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Sample records for 4d phase-contrast magnetic

  1. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

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    Gabbour, Maya [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Schnell, Susanne [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Jarvis, Kelly [Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  2. 4D phase contrast flow imaging for in-stent flow visualization and assessment of stent patency in peripheral vascular stents – A phantom study

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    Bunck, Alexander C., E-mail: alexander.bunck@uk-koeln.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A1, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Strasse 62, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Jüttner, Alena, E-mail: alenajuettner@gmx.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A1, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Kröger, Jan Robert, E-mail: jr.kroeger@uni-muenster.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A1, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Burg, Matthias C., E-mail: m_burg03@uni-muenster.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A1, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Kugel, Harald, E-mail: kugel@uni-muenster.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A1, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Niederstadt, Thomas, E-mail: tnieders@uni-muenster.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A1, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Tiemann, Klaus, E-mail: Klaus.Tiemann@ukmuenster.de [Department of Cardiology and Angiology, University Hospital Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A1, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Schnackenburg, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.schnackenburg@philips.com [Philips Medical Systems DMC GmbH, Röntgenstraße 24, 22335 Hamburg (Germany); Crelier, Gerard R., E-mail: crelier@biomed.ee.ethz.ch [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH and University of Zurich, ETZ F 95, Gloriastrasse 35, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: 4D phase contrast flow imaging is increasingly used to study the hemodynamics in various vascular territories and pathologies. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and validity of MRI based 4D phase contrast flow imaging for the evaluation of in-stent blood flow in 17 commonly used peripheral stents. Materials and methods: 17 different peripheral stents were implanted into a MR compatible flow phantom. In-stent visibility, maximal velocity and flow visualization were assessed and estimates of in-stent patency obtained from 4D phase contrast flow data sets were compared to a conventional 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) as well as 2D PC flow measurements. Results: In all but 3 of the tested stents time-resolved 3D particle traces could be visualized inside the stent lumen. Quality of 4D flow visualization and CE-MRA images depended on stent type and stent orientation relative to the magnetic field. Compared to the visible lumen area determined by 3D CE-MRA, estimates of lumen patency derived from 4D flow measurements were significantly higher and less dependent on stent type. A higher number of stents could be assessed for in-stent patency by 4D phase contrast flow imaging (n = 14) than by 2D phase contrast flow imaging (n = 10). Conclusions: 4D phase contrast flow imaging in peripheral vascular stents is feasible and appears advantageous over conventional 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography and 2D phase contrast flow imaging. It allows for in-stent flow visualization and flow quantification with varying quality depending on stent type.

  3. 4D x-ray phase contrast tomography for repeatable motion of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography based on a grating interferometer was applied to fast and dynamic measurements of biological samples. To achieve this, the scanning procedure in the tomographic scan was improved. A triangle-shaped voltage signal from a waveform generator to a Piezo stage was used for the fast phase stepping in the grating interferometer. In addition, an optical fiber coupled x-ray scientific CMOS camera was used to achieve fast and highly efficient image acquisitions. These optimizations made it possible to perform an x-ray phase contrast tomographic measurement within an 8 min scan with density resolution of 2.4 mg/cm3. A maximum volume size of 13 × 13 × 6 mm3 was obtained with a single tomographic measurement with a voxel size of 6.5 μm. The scanning procedure using the triangle wave was applied to four-dimensional measurements in which highly sensitive three-dimensional x-ray imaging and a time-resolved dynamic measurement of biological samples were combined. A fresh tendon in the tail of a rat was measured under a uniaxial stretching and releasing condition. To maintain the freshness of the sample during four-dimensional phase contrast tomography, the temperature of the bathing liquid of the sample was kept below 10° using a simple cooling system. The time-resolved deformation of the tendon and each fascicle was measured with a temporal resolution of 5.7 Hz. Evaluations of cross-sectional area size, length of the axis, and mass density in the fascicle during a stretching process provided a basis for quantitative analysis of the deformation of tendon fascicle.

  4. Estimation of turbulent kinetic energy using 4D phase-contrast MRI: Effect of scan parameters and target vessel size.

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    Ha, Hojin; Hwang, Dongha; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Baek, Jehyun; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Quantifying turbulence velocity fluctuation is important because it indicates the fluid energy dissipation of the blood flow, which is closely related to the pressure drop along the blood vessel. This study aims to evaluate the effects of scan parameters and the target vessel size of 4D phase-contrast (PC)-MRI on quantification of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Comprehensive 4D PC-MRI measurements with various velocity-encoding (VENC), echo time (TE), and voxel size values were carried out to estimate TKE distribution in stenotic flow. The total TKE (TKEsum), maximum TKE (TKEmax), and background noise level (TKEnoise) were compared for each scan parameter. The feasibility of TKE estimation in small vessels was also investigated. Results show that the optimum VENC for stenotic flow with a peak velocity of 125cm/s was 70cm/s. Higher VENC values overestimated the TKEsum by up to six-fold due to increased TKEnoise, whereas lower VENC values (30cm/s) underestimated it by 57.1%. TE and voxel size did not significantly influence the TKEsum and TKEnoise, although the TKEmax significantly increased as the voxel size increased. TKE quantification in small-sized vessels (3-5-mm diameter) was feasible unless high-velocity turbulence caused severe phase dispersion in the reference image. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

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    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  6. Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Angiography Measurements of Global Cerebral Blood Flow in the Neonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; de Vries, Linda S.; van Bel, Frank; Groenendaal, Floris

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations are important in pathogenesis of neonatal ischemic/hemorrhagic brain damage. In clinical practice, estimation of neonatal CBF is mostly based on Doppler-measured blood flow velocities in major intracranial arteries. Using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiog

  7. Comparison of 4D flow and 2D velocity-encoded phase contrast MRI sequences for the evaluation of aortic hemodynamics.

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    Bollache, Emilie; van Ooij, Pim; Powell, Alex; Carr, James; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare aortic flow and velocity quantification using 4D flow MRI and 2D CINE phase-contrast (PC)-MRI with either one-directional (2D-1dir) or three-directional (2D-3dir) velocity encoding. 15 healthy volunteers (51 ± 19 years) underwent MRI including (1) breath-holding 2D-1dir and (2) free breathing 2D-3dir PC-MRI in planes orthogonal to the ascending (AA) and descending (DA) aorta, as well as (3) free breathing 4D flow MRI with full thoracic aorta coverage. Flow quantification included the co-registration of the 2D PC acquisition planes with 4D flow MRI data, AA and DA segmentation, and calculation of AA and DA peak systolic velocity, peak flow and net flow volume for all sequences. Additionally, the 2D-3dir velocity taking into account the through-plane component only was used to obtain results analogous to a free breathing 2D-1dir acquisition. Good agreement was found between 4D flow and 2D-3dir peak velocity (differences = -3 to 6 %), peak flow (-7 %) and net volume (-14 to -9 %). In contrast, breath-holding 2D-1dir measurements exhibited indices significantly lower than free breathing 2D-3dir and 2D-1dir (differences = -35 to -7 %, p < 0.05). Finally, high correlations (r ≥ 0.97) were obtained for indices estimated with or without eddy current correction, with the lowest correlation observed for net volume. 4D flow and 2D-3dir aortic hemodynamic indices were in concordance. However, differences between respiration state and 2D-1dir and 2D-3dir measurements indicate that reference values should be established according to the PC-MRI sequence, especially for the widely used net flow (e.g. stroke volume in the AA).

  8. Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for analysis of flow phenomena in experimental aortic dissection.

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    Iwai, F; Sostman, H D; Evans, A J; Nadel, S N; Hedlund, L W; Beam, C A; Charles, H C; Spritzer, C E

    1991-12-01

    Using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, cine phase-contrast and magnitude images were obtained in three phantoms that simulated different anatomic configurations of aortic dissection. The dissection phantoms were made of compliant materials, and pulsatile flow was used in all experiments. Phantoms differed only in the location of the fenestration between the true and false lumens (I: an upstream "entry" only, II: both upstream "entry" and downstream "re-entry," and III: a downstream "entry" only). Flow jets, flap motion, and wave propagation were clearly visualized in cine MR images of each phantom, and quantitatively analyzed with reference to the stimulated cardiac cycle of the pump. Flow in the false lumen was always bidirectional. Upstream and downstream flow waves collided and dispersed within the false lumen. Flow through the false lumen was the same in phantoms I and II, and least in phantom III. The average area of the true lumen was largest in phantom III and smallest in I. Phantom I had the highest overall flow rate in the false lumen and greatest change in false lumen size during the cardiac cycle, while the downstream "entry" phantom had the lowest of both parameters. Flow phenomena in aortic dissections can be studied by cine phase-contrast MRI.

  9. Hemodynamic analysis of intracranial aneurysms using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

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    Zhao, Xuemei; Li, Rui; Chen, Yu; Sia, Sheau Fung; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Aihua

    2017-03-01

    Additional hemodynamic parameters are highly desirable in the clinical management of intracranial aneurysm rupture as static medical images cannot demonstrate the blood flow within aneurysms. There are two ways of obtaining the hemodynamic information—by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this paper, we compared PCMRI and CFD in the analysis of a stable patient's specific aneurysm. The results showed that PCMRI and CFD are in good agreement with each other. An additional CFD study of two stable and two ruptured aneurysms revealed that ruptured aneurysms have a higher statistical average blood velocity, wall shear stress, and oscillatory shear index (OSI) within the aneurysm sac compared to those of stable aneurysms. Furthermore, for ruptured aneurysms, the OSI divides the positive and negative wall shear stress divergence at the aneurysm sac.

  10. Turbulent stress measurements with phase-contrast magnetic resonance through tilted slices

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    MacKenzie, Jordan; Soederberg, Daniel; Lundell, Fredrik [Linne FLOW Centre, KTH Mechanics, Stockholm (Sweden); Swerin, Agne [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden-Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, Stockholm (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    Aiming at turbulent measurements in opaque suspensions, a simplistic methodology for measuring the turbulent stresses with phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry is described. The method relies on flow-compensated and flow-encoding protocols with the flow encoding gradient normal to the slice. The experimental data is compared with direct numerical simulations (DNS), both directly but also, more importantly, after spatial averaging of the DNS data that resembles the measurement and data treatment of the experimental data. The results show that the most important MRI data (streamwise velocity, streamwise variance and Reynolds shear stress) is reliable up to at least anti r = 0.75 without any correction, paving the way for dearly needed turbulence and stress measurements in opaque suspensions. (orig.)

  11. Cardiac magnetic resonance: is phonocardiogram gating reliable in velocity-encoded phase contrast imaging?

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    Nassenstein, Kai; Schlosser, Thomas [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Orzada, Stephan; Ladd, Mark E.; Maderwald, Stefan [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Haering, Lars; Czylwik, Andreas [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Communication Systems, Duisburg (Germany); Jensen, Christoph; Bruder, Oliver [Elisabeth Hospital Essen, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Essen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of phonocardiogram (PCG) gated velocity-encoded phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Flow quantification above the aortic valve was performed in 68 patients by acquiring a retrospectively PCG- and a retrospectively ECG-gated velocity-encoded GE-sequence at 1.5 T. Peak velocity (PV), average velocity (AV), forward volume (FV), reverse volume (RV), net forward volume (NFV), as well as the regurgitant fraction (RF) were assessed for both datasets, as well as for the PCG-gated datasets after compensation for the PCG trigger delay. PCG-gated image acquisition was feasible in 64 patients, ECG-gated in all patients. PCG-gated flow quantification overestimated PV ({Delta} 3.8 {+-} 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037) and underestimated FV ({Delta} -4.9 {+-} 15.7 ml; P = 0.015) and NFV ({Delta} -4.5 {+-} 16.5 ml; P = 0.033) compared with ECG-gated imaging. After compensation for the PCG trigger delay, differences were only observed for PV ({Delta} 3.8 {+-} 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037). Wide limits of agreement between PCG- and ECG-gated flow quantification were observed for all variables (PV: -23.9 to 31.4 cm/s; AV: -4.5 to 3.9 cm/s; FV: -35.6 to 25.9 ml; RV: -8.0 to 7.2 ml; NFV: -36.8 to 27.8 ml; RF: -10.4 to 10.2 %). The present study demonstrates that PCG gating in its current form is not reliable enough for flow quantification based on velocity-encoded phase contrast gradient echo (GE) sequences. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of cerebral blood flow using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging and duplex ultrasonography.

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    Khan, Muhammad Ayaz; Liu, Jie; Tarumi, Takashi; Lawley, Justin Stevan; Liu, Peiying; Zhu, David C; Lu, Hanzhang; Zhang, Rong

    2017-02-01

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) and color-coded duplex ultrasonography (CDUS) are commonly used for measuring cerebral blood flow in the internal carotid (ICA) and vertebral arteries. However, agreement between the two methods has been controversial. Recent development of high spatial and temporal resolution blood vessel wall edge-detection and wall-tracking methods with CDUS increased the accuracy and reliability of blood vessel diameter, hence cerebral blood flow measurement. The aim of this study was to compare the improved CDUS method with 3 T PC-MRI for cerebral blood flow measurements. We found that cerebral blood flow velocity measured in the ICA was lower using PC-MRI than CDUS (left ICA: PC-MRI, 18.0 ± 4.2 vs. CDUS, 25.6 ± 8.6 cm/s; right ICA: PC-MRI, 18.5 ± 4.8 vs. CDUS, 26.6 ± 6.7 cm/s, both p blood flow velocity measured in the left vertebral artery with PC-MRI was also lower than CDUS, but no differences in vertebral artery diameter were observed between the methods. Dynamic changes and/or intrinsic physiological fluctuations may have caused these differences in vessel diameter and velocity measurements between the methods. However, estimation of volumetric cerebral blood flow was similar and correlated between the methods despite the presence of large individual differences. These findings support the use of CDUS for cerebral blood flow measurements in the ICA and vertebral artery.

  13. Optimal velocity encoding during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of velocity encoding on measurement of brain blood flow and blood volume of inflow and outflow using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. A single two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography slice was applied perpendicular to the internal carotid artery and the vertebral artery at C2 level. For each subject, the velocity encoding was set from 30 to 90 cm/s with an interval of 10 cm/s for a total of seven settings. Various velocity encodings greatly affected blood flow volume, maximal blood flow velocity and mean blood flow velocity in the internal carotid artery, but did not significantly affect vertebral arteries and jugular veins. When velocity encoding was 60-80 cm/s, the inflow blood volume was 655 ± 118 mL/min, and the outflow volume was 506 ± 186 mL/min. The ratio of outflow/inflow was steady at 0.78-0.83, and there was no aliasing in any of the images. These findings suggest that velocity encodings of 60-80 cm/s should be selected during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography.

  14. Peak flow velocities in the ascending aorta-real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging vs. cine magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohns, Jan M; Kowallick, Johannes T; Joseph, Arun A; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Voit, Dirk; Fasshauer, Martin; Staab, Wieland; Frahm, Jens; Lotz, Joachim; Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina

    2015-10-01

    This prospective study of eight healthy volunteers evaluates peak flow velocities (PFV) in the ascending aorta using real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison to cine phase-contrast MRI and echocardiography. Flow measurements by echocardiography and cine phase-contrast MRI with breath-holding were performed according to clinical standards. Real-time phase-contrast MRI at 40 ms temporal resolution and 1.3 mm in-plane resolution was based on highly undersampled radial fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences with image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion (NLINV). Evaluations focused on the determination of PFV. Linear regressions and Bland-Altman plots were used for comparisons of methods. When averaged across subjects, real-time phase-contrast MRI resulted in PFV of 120±20 cm s(-1) (mean ± SD) in comparison to 122±16 cm s(-1) for cine MRI and 124±20 cm s(-1) for echocardiography. The maximum deviations between real-time phase-contrast MRI and echocardiography ranged from -20 to +14 cm s(-1) (cine MRI: -10 to +12 cm s(-1)). Thus, in general, real-time phase-contrast MRI of cardiac outflow revealed quantitative agreement with cine MRI and echocardiography. The advantages of real-time MRI are measurements during free breathing and access to individual cardiac cycles.

  15. Baseline correction of phase-contrast images in congenital cardiovascular magnetic resonance

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    Lai Wyman W

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One potential source of error in phase contrast (PC congenital CMR flow measurements is caused by phase offsets due to local non-compensated eddy currents. Phantom correction of these phase offset errors has been shown to result in more accurate measurements of blood flow in adults with structurally normal hearts. We report the effect of phantom correction on PC flow measurements at a clinical congenital CMR program. Results Flow was measured in the ascending aorta, main pulmonary artery, and right and left pulmonary arteries as clinically indicated, and additional values such as Qp/Qs were derived from these measurements. Phantom correction in our study population of 149 patients resulted in clinically significant changes in 13% to 48% of these phase-contrast measurements in patients with known or suspected heart disease. Overall, 640 measurements or calculated values were analyzed, and clinically significant changes were found in 31%. Larger vessels were associated with greater phase offset errors, with 22% of the changes in PC flow measurements attributed to the size of the vessel measured. In patients with structurally normal hearts, the pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio after phantom correction was closer to 1.0 than before phantom correction. There was no significant difference in the effect of phantom correction for patients with tetralogy of Fallot as compared to the group as a whole. Conclusions Phantom correction often resulted in clinically significant changes in PC blood flow measurements in patients with known or suspected congenital heart disease. In laboratories performing clinical CMR with suspected phase offset errors of significance, the routine use of phantom correction for PC flow measurements should be considered.

  16. Coronary artery flow measurement using navigator echo gated phase contrast magnetic resonance velocity mapping at 3.0 T.

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    Johnson, Kevin; Sharma, Puneet; Oshinski, John

    2008-01-01

    A validation study and early results for non-invasive, in vivo measurement of coronary artery blood flow using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) at 3.0T is presented. Accuracy of coronary artery blood flow measurements by phase contrast MRI is limited by heart and respiratory motion as well as the small size of the coronary arteries. In this study, a navigator echo gated, cine phase velocity mapping technique is described to obtain time-resolved velocity and flow waveforms of small diameter vessels at 3.0T. Phantom experiments using steady, laminar flow are presented to validate the technique and show flow rates measured by 3.0T phase contrast MRI to be accurate within 15% of true flow rates. Subsequently, in vivo scans on healthy volunteers yield velocity measurements for blood flow in the right, left anterior descending, and left circumflex arteries. Measurements of average, cross-sectional velocity were obtainable in 224/243 (92%) of the cardiac phases. Time-averaged, cross-sectional velocity of the blood flow was 6.8+/-4.3cm/s in the LAD, 8.0+/-3.8cm/s in the LCX, and 6.0+/-1.6cm/s in the RCA.

  17. Real-time phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of haemodynamics: from phantom to patients

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    Traber, Julius; Wurche, Lennart; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Utz, Wolfgang; Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette [Max-Delbrueck-Centrum and Charite -Medical University Berlin and HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Working Group on Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Jin, Ning [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Assessment of haemodynamics is crucial in many cardiac diseases. Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) can accurately access it. Arrhythmia is a major limitation in conventional segmented PC-MRI (SEG). A real-time PC-MRI sequence (RT) could overcome this. We validated RT by comparing to SEG. A prototype RT using shared velocity encoding was tested against SEG at 1.5 T in a flow phantom and consecutively included patients with (n = 55) or without (n = 59) aortic valve disease. In patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib, n = 15), only RT was applied. Phantom: PC images were acquired in front of and behind an interchangeable aortic-stenosis-like inlay. Mean velocity and flow were quantified. Patients: PC images were acquired in the ascending aorta, pulmonary trunk and superior caval vein. Peak velocity, stroke volume and regurgitant fraction were quantified. Phantom: Mean velocities (11 ± 1 to 207 ± 10 cm/s) and flow correlated closely between SEG and RT (r ≥ 0.99, ICC ≥ 0.98, p < 0.0005). Patients without AVD or with aortic regurgitation: Concordance of SEG and RT was excellent regarding peak velocities, stroke volumes (r ≥ 0.91, ICC ≥ 0.94, p < 0.0005) and regurgitant fractions (r = 0.95, ICC = 0.95, p < 0.0005). RT was feasible in all patients with Afib. The real-time sequence is accurate compared to conventional segmented PC-MRI. Its applicability in Afib was shown. Real-time PC-MRI might become a valuable tool in arrhythmia. (orig.)

  18. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging reveals net retrograde aqueductal flow in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringstad, Geir; Emblem, Kyrre Eeg; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to assess the net aqueductal stroke volume (ASV) and CSF aqueductal flow rate derived from phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) in patients with probable idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) before and after ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery, and to compare observations with intracranial pressure (ICP) scores. METHODS PC-MRI at the level of the sylvian aqueduct was undertaken in patients undergoing assessment for probable iNPH. Aqueductal flow in the craniocaudal direction was defined as positive, or antegrade flow, and net ASV was calculated by subtracting retrograde from antegrade aqueductal flow. Aqueductal flow rate per minute was calculated by multiplying net ASV by heart rate. During the same hospital admission, clinical examination was performed using NPH score and overnight continuous ICP monitoring. Twelve patients were followed prospectively 12 months after shunt placement with clinical assessment and a second PC-MRI. The study also included 2 healthy controls. RESULTS Among 21 patients examined for iNPH, 17 (81%) received a shunt (shunt group), and 4 were treated conservatively (conservative group). Among the patients with shunts, a clinical improvement was observed in 16 (94%) of the 17. Net ASV was negative in 16 (76%) of 21 patients before shunt placement and in 5 (42%) of 12 patients after shunt placement, and increased from a median of -5 μl (range -175 to 27 μl) to a median of 1 μl (range -61 to 30 μl; p = 0.04). Among the 12 patients with PC-MRI after shunt placement, 11 were shunt responders, and in 9 of these 11 either a reduced magnitude of retrograde aqueductal flow, or a complete reversal from retrograde to antegrade flow, occurred. Net ASV was significantly lower in the shunt group than in the conservative group (p = 0.01). The aqueductal flow rate increased from -0.56 ml/min (range -12.78 to 0.58 ml/min) to 0.06 ml/min (range -4.51 to 1.93 ml/min; p = 0.04) after shunt placement. CONCLUSIONS In

  19. In vivo hemodynamic analysis of intracranial aneurysms obtained by magnetic resonance fluid dynamics (MRFD) based on time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI

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    Isoda, Haruo; Takeda, Hiroyasu; Yamashita, Shuhei; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Ohkura, Yasuhide; Kosugi, Takashi [Renaissance of Technology Corporation, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Hirano, Masaya [GE Healthcare Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Namba, Hiroki [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Alley, Marcus T.; Bammer, Roland; Pelc, Norbert J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Radiological Sciences Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a very important role in the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to perform in vivo hemodynamic analysis of unruptured intracranial aneurysms of magnetic resonance fluid dynamics using time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI (4D-Flow) at 1.5 T and to analyze relationships between hemodynamics and wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). This study included nine subjects with 14 unruptured aneurysms. 4D-Flow was performed by a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner with a head coil. We calculated in vivo streamlines, WSS, and OSI of intracranial aneurysms based on 4D-Flow with our software. We evaluated the number of spiral flows in the aneurysms and compared the differences in WSS or OSI between the vessel and aneurysm and between whole aneurysm and the apex of the spiral flow. 3D streamlines, WSS, and OSI distribution maps in arbitrary direction during the cardiac phase were obtained for all intracranial aneurysms. Twelve aneurysms had one spiral flow each, and two aneurysms had two spiral flows each. The WSS was lower and the OSI was higher in the aneurysm compared to the vessel. The apex of the spiral flow had a lower WSS and higher OSI relative to the whole aneurysm. Each intracranial aneurysm in this study had at least one spiral flow. The WSS was lower and OSI was higher at the apex of the spiral flow than the whole aneurysmal wall. (orig.)

  20. Phase contrast image simulations for electron holography of magnetic and electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    representation of the magnetic vector potential, that enables us to simulate realistic phase images of fluxons. The aim of this paper is to review the main ideas underpinning our computational framework and the results we have obtained throughout the collaboration. Furthermore, we outline how to generalize...

  1. Numerical Simulation of Steady and Pulsatile Flow Through Vascular Stenoses and Comparisons with Experiments Using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Geoffrey; Agarwal, Ramesh; Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Choi, Eric T.; Amini, Amir A.

    2003-11-01

    A commercially available numerical flow solver "FLUENT" is employed in simulation of blood flow through vascular stenoses. Fluid properties are set to match those of the blood mimicking fluid used in flow phantom experiments at the Washington University School of Medicine. Computational results are compared for steady flow through axisymmetric and three-dimensional phantoms modeling mild to severe stenonses with the data collected using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) technique by colleagues in the CVIA laboratory at Washington University School of Medicine. Computations are also performed for pulsatile flow through vascular stenoses. Comparisons of PC-MRI and FLUENT output data show qualitative agreement in streamline patterns and good quantitative agreement for pressure drop across the stenoses.

  2. Higher CHADS2 score is associated with impaired coronary flow reserve: A study using phase contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirigaya, Hidekuni; Kato, Shingo; Gyotoku, Daiki; Yamada, Nao; Iinuma, Naoki; Kusakawa, Yuka; Iguchi, Kohei; Miki, Yuko; Nakachi, Tatsuya; Fukui, Kazuki; Iwasawa, Tae; Kimura, Kazuo

    2016-10-15

    The presence of coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is an important prognostic marker for coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the CHADS2 score is associated with CMD evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred forty three patients with known or suspected CAD (mean age 70.3±9.5years) were enrolled. All patients did not have any significant coronary stenosis on X-ray coronary angiography (CAG) at the time of MRI acquisition. By using a 1.5T MRI scanner, breath-hold phase contrast cine MRI images of coronary sinus (CS) were obtained to assess the blood flow of CS both at rest and during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) was calculated as CS blood flow during ATP infusion divided by CS blood flow at rest. CMD was defined as CFRcine MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmonik, C. [The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States); Diaz, O.; Klucznik, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States); Grossman, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States). Neurosurgery

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  4. Characterization of a custom-built RF coil for a high-resolution phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byungkuen; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Song, Simon

    2016-11-01

    For the use of clinical purpose magnetic resonance velocimeter (MRV) is a versatile flow visualization technique in that it allows opaque flow, complex geometry, no use of tracer particles and facile fast non-invasive measurements of 3 dimensional and 3 component velocity vectors. However, the spatial resolution of a commercial MR machine is lower than optics-based techniques like PIV. On the other hand, the use of MRV for clinical purposes like cardiovascular flow visualization requires accurate measurements or estimations on wall shear stress (WSS) with a high spatial resolution. We developed a custom-built solenoid RF coil for phase-contrast (PC) MRV to improve its resolution. We compared signal-to-noise ratio, WSS estimations, partial volume effects near wall between the custom RF coil and a commercial coil. Also, a Hagen-Poiseuille flow was analyzed with the custom RF coil. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2016R1A2B3009541).

  5. Influence of Spatial Resolution in Three-dimensional Cine Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging on the Accuracy of Hemodynamic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Atsushi; Isoda, Haruo; Morita, Kento; Mori, Marika; Watanabe, Tomoya; Ishiguro, Kenta; Komori, Yoshiaki; Kosugi, Takafumi

    2017-10-10

    We aim to elucidate the effect of spatial resolution of three-dimensional cine phase contrast magnetic resonance (3D cine PC MR) imaging on the accuracy of the blood flow analysis, and examine the optimal setting for spatial resolution using flow phantoms. The flow phantom has five types of acrylic pipes that represent human blood vessels (inner diameters: 15, 12, 9, 6, and 3 mm). The pipes were fixed with 1% agarose containing 0.025 mol/L gadolinium contrast agent. A blood-mimicking fluid with human blood property values was circulated through the pipes at a steady flow. Magnetic resonance (MR) images (three-directional phase images with speed information and magnitude images for information of shape) were acquired using the 3-Tesla MR system and receiving coil. Temporal changes in spatially-averaged velocity and maximum velocity were calculated using hemodynamic analysis software. We calculated the error rates of the flow velocities based on the volume flow rates measured with a flowmeter and examined measurement accuracy. When the acrylic pipe was the size of the thoracicoabdominal or cervical artery and the ratio of pixel size for the pipe was set at 30% or lower, spatially-averaged velocity measurements were highly accurate. When the pixel size ratio was set at 10% or lower, maximum velocity could be measured with high accuracy. It was difficult to accurately measure maximum velocity of the 3-mm pipe, which was the size of an intracranial major artery, but the error for spatially-averaged velocity was 20% or less. Flow velocity measurement accuracy of 3D cine PC MR imaging for pipes with inner sizes equivalent to vessels in the cervical and thoracicoabdominal arteries is good. The flow velocity accuracy for the pipe with a 3-mm-diameter that is equivalent to major intracranial arteries is poor for maximum velocity, but it is relatively good for spatially-averaged velocity.

  6. Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid flow measurement using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Ryoichi; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Koizumi, Toshiaki; Kato, Yasuji; Mitta, Motoharu; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2002-05-15

    A technical report is presented. To investigate the relation between the severity of myelopathy and the degree of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbance by using magnetic resonance imaging to measure the velocity of the cerebrospinal fluid flow in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Analyses of pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid flow measured by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in healthy subjects and patients with Arnold-Chiari syndrome have been reported. Few studies have evaluated the change of pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid flow velocity and the waveform of the plotted velocity in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Study 1: Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid flow was measured at C7, positioned with cervical spine flexion and extension, to investigate the influence of cervical alignment on the pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid flow in five patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Study 2: In 31 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid flow was measured at C3 and C7, with the neck set centrally. The relevance of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbance and the severity of myelopathy evaluated by the Japanese Orthopedic Association scoring system also were studied. Study 1: The waveform of plotted pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid flow velocity showed no change resulting from the position of the cervical spine. Study 2: A high correlation between the Japanese Orthopedic Association score and the cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile flow amplitude at C7 was demonstrated (r = 0.75; P < 0.0001). The average Japanese Orthopedic Association score of 14 patients whose cerebrospinal fluid flow velocity waveforms were absent was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) than that of 17 patients whose waveforms were present. The disturbance of pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid flow demonstrated high correlation with the severity of myelopathy. Measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbance can quantify the degree of dural sac and spinal

  7. Relationship between coronary flow reserve evaluated by phase-contrast cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance and serum eicosapentaenoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Long-term intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is associated with a low risk for cardiovascular disease. Phase-contrast cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (PC cine CMR) can assess coronary flow reserve (CFR). The present study investigates the relationship between CFR evaluated by PC cine CMR and the serum EPA. Methods We studied 127 patients (male, 116 (91%); mean age, 72.2 ± 7.4 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). X-ray coronary angiography revealed no significant coronary arterial stenoses (defined as luminal diameter reduction ≥50% on quantitative coronary angiogram (QCA) analysis) in all study participants. Breath-hold PC cine CMR images of the coronary sinus (CS) were acquired to assess blood flow of the CS both at rest and during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion. We calculated CFR as CS blood flow during ATP infusion divided by that at rest. Patients were allocated to groups according to whether they had high (n = 64, EPA ≥ 75.8 μg/mL) or low (n = 63, EPA  2.5, which is the previously reported lower limit of normal flow reserve without obstructive CAD. Multivariate analysis revealed that EPA is an independent predictor of CFR > 2.5 (odds ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 – 1.02, p = 0.008). Conclusions The serum EPA is significantly correlated with CFR in CAD patients without significant coronary artery stenosis. PMID:24359564

  8. Suitable image parameters and analytical method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow volume with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handa H

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine suitable image parameters and an analytical method for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow volume. This was done by constructing an experimental model and applying the results to a clinical application. The experimental model was constructed from the aorta of a bull and circulating isotonic saline. The image parameters of PC-MRI (repetition time, flip angle, matrix, velocity rate encoding, and the use of square pixels were studied with percent flow volume (the ratio of actual flow volume to measured flow volume. The most suitable image parameters for accurate blood flow measurement were as follows: repetition time, 50 msec; flip angle, 20 degrees; and a 512 x 256 matrix without square pixels. Furthermore, velocity rate encoding should be set ranging from the maximum flow velocity in the vessel to five times this value. The correction in measuring blood flow was done with the intensity of the region of interest established in the background. With these parameters for PC-MRI, percent flow volume was greater than 90%. Using the image parameters for PC-MRI and the analytical method described above, we evaluated cerebral blood flow volume in 12 patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. The results were compared with conventional xenon computed tomography. The values found with both methods showed good correlation. Thus, we concluded that PC-MRI was a noninvasive method for evaluating cerebral blood flow in patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries.

  9. Phase Error Correction in Time-Averaged 3D Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cerebral Vasculature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ethan MacDonald

    Full Text Available Volume flow rate (VFR measurements based on phase contrast (PC-magnetic resonance (MR imaging datasets have spatially varying bias due to eddy current induced phase errors. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of phase errors in time averaged PC-MR imaging of the cerebral vasculature and explore the effects of three common correction schemes (local bias correction (LBC, local polynomial correction (LPC, and whole brain polynomial correction (WBPC.Measurements of the eddy current induced phase error from a static phantom were first obtained. In thirty healthy human subjects, the methods were then assessed in background tissue to determine if local phase offsets could be removed. Finally, the techniques were used to correct VFR measurements in cerebral vessels and compared statistically.In the phantom, phase error was measured to be <2.1 ml/s per pixel and the bias was reduced with the correction schemes. In background tissue, the bias was significantly reduced, by 65.6% (LBC, 58.4% (LPC and 47.7% (WBPC (p < 0.001 across all schemes. Correction did not lead to significantly different VFR measurements in the vessels (p = 0.997. In the vessel measurements, the three correction schemes led to flow measurement differences of -0.04 ± 0.05 ml/s, 0.09 ± 0.16 ml/s, and -0.02 ± 0.06 ml/s. Although there was an improvement in background measurements with correction, there was no statistical difference between the three correction schemes (p = 0.242 in background and p = 0.738 in vessels.While eddy current induced phase errors can vary between hardware and sequence configurations, our results showed that the impact is small in a typical brain PC-MR protocol and does not have a significant effect on VFR measurements in cerebral vessels.

  10. Three-Directional Evaluation of Mitral Flow in the Rat Heart by Phase-Contrast Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Skårdal

    Full Text Available Determination of mitral flow is an important aspect in assessment of cardiac function. Traditionally, mitral flow is measured by Doppler echocardiography which suffers from several challenges, particularly related to the direction and the spatial inhomogeneity of flow. These challenges are especially prominent in rodents. The purpose of this study was to establish a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR protocol for evaluation of three-directional mitral flow in a rodent model of cardiac disease.Three-directional mitral flow were evaluated by phase contrast CMR (PC-CMR in rats with aortic banding (AB (N = 7 and sham-operated controls (N = 7. Peak mitral flow and deceleration rate from PC-CMR was compared to conventional Doppler echocardiography. The accuracy of PC-CMR was investigated by comparison of spatiotemporally integrated mitral flow with left ventricular stroke volume assessed by cine CMR.PC-CMR portrayed the spatial distribution of mitral flow and flow direction in the atrioventricular plane throughout diastole. Both PC-CMR and echocardiography demonstrated increased peak mitral flow velocity and higher deceleration rate in AB compared to sham. Comparison with cine CMR revealed that PC-CMR measured mitral flow with excellent accuracy. Echocardiography presented significantly lower values of flow compared to PC-CMR.For the first time, we show that PC-CMR offers accurate evaluation of three-directional mitral blood flow in rodents. The method successfully detects alterations in the mitral flow pattern in response to cardiac disease and provides novel insight into the characteristics of mitral flow.

  11. Phase contrast image synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  12. Cerebral blood flow in a healthy Circle of Willis and two intracranial aneurysms: computational fluid dynamics versus four-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Philipp; Stucht, Daniel; Janiga, Gábor; Beuing, Oliver; Speck, Oliver; Thévenin, Dominique

    2014-04-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) opens up multiple opportunities to investigate the hemodynamics of the human vascular system. However, due to numerous assumptions the acceptance of CFD among physicians is still limited in practice and validation through comparison is mandatory. Time-dependent quantitative phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging PC-MRI measurements in a healthy volunteer and two intracranial aneurysms were carried out at 3 and 7 Tesla. Based on the acquired images, three-dimensional (3D) models of the aneurysms were reconstructed and used for the numerical simulations. Flow information from the MR measurements were applied as boundary conditions. The four-dimensional (4D) velocity fields obtained by CFD and MRI were qualitatively as well as quantitatively compared including cut planes and vector analyses. For all cases a high similarity of the velocity patterns was observed. Additionally, the quantitative analysis revealed a good agreement between CFD and MRI. Deviations were caused by minor differences between the reconstructed vessel models and the actual lumen. The comparisons between diastole and systole indicate that relative differences between MRI and CFD are intensified with increasing velocity. The findings of this study lead to the conclusion that CFD and MRI agree well in predicting intracranial velocities when realistic geometries and boundary conditions are provided. Due to the considerably higher temporal and spatial resolution of CFD compared to MRI, complex flow patterns can be further investigated in order to evaluate their role with respect to aneurysm formation or rupture. Nevertheless, special care is required regarding the vessel reconstruction since the geometry has a major impact on the subsequent numerical results.

  13. Generalized phase contrast:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...... (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than...... efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, and can even enable a Reverse Phase Contrast mode where intensity patterns are converted into a phase modulation....

  14. Generalized Phase Contrast

    CERN Document Server

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, ...

  15. Generalized phase contrast:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...... (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than...... the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light...

