

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241043 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available upted by a stop codon, creating non-consensus donor and acceptor splice sites. 2e-41 ... ...tical to SP|P92997 Germin-like protein subfamily 1 member 13 precursor {Arabidopsis thaliana}; exon 2 interr

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243135 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available upted by a stop codon, creating non-consensus donor and acceptor splice sites. 7e-43 ... ...tical to SP|P92997 Germin-like protein subfamily 1 member 13 precursor {Arabidopsis thaliana}; exon 2 interr

  8. Reference: 798 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iption factors, control the delicately tuned reorientation and timing of cell div...EZ and SOMBRERO control the orientation of cell division plane in Arabidopsis root stem cells. 6 913-22 1908

  9. Melatonin induces the transcripts of CBF/DREB1s and their involvement in both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitao; Qian, Yongqiang; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; He, Chaozu

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a naturally occurring small molecule that acts as an important secondary messenger in plant stress responses. However, the mechanism underlying the melatonin-mediated signaling pathway in plant stress responses has not been established. C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought response element Binding 1 factors (DREB1s) encode transcription factors that play important roles in plant stress responses. This study has determined that endogenous melatonin and transcripts level of CBFs (AtCBF1, AtCBF2, and AtCBF3) in Arabidopsis leaves were significantly induced by salt, drought, and cold stresses and by pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection. Moreover, both exogenous melatonin treatment and overexpression of CBFs conferred enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Notably, AtCBFs and exogenous melatonin treatment positively regulated the mRNA expression of several stress-responsive genes (COR15A, RD22, and KIN1) and accumulation of soluble sugars content such as sucrose in Arabidopsis under control and stress conditions. Additionally, exogenous sucrose also conferred improved resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Taken together, this study indicates that AtCBFs confer enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, and AtCBF-mediated signaling pathway and sugar accumulation may be involved in melatonin-mediated stress response in Arabidopsis, at least partially.

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071710 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071710 J023110L07 At4g14030.1 selenium-binding protein, putative contains Pfam profile PF05694: 56kDa sele...nium binding protein (SBP56); identical to Putative selenium-binding protein (Swiss...-Prot:O23264) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to selenium binding protein (GI:15485232) [Arabidopsis thalian...a]; identical to cDNA from partial mRNA for selenium binding protein (sbp gene) GI:15485231 1e-162 ...

  11. Reference: 221 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ell cycle. In addition, RAD51 is required for meiosis and its Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog is important... cell cultures, the RAD51 paralog RAD51C is also important for mitotic homologous...ortant for recombination and DNA repair in the mitotic c...chromosome (homolog) pairing, synapsis, and recombination. The budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) RAD51 gene is known to be imp

  12. Reference: 598 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omoter is markedly reduced in the cdkc;2 and cyct1;5 mutants, indicating that the kinase complexes are important... flowering. These results establish Arabidopsis CDKC kinase complexes as important...T1;4 and CYCT1;5, play important roles in infection with Cauliflower mosaic virus...hat Arabidopsis thaliana CDK9-like proteins, CDKC;1 and CDKC;2, and their interacting cyclin T partners, CYC

  13. Ca2+Acts Upstream of H2O2 in Mediating H2S-Induced Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis thaliana%Ca2+位于H2O2上游参与H2S诱导的拟南芥气孔关闭过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李洪旺; 车永梅; 侯丽霞; 王兰香; 刘香凝; 刘新

    2015-01-01

    Using Arabidopsis thaliana as material, the effects of Ca2+in hydrogen sulphide (H2S)-induced guard cell movement and its relationship with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were investigated through pharmacological test combined with spectrophotography and confocal laser scanning microscopy techniques. The results showed that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, caused stomatal closure, and this inductive effects were weakened by addition of Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol-bis-(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and plasma membrane Ca2+channel blocker nifedipine (Nif), respectively, however, endoplasmic retic-ulum calcium pump blocker thapsigargin (Thaps) had no signiifcant effect on stomatal movement induced by H2S. These observations suggest that Ca2+participates in H2S-induced stomatal closure, [Ca2+]cyt elevation in re-sponse to H2S is mainly due to calcium inlfux across the plasma membrane. In addition, H2S up-regulated the expression of NADPH oxidase genes AtRBOHD, AtRBOHF as well as cell wall peroxidase gene AtPRX34, prompted H2O2 accumulation in leaves and guard cells, while EGTA inhibited these effects of H2S. On the other hand, exogenous CaCl2 promoted the expression of AtRBOHD, AtRBOHF and AtPRX34. Based on above results, it can be concluded that Ca2+ acts upstream of H2O2 in mediating H2S-induced stomatal closure in A. thaliana.%以拟南芥为材料,利用药理学实验,结合分光光度法和激光共聚焦显微技术,研究了Ca2+在硫化氢(H2S)诱导拟南芥气孔关闭过程中的作用及其与过氧化氢(H2O2)的关系。结果表明: H2S诱导气孔关闭, Ca2+螯合剂EGTA和质膜Ca2+通道阻断剂硝苯地平(Nif)能不同程度抑制H2S诱导的气孔关闭,而内质网钙泵阻断剂毒胡萝卜素(Thaps)对H2S的作用无显著影响。由此推测, Ca2+参与调节H2S诱导的拟南芥气孔关闭过程,且胞质中Ca2+来源于胞外Ca2+的内流。另外, H2S诱导拟南芥叶片NADPH氧化酶

  14. A High-Throughput Screening System for Arabidopsis Transcription Factors and Its Application to Med25-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Ou; Minami Matsui; Hong-Ya Gu; Li-Jia Qu; Kang-Quan Yin; Sai-Nan Liu; Yan Yang; Tren Gu; Jennifer Man Wing Hui; Li Zhang; Jin Miao; Youichi Kondou

    2011-01-01

    T The activities of transcription factors (TFs) require interactions with specific DNA sequences and other regulatory proteins. To detect such interactions in Arabidopsis, we developed a high-throughput screening system with a Gateway-compatible Gal4-AD-TF library of 1589 Arabidopsis TFs, which can be easily screened by mating-based yeast-one-hybrid (Y1H) and yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H) methods. The efficiency of the system was validated by examining two well-characterized TF-DNA and TF-protein interactions: the CHE-CCA1 promoter interaction by Y1H and NPR1-TGAs interactions by Y2H. We used this system to identify eight TFs that interact with a Mediator subunit, Med25, a key regulator in JA signaling. We identified five TFs that interacted with the GCC-box cis-element in the promoter of PDF1.2, a downstream gene of Med25. We found that three of these TFs, all from the AP2-EREBP family, interact directly both with Med25 and the GCC-box of PDF1.2, suggesting that Med25 regulates PDF1.2 expression through these three TFs.These results demonstrate that this high-throughput Y1H/Y2H screening system is an efficient tool for studying transcriptional regulation networks in Arabidopsis. This system will be available for other Arabidopsis researchers, and thus it provides a vital resource for the Arabidopsis community.