  16. Aortic valve stenotic area calculation from phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance: the importance of short echo time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Brett R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can potentially quantify aortic valve area (AVA in aortic stenosis (AS using a single-slice phase contrast (PC acquisition at valve level: AVA = aortic flow/aortic velocity-time integral (VTI. However, CMR has been shown to underestimate aortic flow in turbulent high velocity jets, due to intra-voxel dephasing. This study investigated the effect of decreasing intra-voxel dephasing by reducing the echo time (TE on AVA estimates in patients with AS. Method 15 patients with moderate or severe AS, were studied with three different TEs (2.8 ms/2.0 ms/1.5 ms, in the main pulmonary artery (MPA, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT and 0 cm/1 cm/2.5 cm above the aortic valve (AoV. PC estimates of stroke volume (SV were compared with CMR left ventricular SV measurements and PC peak velocity, VTI and AVA were compared with Doppler echocardiography. CMR estimates of AVA obtained by direct planimetry from cine acquisitions were also compared with the echoAVA. Results With a TE of 2.8 ms, the mean PC SV was similar to the ventricular SV at the MPA, LVOT and AoV0 cm (by Bland-Altman analysis bias ± 1.96 SD, 1.3 ± 20.2 mL/-6.8 ± 21.9 mL/6.5 ± 50.7 mL respectively, but was significantly lower at AoV1 and AoV2.5 (-29.3 ± 31.2 mL/-21.1 ± 35.7 mL. PC peak velocity and VTI underestimated Doppler echo estimates by approximately 10% with only moderate agreement. Shortening the TE from 2.8 to 1.5 msec improved the agreement between ventricular SV and PC SV at AoV0 cm (6.5 ± 50.7 mL vs 1.5 ± 37.9 mL respectively but did not satisfactorily improve the PC SV estimate at AoV1 cm and AoV2.5 cm. Agreement of CMR AVA with echoAVA was improved at TE 1.5 ms (0.00 ± 0.39 cm2 versus TE 2.8 (0.11 ± 0.81 cm2. The CMR method which agreed best with echoAVA was direct planimetry (-0.03 cm2 ± 0.24 cm2. Conclusion Agreement of CMR AVA at the aortic valve level with echo AVA improves with a reduced TE of 1.5 ms

  17. Magnetic resonance 4D flow analysis of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in Chiari I malformation with and without syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunck, Alexander C. [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Kroeger, Jan Robert; Juettner, Alena; Heindel, Walter; Schwindt, Wolfram; Niederstadt, Thomas [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Brentrup, Angela [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Neurosurgery, Muenster (Germany); Fiedler, Barbara [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of General Pediatrics, Muenster (Germany); Crelier, Gerard R. [ETH and University of Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland); Martin, Bryn A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Laboratory of Hemodynamics and Cardiovascular Technology, School of Engineering, Interfaculty Institute of Bioengineering, Lausanne (Switzerland); Maintz, David [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    To analyse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics in patients with Chiari type I malformation (CM) with and without syringomyelia using 4D magnetic resonance (MR) phase contrast (PC) flow imaging. 4D-PC CSF flow data were acquired in 20 patients with CM (12 patients with presyrinx/syrinx). Characteristic 4D-CSF flow patterns were identified. Quantitative CSF flow parameters were assessed at the craniocervical junction and the cervical spinal canal and compared with healthy volunteers and between patients with and without syringomyelia. Compared with healthy volunteers, 17 CM patients showed flow abnormalities at the craniocervical junction in the form of heterogeneous flow (n = 3), anterolateral flow jets (n = 14) and flow vortex formation (n = 5), most prevalent in patients with syringomyelia. Peak flow velocities at the craniocervical junction were significantly increased in patients (-15.5 {+-} 11.3 vs. -4.7 {+-} 0.7 cm/s in healthy volunteers, P < 0.001). At the level of C1, maximum systolic flow was found to be significantly later in the cardiac cycle in patients (30.8 {+-} 10.3 vs. 22.7 {+-} 4.1%, P < 0.05). 4D-PC flow imaging allowed comprehensive analysis of CSF flow in patients with Chiari I malformation. Alterations of CSF hydrodynamics were most pronounced in patients with syringomyelia. (orig.)

  18. Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography: Japanese SKA Cosmic Magnetism Science

    CERN Document Server

    Akahori, Takuya; Ichaki, Kiyotomo; Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Kudoh, Takahiro; Kudoh, Yuki; Machida, Mami; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takizawa, Motokazu

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play essential roles in various astronomical objects. Radio astronomy has revealed that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our Universe. However, the real origin and evolution of magnetic fields is poorly proven. In order to advance our knowledge of cosmic magnetism in coming decades, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) should have supreme sensitivity than ever before, which provides numerous observation points in the cosmic space. Furthermore, the SKA should be designed to facilitate wideband polarimetry so as to allow us to examine sightline structures of magnetic fields by means of depolarization and Faraday Tomography. The SKA will be able to drive cosmic magnetism of the interstellar medium, the Milky Way, galaxies, AGN, galaxy clusters, and potentially the cosmic web which may preserve information of the primeval Universe. The Japan SKA Consortium (SKA-JP) Magnetism Science Working Group (SWG) proposes the project "Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography"...

  19. Diagnostic Performance of Combined Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Suspected Subclavian Steal Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Teng-Fu; Cheng, Kai-Lun; Shen, Chao-Yu; Wu, Ming-Chi; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Su, Chun-Hung; Chen, Fong-Lin; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Lin, Yung-Chang

    2016-05-01

    The study sought to evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with suspected subclavian steal syndrome (SSS) using both contrast-enhanced (CE) MR angiography and phase-contrast (PC) MRI. Fifteen suspected SSSs from 13 patients were evaluated using CE-MR angiography and PC-MRI. Ten patients also received dynamic CE-MR angiography. All MRI examinations were technically successful. By combining CE-MR angiography with PC-MRI, 10 SSSs were diagnosed in 9 patients. The delay enhancement dynamic technique predicted SSS with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 57.1%, 100%, and 72.7%, respectively. Without the dynamic technique, affected delay-enhanced arteries were poorly visualized and could be mistaken for occluded vessels. Retrograde vertebral flow by PC-MRI was used to predict ipsilateral SSS with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 100%, 60%, and 86.7%, respectively. There were 2 false positives including 1 patient with a proximal total occlusion of the affected vertebral artery and another with brachiocephalic steal syndrome rather than SSS. This suggested that retrograde vertebral flow does not always indicate SSS. CE-MR angiography combined with PC-MRI is efficacious when evaluating SSS in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Padmore, H A; Parkinson, D Y; Pien, J; Schirotzek, A; Yang, C; 10.1117/12.861946

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. In- terference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher con- trast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  1. [Pulmonary blood flow measurement using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without contrast medium;comparison of phase contrast MRI and perfusion-ventilation scintigraphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuyanagi, Eiji; Sato, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Saito, Hirotsugu

    2014-02-01

    To define the accuracy of pulmonary arterial blood flow (PA-flow) measured by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI), we compared the PA-flow data of PC-MRI with the data of perfusion-ventilation lung scintigraphy. Eighteen patients who preoperatively underwent PA-flow measurement using PC-MRI and perfusion-ventilation lung scintigraphy were evaluated. The PA-flow (cm3/sec) of MRI was calculated by multiplying maximum velocity (cm/sec) by region of interest (ROI) area (cm2) of measured main pulmonary artery using phase contrast method. The left to right ratio (R/L ratio) of PA-flow measured by PC-MRI was compared with the R/L ratios of the date of perfusion-ventilation lung scintigraphy. The R/L ratios of PC-MRI and perfusion lung scintigraphy were 1.43 ± 1.07 and 1.35 ± 0.82, respectively. Both ratios showed excellent correlation( y=-0.50+1.30x, r=0.99,pperfusion lung scintigraphy in the patients with a past history of lung resection, even if their R/L ratios of perfusion lung scintigraphy differed from those of ventilation lung scintigraphy. These results revealed that the PA-flow could be accurately measured by PC-MRI without contrast medium and nuclear medicine instruments.

  2. Phase Contrast Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    with a simple one-to-one mapping between resolution elements of a spatial phase modulator and resolution elements of the generated intensity pattern is provided. According to the invention a method is provided for synthesizing an intensity pattern with low loss of electromagnetic energy, comprising spatial...... modulation of electromagnetic radiation with a spatial phase mask for modulation of the phase of the incident eletromagnetic radiation by phasor values of individual resolution elements of the spatial phase mask, each phasor value being determined in such a way that the values of the Fourier transformed......The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation...

  3. 4-d magnetism: Electronic structure and magnetism of some Mo-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Bose, S. K.; Kudrnovský, J.

    2017-02-01

    We report results of a first-principles density-functional study of alloys of the 4 d -element Mo with group IV elements Si, Ge and Sn in zinc blende (ZB) and rock salt (RS) structures. The study was motivated by a similar study of ours based on the 4 d -element Tc, which showed the presence of half-metallic states with integer magnetic moment (1μB) per formula unit in TcX (X=C, Si, Ge) alloys. The calculated Curie temperatures for the ferromagnetic (FM) phases were low, around or less than 300 K. Searching for the possibility of 4 d -based alloys with higher Curie temperatures we have carried out the study involving the elements Mo, Ru and Rh. Among these the most promising case appears to be that involving the element Mo. Among the MoX (X=Si, Ge, Sn) alloys in ZB and RS structures, both MoGe and MoSn in ZB structures are found to possess an integer magnetic moment of 2μB per formula unit. ZB MoSn can be classified as a marginal/weak half-metal or a spin gapless semiconductor, while ZB MoGe would be best described as a gapless magnetic semiconductor. The calculated Curie temperatures are in the range 300-700 K. Considering the theoretical uncertainty in the band gaps due not only to the treatment of exchange and correlation effects, but density functional theory itself, these classifications may change somewhat, but both merit investigation from the viewpoint of potential spintronic application. Based on their higher Curie temperatures, Mo-based alloys would serve such purpose better than the previously reported Tc-based ones.

  4. Phase-contrast magnet resonance imaging reveals regional, transmural, and base-to-apex dispersion of mechanical dysfunction in patients with long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brado, Johannes; Dechant, Markus J; Menza, Marius; Komancsek, Adriana; Lang, Corinna N; Bugger, Heiko; Foell, Daniela; Jung, Bernd A; Stiller, Brigitte; Bode, Christoph; Odening, Katja E

    2017-09-01

    Regional dispersion of prolonged repolarization is a hallmark of long QT syndrome (LQTS). We have also revealed regional heterogeneities in mechanical dysfunction in transgenic rabbit models of LQTS. In this clinical pilot study, we investigated whether patients with LQTS exhibit dispersion of mechanical/diastolic dysfunction. Nine pediatric patients with genotyped LQTS (12.2 ± 3.3 years) and 9 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (10.6 ± 1.5 years) were subjected to phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to analyze radial (Vr) and longitudinal (Vz) myocardial velocities during systole and diastole in the left ventricle (LV) base, mid, and apex. Twelve-lead electrocardiograms were recorded to assess the heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval. The QTc interval was longer in patients with LQTS than in controls (469.1 ± 39.4 ms vs 417.8 ± 24.4 ms; P dispersion of contraction duration was increased in the LV apex (TTPVz_max-min: 38.9 ± 25.5 ms vs 20.2 ± 14.7 ms; P = .07; TTPVz-Vr: -21.7 ± 14.5 ms vs -8.7 ± 11.3 ms; P dispersion is increased in LQTS with an increased regional and transmural dispersion of contraction duration and altered apicobasal longitudinal relaxation sequence. LQTS is an electromechanical disorder, and phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging Heterogeneity in mechanical dysfunction enables a detailed assessment of mechanical consequences of LQTS. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis: indirect assessment of hepatic venous pressure gradient by measuring azygos flow with 2D-cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouya, Hervé; Grabar, Sophie; Vignaux, Olivier; Saade, Anastasia; Pol, Stanislas; Legmann, Paul; Sogni, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    To measure azygos, portal and aortic flow by two-dimensional cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D-cine PC MRI), and to compare the MRI values to hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurements, in patients with cirrhosis. Sixty-nine patients with cirrhosis were prospectively included. All patients underwent HVPG measurements, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 2D-cine PC MRI measurements of azygos, portal and aortic blood flow. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the correlation between the blood flow and HVPG. The performance of 2D-cine PC MRI to diagnose severe portal hypertension (HVPG ≥ 16 mmHg) was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, and area under the curves (AUC) were compared. Azygos and aortic flow values were associated with HVPG in univariate linear regression model. Azygos flow (p cine PC MRI is a promising technique to evaluate significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis. • Noninvasive HVPG assessment can be performed with MRI azygos flow. • Azygos MRI flow is an easy-to-measure marker to detect significant portal hypertension. • MRI flow is more specific that varice grade to detect portal hypertension.

  6. [Quantitative Analysis of Wall Shear Stress for Human Carotid Bifurcation at Cardiac Phases by the Use of Phase Contrast Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Computational Fluid Dynamics Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saho, Tatsunori; Onishi, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Detailed strategy for regional hemodynamics is significant for knowledge of plaque development on vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to derive relation between atherosclerosis and hemodynamics at human carotid bifurcation by the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to provide more accurate hemodynamic information. Blood velocity datasets at common carotid artery were obtained by phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (PC cine MRI). Carotid bifurcation model was computed for systolic, mid-diastolic, and end-diastolic phase. Comparison of wall shear stress (WSS) was performed for each cardiac phase. PC cine MRI provided velocity measurement for common carotid artery with various cardiac phases. The blood velocity had acute variation from 0.21 m/s to 1.07 m/s at systolic phase. The variation of WSS during cardiac phase was presented at carotid bifurcation model. High shear stress area was observed at dividing wall for all cardiac phases. The systole-diastole WSS ratio was 10.15 at internal carotid side of bifurcation. And low shear stress (cine MRI was allowed to determine an accurate analysis condition. This led to the representation of hemodynamics in vivo.

  7. Cerebral blood flow volume measurements of the carotid artery and ipsilateral branches using two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    The optimal velocity encoding of phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC MRA) in measuring cerebral blood flow volume (BFV) ranges from 60 to 80 cm/s. To verify the accuracy of two-dimensional (2D) PC MRA, the present study localized the region of interest at blood vessels of the neck using PC MRA based on three-dimensional time-of-flight sequences, and the velocity encodingwas set to 80 cm/s. Results of the measurements showed that the error rate was 7.0 ± 6.0%in the estimation of BFV in the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery and the ipsilateralcommon carotid artery. There was no significant difference, and a significant correlation in BFV between internal carotid artery + external carotid artery and ipsilateral common carotid artery. Inaddition, the BFV of the common carotid artery was correlated with that of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. The main error was attributed to the external carotid artery and its branches. Therefore,after selecting the appropriate scanning parameters and protocols, 2D PC MRA is more accuratein the determination of BFV in the carotid arteries.

  8. Minimizing the blood velocity differences between phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics simulation in cerebral arteries and aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Adib, Mohd Azrul Hisham; Ii, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Wada, Shigeo

    2017-02-04

    The integration of phase-contrast magnetic resonance images (PC-MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a way to obtain detailed information of patient-specific hemodynamics. This study proposes a novel strategy for imposing a pressure condition on the outlet boundary (called the outlet pressure) in CFD to minimize velocity differences between the PC-MRI measurement and the CFD simulation, and to investigate the effects of outlet pressure on the numerical solution. The investigation involved ten patient-specific aneurysms reconstructed from a digital subtraction angiography image, specifically on aneurysms located at the bifurcation region. To evaluate the effects of imposing the outlet pressure, three different approaches were used, namely: a pressure-fixed (P-fixed) approach; a flow rate control (Q-control) approach; and a velocity-field-optimized (V-optimized) approach. Numerical investigations show that the highest reduction in velocity difference always occurs in the V-optimized approach, where the mean of velocity difference (normalized by inlet velocity) is 19.3%. Additionally, the highest velocity differences appear near to the wall and vessel bifurcation for 60% of the patients, resulting in differences in wall shear stress. These findings provide a new methodology for PC-MRI integrated CFD simulation and are useful for understanding the evaluation of velocity difference between the PC-MRI and CFD.

  9. Vessel segmentation in 4D arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance angiography images of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phellan, Renzo; Lindner, Thomas; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Forkert, Nils D.

    2017-03-01

    4D arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance angiography (4D ASL MRA) is a non-invasive and safe modality for cerebrovascular imaging procedures. It uses the patient's magnetically labeled blood as intrinsic contrast agent, so that no external contrast media is required. It provides important 3D structure and blood flow information but a sufficient cerebrovascular segmentation is important since it can help clinicians to analyze and diagnose vascular diseases faster, and with higher confidence as compared to simple visual rating of raw ASL MRA images. This work presents a new method for automatic cerebrovascular segmentation in 4D ASL MRA images of the brain. In this process images are denoised, corresponding image label/control image pairs of the 4D ASL MRA sequences are subtracted, and temporal intensity averaging is used to generate a static representation of the vascular system. After that, sets of vessel and background seeds are extracted and provided as input for the image foresting transform algorithm to segment the vascular system. Four 4D ASL MRA datasets of the brain arteries of healthy subjects and corresponding time-of-flight (TOF) MRA images were available for this preliminary study. For evaluation of the segmentation results of the proposed method, the cerebrovascular system was automatically segmented in the high-resolution TOF MRA images using a validated algorithm and the segmentation results were registered to the 4D ASL datasets. Corresponding segmentation pairs were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). On average, a DSC of 0.9025 was achieved, indicating that vessels can be extracted successfully from 4D ASL MRA datasets by the proposed segmentation method.

  10. A method for measurement of joint kinematics in vivo by registration of 3-D geometric models with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrance, Peter J; Williams, Glenn N; Novotny, John E; Buchanan, Thomas S

    2005-10-01

    A new method is presented for measuring joint kinematics by optimally matching modeled trajectories of geometric surface models of bones with cine phase contrast (cine-PC) magnetic resonance imaging data. The incorporation of the geometric bone models (GBMs) allows computation of kinematics based on coordinate systems placed relative to full 3-D anatomy, as well as quantification of changes in articular contact locations and relative velocities during dynamic motion. These capabilities are additional to those of cine-PC based techniques that have been used previously to measure joint kinematics during activity. Cine-PC magnitude and velocity data are collected on a fixed image plane prescribed through a repetitively moved skeletal joint. The intersection of each GBM with a simulated image plane is calculated as the model moves along a computed trajectory, and cine-PC velocity data are sampled from the regions of the velocity images within the area of this intersection. From the sampled velocity data, the instantaneous linear and angular velocities of a coordinate system fixed to the GBM are estimated, and integration of the linear and angular velocities is used to predict updated trajectories. A moving validation phantom that produces motions and velocity data similar to those observed in an experiment on human knee kinematics was designed. This phantom was used to assess cine-PC rigid body tracking performance by comparing the kinematics of the phantom measured by this method to similar measurements made using a magnetic tracking system. Average differences between the two methods were measured as 2.82 mm rms for anterior/posterior tibial position, and 2.63 deg rms for axial rotation. An intertrial repeatability study of human knee kinematics using the new method produced rms differences in anterior/posterior tibial position and axial rotation of 1.44 mm and 2.35 deg. The performance of the method is concluded to be sufficient for the effective study of kinematic

  11. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Hojin [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae [Asan Institute of Life Science, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Jihoon [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Hak [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Namkug [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Convergence Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  12. Hemodynamic measurement using four-dimensional phase-contrast MRI: Quantification of hemodynamic parameters and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ho Jin; Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Young Hak; Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun; KIm, Nam Kug [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  13. Effects of arterial blood flow on walls of the abdominal aorta: distributions of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Shimamura, Yoshiaki; Tezuka, Chie; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liu, Hao; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Although abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur mostly inferior to the renal artery, the mechanism of the development of AAA in relation to its specific location is not yet clearly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that even healthy volunteers may manifest specific flow characteristics of blood flow and alter wall shear or oscillatory shear stress in the areas where AAAs commonly develop. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this prospective study, aged from 24 to 27. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with electrocardiographic triggering. Flow-sensitive four-dimensional MR imaging of the abdominal aorta, with three-directional velocity encoding, including simple morphological image acquisition, was performed. Information on specific locations on the aortic wall was applied to the flow encodes to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). While time-framed WSS showed the highest peak of 1.14 ± 0.25 Pa in the juxtaposition of the renal artery, the WSS plateaued to 0.61 Pa at the anterior wall of the abdominal aorta. The OSI peaked distal to the renal arteries at the posterior wall of the abdominal aorta of 0.249 ± 0.148, and was constantly elevated in the whole abdominal aorta at more than 0.14. All subjects were found to have elevated OSI in regions where AAAs commonly occur. These findings indicate that areas of constant peaked oscillatory shear stress in the infra-renal aorta may be one of the factors that lead to morphological changes over time, even in healthy individuals.

  14. Influence of pulmonary regurgitation inequality on differential perfusion of the lungs in tetralogy of Fallot after repair: a phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and perfusion scintigraphy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Ting; Huang, Yi-Luan; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Huang, Ju-Tung; Peng, Nan-Jing; Pan, Jun-Yen; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Yang, Tsung-Lung

    2007-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of pulmonary regurgitation inequality on differential perfusion of the lungs in tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) after repair. Asymmetry of lung perfusion is one of the best predictors of outcome in TOF after repair. A recent phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) study found prominent regurgitation inequality between the bilateral pulmonary arteries in TOF after repair. Forty-three TOF post-repair patients (median age = 51 months, 31 men) received PC-MRI and 99mTc-labeled macroaggregates of albumin perfusion scintigraphy (PS) in the same day. We took PC-MRI measurements of forward flow volume (FFV), backward flow volume (BFV), and net flow volume (NFV) (NFV = FFV - BFV) and regurgitation fraction (RF) (RF = BFV/FFV) at the left and right pulmonary arteries (LPA and RPA). The differential perfusion of the left lung (L%) (L% = left lung/left + right lung) as calculated by NFV ratio, by FFV ratio of PC-MRI, and by PS were compared. The discrepancy between L% by NFV versus L% by PS was affected by the severity of RF of LPA (r = -0.51, p = 0.001); agreement between L% by NFV versus L% by PS was good (intraclass correlation coefficient [Ri] = 0.87) if RF of LPA or =0.4 (n = 20). In contrast, agreement between L% by FFV versus L% by PS was high and unaffected by RF of LPA (Ri = 0.94, 0.92, respectively). While integrating PC-MRI of pulmonary artery as a comprehensive MRI evaluation of TOF after repair, conventional NFV ratio method tended to underestimate the left lung perfusion and may lead to unnecessary intervention. The FFV ratio method should be used for precise assessment of differential lung perfusion.

  15. Impairment of Coronary Flow Reserve Evaluated by Phase Contrast Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Saito, Naka; Kirigaya, Hidekuni; Gyotoku, Daiki; Iinuma, Naoki; Kusakawa, Yuka; Iguchi, Kohei; Nakachi, Tatsuya; Fukui, Kazuki; Futaki, Masaaki; Iwasawa, Tae; Kimura, Kazuo; Umemura, Satoshi

    2016-02-23

    Phase contrast (PC) cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the coronary sinus allows for noninvasive evaluation of coronary flow reserve (CFR), which is an index of left ventricular microvascular function. The objective of this study was to investigate coronary flow reserve in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We studied 25 patients with HFpEF (mean and SD of age: 73±7 years), 13 with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) (67±10 years), and 18 controls (65±15 years). Breath-hold PC cine-MRI images of the coronary sinus were obtained to assess blood flow at rest and during ATP infusion. CFR was calculated as coronary sinus blood flow during ATP infusion divided by coronary sinus blood flow at rest. Impairment of CFR was defined as CFR <2.5 according to a previous study. The majority (76%) of HFpEF patients had decreased CFR. CFR was significantly decreased in HFpEF patients in comparison to hypertensive LVH patients and control subjects (CFR: 2.21±0.55 in HFpEF vs 3.05±0.74 in hypertensive LVH, 3.83±0.73 in controls; P<0.001 by 1-way ANOVA). According to multivariable linear regression analysis, CFR independently and significantly correlated with serum brain natriuretic peptide level (β=-68.0; 95% CI, -116.2 to -19.7; P=0.007). CFR was significantly lower in patients with HFpEF than in hypertensive LVH patients and controls. These results indicated that impairment of CFR might be a pathophysiological factor for HFpEF and might be related to HFpEF disease severity. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Interdependencies of aortic arch secondary flow patterns, geometry, and age analysed by 4-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frydrychowicz, Alex [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Luebeck (Germany); Berger, Alexander; Russe, Maximilian F.; Bock, Jelena [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Munoz del Rio, Alejandro [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Harloff, Andreas [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Northwestern University, Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-05-15

    It was the aim to analyse the impact of age, aortic arch geometry, and size on secondary flow patterns such as helix and vortex flow derived from flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D PC-MRI). 62 subjects (age range = 20-80 years) without circumscribed pathologies of the thoracic aorta (ascending aortic (AAo) diameter: 3.2 {+-} 0.6 cm [range 2.2-5.1]) were examined by 4D PC-MRI after IRB-approval and written informed consent. Blood flow visualisation based on streamlines and time-resolved 3D particle traces was performed. Aortic diameter, shape (gothic, crook-shaped, cubic), angle, and age were correlated with existence and extent of secondary flow patterns (helicity, vortices); statistical modelling was performed. Helical flow was the typical pattern in standard crook-shaped aortic arches. With altered shapes and increasing age, helicity was less common. AAo diameter and age had the highest correlation (r = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively) with number of detected vortices. None of the other arch geometric or demographic variables (for all, P {>=} 0.177) improved statistical modelling. Substantially different secondary flow patterns can be observed in the normal thoracic aorta. Age and the AAo diameter were the parameters correlating best with presence and amount of vortices. Findings underline the importance of age- and geometry-matched control groups for haemodynamic studies. (orig.)

  17. Ab initio investigations of magnetic properties of ultrathin transition-metal films on 4d substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Zubi, Ali

    2010-12-22

    In this thesis, we investigate the magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal monolayers on 4d transition-metal substrates by means of state of the art first-principles quantum theory. In order to reveal the underlying physics of these systems we study trends by performing systematic investigations across the transition-metal series. Case studies are presented for which Rh has been chosen as exemplary 4d substrate. We consider two substrate orientations, a square lattice provided by Rh(001) and a hexagonal lattice provided by Rh(111). We find, all 3d transition-metal (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) monolayers deposited on the Rh substrate are magnetic and exhibit large local moments which follow Hund's rule with a maximum magnetic moment for Mn of about 3.7 {mu}{sub B} depending on the substrate orientation. The largest induced magnetic moment of about 0.46 {mu}{sub B} is found for Rh atoms adjacent to the Co(001)-film. On Rh(001) we predict a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state for V, Co and Ni, while Cr, Mn and Fe monolayers favor a c(2 x 2) antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, a checkerboard arrangement of up and down magnetic moments. The magnetic anisotropy energies of these ultrathin magnetic films are calculated for the FM and the AFM states. With the exception of V and Cr, the easy axis of the magnetization is predicted to be in the film plane. With the exception of Fe, analogous results are obtained for the 3d-metal monolayers on Rh(111). For Fe on Rh(111) a novel magnetic ground state is predicted, a double-row-wise antiferromagnetic state along the [11 anti 2] direction, a sequence of ferromagnetic double-rows of atoms, whose magnetic moments couple antiferromagnetically from double row to double row. The magnetic structure can be understood as superposition of a left- and right-rotating flat spin spiral. In a second set of case studies the properties of an Fe monolayer deposited on varies hexagonally terminated hcp (0001) and fcc (111) surfaces of 4d

  18. Feasibility of measuring renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spithoven, E.M.; Meijer, E.; Boertien, W.E.; Gaillard, C.A.J.M.; Jong, P.E. de; Gansevoort, R.T. [University of Groningen, Department of Nephrology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30.001, RB Groningen (Netherlands); Borns, C.; Kappert, P.; Greuter, M.J.W.; Jagt, E. van der [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Vart, P. [University of Groningen, Department of Health Sciences, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Renal blood flow (RBF) has been shown to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of phase-contrast RBF by MRI (RBF{sub MRI}) in ADPKD patients with a wide range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values. First, we validated RBF{sub MRI} measurement using phantoms simulating renal artery hemodynamics. Thereafter, we investigated in a test-set of 21 patients intra- and inter-observer coefficient of variation of RBF{sub MRI}. After validation, we measured RBF{sub MRI} in a cohort of 91 patients and compared the variability explained by characteristics indicative for disease severity for RBF{sub MRI} and RBF measured by continuous hippuran infusion. The correlation in flow measurement using phantoms by phase-contrast MRI was high and fluid collection was high (CCC=0.969). Technical problems that precluded RBF{sub MRI} measurement occurred predominantly in patients with a lower eGFR (34% vs. 16%). In subjects with higher eGFRs, variability in RBF explained by disease characteristics was similar for RBF{sub MRI} compared to RBF{sub Hip,} whereas in subjects with lower eGFRs, this was significantly less for RBF{sub MRI}. Our study shows that RBF can be measured accurately in ADPKD patients by phase-contrast, but this technique may be less feasible in subjects with a lower eGFR. (orig.)

  19. 4D magnetic resonance flow imaging for estimating pulmonary vascular resistance in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Schafer, Michal; Podgorski, Chris A; Schroeder, Joyce D; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Buckner, J Kern; Hunter, Kendal S; Shandas, Robin; Fenster, Brett E

    2016-10-01

    To develop an estimate of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) using blood flow measurements from 3D velocity-encoded phase contract magnetic resonance imaging (here termed 4D MRI). In all, 17 patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and five controls underwent right heart catheterization (RHC), 4D and 2D Cine MRI (1.5T) within 24 hours. MRI was used to compute maximum spatial peak systolic vorticity in the main pulmonary artery (MPA) and right pulmonary artery (RPA), cardiac output, and relative area change in the MPA. These parameters were combined in a four-parameter multivariate linear regression model to arrive at an estimate of PVR. Agreement between model predicted and measured PVR was also evaluated using Bland-Altman plots. Finally, model accuracy was tested by randomly withholding a patient from regression analysis and using them to validate the multivariate equation. A decrease in vorticity in the MPA and RPA were correlated with an increase in PVR (MPA: R(2) = 0.54, P < 0.05; RPA: R(2) = 0.75, P < 0.05). Expanding on this finding, we identified a multivariate regression equation that accurately estimates PVR (R(2) = 0.94, P < 0.05) across severe PH and normotensive populations. Bland-Altman plots showed 95% of the differences between predicted and measured PVR to lie within 1.49 Wood units. Model accuracy testing revealed a prediction error of ∼20%. A multivariate model that includes MPA relative area change and flow characteristics, measured using 4D and 2D Cine MRI, offers a promising technique for noninvasively estimating PVR in PH patients. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;44:914-922. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. 4d electron Ruthenate systems: their unique and new magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungran; Shin, Yeongjae; Anwar, M. S.; Sugimoto, Yusuke; Lee, Mincheol; Kang, Sungjin; Yonezawa, Shingo; Maeno, Yoshiteru; Noh, Taewon

    The Ruddlesden-Popper series (PR) of Srn+1RunO3n+1 has attract much interest of their unique physical properties. Among them, SrRuO3 (n = ∞) (SRO) is the only ferromagnetic metallic oxide especially in Ru 4d transition metal oxides. Bulk SRO has orthorhombic structure showing the Curie temperature (TC) ~ 160 K. It is well known that RuO6 octahedral distortion plays critical roles in its mangetic properties. In film systems, such RuO6 octahedra can be easily controlled by strain-engineering. In this talk, with high quality SRO films fully strained (-1.7%-1%) using various substrates, we systematically studied their structural changes and associated magnetic properties. Compared to theoretical predictions, the structural changes can be explained, while the magnetic property changes cannot be understood. Surprisingly, when SRO113 is grown on its PR series of Sr2RuO4 (n=1) (SRO214) single crystal, the exact substrate of SRO214 magnetization results in strongly enhanced magnetization (M > 3 μB/Ru, TC ~ 160 K), which has never found SRO113 (001) since the low-spin configuration of SRO113 prevent M never exceed 2 μB/Ru. The mystery of M in SRO113 (especially SRO113/SRO214) will be further discussed.

  1. Phase-contrast MRI and applications in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A., E-mail: adgoldberg@geisinger.edu [Department of Radiology, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA (United States); Jha, S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    A review of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging techniques, with specific application to congenital heart disease, is presented. Theory, pitfalls, advantages, and specific examples of multiple, well-described congenital heart disease presentations are discussed.

  2. The Generalised Phase Contrast Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    . Optimal conditions for visibility, peak irradiance and accuracy are derived and shown to be perfectly in line with empirical results from the literature. New graphic methods for advanced analysis purposes are demonstrated supporting these conclusions as well as providing new tools for innovative filter...... designs and parameter settings. Finally, a number of original applications facilitated by the parallel light-beam encoding of the Generalised Phase Contrast method are briefly outlined. These include among others, wavefront sensing and generation, advanced usercontrolled optical micro......-manipulation, optical phase-only encryption/decryption and fully integrated micro-optical implementations....

  3. CALCULATION OF MAGNETIC-X-RAY DICHROISM IN 4D AND 5D ABSORPTION-SPECTRA OF ACTINIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OGASAWARA, H; KOTANI, A; THOLE, BT

    1991-01-01

    We present atomic calculations of the magnetic dichroism in 4d and 5d x-ray-absorption (XAS) spectra of trivalent actinide ions. The calculations are carried out for both linearly and circularly polarized light at zero temperature. Large magnetic dichroism is predicted for 5d XAS with

  4. Magnetic Dichroism in the 4d-Core Photoabsorption for the Mixed Valent Ferromagnet CeRh3B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Takeo; Imada, Shin

    1989-06-01

    The Ce 4d-core X-ray absorption spectrum (4d XAS) of the mixed valent ferromagnet CeRh3B2 is calculated based on the impurity Anderson model incorporated with electron-electron (or core hole) interactions described by the Slater integrals. The ferromagnetic ordering is taken into account by the molecular field acting on the 4f electron of the impurity atom. The difference in the 4d XAS between the right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized incident photons is predicted to be very remarkable, even for the magnetization of ˜ 1 μB per Ce atom.

  5. Detection of diminished response to cold pressor test in smokers: assessment using phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Yoon, Yeonyee E; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nagata, Motonori; Takase, Shinichi; Nakamori, Shiro; Ito, Masaaki; Sakuma, Hajime

    2014-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility for measuring the cold pressor test (CPT)-induced myocardial blood flow (MBF) alteration using phase-contrast (PC) cine MRI, and to determine if this approach could detect altered MBF response to CPT in smokers. After obtaining informed consent, ten healthy male non-smokers (mean age: 28±5 years) and ten age-matched male smokers (smoking duration ≥5 years, mean age: 28±3 years) were examined in this institutional review board approved study. Breath-hold PC cine MR images of the coronary sinus were obtained with a 3T MR imager with 32 channel coils at rest and during a CPT performed after immersing one foot in ice water. MBF was calculated as coronary sinus flow divided by the left ventricular (LV) mass which was given as a total LV myocardial volume measured on cine MRI multiplied by the specific gravity (1.05 g/mL). In non-smokers, MBF was 0.86±0.25 mL/min/g at rest, with a significant increase to 1.20±0.36 mL/min/g seen during CPT (percentage change of MBF (∆MBF (%)); 39.2%±14.4%, pcine MRI can be used to reproducibly quantify MBF response to CPT and to detect impaired flow response in smokers. This MR approach may be useful for monitoring the sequential change of coronary blood flow in various potentially pathologic conditions and for investigating its relationship with cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 4D Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry in a 3D printed brain aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amili, Omid; Schiavazzi, Daniele; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are of great clinical importance. It is believed that hemodynamics play a critical role in the development, growth, and rupture of brain arteries with such condition. The flow structure in the aneurysm sac is complex, unsteady, and three-dimensional. Therefore the time-resolved measurement of the three-dimensional three-component velocity field is crucial to predict the clinical outcome. In this study magnetic resonance velocimetry is used to assess the fluid dynamics inside a 3D printed model of a giant intracranial aneurysm. We reach sub-millimeter resolution while resolving sixteen instances within the cardiac cycle. The physiological flow waveform is imposed using an in-house built pump in a flow circuit where the cardiovascular impedance is matched. The flow evolution over time is reconstructed in detail. The complex flow structure is characterized by vortical and helical motions that reside in the aneurysm for most part of the cycle. The 4D pressured distribution is also reconstructed from the velocity field. The present case study was used in a previous CFD challenge, therefore these results may provide useful experimental comparison for simulations performed by other research groups.