  15. Analysis of Arabidopsis JAZ gene expression during Pseudomonas syringae pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demianski, Agnes J; Chung, Kwi Mi; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2012-01-01

    The jasmonates (JAs) comprise a family of plant hormones that regulate several developmental processes and mediate responses to various abiotic and biotic stresses, including pathogens. JA signalling is manipulated by several strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, including P. syringae strain DC3000, using the virulence factor coronatine (COR) as a mimic of jasmonyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). To better understand the JA-Ile-mediated processes contributing to P. syringae disease susceptibility, it is important to investigate the regulation of JA signalling during infection. In Arabidopsis thaliana, JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins are negative regulators of JA signalling. The transcription factor JASMONATE INSENSITIVE1 (JIN1/ATMYC2) has been implicated in the regulation of JAZ gene expression. To investigate the regulation of JAZ genes during P. syringae pathogenesis, we examined JAZ gene expression during infection of Arabidopsis by DC3000. We found that eight of the 12 JAZ genes are induced during infection in a COR-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, the induction of the majority of JAZ genes during infection was not dependent on JIN1, indicating that JIN1 is not the only transcription factor regulating JAZ genes. A T-DNA insertion mutant and an RNA interference line disrupted for the expression of JAZ10, one of the few JAZ genes regulated by JIN1 during infection, exhibited enhanced JA sensitivity and increased susceptibility to DC3000, with the primary effect being increased disease symptom severity. Thus, JAZ10 is a negative regulator of both JA signalling and disease symptom development.

  16. Defence responses of arabidopsis thaliana to infection by pseudomonas syringae are regulated by the circadian clock

    KAUST Repository

    Bhardwaj, Vaibhav

    2011-10-31

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime. © 2011 Bhardwaj et al.

  17. Intercultural Mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Marian Radulescu; Denisa Mitrut

    2012-01-01

    The Intercultural Mediator facilitates exchanges between people of different socio-cultural backgrounds and acts as a bridge between immigrants and national and local associations, health organizations, services and offices in order to foster integration of every single individual. As the use mediation increases, mediators are more likely to be involved in cross-cultural mediation, but only the best mediators have the opportunity to mediate cross border business disputes or international poli...

  18. Gibberellins inhibit adventitious rooting in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis by affecting auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Petterle, Anna; Bellini, Catherine; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of processes involved in adventitious rooting is important to improve both fundamental understanding of plant physiology and the propagation of numerous plants. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloïdes) plants overexpressing a key gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis gene (AtGA20ox1) grow rapidly but have poor rooting efficiency, which restricts their clonal propagation. Therefore, we investigated the molecular basis of adventitious rooting in Populus and the model plant Arabidopsis. The production of adventitious roots (ARs) in tree cuttings is initiated from the basal stem region, and involves the interplay of several endogenous and exogenous factors. The roles of several hormones in this process have been characterized, but the effects of GAs have not been fully investigated. Here, we show that a GA treatment negatively affects the numbers of ARs produced by wild-type hybrid aspen cuttings. Furthermore, both hybrid aspen plants and intact Arabidopsis seedlings overexpressing AtGA20ox1, PttGID1.1 or PttGID1.3 genes (with a 35S promoter) produce few ARs, although ARs develop from the basal stem region of hybrid aspen and the hypocotyl of Arabidopsis. In Arabidopsis, auxin and strigolactones are known to affect AR formation. Our data show that the inhibitory effect of GA treatment on adventitious rooting is not mediated by perturbation of the auxin signalling pathway, or of the strigolactone biosynthetic and signalling pathways. Instead, GAs appear to act by perturbing polar auxin transport, in particular auxin efflux in hybrid aspen, and both efflux and influx in Arabidopsis.

  19. Signal transduction regulating meristem development in Arabidopsis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cark, Steven E.

    2003-09-10

    Research support by DE-FG02-96ER20227 focused on the CLV loci and their regulation of organ formation at the Arabidopsis shoot meristem. Shoot meristem function is central to plant development as all of the above-ground organs and tissues of the plant are derived post-embryonically from the shoot meristem. At the shoot meristem, stem cells are maintained, and progeny cells undergo a switch toward differentiation and organ formation. The CLV loci, represented by three genes CLV1, CLV2 and CLV3 are key regulators of meristem development. Each of the CLV loci encode a putative receptor-mediated signaling component. When this work began, virtually nothing was known about receptor-mediated signaling in plants. Thus, our goal was to both characterize these genes and the proteins they encode as regulators of meristem development, and to investigate how receptor-mediated signaling might function in plants. Our work lead to several major publications that were significant contributions to understanding this system.

  20. Advances in Arabidopsis research in China from 2006 to 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yan; ZUO JianRu; YANG WeiCai

    2007-01-01

    @@ Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant species, has a number of advantages over other plant species as an experimental organism due to many of its genetic and genomic features. The Chinese Arabidopsis community has made significant contributions to plant biology research in recent years[1,2]. In 2006, studies of plant biology in China received more attention than ever before, especially those pertaining to Arabidopsis research. Here we briefly summarize recent advances in Arabidopsis research in China.

  1. Functional interconnection of MYC2 and SPA1 in the photomorphogenic seedling development of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangappa, Sreeramaiah N; Prasad, V Babu Rajendra; Chattopadhyay, Sudip

    2010-11-01

    MYC2 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that cross talks with light, abscisic acid (ABA), and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways. Here, we have shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MYC2 directly binds to the G-box present in the SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME A1 (SPA1) promoter and that it controls the expression of SPA1 in a COP1-dependent manner. Analyses of atmyc2 spa1 double mutants suggest that whereas MYC2 and SPA1 act redundantly to suppress photomorphogenic growth in the dark, they function synergistically for the suppression of photomorphogenic growth in the light. Our studies have also revealed that MYC2-mediated ABA and JA responses are further modulated by SPA1. Taken together, this study demonstrates the molecular and physiological interrelations of MYC2 and SPA1 in light, ABA, and JA signaling pathways.