  7. Normal ranges and test-retest reproducibility of flow and velocity parameters in intracranial arteries measured with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia de Verdier, Maria; Wikstroem, Johan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate normal ranges and test-retest reproducibility of phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI)-measured flow and velocity parameters in intracranial arteries. Highest flow (HF), lowest flow (LF), peak systolic velocity (PSV), and end diastolic velocity (EDV) were measured at two dates in the anterior (ACA), middle (MCA), and posterior (PCA) cerebral arteries of 30 healthy volunteers using two-dimensional PC-MRI at 3 T. Least detectable difference (LDD) was calculated. In the left ACA, HF was (mean (range, LDD)) 126 ml/min (36-312, 59 %), LF 61 ml/min (0-156, 101 %), PSV 64 cm/s (32-141, 67 %), and EDV 35 cm/s (18-55, 42 %); in the right ACA, HF was 154 ml/min (42-246, 49 %), LF 77 ml/min (0-156, 131 %), PSV 75 cm/s (26-161, 82 %), and EDV 39 cm/s (7-59, 67 %). In the left MCA, HF was 235 ml/min (126-372, 35 %), LF 116 ml/min (42-186, 48 %), PSV 90 cm/s (55-183, 39 %), and EDV 46 cm/s (20-66, 28 %); in the right MCA, HF was 238 ml/min (162-342, 44 %), LF 120 ml/min (72-216, 48 %), PSV 88 cm/s (55-141, 35 %), and EDV 45 cm/s (26-67, 23 %). In the left PCA, HF was 108 ml/min (42-168, 54 %), LF 53 ml/min (18-108, 64 %), PSV 50 cm/s (24-77, 63 %), and EDV 28 cm/s (14-40, 45 %); in the right PCA, HF was 98 ml/min (30-162, 49 %), LF 49 ml/min (12-84, 55 %), PSV 47 cm/s (27-88, 59 %), and EDV 27 cm/s (16-41, 45 %). PC-MRI-measured flow and velocity parameters in the main intracranial arteries have large normal ranges. Reproducibility is highest in MCA. (orig.)

  8. Minimally-destructive Partial Phase Contrast Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wigley, Paul; Hardman, Kyle; Sooriyabandara, Mahasen; Perumbil, Manju; Close, John; Robins, Nicholas; Kuhn, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a minimally-destructive imaging technique based on a combination of phase contrast and Faraday rotation imaging used to continuously observe a condensate of 85 Rb. We demonstrate that the technique is capable of imaging a small sample of only 10 4 atoms up to 100 times with negligible decreases in atom number and no observable heating. At approximately 1GHz detuning, the SNR remains at approximately 7 for all 100 images, with a 22ms TOF absorption image confirming the survival of the condensate. The splitting of the magnetic sublevels of this species at such fields show non-trivial selection rules. We present experimental data outlining particular allowed transitions in this regime.

  9. Usefulness of phase contrast cine mode magnetic resonance imaging for surgical decision making in patients with hydrocephalus combined with achondroplasia. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Junichi; Tatsuzawa, Kazunori; Sasajima, Hiroyasu; Mineura, Katsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    A 1-year 9-month-old girl presented with achondroplasia. Serial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated mild compression of the medulla oblongata by the occipital bone, macrocrania, and progressive hydrocephalus. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow study using MR imaging clearly demonstrated CSF flow disturbance at the cervicospinal junction. Foramen magnum decompression was performed for her hydrocephalus and compressed medulla. Postoperative CSF flow study demonstrated improvement of CSF flow at the craniocervical junction. The patient has remained in a stable condition for 7 months postoperatively. Achondroplasia represents hydrocephalus or medullary compression caused by narrowed foramen magnum, which can result in sudden death in some infants. Surgical indications and methods for hydrocephalus combined with achondroplasia remain controversial because the natural history of the hydrocephalus has remained unclear. CSF flow study using MR imaging can provide useful information regarding the surgical indication and methods for the treatment of hydrocephalus combined with achondroplasia.

  10. Improved cerebral microbleeds detection using their magnetic signature on T2*-phase-contrast: A comparison study in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaouana, Takoua; Bertrand, Anne; Ouamer, Fatma; Law-Ye, Bruno; Pyatigorskaya, Nadya; Bouyahia, Ali; Thiery, Nathalie; Dufouil, Carole; Delmaire, Christine; Dormont, Didier; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Chupin, Marie

    2017-01-01

    In vivo detection of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) from T2* gradient recalled echo (GRE) magnitude image suffers from low specificity, modest inter-rater reproducibility and is biased by its sensitivity to acquisition parameters. New methods were proposed for improving this identification, but they mostly rely on 3D acquisitions, not always feasible in clinical practice. A fast 2D phase processing technique for computing internal field maps (IFM) has been shown to make it possible to characterize CMBs through their magnetic signature in routine clinical setting, based on 2D multi-slice acquisitions. However, its clinical interest for CMBs identification with respect to more common images remained to be assessed. To do so, systematic experiments were undertaken to compare the ratings obtained by trained observers with several image types, T2* magnitude, Susceptibility Weighted Imaging reconstructions (SWI) and IFM built from the same T2*-weighted acquisition. 15 participants from the MEMENTO multi-center cohort were selected: six subjects with numerous CMBs (20 ± 6 CMBs), five subjects with a few CMBs (2 ± 1 CMBs) and four subjects without CMB. 2D multi-slice T2* GRE sequences were acquired on Philips and Siemens 3T systems. After pilot experiments, T2* magnitude, Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) minimum intensity projection (mIP) on three slices and IFM were considered for the rating experiments. A graphical user interface (GUI) was designed in order to consistently display images in random order. Six raters of various background and expertise independently selected "definite" or "possible" CMBs. Rating results were compared with respect to a specific consensus reference, on both lesion and subject type points of view. IFM yielded increased sensitivity and decreased false positives rate (FPR) for CMBs identification compared to T2* magnitude and SWI-mIP images. Inter-rater variability was decreased with IFM when identifying subjects with numerous lesions

  11. Electronic structures and magnetic properties of 3d and 4d transition-metal impurities in ferromagnetic Fe

    CERN Document Server

    Park, J H; Min, B I; Cho, H S

    2000-01-01

    Employing the self-consistent local approach, the tight-binding linear-muffin-tin orbital recursion method, we have investigated the electronic structures and the magnetic properties of 3d and 4d transition-metal (TM) impurities in ferromagnetic bcc Fe. In both 3d and 4d TM impurities, virtual bound states appear and are characterized by a high density of states in the energy spectrum. The characters of the states are studied by calculating the bond order between interaction orbitals. For early TM impurities, the states at the impurity sites have more antibonding characters, while the states at neighboring Fe sites have more bonding characters. For late TM impurities, the situation is reversed. late TM impurities of both the 3d and the 4d TM series have the same magnetic ordering as the host Fe atoms whereas early TM impurities have magnetic moments antiparallel to that of the host. As for the Mn impurity, an inward relaxation of neighboring Fe atoms stabilizes the antiferromagnetic ordering with respect to t...

  12. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong Jin; Kim, Young Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University School of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 {+-} 0.1 vs. 2.88 {+-} 0.1 (before) and 1.8 {+-} 0.4 vs 2.83 {+-} 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 {+-} 0.43 and 2.81 {+-} 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 {+-} 6.6 vs. 140.8 {+-} 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 {+-} 25.4 vs. 466.3 {+-} 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging 4-D flow-based analysis of aortic hemodynamics in Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Raoul [University Medical Center Heidelberg, Department of Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Neu, Marie [University Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Hemostaseology, Mainz (Germany); Hirtler, Daniel [University of Freiburg, Department of Congenital Heart Defects and Pediatric Cardiology, Heart Center, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Gimpel, Charlotte [Center for Pediatrics, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of General Pediatrics, Adolescent Medicine and Neonatology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States); Geiger, Julia [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    Cardiovascular surveillance is important in Turner syndrome because of the increased risk of aortic dilation and dissection with consecutively increased mortality. To compare 4-D flow MRI for the characterization of aortic 3-D flow patterns, dimensions and vessel wall parameters in pediatric patients with Turner syndrome and age-matched controls. We performed 4-D flow MRI measuring in vivo 3-D blood flow with coverage of the thoracic aorta in 25 patients with Turner syndrome and in 16 female healthy controls (age mean ± standard deviation were 16 ± 5 years and 17 ± 4 years, respectively). Blood flow was visualized by time-resolved 3-D path lines. Visual grading of aortic flow in terms of helices and vortices was performed by two independent observers. Quantitative analysis included measurement of aortic diameters, quantification of peak systolic wall shear stress, pulsatility index and oscillatory shear index at eight defined sites. Patients with Turner syndrome had significantly larger aortic diameters normalized to BSA, increased vortices in the ascending aorta and elevated helix flow in the ascending and descending aorta compared to controls (all P<0.03). Patients with abnormal helical or vortical flow in the ascending aorta had significantly larger diameters of the ascending aorta (P<0.03). Peak systolic wall shear stress, pulsatility index and oscillatory shear index were significantly lower in Turner patients compared to controls (p=0.02, p=0.002 and p=0.01 respectively). Four-dimensional flow MRI provides new insights into the altered aortic hemodynamics and wall shear stress that could have an impact on the development of aortic dissections. (orig.)

  14. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C. (X-Ray Science Division); (Northwestern Univ.); (Diamond Light Source, Ltd.)

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  15. Generalised phase contrast: microscopy, manipulation and more

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Generalised phase contrast (GPC) not only leads to more accurate phase imaging beyond thin biological samples, but serves as an enabling framework in developing tools over a wide spectrum of contemporary applications in optics and photonics, including optical trapping and micromanipulation, optic...... phase cryptography, light-efficient image projection and parallel laser beam shaping for optical landscapes. In this review, we discuss the fundamental ideas behind generalised phase contrast and present a survey of its exciting applications.......Generalised phase contrast (GPC) not only leads to more accurate phase imaging beyond thin biological samples, but serves as an enabling framework in developing tools over a wide spectrum of contemporary applications in optics and photonics, including optical trapping and micromanipulation, optical...

  16. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lider, V. V., E-mail: lider@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in fetal anomalies: What does it add to 3D and 4D US?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behairy, Noha H. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Kasr El Aini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: noha_behairy@yahoo.com; Talaat, Soha; Saleem, Sahar N. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Kasr El Aini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Raouf, Maged Abd [Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Kasr El Aini Hospital, Cairo University (Egypt)

    2010-04-15

    Objective: The objective of our study is to evaluate the contribution of adding MRI findings to sonographic data when assessing fetal anomalies and to determine how this addition may affect the management of pregnancy. Study design: We prospectively examined 26 fetuses who had sonographically suspected congenital anomalies over a period of 1 year. 2D/3D and 4D ultrasound, Doppler and magnetic resonant imaging was done for all patients. MRI was done within 1 week following US examination. The maternal age range was 18-39 years. The gestational age range was 15-38 weeks (mean age = 29 weeks). Ultrasound and magnetic resonance findings were compared together. Results: We reported different types of congenital anomalies including eight cases of isolated central nervous system anomalies, four abdominal, five musculoskeletal anomalies, seven cases of renal anomalies and two cases of Meckel Gruber syndrome. MRI and sonography showed concordant findings in 18 cases. MRI changed the diagnosis in five cases and provided additional information in three cases. Ultrasound was superior to magnetic resonance imaging in three cases. Conclusion: Our results showed that fetal MR imaging can be used as a complementary modality to US in diagnosing fetal abnormality in which US findings are inconclusive or equivocal.

  18. Phase contrast imaging of Bose condensed clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, R; Rozendaal, R.A.; Koller, S.B.; Vogels, J.M.; van der Straten, P.

    2010-01-01

    Phase contrast imaging is used to observe Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) at finite temperature in situ. The imaging technique is used to accurately derive the absolute phase shift of a probe laser beam due to both the condensate and the thermal cloud. The accuracy of the method is enhanced by usin

  19. Iterative Reconstruction for Differential Phase Contrast Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, T.; Brendel, B.; Roessl, E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to combine two areas of active research in tomographic x-ray imaging. The first one is the use of iterative reconstruction techniques. The second one is differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI). Method: We derive an SPS type maximum likelihood (ML) reconstructi

  20. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer.A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4 was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography.Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide.4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  1. 4D Flow MRI in Neuroradiology: Techniques and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Delattre, Benedicte; Brina, Olivier; Bouillot, Pierre; Vargas, Maria Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Assessment of the intracranial flow is important for the understanding and management of cerebral vascular diseases. From brain aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations lesions to intracranial and cervical stenosis, the appraisal of the blood flow can be crucial and influence positively on patients' management. The determination of the intracranial hemodynamics and the collateral pattern seems to play to a major role in the management of these lesions. 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive phase contrast derived method that has been developed and applied in neurovascular diseases. It has a great potential if followed by further technical improvements and comprehensive and systematic clinical studies.

  2. Multiscale differential phase contrast analysis with a unitary detector

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2015-12-30

    A new approach to generate differential phase contrast (DPC) images for the visualization and quantification of local magnetic fields in a wide range of modern nano materials is reported. In contrast to conventional DPC methods our technique utilizes the idea of a unitary detector under bright field conditions, making it immediately usable by a majority of modern transmission electron microscopes. The approach is put on test to characterize the local magnetization of cylindrical nanowires and their 3D ordered arrays, revealing high sensitivity of our method in a combination with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.

  3. Evaluation of elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure based on magnetic resonance 4D velocity mapping: comparison of visualization techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Reiter

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Three-dimensional (3D magnetic resonance phase contrast imaging (PC-MRI allows non-invasive diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH and estimation of elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP based on vortical motion of blood in the main pulmonary artery. The purpose of the present study was to compare the presence and duration of PH-associated vortices derived from different flow visualization techniques with special respect to their performance for non-invasive assessment of elevated mPAP and diagnosis of PH. METHODS: Fifty patients with suspected PH (23 patients with and 27 without PH were investigated by right heart catheterization and time-resolved PC-MRI of the main pulmonary artery. PC-MRI data were visualized with dedicated prototype software, providing 3D vector, multi-planar reformatted (MPR 2D vector, streamline, and particle trace representation of flow patterns. Persistence of PH-associated vortical blood flow (tvortex was evaluated with all visualization techniques. Dependencies of tvortex on visualization techniques were analyzed by means of correlation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis. RESULTS: tvortex values from 3D vector visualization correlated strongly with those from other visualization techniques (r = 0.98, 0.98 and 0.97 for MPR, streamline and particle trace visualization, respectively. Areas under ROC curves for diagnosis of PH based on tvortex did not differ significantly and were 0.998 for 3D vector, MPR vector and particle trace visualization and 0.999 for streamline visualization. Correlations between elevated mPAP and tvortex in patients with PH were r = 0.96, 0.93, 0.95 and 0.92 for 3D vector, MPR vector, streamline and particle trace visualization, respectively. Corresponding standard deviations from the linear regression lines ranged between 3 and 4 mmHg. CONCLUSION: 3D vector, MPR vector, streamline as well as particle trace visualization of time-resolved 3D PC

  4. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Lab.

    1996-08-01

    X-ray transmission imaging that creates image contrast from the distribution of the X-ray absorption coefficient is not sensitive to materials consisting of light elements such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. On the other hand, the X-ray phase shift caused by the light elements is substantial enough to be detected even when absorption is almost zero. Hence, phase-contrast X-ray imaging is a promising technique for observing the structure inside biological soft tissues without the need for staining and without serious radiation exposure. Using fringe scanning X-ray interferometry, the X-ray phase shift caused by an object was measured. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of cancerous tissues using the measured phase shifts was enabled under tomographic configuration phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT). (author)

  5. Reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, C.

    1997-02-01

    Phase contrast imaging with coherent x-rays can be distinguished in outline imaging and holography, depending on the wavelength {lambda}, the object size d and the object-to-detector distance r. When r << d{sup 2}{lambda}, phase contrast occurs only in regions where the refractive index fastly changes, i.e. at interfaces and edges in the sample. With increasing object-to-detector distance we come in the area of holographic imaging. The image contrast outside the shadow region of the object is due to interference of the direct, undiffracted beam and a beam diffracted by the object, or, in terms of holography, the interference of a reference wave with the object wave. Both, outline imaging and holography, offer the possibility to obtain three dimensional information of the sample in conjunction with a tomographic technique. But the data treatment and the kind of information one can obtain from the reconstruction is different.

  6. The first 4d/4f single-molecule magnet containing a {Ru(III)2Dy(III)2} core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stuart K; Wielechowski, Daniel P; Vieru, Veacheslav; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Murray, Keith S

    2015-02-07

    We report the synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of the first 4d-4f single-molecule magnet. The complex [Ru(III)2Dy(III)2(OMe)2(O2CPh)4(mdea)2(NO3)2] displays a butterfly type core, with an anisotropy barrier of 10.7 cm(-1). Ab initio and DFT calculations provide insight into the observed magnetic behaviour.

  7. Compressed sensing for phase contrast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaass, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Noeel, Peter B.; Tapfer, Arne; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Department of Physics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Department of Radiology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2012-07-31

    Modern x-ray techniques opened the possibility to retrieve phase information. Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) has the potential to significantly improve soft tissue contrast. Radiation dose, however, continues to be an issue when moving from bench to bedside. Dose reduction in this work is achieved by sparsely acquiring PCCT data. To compensate for appearing aliasing artifacts we introduce a compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework. We present the feasibility of CS on PCCT with numerical as well as measured phantom data. The results proof that CS compensates for under-sampling artifacts and maintains the superior soft tissue contrast and detail visibility in the reconstructed images.

  8. Compressed sensing for phase contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaass, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Noël, Peter B.; Tapfer, Arne; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Haase, Axel

    2012-07-01

    Modern x-ray techniques opened the possibility to retrieve phase information. Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) has the potential to significantly improve soft tissue contrast. Radiation dose, however, continues to be an issue when moving from bench to bedside. Dose reduction in this work is achieved by sparsely acquiring PCCT data. To compensate for appearing aliasing artifacts we introduce a compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework. We present the feasibility of CS on PCCT with numerical as well as measured phantom data. The results proof that CS compensates for under-sampling artifacts and maintains the superior soft tissue contrast and detail visibility in the reconstructed images.

  9. Laser projection using generalized phase contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Rodrigo, Peter John

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate experimental laser projection of a gray-level photographic image with 74% light efficiency using the generalized phase contrast (GPC) method. In contrast with a previously proposed technique [Alonzo et al., New J. Phys. 9, 132 (2007)], a new approach to image construction via GPC...... is introduced. An arbitrary phase shift filter eliminates the need for high-frequency modulation and conjugate phase encoding. This lowers device performance requirements and allows practical implementation with currently available dynamic spatial light modulators. (c) 2007 Optical Society of America....

  10. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Laboratory; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji

    1995-12-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) enabling the observation of biological soft tissues without contrast enhancement has been developed. The X-ray phase shift caused by an object is measured and input to a standard CT reconstruction algorithm. A thousand times increase in the image sensitivity to soft tissues is achieved compared with the conventional CT using absorption contrast. This is because the X-ray phase shift cross section of light elements is about a thousand times larger than the absorption cross section. The phase shift is detected using an X-ray interferometer and computer analyses of interference patterns. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron X-ray source. Excellent image sensitivity is demonstrated in the observation of cancerous rabbit liver. The CT images distinguish cancer lesion from normal liver tissue and, moreover, visualize the pathological condition in the lesion. Although the X-ray energy employed and the present observation area size are not suitable for medical applications as they are, phase-contrast X-ray CT is promising for investigating the internal structure of soft tissue which is almost transparent for X-rays. The high sensitivity also provides the advantage of reducing X-ray doses. (author).

  11. Holo-GPC: Holographic Generalized Phase Contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew; Glückstad, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Light shaping methods based on spatial phase-only modulation can be classified depending on whether they distribute multiple beams or shape the individual beams. Diffractive optics or holography can be classified as the former, as it spatially distributes a plurality of focal spots over a working...... volume. On the other hand, Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) forms beams with well-defined lateral shapes and could be classified as the latter. To certain extents, GPC and holography can also perform both beam distribution and beam shaping. But despite the overlap in beam distribution and beam shaping...... of GPC in forming well-defined speckle-free shapes that can be distributed over an extended 3D volume through holographic means. The combined strengths of the two photon-efficient phase-only light shaping modalities open new possibilities for contemporary laser sculpting applications....

  12. Vowel identification by amplitude and phase contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molis, Michelle R; Diedesch, Anna; Gallun, Frederick; Leek, Marjorie R

    2013-02-01

    Vowel identification is largely dependent on listeners' access to the frequency of two or three peaks in the amplitude spectrum. Earlier work has demonstrated that, whereas normal-hearing listeners can identify harmonic complexes with vowel-like spectral shapes even with very little amplitude contrast between "formant" components and remaining harmonic components, listeners with hearing loss require greater amplitude differences. This is likely the result of the poor frequency resolution that often accompanies hearing loss. Here, we describe an additional acoustic dimension for emphasizing formant versus non-formant harmonics that may supplement amplitude contrast information. The purpose of this study was to determine whether listeners were able to identify "vowel-like" sounds using temporal (component phase) contrast, which may be less affected by cochlear loss than spectral cues, and whether overall identification improves when congruent temporal and spectral information are provided together. Five normal-hearing and five hearing-impaired listeners identified three vowels over many presentations. Harmonics representing formant peaks were varied in amplitude, phase, or a combination of both. In addition to requiring less amplitude contrast, normal-hearing listeners could accurately identify the sounds with less phase contrast than required by people with hearing loss. However, both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired groups demonstrated the ability to identify vowel-like sounds based solely on component phase shifts, with no amplitude contrast information, and they also showed improved performance when congruent phase and amplitude cues were combined. For nearly all listeners, the combination of spectral and temporal information improved identification in comparison to either dimension alone.

  13. Left ventricular fluid kinetic energy time curves in heart failure from cardiovascular magnetic resonance 4D flow data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, Mikael; Arvidsson, Per M; Töger, Johannes; Borgquist, Rasmus; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2015-12-20

    Measurement of intracardiac kinetic energy (KE) provides new insights into cardiac hemodynamics and may improve assessment and understanding of heart failure. We therefore aimed to investigate left ventricular (LV) KE time curves in patients with heart failure and in controls. Patients with heart failure (n = 29, NYHA class I-IV) and controls (n = 12) underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) including 4D flow. The vortex-ring boundary was computed using Lagrangian coherent structures. The LV endocardium and vortex-ring were manually delineated and KE was calculated as ½mv(2) of the blood within the whole LV and the vortex ring, respectively. The systolic average KE was higher in patients compared to controls (2.2 ± 1.4 mJ vs 1.6 ± 0.6 mJ, p = 0.048), but lower when indexing to EDV (6.3 ± 2.2 μJ/ml vs 8.0 ± 2.1 μJ/ml, p = 0.025). No difference was seen in diastolic average KE (3.2 ± 2.3 mJ vs 2.0 ± 0.8 mJ, p = 0.13) even when indexing to EDV (9.0 ± 4.4 μJ/ml vs 10.2 ± 3.3 μJ/ml, p = 0.41). In patients, a smaller fraction of diastolic average KE was observed inside the vortex ring compared to controls (72 ± 6% vs 54 ± 9%, p < 0.0001). Three distinctive KE time curves were seen in patients which were markedly different from findings in controls, and with a moderate agreement between KE time curve patterns and degree of diastolic dysfunction (Cohen's kappa = 0.49), but unrelated to NYHA classification (p = 0.12), or 6-minute walk test (p = 0.72). Patients with heart failure exhibit higher systolic average KE compared to controls, suggesting altered intracardiac blood flow. The different KE time curves seen in patients may represent a conceptually new approach for heart failure classification.

  14. [Measurement of cerebral blood flow using phase-contrast MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, T; Shishido, F; Koga, M; Ikehira, H; Kimura, F; Yoshida, K

    1997-07-01

    The development of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging(P-C MRI) provides a noninvasive method for measurement of volumetric blood flow(VFR). The VFR of the left and right internal carotid arteries and basilar artery were measured using P-C MRI, and total cerebral blood flow(tCBF) was calculated by summing up the VFR values in three vessels. We investigated the changes in these blood flows as influenced from age, head size, height, weight, body surface area and handedness. Moreover, regional CBF(rCBF) was measured by combining with the single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) of 123I. The blood flows were 142 +/- 58 mL/ min(mean +/- SD) in the basilar artery, 229 +/- 86 mL/min in the left, 223 +/- 58 mL/min in the right internal carotid artery, and tCBF was 617 +/- 128 mL/min(Ref. Magn Resn Imaging 14:P. 1143, 1996). Significant increases were observed in head-size-related change of VFR in the basilar artery and height-related change of tCBF. The value of rCBF was easily acquired in combination with SPECT. Phase-contrast MRI is useful for a noninvasive and rapid analysis of cerebral VFR and has potential for clinical use.

  15. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  16. Nanometer size 3d–4d and 3d–5d substitutional clusters: Promising candidates for magnetic storageapplications

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-05-01

    Spin-polarized density-functional calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC) have been performed for FemRhn and FemPtn clusters having N=m+n,N≤19 atoms. The spin magnetic moments, orbital magnetic moments, and the magnetic anisotropy energies have been determined. A significant enhancement of magnetic anisotropy energies is found by the substitutional nanoalloying of Fe with Rh and Pt atoms. We obtained a remarkable non-monotonous dependence of the MAE as a function of Fe content, i.e., upon going from pure Fe to pure Rh and Pt. The substitutional nanoalloying boost the magnetic anisotropy energies by creating significant cluster symmetry lowerings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  17. X-ray phase-contrast CT of a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Tapfer

    Full Text Available To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (CT for preclinical research, a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC was investigated. One ex-vivo mouse specimen was scanned with different grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging setups covering two different settings: i high-resolution synchrotron radiation (SR imaging and ii dose-reduced imaging using either synchrotron radiation or a conventional x-ray tube source. These experimental settings were chosen to assess the potential of phase-contrast imaging for two different types of application: i high-performance imaging for virtual microscopy applications and ii biomedical imaging with increased soft-tissue contrast for in-vivo applications. For validation and as a reference, histological slicing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were performed on the same mouse specimen. For each x-ray imaging setup, attenuation and phase-contrast images were compared visually with regard to contrast in general, and specifically concerning the recognizability of lesions and cancerous tissue. To quantitatively assess contrast, the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR of selected regions of interest (ROI in the attenuation images and the phase images were analyzed and compared. It was found that both for virtual microscopy and for in-vivo applications, there is great potential for phase-contrast imaging: in the SR-based benchmarking data, fine details about tissue composition are accessible in the phase images and the visibility of solid tumor tissue under dose-reduced conditions is markedly superior in the phase images. The present study hence demonstrates improved diagnostic value with phase-contrast CT in a mouse model of a complex endogenous cancer, promoting the use and further development of grating-based phase-contrast CT for biomedical imaging applications.

  18. Intact Imaging of Human Heart Structure Using X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Gen; Hoshino, Masato; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kiyozo; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Yagi, Naoto; Okita, Yutaka; Tsukube, Takuro

    2017-02-01

    Structural examination of human heart specimens at the microscopic level is a prerequisite for understanding congenital heart diseases. It is desirable not to destroy or alter the properties of such specimens because of their scarcity. However, many of the currently available imaging techniques either destroy the specimen through sectioning or alter the chemical and mechanical properties of the specimen through staining and contrast agent injection. As a result, subsequent studies may not be possible. X-ray phase-contrast tomography is an imaging modality for biological soft tissues that does not destroy or alter the properties of the specimen. The feasibility of X-ray phase-contrast tomography for the structural examination of heart specimens was tested using infantile and fetal heart specimens without congenital diseases. X-ray phase-contrast tomography was carried out at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility using the Talbot grating interferometer at the bending magnet beamline BL20B2 to visualize the structure of five non-pretreated whole heart specimens obtained by autopsy. High-resolution, three-dimensional images were obtained for all specimens. The images clearly showed the myocardial structure, coronary vessels, and conduction bundle. X-ray phase-contrast tomography allows high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of human heart specimens. Intact imaging using X-ray phase-contrast tomography can contribute to further structural investigation of heart specimens with congenital heart diseases.

  19. High-resolution magnetic resonance histology of the embryonic and neonatal mouse: a 4D atlas and morphologic database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petiet, Alexandra E; Kaufman, Matthew H; Goddeeris, Matthew M; Brandenburg, Jeffrey; Elmore, Susan A; Johnson, G Allan

    2008-08-26

    Engineered mice play an ever-increasing role in defining connections between genotype and phenotypic expression. The potential of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) for morphologic phenotyping in the mouse has previously been demonstrated; however, applications have been limited by long scan times, availability of the technology, and a foundation of normative data. This article describes an integrated environment for high-resolution study of normal, transgenic, and mutant mouse models at embryonic and neonatal stages. Three-dimensional images are shown at an isotropic resolution of 19.5 microm (voxel volumes of 8 pL), acquired in 3 h at embryonic days 10.5-19.5 (10 stages) and postnatal days 0-32 (6 stages). A web-accessible atlas encompassing this data was developed, and for critical stages of embryonic development (prenatal days 14.5-18.5), >200 anatomical structures have been identified and labeled. Also, matching optical histology and analysis tools are provided to compare multiple specimens at multiple developmental stages. The utility of the approach is demonstrated in characterizing cardiac septal defects in conditional mutant embryos lacking the Smoothened receptor gene. Finally, a collaborative paradigm is presented that allows sharing of data across the scientific community. This work makes magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse embryo and neonate broadly available with carefully annotated normative data and an extensive environment for collaborations.

  20. Adaptive optimisation of a generalised phase contrast beam shaping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, F.; Choi, F. S.; Glückstad, J.; Booth, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    The generalised phase contrast (GPC) method provides versatile and efficient light shaping for a range of applications. We have implemented a generalised phase contrast system that used two passes on a single spatial light modulator (SLM). Both the pupil phase distribution and the phase contrast filter were generated by the SLM. This provided extra flexibility and control over the parameters of the system including the phase step magnitude, shape, radius and position of the filter. A feedback method for the on-line optimisation of these properties was also developed. Using feedback from images of the generated light field, it was possible to dynamically adjust the phase filter parameters to provide optimum contrast.

  1. Acoustically modulated x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Theron J; Bailat, Claude J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2004-11-07

    We report the use of ultrasonic radiation pressure with phase contrast x-ray imaging to give an image proportional to the space derivative of a conventional phase contrast image in the direction of propagation of an ultrasonic beam. Intense ultrasound is used to exert forces on objects within a body giving displacements of the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Subtraction of images made with and without the ultrasound field gives an image that removes low spatial frequency features and highlights high frequency features. The method acts as an acoustic 'contrast agent' for phase contrast x-ray imaging, which in soft tissue acts to highlight small density changes.

  2. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  3. Kerr/CFT correspondence in a 4D extremal rotating regular black hole with a non-linear magnetic monopole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Takeuchi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We carry out the Kerr/CFT correspondence in a four-dimensional extremal rotating regular black hole with a non-linear magnetic monopole (NLMM. One problem in this study would be whether our geometry can be a solution or not. We search for the way making our rotating geometry into a solution based on the fact that the Schwarzschild regular geometry can be a solution. However, in the attempt to extend the Schwarzschild case that we can naturally consider, it turns out that it is impossible to construct a model in which our geometry can be a exact solution. We manage this problem by making use of the fact that our geometry can be a solution approximately in the whole space-time except for the black hole's core region. As a next problem, it turns out that the equation to obtain the horizon radii is given by a fifth-order equation due to the regularization effect. We overcome this problem by treating the regularization effect perturbatively. As a result, we can obtain the near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK geometry with the correction of the regularization effect. Once obtaining the NHEK geometry, we can obtain the central charge and the Frolov–Thorne temperature in the dual CFT. Using these, we compute its entropy through the Cardy formula, which agrees with the one computed from the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy.

  4. Noninvasive 4D pressure difference mapping derived from 4D flow MRI in patients with repaired aortic coarctation: comparison with young healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengier, Fabian; Delles, Michael; Eichhorn, Joachim; Azad, Yoo-Jin; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Ley, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    To assess spatial and temporal pressure characteristics in patients with repaired aortic coarctation compared to young healthy volunteers using time-resolved velocity-encoded three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (4D flow MRI) and derived 4D pressure difference maps. After in vitro validation against invasive catheterization as gold standard, 4D flow MRI of the thoracic aorta was performed at 1.5T in 13 consecutive patients after aortic coarctation repair without recoarctation and 13 healthy volunteers. Using in-house developed processing software, 4D pressure difference maps were computed based on the Navier-Stokes equation. Pressure difference amplitudes, maximum slope of pressure amplitudes and spatial pressure range at mid systole were retrospectively measured by three readers, and twice by one reader to assess inter- and intraobserver agreement. In vitro, pressure differences derived from 4D flow MRI showed excellent agreement to invasive catheter measurements. In vivo, pressure difference amplitudes, maximum slope of pressure difference amplitudes and spatial pressure range at mid systole were significantly increased in patients compared to volunteers in the aortic arch, the proximal descending and the distal descending thoracic aorta (p coarctation.

  5. Accuracy of four-dimensional phase-contrast velocity mapping for blood flow visualizations: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anders; Bloch, Karin Markenroth; Töger, Johannes; Heiberg, Einar; Ståhlberg, Freddy

    2013-07-01

    Time-resolved three-dimensional, three-directional phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocity mapping (4D PC-MRI) is a powerful technique to depict dynamic blood flow patterns in the human body. However, the impact of phase background effects on flow visualizations has not been thoroughly studied previously, and it has not yet been experimentally demonstrated to what degree phase offsets affect flow visualizations and create errors such as inaccurate particle traces. To quantify background phase offsets and their subsequent impact on particle trace visualizations in a 4D PC-MRI sequence. Additionally, we sought to investigate to what degree visualization errors are reduced by background phase correction. A rotating phantom with a known velocity field was used to quantify background phase of 4D PC-MRI sequences accelerated with SENSE as well as different k-t BLAST speed-up factors. The deviation in end positions between particle traces in the measured velocity fields were compared before and after the application of two different phase correction methods. Phantom measurements revealed background velocity offsets up to 7 cm/s (7% of velocity encoding sensitivity) in the central slice, increasing with distance from the center. Background offsets remained constant with increasing k-t BLAST speed-up factors. End deviations of up to 5.3 mm (1.8 voxels) in the direction perpendicular to the rotating disc were found between particle traces and the seeding plane of the traces. Phase correction by subtraction of the data from the stationary phantom reduced the average deviation by up to 56%, while correcting the data-set with a first-order polynomial fit to stationary regions decreased average deviation up to 78%. Pathline visualizations can be significantly affected by background phase errors, highlighting the importance of dedicated and robust phase correction methods. Our results show that pathline deviation can be substantial if adequate phase background errors are not

  6. Systemic-to-pulmonary collateral flow in patients with palliated univentricular heart physiology: measurement using cardiovascular magnetic resonance 4D velocity acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde Israel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic-to-pulmonary collateral flow (SPCF may constitute a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with single-ventricle physiology (SV. However, clinical research is limited by the complexity of multi-vessel two-dimensional (2D cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR flow measurements. We sought to validate four-dimensional (4D velocity acquisition sequence for concise quantification of SPCF and flow distribution in patients with SV. Methods 29 patients with SV physiology prospectively underwent CMR (1.5 T (n = 14 bidirectional cavopulmonary connection [BCPC], age 2.9 ± 1.3 years; and n = 15 Fontan, 14.4 ± 5.9 years and 20 healthy volunteers (age, 28.7 ± 13.1 years served as controls. A single whole-heart 4D velocity acquisition and five 2D flow acquisitions were performed in the aorta, superior/inferior caval veins, right/left pulmonary arteries to serve as gold-standard. The five 2D velocity acquisition measurements were compared with 4D velocity acquisition for validation of individual vessel flow quantification and time efficiency. The SPCF was calculated by evaluating the disparity between systemic (aortic minus caval vein flows and pulmonary flows (arterial and venour return. The pulmonary right to left and the systemic lower to upper body flow distribution were also calculated. Results The comparison between 4D velocity and 2D flow acquisitions showed good Bland-Altman agreement for all individual vessels (mean bias, 0.05±0.24 l/min/m2, calculated SPCF (−0.02±0.18 l/min/m2 and significantly shorter 4D velocity acquisition-time (12:34 min/17:28 min,p 2; Fontan 0.62±0.82 l/min/m2 and not in controls (0.01 + 0.16 l/min/m2, (3 inverse relation of right/left pulmonary artery perfusion and right/left SPCF (Pearson = −0.47,p = 0.01 and (4 upper to lower body flow distribution trend related to the weight (r = 0.742, p  Conclusions 4D

  7. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  8. Spectral phase-contrast CT using the LAMBDA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehn, Sebastian; Epple, Michael; Potdevin, Guillaume; Renker, Dieter; Pfeiffer, Franz [Chair of Biomedical Physics, TU Muenchen (Germany); Pennicard, David; Smoljanin, Sergej; Lange, Sabine; Graafsma, Heinz [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques offer significantly improved soft-tissue contrast compared to absorption-based measurements commonly used in clinical radiology. Grating-based phase contrast methods have proven to be fully compatible to standard laboratory X-ray sources and are currently being used in preclinical research. However, the imaging quality in this method is strongly energy-dependent, which may result in poor signal to noise ratios when using beams with broad energy spectra. One can overcome this disadvantage using energy sensitive detectors like the Medipix3, only taking into account the energies where the SNR is at a maximum. Thereby, an improvement to image quality and a reduction in radiation dose may be reached. This presentation will give an overview over the new Medipix3-based LAMBDA detector, which is currently being developed at DESY, used in grating-based spectral phase-contrast tomography.