  2. Cryopreservation of transformed and wild-type Arabidopsis and tobacco cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Margit; Murray, James A H

    2004-02-01

    We have recently described Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures that can be effectively synchronised. Here, we describe procedures that allow clonal-transformed cell suspension lines to be produced using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and an optimised and straightforward procedure for the cryopreservation and recovery of both parental and transformed lines. Frozen cultures show 90% viability and rapid re-growth after recovery. We show that the cryopreservation procedure is equally applicable to the frequently used tobacco bright yellow (BY)2 cell suspension culture, and that cell cycle synchronisation capacity of parental lines is maintained after both transformation and recovery from cryopreservation. The techniques require no specialised equipment, and are suitable for routine laboratory use, greatly facilitating the handling and maintenance of cell cultures and providing security against both contamination and cumulative somaclonal variation. Finally, the ability to store easily large numbers of transformed lines opens the possibility of using Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures for high-throughput analysis.

  3. Meta-analysis of Arabidopsis KANADI1 direct target genes identifies basic growth-promoting module acting upstream of hormonal signaling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Yakun; Straub, Daniel; Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere;

    2015-01-01

    An intricate network of antagonistically acting transcription factors mediates formation of a flat leaf lamina of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. In this context, members of the class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) transcription factor family specify the adaxial domain (future upper side...

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide-induced Cell Death in Arabidopsis : Transcriptional and Mutant Analysis Reveals a Role of an Oxoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenase Gene in the Cell Death Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Minkov, Ivan N.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a major regulator of plant programmed cell death (PCD) but little is known about the downstream genes from the H2O2-signaling network that mediate the cell death. To address this question, a novel system for studying H2O2-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana was

  5. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako eUchiyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010. To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV, which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP, Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread.

  6. Exposure to Sound Vibrations Lead to Transcriptomic, Proteomic and Hormonal Changes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ritesh; Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Choi, Bosung; Kwon, Young Sang; Bae, Dong Won; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-01-01

    Sound vibration (SV) is considered as an external mechanical force that modulates plant growth and development like other mechanical stimuli (e.g., wind, rain, touch and vibration). A number of previous and recent studies reported developmental responses in plants tailored against SV of varied frequencies. This strongly suggests the existence of sophisticated molecular mechanisms for SV perception and signal transduction. Despite this there exists a huge gap in our understanding regarding the SV-mediated molecular alterations, which is a prerequisite to gain insight into SV-mediated plant development. Herein, we investigated the global gene expression changes in Arabidopsis thaliana upon treatment with five different single frequencies of SV at constant amplitude for 1 h. As a next step, we also studied the SV-mediated proteomic changes in Arabidopsis. Data suggested that like other stimuli, SV also activated signature cellular events, for example, scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), alteration of primary metabolism, and hormonal signaling. Phytohormonal analysis indicated that SV-mediated responses were, in part, modulated by specific alterations in phytohormone levels; especially salicylic acid (SA). Notably, several touch regulated genes were also up-regulated by SV treatment suggesting a possible molecular crosstalk among the two mechanical stimuli, sound and touch. Overall, these results provide a molecular basis to SV triggered global transcriptomic, proteomic and hormonal changes in plant. PMID:27665921

  7. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  8. An Efficient Visual Screen for CRISPR/Cas9 Activity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Florian; Mantegazza, Otho; Greiner, André; Hegemann, Peter; Eisenhut, Marion; Weber, Andreas P. M.

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system enables precision editing of the genome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and likely of any other organism. Tools and methods for further developing and optimizing this widespread and versatile system in Arabidopsis would hence be welcomed. Here, we designed a generic vector system that can be used to clone any sgRNA sequence in a plant T-DNA vector containing an ubiquitously expressed Cas9 gene. With this vector, we explored two alternative marker systems for tracking Cas9-mediated gene-editing in vivo: BIALAPHOS RESISTANCE (BAR) and GLABROUS1 (GL1). BAR confers resistance to glufosinate and is widely used as a positive selection marker; GL1 is required for the formation of trichomes. Reversion of a frameshift null BAR allele to a functional one by Cas9-mediated gene editing yielded a higher than expected number of plants that are resistant to glufosinate. Surprisingly, many of those plants did not display reversion of the BAR gene through the germline. We hypothesize that few BAR revertant cells in a highly chimeric plant likely provide system-wide resistance to glufosinate and thus we suggest that BAR is not suitable as marker for tracking Cas9-mediated gene-editing. Targeting the GL1 gene for disruption with Cas9 provided clearly visible phenotypes of partially and completely glabrous plants. 50% of the analyzed T1 plants produced descendants with a chimeric phenotype and we could recover fully homozygous plants in the T3 generation with high efficiency. We propose that targeting of GL1 is suitable for assessing and optimizing Cas9-mediated gene-editing in Arabidopsis. PMID:28174584

  9. The Arabidopsis EDR1 Protein Kinase Negatively Regulates the ATL1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase to Suppress Cell Death[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Irene; Gu, Yangnan; Qi, Dong; Dubiella, Ullrich

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced programmed cell death under a variety of abiotic and biotic stress conditions. All edr1 mutant phenotypes can be suppressed by missense mutations in the KEEP ON GOING gene, which encodes a trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE)-localized E3 ubiquitin ligase. Here, we report that EDR1 interacts with a second E3 ubiquitin ligase, ARABIDOPSIS TOXICOS EN LEVADURA1 (ATL1), and negatively regulates its activity. Overexpression of ATL1 in transgenic Arabidopsis induced severe growth inhibition and patches of cell death, while transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves induced cell death and tissue collapse. The E3 ligase activity of ATL1 was required for both of these processes. Importantly, we found that ATL1 interacts with EDR1 on TGN/EE vesicles and that EDR1 suppresses ATL1-mediated cell death in N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis. Lastly, knockdown of ATL1 expression suppressed cell death phenotypes associated with the edr1 mutant and made Arabidopsis hypersusceptible to powdery mildew infection. Taken together, our data indicate that ATL1 is a positive regulator of programmed cell death and EDR1 negatively regulates ATL1 activity at the TGN/EE and thus controls stress responses initiated by ATL1-mediated ubiquitination events. PMID:25398498

  10. Evidence for a positive regulatory role of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) Fa WRKY1 and Arabidopsis At WRKY75 proteins in resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encinas-Villarejo, Sonia; Maldonado, Ana M; Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; de los Santos, Berta; Romero, Fernando; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular basis of plant resistance to pathogens in species other than Arabidopsis is limited. The function of Fa WRKY1, the first WRKY gene isolated from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa), an important agronomical fruit crop, has been investigated here. Fa WRKY1 encodes a IIc WRKY transcription factor and is up-regulated in strawberry following Colletotrichum acutatum infection, treatments with elicitors, and wounding. Its Arabidopsis sequence homologue, At WRKY75, has been described as playing a role in regulating phosphate starvation responses. However, using T-DNA insertion mutants, a role for the At WRKY75 and Fa WRKY1 in the activation of basal and R-mediated resistance in Arabidopsis is demonstrated. At wrky75 mutants are more susceptible to virulent and avirulent isolates of Pseudomonas syringae. Overexpression of Fa WRKY1 in At wrky75 mutant and wild type reverts the enhanced susceptible phenotype of the mutant, and even increases resistance to avirulent strains of P. syringae. The resistance phenotype is uncoupled to PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR) gene expression, but it is associated with a strong oxidative burst and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) induction. Taken together, these results indicate that At WRKY75 and Fa WRKY1 act as positive regulators of defence during compatible and incompatible interactions in Arabidopsis and, very likely, Fa WRKY1 is an important element mediating defence responses to C. acutatum in strawberry. Moreover, these results provide evidence that Arabidopsis can be a useful model for functional studies in Rosacea species like strawberry.