  9. Abdominal 4D flow MR imaging in a breath hold: combination of spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing for highly accelerated acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyvorne, Hadrien; Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Jajamovich, Guido; Besa, Cecilia; Cui, Yong; Stalder, Aurélien; Markl, Michael; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-04-01

    To develop a highly accelerated phase-contrast cardiac-gated volume flow measurement (four-dimensional [4D] flow) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique based on spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing and to compare this technique with established phase-contrast imaging techniques for the quantification of blood flow in abdominal vessels. This single-center prospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. Ten subjects (nine men, one woman; mean age, 51 years; age range, 30-70 years) were enrolled. Seven patients had liver disease. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Two 4D flow acquisitions were performed in each subject, one with use of Cartesian sampling with respiratory tracking and the other with use of spiral sampling and a breath hold. Cartesian two-dimensional (2D) cine phase-contrast images were also acquired in the portal vein. Two observers independently assessed vessel conspicuity on phase-contrast three-dimensional angiograms. Quantitative flow parameters were measured by two independent observers in major abdominal vessels. Intertechnique concordance was quantified by using Bland-Altman and logistic regression analyses. There was moderate to substantial agreement in vessel conspicuity between 4D flow acquisitions in arteries and veins (κ = 0.71 and 0.61, respectively, for observer 1; κ = 0.71 and 0.44 for observer 2), whereas more artifacts were observed with spiral 4D flow (κ = 0.30 and 0.20). Quantitative measurements in abdominal vessels showed good equivalence between spiral and Cartesian 4D flow techniques (lower bound of the 95% confidence interval: 63%, 77%, 60%, and 64% for flow, area, average velocity, and peak velocity, respectively). For portal venous flow, spiral 4D flow was in better agreement with 2D cine phase-contrast flow (95% limits of agreement: -8.8 and 9.3 mL/sec, respectively) than was Cartesian 4D flow (95% limits of agreement: -10.6 and 14.6 m

  10. Feasibility of differential phase contrast CT for whole body imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Bevins, Nicholas B.; Zambelli, Joseph N.; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast based imaging techniques have shown improved contrast in certain biological materials. This has led to an increased interest for the potential of preclinical and clinical imaging systems that incorporate phase sensitive imaging techniques. However, the interplay between the phase contrast mechanism and the so-called small-angle scattering or dark-field mechanism is often not considered. In this work we explore the potential for phase-sensitive whole body imaging by imaging a freshly euthanized specimen. The results suggest that when extrapolating phantom and ex vivo results to whole body imaging, one must consider the complex anatomy of the entire body and its effect on each contrast mechanism.

  11. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snigireva, I. [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  12. Phase contrast imaging of breast tumours with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivo, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: aolivo@medphys.ucl.ac.uk; Rigon, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Area Science Park, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy)], E-mail: rigon@ts.infn.it; Vinnicombe, S.J. [Department of Radiology, St. Bartholomews Hospital, Barts and the London NHS Trust, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.j.vinnicombe@qmul.ac.uk; Cheung, K.C. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.c.cheung@dl.ac.uk; Ibison, M. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.ibison@dl.ac.uk; Speller, R.D. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rspeller@medphys.ucl.ac.uk

    2009-06-15

    Even though the potential of phase contrast (PC) imaging has been demonstrated in a number of biological tissue samples, the availability of free-space propagation phase contrast images of real breast tumours is still limited. The aim of this study was to obtain phase contrast images of two different pathological breast specimens containing tumours of differing morphological type at two synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities, and to assess any qualitative improvements in the evaluation and characterisation of the masses through the use of phase contrast imaging. A second aim was to assess the effects of parameters such as detector resolution, beam energy and sample-to-detector distance on image quality using the same breast specimens, as to date these effects have been modelled and discussed only for geometric phantoms. At each synchrotron radiation facility a range of images was acquired with different detectors and by varying the above parameters. Images of the same samples were also acquired with the absorption-based approach to allow a direct comparison and estimation of the advantages specifically ascribable to the PC technique.

  13. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  14. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2017-01-31

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  15. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part I – 4D Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Rosu, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available “first generation” 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are described, including necessity of breathing surrogates for 4D image reconstruction, assumptions made in acquisition and reconstruction about the breathing pattern, and commonly-observed artifacts. Both established and developmental methods to deal with these limitations are detailed. Finally, strategies to construct 4D targets and images and, alternatively, to compress 4D information into static targets and images for radiation therapy planning are described. PMID:22784929

  16. Renal Arteries: Isotropic, High-Spatial-Resolution, Unenhanced MR Angiography with Three-dimensional Radial Phase Contrast1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Darren P.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Landgraf, Benjamin R.; Bley, Thorsten A.; Reeder, Scott B.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Grist, Thomas M.; Wieben, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare a new three-dimensional (3D) radial phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) angiographic method with contrast material–enhanced MR angiography for anatomic assessment of the renal arteries. Materials and Methods: An institutional review board approved this prospective HIPAA-compliant study. Informed consent was obtained. Twenty-seven subjects (mean age, 52.6 years ± 20.5 [standard deviation]) were imaged with respiratory-gated phase-contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (VIPR) prior to contrast-enhanced MR angiographic acquisition with a 3.0-T clinical system. The imaging duration for phase-contrast VIPR was 10 minutes and provided magnitude and complex difference (“angiographic”) images with 3D volumetric (320 mm) coverage and isotropic high spatial resolution (1.25 mm3). Quantitative analysis consisted of comparing vessel diameters between the two techniques. Qualitative assessment included evaluation of the phase-contrast VIPR and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques for artifacts, noise, and image quality. Bland-Altman analysis was used for comparison of quantitative measurements, and the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for comparison of qualitative scores. Results: Phase-contrast VIPR images were successfully acquired in all subjects. The vessel diameters measured with phase-contrast VIPR were slightly greater than those measured with contrast-enhanced MR angiography (mean bias = 0.09 mm). Differences in mean artifact, quality scores for the proximal renal arteries, and overall image quality scores between phase-contrast VIPR and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques were not statistically significant (P = .31 and .29, .27 and .39, and .43 and .69 for readers 1 and 2, respectively). The quality scores for the segmental renal arteries were higher for phase-contrast VIPR than for contrast-enhanced MR angiography (P contrast-enhanced MR angiography and were statistically

  17. Theoretical analysis of the magnetic circular dichroism in the 2p3d and 2p4d x-ray emission of Gd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de; Nakazawa, M.; Kotani, A.; Krisch, M.H.; Sette, F.

    1997-01-01

    The 2p3d and 2p4d x-ray emission spectral shapes have been calculated using a theoretical description of spin-polarized 2p photoemission and atomic multiplet calculations of the 2p3d and 2p4d radiative decay. Emphasis is given to the use of circular-polarized x rays for the excitation process. Good

  18. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  19. Interactive cell segmentation based on phase contrast optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hang; Su, Zhou; Zheng, Shibao; Yang, Hua; Wei, Sha

    2014-01-01

    Cell segmentation in phase contrast microscopy images lays a crucial foundation for numerous subsequent computer-aided cell image analysis, but it encounters many unsolved challenges due to image qualities and artifacts caused by phase contrast optics. Addressing the unsolved challenges, the authors propose an interactive cell segmentation scheme over phase retardation features. After partitioning the images into phase homogeneous atoms, human annotations are propagated to unlabeled atoms over an affinity graph that is learned based on discrimination analysis. Then, an active query strategy is proposed for which the most informative unlabeled atom is selected for annotation, which is also propagated to the other unlabeled atoms. Cell segmentation converges to quality results after several rounds of interactions involving both the user's intentions and characteristics of image features. Experimental results demonstrate that cells with different optical properties are well segmented via the proposed approach.

  20. Elemental x-ray imaging using Zernike phase contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi-Gang; Chen, Jian; Wali, Faiz; Bao, Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Tian, Yang-Chao; Gao, Kun

    2016-10-01

    We develop an element-specific x-ray microscopy method by using Zernike phase contrast imaging near absorption edges, where a real part of refractive index changes abruptly. In this method two phase contrast images are subtracted to obtain the target element: one is at the absorption edge of the target element and the other is near the absorption edge. The x-ray exposure required by this method is expected to be significantly lower than that of conventional absorption-based x-ray elemental imaging methods. Numerical calculations confirm the advantages of this highly efficient imaging method. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825801) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11505188, and 11305173).

  1. Phase-contrast microfocus X-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Henrique S.; Pereira, Gabriela R.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mails: henrique@lin.ufrj.br; gabriela@lin.ufrj.br; davi@lin.ufrj.br; ricardo@lin.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    A phase-contrast X-ray system was developed using a microfocus source. This system uses a highly coherent cone-beam with ten micrometers of minimal focal spot size in a free-space propagation method to obtain phase contrast imaging (PCI). The phase contrast technique relies on its ability to record intensity data which contains information on the X-ray's phase shift. In this technique, the contrast is obtained through refraction, differing from the conventional techniques that use the X-ray attenuation. The system was developed at the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory (LIN), COPPE/UFRJ, and it utilizes a high-resolution image plate as a detector. This image plate has a high energy-efficiency in low energy. The results showed that the system allows obtaining high contrast images with less than fifty micrometers of resolution for low density samples and it can be used in several areas, mainly in biology, medical physics and in applications with composites materials. (author)

  2. Grid-Based Fourier Transform Phase Contrast Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Sajjad

    Low contrast in x-ray attenuation imaging between different materials of low electron density is a limitation of traditional x-ray radiography. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One recently developed phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al. that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 microm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 microm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the grid in the Fourier domain. A Matlab code was written to perform the image processing. For the first time, the effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the window function type used to separate the harmonics, and the window widths, were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and new methods investigated to form improved phase contrast images.

  3. Mesh-based phase contrast Fourier transform imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Sajjad; Bashir, Sajid; MacDonald, C. A.; Petruccelli, Jonathan C.

    2017-04-01

    Traditional x-ray radiography is limited by low attenuation contrast in materials of low electron density. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a recently developed technique that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 μm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 μm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the mesh in the Fourier domain. The effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the width of the window function used to separate the harmonics were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and combined to form improved phase contrast images.

  4. Enhancing 4D PC-MRI in an aortic phantom considering numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Schoch, Nicolai; Weis, Christian; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Speidel, Stefanie; Farag, Mina; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    To date, cardiovascular surgery enables the treatment of a wide range of aortic pathologies. One of the current challenges in this field is given by the detection of high-risk patients for adverse aortic events, who should be treated electively. Reliable diagnostic parameters, which indicate the urge of treatment, have to be determined. Functional imaging by means of 4D phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) enables the time-resolved measurement of blood flow velocity in 3D. Applied to aortic phantoms, three dimensional blood flow properties and their relation to adverse dynamics can be investigated in vitro. Emerging "in silico" methods of numerical simulation can supplement these measurements in computing additional information on crucial parameters. We propose a framework that complements 4D PC-MRI imaging by means of numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The framework is developed on the basis of a prototypic aortic phantom and validated by 4D PC-MRI measurements of the phantom. Based on physical principles of biomechanics, the derived simulation depicts aortic blood flow properties and characteristics. The framework might help identifying factors that induce aortic pathologies such as aortic dilatation or aortic dissection. Alarming thresholds of parameters such as wall shear stress distribution can be evaluated. The combined techniques of 4D PC-MRI and numerical simulation can be used as complementary tools for risk-stratification of aortic pathology.

  5. 4D Flow Assessment of Vorticity in Right Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Browning

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diastolic dysfunction, a leading cause of heart failure in the US, is a complex pathology which manifests morphological and hemodynamic changes in the heart and circulatory system. Recent advances in time-resolved phase-contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow have allowed for characterization of blood flow in the right ventricle (RV and right atrium (RA, including calculation of vorticity and qualitative visual assessment of coherent flow patterns. We hypothesize that right ventricular diastolic dysfunction (RVDD is associated with changes in vorticity and right heart blood flow. This paper presents background on RVDD, and 4D Flow tools and techniques used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of cardiac flows in the normal and disease states. In this study, 20 patients with RVDD and 14 controls underwent cardiac 4D Flow and echocardiography. A method for determining the time-step for peak early diastole using 4D Flow data is described. Spatially integrated early diastolic vorticity was extracted from the RV, RA, and combined RV/RA regions of each subject using a range of vorticity thresholding and scaling methods. Statistically significant differences in vorticity were found in the RA and combined RA/RV in RVDD subjects compared to controls when vorticity vectors were both thresholded and scaled by cardiac index.

  6. 4D Electron Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-06-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional (3D) imaging of noncrystalline and crystalline equilibrium structures, as well as elemental volume composition, of materials and biological specimens, including those of viruses and cells. We report the development of 4D electron tomography by integrating the fourth dimension (time resolution) with the 3D spatial resolution obtained from a complete tilt series of 2D projections of an object. The different time frames of tomograms constitute a movie of the object in motion, thus enabling studies of nonequilibrium structures and transient processes. The method was demonstrated using carbon nanotubes of a bracelet-like ring structure for which 4D tomograms display different modes of motion, such as breathing and wiggling, with resonance frequencies up to 30 megahertz. Applications can now make use of the full space-time range with the nanometer-femtosecond resolution of ultrafast electron tomography.

  7. 4D Electron Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional (3D) imaging of noncrystalline and crystalline equilibrium structures, as well as elemental volume composition, of materials and biological specimens, including those of viruses and cells. We report the development of 4D electron tomography by integrating the fourth dimension (time resolution) with the 3D spatial resolution obtained from a complete tilt series of 2D projections of an object. The different time frames of tomograms constitute a mov...

  8. Various clinical application of phase contrast X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Je, Jungho

    2008-02-01

    In biomedical application study using phase contrast X-ray, both sample thickness or density and absorption difference are very important factors in aspects of contrast enhancement. We present experimental evidence that synchrotron hard X-ray are suitable for radiological imaging of biological samples down to the cellular level. We investigated the potential of refractive index radiology using un-monochromatized synchrotron hard X-rays for the imaging of cell and tissue in various diseases. Material had been adopted various medical field, such as apoE knockout mouse in cardiologic field, specimen from renal and prostatic carcinoma patient in urology, basal cell epithelioma in dermatology, brain tissue from autosy sample of pakinson's disease, artificially induced artilrtis tissue from rabbits and extracted tooth from patients of crack tooth syndrome. Formalin and paraffin fixed tissue blocks were cut in 3 mm thickness for the X-ray radiographic imaging. From adjacent areas, 4 μm thickness sections were also prepared for hematoxylin-eosin staining. Radiographic images of dissected tissues were obtained using the hard X-rays from the 7B2 beamline of the Pohang Light Source (PLS). The technique used for the study was the phase contrast images were compared with the optical microscopic images of corresponding histological slides. Radiographic images of various diseased tissues showed clear histological details of organelles in normal tissues. Most of cancerous lesions were well differentiated from adjacent normal tissues and detailed histological features of each tumor were clearly identified. Also normal microstructures were identifiable by the phase contrast imaging. Tissue in cancer or other disease showed clearly different findings from those of surrounding normal tissue. For the first time we successfully demonstrated that synchrotron hard X-rays can be used for radiological imaging of relatively thick tissue samples with great histological details.

  9. Observation of multilayer graphene sheets using terahertz phase contrast microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZHIKUN LIU; YANAN XIE; LI GENG; DENGKE PAN; PAN SONG

    2017-01-01

    Although it is important for the study of graphene, identifying and characterizing the number of graphene layers is challenging. In this paper, we calculate graphene’s transmission.The result shows that the phase change is more sensitive than the intensity change when light passes through graphene in some THz frequencies. Based on this fact, a simple route is presented for identifying the single or few layers of graphene sheets by using terahertz phase contrast microscopy (TPCM). The route is fast, and easy to be carried out.

  10. Breast cancer detection using phase contrast diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qizhi; Li, Changqing; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Fajardo, Laurie L.; Jiang, Huabei

    2007-02-01

    In this report, a phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography system, which can measure the refractive indices of human breast masses in vivo, is described. To investigate the utility of phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography (PCDOT) for differentiation of malignant and benign breast masses in humans, and to compare PCDOT with conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for analysis of breast masses in humans. 35 breast masses were imaged in 33 patients (mean age = 51 years; range 22-80 years) using PCDOT. Images characterizing the tissue refractive index, absorption and scattering of breast masses were obtained with a finite element-based reconstruction algorithm. The accuracies of absorption and scattering images were compared with images of refractive index in light of the pathology results. Absorption and scattering images were unable to accurately discriminate benign from malignant lesions. Malignant lesions tended to have decreased refractive index allowing them to discriminate from benign lesions in most cases. The sensitivity, specificity, false positive value, and overall accuracy for refractive index were 81.8%, 70.8%, 29.2%, and 74.3%, respectively. Overall we show that benign and malignant breast masses in humans demonstrate different refractive index and differences in refractive index properties can be used to discriminate benign from malignant masses in patients with high accuracy. This opens up a new avenue for improved breast cancer detection using NIR diffusing light.

  11. LEEM image phase contrast of MnAs stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, A.B., E-mail: pangangbo@gmail.com [School of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, Anhui, 235000 (China); Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Pavlovska, A. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Däweritz, L. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Locatelli, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste, S.C.p.a., Basovizza, Trieste 34012 (Italy); Bauer, E. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Altman, M.S. [Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-07-15

    Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) imaging of strained MnAs layers epitaxially grown on GaAs(001) reveals striped contrast features that become more pronounced and vary systematically in width with increasing defocus, but that are completely absent in focus. Weaker subsidiary fringe-like features are observed along the stripe lengths, while asymmetric contrast reversal occurs between under-focus and over-focus conditions. A Fourier optics calculation is performed that demonstrates that these unusual observations can be attributed to a phase contrast mechanism between the hexagonal α phase and orthorhombic β phase regions of the MnAs film, which self-organize into a periodic stripe array with ridge-groove morphology. The unequal widths of the α and β phase regions are determined accurately from the through focus series, while the height variation in this system can also be determined in principle from the energy dependence of contrast. - Highlights: • LEEM image of MnAs/GaAs(001) reveals striped contrast features varying with defocus. • Duplex contrast and asymmetric reversal between under- and over-focus are observed. • Fourier optics calculation attributes the contrast to a phase contrast mechanism. • Widths of the α and β phase regions are determined accurately. • Height variation in this system can also be determined in principle.

  12. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-11-12

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  13. Noise characteristics of x-ray differential phase contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Joseph; Li, Ke; Bevins, Nicholas; Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    The noise characteristics of x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) were investigated. Both theoretical derivation and experimental results demonstrated that the dependence of noise variance on spatial resolution in DPC-CT follows an inverse linear law. This behavior distinguishes DPC-CT from conventional absorption based x-ray CT, where the noise variance varies inversely with the cube of the spatial resolution. This anomalous noise behavior in DPC-CT is due to the Hilbert filtering kernel used in the CT reconstruction algorithm, which equally weights all spatial frequency content. Additionally, we demonstrate that the noise power of DPC-CT is scaled by the inverse of spatial frequency and is highly concentrated at the low spatial frequencies, whereas conventional absorption CT increases in power at the high spatial frequencies.

  14. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Damircheli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM. Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  15. Computed tomography using broadband Bessel THz beams and phase contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitman, Assaf; Goldring, Sharone; Moshe, Inon; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-04-01

    We present new results demonstrating the capability of performing computed tomography (CT) using broadband Bessel terahertz (THz) beams. Nondiffractive beams such as these exhibit propagation-invariant lines of focus with an extended depth-of-field compared to conventional Gaussian beams. Using this property, we demonstrate a considerable improvement in the 3D reconstruction image of a synthetic sample through the backprojection algorithm. Only when THz Bessel beams are used, a full reconstruction of the object structure is made. Moreover, we use phase-contrast mechanism which improves the spatial resolution and reconstructed images. Our results highlight the potential in using nondiffractive Bessel beams to significantly improve 3D-image reconstruction of THz CT.

  16. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  17. Improved Hilbert phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeck, Philip J.B.

    2015-07-15

    Hilbert phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode could be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryo sections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal by (Danev et al., 2002) the Hilbert phase plate applies a phase shift of π to approximately half the focal plane (for example the right half excluding the central beam) and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus. After correction for the inbuilt asymmetry of differential phase contrast this image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from the lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length and spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably almost without loss of contrast by using a Hilbert phase plate of half the thickness, leading to a phase shift of π/2, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. - Highlights: • In this paper I present theory and simulations for a Hilbert phase plate that phase shifts the electron wave by π/2 instead of π while images are recorded close to Scherzer defocus instead of Gaussian focus. • I show that the point resolution for this new imaging mode is considerably higher without loss of contrast. • An additional advantage lies in the reduced thickness of the phase plate which leads to reduced inelastic scattering in the phase plate and less noise.

  18. 4D flow MRI assessment of extracranial-intracranial bypass: qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the hemodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Tetsuro [University Hospital Zurich/University of Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Nippon Medical School, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Takagi, Ryo; Amano, Yasuo; Orita, Erika; Matsumura, Yoshio; Kumita, Shin-ichiro [Nippon Medical School, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Murai, Yasuo [Nippon Medical School, Department of Neurological Surgery, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Our aim was to assess the feasibility of using time-resolved 3D phase-contrast (4D flow) MRI to characterize extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass. We enrolled 32 patients who underwent EC-IC bypass (15 men, 17 women; mean age 66.4 years). In all, 16 underwent radial artery graft (RAG) bypass and 16 underwent superficial temporal artery (STA) bypass. 4D flow MRI, time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and computed tomography angiography (CTA) were performed. Bypass patency, flow direction, and blood flow volume (BFV) of each artery were determined by 4D flow MRI. Arterial diameters were measured by TOF-MRA and CTA. We compared RAG and STA bypasses by evaluating the flow direction and BFV of each artery. We evaluated the correlation between arterial diameters (measured by CTA or MRA) and the BFV and the detectability of flow direction (measured by 4D flow MRI) of each artery. 4D flow MRI confirmed the patency of each bypass artery. Flow direction of the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery and BFV in the bypass artery differed between RAG and STA groups (p < 0.01). BFV in the bypass slightly correlated with the diameters on CTA (p < 0.05, R{sup 2} = 0.287). Of the 29 arteries in the circle of Willis, nine were not depicted on 4D flow MRI. Cutoff values for arterial diameters on CTA and TOF-MRA for detecting the artery on 4D flow MRI were 2.4 and 1.8 mm, respectively. 4D flow MRI provided unique information for characterizing EC-IC bypasses, although this detectability is limited when addressing small arteries with slow flow. (orig.)

  19. On detector linearity and precision of beam shift detection for quantitative differential phase contrast applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweck, Josef; Schwarzhuber, Felix; Wild, Johannes; Galioit, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Differential phase contrast is a STEM imaging mode where minute sideways deflections of the electron probe are monitored, usually by using a position sensitive device (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Lohr et al., 2012 [2]) or, alternatively in some cases, a fast camera (Müller et al., 2012 [3,4]; Yang et al., 2015 [5]; Pennycook et al., 2015 [6]) as a pixelated detector. While traditionally differential phase contrast electron microscopy was mainly focused on investigations of micro-magnetic domain structures and their specific features, such as domain wall widths, etc. (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Chapman et al., 1978, 1981, 1985 [7-9]; Sannomiya et al., 2004 [10]), its usage has recently been extended to mesoscopic (Lohr et al., 2012, 2016 [2,12]; Bauer et al., 2014 [11]; Shibata et al., 2015 [13]) and nano-scale electric fields (Shibata et al., 2012 [14]; Mueller et al., 2014 [15]). In this paper, the various interactions which can cause a beam deflection are reviewed and expanded by two so far undiscussed mechanisms which may be important for biological applications. As differential phase contrast microscopy strongly depends on the ability to detect minute beam deflections we first treat the linearity problem for an annular four quadrant detector and then determine the factors which limit the minimum measurable deflection angle, such as S/N ratio, current density, dwell time and detector geometry. Knowing these factors enables the experimenter to optimize the set-up for optimum performance of the microscope and to get a clear figure for the achievable field resolution error margins.

  20. SEGMENTACIÓN DE IMÁGENES DE RESONANCIA MAGNÉTICA EN CONTRASTE DE FASE PARA EL ESTUDIO DE LA DINÁMICA DEL LÍQUIDO CEFALORRAQUÍDEO PERIMEDULAR Segmentation of Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Dynamic of Perimedullary Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N FLÓREZ

    Full Text Available La imagen de resonancia magnética en contraste de fase permite estudiar la dinámica del líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR perimedular de manera cuantitativa. Sin embargo la anatomía propia del espacio subaracnoideo dificulta la segmentación del LCR debido a la presencia de estructuras vasculares y nervios raquídeos. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir un método de segmentación semiautomático para el estudio de la dinámica del LCR perimedular. El proceso se inicializa con un punto semilla dentro de la región a analizar. El algoritmo crea un mapa de correlación, calcula un valor de umbral y clasifica píxeles de LCR combinando diversas características temporales del comportamiento del flujo como atributos de entrada a un algoritmo k-medias. Un observador llevó a cabo diez veces la segmentación en cinco sujetos sanos y se calculó el volumen por ciclo y el área en el espacio perimedular C2C3. Las variaciones de las medidas fueron evaluadas como una estimación de la reproducibilidad del método. Para esto se calculó el coeficiente de variación. La variabilidad de las medidas fue menor del 5%. El método facilita la cuantificación del LCR perimedular. En 16 sujetos sanos se cuantificó el volumen por ciclo de LCR y el área en el espacio C2C3 y cisterna prepontina.Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging allows studying quantitatively the perimedullary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics. However, the anatomy of the subarachnoid space difficults the segmentation of CSF due to the presence of vascular structures and spinal nerves. The aim of this paper is to describe a semiautomatic segmentation method for the study of the perimedullary CSF dynamics. The process is started with a seed point within the region to analyze. The algorithm creates a correlation map, calculates a threshold value and classifies pixels of CSF combining different temporal characteristics of flow behavior as input attributes to a k-means algorithm. One

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Flow Quantification across the Atrioventricular Valve in Patients with Functional Univentricular Heart after Fontan's Surgery and Healthy Controls: Measurement by 4D Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Streamline Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Hoi Lam; Roest, Arno A W; Calkoen, Emmeline E; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; van der Geest, Rob J; Hazekamp, Mark G; de Roos, Albert; Westenberg, Jos J M

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the inflow pattern and flow quantification in patients with functional univentricular heart after Fontan's operation using 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with streamline visualization when compared with the conventional 2D flow approach. Seven patients with functional univentricular heart after Fontan's operation and twenty-three healthy controls underwent 4D flow MRI. In two orthogonal two-chamber planes, streamline visualization was applied, and inflow angles with peak inflow velocity (PIV) were measured. Transatrioventricular flow quantification was assessed using conventional 2D multiplanar reformation (MPR) and 4D MPR tracking the annulus and perpendicular to the streamline inflow at PIV, and they were validated with net forward aortic flow. Inflow angles at PIV in the patient group demonstrated wide variation of angles and directions when compared with the control group (P functional univentricular heart with previous Fontan's procedure. 4D flow aided generation of measurement planes according to the blood flood dynamics and has proven to be more accurate than the fixed plane 2D flow measurements when calculating flow quantifications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Anisotropic Ru3 + 4 d5 magnetism in the α -RuCl3 honeycomb system: Susceptibility, specific heat, and zero-field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, M.; Schmidt, M.; Rosner, H.; Tsirlin, A. A.; Yasuoka, H.; Baenitz, M.

    2015-05-01

    Hexagonal α -Ru trichloride single crystals exhibit a strong magnetic anisotropy and we show that upon applying fields up to 14 T in the honeycomb plane the successive magnetic order at T1=14 K and T2=8 K could be completely suppressed, whereas in the perpendicular direction the magnetic order is robust. Furthermore, the field dependence of χ (T ) implies coexisting ferro- and antiferromagnetic exchange between in-plane components of Ru3+ spins, whereas for out-of-plane components a strong antiferromagnetic exchange becomes evident. 101Ru zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance in the ordered state evidence a complex (probably noncoplanar chiral) long-range magnetic structure. The large orbital moment on Ru3 + is found in density-functional calculations.

  3. Multilayer coated gratings for phase-contrast computed tomography (CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Zsolt; Bhandari, Harish B.; Wen, Harold H.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2014-03-01

    By using the principle of grating interferometry, X-ray phase contrast imaging can now be performed with incoherent radiation from standard X-ray tube. This approach is in stark contrast with imaging methods using coherent synchrotron X-ray sources or micro-focus sources to improve contrast. The gratings interferometer imaging technique is capable of measuring the phase shift of hard X-rays travelling through a sample, which greatly enhances the contrast of low absorbing specimen compared to conventional amplitude contrast images. The key components in this approach are the gratings which consists of alternating layers of high and low Z (atomic number) materials fabricated with high aspect ratios. Here we report on a novel method of fabricating the grating structures using the technique of electron-beam (ebeam) thin film deposition. Alternating layers of silicon (Z=14) and tungsten (Z=74) were deposited, each measuring 100 nm each, on a specially designed echelle substrate, which resulted in an aspect ratio of ~100:1. Fabrication parameters related to the thin film deposition such as geometry, directionality, film adhesion, stress and the resulting scanning electron micrographs will be discussed in detail. Using e-beam method large-area gratings with precise multilayer coating thicknesses can be fabricated economically circumventing the expensive lithography steps.

  4. Unstained viable cell recognition in phase-contrast microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczylas, M.; Rakowski, W.; Cherubini, R.; Gerardi, S.

    2011-09-01

    Individual cell recognition is a relevant task to be accomplished when single-ion microbeam irradiations are performed. At INFN-LNL facility cell visualization system is based on a phase-contrast optical microscope, without the use of any cell dye. Unstained cells are seeded in the special designed Petri dish, between two mylar foils, and at present the cell recognition is achieved manually by an expert operator. Nevertheless, this procedure is time consuming and sometimes it could be not practical if the amount of living cells to be irradiated is large. To reduce the time needed to recognize unstained cells on the Petri dish, it has been designed and implemented an automated, parallel algorithm. Overlapping ROIs sliding in steps over the captured grayscale image are firstly pre-classified and potential cell markers for the segmentation are obtained. Segmented objects are additionally classified to categorize cell bodies from other structures considered as sample dirt or background. As a result, cell coordinates are passed to the dedicated CELLView program that controls all the LNL single-ion microbeam irradiation protocol, including the positioning of individual cells in front of the ion beam. Unstained cell recognition system was successfully tested in experimental conditions with two different mylar surfaces. The recognition time and accuracy was acceptable, however, improvements in speed would be useful.

  5. Improved Zernike-type phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, P J B

    2015-07-01

    Zernike phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high-resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode can be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryosections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal discussed in Danev and Nagayama (2001) and references therein, the Zernike phase plate applies a phase shift of π/2 to all scattered electron beams outside a given scattering angle and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus or slight underfocus (below Scherzer defocus). Alternatively, a phase shift of -π/2 is applied to the central beam using the Boersch phase plate. The resulting image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from a given lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length, the amount of defocus and the spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper, I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably without loss of contrast by using a Zernike or Boersch phase plate that leads to a phase shift between scattered and unscattered electrons of only π /4, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Understanding phase contrast MR angiography a practical approach with Matlab examples

    CERN Document Server

    Suresh Paul, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Providing many unique MATLAB codes and functions throughout, this book covers the basics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), leading to an in-depth understanding of the concepts and tools required for analysis and interpretation of Phase Contrast MR Angiography (PC-MRA). The concept of PC-MRA is often difficult, but essential for practicing engineers and scientists working in MR related areas. The concepts are better understood by uniquely combining the physical principles of fluid flow and MR imaging, laid out by modeling the theory and applications using a commonly used software tool MATLAB®. The book starts with a detailed theory of PC-MRA followed by a description of various image processing methods, including detailed MATLAB codes used for their implementation. The flow concepts in the context of MR imaging are explained using MATLAB based simulations.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of blood flow regularized by 3D phase contrast MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rispoli, Vinicius C; Nielsen, Jon; Nayak, Krishna S

    2015-01-01

    approach in regularizing 3D flow fields is evaluated. METHODS: The proposed algorithm incorporates both a Newtonian fluid physics model and a linear PC-MRI signal model. The model equations are solved numerically using a modified CFD algorithm. The numerical solution corresponds to the optimal solution......BACKGROUND: Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used clinically for quantitative assessment of cardiovascular flow and function, as it is capable of providing directly-measured 3D velocity maps. Alternatively, vascular flow can be estimated from model-based computation fluid...... dynamics (CFD) calculations. CFD provides arbitrarily high resolution, but its accuracy hinges on model assumptions, while velocity fields measured with PC-MRI generally do not satisfy the equations of fluid dynamics, provide limited resolution, and suffer from partial volume effects. The purpose...

  8. Design of tangential viewing phase contrast imaging for turbulence measurements in JT-60SA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, K., E-mail: ktanaka@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Advanced Energy Engineering, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Coda, S. [EPFL–SPC, Lausanne (Switzerland); Yoshida, M.; Sasao, H.; Kawano, Y.; Imazawa, R.; Kubo, H.; Kamada, Y. [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    A tangential viewing phase contrast imaging system is being designed for the JT-60SA tokamak to investigate microturbulence. In order to obtain localized information on the turbulence, a spatial-filtering technique is applied, based on magnetic shearing. The tangential viewing geometry enhances the radial localization. The probing laser beam is injected tangentially and traverses the entire plasma region including both low and high field sides. The spatial resolution for an Internal Transport Barrier discharge is estimated at 30%–70% of the minor radius at k = 5 cm{sup −1}, which is the typical expected wave number of ion scale turbulence such as ion temperature gradient/trapped electron mode.

  9. Differential phase contrast 2.0-Opening new 'fields' for an established technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohr, Matthias; Schregle, Ralph [Physics Faculty, Regensburg University, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Jetter, Michael; Waechter, Clemens [Institute for Semiconductor Optics and Functional Interfaces, Stuttgart University, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Wunderer, Thomas; Scholz, Ferdinand [Institute for Optoelectronics, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 45, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Zweck, Josef, E-mail: josef.zweck@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Physics Faculty, Regensburg University, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Differential phase contrast microscopy has become known as a high resolution imaging technique for magnetic micro-structures in the past. The method senses the local induction by measuring the deflection of the probe beam after it passes through a specimen area carrying a magnetic field. Little attention has been paid, however, to the fact that this technique is also capable of measuring electric fields. An application of the technique to measure piezoelectric polarization fields inside multi-layered structures such as quantum wells is demonstrated. For this purpose, piezoelectric fields within non-centrosymmetric crystal structures, based on GaN/InGaN/GaN quantum wells, are investigated. It can be shown that the technique is sensitive to these fields and yields detailed information about the field distribution. The specific information and experimental limitations as well as artefacts of the technique will be discussed in detail and first measurements are shown. The main advantages turn out to be high sensitivity for electric fields, combined with a very high resolution, which is limited only by the STEM probe size. Another advantage is the large achievable field of view. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a technique which allows the determination of inner electric fields in matter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inner fields are believed to be one major reason for the so-called efficiency 'droop' in green solid state lasers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The technique used is differential phase contrast, used for the first time for inner electric field determination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The technique is complementary to electron holography, offers a wider field of view and reveals new structures.

  10. Feasibility of 4D flow MR imaging of the brain with either Cartesian y-z radial sampling or k-t SENSE: comparison with 4D Flow MR imaging using SENSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Tetsuro; Amano, Yasuo; Takagi, Ryo; Matsumura, Yoshio; Murai, Yasuo; Kumita, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    A drawback of time-resolved 3-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance (4D Flow MR) imaging is its lengthy scan time for clinical application in the brain. We assessed the feasibility for flow measurement and visualization of 4D Flow MR imaging using Cartesian y-z radial sampling and that using k-t sensitivity encoding (k-t SENSE) by comparison with the standard scan using SENSE. Sixteen volunteers underwent 3 types of 4D Flow MR imaging of the brain using a 3.0-tesla scanner. As the standard scan, 4D Flow MR imaging with SENSE was performed first and then followed by 2 types of acceleration scan-with Cartesian y-z radial sampling and with k-t SENSE. We measured peak systolic velocity (PSV) and blood flow volume (BFV) in 9 arteries, and the percentage of particles arriving from the emitter plane at the target plane in 3 arteries, visually graded image quality in 9 arteries, and compared these quantitative and visual data between the standard scan and each acceleration scan. 4D Flow MR imaging examinations were completed in all but one volunteer, who did not undergo the last examination because of headache. Each acceleration scan reduced scan time by 50% compared with the standard scan. The k-t SENSE imaging underestimated PSV and BFV (P scan and each acceleration scan (P scan and each acceleration scan. For visual assessment, y-z radial sampling deteriorated the image quality of the 3 arteries. Cartesian y-z radial sampling is feasible for measuring flow, and k-t SENSE offers sufficient flow visualization; both allow acquisition of 4D Flow MR imaging with shorter scan time.