  11. Recent Progress in Arabidopsis Research in China: A Preface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Xu

    2006-01-01

    @@ In 2002, a workshop on Arabidopsis research in China was held in Shanghai, when a small group of Chinese plant scientists was working on this model species. Since then, we have witnessed the rapid growth of Arabidopsis research in China. This special issue of Journal of Integrative Plant Biology is dedicated exclusively to the Fourth Workshop on Arabidopsis Research in China, scheduled on November 30, 2005, in Beijing. In addition to reports collected in this special issue, the Chinese Arabidopsis community has been able to make significant contributions to many research fields. Here, I briefly summarize recent advances in Arabidopsis research in China.

  12. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  13. Reference: 510 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ch stabilizes the water-oxidizing complex, is represented in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) by two isofo...rms. Two T-DNA insertion mutant lines deficient in either the PsbO1 or the PsbO2 protein were re...ally. Both PsbO proteins were able to support the oxygen evolution activity of PSII, although PsbO2 was less... efficient than PsbO1 under photoinhibitory conditions. Prolonged high light stress led to re...duced growth and fitness of the mutant lacking PsbO2 as compared with the wild type and the muta

  14. Reference: 600 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n M et al. 2007 Jun. Plant J. 50(5):810-24. A novel abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutant, aba4, was identified in a scre...en for paclobutrazol-resistant germination. Compared with wild-type, the mutant showed reduced e...by map-based cloning, and found to be a unique gene in the Arabidopsis genome. The predicted protein has fou...r putative helical transmembrane domains and shows significant similarity to pred...icted proteins from tomato, rice and cyanobacteria. Constitutive expression of the ABA4 gene in Arabidopsis

  15. Reference: 59 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 59 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u14563930i Kaczorowski Kare...naling network in Arabidopsis, we used a sensitized genetic screen for deetiolation-defective seedlings. Two allelic mutants were... isolated that exhibited reduced sensitivity to both continuous red and far-re...d light, suggesting involvement in both phyA and phyB signaling. The molecular lesions res...ponsible for the phenotype were shown to be mutations in the Arabidopsis PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) g

  16. Reference: 756 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available elle et al. 2008 Jun. Plant Physiol. 147(2):595-610. Treatment of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) alterna...tive oxidase1a (aox1a) mutant plants with moderate light under drought conditions resulted in a phenotypic difference compare...d with ecotype Columbia (Col-0), as evidenced by a 10-fold incre...ase in the accumulation of anthocyanins in leaves, alterations in photosynthetic efficiency, and increased superoxide radical and re...duced root growth at the early stages of seedling growth. Analysis of metabolite profiles re

  17. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-10-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning.

  18. Substitution of a Conserved Glycine in the PHR Domain of Arabidopsis CRYPTOCHROME 1 Confers a Constitutive Light Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Nan Gu; Yan-Chun Zhang; Hong-QuanYang

    2012-01-01

    CRYPTOCHROMES (CRYs) are photolyase-like ultraviolet-A/blue light photoreceptors that mediate various light responses in plants.The signaling mechanism of Arabidopsis CRYs (CRY1 and CRY2) involves direct CRY-COP1 interaction.Here,we report that CRY1G380R,which carries a Gly-to-Arg substitution of the highly conserved G380 in the photolyase-related (PHR) domain of Arabidopsis CRY1,shows constitutive CRY1 photoreceptor activity in Arabidopsis.Transgenic plants overexpressing CRY1G380R display a constitutively photomorphogenic (COP) phenotype in darkness,as well as a dramatic early flowering phenotype under short-day light conditions (SD).We further demonstrate that CRY1G380R expression driven by the native CRY1 promoter also results in a COP phenotype in darkness.Moreover,overexpression of either the Arabidopsis homolog CRY2G377R or the rice ortholog OsCRY1bG388R of CRY1G380R in Arabidopsis results in a COP phenotype in darkness.Cellular localization studies indicate that CRY1G380R co-localizes with COP1 in the same nuclear bodies (NBs) in vivo and inhibits the nuclear accumulation of COP1 in darkness.These results suggest that the conserved G380 may play a critical role in regulating the photoreceptor activity of plant CRYs and that CRY1G380R might constitutively phenocopy the photo-activated CRY1 in darkness and thus constitutively mediate CRY1 signaling.

  19. Epigenetic Suppression of T-DNA Insertion Mutants in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangbin Gao; Yunde Zhao

    2013-01-01

    T-DNA insertion mutants have been widely used to define gene functions in Arabidopsis and in other plants.Here,we report an unexpected phenomenon of epigenetic suppression of T-DNA insertion mutants in Arabidopsis.When the two T-DNA insertion mutants,yucl-1 and ag-TD,were crossed together,the defects in all of the ag-TD plants in the F2 population were partially suppressed regardless of the presence of yucl-1.Conversion of ag-TD to the suppressed ag-TD (named as ag-TD*) did not follow the laws of Mendelian genetics.The ag-TD* could be stably transmitted for many generations without reverting to ag-TD,and ag-TD* had the capacity to convert ag-TD to ag-TD*.We show that epigenetic suppression of T-DNA mutants is not a rare event,but certain structural features in the T-DNA mutants are needed in order for the suppression to take place.The suppressed T-DNA mutants we observed were all intronic T-DNA mutants and the T-DNA fragments in both the trigger T-DNA as well as in the suppressed T-DNA shared stretches of identical sequences.We demonstrate that the suppression of intronic T-DNA mutants is mediated by trans-interactions between two ToDNA insertions.This work shows that caution is needed when intronic T-DNA mutants are used.