  11. 4D-flow cardiac magnetic resonance-derived vorticity is sensitive marker of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Michal; Humphries, Stephen; Stenmark, Kurt R; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Buckner, J Kern; Hunter, Kendall S; Fenster, Brett E

    2017-04-27

    To investigate the possibility that vorticity assessed by four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance (4D-Flow CMR) in the left ventricle of patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a potential marker of early LV diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) and more sensitive than standard echocardiography, and whether changes in vorticity are associated with quantitative computed tomography (CT) and clinical markers of COPD, and right ventricular (RV) echocardiographic markers indicative of ventricular interdependency. Sixteen COPD patients with presumptive LVDD and 10 controls underwent same-day 4D-Flow CMR and Doppler echocardiography to quantify early and late diastolic vorticity as well as standard evaluation for LVDD. Furthermore, all patients underwent detailed CT analysis for COPD markers including percent emphysema and air trapping. The 4D-Flow CMR derived diastolic vorticity measures were correlated with CT measures, standard clinical and CMR markers, and echocardiographic diastolic RV metrics. Early diastolic vorticity was significantly reduced in COPD patients (P < 0.0001) with normal left ventricular (LV) mass, geometry, systolic function, and no or mild signs of Doppler LVDD when compared with controls. Vorticity significantly differentiated COPD patients without echocardiographic signs of LVDD (n = 11) from controls (P < 0.0001), and from COPD patients with stage I LVDD (n = 5) (P < 0.0180). Vorticity markers significantly correlated with CT computed measures, CMR-derived RV ejection fraction, echocardiographic RV diastolic metrics, and 6-minute walk test. 4D-Flow CMR derived diastolic vorticity is reduced in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD and no or mild signs of LVDD, implying early perturbations in the LV flow domain preceding more obvious mechanical changes (i.e. stiffening and dilation). Furthermore, reduced LV vorticity appears to be driven by COPD induced changes in lung tissue and parallel RV

  12. Experimentally enhanced model-based deconvolution of propagation-based phase-contrast data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichotka, M.; Palma, K.; Hasn, S.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years phase-contrast has become a much investigated modality in radiographic imaging. The radiographic setups employed in phase-contrast imaging are typically rather costly and complex, e.g. high performance Talbot-Laue interferometers operated at synchrotron light sources. In-line phase-contrast imaging states the most pedestrian approach towards phase-contrast enhancement. Utilizing small angle deflection within the imaged sample and the entailed interference of the deflected and un-deflected beam during spatial propagation, in-line phase-contrast imaging only requires a well collimated X-ray source with a high contrast & high resolution detector. Employing high magnification the above conditions are intrinsically fulfilled in cone-beam micro-tomography. As opposed of 2D imaging, where contrast enhancement is generally considered beneficial, in tomographic modalities the in-line phase-contrast effect can be quite a nuisance since it renders the inverse problem posed by tomographic reconstruction inconsistent, thus causing reconstruction artifacts. We present an experimentally enhanced model-based approach to disentangle absorption and in-line phase-contrast. The approach employs comparison of transmission data to a system model computed iteratively on-line. By comparison of the forward model to absorption data acquired in continuous rotation strong local deviations of the data residual are successively identified as likely candidates for in-line phase-contrast. By inducing minimal vibrations (few mrad) to the sample around the peaks of such deviations the transmission signal can be decomposed into a constant absorptive fraction and an oscillating signal caused by phase-contrast which again allows to generate separate maps for absorption and phase-contrast. The contributions of phase-contrast and the corresponding artifacts are subsequently removed from the tomographic dataset. In principle, if a 3D handling of the sample is available, this method also

  13. Design of a phase contrast imaging diagnostic for the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, E. M.; Porkolab, M.; Grulke, O.; Böttger, L.-G.; Sehren, C.

    2016-10-01

    The Wendelstein 7-X stellarator at IPP Greifswald commenced operation in 2015, and while its design has been aimed at minimizing neoclassical transport, turbulent transport is expected to be strongly affected by the magnetic geometry. With this in mind, MIT and IPP-Greifswald scientists have undertaken a project to design and implement a phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic to measure turbulence in W7-X in the OP1.2 operating phase starting in 2017. The principle and design aspects of the PCI method have been described in numerous past publications. In W7-X the PCI system will have two imaging systems differing only in the angle of the spatial mask that selects for magnetic pitch angle, and will produce measurements of poloidal and radial correlations. A series of remotely controllable optics will allow the beam size and image magnification to be adjustable. We expect sensitivity to fluctuations in the range of 2 kHz to approximately 2 MHz and wavenumbers in the range of 1 cm-1 to 30 cm-1 which should allow us to detect ITG, TEM and possibly ETG turbulence. The MIT portion of this project is supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-SC0014229, and the IPP part is funded under Euratom Grant agreement No 633053.

  14. Comparison of Global Cerebral Blood Flow Measured by Phase-Contrast Mapping MRI with O-15-H2O Positron Emission Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare mean global cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by phase-contrast mapping magnetic resonance imaging (PCM MRI) and by 15O-H2O positron emission tomography (PET) in healthy subjects. PCM MRI is increasingly being used to measure mean global CBF, but has not been validated in vivo...

  15. Evaluation of edge effect due to phase contrast imaging for mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Satoru; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Tohyama, Keiko; Morishita, Junji; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    It is well-known that the edge effect produced by phase contrast imaging results in the edge enhancement of x-ray images and thereby sharpens those images. It has recently been reported that phase contrast imaging using practical x-ray tubes with small focal spots has improved image sharpness as observed in the phase contrast imaging with x-ray from synchrotron radiation or micro-focus x-ray tubes. In this study, we conducted the phase contrast imaging of a plastic fiber and plant seeds using a customized mammography equipment with a 0.1 mm focal spot, and the improvement of image sharpness was evaluated in terms of spatial frequency response of the images. We observed that the image contrast of the plastic fiber was increased by edge enhancement, and, as predicted elsewhere, spectral analysis revealed that as the spatial frequencies of the x-ray images increased, so did the sharpness gained through phase contrast imaging. Thus, phase contrast imaging using a practical molybdenum anode tube with a 0.1 mm-focal spot would benefit mammography, in which the morphological detectability of small species such as microcalcifications is of great concern. And detectability of tumor-surrounded glandular tissues in dense breast would be also improved by the phase contrast imaging.

  16. CHY formulae in 4d

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a rather general way to reduce integrands with polarisation involved in the Cachazo-He-Yuan formulae, such as the reduced Pfaffian and its compactification, as well as the new object for F3 amplitude. We prove that the reduced Pfaffian vanishes unless on a certain set of solutions. It leads us to build up the 4d CHY formulae using spinors, which strains off many useless solutions. The supersymmetrization is straightforward and may provide a hint to understanding ambitwistor string in 4d.

  17. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D V G L N

    2008-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy.

  18. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  19. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics, Technische Universitaetet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany) and Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, 22185 Lund (Germany); Bruker microCT, 2550 Kontich (Belgium); Institute of Micro Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Microworks GmbH, 76137 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-07-31

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  20. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Haugaard; Bech, Martin; Binderup, Tina

    2013-01-01

    whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years) diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase......-contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study...

  1. Near-field x-ray phase contrast imaging and phase retrieval algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Hua-Feng; Xie Hong-Lan; Gao Hong-Yi; Chen Jian-Wen; Li Ru-Xin; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical analyses of x-ray diffraction phase contrast imaging and near field phase retrieval method are presented.A new variant of the near field intensity distribution is derived with the optimal phase imaging distance and spatial frequency of object taken into account. Numerical examples of phase retrieval using simulated data are also given. On the above basis, the influence of detecting distance and polychroism of radiation on the phase contrast image and the retrieved phase distribution are discussed. The present results should be useful in the practical application of in-line phase contrast imaging.

  2. Dynamic measurements of total hepatic blood flow with Phase Contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yzet, Thierry [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Place Victor Pauchet, 80054 Amiens cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: Yzet.Thierry@chu-amiens.fr; Bouzerar, Roger [Department of Imaging and Biophysics, University Hospital, Jules Verne University of Picardie, Place Victor Pauchet, 80054 Amiens cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: bouzerar.roger@chu-amiens.fr; Baledent, Olivier [Department of Imaging and Biophysics, University Hospital, Jules Verne University of Picardie, Place Victor Pauchet, 80054 Amiens cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: Olivier.Baledent@chu-amiens.fr; Renard, Cedric [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Place Victor Pauchet, 80054 Amiens cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: Renard.Cedric@chu-amiens.fr; Lumbala, Didier Mbayo [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Place Victor Pauchet, 80054 Amiens cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: MbayoLumbala.Didier@chu-amiens.fr; Nguyen-Khac, Eric [Mobile Unit of Alcoology, University Hospital, Place Victor Pauchet, 80054 Amiens cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: Nguyen-Khac.Eric@chu-amiens.fr; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc [Department of Visceral and Digestive General Surgery, University Hospital, Place Victor Pauchet, 80054 Amiens cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: regimbeau.jean-marc@chu-amiens.fr; Deramond, H. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Place Victor Pauchet, 80054 Amiens cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: deramond.herve@chu-amiens.fr; Meyer, Marc-Etienne [Department of Imaging and Biophysics, University Hospital, Jules Verne University of Picardie, Place Victor Pauchet, 80054 Amiens cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: Meyer.Marc-Etienne@chu-amiens.fr

    2010-01-15

    Background/Aims: To measure total hepatic blood flow including portal and proper hepatic artery flows as well as the temporal evolution of the vessel's section during a cardiac cycle. Methods: Twenty healthy subjects, with a mean age of 26 years, were explored. Magnetic resonance imaging blood flow measurements were carried out in the portal vein and the proper hepatic artery. MR studies were performed using a 1.5T imager (General Electric Medical Systems). Gradient-echo 2D Fast Cine Phase Contrast sequences were used with both cardiac and respiratory gatings. Data analysis was performed using a semi-automatic software built in our laboratory. Results: The total hepatic flow rate measured was 1.35 {+-} 0.18 L/min or 19.7 {+-} 4.6 mL/(min kg). The proper hepatic artery provided 19.1% of the total hepatic blood flow entering the liver. Those measurements were in agreement with earlier studies using direct measurements. Mean and maximum velocities were also assessed and a discrepancy between our values and the literature's Doppler data was found. Measurements of the portal vein area have shown a mean variation, defined as a 'pulsatility' index of 18% over a cardiac cycle. Conclusions: We report here proper hepatic artery blood flow rate measurements using MRI. Associated with portal flow measurements, we have shown the feasibility of total hepatic flowmetry using a non-invasive and harmless technique.

  3. Vascular centerline extraction in 3D MR angiograms for phase contrast MRI blood flow measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Hoyos, M. [CREATIS, CNRS 5515 et INSERM U630 Research Unit, INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Universidad de los Andes, Bogota (Colombia). Grupo Imagine, Grupo de Ingenieria Biomedica; Orlowski, P.; Piatkowska-Janko, E.; Bogorodzki, P. [Warsaw Univ. of Tech. (Poland). ZEJM-BINSK, Inst. of Radioelectronics; Orkisz, M. [CREATIS, CNRS 5515 et INSERM U630 Research Unit, INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-03-15

    The accuracy of 2D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) depends on the alignment between the vessels and the imaging plane. PC MRA imaging of blood flow is challenging when the flow in several vessels is to be evaluated with one acquisition. For this purpose, semi-automatic determination of the plane most perpendicular to several vessels is proposed based on centerlines extracted from 3D MRA. Arterial centerlines are extracted from 3D MRA based on iterative estimation-prediction, multi-scale analysis of image moments, and a second-order shape model. The optimal plane is determined by minimizing misalignment between its normal vector and the centerlines' tangent vectors. The method was evaluated on a phantom and on 35 patients, by seeking the optimal plane for cerebral blood flow quantification simultaneously in internal carotids and vertebral arteries. In the phantom, difference of orientation and of height between known and calculated planes was 1.2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. In the patients, all but one centerline were correctly extracted and the misalignment of the plane was within 12 per artery. Semi-automatic centerline extraction simplifies and automates determination of the plane orthogonal to one vessel, thereby permitting automatic simultaneous minimization of the misalignment with several vessels in PC MRA. (orig.)

  4. The Accuracy and Precision of Flow Measurements Using Phase Contrast Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chao

    Quantitative volume flow rate measurements using the magnetic resonance imaging technique are studied in this dissertation because the volume flow rates have a special interest in the blood supply of the human body. The method of quantitative volume flow rate measurements is based on the phase contrast technique, which assumes a linear relationship between the phase and flow velocity of spins. By measuring the phase shift of nuclear spins and integrating velocity across the lumen of the vessel, we can determine the volume flow rate. The accuracy and precision of volume flow rate measurements obtained using the phase contrast technique are studied by computer simulations and experiments. The various factors studied include (1) the partial volume effect due to voxel dimensions and slice thickness relative to the vessel dimensions; (2) vessel angulation relative to the imaging plane; (3) intravoxel phase dispersion; (4) flow velocity relative to the magnitude of the flow encoding gradient. The partial volume effect is demonstrated to be the major obstacle to obtaining accurate flow measurements for both laminar and plug flow. Laminar flow can be measured more accurately than plug flow in the same condition. Both the experiment and simulation results for laminar flow show that, to obtain the accuracy of volume flow rate measurements to within 10%, at least 16 voxels are needed to cover the vessel lumen. The accuracy of flow measurements depends strongly on the relative intensity of signal from stationary tissues. A correction method is proposed to compensate for the partial volume effect. The correction method is based on a small phase shift approximation. After the correction, the errors due to the partial volume effect are compensated, allowing more accurate results to be obtained. An automatic program based on the correction method is developed and implemented on a Sun workstation. The correction method is applied to the simulation and experiment results. The

  5. In-line phase contrast micro-CT reconstruction for biomedical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Tan, Renbo

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast micro computed tomography (micro-CT) can non-destructively provide the internal structure information of soft tissues and low atomic number materials. It has become an invaluable analysis tool for biomedical specimens. Here an in-line phase contrast micro-CT reconstruction technique is reported, which consists of a projection extraction method and the conventional filter back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The projection extraction is implemented by applying the Fourier transform to the forward projections of in-line phase contrast micro-CT. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a biomedical specimen dataset measured at an X-ray tube source micro-CT setup. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented technique can improve the imaging contrast of biomedical specimens. It will be of interest for a wide range of in-line phase contrast micro-CT applications in medicine and biology.

  6. Development of a compact gantry for quantitative phase-contrast CT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics (E17) and Institute of Medical Engineering (IMETUM), Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander [Skyscan, Kontich (Belgium); Kenntner, Johannes [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim [Microworks, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Here we present experimental X-ray cone-beam phase-contrast imaging results of a phantom study obtained with a highly compact grating-based gantry setup. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance, quantitativeness and accuracy of phase-contrast and absorption-based computed tomography scans which yield the three dimensional distribution of attenuation coefficient {mu} and refractive index decrement {delta} of different liquids contained in the phantom. Furthermore two different methods of color coding are explored to display both absorption and phase data in a single image. Experimental results for {mu} and {delta} match accurately with tabulated data meaning that the gantry setup performs well in both absorption and phase contrast. The substances contained in the phantom can be considerably better distinguished as the grating-based approach - which combines absorption and phase contrast - provides significantly more information than conventional absorption contrast alone.

  7. Visualization of neurons in the brain with phase-contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Takashima, Kenta; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional structural analysis of brain is essential to understand neuronal function and brain pathology. The phase-contrast X-ray imaging technique uses an X-ray interferometer and is an extremely sensitive method to visualize structures with low X-ray absorbance. Since the phase shifts caused by light elements can be detected as interference patterns in spite of nearly zero absorption coefficients, the signal/noise ratio for the phase-contrast images of the brain is expected to be hundreds times higher than that obtained with the conventional X-ray absorption contrast method. With phase-contrast imaging technique, we could visualize brain microstructures and specific types of neurons, such as the pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. Phase-contrast CT is a promising technique for nondestructive visualization of brain and spinal cord.

  8. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Barty, A; Martz, H E; Lee, W; Fezzaa, K

    2004-05-07

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  9. Estimation of visibility of phase contrast with extraction voltages for field emission gun electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xing

    2017-02-01

    Estimation was made for visibility of phase contrast with varying extraction voltages. The resulting decay rates of visibility show that images with low image contrast from cryo EM will be seriously impacted with high extraction voltages.

  10. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  11. Instant Cinema 4D starter

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminar, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks.This book is written in a friendly, practical style with lots of screenshots and help that will ensure you grow in confidence chapter by chapter.This book is recommended for artists that have experience in other 3D software packages, and who want to learn Cinema 4D. That being said, dedicated readers without experience in other 3D software should not be discouraged from reading this book to learn the basics of Cinema 4D as their first 3D package.

  12. Feasibility study of phase-contrast cone beam CT imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weixing

    Attenuation-based x-ray imaging techniques have been developed for many decades. One of the state-of-the-art imaging modalities is the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) that efficiently scans an object and reproduces high-resolution and isotropic three-dimensional images of it. However, attenuation-based imaging shows a limitation in soft tissue imaging where the absorption contrast is low. Recently several phase-contrast techniques have been developed that are expected to improve low-contrast details by using the phase information of the object. The idea of this thesis is to incorporate the phase-contrast techniques into the current cone beam CT systems to combine the advantages of both phase-contrast imaging and CBCT. From a practical view of medical imaging, two phase-contrast cone beam CT systems are proposed by using the in-line phase-contrast technique and the differential phase-contrast technique, respectively. An in-line phase-contrast image is a Fresnel diffraction pattern in the near field. The image is edge-enhanced, and for soft tissues it is possible to retrieve the phase projection from a single in-line image. Therefore, this technique can be utilized in either of two methods. The first method is to produce edge-enhanced reconstruction images of the attenuation coefficient, and the second is to reconstruct the phase coefficient using the retrieved phase projections. In order to investigate this modality, computer simulations were performed for both working modes. The results using the in-line phase-contrast technique demonstrate superior image quality than that of the attenuation-based technique. A bench-top in-line PC-CBCT system was designed and constructed on top of an optical table, and a simple phantom was imaged and reconstructed using both modes to validate the principle of the proposed imaging scheme. The grating-based differential phase-contrast technique is able to produce the first derivative of phase projections using the principle of

  13. Registration of phase-contrast images in propagation-based X-ray phase tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, L; Hänsch, A; Wolfram, U; Pacureanu, A; Cloetens, P; Peyrin, F; Rit, S; Langer, M

    2017-08-16

    X-ray phase tomography aims at reconstructing the 3D electron density distribution of an object. It offers enhanced sensitivity compared to attenuation-based X-ray absorption tomography. In propagation-based methods, phase contrast is achieved by letting the beam propagate after interaction with the object. The phase shift is then retrieved at each projection angle, and subsequently used in tomographic reconstruction to obtain the refractive index decrement distribution, which is proportional to the electron density. Accurate phase retrieval is achieved by combining images at different propagation distances. For reconstructions of good quality, the phase-contrast images recorded at different distances need to be accurately aligned. In this work, we characterise the artefacts related to misalignment of the phase-contrast images, and investigate the use of different registration algorithms for aligning in-line phase-contrast images. The characterisation of artefacts is done by a simulation study and comparison with experimental data. Loss in resolution due to vibrations is found to be comparable to attenuation-based computed tomography. Further, it is shown that registration of phase-contrast images is nontrivial due to the difference in contrast between the different images, and the often periodical artefacts present in the phase-contrast images if multilayer X-ray optics are used. To address this, we compared two registration algorithms for aligning phase-contrast images acquired by magnified X-ray nanotomography: one based on cross-correlation and one based on mutual information. We found that the mutual information-based registration algorithm was more robust than a correlation-based method. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Visualizing typical features of breast fibroadenomas using phase-contrast CT: an ex-vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Grandl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibroadenoma is the most common benign solid breast lesion type and a very common cause for histologic assessment. To justify a conservative therapy, a highly specific discrimination between fibroadenomas and other breast lesions is crucial. Phase-contrast imaging offers improved soft-tissue contrast and differentiability of fine structures combined with the potential of 3-dimensional imaging. In this study we assessed the potential of grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging for visualizing diagnostically relevant features of fibroadenomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Grating-based phase-contrast CT was performed on six ex-vivo formalin-fixed breast specimens containing a fibroadenoma and three samples containing benign changes that resemble fibroadenomas using Talbot Lau interferometry and a polychromatic X-ray source. Phase-contrast and simultaneously acquired absorption-based 3D-datasets were manually matched with corresponding histological slices. The visibility of diagnostically valuable features was assessed in comparison with histology as the gold-standard. RESULTS: In all cases, matching of grating-based phase-contrast CT images and histology was successfully completed. Grating-based phase-contrast CT showed greatly improved differentiation of fine structures and provided accurate depiction of strands of fibrous tissue within the fibroadenomas as well as of the diagnostically valuable dilated, branched ductuli of the fibroadenomas. A clear demarcation of tumor boundaries in all cases was provided by phase- but not absorption-contrast CT. CONCLUSIONS: Pending successful translation of the technology to a clinical setting and considerable reduction of the required dose, the data presented here suggest that grating-based phase-contrast CT may be used as a supplementary non-invasive diagnostic tool in breast diagnostics. Phase-contrast CT may thus contribute to the reduction of false positive findings and reduce the recall and core

  15. Report of improved performance in Talbot–Lau phase-contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.weber@fau.de; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics (ECAP), Radiation and Detector Physics Group, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many expectations have been raised since the use of conventional x-ray tubes on grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Despite a reported increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in many publications, there is doubt on whether phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) is advantageous in clinical CT scanners in vivo. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by analyzing the performance of a phase-contrast CT laboratory setup. Methods: A phase-contrast CT performance analysis was done. Projection images of a phantom were recorded, and image slices were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection methods. The resulting image slices were analyzed by determining the CNRs in the attenuation and phase image. These results were compared to analytically calculated expectations according to the already published phase-contrast CT performance analysis by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. There, a severe mistake was found leading to wrong predictions of the performance of phase-contrast CT. The error was corrected and with the new formulae, the experimentally obtained results matched the analytical calculations. Results: The squared ratios of the phase-contrast CNR and the attenuation CNR obtained in the authors’ experiment are five- to ten-fold higher than predicted by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. The effective lateral spatial coherence length deduced outnumbers the already optimistic assumption of Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)] by a factor of 3. Conclusions: The authors’ results indicate that the assumptions made in former performance analyses are pessimistic. The break-even point, when phase-contrast CT outperforms attenuation CT, is within reach even with realistic, nonperfect gratings. Further improvements to state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners, like increasing the spatial resolution, could change the balance in favor of phase-contrast computed tomography

  16. X-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis for improved breast tissue discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleede, Simone, E-mail: Schleede@tum.de [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bech, Martin, E-mail: martin.bech@tum.de [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, 22185 Lund (Sweden); Grandl, Susanne, E-mail: Susanne.Grandl@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 München (Germany); Sztrókay, Aniko, E-mail: Aniko.Sztrokay@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 München (Germany); Herzen, Julia, E-mail: julia.herzen@hzg.de [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Mayr, Doris, E-mail: doris.mayr@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Pathology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Thalkirchner Str. 36, 80337 Munich (Germany); Stockmar, Marco, E-mail: marco.stockmar@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Potdevin, Guillaume, E-mail: potdevinguillaume@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Attenuation-based tomosynthesis has proven to successfully resolve the glandular tissue overlap present in mammography. However, the ability of tomosynthesis to differentiate tumorous and glandular tissue remains limited, due to the small differences in X-ray attenuation in breast tissue. One possibility to overcome this limitation and to further increase the diagnostic value of tomosynthesis exams, is the application of recently developed grating-based phase-contrast methods, which provide complementary information on the phase shift and the local scattering power of the sample. In this study, we report on first phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis results of a mastectomy sample slice with an invasive ductal carcinoma. Material and methods: A slice of a mastectomy sample with histologically proven invasive ductal cancer was imaged at the synchrotron radiation source ESRF (Grenoble, France). We used a two-grating interferometer setup at the ninth fractional Talbot distance and with an X-ray energy of 23 keV. In grating interferometry absorption, differential phase, and scattering images are recorded simultaneously. The tomosynthesis scan comprises 61 projections. Multimodal tomosynthesis results were reconstructed using a standard filtered back-projection approach. Our findings are supported by a comparison of tomographic views to histopathology. Results: Phase-contrast tomosynthesis combines the advantage of improved soft-tissue discrimination in phase-contrast imaging with the ability of tomosynthesis to provide a third dimension so that improved feature visibility is not hampered by superposition artifacts. Our results indicate superior diagnostic value due to the depth resolution supplied in tomosynthesis imaging; a region of necrotic tissue that is obscured in a projection image can clearly be depicted in one single tomosynthesis slice. Compared to absorption tomosynthesis alone, soft tissue contrast is significantly enhanced in phase-contrast

  17. HII galaxies in 4D

    CERN Document Server

    Telles, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    HII galaxies are clumpy and their gas kinematics can be mapped to show the global turbulent motions and the effect of massive star evolution. The distribution of their physical conditions is homogeneous and oxygen abundance is uniform. The presence of nebular HeII 4868 line seems to be higher in a low abundance galaxy, implying a harder ionization power probably due to stars in low metallicity. Innovative methods of data cube analysis, namely PCA tomography (nicknamed 4D), seem promising in revealing additional information not detected with the standard methods. I review some of our own recent work on the 3D spectroscopy of HII galaxies.

  18. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Masato, E-mail: hoshino@spring8.or.jp; Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tsukube, Takuro [Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital, 1-3-1 Wakinohamakaigandori, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-0073 (Japan); Yagi, Naoto [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-10-08

    Quantitative measurements of biological fresh samples based on three-dimensional densitometry using X-ray phase contrast tomography are presented. X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching.

  19. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Haugaard Jensen

    Full Text Available Invasive cancer causes a change in density in the affected tissue, which can be visualized by x-ray phase-contrast tomography. However, the diagnostic value of this method has so far not been investigated in detail. Therefore, the purpose of this study was, in a blinded manner, to investigate whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study was that the diagnostic sensitivity of the image analysis for detecting malignancy was 100% and the specificity was 87%. The positive predictive value was 91% for detecting malignancy and the negative predictive value was 100%. We conclude that x-ray phase-contrast imaging can accurately detect density variations to obtain information regarding lymph node involvement previously inaccessible with standard absorption x-ray imaging.

  20. An analysis-synthesis approach for neurosphere modelisation under phase-contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, Stéphane; Huang, Chao-Hui; Ahmed, Sohail; Lim, Joo-Hwee; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The study of stem cells is one of the most important biomedical research. Understanding their development could allow multiple applications in regenerative medicine. For this purpose, automated solutions for the observation of stem cell development process are needed. This study introduces an on-line analysis method for the modelling of neurosphere evolution during the early time of their development under phase contrast microscopy. From the corresponding phase contrast time-lapse sequences, we extract information from the neurosphere using a combination of phase contrast physics deconvolution and curve detection for locate the cells inside the neurosphere. Then, based on prior biological knowledge, we generate possible and optimal 3-dimensional configuration using 2D to 3D registration methods and evolutionary optimisation algorithm.

  1. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related in images. This relationship can be described by a natural logarithm equation. Thus, from the one phase-contrast view, depth information can be retrieved from its contrast. Our preliminary biological experiments indicate promise in its application to measurements requiring in vivo and ongoing assessment of lung tumor progression.

  2. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchen, M J; Lewis, R A; Morgan, M J; Siu, K K W; Habib, A [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Wallace, M J; Siew, M L; Hooper, S B [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Fouras, A [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N; Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au

    2008-11-07

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 {mu}m) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 {mu}L were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  3. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Zachary F; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2017-01-01

    We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification-an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC), is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC), which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps) for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel.

  4. Spherical-Wave Far-Field Interferometer for Hard X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, Houxun; Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Chedid, Nicholas; Panna, Alireza; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    Low dose, high contrast x-ray imaging is of general interest in medical diagnostic applications. X-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometers using collimated synchrotron beams demonstrate the highest levels of phase contrast under a given exposure dose. However, common x-ray sources emit divergent cone beams. Here, we developed a spherical-wave inline Mach-Zehnder interferometer for phase contrast imaging over an extended area with a broadband and divergent source. The first tabletop system was tested in imaging experiments of a mammographic accreditation phantom and various biological specimens. The noise level of the phase contrast images at a clinical radiation dose corresponded to a 6 nano radian bending of the x-ray wavefront. Un-resolved structures with conventional radiography and near-field interferometer techniques became visible at a fraction of the radiation dose.

  5. Subtraction MR Venography Acquired from Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography: Comparison with Phase-Contrast MR Venography and Single-Phase Contrast-Enhanced MR Venography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jinhee; Kim, Bum-Soo; Sung, Jinkyeong; Kim, Bom-Yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the image characteristics of subtraction magnetic resonance venography (SMRV) from time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (TRMRA) compared with phase-contrast MR venography (PCMRV) and single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography (CEMRV). Twenty-one patients who underwent brain MR venography (MRV) using standard protocols (PCMRV, CEMRV, and TRMRA) were included. SMRV was made by subtracting the arterial phase data from the venous phase data in TRMRA. Co-registration and subtraction of the two volume data was done using commercially available software. Image quality and the degree of arterial contamination of the three MRVs were compared. In the three MRVs, 19 pre-defined venous structures (14 dural sinuses and 5 cerebral veins) were evaluated. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the three MRVs were also compared. Single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography showed better image quality (median score 4 in both reviewers) than did the other two MRVs (p < 0.001), whereas SMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) and PCMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) had similar image quality (p ≥ 0.951). SMRV (median score 0 in both reviewers) suppressed arterial signal better than did the other MRVs (median score 1 in CEMRV, median score 2 in PCMRV, both reviewers) (p < 0.001). The dural sinus score of SMRV (median and interquartile range [IQR] 48, 43-50 for reviewer 1, 47, 43-49 for reviewer 2) was significantly higher than for PCMRV (median and IQR 31, 25-34 for reviewer 1, 30, 23-32 for reviewer 2) (p < 0.01) and did not differ from that of CEMRV (median and IQR 50, 47-52 for reviewer 1, 49, 45-51 for reviewer 2) (p = 0.146 in reviewer 1 and 0.123 in reviewer 2). The SNR and CNR of SMRV (median and IQR 104.5, 83.1-121.2 and 104.1, 74.9-120.5, respectively) were between those of CEMRV (median and IQR 150.3, 111-182.6 and 148.4, 108-178.2) and PCMRV (median and IQR 59.4, 49.2-74.9 and 53.6, 43.8-69.2). Subtraction magnetic

  6. Subtraction MR venography acquired from time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography: Comparison with phase-contrast MR venography and single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Hee; Kim, Bum Soo; KIm, Bom Yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So Lyung; Ahn, Kook Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Ji Kyeong [Dept. of Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the image characteristics of subtraction magnetic resonance venography (SMRV) from time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (TRMRA) compared with phase-contrast MR venography (PCMRV) and single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography (CEMRV). Twenty-one patients who underwent brain MR venography (MRV) using standard protocols (PCMRV, CEMRV, and TRMRA) were included. SMRV was made by subtracting the arterial phase data from the venous phase data in TRMRA. Co-registration and subtraction of the two volume data was done using commercially available software. Image quality and the degree of arterial contamination of the three MRVs were compared. In the three MRVs, 19 pre-defined venous structures (14 dural sinuses and 5 cerebral veins) were evaluated. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the three MRVs were also compared. Single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography showed better image quality (median score 4 in both reviewers) than did the other two MRVs (p < 0.001), whereas SMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) and PCMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) had similar image quality (p ≥ 0.951). SMRV (median score 0 in both reviewers) suppressed arterial signal better than did the other MRVs (median score 1 in CEMRV, median score 2 in PCMRV, both reviewers) (p < 0.001). The dural sinus score of SMRV (median and interquartile range [IQR] 48, 43-50 for reviewer 1, 47, 43-49 for reviewer 2) was significantly higher than for PCMRV (median and IQR 31, 25-34 for reviewer 1, 30, 23-32 for reviewer 2) (p < 0.01) and did not differ from that of CEMRV (median and IQR 50, 47-52 for reviewer 1, 49, 45-51 for reviewer 2) (p = 0.146 in reviewer 1 and 0.123 in reviewer 2). The SNR and CNR of SMRV (median and IQR 104.5, 83.1-121.2 and 104.1, 74.9-120.5, respectively) were between those of CEMRV (median and IQR 150.3, 111-182.6 and 148.4, 108-178.2) and PCMRV (median and IQR 59.4, 49.2-74.9 and 53.6, 43.8-69.2). Subtraction magnetic

  7. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Haugaard; Bech, Martin; Binderup, Tina;

    2013-01-01

    whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years) diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase...... was that the diagnostic sensitivity of the image analysis for detecting malignancy was 100% and the specificity was 87%. The positive predictive value was 91% for detecting malignancy and the negative predictive value was 100%. We conclude that x-ray phase-contrast imaging can accurately detect density variations...

  8. Heralded phase-contrast imaging using an orbital angular momentum phase-filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspden, Reuben S.; Morris, Peter A.; He, Ruiqing; Chen, Qian; Padgett, Miles J.

    2016-05-01

    We utilise the position and orbital angular momentum (OAM) correlations between the signal and idler photons generated in the down-conversion process to obtain ghost images of a phase object. By using an OAM phase filter, which is non-local with respect to the object, the images exhibit isotropic edge-enhancement. This imaging technique is the first demonstration of a full-field, phase-contrast imaging system with non-local edge enhancement, and enables imaging of phase objects using significantly fewer photons than standard phase-contrast imaging techniques.

  9. Design and construction of an X-ray phase contrast CT system at BSRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Junyue [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu Peiping [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]. E-mail: zhupp@ihep.ac.cn; Yuan Qingxi [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang Wanxia [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shu Hang [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu Tiandou [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]. E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2006-11-15

    The 4W1A beamline at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) had been dedicated to researches in the field of X-ray phase contrast imaging. In both available layouts, e.g., in-line imaging and diffraction enhanced imaging, a spatial resolution better than 10 {mu}m has been achieved and an X-ray phase contrast CT system has been installed and tested on the beamline. With or without analyzer, it can work either in in-line or the diffraction enhanced mode.

  10. Design and construction of an X-ray phase contrast CT system at BSRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junyue; Zhu, Peiping; Yuan, Qingxi; Huang, Wanxia; Shu, Hang; Hu, Tiandou; Wu, Ziyu

    2006-11-01

    The 4W1A beamline at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) had been dedicated to researches in the field of X-ray phase contrast imaging. In both available layouts, e.g., in-line imaging and diffraction enhanced imaging, a spatial resolution better than 10 μm has been achieved and an X-ray phase contrast CT system has been installed and tested on the beamline. With or without analyzer, it can work either in in-line or the diffraction enhanced mode.

  11. Combining Generalized Phase Contrast with matched filtering into a versatile beam shaping approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    2010-01-01

    We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical ...... manipulation, high-speed sorting and other parallel spatial light applications [1].......We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical...

  12. Combining generalized phase contrast with matched filtering into a versatile beam shaping system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical ...... manipulation, high-speed sorting and other parallel spatial light applications.......We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical...

  13. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Laboratory for Micro and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Philips Technologie GmbH, Roentgenstrasse 24, 22335 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Pathology, Kantonsspital Baden, 5404 Baden (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, Kantonsspital Baden, 5404 Baden (Switzerland); Institute of Pathology, Kantonsspital Baden, 5404 Baden (Switzerland); Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Interdisciplinary Breast Center Baden, Kantonsspital Baden, 5404 Baden (Switzerland); Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen, Switzerland and Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-07-31

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  14. Simulation study of phase retrieval for hard X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Bin; PENG; Xiang; TIAN; Jindong; NIU; Hanben; DIAO; Luh

    2005-01-01

    Two algorithms for the phase retrieval of hard X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging are presented. One is referred to as Iterative Angular Spectrum Algorithm (IASA) and the other is a hybrid algorithm that combines IASA with TIE (transport of intensity equation). The calculations of the algorithms are based on free space propagation of the angular spectrum. The new approaches are demonstrated with numerical simulations. Comparisons with other phase retrieval algorithms are also performed. It is shown that the phase retrieval method combining the IASA and TIE is a promising technique for the application of hard X-ray phase contrast imaging.

  15. Anomalous scaling law for noise variance and spatial resolution in differential phase contrast computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Qi, Zhihua; Bevins, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    In conventional absorption based x-ray computed tomography (CT), the noise variance in reconstructed CT images scales with spatial resolution following an inverse cubic relationship. Without reconstruction, in x-ray absorption radiography, the noise variance scales as an inverse square with spatial resolution. In this letter we report that while the inverse square relationship holds for differential phase contrast projection imaging, there exists an anomalous scaling law in differential phase contrast CT, where the noise variance scales with spatial resolution following an inverse linear relationship. The anomalous scaling law is theoretically derived and subsequently validated with phantom results from an experimental Talbot-Lau interferometer system.

  16. On the relationship between intensity diffraction tomography and phase-contrast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, Mark A.; Shi, Daxin

    2004-10-01

    Diffraction tomography (DT) is a well-known method for reconstructing the complex-valued refractive index distribution of weakly scattering objects. A reconstruction theory of intensity DT (I-DT) has been proposed [Gbur and Wolf, JOSA A, 2002] that can accomplish such a reconstruction from knowledge of only the wavefield intensities on two different transverse planes at each tomographic view angle. In this work, we elucidate the relationship between I-DT and phase-contrast tomography and demonstrate that I-DT reconstruction theory contains some of the existing reconstruction algorithms for phase-contrast tomography as special cases.

  17. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities.