  20. The capsid protein p38 of turnip crinkle virus is associated with the suppression of cucumber mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana co-infected with cucumber mosaic virus and turnip crinkle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Juan; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jian; Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhang, Ping; Zhu, Tong; Chen, Li-Juan; Bao, Wei-Kai; Xi, De-Hui; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Infection of plants by multiple viruses is common in nature. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) belong to different families, but Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana are commonly shared hosts for both viruses. In this study, we found that TCV provides effective resistance to infection by CMV in Arabidopsis plants co-infected by both viruses, and this antagonistic effect is much weaker when the two viruses are inoculated into different leaves of the same plant. However, similar antagonism is not observed in N. benthamiana plants. We further demonstrate that disrupting the RNA silencing-mediated defense of the Arabidopsis host does not affect this antagonism, but capsid protein (CP or p38)-defective mutant TCV loses the ability to repress CMV, suggesting that TCV CP plays an important role in the antagonistic effect of TCV toward CMV in Arabidopsis plants co-infected with both viruses.

  1. Investigations on the photoregulation of chloroplast movement and leaf positioning in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In-Seob; Cho, Hae-Young; Moni, Akhi; Lee, Ah-Young; Briggs, Winslow R

    2013-01-01

    We recently investigated the roles of the phototropin 1 (PHOT1) LOV (light, oxygen or voltage) domains in mediating phototropic curvature in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings expressing either wild-type PHOT1 or PHOT1 with one or both LOV domains inactivated by a single amino acid replacement. We have now investigated the role of the PHOT1 LOV domains in chloroplast movement and in leaf positioning in response to blue light. Low fluence rate blue light is known to mediate a chloroplast accumulation response and high fluence rate blue light an avoidance response in Arabidopsis leaves. As was the case for phototropism, LOV2 of PHOT1 is essential for chloroplast accumulation and LOV1 is dispensable. PHOT1 LOV2 is also essential to maintain developing primary leaves in a horizontal position under white light from above and LOV1 is again dispensable. A red light pulse given to dark-adapted light-grown plants followed by 2 h of darkness enhances both the chloroplast accumulation response under dim blue light and the chloroplast avoidance response under strong blue light. The effect is far-red reversible. This photoreversible response is normal in a phyB null mutant but does not appear in a phyA null mutant. These results suggest that phyA mediates the enhancement, induced by a red light pulse, of blue light-induced chloroplast movements.

  2. In Vivo Phosphorylation Site Mapping and Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Phototropin 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stuart Sullivan; Catriona E. Thomson; Douglas J.Lamont; Matthew A. Jones; John M.Christie

    2008-01-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2) are blue-light receptor kinases controlling a range of responses that optimize the photosynthetic efficiency of plants. Light sensing is mediated by two flavin-binding motifs, known as LOV1 and LOV2,located within the N-terminal region of the protein. Photoexcitation via LOV2 leads to activation of the C-terminal kinase domain and consequently receptor autophosphorylation. However, knowledge of the in-vivo phosphorylation sites for Arabidopsis phototropins is lacking and has impeded progress in elucidating the functional significance of receptor phosphorylation. We have purified phot1 from Arabidopsis and identified the in-vivo sites of receptor phosphorylation by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Arabidopsis-derived phot1 binds flavin mononucleotide as chromophore and is phosphorylated at four major sites located upstream of LOV2 (Ser58, Ser85, Ser350, and Ser410), three of which are induced by blue light. Nevertheless, structure-function analysis indicates that the biological activity of phot1 can be attributed to a modular unit comprising the LOV2-kinase region of the protein. Thus, peptide regions upstream of LOV2, including the sites of receptor phosphorylation identified here, do not appear to be important for receptor signaling. By contrast, these regions may be necessary for maximizing stomatal performance and possibly light-induced relocalization of phot1.

  3. Natural variation and dosage of the HEI10 meiotic E3 ligase control Arabidopsis crossover recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Underwood, Charles J.; Lambing, Christophe; Martinez-Garcia, Marina; Lawrence, Emma J.; Ziolkowska, Liliana; Griffin, Catherine; Choi, Kyuha; Franklin, F. Chris H.; Martienssen, Robert A.; Henderson, Ian R.

    2017-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo crossover recombination, which creates genetic diversity and balances homolog segregation. Despite these critical functions, crossover frequency varies extensively within and between species. Although natural crossover recombination modifier loci have been detected in plants, causal genes have remained elusive. Using natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we identified two major recombination quantitative trait loci (rQTLs) that explain 56.9% of crossover variation in Col×Ler F2 populations. We mapped rQTL1 to semidominant polymorphisms in HEI10, which encodes a conserved ubiquitin E3 ligase that regulates crossovers. Null hei10 mutants are haploinsufficient, and, using genome-wide mapping and immunocytology, we show that transformation of additional HEI10 copies is sufficient to more than double euchromatic crossovers. However, heterochromatic centromeres remained recombination-suppressed. The strongest HEI10-mediated crossover increases occur in subtelomeric euchromatin, which is reminiscent of sex differences in Arabidopsis recombination. Our work reveals that HEI10 naturally limits Arabidopsis crossovers and has the potential to influence the response to selection. PMID:28223312

  4. TORNADO1 regulates root epidermal patterning through the WEREWOLF pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Song, Sang-Kee; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-01-01

    Cell fate in the root epidermis of Arabidopsis thaliana is determined in a position-dependent manner. SCRAMBLED (SCM), an atypical leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, mediates this positional regulation via its effect on WEREWOLF (WER) expression, and subsequently, its downstream transcription factor, GLABRA2 (GL2), which are required for nonhair cell development. Previously, TORNADO1 (TRN1), a plant-specific protein with a leucine-rich repeat ribonuclease inhibitor-like domain, was shown to be required for proper epidermal patterning in Arabidopsis roots. In this work, we analyzed the possible involvement of TRN1 in the known root epidermal gene network. We discovered that the trn1 mutant caused the ectopic expression of WER and the randomized expression of GL2 and EGL3. This suggests that TRN1 regulates the position-dependent cell fate determination by affecting WER expression in Arabidopsis root epidermis. Additionally, the distinct phenotypes of the aerial parts of the trn1-t and scm-2 mutant suggest that TRN1 and SCM might have different functions in the development of aerial parts.

  5. FUM2, a Cytosolic Fumarase, Is Essential for Acclimation to Low Temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Beth C; Miller, Matthew A E; Feil, Regina; Rattray, Nicholas; Bowsher, Caroline G; Goodacre, Royston; Lunn, John E; Johnson, Giles N

    2016-09-01

    Although cold acclimation is a key process in plants from temperate climates, the mechanisms sensing low temperature remain obscure. Here, we show that the accumulation of the organic acid fumaric acid, mediated by the cytosolic fumarase FUM2, is essential for cold acclimation of metabolism in the cold-tolerant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). A nontargeted metabolomic approach, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, identifies fumarate as a key component of the cold response in this species. Plants of T-DNA insertion mutants, lacking FUM2, show marked differences in their response to cold, with contrasting responses both in terms of metabolite concentrations and gene expression. The fum2 plants accumulated higher concentrations of phosphorylated sugar intermediates and of starch and malate. Transcripts for proteins involved in photosynthesis were markedly down-regulated in fum2.2 but not in wild-type Columbia-0. Plants of fum2 show a complete loss of the ability to acclimate photosynthesis to low temperature. We conclude that fumarate accumulation plays an essential role in low temperature sensing in Arabidopsis, either indirectly modulating metabolic or redox signals or possibly being itself directly involved in cold sensing.