  18. Analysis of an automated background correction method for cardiovascular MR phase contrast imaging in children and young adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Hilpipre, Nicholas; Boylan, Emma E.; Popescu, Andrada R.; Deng, Jie [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); McNeal, Gary R. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., Customer Solutions Group, Cardiovascular MR R and D, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Gang [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago Research Center, Biostatistics Research Core, Chicago, IL (United States); Choi, Grace [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for evaluating vessel blood flow. Inherent errors in acquisition, such as phase offset, eddy currents and gradient field effects, can cause significant inaccuracies in flow parameters. These errors can be rectified with the use of background correction software. To evaluate the performance of an automated phase contrast MRI background phase correction method in children and young adults undergoing cardiac MR imaging. We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing routine clinical cardiac MRI including phase contrast MRI for flow quantification in the aorta (Ao) and main pulmonary artery (MPA). When phase contrast MRI of the right and left pulmonary arteries was also performed, these data were included. We excluded patients with known shunts and metallic implants causing visible MRI artifact and those with more than mild to moderate aortic or pulmonary stenosis. Phase contrast MRI of the Ao, mid MPA, proximal right pulmonary artery (RPA) and left pulmonary artery (LPA) using 2-D gradient echo Fast Low Angle SHot (FLASH) imaging was acquired during normal respiration with retrospective cardiac gating. Standard phase image reconstruction and the automatic spatially dependent background-phase-corrected reconstruction were performed on each phase contrast MRI dataset. Non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected net flow, forward flow, regurgitant volume, regurgitant fraction, and vessel cardiac output were recorded for each vessel. We compared standard non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected mean flow values for the Ao and MPA. The ratio of pulmonary to systemic blood flow (Qp:Qs) was calculated for the standard non-background and background-phase-corrected data and these values were compared to each other and for proximity to 1. In a subset of patients who also underwent phase contrast MRI of the MPA, RPA, and LPA a comparison was made between standard non

  19. E4D_RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-22

    Time-lapse ERT imaging for monitoring both natural and engineered subsurface processes has advanced rapidly over the past 15-20 years. However, imaging results generally required a significant amount of manual and computational effort, and therefore were not available while the process was occurring. Although the value of real-time imaging was recognized, several obstacles prevented it's implementation. E4D_RT addresses these obstacles by 1) providing specialized algorithms that negate the need for user intervention, thereby automating the time-lapse data processing steps, 2) linking field data collection systems with parallel supercomputing systems via wireless data transfer link, and 3) addressing the computational burdens by utilizing distributed memory supercomputing resources, thereby enabling rapid data processing and imaging results.

  20. Use of Caval Subtraction 2D Phase-Contrast MR Imaging to Measure Total Liver and Hepatic Arterial Blood Flow: Preclinical Validation and Initial Clinical Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Manil D; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Bainbridge, Alan; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Davies, Nathan; Halligan, Steve; Lythgoe, Mark F; Taylor, Stuart A

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To validate caval subtraction two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measurements of total liver blood flow (TLBF) and hepatic arterial fraction in an animal model and evaluate consistency and reproducibility in humans. Materials and Methods Approval from the institutional ethical committee for animal care and research ethics was obtained. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2D phase-contrast MR imaging of the portal vein (PV) and infrahepatic and suprahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC). TLBF and hepatic arterial flow were estimated by subtracting infrahepatic from suprahepatic IVC flow and PV flow from estimated TLBF, respectively. Direct PV transit-time ultrasonography (US) and fluorescent microsphere measurements of hepatic arterial fraction were the standards of reference. Thereafter, consistency of caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging-derived TLBF and hepatic arterial flow was assessed in 13 volunteers (mean age, 28.3 years ± 1.4) against directly measured phase-contrast MR imaging PV and proper hepatic arterial inflow; reproducibility was measured after 7 days. Bland-Altman analysis of agreement and coefficient of variation comparisons were undertaken. Results There was good agreement between PV flow measured with phase-contrast MR imaging and that measured with transit-time US (mean difference, -3.5 mL/min/100 g; 95% limits of agreement [LOA], ±61.3 mL/min/100 g). Hepatic arterial fraction obtained with caval subtraction agreed well with those with fluorescent microspheres (mean difference, 4.2%; 95% LOA, ±20.5%). Good consistency was demonstrated between TLBF in humans measured with caval subtraction and direct inflow phase-contrast MR imaging (mean difference, -1.3 mL/min/100 g; 95% LOA, ±23.1 mL/min/100 g). TLBF reproducibility at 7 days was similar between the two methods (95% LOA, ±31.6 mL/min/100 g vs ±29.6 mL/min/100 g). Conclusion Caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging is a simple and clinically

  1. Efficient formation of extended line intensity patterns using matched-filtering generalized phase contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Aabo, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the efficient generation of line patterns using matched-filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC). So far, the main emphasis of mGPC light addressing has been on the creation of rapidly reconfigurable focused spots. This has recently been extended to encoding extended line patter...

  2. Generation of a Desired Wavefront with a Plurality of Phase Contrast Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing an intensity pattern based on generalized phase contrast imaging. The phase filter contains a plurality of phase shifting regions that is matched to the layout of a light source array, each of the regions being positioned...

  3. In-line phase-contrast imaging for strong absorbing objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Caro, Liberato; Giannini, Cinzia [Istituto di Cristallografia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IC-CNR), via Amendola 122/O, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Cedola, Alessia; Bukreeva, Inna; Lagomarsino, Stefano [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFN-CNR), via Cinto Romano 42, I-00156 Roma (Italy)

    2008-11-21

    Phase-contrast imaging is one of the most important emerging x-ray imaging techniques. In this work we analyse, from a theoretical point of view, the in-line phase-contrast image formation under general assumptions. The approach is based on wave-optical theory (Fresnel/Kirchoff diffraction integrals) and on the formalism of the mutual coherence function for the evolution of the coherence wavefield properties. Our theoretical model can be applied to phase-contrast imaging realized both by using highly coherent synchrotron radiation and micro-focus x-ray laboratory sources. Thus, the model is suitable for widespread applications, ranging from material science to medical imaging of human body parts. However, it cannot be applied to polychromatic sources, although the validity of the model does not require particularly demanding characteristics of monochromaticity. In addition, for moderate phase gradients, a useful analytical formula of the phase-contrast visibility is derived, based on the a priori knowledge of source size and distance, pixel detector size, defocus distance, material/tissue dielectric susceptibility and characteristic scales of transversal and longitudinal non-uniformities of the material/tissue dielectric susceptibility. Comparisons both with experimental results published by other authors and with simulations based on a Fourier optics approach have been reported, to confirm the validity of the proposed analytical formula.

  4. Differential diagnosis of arachnoid cyst from subarachnoid space enlargement by phase-contrast cine MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于群; 孔祥泉; 刘定西

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To reveal the relationship of brain motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow by phase-contrast cine MRI, and to evaluate this technique in differentiating between arachnoid cysts and subarachnoid space enlargement. Methods Using a phase-contrast cine MRI pulse sequence, we measured brain motion and CSF flow during the cardiac cycle in 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with MRI-suspected arachnoid cyst or subarachnoid space enlargement. CSF stroke volume curve was illustrated according to flow quantification, and time-signal intensity curve was traced. The two curves were compared. Results This study showed that brain motion was due to the volume difference between arterial and venous blood flow during a cardiac cycle, and thus drives CSF pulsation. Arachnoid cysts and subarachnoid space enlargement carried different curve patterns, demonstrating that phase-contrast MRI and flow quantification can be a useful and reliable technique for non-invasive evaluation of brain motion and CSF flow. Conclusion Arachnoid cysts can be successfully differentiated using phase-contrast cine MRI from subarachnoid space enlargement.

  5. Complete staining of human spermatozoa and immature germ cells combined with phase contrast microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, A Y; Drejer, J O; Bagger, P V

    1987-01-01

    A method combining Janus green B and Thymol blue stains the anterior part of the head, the nuclear membrane, middle piece, and tail of spermatozoa light green and the nucleus deep purple. The method provides excellent stained preparations for the evaluation of sperm morphology by phase contrast...

  6. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using integrated phase contrast microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-Qing

    2010-05-01

    We present a methodology that combines external phase contrast microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical tweezers to monitor a variety of changes during the germination of single Bacillus cereus spores in both nutrient (l-alanine) and non-nutrient (Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA)) germinants with a temporal resolution of approximately 2 s. Phase contrast microscopy assesses changes in refractility of individual spores during germination, while Raman spectroscopy gives information on changes in spore-specific molecules. The results obtained include (1) the brightness of the phase contrast image of an individual dormant spore is proportional to the level of CaDPA in that spore; (2) the end of the first Stage of germination, revealed as the end of the rapid drop in spore refractility by phase contrast microscopy, precisely corresponds to the completion of the release of CaDPA as revealed by Raman spectroscopy; and (3) the correspondence between the rapid drop in spore refractility and complete CaDPA release was observed not only for spores germinating in the well-controlled environment of an optical trap but also for spores germinating when adhered on a microscope coverslip. Using this latter method, we also simultaneously characterized the distribution of the time-to-complete-CaDPA release (T(release)) of hundreds of individual B. cereus spores germinating with both saturating and subsaturating concentrations of l-alanine and with CaDPA.

  7. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part II: Optimisation of imaging conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hao, E-mail: hao.yang@materials.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Materials. Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Pennycook, Timothy J.; Nellist, Peter D. [University of Oxford, Department of Materials. Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    In Part I of this series of two papers, we demonstrated the formation of a high efficiency phase-contrast image at atomic resolution using a pixelated detector in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with ptychography. In this paper we explore the technique more quantitatively using theory and simulations. Compared to other STEM phase contrast modes including annular bright field (ABF) and differential phase contrast (DPC), we show that the ptychographic phase reconstruction method using pixelated detectors offers the highest contrast transfer efficiency and superior low dose performance. Applying the ptychographic reconstruction method to DPC segmented detectors also improves the detector contrast transfer and results in less noisy images than DPC images formed using difference signals. We also find that using a minimum array of 16×16 pixels is sufficient to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for imaging beam sensitive weak phase objects. Finally, the convergence angle can be adjusted to enhance the contrast transfer based on the spatial frequencies of the specimen under study. - Highlights: • High efficiency phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) can be achieved using pixelated detectors followed by a ptychographic reconstruction. • Ptychographic reconstruction offers the highest PCTF across the entire spatial frequency range compared to DPC and ABF. • Image simulations show that a ptychographic reconstruction using pixelated detectors offers a superior low dose performance for imaging weak phase objects. • Optimisation of imaging conditions using pixelated detectors are discussed by considering the contrast transfer function for various cases.

  8. Contrast-to-noise in X-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, K.J.; Geller, D.; Koehler, T.; Martens, G.; Schusser, S.; Vogtmeier, G.; Roessl, E.

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative theory for the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI) is proposed and compared to that of images derived from classical absorption contrast imaging (ACI). Most prominently, the CNR for DPCI contains the reciprocal of thespatial wavelength to be ima

  9. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with tabletop synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Dollar, F; Bloom, M S; Chvykov, V; Kalintchenko, G; Krushelnick, K; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Najmudin, Z; Palmer, C A J; Schreiber, J; Schumaker, W; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1896, x-rays have had a profound impact on science, medicine and technology. Here we show that the x-rays from a novel tabletop source of bright coherent synchrotron radiation can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens, yielding superior image quality and avoiding the need for scarce or expensive conventional sources.

  10. Requirements for dynamical differential phase contrast x-ray imaging with a laboratory source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macindoe, David; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Irvine, Sarah C.; Fouras, Andreas; Morgan, Kaye S.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray phase contrast enables weakly-attenuating structures to be imaged, with bright synchrotron sources adding the ability to capture time sequences and analyse sample dynamics. Here, we describe the translation of dynamical differential phase contrast imaging from the synchrotron to a compact x-ray source, in order to achieve this kind of time sequence imaging in the laboratory. We formulate broadly-applicable set-up guidelines for the single-grid, single-exposure imaging technique using a divergent source, exploring the experimental factors that restrict set-up size, imaging sensitivity and sample size. Experimental images are presented using the single-grid phase contrast technique with a steel attenuation grid and a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, enabling exposure times as short as 0.5 s for dynamic imaging. Differential phase contrast images were retrieved from phantoms, incorporating noise filtering to improve the low-count images encountered when imaging dynamics using short exposures.

  11. Noise robustness of a combined phase retrieval and reconstruction method for phase-contrast tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2016-01-01

    Classical reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography consist of two stages: phase retrieval and tomographic reconstruction. A novel algebraic method combining the two was suggested by Kostenko et al. [Opt. Express 21, 12185 (2013) [CrossRef], and preliminary results demonstrated improved...... is substantially more robust toward noise; our simulations point to a possible reduction in counting times by an order of magnitude....

  12. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  13. Evaluation of a new reconstruction algorithm for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Maria; Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging might open up entirely new opportunities in medical imaging. However, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, vibrations or distortions of the system lead to inaccuracies within the phase-stepping procedure. Given insufficient stability of the phase-step positions, up to now, artifacts in phase-contrast images occur, which lower the image quality. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging in clinical routine as for example tiny structures of the human anatomy cannot be observed. In this contribution we evaluate an algorithm proposed by Vargas et.al.1 and applied to X-ray imaging by Pelzer et.al. that enables us to reconstruct a differential phase-contrast image without the knowledge of the specific phase-step positions. This method was tested in comparison to the standard reconstruction by Fourier analysis. The quality of phase-contrast images remains stable, even if the phase-step positions are completely unknown and not uniformly distributed. To also achieve attenuation and dark-field images the proposed algorithm has been combined with a further algorithm of Vargas et al.3 Using this algorithm, the phase-step positions can be reconstructed. With the help of the proper phase-step positions it is possible to get information about the phase, the amplitude and the offset of the measured data. We evaluated this algorithm concerning the measurement of thick objects which show a high absorbency.

  14. Noninvasive pressure difference mapping derived from 4D flow MRI in patients with unrepaired and repaired aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengier, Fabian; Delles, Michael; Eichhorn, Joachim; Azad, Yoo-Jin; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Ley, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    To develop a method for computing and visualizing pressure differences derived from time-resolved velocity-encoded three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (4D flow MRI) and to compare pressure difference maps of patients with unrepaired and repaired aortic coarctation to young healthy volunteers. 4D flow MRI data of four patients with aortic coarctation either before or after repair (mean age 17 years, age range 3-28, one female, three males) and four young healthy volunteers without history of cardiovascular disease (mean age 24 years, age range 20-27, one female, three males) was acquired using a 1.5-T clinical MR scanner. Image analysis was performed with in-house developed image processing software. Relative pressures were computed based on the Navier-Stokes equation. A standardized method for intuitive visualization of pressure difference maps was developed and successfully applied to all included patients and volunteers. Young healthy volunteers exhibited smooth and regular distribution of relative pressures in the thoracic aorta at mid systole with very similar distribution in all analyzed volunteers. Patients demonstrated disturbed pressures compared to volunteers. Changes included a pressure drop at the aortic isthmus in all patients, increased relative pressures in the aortic arch in patients with residual narrowing after repair, and increased relative pressures in the descending aorta in a patient after patch aortoplasty. Pressure difference maps derived from 4D flow MRI can depict alterations of spatial pressure distribution in patients with repaired and unrepaired aortic coarctation. The technique might allow identifying pathophysiological conditions underlying complications after aortic coarctation repair.

  15. Cartilage and soft tissue imaging using X-rays: propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography of the human knee in comparison with clinical imaging techniques and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Annie; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Geith, Tobias; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Auweter, Sigrid D; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian F; Coan, Paola

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates high-resolution tomographic x-ray phase-contrast imaging in whole human knee joints for the depiction of soft tissue with emphasis on hyaline cartilage. The method is compared with conventional computed tomography (CT), synchrotron radiation absorption-based CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After approval of the institutional review board, 2 cadaveric human knees were examined at an synchrotron institution using a monochromatic x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm field of view, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm. Images of phase-contrast imaging CT were reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Image quality and tissue contrast were evaluated and compared in all modalities and with histology. Phase-contrast imaging provides visualization of altered cartilage regions invisible in absorption CT with simultaneous high detail of the underlying bony abnormalities. The delineation of surface changes is similar to 3-T MRI using cartilage-dedicated sequences. Phase-contrast imaging CT presents soft tissue contrast surpassing that of conventional CT with a clear discrimination of ligamentous, muscular, neural, and vascular structures. In addition, phase-contrast imaging images show cartilage and meniscal calcifications that are not perceptible on conventional CT or on MRI. Phase-contrast imaging CT may facilitate a more complete evaluation of the human knee joint by providing concurrent comprehensive information about cartilage, the underlying subchondral bone, and their changes in osteoarthritic conditions.

  16. Evaluation of the potential of phase-contrast computed tomography for improved visualization of cancerous human liver tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, Peter B.; Fingerle, Alexander A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Herzen, Julia [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Physics Dept. and Inst. of Medical Engineering] [and others

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCCT) is currently investigated and developed as a potentially very interesting extension of conventional CT, and can offer several advantages for specific indications in diagnostic imaging. Current absorption-based computed tomography (CT) without the application of contrast material is limited in the detection of minor density differences in soft-tissue. The purpose of this study is to test whether PCCT can improve soft tissue contrast in healthy and tumorous human liver specimens. Materials and Methods: Two specimens of human liver (one healthy and one metastasized liver sample) were imaged with brilliant X-ray beam at the synchrotron radiation source ESRF in Grenoble, France. For correlation the same specimens were imaged with a magnetic resonance imaging system at 1.5 T. The histopathology confirmed our findings in the corresponding sections of the specimens. Results: In the phase-contrast CT images we observed a significantly enhanced soft-tissue contrast when compared to simultaneously recorded standard absorption CT measurements. Further, we found that the pathological and morphological information in the PCCT reconstructions show significant improvement when compared to those performed on MRI. Based on matching of prominent features, a good correlation between PCCT and the histological section is demonstrated; especially the tumor capsule and the surrounding vascular structures are visible in PCCT. In addition, our study revealed the ability of PCCT to visualize the blood vessels structure in the tumorous liver without the need of any contrast agents. Conclusion: Grating-based PCCT significantly improves the soft-tissue contrast in ex-vivo liver specimens and holds the potential to overcome the need of contrast materials for visualization of the tumor vascularization. (orig.)

  17. Characterization of three dimensional volumetric strain distribution during passive tension of the human tibialis anterior using Cine Phase Contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elisabeth R; Morrow, Duane A; Felmlee, Joel P; Murthy, Naveen S; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2016-10-03

    Intramuscular pressure correlates strongly with muscle tension and is a promising tool for quantifying individual muscle force. However, clinical application is impeded by measurement variability that is not fully understood. Previous studies point to regional differences in IMP, specifically increasing pressure with muscle depth. Based on conservation of mass, intramuscular pressure and volumetric strain distributions may be inversely related. Therefore, we hypothesized volumetric strain would decrease with muscle depth. To test this we quantified 3D volumetric strain in the tibialis anterior of 12 healthy subjects using Cine Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Cine Phase Contrast data were collected while a custom apparatus rotated the subjects' ankle continuously between neutral and plantarflexion. A T2-weighted image stack was used to define the resting tibials anterior position. Custom and commercial post-processing software were used to quantify the volumetric strain distribution. To characterize regional strain changes, the muscle was divided into superior-inferior sections and either medial-lateral or anterior-posterior slices. Mean volumetric strain was compared across the sections and slices. As hypothesized, volumetric strain demonstrated regional differences with a decreasing trend from the anterior (superficial) to the posterior (deep) muscle regions. Statistical tests showed significant main effects and interactions of superior-inferior and anterior-posterior position as well as superior-inferior and medial-lateral position on regional strain. These data support our hypothesis and imply a potential relationship between regional volumetric strain and intramuscular pressure. This finding may advance our understanding of intramuscular pressure variability sources and lead to more reliable measurement solutions in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishing a framework to implement 4D XCAT Phantom for 4D radiotherapy research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K Panta

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: An integrated computer program has been developed to generate, review, analyse, process, and export the 4D XCAT images. A framework has been established to implement the 4D XCAT phantom for 4D RT research.

  19. A uniqueness result for propagation-based phase contrast imaging from a single measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Maretzke, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Phase contrast imaging seeks to reconstruct the complex refractive index of an unknown sample from scattering intensities, measured for example under illumination with coherent X-rays. By incorporating refraction, this method yields improved contrast compared to purely absorption-based radiography but involves a phase retrieval problem which, in general, allows for ambiguous reconstructions. In this paper, we show uniqueness of propagation-based phase contrast imaging for compactly supported objects in the near field regime, based on a description by the projection- and paraxial approximations. In this setting, propagation is governed by the Fresnel propagator and the unscattered part of the illumination function provides a known reference wave at the detector which facilitates phase reconstruction. The uniqueness theorem is derived using the theory of entire functions. Unlike previous results based on exact solution formulae, it is valid for arbitrary complex objects and requires intensity measurements only ...

  20. SR biomedical imaging with phase-contrast and fluorescent x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu, Jin; Yoneyama, Akio; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Hirai, Yasuharu; Kuroe, Taichi; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Kazuyaki; Dilmanian, F. A.; Akatsuka, Takao

    2004-10-01

    New synchrotron x-ray CT system with phase-contrast and fluorescent techniques are being developed for biomedical researches with the high-contrast and high-spatial resolution. We have applied these techniques for in-vivo and ex-vivo imaging. The phase-contrast x-ray CT (PCCT) was a highly sensitive imaging technique to depict the morphological information of the soft tissue in biological object, whereas fluorescent x-ray CT (FXCT) could depict the functional information concerning to specific heavy atomic number elements at very low content. Thus, the success of in-vivo imaging by PCCT and FXCT allows starting new approach to bio-imaging researches.

  1. High resolution laboratory grating-based x-ray phase-contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viermetz, Manuel P.; Birnbacher, Lorenz J. B.; Fehringer, Andreas; Willner, Marian; Noel, Peter B.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) is a promising imaging method for imaging of soft tissue contrast without the need of any contrast agent. The focus of this study is the increase in spatial resolution without loss in sensitivity to allow visualization of pathologies comparable to the convincing results obtained at the synchrotron. To improve the effective pixel size a super-resolution reconstruction based on subpixel shifts involving a deconvolution of the image is applied on differential phase-contrast data. In our study we could achieve an effective pixel sizes of 28mm without any drawback in terms of sensitivity or the ability to measure quantitative data.

  2. Phase-contrast CT: fundamental theorem and fast image reconstruction algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronnikov, Andrei V.

    2006-08-01

    Phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) is an emerging imaging technique that can be implemented at third generation synchrotron radiation sources or by using a microfocus x-ray tube. Promising experimental results have recently been obtained in material science and biological applications. At the same time, the lack of a mathematical theory comparable to that of conventional absorption-based CT limits the progress in this field. We suggest such a theory and prove a fundamental theorem that plays the same role for phase-contrast CT as the Fourier slice theorem does for absorption-based CT. The fundamental theorem allows us to derive fast image reconstruction algorithms in the form of filtered backprojection (FBP).

  3. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.

  4. Evaluation on correction factor for in-line X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Mingli; Huang, Zhifeng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Ran [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging; Yin, Hongxia; Liu, Yunfu; Wang, Zhenchang [Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China). Medical Imaging Center; Xiao, Tiqiao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Inst. of Applied Physics

    2011-07-01

    X-ray in-line phase contrast computed tomography (CT) is an effective nondestructive tool, providing 3D distribution of the refractive index of weakly absorbing low-Z object with high resolution and image contrast, especially with high-brilliance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources. Modified Bronnikov's algorithm (MBA), one of the in-line phase contrast CT reconstruction algorithms, can reconstruct the refractive index distribution of a pure phase object with a single computed tomographic data set. The key idea of the MBA is to use a correction factor in the filter function to stabilize the behavior at low frequencies. In this paper, we evaluate the influences of the correction factor to the final reconstruction results of the absorption-phase-mixed objects with analytical simulation and actual experiments. The limitations of the MBA are discussed finally. (orig.)

  5. Array illumination with minimal non-uniformity based on generalized phase contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The generalized phase contrast method (GPC) has been previously shown to be an efficient technique for generating array illumination and is thus highly suitable for such applications as dynamic multiple beam trapping and optical micromanipulation. However, projected arrays usually exhibit intensity...... roll-offs that may be undesirable for some applications. We show that the uniformity of GPC-generated array illuminations can be improved using intuitive corrections to the input spatial phase modulation, by increasing or decreasing it to respectively raise or lower the intensity of the corresponding...... output spots to improve uniformity. This is combined with matching corrections to the phase shift introduced by the phase contrast filter. Results from numerical experiments show that the array illumination uniformity error improves from over 40% to less than 1% while maintaining the efficiency prior...

  6. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krenkel, Martin, E-mail: mkrenke@gwdg.de; Töpperwien, Mareike; Salditt, Tim, E-mail: tsaldit@gwdg.de [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Dullin, Christian [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Alves, Frauke [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Department of Haematology and Medical Oncology, Medical Center Göttingen, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Department of Molecular Biology of Neuronal Signals, Max-Planck-Institute of Experimental Medicine, 37075 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  7. Experimental demonstration of passive coherent combining of fiber lasers by phase contrast filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeux, François; Desfarges-Berthelemot, Agnès; Kermène, Vincent; Barthelemy, Alain

    2012-12-17

    We report experiments on a new laser architecture involving phase contrast filtering to coherently combine an array of fiber lasers. We demonstrate that the new technique yields a more stable phase-locking than standard methods using only amplitude filtering. A spectral analysis of the output beams shows that the new scheme generates more resonant frequencies common to the coupled lasers. This property can enhance the combining efficiency when the number of lasers to be coupled is large.

  8. Theoretical analysis of x-ray CT phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sheng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Xuelong

    2008-12-01

    Recently phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention. An obvious advantage of using X-rays for imaging the internal structure of relatively thick samples lies in its high degree of penetration of solid objects. However, often leads to poor image contrast for soft tissue. Phase contrast imaging can be very useful in such situation, as the phase of the transmitted beam may often be more sensitive indicator of density of sample than convention contrast. On the other hand, Computed Tomography is the best technology in the aspect of X-rays detection. Using the technology, the detected object can be imaged to three-dimensional image, so as to observe the inner structure of object, and be convenient to the disease examination. If the phase contrast imaging can be used to the technology of Computed Tomography, the high resolution image can be gained. The technology will become the development orientation of medical image. The aim of this article was to apply the theory of X-rays phase contrast imaging to the traditional X-CT technique. For this purpose, the formula deduced from the imaging theory with parallel monochromatic X-rays illuminating the object based on the Fresnel-Kircohhof theory had been completed and a formula similar to that of the traditional X-CT reconstruction had been gained, which was Radon transform formula. At last, X-rays reconstruction simulation had been carried out according to the formula, and proved that the method could be used in clinical medical imaging. The method discussed in this paper had a very bright prospect for application.

  9. X-ray Phase Contrast Allows Three Dimensional, Quantitative Imaging of Hydrogel Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, Alyssa A.; Larson, Jeffery C.; Jiang, Bin; Zhong, Zhong; Anastasio, Mark A.; Brey, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional imaging techniques are needed for the evaluation and assessment of biomaterials used for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Hydrogels are a particularly popular class of materials for medical applications but are difficult to image in tissue using most available imaging modalities. Imaging techniques based on X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) have shown promise for tissue engineering applications due to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray...

  10. Synchrotron radiation phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of acupuncture points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongming; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi [Fudan University, Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Liu, Chenglin [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng (China); Dang, Ruishan [The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiao, Tiqiao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Peiping [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2011-08-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using synchrotron radiation in-line X-ray phase contrast computerized tomography. Two acupuncture points, named Zhongji (RN3) and Zusanli (ST36), were studied. We found an accumulation of microvessels at each acupuncture point region. Images of the tissues surrounding the acupuncture points do not show such kinds of structure. This is the first time that 3D images have revealed the specific structures of acupuncture points. (orig.)

  11. Generalized Phase contrast and matched filtering for speckle‐free patterned illumination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    2013-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) and matched‐filtering GPC use tandem diffractive phase elements on Fourier‐conjugate planes of a 4f optical processor to efficiently reshape incident light into a pattern that resembles the input phase modulation pattern. The synthesized patterns are inherently sp...... excitation, exhibits some robustness against light scattering and, hence, makes a promising tool for spatially precise targeting of deeper subsurface neurons using minimally speckled patterned illumination for multiphoton excitation....

  12. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displace the blood inside cerebral vessels and then replace it with air making air-filled mouse brain. After sample preparation, X-ray phase-contrast tomography is performed to collect the data for volume reconstruction. Here, we adopt a phase-retrieval combined filtered backprojection method to reconstruct its three-dimensional structure and redesigned the reconstruction kernel. To evaluate its performance, we carried out experiments at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that the air-tissue structured cerebral vasculatures are highly visible with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and can be clearly resolved in reconstructed cross-images. Besides, functional areas, such as the corpus callosum, corpus striatum, and nuclei, are also clearly resolved. The proposed method is comparable with hematoxylin and eosin staining method but represents the studied mouse brain in three dimensions, offering a potential powerful tool for the research of brain disorders.

  13. The application of phase contrast X-ray techniques for imaging Li-ion battery electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, D. S.; Bradley, R. S.; Tariq, F.; Cooper, S. J.; Taiwo, O. O.; Gelb, J.; Merkle, A.; Brett, D. J. L.; Brandon, N. P.; Withers, P. J.; Lee, P. D.; Shearing, P. R.

    2014-04-01

    In order to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cells and batteries across a range of applications, an understanding of the mechanisms by which they age and degrade at the microstructural level is required. Here, the most widely commercialized Li-ion batteries based on porous graphite based electrodes which de/intercalate Li+ ions during charge/discharge are studied by two phase contrast enhanced X-ray imaging modes, namely in-line phase contrast and Zernike phase contrast at the micro (synchrotron) and nano (laboratory X-ray microscope) level, respectively. The rate of charge cycling is directly dependent on the nature of the electrode microstructure, which are typically complex multi-scale 3D geometries with significant microstructural heterogeneities. We have been able to characterise the porosity and the tortuosity by micro-CT as well as the morphology of 5 individual graphite particles by nano-tomography finding that while their volume varied significantly their sphericity was surprisingly similar. The volume specific surface areas of the individual grains measured by nano-CT are significantly larger than the total volume specific surface area of the electrode from the micro-CT imaging, which can be attributed to the greater particle surface area visible at higher resolution.

  14. Experimental results from a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Meiser, Jan; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    To explore the future clinical potential of improved soft-tissue visibility with grating-based X-ray phase contrast (PC), we have developed a first preclinical computed tomography (CT) scanner featuring a rotating gantry. The main challenge in the transition from previous bench-top systems to a preclinical scanner are phase artifacts that are caused by minimal changes in the grating alignment during gantry rotation. In this paper, we present the first experimental results from the system together with an adaptive phase recovery method that corrects for these phase artifacts. Using this method, we show that the scanner can recover quantitatively accurate Hounsfield units in attenuation and phase. Moreover, we present a first tomography scan of biological tissue with complementary information in attenuation and phase contrast. The present study hence demonstrates the feasibility of grating-based phase contrast with a rotating gantry for the first time and paves the way for future in vivo studies on small animal disease models (in the mid-term future) and human diagnostics applications (in the long-term future). PMID:23019354

  15. Phase contrast micro-CT with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, R.; Kieffer, J. C.; Krol, A.; Fourmaux, S.; Ozaki, T.; Ye, H.; Kincaid, R. E., Jr.; Rakhman, A.

    2005-08-01

    We investigated performance of ultrafast laser-based x-ray source for phase contrast imaging in 2D projection imaging and in enhanced micro-CT imaging. Good quality images were obtained, including images of small animals, in the single energy and multiple energy, in line phase-contrast enhancing geometry using x-ray line energy matching object thickness and density. Phase information has been inferred from images obtained at the same x-ray energy but at different object-to-detector distances and also from images obtained at the same object-to-detector distance but with different K-alpha line energies. Ultrafast laser-based, compact, x-ray source is a promising technique for micro-CT systems. Its utilization might result in faster scans with lower radiation dose, better spatial and contrast resolution and also femtosecond temporal resolution. In addition, it might allow practical implementation of dual-energy and phase-contrast imaging micro-CT that is not possible with conventional micro-CT.

  16. Preliminary results from a first preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering (IMETUM), Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander [Skyscan, Kontich (Belgium)

    2012-07-01

    Conventional absorption-based X-ray imaging of biomedical samples provides only weak soft-tissue contrast. This limitation can be addressed by phase-contrast imaging, which exploits the phase shift that X-rays undergo when passing through an object. The phase shift, apparent in a minimal angular refraction of the X-ray, can be measured by grating-based interferometric methods at laboratory X-ray sources. Using this technique, improved soft-tissue contrast can be achieved and great potential for medical imaging is anticipated. As a first step towards clinical implementation, we have developed a grating-based compact preclinical phase-contrast CT scanner with rotating gantry, from which we present the first results of soft tissue samples. In particular, the effect of the rotational movement of the gantry on the interferometric image acquisition is characterized and the consequent challenges for image preprocessing and image formation are presented. First scans of biological samples clearly show the improved soft-tissue contrast and hence prove the feasibility of phase-contrast X-ray tomography with a compact rotating gantry system.

  17. A reconstruction method for cone-beam differential x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Velroyen, Astrid; Tan, Renbo; Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Liyuan; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-09-10

    Most existing differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) approaches are based on three kinds of scanning geometries, described by parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam. Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution, cone-beam DPC-CT has attracted significant interest. In this paper, we report a reconstruction method based on a back-projection filtration (BPF) algorithm for cone-beam DPC-CT. Due to the differential nature of phase contrast projections, the algorithm restrains from differentiation of the projection data prior to back-projection, unlike BPF algorithms commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a micro-focus x-ray tube source. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can deal with several classes of truncated cone-beam datasets. We believe that this feature is of particular interest for future medical cone-beam phase-contrast CT imaging applications.

  18. Theoretical considerations for X-ray phase contrast mammography by Thomson source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cedola, A. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFN-CNR), via Cineto Romano 42, I-00156 Roma (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro2, 00185 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: cedola@ifn.cnr.it; Bukreeva, I.; Lagomarsino, S. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFN-CNR), via Cineto Romano 42, I-00156 Roma (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro2, 00185 Rome (Italy); Petrillo, V.; Maroli, C. [Universita di Milano, Physics Department and INFN Sezione di Milano Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2009-09-01

    The advent, in the near future, of compact X-ray sources like Thomson Back-Scattering (TBS) will allow the clinical application of advanced X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase contrast, with higher sensitivity and lower impact in terms of dose delivery. In this work, we theoretically investigated the possibility of using such sources for phase contrast imaging of micro-calcifications included in a breast tissue. In our study we analyzed the phase and amplitude distribution of the TBS source and we showed that this source can be used for phase contrast imaging since the source coherence at the sample position is sufficiently high for achieving good contrast and micrometer spatial resolution. Indeed the spatial coherence of a TBS source is closer to that of a synchrotron radiation source, and much better than that of a laboratory source. Moreover, we showed the advantages of phase imaging with respect to standard absorption imaging, in the specific case of micro-calcifications detection.

  19. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  20. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576-81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  1. Towards quantitative, atomic-resolution reconstruction of the electrostatic potential via differential phase contrast using electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, R.; Chen, Z. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Differential phase contrast images in scanning transmission electron microscopy can be directly and quantitatively related to the gradient of the projected specimen potential provided that (a) the specimen can be treated as a phase object and (b) full 2D diffraction patterns as a function of probe position can be obtained. Both are challenging to achieve in atomic resolution imaging. The former is fundamentally limited by probe spreading and dynamical electron scattering, and we explore its validity domain in the context of atomic resolution differential phase contrast imaging. The latter, for which proof-of-principle experimental data sets exist, is not yet routine. We explore the extent to which more established segmented detector geometries can instead be used to reconstruct a quantitatively good approximation to the projected specimen potential. - Highlights: • Atomic-resolution differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging explored via simulation. • Phase-object approximation limits quantification to specimens a few nanometers thick. • Segmented detectors give good estimates of the diffraction pattern's first moment.

  2. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yan; Lin, Xiaojie; Yuan, Falei; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displace the blood inside cerebral vessels and then replace it with air making air-filled mouse brain. After sample preparation, X-ray phase-contrast tomography is performed to collect the data for volume reconstruction. Here, we adopt a phase-retrieval combined filtered backprojection method to reconstruct its three-dimensional structure and redesigned the reconstruction kernel. To evaluate its performance, we carried out experiments at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that the air-tissue structured cerebral vasculatures are highly visible with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and can be clearly resolved in reconstructed cross-images. Besides, functional areas, such as the corpus callosum, corpus striatum, and nuclei, are also clearly resolved. The proposed method is comparable with hematoxylin and eosin staining method but represents the studied mouse brain in three dimensions, offering a potential powerful tool for the research of brain disorders.

  3. High-energy x-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography of human anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Florian; Hauke, Christian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Seifert, Maria; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast Talbot-Lau interferometry is a promising imaging technology that has the potential to raise soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based imaging. Additionally, it is sensitive to attenuation, refraction and scattering of the radiation and thus provides complementary and otherwise inaccessible information due to the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. Until recent progress the method has been mainly limited to photon energies below 40 keV. Scaling the method to photon energies that are sufficient to pass large and spacious objects represents a challenging task. This is caused by increasing demands regarding the fabrication process of the gratings and the broad spectra that come along with the use of polychromatic X-ray sources operated at high acceleration voltages. We designed a setup that is capable to reach high visibilities in the range from 50 to 120 kV. Therefore, spacious and dense parts of the human body with high attenuation can be measured, such as a human knee. The authors will show investigations on the resulting attenuation, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. The images experimentally show that X-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography is feasible with highly absorbing parts of the human body containing massive bones.

  4. Regularized Newton Methods for X-ray Phase Contrast and General Imaging Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Maretzke, Simon; Krenkel, Martin; Salditt, Tim; Hohage, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Like many other advanced imaging methods, x-ray phase contrast imaging and tomography require mathematical inversion of the observed data to obtain real-space information. While an accurate forward model describing the generally nonlinear image formation from a given object to the observations is often available, explicit inversion formulas are typically not known. Moreover, the measured data might be insufficient for stable image reconstruction, in which case it has to be complemented by suitable a priori information. In this work, regularized Newton methods are presented as a general framework for the solution of such ill-posed nonlinear imaging problems. For a proof of principle, the approach is applied to x-ray phase contrast imaging in the near-field propagation regime. Simultaneous recovery of the phase- and amplitude from a single near-field diffraction pattern is demonstrated for the first time. The presented methods further permit all-at-once phase contrast tomography, i.e. simultaneous phase retriev...

  5. A phase contrast cytomorphometric study of squames of normal oral mucosa and oral leukoplakia: Original study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afreen Nadaf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral leukoplakia represents the most common potentially malignant oral disorder, representing 85% of such lesions. The worldwide prevalence of leukoplakia is 1.5- 4.3%. Leukoplakia is often associated with carcinogenic exposures, such as from use of tobacco, alcohol or betel nut. The level of risk for malignant transformation of leukoplakia is associated with lesion histology. The overall malignant transformation rates for dysplastic lesions range from 11% to 36%, depending on the length of follow-up. Exfoliative cytology is a simple and minimally invasive method. Phase contrast microscope, an essential tool in the field of biology and medical research provides improved discrimination of cellular details. Aims: To study and compare the cytomorphological and cytomorphometric features of squames obtained from the mucosa of normal individuals, tobacco habituates with and without clinically evident leukoplakia. To assess the role of phase contrast microscopy as an alternative and easy method of cytological evaluation of wet and unstained smears. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases from each group were taken. Fixed, unstained smears were viewed under phase contrast microscope and were evaluated morphologically and morphometrically for nuclear and cellular diameters. Results: The study showed a significant increase in the mean nuclear diameter and decrease in the mean cellular diameter. Conclusion: Cytomorphometric changes could be the earliest indicators of cellular alterations. This indicates that there could be a cause-effect relationship between tobacco and quantitative alterations.

  6. Effect of chronic unloading and rehabilitation on human Achilles tendon properties: a velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongsuk; Finni, Taija; Ahn, Sinyeob; Hodgson, John A; Lee, Hae-Dong; Edgerton, V Reggie; Sinha, Shantanu

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to measure and monitor changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties and force production capability of triceps surae muscles after 4 wk of limb suspension and 6 wk of physical rehabilitation. Five healthy volunteers underwent unilateral lower limb suspension followed by weekly physiotherapy. A velocity-encoded, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (VE-PC-MRI) technique was used to estimate the tendon strain as a function of force produced during the submaximal isometric contractions. After limb suspension, triceps surae muscle strength decreased to 53.2 +/- 15.6% (mean +/- SD) of the presuspension level (P Young's modulus, estimated from the slope of the tendon stress-strain relationship, decreased by 17.1% (from 140.50 +/- 29.33 to 119.95 +/- 36.07 MPa, P Muscle strength, tendon stiffness, and transition point recovered to presuspension levels by the end of 6 wk of rehabilitation. Calcaneus movement was significant during the "isometric" contraction, accounting for 52.13 +/- 7.63% of the tendon displacement. Tendon cross-sectional area determined from anatomic magnetic resonance axial images remained unchanged, suggesting that the altered tendon elastic modulus and transition point were largely due to material deterioration. The increase in the transition point following chronic unloading as measured by the VE-PC-MRI technique has not been previously reported and offers new insights into the biomechanical changes that may occur in the tendon crimp structure.

  7. 4-D OCT in Developmental Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Although strong evidence exists to suggest that altered cardiac function can lead to CHDs, few studies have investigated the influential role of cardiac function and biophysical forces on the development of the cardiovascular system due to a lack of proper in vivo imaging tools. 4-D imaging is needed to decipher the complex spatial and temporal patterns of biomechanical forces acting upon the heart. Numerous solutions over the past several years have demonstrated 4-D OCT imaging of the developing cardiovascular system. This chapter will focus on these solutions and explain their context in the evolution of 4-D OCT imaging. The first sections describe the relevant techniques (prospective gating, direct 4-D imaging, retrospective gating), while later sections focus on 4-D Doppler imaging and measurements of force implementing 4-D OCT Doppler. Finally, the techniques are summarized, and some possible future directions are discussed.

  8. CINEMA 4D The Artist's Project Sourcebook

    CERN Document Server

    McQuilkin, Kent

    2011-01-01

    Cinema 4D is a fully integrated 3D modeling, animation, and rendering package used extensively in the film, television, science, architecture, engineering and other industries. Generally ranked as the 3rd most widely-used 3Dapplication Cinema 4D is widely praised for its stability, speed and ease of use. Recent film and broadcast productions that have used Cinema 4D include Open Season, Monster House, Superman Returns, Polar Express, Monday Night Football. This third edition of Cinema 4D is updated to address the latest release of the application as well as its critically acclaimed MoGr

  9. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Mark, E-mail: mark-mueller@ph.tum.de; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bech, Martin [Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Barngatan 2:1, 221 85 Lund (Sweden); Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander [Bruker microCT, Kartuizersweg 3B, B-2550 Kontich (Belgium); Pfeiffer, Franz [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institut für diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81675 München (Germany); Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  10. Improving image quality in laboratory x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, F.; Marschner, M.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Noël, P.; Herzen, J.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2017-03-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast (gbPC) is known to provide significant benefits for biomedical imaging. To investigate these benefits, a high-sensitivity gbPC micro-CT setup for small (≍ 5 cm) biological samples has been constructed. Unfortunately, high differential-phase sensitivity leads to an increased magnitude of data processing artifacts, limiting the quality of tomographic reconstructions. Most importantly, processing of phase-stepping data with incorrect stepping positions can introduce artifacts resembling Moiré fringes to the projections. Additionally, the focal spot size of the X-ray source limits resolution of tomograms. Here we present a set of algorithms to minimize artifacts, increase resolution and improve visual impression of projections and tomograms from the examined setup. We assessed two algorithms for artifact reduction: Firstly, a correction algorithm exploiting correlations of the artifacts and differential-phase data was developed and tested. Artifacts were reliably removed without compromising image data. Secondly, we implemented a new algorithm for flatfield selection, which was shown to exclude flat-fields with strong artifacts. Both procedures successfully improved image quality of projections and tomograms. Deconvolution of all projections of a CT scan can minimize blurring introduced by the finite size of the X-ray source focal spot. Application of the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm to gbPC-CT projections resulted in an improved resolution of phase-contrast tomograms. Additionally, we found that nearest-neighbor interpolation of projections can improve the visual impression of very small features in phase-contrast tomograms. In conclusion, we achieved an increase in image resolution and quality for the investigated setup, which may lead to an improved detection of very small sample features, thereby maximizing the setup's utility.

  11. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  12. Cine phase-contrast MR to assess portal blood flow in a 10-year-old girl with abdominal aortic coarctation: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, T.W.I.; Culham, J.A.G. [Department of Radiology, British Columbia Children`s Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1998-08-01

    We report the case of a 10-year-old girl with repaired abdominal aortic coarctation in whom chronic mesenteric ischemia was clinically suspected. Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) was used to determine the difference between fasting and postprandial portal blood flow. Fasting flow rates in the portal vein were normal. After a meal, blood flow in the portal vein increased 226 % over the fasting state, showing normal augmentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of this technique to a pediatric setting. (orig.) With 2 figs., 10 refs.

  13. The Phase-Contrast Imaging Instrument at the Matter in Extreme Conditions Endstation at LCLS

    CERN Document Server

    Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C; Arnold, Brice; Brown, Shaughnessy B; Fry, Alan; Gleason, Arianna; Granados, Eduardo; Hashim, Akel; Hastings, Jerome B; Samberg, Dirk; Seiboth, Frank; Tavella, Franz; Xing, Zhou; Lee, Hae Ja; Schroer, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Phase-Contrast Imaging instrument at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The instrument can image phenomena with a spatial resolution of a few hundreds of nanometers and at the same time reveal the atomic structure through X-ray diffraction, with a temporal resolution better than 100 femtosecond. It was specifically designed for studies relevant to High-Energy-Density Science and can monitor, e.g., shock fronts, phase transitions, or void collapses. This versatile instrument was commissioned last year and is now available to the MEC user community.

  14. Phase contrast soft x-ray microscopy using Zernike zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakdinawat, Anne; Liu, Yanwei

    2008-02-04

    Soft x-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy was implemented using a "Zernike zone plate" (ZZP) without the use of a separate phase filter in the back focal plane. The ZZP is a single optic that integrates the appropriate +/-pi/2 radians phase shift through selective zone placement shifts in a Fresnel zone plate. Imaging using a regular zone plate, positive ZZP, and negative ZZP was performed at a wavelength of lambda = 2.163 nm. Contrast enhancement with the positive ZZP and contrast reversal with the negative ZZP were observed.

  15. Quantitative Evaluation Methods of In-Line X-Ray Phase Contrast Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zheng; LI Cheng-Quan; YU Ai-Min

    2007-01-01

    By revealing the relationship between edge visibility and imaging parameters in in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI), we propose a method to quantitatively measure the contribution of absorption and phase shift from acquired images. We also prove that edge visibility will grow with the increasing source-object distance and object-detector distance. The result is validated by relative phase factor and by experiments conducted on a microfocus x-ray source. This method provides a new approach to evaluate in-line PCI images and is helpful for deciding imaging parameters.

  16. Wavefront sensing based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huang; Qi, Bian; Chenlu, Zhou; Tenghao, Li; Mali, Gong

    2016-07-01

    A novel wavefront sensing method based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing is proposed. The wavefront gradient field in the object plane is modulated into intensity distribution in a gang of patterns, making high-density detection available. By applying the method, we have also designed a wavefront sensor. It consists of a classical coherent optical processing system, a CCD detector array, two pieces of orthogonal composite sinusoidal gratings, and a mechanical structure that can perform real-time linear positioning. The simulation results prove and demonstrate the validity of the method and the sensor in high-precision measurement of the wavefront gradient field.

  17. Ultrafast, high resolution, phase contrast imaging of impact response with synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Jensen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamic response of materials at extreme conditions requires diagnostics that can provide real-time, in situ, spatially resolved measurements on the nanosecond timescale. The development of methods such as phase contrast imaging (PCI typically used at synchrotron sources offer unique opportunities to examine dynamic material response. In this work, we report ultrafast, high-resolution, dynamic PCI measurements of shock compressed materials with 3 μm spatial resolution using a single 60 ps synchrotron X-ray bunch. These results firmly establish the use of PCI to examine dynamic phenomena at ns to μs timescales.

  18. Diffractive generalized phase contrast for adaptive phase imaging and optical security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly...... optimization of the input aperture parameters according to desired output characteristics. For wavefront sensing, the achieved aperture control opens a new degree of freedom for improving the accuracy of quantitative phase imaging. Diffractive GPC input modulation also fits well with grating-based optical...

  19. Optical phase encryption by phase contrast using electrically addressed spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishchal, Naveen Kumar; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2003-03-01

    We report the use of an electrically addressed liquid crystal spatial light modulator (EALCSLM) operating in the phase mode as a phase-contrast filter (PCF). As an application, an optical phase encryption system has been implemented. We encrypt and decrypt a two-dimensional phase image obtained from an amplitude image. Encrypted image is holographically recorded in a Barium titanate crystal and is then decrypted by generating through phase conjugation, a conjugate of the encrypted image. The decrypted phase image is converted into an amplitude image using an EASLM as a PCF. The idea has been supported by the experimental results.

  20. Extracting optical scattering properties on the basis of phase contrast images for diagnosing stomach cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Zhang, Hui; Lin, Xiaona; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-04-01

    We combine morphological granulometry with Mie theory in order to analyze phase contrast images of biomedical tissue for cancer diagnosis. This method correlates microscopic phase distributions of the tissue image and macroscopic optical scattering properties of the tissue. Our results show that the particle size density distribution can be used to quantitatively identify morphological changes of cancerous stomach tissues. Our method can distinguish normal tissue from cancerous tissues, using the significant differences in scattering coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and phase function. Therefore, this method can provide not only quantitative information for the diagnosis of cancer, but also accurate optical scattering parameters for photothermal therapy for cancer.

  1. Phase-only spatial light modulation by the reverse phase contrast method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.; Mogensen, P.C.; Eriksen, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to phase-only spatial light modulation is proposed in which a given amplitude pattern can be converted into a spatially identical binary phase pattern. A spatial filtering approach is applied to transform spatial amplitude modulation into spatial phase modulation using the Reverse...... Phase Contrast (RPC) method. The analytical method for achieving this is outlined and experimental results are shown for the generation of a binary phase-only distribution using an amplitude spatial light modulator and a phase-only spatial filter....

  2. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoennicke, M. G. [Universidade Federal da Integracao Latino-Americana, 85867-970 Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil); Manica, J. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, 85867-970 Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil); Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Caixa Postal 19091, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Huang, X.-R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  3. Microscopy imaging and quantitative phase contrast mapping in turbid microfluidic channels by digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturzo, Melania; Finizio, Andrea; Memmolo, Pasquale; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro

    2012-09-07

    We show that sharp imaging and quantitative phase-contrast microcopy is possible in microfluidics in flowing turbid media by digital holography. In fact, in flowing liquids with suspended colloidal particles, clear vision is hindered and cannot be recovered by any other microscopic imaging technique. On the contrary, using digital holography, clear imaging is possible thanks to the Doppler frequency shift experienced by the photons scattered by the flowing colloidal particles, which do not contribute to the interference process, i.e. the recorded hologram. The method is illustrated and imaging results are demonstrated for pure phase objects, i.e. biological cells in microfluidic channels.

  4. Investigation of suitable biopsy markers for grating-based phase contrast mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda, C.; Wang, Z.; Forte, S.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Stampanoni, M.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-contrast mammography is a rising technology where, in addition to X-ray absorption, images show phase and dark-field contrast. Although the use of biopsy markers constitutes a fundamental task in breast examinations, there has not been any investigation concerning appropriate clips for this technology. We studied the suitability of three markers (Tumark, Somatex Medical Technologies; Hydromark, Mammotome; and Mammostar, Mammotome) for this modality on a laboratory source setup using a chicken breast phantom. The first two clips appeared to be innocuous, whereas Mammostar showed the potential that the non-metallic portion only could be used as a marker for this technique.

  5. Longitudinal Monitoring of Hepatic Blood Flow before and after TIPS by Using 4D-Flow MR Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannas, Peter; Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Johnson, Kevin M.; Woods, Michael A.; Ozkan, Orhan; Motosugi, Utaroh; Wieben, Oliver; Reeder, Scott B.; Kramer, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of four-dimensional (4D)– flow magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for noninvasive longitudinal hemodynamic monitoring of hepatic blood flow before and after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this prospective Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant study with written informed consent. Four-dimensional–flow MR imaging was performed in seven patients with portal hypertension and refractory ascites before and 2 and 12 weeks after TIPS placement by using a time-resolved three-dimensional radial phase-contrast acquisition. Flow and peak velocity measurements were obtained in the superior mesenteric vein (SMV), splenic vein (SV), portal vein (PV), and the TIPS. Flow volumes and peak velocities in each vessel, as well as the ratio of in-stent to PV flow, were compared before and after TIPS placement by using analysis of variance. Results Flow volumes significantly increased in the SMV (0.24 L/ min; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.07, 0.41), SV (0.31 L/min; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.54), and PV (0.88 L/min; 95% CI: 0.06, 1.70) after TIPS placement (all P .11). Ascites resolved in six of seven patients. In those with resolved ascites, the TIPS-to-PV flow ratio was 0.8 ± 6 0.2 and 0.9 ± 0.2 at the two post-TIPS time points, respectively, while the observed ratios were 4.6 and 4.3 in the patient with refractory ascites at the two post-TIPS time points, respectively. In this patient, 4D-flow MR imaging demonstrated arterio-portal-venous shunting, with draining into the TIPS. Conclusion Four-dimensional–flow MR imaging is feasible for noninvasive longitudinal hemodynamic monitoring of hepatic blood flow before and after TIPS placement. PMID:27171019

  6. First small-animal in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, B.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Liu, X.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Sasov, A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a compact grating-based in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT system with a rotating gantry. The 50 W microfocus x-ray source operates with 20 to 50 kV peak energy. The length of the rotating interferometer is around 47 cm. Pixel size in the object is 30 micron; the field of view is approx. 35 mm in diameter, suited to image a mouse. The interferometer consists of three gratings: an absorption grating close to the x-ray source, a phase grating to introduce a π/2 phase shift and an absorption analyzer grating positioned at the first fractional Talbot distance. Numerous drives and actuators are used to provide angular and linear grating alignment, phase stepping and object/gantry precision positioning. Phantom studies were conducted to investigate performance, accuracy and stability of the scanner. In particular, the influences of gantry rotation and of temperature fluctuations on the interferometric image acquisition were characterized. Also dose measurements were performed. The first imaging results obtained with the system show the complementary nature of phase-contrast micro-CT images with respect to absorption-based micro-CT. Future improvements, necessary to optimize the scanner for in-vivo small-animal CT scanning on a regular and easy-to-use basis, are also discussed.

  7. Quantitative imaging of electron density and effective atomic number using phase contrast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen Guanghong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.ed [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Compared to single energy CT, which only provides information for x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual-energy CT is able to obtain both the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual-energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is presented. Rather than requiring two projection data sets with different x-ray energy spectra, diffraction-grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from the same projection data using a single x-ray energy spectra. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Two physical phantoms were constructed and used to validate the presented method. Experimental results demonstrate that (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship, and (2) the effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of the linear attenuation to refractive index decrement using a power function plus a constant. The presented method will provide insight into the technique of material separation and find its use in medical and industrial applications.

  8. Quantitative imaging of electron density and effective atomic number using phase contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-05-01

    Compared to single energy CT, which only provides information for x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual-energy CT is able to obtain both the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual-energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is presented. Rather than requiring two projection data sets with different x-ray energy spectra, diffraction-grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from the same projection data using a single x-ray energy spectra. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Two physical phantoms were constructed and used to validate the presented method. Experimental results demonstrate that (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship, and (2) the effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of the linear attenuation to refractive index decrement using a power function plus a constant. The presented method will provide insight into the technique of material separation and find its use in medical and industrial applications.

  9. A novel quantitative imaging technique for material differentiation based on differential phase contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-04-01

    Compared to single energy CT, which provides information only about the x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual energy CT is able to obtain the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is described. Rather than requiring two scans with different x-ray photon energies, diffraction grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both the linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from a single scan. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Experimental results demonstrate that: (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship; and (2) effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of linear attenuation to refractive index decrement, using a simple function, i.e., a power function plus a constant. The presented method will shed insight into the field of material separation and find its use in medical and non-medical applications.

  10. Microdissection of Human Esophagogastric Junction Wall with Phase-contrast X-ray CT Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfa; Zhou, Guangzhao; Tian, Dongping; Lin, Runhua; Peng, Guanyun; Su, Min

    2015-01-01

    Phase-contrast x-ray imaging using an x-ray interferometer has great potential to reveal the structures inside soft tissues, because the sensitivity of this method to hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen is about 1000 times higher than that of the absorption-contrast x-ray method. In this study, we used phase-contrast X-ray CT to investigate human resected esophagogastric junction. This technology revealed the three-layer structure of the esophagogastric junction wall—mucous, submucosa and muscular layers. The mucous and muscular layers were clearly separated by a loose submucosa layer with a honeycomb appearance. The shape of the mucous and muscular layers was intact. The boundary between the mucous and submucosa layers was distinct, as was the border of the muscular and submucosa layers. The surface of the esophagogastric junction was displayed clearly through 3D reconstruction. The technology might be helpful in the diagnosis of esophagogastric junction lesion, especially for the early adenocarcinoma. PMID:26346099

  11. Segmentation and Tracking of Lymphocytes Based on Modified Active Contour Models in Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an improved active contour model for segmenting and tracking accurate boundaries of the single lymphocyte in phase-contrast microscopic images. Active contour models have been widely used in object segmentation and tracking. However, current external-force-inspired methods are weak at handling low-contrast edges and suffer from initialization sensitivity. In order to segment low-contrast boundaries, we combine the region information of the object, extracted by morphology gray-scale reconstruction, and the edge information, extracted by the Laplacian of Gaussian filter, to obtain an improved feature map to compute the external force field for the evolution of active contours. To alleviate initial location sensitivity, we set the initial contour close to the real boundaries by performing morphological image processing. The proposed method was tested on live lymphocyte images acquired through the phase-contrast microscope from the blood samples of mice, and comparative experimental results showed the advantages of the proposed method in terms of the accuracy and the speed. Tracking experiments showed that the proposed method can accurately segment and track lymphocyte boundaries in microscopic images over time even in the presence of low-contrast edges, which will provide a good prerequisite for the quantitative analysis of lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  12. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models.

  13. Teachable, high-content analytics for live-cell, phase contrast movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alworth, Samuel V; Watanabe, Hirotada; Lee, James S J

    2010-09-01

    CL-Quant is a new solution platform for broad, high-content, live-cell image analysis. Powered by novel machine learning technologies and teach-by-example interfaces, CL-Quant provides a platform for the rapid development and application of scalable, high-performance, and fully automated analytics for a broad range of live-cell microscopy imaging applications, including label-free phase contrast imaging. The authors used CL-Quant to teach off-the-shelf universal analytics, called standard recipes, for cell proliferation, wound healing, cell counting, and cell motility assays using phase contrast movies collected on the BioStation CT and BioStation IM platforms. Similar to application modules, standard recipes are intended to work robustly across a wide range of imaging conditions without requiring customization by the end user. The authors validated the performance of the standard recipes by comparing their performance with truth created manually, or by custom analytics optimized for each individual movie (and therefore yielding the best possible result for the image), and validated by independent review. The validation data show that the standard recipes' performance is comparable with the validated truth with low variation. The data validate that the CL-Quant standard recipes can provide robust results without customization for live-cell assays in broad cell types and laboratory settings.

  14. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mírian L A F; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray μCT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumbá (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based μCT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  15. Systolically gated 3D phase contrast MRA of mesenteric arteries in suspected mesenteric ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasser, M.N.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Roos, A. de [Leiden Univ. Hospital (Netherlands)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of MRA for detecting stenoses in the celiac (CA) and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries in patients suspected of having chronic mesenteric ischemia, using an optimized systolically gated 3D phase contrast technique. In an initial study in 24 patients who underwent conventional angiography of the abdominal vessels for different clinical indications, a 3D phase contrast MRA technique (3D-PCA) was evaluated and optimized to image the CAs and SMAs. Subsequently, a prospective study was performed to assess the value of systolically gated 3D-PCA in evaluation of the mesenteric arteries in 10 patients with signs and symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and surgical findings were used as the reference standard. In the initial study, systolic gating appeared to be essential in imaging the SMA on 3D-PCA. In 10 patients suspected of mesenteric ischemia, systolically gated 3D-PCA identified significant proximal disease in the two mesenteric vessels in 4 patients. These patients underwent successful reconstruction of their stenotic vessels. Cardiac-gated MRA may become a useful tool in selection of patients suspected of having mesenteric ischemia who may benefit from surgery. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Laser light-field fusion for wide-field lensfree on-chip phase contrast nanoscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud

    2016-01-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. Nanoscopy is often synonymous with high equipment costs and limited FOV. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast nanoscopy, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using an on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images with resolving power below the pixel pitch of the sensor array as well as the wavelength of the probing light source, beyond the diffraction limit. Experimental results demonstrate, for the first time, a lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 500 nm nanoparticles without any specialized or intricate sample preparation or the use of synthetic aperture- or lateral shift-based t...

  17. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-03-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue.

  18. Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Microtomography from a Compact Laser Driven Betatron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Wenz, J; Khrennikov, K; Bech, M; Thibault, P; Heigoldt, M; Pfeiffer, F; Karsch, S

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called Betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present the first phase-contrast micro-tomogram revealing quantitative electron density values of a biological sample using betatron X-rays, and a comprehensive source characterization. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential fo...

  19. Segmentation of the Clustered Cells with Optimized Boundary Detection in Negative Phase Contrast Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Wang

    Full Text Available Cell image segmentation plays a central role in numerous biology studies and clinical applications. As a result, the development of cell image segmentation algorithms with high robustness and accuracy is attracting more and more attention. In this study, an automated cell image segmentation algorithm is developed to get improved cell image segmentation with respect to cell boundary detection and segmentation of the clustered cells for all cells in the field of view in negative phase contrast images. A new method which combines the thresholding method and edge based active contour method was proposed to optimize cell boundary detection. In order to segment clustered cells, the geographic peaks of cell light intensity were utilized to detect numbers and locations of the clustered cells. In this paper, the working principles of the algorithms are described. The influence of parameters in cell boundary detection and the selection of the threshold value on the final segmentation results are investigated. At last, the proposed algorithm is applied to the negative phase contrast images from different experiments. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated. Results show that the proposed method can achieve optimized cell boundary detection and highly accurate segmentation for clustered cells.

  20. Segmentation of the Clustered Cells with Optimized Boundary Detection in Negative Phase Contrast Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuliang; Zhang, Zaicheng; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng

    2015-01-01

    Cell image segmentation plays a central role in numerous biology studies and clinical applications. As a result, the development of cell image segmentation algorithms with high robustness and accuracy is attracting more and more attention. In this study, an automated cell image segmentation algorithm is developed to get improved cell image segmentation with respect to cell boundary detection and segmentation of the clustered cells for all cells in the field of view in negative phase contrast images. A new method which combines the thresholding method and edge based active contour method was proposed to optimize cell boundary detection. In order to segment clustered cells, the geographic peaks of cell light intensity were utilized to detect numbers and locations of the clustered cells. In this paper, the working principles of the algorithms are described. The influence of parameters in cell boundary detection and the selection of the threshold value on the final segmentation results are investigated. At last, the proposed algorithm is applied to the negative phase contrast images from different experiments. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated. Results show that the proposed method can achieve optimized cell boundary detection and highly accurate segmentation for clustered cells.

  1. Preliminary Research on Dual-Energy X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Huajie; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been widely applied to measure bone mineral density (BMD) and soft-tissue composition of human body. However, the use of DEXA is greatly limited for low-Z materials such as soft tissues due to their weak absorption. While X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) shows significantly improved contrast in comparison with the conventional standard absorption-based X-ray imaging for soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a novel X-ray phase-contrast method to measure the area density of low-Z materials, including a single-energy method and a dual-energy method. The single-energy method is for the area density calculation of one low-Z material, while the dual-energy method is aiming to calculate the area densities of two low-Z materials simultaneously. Comparing the experimental and simulation results with the theoretic ones, the new method proves to have the potential to replace DEXA in area density measurement. The new method sets the prerequisites for future precise and lo...

  2. Table-top phase-contrast imaging employing photon-counting detectors towards mammographic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, K. D.; Pichotka, M.; Hasn, S.; Granja, C.

    2017-02-01

    In mammography the difficult task to detect microcalcifications (≈ 100 μm) and low contrast structures in the breast has been a topic of interest from its beginnings. The possibility to improve the image quality requires the effort to employ novel X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase-contrast, and high resolution detectors. Phase-contrast techniques are promising tools for medical diagnosis because they provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based X-ray imaging methods. In this work a Hamamatsu microfocus X-ray source with tungsten anode and a photon counting detector (Timepix operated in Medipix mode) was used. A significant improvement in the detection of phase-effects using Medipix detector was observed in comparison to an standard flat-panel detector. An optimization of geometrical parameters reveals the dependency on the X-ray propagation path and the small angle deviation. The quantification of these effects was achieved taking into account the image noise, contrast, spatial resolution of the phase-enhancement, absorbed dose, and energy dependence.

  3. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mirian L.A.F.; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray CT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumba (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based CT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  4. Comparison of laboratory grating-based and speckle-tracking x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romell, J.; Zhou, T.; Zdora, M.; Sala, S.; Koch, F. J.; Hertz, H. M.; Burvall, A.

    2017-06-01

    Phase-contrast imaging with x-rays is a developing field for imaging weakly absorbing materials. In this work, two phase-contrast imaging methods, grating- and speckle-based imaging, that measure the derivative of the phase shift, have been implemented with a laboratory source and compared experimentally. It was found that for the same dose conditions, the speckle-tracking differential phase-contrast images have considerably higher contrast-to-noise ratio than the grating-based images, but at the cost of lower resolution. Grating-based imaging performs better in terms of resolution, but would require longer exposure times, mainly due to absorption in the grating interferometer.

  5. A phase contrast imaging–interferometer system for detection of multiscale electron density fluctuations on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Marinoni, A. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Heterodyne interferometry and phase contrast imaging (PCI) are robust, mature techniques for measuring low-k and high-k electron density fluctuations, respectively. This work describes the first-ever implementation of a combined PCI–interferometer. The combined system uses a single 10.6 μm probe beam, two interference schemes, and two detectors to measure electron density fluctuations at large spatiotemporal bandwidth (10 kHz magnetic measurements. The combined diagnostic’s small port requirements and minimal access restrictions make it well-suited to the harsh neutron environments and limited port space expected in next-step devices.

  6. Phase-contrast MRI and CFD modeling of apparent 3He gas flow in rat pulmonary airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2012-08-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized 3He is potentially useful for developing and testing patient-specific models of pulmonary airflow. One challenge, however, is that PC-MRI provides apparent values of local 3He velocity that not only depend on actual airflow but also on gas diffusion. This not only blurs laminar flow patterns in narrow airways but also introduces anomalous airflow structure that reflects gas-wall interactions. Here, both effects are predicted in a live rat using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and for the first time, simulated patterns of apparent 3He gas velocity are compared with in vivo PC-MRI. Results show (1) that correlations (R2) between measured and simulated airflow patterns increase from 0.23 to 0.79 simply by accounting for apparent 3He transport, and (2) that remaining differences are mainly due to uncertain airway segmentation and partial volume effects stemming from relatively coarse MRI resolution. Higher-fidelity testing of pulmonary airflow predictions should therefore be possible with future imaging improvements.

  7. Simulated cystic renal lesions: quantitative X-ray phase-contrast CT--an in vitro phantom study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fingerle, Alexander A; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Münzel, Daniela; Hahn, Dieter; Rummeny, Ernst J; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    To determine if grating-based x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) can allow differentiation of simulated simple, protein-rich, hemorrhagic, and enhancing cystic renal lesions in an in vitro phantom...

  8. Improving visibility of X-ray phase-contrast imaging with Wiener filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shaorun; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the degrading effects of the physical parameters on the in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi), a simulation tool based on the Fresnel/Kirchhoff diffraction integral was firstly developed with comprehensively considering effects of the source-to-sample (S-S) and sample-to-detector (S-D) distances, the practical characteristics of a polychromatic and finite size source, the point spread function (PSF) of the fluorescent screen and the spatial resolution of the detector on the theoretical phase-contrast pattern. By a comparison between the simulative profile and the experimental one under the commonly-used parameters, an acceptable consistency has been demonstrated in despite of the deviation between the theoretically-predicted contrast (0.188) and the original experimental one (0.12). From the simulations, it is apparently observed that the fine interference pattern has been severely degraded by the finite spatial resolution, and will inevitably be further deteriorated by the system noise in practice. Since the image quality of the X-ray phase-contrast imaging is strongly dependent on the physical parameters of the system, a model-based deblurring procedure to upgrade the image visibility is preferably desired. As a simple restoration way, a Wiener filter was then introduced to offer an optimal tradeoff between the contrast preservation and the noise suppression. Finally, to minimize the deviation resulting from the finite spatial resolution, one-dimensional interpolation was performed by positioning the set square at a tiny angle to the vertical direction. The result after the Wiener-filtering-based deblurring has shown a considerably improved profile visibility: the processed experimental contrast (0.156) increased by 30% as compared to the original one (0.12) in company with the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by 0.9dB. With the trend of the post-filtered experimental contrast to the theoretical one, it could be motivated that

  9. Measurement of depth-resolved thermal deformation distribution using phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Dong, Bo; Bai, Yulei; Ye, Shuangli; Lei, Zhenkun; Zhou, Yanzhou

    2015-10-19

    An updated B-scan method is proposed for measuring the evolution of thermal deformation fields in polymers. In order to measure the distributions of out-of-plane deformation and normal strain field, phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography (PC-SOCT) was performed with the depth range and resolution of 4.3 mm and 10.7 μm, respectively, as thermal loads were applied to three different multilayer samples. The relation between temperature and material refractive index was predetermined before the measurement. After accounting for the refractive index, the thermal deformation fields in the polymer were obtained. The measured thermal expansion coefficient of silicone sealant was approximately equal to its reference value. This method allows correctly assessing the mechanical properties in semitransparent polymers.

  10. Non-invasive classification of microcalcifications with phase-contrast X-ray mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Singer, Gad; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Schneider, Christof W.; Stampanoni, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Microcalcifications can be indicative in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Here we report a non-invasive diagnostic method that may potentially distinguish between different types of microcalcifications using X-ray phase-contrast imaging. Our approach exploits the complementary nature of the absorption and small-angle scattering signals of microcalcifications, obtained simultaneously with an X-ray grating interferometer on a conventional X-ray tube. We demonstrate that the new approach has 100% sensitivity and specificity when applied to phantom data, and we provide evidence of the solidity of the technique by showing its discrimination power when applied to fixed biopsies, to non-fixed tissue specimens and to fresh, whole-breast samples. The proposed method might be further developed to improve early breast cancer diagnosis and has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy and reduce the number of uncomfortable breast biopsies, or, in case of widespread microcalcifications, to select the biopsy site before intervention.

  11. High-sensitivity phase-contrast tomography of rat brain in phosphate buffered saline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics, Technical University Munich, 85748 Garching (Germany); David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Poitry-Yamate, Carole; Gruetter, Rolf [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Mueller, Bert [Biomaterials Science Center, University of Basel, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Weitkamp, Timm, E-mail: franz.pfeiffer@ph.tum.d [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2009-09-01

    We report advances and complementary results concerning a recently developed method for high-sensitivity grating-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography. In particular we demonstrate how the soft tissue sensitivity of the technique can be used to obtain in-vitro tomographic images of rat brain specimens. Contrary to our previous experiments with fixated specimen (chemically modified or formalin fixed), the present results on the rat's brain are closer to the in-vivo situation. The findings are particularly important from a clinical point of view, since a similar approach using three gratings can be implemented with more readily available x-ray sources, such as standard x-ray tubes.

  12. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, F. J.; Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2015-12-01

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  13. Feedback control of an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate using phase-contrast imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Szigeti, Stuart S; Carvalho, Andre R R; Hope, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    The linewidth of an atom laser is limited by density fluctuations in the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) from which the atom laser beam is outcoupled. In this paper we show that a stable spatial mode for an interacting BEC can be generated using a realistic control scheme that includes the effects of the measurement backaction. This model extends the feedback theory, based on a phase-contrast imaging setup, presented in \\cite{Szigeti:2009}. In particular, it is applicable to a BEC with large interatomic interactions and solves the problem of inadequacy of the mean-field (coherent state) approximation by utilising a fixed number state approximation. Our numerical analysis shows the control to be more effective for a condensate with a large nonlinearity.

  14. Feedback control of an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate using phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigeti, S. S.; Hush, M. R.; Carvalho, A. R. R.; Hope, J. J.

    2010-10-01

    The linewidth of an atom laser is limited by density fluctuations in the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) from which the atom laser beam is outcoupled. In this paper we show that a stable spatial mode for an interacting BEC can be generated using a realistic control scheme that includes the effects of the measurement backaction. This model extends the feedback theory, based on a phase-contrast imaging setup, presented by Szigeti, Hush, Carvalho, and Hope [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.013614 80, 013614 (2009)]. In particular, it is applicable to a BEC with large interatomic interactions and solves the problem of inadequacy of the mean-field (coherent state) approximation by utilizing a fixed number state approximation. Our numerical analysis shows the control to be more effective for a condensate with a large nonlinearity.

  15. Fourier domain image fusion for differential X-ray phase-contrast breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Eduardo; Sperl, Jonathan I; Bequé, Dirk; Benz, Tobias; Scherer, Kai; Herzen, Julia; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina; Grandl, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    X-Ray Phase-Contrast (XPC) imaging is a novel technology with a great potential for applications in clinical practice, with breast imaging being of special interest. This work introduces an intuitive methodology to combine and visualize relevant diagnostic features, present in the X-ray attenuation, phase shift and scattering information retrieved in XPC imaging, using a Fourier domain fusion algorithm. The method allows to present complementary information from the three acquired signals in one single image, minimizing the noise component and maintaining visual similarity to a conventional X-ray image, but with noticeable enhancement in diagnostic features, details and resolution. Radiologists experienced in mammography applied the image fusion method to XPC measurements of mastectomy samples and evaluated the feature content of each input and the fused image. This assessment validated that the combination of all the relevant diagnostic features, contained in the XPC images, was present in the fused image as well.

  16. Theory of single-shot phase contrast imaging in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O; Byrnes, Tim

    2014-06-13

    We introduce a theoretical framework for single-shot phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Our model allows for the simple calculation of the quantum backaction resulting from the measurement, and the amount of information that is read out. We find that there is an optimum time Gτ ∼ 1/N for the light-matter interaction (G is the ac Stark shift frequency, N is the number of particles in the BEC), where the maximum amount of information can be read out from the BEC. A universal information-disturbance tradeoff law ε(F)ε(G) ∝ 1/N(2) is found where ε(F) is the amount of backaction and ε(G) is the estimation error. The PCI measurement can also be found to be a direct probe of the quantum fluctuations of the BEC, via the noise of the PCI signal.