  6. Employing libraries of zinc finger artificial transcription factors to screen for homologous recombination mutants in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhout, Beatrice I; Pinas, Johan E; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2006-11-01

    A library of genes for zinc finger artificial transcription factors (ZF-ATF) was generated by fusion of DNA sequences encoding three-finger Cys(2)His(2) ZF domains to the VP16 activation domain under the control of the promoter of the ribosomal protein gene RPS5A from Arabidopsis thaliana. After introduction of this library into an Arabidopsis homologous recombination (HR) indicator line, we selected primary transformants exhibiting multiple somatic recombination events. After PCR-mediated rescue of ZF sequences, reconstituted ZF-ATFs were re-introduced in the target line. In this manner, a ZF-ATF was identified that led to a 200-1000-fold increase in somatic HR (replicated in an independent second target line). A mutant plant line expressing the HR-inducing ZF-ATF exhibited increased resistance to the DNA-damaging agent bleomycin and was more sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), a combination of traits not described previously. Our results demonstrate that the use of ZF-ATF pools is highly rewarding when screening for novel dominant phenotypes in Arabidopsis.

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-47 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-28 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-26 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-45 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 1e-24 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 2e-65 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110534 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110534 002-168-A07 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-114 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-50 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 5e-25 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 8e-98 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061162 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061162 006-209-A01 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 3e-35 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 3e-66 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069071 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069071 J023010H01 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-167 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121003 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121003 J023045B21 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-167 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-45 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-98 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060286 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060286 001-006-C08 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 6e-78 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 1e-125 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 8e-25 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 3e-31 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-130 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105393 001-123-B04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 5e-48 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-29 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109812 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109812 002-147-H02 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 5e-90 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 8e-63 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 1e-126 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-124 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 4e-27 ...

  19. Reference: 415 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available study focuses on the seven other Arabidopsis CAD for which functions are not yet elucidated. Their expression patterns were determine...ession of CAD 1, B1, and G genes was determined using their promoters fused to the GUS reporter gene. CAD 1

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243408 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available subunit ClpX, putative similar to CLP protease regulatory subunit CLPX GI:2674203 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; non-consensus... splice donor GC at exon 4; non-consensus splice donor AA at exon 7 1e-151 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242797 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available subunit ClpX, putative similar to CLP protease regulatory subunit CLPX GI:2674203 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; non-consensus... splice donor GC at exon 4; non-consensus splice donor AA at exon 7 2e-23 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243408 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available subunit ClpX, putative similar to CLP protease regulatory subunit CLPX GI:2674203 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; non-consensus... splice donor GC at exon 4; non-consensus splice donor AA at exon 7 2e-12 ...

  3. Reference: 767 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Mutation analysis of 25 of the 27 member genes representing 13 of the 14 sub-families... of the UBP gene family revealed that single-gene mutants of three genes in two sub-families exhibit v

  4. Reference: 158 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available onika et al. 2005 Feb. Plant J. 41(3):386-99. Cullin proteins, which belong to multigenic families in all eu...ic search revealed the existence of at least 76 BTB-domain proteins in Arabidopsis belonging to 11 major families.... Yeast two-hybrid experiments indicate that representative members of certain families are able to phy

  5. Reference: 456 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available h other Spo11/topo VIA proteins, but their functional relationship during meiosis or other processes is not ...s. Thus, the three Arabidopsis Spo11 homologues appear to function in two discrete processes, i.e. AtSPO11-1

  6. Reference: 51 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available urce of acetyl-CoA formation in the plastids of plants and is composed of multiple copies of four different ...astidic E2 (dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase) subunit, plE2, of the complex in Arabidopsis destroys the expre

  7. Reference: 567 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ith findings that noxy2 and mutants with defective 9-LOX activity showed increased numbers of lateral roots,...or of lateral root formation. Histochemical and molecular analyses revealed that 9-HOT activated events comm...in Arabidopsis regulate lateral root development and defense responses through a specific signaling cascade.

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287911 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287911 J065213B08 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 3e-85 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK318551 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK318551 J075138M12 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 4e-27 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241823 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241823 J065212G21 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 1e-150 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243378 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243378 J100063A13 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 5e-18 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288351 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288351 J090024C17 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 2e-24 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242252 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242252 J075182G16 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 6e-88 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK073411 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073411 J033041P20 At4g02060.1 prolifera protein (PRL) / DNA replication licensing... factor Mcm7 (MCM7) identical to DNA replication licensing factor Mcm7 SP|P43299 PROLIFERA protein {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam profile PF00493: MCM2/3/5 family 0.0 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100867 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100867 J023124E13 At2g29640.1 josephin family protein contains Pfam domain PF02099: Jose...phin; similar to Josephin-like protein (Swiss-Prot:O82391) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 7e-59 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241402 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241402 J065159A02 At4g19070.1 68417.m02810 cadmium-responsive protein / cadmium i...nduced protein (AS8) identical to cadmium induced protein AS8 SP:P42735 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-11 ...

  17. Proteomics of Arabidopsis seed germination and priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, K.; Job, C.; Groot, S.P.C.; Puype, M.; Demol, H.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Job, D.

    2003-01-01

    To better understand seed germination, a complex developmental process, we developed a proteome analysis of the model plant Arabidopsis for which complete genome sequence is now available. Among about 1,300 total seed proteins resolved in two-dimensional gels, changes in the abundance (up- and down-

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241096 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241096 J065076O13 At3g10520.1 68416.m01262 non-symbiotic hemoglobin 2 (HB2) (GLB2...) identical to SP|O24521 Non-symbiotic hemoglobin 2 (Hb2) (ARAth GLB2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-40 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240885 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240885 J065029A17 At3g10520.1 68416.m01262 non-symbiotic hemoglobin 2 (HB2) (GLB2...) identical to SP|O24521 Non-symbiotic hemoglobin 2 (Hb2) (ARAth GLB2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 6e-34 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241096 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241096 J065076O13 At2g16060.1 68415.m01841 non-symbiotic hemoglobin 1 (HB1) (GLB1...) identical to SP|O24520 Non-symbiotic hemoglobin 1 (Hb1) (ARAth GLB1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-59 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240885 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240885 J065029A17 At2g16060.1 68415.m01841 non-symbiotic hemoglobin 1 (HB1) (GLB1...) identical to SP|O24520 Non-symbiotic hemoglobin 1 (Hb1) (ARAth GLB1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-49 ...

  2. Protease gene families in Populus and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteases play key roles in plants, maintaining strict protein quality control and degrading specific sets of proteins in response to diverse environmental and developmental stimuli. Similarities and differences between the proteases expressed in different species may give valuable insights into their physiological roles and evolution. Results We have performed a comparative analysis of protease genes in the two sequenced dicot genomes, Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa by using genes coding for proteases in the MEROPS database 1 for Arabidopsis to identify homologous sequences in Populus. A multigene-based phylogenetic analysis was performed. Most protease families were found to be larger in Populus than in Arabidopsis, reflecting recent genome duplication. Detailed studies on e.g. the DegP, Clp, FtsH, Lon, rhomboid and papain-Like protease families showed the pattern of gene family expansion and gene loss was complex. We finally show that different Populus tissues express unique suites of protease genes and that the mRNA levels of different classes of proteases change along a developmental gradient. Conclusion Recent gene family expansion and contractions have made the Arabidopsis and Populus complements of proteases different and this, together with expression patterns, gives indications about the roles of the individual gene products or groups of proteases.

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241728 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241728 J065199H08 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 3e-36 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240645 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240645 J023003B03 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 1e-17 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243302 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243302 J100054J17 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 4e-82 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241015 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241015 J065054A13 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 8e-37 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288091 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288091 J075184D14 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 4e-29 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK318617 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK318617 J100090H20 At1g19850.1 68414.m02490 transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) /... auxin-responsive protein (IAA24) / auxin response factor 5 (ARF5) identical to transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP/IAA24/ARF5) SP:P93024 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-63 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103452 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK103452 J033129I11 At1g19850.1 transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) / auxin-respon...sive protein (IAA24) / auxin response factor 5 (ARF5) identical to transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP/IAA24/ARF5) SP:P93024 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-166 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243230 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243230 J100044L04 At1g19850.1 68414.m02490 transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) /... auxin-responsive protein (IAA24) / auxin response factor 5 (ARF5) identical to transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP/IAA24/ARF5) SP:P93024 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-65 ...

  11. Reference: 346 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 346 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16496096i Todd Christopher...midohydrolase activity from Arabidopsis thaliana. 5 1108-13 16496096 2006 Apr Planta Polacco Joe C|Todd Christopher D

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242980 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242980 J090094F15 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-19 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241644 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241644 J065189M04 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-37 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241055 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241055 J065063N18 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-26 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242211 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242211 J075171C16 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-21 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243669 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243669 J100089N11 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 6e-14 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241645 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241645 J065189N07 At5g20000.1 68418.m02380 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit, putative almost... identical to 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit RPT6a GI:6652888 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; almost

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243043 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243043 J100008P08 At5g20000.1 68418.m02380 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit, putative almost... identical to 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit RPT6a GI:6652888 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; almost

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241277 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241277 J065134P20 At5g20000.1 68418.m02380 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit, putative almost... identical to 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit RPT6a GI:6652888 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; almost

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241074 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241074 J065068E03 At5g20000.1 68418.m02380 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit, putative almost... identical to 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit RPT6a GI:6652888 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; almost

  1. Reference: 386 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 386 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16698900i Hricová Andrea...d mesophyll cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. 3 942-56 16698900 2006 Jul Plant physiology Hricová Andrea|Micol José Luis|Quesada Victor

  2. Reference: 394 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 394 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16766689i Rudella Andrea...and defects in chloroplast biogenesis in Arabidopsis. 7 1704-21 16766689 2006 Jul The Plant cell Alonso Jose M|Ecker Joseph R|Friso Giulia|Rudella Andrea|van Wijk Klaas J

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243428 J100067L15 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-36 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288699 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288699 J090061C22 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-36 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243271 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243271 J100049K04 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 4e-35 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241812 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241812 J065210K15 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-22 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241549 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241549 J065176M15 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-32 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241615 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241615 J065186D02 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-35 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288487 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288487 J090040H24 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-37 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287469 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287469 J043021L20 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-36 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241370 J065154C10 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-31 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288415 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288415 J090031E07 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-37 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287447 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287447 J043016O04 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-30 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241364 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241364 J065152E11 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-20 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 3e-13 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241281 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-12 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241762 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 9e-17 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242986 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-13 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287689 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available avonol 3-O-methyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to ...1.1.76) (AtOMT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-23 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240736 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available avonol 3-O-methyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to ...1.1.76) (AtOMT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-22 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241705 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available avonol 3-O-methyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to ...1.1.76) (AtOMT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-11 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287483 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available avonol 3-O-methyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to ...1.1.76) (AtOMT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-37 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK107208 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ala hydrolase, putative virtually identical to gr1-protein from [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:3559811; similar t...AK107208 002-125-B11 At1g44350.1 IAA-amino acid hydrolase 6, putative (ILL6) / IAA-

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062144 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062144 001-045-G08 At5g54080.2 homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase / homogentisicase/ho... (EC 1.13.11.5) (Homogentisicase) (Homogentisate oxygenase) (Homogentisic acid oxidase) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam profile PF04209: homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase 1e-155 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061294 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061294 006-301-D01 At3g08900.1 reversibly glycosylated polypeptide-3 (RGP3) nearl...y identical to reversibly glycosylated polypeptide-3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:11863238; contains non-consensus GA-donor splice site at intron 2 0.0 ...

  6. Reference: 119 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of the Arabidopsis homolog of MSH4 (AtMSH4). We demonstrate that AtMSH4 expression can only be detected in floral tissues, consisten...chromosomes. A T-DNA insertional mutant (Atmsh4) exhibited normal vegetative growth but a severe reduction in fertility, consistent

  7. Reference: 428 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on was delayed in the psb27 mutant, suggesting that Psb27 is required for efficient...icient repair of photodamaged photosystem II. 4-5 567-75...he involvement of this lumenal protein in the recovery process of PSII. A Psb27 homologue in Arabidopsis thaliana is required for eff

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105724 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105724 001-201-G07 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bisph...osphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 0.0 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK072243 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072243 J023003N10 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bispho...sphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 0.0 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243221 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243221 J100043L21 At5g15410.2 68418.m01803 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic... nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-40 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK067626 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067626 J013112I06 At5g15410.1 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic nu...cleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243602 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243602 J100084P18 At5g15410.2 68418.m01803 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic... nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-98 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288592 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288592 J090051B06 At5g15410.2 68418.m01803 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic... nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-145 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060339 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060339 001-008-C12 At5g15410.2 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic n...ucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-175 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069395 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069395 J023011N07 At1g71440.1 tubulin folding cofactor E / Pfifferling (PFI) almo...st identical to tubulin folding cofactor E (Pfifferling; PFI) GI:20514267 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; identical to cDNA tubulin folding cofactor E, GI:20514266 7e-41 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102150 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102150 J033086D17 At3g10220.1 tubulin folding cofactor B identical to tubulin folding... cofactor B GI:20514259 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; identical to cDNA tubulin folding cofactor B GI:20514258 6e-91 ...

  17. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Miklós Pogány; Tamás Dankó; Evelin Kámán-Tóth; Ildikó Schwarczinger; Zoltán Bozsó

    2015-01-01

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is s...

  18. Reference: 566 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utations in the MKK3-MPK6 cascade, which indicates important roles in JA signaling. We provide a model expla...tress - into three different sets of responses in Arabidopsis. The mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade MKK3-MPK6 is an important

  19. Reference: 392 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pment. The Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF AUXIN RESISTANCE proteins are nucleoporins with an important role in ho...olyadenylated RNA within the nucleus, indicating that SAR1 and SAR3 are required for mRNA export. Our results demonstrate the importa...nt role of the plant NPC in hormone signaling and develo

  20. Reference: 438 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ity and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. 18 6902-12 16943431 2006 Sep Molecular and cellular bio...logy Chen Zhizhong|Gong Zhizhong|Hong Xuhui|Jablonowski Daniel|Ren Xiaozhi|Schaffrath Raffael|Zhang Hairong|Zhou Xiaofeng|Zhu Jian-Kang

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK059353 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059353 001-026-D01 At1g01170.1 ozone-responsive stress-related protein, putative ...similar to stress-related ozone-induced protein AtOZI1 (GI:790583) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains 1 predicted transmembrane domain; 2e-29 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066771 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066771 J013083K07 At1g01170.1 ozone-responsive stress-related protein, putative s...imilar to stress-related ozone-induced protein AtOZI1 (GI:790583) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains 1 predicted transmembrane domain; 2e-29 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK059160 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059160 001-023-D05 At1g01170.1 ozone-responsive stress-related protein, putative ...similar to stress-related ozone-induced protein AtOZI1 (GI:790583) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains 1 predicted transmembrane domain; 3e-28 ...

  4. Reference: 234 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 234 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15980261i Stepanova ...ion of two root-specific ethylene-insensitive mutants in Arabidopsis. 8 2230-42 15980261 2005 Aug The Plant cell Alonso Jose M|Hamilton Alexandra A|Hoyt Joyce M|Stepanova Anna N

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101721 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101721 J033061A20 At3g57040.1 two-component responsive regulator / response reactor... 4 (RR4) identical to responce reactor4 GI:3273202 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00072 response regulator receiver domain 9e-49 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058585 001-017-G01 At3g57040.1 two-component responsive regulator / response reactor... 4 (RR4) identical to responce reactor4 GI:3273202 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00072 response regulator receiver domain 6e-55 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066153 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF02861: Clp amino... terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287906 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available subunit / ClpC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF028...61: Clp amino terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100126 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF02861: Clp amino... terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058510 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lpC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF02861: Clp amin...o terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069552 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF02861: Clp amino... terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288349 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288349 J090023P19 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affect...ing germination 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-23 ...

  13. Reference: 396 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ht to be encoded in Arabidopsis by the ATS1 locus. A number of genetic mutants deficient in this activity have been described. How...hosphatidylglycerol raised the question of whether an alternative pathway of phosphatidylglycerol assembly in the plastid exists. How

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103126 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0S proteasome beta subunit PBB1 (PBB1) GB:AAC32066 [Arabidopsis thaliana] (Genetics 149 (2), 677-692 (1998)); contains Pfam profile: PF00227 proteasome A-type and B-type; 1e-129 ...

  15. Reference: 750 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 750 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u18390594i Fulton Daniel...in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. 4 1040-58 18390594 2008 Apr The Plant cell Dorken Gary|Eicke Simona|Francisco Perigio|Fulton Daniel

  16. Reference: 161 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis have not been identified. We tested whether several Arabidopsis thaliana enzy...ith the fact that GH3.6 was active on each of these auxins. By contrast, GH3.6 and the other five enzymes tested

  17. Reference: 267 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tien et al. 2005 Sep. Plant J. 43(6):824-36. The sucrose transporter gene AtSUC5 was studied as part of a programme aimed at identify...ing and studying the genes involved in seed maturation in Arabidopsis. Expression p

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242807 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242807 J090060H17 At5g37500.1 68418.m04516 guard cell outward rectifying K+ chann...el (GORK) identical to guard cell outward rectifying K+ channel [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|11414742|emb|CAC17

  19. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110694 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110694 002-170-A08 At5g59560.2 sensitivity to red light reduced protein (SRR1) id...entical to sensitivity to red light reduced protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:25527089; supporting cDNA gi|25527088|gb|AY127047.1| 1e-18 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243061 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243061 J100014C18 At5g24520.2 68418.m02892 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 1e-102 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288081 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288081 J075172F18 At5g24520.3 68418.m02893 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 4e-13 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287566 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287566 J065027L04 At1g34790.1 68414.m04337 transparent testa 1 protein (TT1) / zi...nc finger (C2H2 type) protein TT1 identical to transparent testa 1 GI:18253279 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF00096: Zinc finger, C2H2 type 2e-77 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288081 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288081 J075172F18 At5g24520.1 68418.m02891 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 4e-13 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289209 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289209 J100058I16 At1g34790.1 68414.m04337 transparent testa 1 protein (TT1) / zi...nc finger (C2H2 type) protein TT1 identical to transparent testa 1 GI:18253279 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF00096: Zinc finger, C2H2 type 1e-12 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243061 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243061 J100014C18 At5g24520.1 68418.m02891 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 1e-102 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243061 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243061 J100014C18 At5g24520.3 68418.m02893 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 1e-102 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243285 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243285 J100051N01 At1g34790.1 68414.m04337 transparent testa 1 protein (TT1) / zi...nc finger (C2H2 type) protein TT1 identical to transparent testa 1 GI:18253279 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF00096: Zinc finger, C2H2 type 1e-24 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288081 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288081 J075172F18 At5g24520.2 68418.m02892 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 4e-13 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 8e-44 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-20 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-41 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-26 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-11 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-16 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062711 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062711 001-106-C02 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 9e-34 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108506 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108506 002-143-H11 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 7e-14 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-17 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071661 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071661 J023105D07 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-33 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 8e-18 ...