  17. Theory of single-shot phase contrast imaging in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a theoretical framework for single-shot phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates. Our model allows for the simple calculation of the quantum backaction resulting from the measurement, and the amount of information that is read out. We find that there is an optimum time $ G\\tau \\sim 1/N $ for the light-matter interaction ($G $ is the ac Stark shift frequency, $ N $ is the number of particles in the BEC), where the maximum amount of information can be read out from the BEC. A universal information-disturbance tradeoff law $ \\epsilon_F \\epsilon_G \\propto 1/N^2 $ is found where $ \\epsilon_F $ is the amount of backaction and $ \\epsilon_G $ is the estimation error. The PCI measurement can also be found to be a direct probe of the quantum fluctuations of the BEC, via the noise of the PCI signal.

  18. Phase contrast and DIC instrumentation and applications in cell, developmental, and marine biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Heinz

    1994-05-01

    Nomarski's differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is discussed in comparison to Zernike's phase contrast (PhC) microscopy. The possibilities and limits of both are demonstrated by various applications. The high contrast and the use of the full numerical aperture of the DIC optics makes it possible to obtain a series of 'optical sections' through rather thick living specimens (e.g. head of water flea, salivary gland of Drosophila, Xenopus nucleolus, sea urchen egg, mouse embryo). PhC and DIC optics are today available for high resolution light microscopy until N.A. 1.4 Oil as well as for long working distance (LWD) optics, mainly combined with inverted biological microscopes.

  19. Parallel optical sorting of biological cells using the generalized phase contrast method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars; Bu, Minqiang; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    of biological cells in microfluidic systems exclusively using light. We demonstrate an optical cell sorter that uses simultaneous manipulation by multiple laser beams using the Generalized Phase Contrast method (GPC). The basic principle in an optical sorter is that the radiation force of the optical beam can...... push the biological cell from one microfluidic sheath flow to another. By incorporating a spatial light modulator the manipulation can be made parallel with multiple laser beams. We claim advantages over the serial optical sorters with only a single laser beam that has been demonstrated by others.......Optical forces are used to fixate biological cells with optical tweezers where numerous biological parameters and phenomena can be studied. Optical beams carry a small momentum which generates a weak optical force, but on a cellular level this force is strong enough to allow for manipulation...

  20. X-ray phase-contrast CT imaging of the acupoints based on synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenglin, Liu, E-mail: lclyctc@163.com [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers’ College, Yancheng 224051 (China); Xiaohua, Wang; Hua, Xu [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers’ College, Yancheng 224051 (China); Fang, Liu; Ruishan, Dang [Anatomy Department of Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Dongming, Zhang; Xinyi, Zhang [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center of Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Honglan, Xie; Tiqiao, Xiao [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility of Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, CAS, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, the morphology of the acupuncture point (abbreviated as acupoint hereafter) or tissue where there were no acupoints in the fractional rabbit hind limb was studied by in-line phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) methods based on synchrotron radiation. The density of micro-vessels was calculated for tissues with acupoints or without acupoints. Differences between acupoints area and non-acupoint areas determined by the density of the micro-vessels propose a strong evidence of the existence of acupoints. Our results showed that there were two significantly higher densities of the micro-vessels, where two acupoints were located, respectively. In addition, there were large numbers of involutedly microvascular structure in the acupoint areas. Nevertheless, in non-acupoints area, the microvascular structure was relatively simple and flat.

  1. Generalized Phase Contrast with matched filtering using LCoS pico-projectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We report a beam shaping system for generating high intensity programmable optical spots using mGPC: matched filtering combined with Generalized Phase Contrast applying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low cost alternative for optical trapping and manipulation......, optical lattices and other beam shaping applications usually implemented with high-end spatial light modulators. Portable pico-projectors based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices were used as binary phase-only spatial light modulators by setting the appropriate polarization of the illumination...... in these consumer pico-projector LCoS-devices, the mGPC approach tolerates phase aberrations that would have otherwise been contrasted by a standard phase imaging technique....

  2. Generalized phase contrast-enhanced diffractive coupling to light-driven microtools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin;

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling to optically manipulated microtools coined as wave-guided optical waveguides using diffractive techniques on a “point and shoot” approach. These microtools are extended microstructures fabricated using two-photon photopolymerization and f...... of the trapping medium. The ability to switch from on-demand to continuous addressing with efficient illumination leverages our microtools for potential applications in stimulation and near-field-based biophotonics on cellular scales...... capability of the microtools, the applied spatial light modulator has been illuminated with a properly matched input beam cross section based on the generalized phase contrast method. Our results show a significant gain in the output at the tip of each microtool as measured from the fluorescence signal...

  3. Fourier transform based iterative method for x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    Biological soft tissues encountered in clinical and pre-clinical imaging mainly consist of light element atoms, and their composition is nearly uniform with little density variation. Thus, x-ray attenuation imaging suffers from low image contrast resolution. By contrast, x-ray phase shift of soft tissues is about a thousand times greater than x-ray absorption over the diagnostic energy range, thereby a significantly higher sensitivity can be achieved in terms of phase shift. In this paper, we propose a novel Fourier transform based iterative method to perform x-ray tomographic imaging of the refractive index directly from differential phase shift data. This approach offers distinct advantages in cases of incomplete and noisy data than analytic reconstruction, and especially suitable for phase-contrast interior tomography by incorporating prior knowledge in a region of interest (ROI). Biological experiments demonstrate the merits of the proposed approach.

  4. Scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach based on phase-contrast microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In order to study scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach, we collect images for human gastric specimens by using phase-contrast microscope. The images were processed by the way of mathematics morphology. The equivalent particle size distribution of tissues can be obtained. Combining with Mie scattering theory, the scattering properties of tissues can be calculated. Assume scattering of light in biological tissue can be seen as separate scattering events by different particles, total scattering properties can be equivalent to as scattering sum of particles with different diameters. The results suggest that scattering coefficient of the cancerous tissue is significantly higher than that of normal tissue. The scattering phase function is different especially in the backscattering area. Those are significant clinical benefits to diagnosis cancerous tissue

  5. Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchrotron Microtomography for Virtual Dissection of the Head of Rhodnius prolixus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, G.; Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Soares, J.; Cardoso, S. C.; Garcia, E. S.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Mohammadi, S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-04-01

    Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchroton Microtomography is a non-destructive technique that allows the microanatomical investigations of Rhodnius prolixus, one of the most important insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi. In this work complete series of virtual thin sections through the heads of selected Rhodnius prolixus were obtained. The sections of the head were important to compare the difference in use the spatial resolution of 2 μm or 4.5 μm and to see anatomical details that couldn't be seen with other technique. Three different groups of Rhodnius prolixus were used. One group was fed with defibrinated rabbit blood and after 10 days was sacrificed, other group was sacrificed 4 days after feeding and the last group remained unfed. The results show some differences for each kind of groups and for the different resolutions.

  6. Programmable aperture microscopy: A computational method for multi-modal phase contrast and light field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Zhang, Minliang; Chen, Qian

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective programmable aperture microscope to realize multi-modal computational imaging by integrating a programmable liquid crystal display (LCD) into a conventional wide-field microscope. The LCD selectively modulates the light distribution at the rear aperture of the microscope objective, allowing numerous imaging modalities, such as bright field, dark field, differential phase contrast, quantitative phase imaging, multi-perspective imaging, and full resolution light field imaging to be achieved and switched rapidly in the same setup, without requiring specialized hardwares and any moving parts. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging unstained cheek cells, profiling microlens array, and changing perspective views of thick biological specimens. The post-exposure refocusing of a butterfly mouthpart and RFP-labeled dicot stem cross-section is also presented to demonstrate the full resolution light field imaging capability of our system for both translucent and fluorescent specimens.

  7. A method for automatic liver segmentation from multi-phase contrast-enhanced CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rong; Luo, Ming; Wang, Shaofa; Wang, Luyao; Xie, Qingguo

    2014-03-01

    Liver segmentation is a basic and indispensable function in systems of computer aided liver surgery for volume calculation, operation designing and risk evaluation. Traditional manual segmentation is very time consuming because of the complicated contours of liver and the big amount of images. For increasing the efficiency of the clinical work, in this paper, a fully-automatic method was proposed to segment the liver from multi-phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. As an advanced region growing method, we applied various pre- and post-processing to get better segmentation from the different phases. Fifteen sets of clinical abdomens CT images of five patients were segmented by our algorithm, and the results were acceptable and evaluated by an experienced surgeon. The running-time is about 30 seconds for a single-phase data which includes more than 200 slices.

  8. Revealing letters in rolled Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocella, Vito; Brun, Emmanuel; Ferrero, Claudio; Delattre, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of papyrus rolls, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD and belonging to the only library passed on from Antiquity, were discovered 260 years ago at Herculaneum. These carbonized papyri are extremely fragile and are inevitably damaged or destroyed in the process of trying to open them to read their contents. In recent years, new imaging techniques have been developed to read the texts without unwrapping the rolls. Until now, specialists have been unable to view the carbon-based ink of these papyri, even when they could penetrate the different layers of their spiral structure. Here for the first time, we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography can reveal various letters hidden inside the precious papyri without unrolling them. This attempt opens up new opportunities to read many Herculaneum papyri, which are still rolled up, thus enhancing our knowledge of ancient Greek literature and philosophy.

  9. Low-dose x-ray phase-contrast and absorption CT using equally sloped tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Mao, Yu; Cloetens, Peter; Miao, Jianwei

    2010-09-01

    Tomographic reconstruction from undersampled and noisy projections is often desirable in transmission CT modalities for purposes of low-dose tomography and fast acquisition imaging. However under such conditions, due to the violation of the Nyquist sampling criteria and the presence of noise, reconstructions with acceptable accuracy may not be possible. Recent experiments in transmission electron tomography and coherent diffraction microscopy have shown that the technique of equally sloped tomography (EST), an exact tomographic method utilizing an oversampling iterative Fourier-based reconstruction, provides more accurate image reconstructions when the number of projections is significantly undersampled relative to filtered back projection and algebraic iterative methods. Here we extend this technique by developing new reconstruction algorithms which allow for the incorporation of advanced mathematical regularization constraints, such as the nonlocal means total variational model, in a manner that is consistent with experimental projections. We then evaluate the resulting image quality of the developed algorithm through simulations and experiments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility on image quality phantoms using the x-ray absorption and phase contrast CT modalities. Both our simulation and experimental results have indicated that the method can reduce the number of projections by 60-75% in parallel beam modalities, while achieving comparable or better image quality than the conventional reconstructions. As large-scale and compact synchrotron radiation facilities are currently under rapid development worldwide, the implementation of low-dose x-ray absorption and phase-contrast CT can find broad applications in biology and medicine using these advanced x-ray sources.

  10. Low-dose x-ray phase-contrast and absorption CT using equally sloped tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Miao Jianwei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mao Yu [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cloetens, Peter, E-mail: miao@physics.ucla.ed, E-mail: fahimian@stanford.ed [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2010-09-21

    Tomographic reconstruction from undersampled and noisy projections is often desirable in transmission CT modalities for purposes of low-dose tomography and fast acquisition imaging. However under such conditions, due to the violation of the Nyquist sampling criteria and the presence of noise, reconstructions with acceptable accuracy may not be possible. Recent experiments in transmission electron tomography and coherent diffraction microscopy have shown that the technique of equally sloped tomography (EST), an exact tomographic method utilizing an oversampling iterative Fourier-based reconstruction, provides more accurate image reconstructions when the number of projections is significantly undersampled relative to filtered back projection and algebraic iterative methods. Here we extend this technique by developing new reconstruction algorithms which allow for the incorporation of advanced mathematical regularization constraints, such as the nonlocal means total variational model, in a manner that is consistent with experimental projections. We then evaluate the resulting image quality of the developed algorithm through simulations and experiments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility on image quality phantoms using the x-ray absorption and phase contrast CT modalities. Both our simulation and experimental results have indicated that the method can reduce the number of projections by 60-75% in parallel beam modalities, while achieving comparable or better image quality than the conventional reconstructions. As large-scale and compact synchrotron radiation facilities are currently under rapid development worldwide, the implementation of low-dose x-ray absorption and phase-contrast CT can find broad applications in biology and medicine using these advanced x-ray sources.

  11. Design and characterization of a phase contrast X-ray CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Joseph N.

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging has recently attracted wide research interest, as it offers the possibility to exploit different contrast mechanisms than conventional absorption imaging, with the potential for higher quality images or more available information as a result. This work details design and construction of au experimental grating-interferometer-based differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) imaging system, presents measurements of performance, and compares this new imaging technique with conventional absorption imaging. Details of the fabrication of the specialized x-ray phase and absorption gratings are also provided. This system is unique in that makes use of a conventional rotating-anode x-ray tube, unlike previous designs which were based upon stationary anode x-ray tubes or synchrotron sources. The imaging system described here enables simultaneous reconstruction of electron density, effective atomic number, attenuation coefficient, and small-angle scatter density with data acquired from a single scan. It is theoretically shown and experimentally verified that DPC-CT imaging allows imaging of electron density at high spatial resolution with a much less severe dose penalty compared with conventional absorption imaging. Improved object visibility using electron density imaging is demonstrated with CNR measurements in physical phantoms and comparisons of reconstructions of breast tissue samples. The ability to directly image both electron density and effective atomic number provides a truly quantitative imaging technique and accuracy of the technique is shown using phantoms and potential applications are demonstrated using breast tissue samples. A new reconstruction algorithm which allows a doubling of the diameter of the scanning field of view, a potential enabling technology for eventual clinical use, is also demonstrated.

  12. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wei [BME Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G., E-mail: brankov@iit.edu [ECE Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  13. Phase contrast imaging reveals low lung volumes and surface areas in the developing marsupial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon J Simpson

    Full Text Available Marsupials are born with immature lungs when compared to eutherian mammals and rely, to various extents, on cutaneous gas exchange in order to meet metabolic requirements. Indeed, the fat-tailed dunnart is born with lungs in the canalicular stage of development and relies almost entirely on the skin for gas exchange at birth; consequently undergoing the majority of lung development in air. Plane radiographs and computed tomography data sets were acquired using phase contrast imaging with a synchrotron radiation source for two marsupial species, the fat-tailed dunnart and the larger tammar wallaby, during the first weeks of postnatal life. Phase contrast imaging revealed that only two lung sacs contain air after the first hour of life in the fat-tailed dunnart. While the lung of the tammar wallaby was comparatively more developed, both species demonstrated massive increases in air sac number and architectural complexity during the postnatal period. In addition, both the tammar wallaby and fat-tailed dunnart had lower lung volumes and parenchymal surface areas than were expected from morphometrically determined allometric equations relating these variables to body mass during the neonatal period. However, lung volume is predicted to scale with mass as expected after the neonatal marsupial reaches a body mass of ∼1 g and no longer relies on the skin for gas exchange. Decreased lung volume in the marsupial neonate further supports the maxim that cutaneous gas exchange occurs in the marsupial neonate because the respiratory apparatus is not yet capable of meeting the gas exchange requirements of the newborn.

  14. 4D flow MR imaging of the portal venous system: a feasibility study in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parekh, Keyur; Rose, Michael; Popescu, Andrada; Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States); Schnell, Susanne [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-02-15

    To determine the feasibility of 4D flow MRI for visualization and quantification of the portal venous haemodynamics in children and young adults. 4D flow was performed in 28 paediatric patients (median age, 8.5 years; interquartile range, 5.2-16.5), 15 with non-operated native portal system and 13 with surgically created portal shunt. Image quality assessment for 3D flow visualization and flow pattern analyses was performed. Regional 4D flow peak velocity and net flow were compared with 2D-cine phase contrast MRI (2D-PC MR) in the post-surgical patients. Mean 3D flow visualization quality score was excellent (mean ± SD, 4.2 ± 0.9) with good inter-rater agreement (κ,0.67). Image quality in children aged >10 years was better than children ≤10 years (p < 0.05). Flow pattern was defined for portal, superior mesenteric, splenic veins and splenic artery in all patients. 4D flow and 2D-PC MR peak velocity and net flow were similar with good correlation (peak velocity: 4D flow 22.2 ± 9.1 cm/s and 2D-PC MR 25.2 ± 11.2 cm/s, p = 0.46; r = 0.92, p < 0.0001; net flow: 4D flow 9.5 ± 7.4 ml/s and 2D-PC MR 10.1 ± 7.3 ml/s, p = 0.65; r = 0.81, p = 0.0007). 4D flow MRI is feasible and holds promise for the comprehensive 3D visualization and quantification of portal venous flow dynamics in children and young adults. (orig.)

  15. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Multi-dimensional flow-preserving compressed sensing (MuFloCoS) for time-resolved velocity-encoded phase contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Jana; Schmitt, Peter; Saake, Marc; Stubinger, Axel; Grimm, Robert; Forman, Christoph; Greiser, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim; Maier, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    4-D time-resolved velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI (4-D PCI) is a fully non-invasive technique to assess hemodynamics in vivo with a broad range of potential applications in multiple cardiovascular diseases. It is capable of providing quantitative flow values and anatomical information simultaneously. The long acquisition time, however, still inhibits its wider clinical use. Acceleration is achieved at present using parallel MRI (pMRI) techniques which can lead to substantial loss of image quality for higher acceleration factors. Both the high-dimensionality and the significant degree of spatio-temporal correlation in 4-D PCI render it ideally suited for recently proposed compressed sensing (CS) techniques. We propose the Multi-Dimensional Flow-preserving Compressed Sensing (MuFloCoS) method to exploit these properties. A multi-dimensional iterative reconstruction is combined with an interleaved sampling pattern (I-VT), an adaptive masked and weighted temporal regularization (TMW) and fully automatically obtained vessel-masks. The performance of the novel method was analyzed concerning image quality, feasibility of acceleration factors up to 15, quantitative flow values and diagnostic accuracy in phantom experiments and an in vivo carotid study with 18 volunteers. Comparison with iterative state-of-the-art methods revealed significant improvements using the new method, the temporal normalized root mean square error of the peak velocity was reduced by 45.32% for the novel MuFloCoS method with acceleration factor 9. The method was furthermore applied to two patient cases with diagnosed high-grade stenosis of the ICA, which confirmed the performance of MuFloCoS to produce valuable results in the presence of pathological findings in 56 s instead of over 8 min (full sampling).

  17. Amyloid-β plaque deposition measured using propagation-based X-ray phase contrast CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfo, Alberto; Lathuilière, Aurélien; Laversenne, Vanessa; Schneider, Bernard; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta accumulation into insoluble plaques (Aβp) is known to play a significant role in the pathological process in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The presence of Aβp is also one of the neuropathological hallmarks for the disease. AD final diagnosis is generally acknowledged after the evaluation of Aβp deposition in the brain. Insoluble Aβp accumulation may also concur to cause AD as postulated in the so-called amyloid hypothesis. Therefore, the visualization, evaluation and quantification of Aβp are nowadays the keys for a better understanding of the disease, which may point to a possible cure for AD in the near future. Synchrotron-based X-ray phase contrast (XPC) has been demonstrated as the only imaging method that can retrieve the Aβp signal with high spatial resolution (up to 10 µm), high sensitivity and three-dimensional information at the same time. Although at the moment XPC is suitable for ex vivo samples only, it may develop into an alternative to positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in Aβp imaging. In this contribution the possibility of using synchrotron-based X-ray phase propagation computed tomography to visualize and measure Aβp on mouse brains is presented. A careful setup optimization for this application leads to a significant improvement of spatial resolution (∼1 µm), data acquisition speed (five times faster), X-ray dose (five times lower) and setup complexity, without a substantial loss in sensitivity when compared with the classic implementation of grating-based X-ray interferometry. PMID:27140162

  18. Soleus aponeurosis strain distribution following chronic unloading in humans: an in vivo MR phase-contrast study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Dong; Finni, Taija; Hodgson, John A; Lai, Alex M; Edgerton, V Reggie; Sinha, Shantanu

    2006-06-01

    The in vivo strain properties of human skeletal muscle-tendon complexes are poorly understood, particularly following chronic periods of reduced load bearing. We studied eight healthy volunteers who underwent 4 wk of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) to induce chronic unloading. Before and after the ULLS, maximum isometric ankle plantar flexion torque was determined by using a magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible dynamometry. Volumes of the triceps surae muscles and strain distribution of the soleus aponeurosis and the Achilles tendon at a constant submaximal plantar flexion (20% pre-maximal voluntary contraction) were measured by using MRI and velocity-encoded, phase-contrast MRI techniques. Following ULLS, volumes of the soleus and the medial gastrocnemius and the maximum isometric ankle plantar flexion (maximum voluntary contraction) decreased by 5.5+/-1.9, 7.5+/-2.7, and 48.1+/-6.1%, respectively. The strain of the aponeurosis along the length of the muscle before the ULLS was 0.3+/-0.3%, ranging from -1.5 to 2.7% in different locations of the aponeurosis. Following ULLS, the mean strain was -6.4+/-0.3%, ranging from -1.6 to 1.3%. The strain distribution of the midregion of the aponeurosis was significantly influenced by the ULLS, whereas the more distal component showed no consistent changes. Achilles tendon strain was not affected by the ULLS. These results raise the issue as to whether these changes in strain distribution affect the functional properties of the triceps surae and whether the probability of strain injuries within the triceps surae increases following chronic unloading in those regions of this muscle complex in which unusual strains occur.

  19. 4D Bioprinting for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Yang, Qingzhen; Zhao, Xin; Jin, Guorui; Ma, Yufei; Xu, Feng

    2016-09-01

    3D bioprinting has been developed to effectively and rapidly pattern living cells and biomaterials, aiming to create complex bioconstructs. However, placing biocompatible materials or cells into direct contact via bioprinting is necessary but insufficient for creating these constructs. Therefore, '4D bioprinting' has emerged recently, where 'time' is integrated with 3D bioprinting as the fourth dimension, and the printed objects can change their shapes or functionalities when an external stimulus is imposed or when cell fusion or postprinting self-assembly occurs. In this review, we highlight recent developments in 4D bioprinting technology. Additionally, we review the uses of 4D bioprinting in tissue engineering and drug delivery. Finally, we discuss the major roadblocks to this approach, together with possible solutions, to provide future perspectives on this technology.

  20. Global 4-D trajectory optimization for spacecraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Global 4-D trajectory(x,y,z,t)is optimized for a spacecraft,which is launched from the Earth to fly around the Sun,just as star-drift of 1437 asteroids in the solar system.The spacecraft trajectory is controlled by low thrust.The performance index of optimal trajectory is to maximize the rendezvous times with the intermediate asteroids,and also maximize the final mass.This paper provides a combined algorithm of global 4-D trajectory optimization.The algorithm is composed of dynamic programming and two-point-boundary algorithm based on optimal control theory.The best 4-D trajectory is obtained:the spacecraft flies passing 55 asteroids,and rendezvous with(following or passing again)asteroids for 454 days,and finally rendezvous with the asteroid 2005SN25 on the day 60521(MJD),the final mass of the spacecraft is 836.53 kg.

  1. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapata, A., E-mail: adrian.sarapata@tum.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 and Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Pfeiffer, F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  2. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Finkenthal, M.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Pfeiffer, F.; Stutman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  3. Polychromatic phase contrast imaging as a basic step towards a widespread application of the technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, A.; Speller, R.

    2007-10-01

    Phase contrast imaging (PCI) is probably the most exciting amongst emerging X-ray imaging techniques, as it has the potential to remove some of the main limitations of conventional radiology. As a consequence, significant effort is currently directed towards developing the technique for the first clinical implementations. In recent years, PCI has been widely experimented, but its use has been mainly restricted to synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities. Source-related limitations are in fact the most relevant in this context, and the fact that most phase techniques require monochromatic radiation makes these limitations even more severe. Amongst the different techniques, free-space propagation is the most suited to a polychromatic implementation. A detailed simulation, based on Fresnel/Kirchoff diffraction integrals, was devised to describe this imaging modality. This simulation accounts for source dimensions, beam spectrum and divergence and detector point spread function, and can thus be applied to any X-ray imaging system. In particular, by accepting these parameters as input, along with ones describing the sample, the model can be used to optimize the geometry of the set-up, i.e. to assess the source-to-sample and sample-to-detector distances that maximize feature detection. The simulation was validated experimentally by acquiring a range of images of different samples with a laboratory X-ray source. Good agreement was found between simulated and experimental data in all cases. In order to maximize the generality of the results, all acquisitions were carried out using a polychromatic source and an energy-resolving detector. This effectively allowed the recording of a range of monochromatic and polychromatic images in a single acquisition, as an assortment of the former can be created by integrating different parts of the acquired spectra. The most notable result obtained in this study is that in most practical cases polychromatic PCI can provide the same image

  4. Cinema 4D R13 Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Szabo, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This book contains short recipes designed to effectively teach tools in the minimum amount of time. Each recipe hits on a topic that can be combined or incorporated with other recipes to give you the building blocks you need to start making great designs with Cinema 4D. Rather than demonstrating how to make a few specific and extensive projects, the recipes create a solid base of knowledge to help the reader understand the tools available to foster their own creativity. This book is for anyone who wants to quickly get up to speed with Cinema 4D to create 3D projects that run laps around simple

  5. Representing Participation in ICT4D Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, J. P.; Flyverbom, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    identify two dimensions to participation and ICT4D: whether participation 1) is hierarchical/top-down or agent-driven/bottom-up, and 2) involves conflict or cooperation. Based on these dimensions we articulate four ideal types of discourse that permeate ICT and development efforts: stakeholder......, depending on the context of their implementation, are permeated by multiple discourses about participation. Our four ideal types of participation discourses are, therefore, useful starting points to discuss the intricate dynamics of participation in ICT4D projects....

  6. 4D MR imaging using robust internal respiratory signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, CheukKai; Wen, Zhifei; Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, R. H. N.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Beddar, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using internal respiratory (IR) surrogates to sort four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images. The 4D MR images were constructed by acquiring fast 2D cine MR images sequentially, with each slice scanned for more than one breathing cycle. The 4D volume was then sorted retrospectively using the IR signal. In this study, we propose to use multiple low-frequency components in the Fourier space as well as the anterior body boundary as potential IR surrogates. From these potential IR surrogates, we used a clustering algorithm to identify those that best represented the respiratory pattern to derive the IR signal. A study with healthy volunteers was performed to assess the feasibility of the proposed IR signal. We compared this proposed IR signal with the respiratory signal obtained using respiratory bellows. Overall, 99% of the IR signals matched the bellows signals. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IR signal and bellows signal was 0.18 s in this cohort of matching signals. For the acquired images corresponding to the other 1% of non-matching signal pairs, the respiratory motion shown in the images was coherent with the respiratory phases determined by the IR signal, but not the bellows signal. This suggested that the IR signal determined by the proposed method could potentially correct the faulty bellows signal. The sorted 4D images showed minimal mismatched artefacts and potential clinical applicability. The proposed IR signal therefore provides a feasible alternative to effectively sort MR images in 4D.

  7. Interior tomography in x-ray differential phase contrast CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-05-01

    Differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) is an x-ray imaging method that uses the wave properties of imaging photons as the contrast mechanism. It has been demonstrated that DPC images can be obtained using a conventional x-ray tube and a Talbot-Lau-type interferometer. Due to the limited size of the gratings, current data acquisition systems only offer a limited field of view, and thus are prone to data truncation. As a result, the reconstructed DPC-CT image may suffer from image artifacts and increased inaccuracy in the reconstructed image values. In this paper, we demonstrate that a small region of interest (ROI) within a large object can be accurately and stably reconstructed using fully truncated projection datasets provided that a priori information on electron density is known for a small region inside the ROI. The method reconstructs an image iteratively to satisfy a group of physical conditions by using a projection onto convex set (POCS) approach. In this work, this POCS algorithm is validated using both numerical simulations and physical phantom experimental data. In both cases, the root mean square error is reduced by an order of magnitude with respect to the truncated analytic reconstructions. Truncation artifacts observed in the latter reconstructions are eliminated using the POCS algorithm.

  8. Detection performance study for cone-beam differential phase contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-03-01

    X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods have seen tremendous growth and increased interest in recent years. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages, but all have shown the ability to improve the detection of various objects because of the additional phase measurements. Of the various methods, grating-based differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) imaging has shown greater quantitative and diagnostic capabilities than traditional absorption CT. Although it has been shown that DPC-CT provides superior contrast of certain materials, one question has not been fully addressed to date is whether DPC-CT can provide improved accuracy in detecting low contrast masses using the same radiation dose as that given in absorption CT. The detectability is not only related to contrast to noise ratio, but also to the noise texture. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the peculiar noise texture found in cone-beam DPC-CT affects low contrast objects' detectability through human observer ROC analysis. Studies for both axial and sagittal planes were carried out, as both could potentially be used in clinical practice for a 3D image. The results demonstrate that noise texture found in conebeam DPC-CT strongly affects human visual perception, and that object detectabilities in axial and sagittal images of DPC-CT are different.

  9. Late phase contrast enhanced-CT analysis of thrombosed type aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Takagi, Ryo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Seven patients with thrombosed type aortic dissection who underwent both early- and late-phase contrast enhanced (CE)-CT scans were analyzed. The image acquisition of early-phase CE-CT began 30 seconds after the intravenous administration of contrast material at an injection rate of 1.5 ml per second. Late-phase CE-CT began 6 minutes after contrast material injection. The thrombosed false lumens were not enhanced on early-phase CE-CTs in any of the cases. In five of seven cases, on the other hand, false lumens of the descending aorta were enhanced on late-phase images. Late enhancement in the false lumen was roughly divided into two patterns; a crescentic enhancement of the sub-adventitial region (3 cases), and a vague enhancement around the ulcer-like projection (2 cases). The mechanism of late enhancement in the false lumen was not fully elucidated. Although the clinical significance of late enhancement has not yet been established, it will be useful to demonstrate an unstable status of the thrombosed false lumens before organization. (author).

  10. An FBP image reconstruction algorithm for x-ray differential phase contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2008-03-01

    Most recently, a novel data acquisition method has been proposed and experimentally implemented for x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT), in which a conventional x-ray tube and a Talbot-Lau type interferometer were utilized in data acquisition. The divergent nature of the data acquisition system requires a divergent-beam image reconstruction algorithm for DPC-CT. This paper focuses on addressing this image reconstruction issue. We developed a filtered backprojection algorithm to directly reconstruct the DPC-CT images from acquired projection data. The developed algorithm allows one to directly reconstruct the decrement of the real part of the refractive index from the measured data. In order to accurately reconstruct an image, the data need to be acquired over an angular range of at least 180° plus the fan-angle. Different from the parallel beam data acquisition and reconstruction methods, a 180° rotation angle for data acquisition system does not provide sufficient data for an accurate reconstruction of the entire field of view. Numerical simulations have been conducted to validate the image reconstruction algorithm.

  11. Spatial resolution characterization of differential phase contrast CT systems via modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-06-01

    By adding a Talbot-Lau interferometer to a conventional x-ray absorption computed tomography (CT) imaging system, both differential phase contrast (DPC) signal and absorption contrast signal can be simultaneously measured from the same set of CT measurements. The imaging performance of such multi-contrast x-ray CT imaging systems can be characterized with standard metrics such as noise variance, noise power spectrum, contrast-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function (MTF), and task-based detectability index. Among these metrics, the measurement of the MTF can be challenging in DPC-CT systems due to several confounding factors such as phase wrapping and the difficulty of using fine wires as probes. To address these technical challenges, this paper discusses a viable and reliable method to experimentally measure the MTF of DPC-CT. It has been found that the spatial resolution of DPC-CT is degraded, when compared to that of the corresponding absorption CT, due to the presence of a source grating G0 in the Talbot-Lau interferometer. An effective MTF was introduced and experimentally estimated to describe the impact of the Talbot-Lau interferometer on the system MTF.

  12. Proposed imaging of the ultrafast electronic motion in samples using x-ray phase-contrast

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Gopal; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Tracing the motion of electrons has enormous relevance to understanding ubiquitous phenomena in ultrafast science, such as the dynamical evolution of the electron density during complex chemical and biological processes. Scattering of ultrashort x-ray pulses from an electronic wavepacket would appear to be the most obvious approach to image the electronic motion in real-time and real-space with the notion that such scattering patterns, in the far-field regime, encode the instantaneous electron density of the wavepacket. However, recent results by Dixit {\\em et al.} [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., {\\bf 109}, 11636 (2012)] have put this notion into question and shown that the scattering in the far-field regime probes spatio-temporal density-density correlations. Here, we propose a possible way to image the instantaneous electron density of the wavepacket via ultrafast x-ray {\\em phase contrast imaging}. Moreover, we show that inelastic scattering processes, which plague ultrafast scattering in the far-field reg...

  13. X-ray micro-beam techniques and phase contrast tomography applied to biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Bukreeva, Inna; Pelliccia, Daniele; Burghammer, Manfred; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-12-01

    A deeper comprehension of the biomineralization (BM) process is at the basis of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine developments. Several in-vivo and in-vitro studies were dedicated to this purpose via the application of 2D and 3D diagnostic techniques. Here, we develop a new methodology, based on different complementary experimental techniques (X-ray phase contrast tomography, micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence scanning technique) coupled to new analytical tools. A qualitative and quantitative structural investigation, from the atomic to the micrometric length scale, is obtained for engineered bone tissues. The high spatial resolution achieved by X-ray scanning techniques allows us to monitor the bone formation at the first-formed mineral deposit at the organic-mineral interface within a porous scaffold. This work aims at providing a full comprehension of the morphology and functionality of the biomineralization process, which is of key importance for developing new drugs for preventing and healing bone diseases and for the development of bio-inspired materials.

  14. X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging of Calcified Tissue and Biomaterial Structure in Bioreactor Engineered Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Alyssa A. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, IL (United States); Larson, Jeffery C. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, IL (United States); Garson, III, Alfred B. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Guan, Huifeng [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Zhong, Zhong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Fisher, John P. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Brey, Eric M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, IL (United States)

    2014-11-04

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. These techniques allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems and will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. Furthermore, these results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors.

  15. Schlieren, Phase-Contrast, and Spectroscopy Diagnostics for the LBNL HIF Plasma Channel Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, D. M.; Niemann, C.; Fessenden, T. J.; Leemans, W.; Vandersloot, K.; Dahlbacka, G.; Yu, S. S.; Sharp, W. M.; Tauschwitz, A.

    1999-11-01

    The LBNL Plasma Channel experiment has demonstrated stable 42-cm Z-pinch discharge plasma channels with peak currents in excess of 50 kA for a 7 torr nitrogen, 30 kV discharge. These channels offer the possibility of transporting heavy-ion beams for inertial fusion. We postulate that the stability of these channels resides in the existance of a neutral-gas density depresion created by a pre-pulse discharge before the main capacitor bank discharge is created. Here, we present the results and experimental diagnostics setup used for the study of the pre-pulse and main bank channels. Observation of both the plasma and neutral gas dynamics is achieved. Schlieren, Zernike's phase-contrast, and spectroscopic techniques are used. Preliminary Schlieren results show a gas shockwave moving radially at a rate of ≈ 10^6 mm/sec as a result of the fast and localized deposited energy during the evolution of the pre-pulse channel. This data will be used to validate simulation codes (BUCKY and CYCLOPS).

  16. Value of MR phase-contrast flow measurements for functional assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, Sebastian [German Cancer Research Center DKFZ, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); University Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Mereles, Derliz; Gruenig, Ekkehard [University Heidelberg, Department of Internal Medicine III, Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, Michael; Schoeck, Helena; Eichinger, Monika; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Fink, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center DKFZ, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Goals of our study were to compare the pulmonary hemodynamics between healthy volunteers and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and correlate MR flow measurements with echocardiography. Twenty-five patients with PAH and 25 volunteers were examined at 1.5 T. Phase-contrast flow measurements were performed in the ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk, resulting in the following parameters: peak velocity (cm/s), average blood flow (l/min), time to peak velocity (ms), velocity rise gradient and pulmonary distensibility (cm{sup 2}). The bronchosystemic shunt was calculated. In PAH patients transthoracic echocardiography and right-heart catheterization (RHC) served as the gold standard. In comparison to volunteers, the PAH patients showed significantly reduced pulmonary velocities (P = 0.002), blood flow (P = 0.002) and pulmonary distensibility (P = 0.008). In patients, the time to peak velocity was shorter (P<0.001), and the velocity rise gradient was steeper (P = 0.002) than in volunteers. While in volunteers the peak velocity in the aorta was reached earlier, it was the reverse in patients. Patients showed a significant bronchosystemic shunt (P = 0.01). No meaningful correlation was found between MRI measurements and echocardiography or RHC. MRI is a feasible technique for the differentiation between PAH and volunteers. Further studies have to be conducted for the absolute calculation of pressure estimates. (orig.)

  17. X-ray micro-beam techniques and phase contrast tomography applied to biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratini, Michela, E-mail: michela.fratini@gmail.com [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, 00184 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze, Università di Roma Tre, 00144 Roma (Italy); Campi, Gaetano [Institute of Crystallography, CNR, 00015 Monterotondo, Roma (Italy); Bukreeva, Inna [CNR NANOTEC-Institute of Nanotechnology, 00195 Roma (Italy); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pelliccia, Daniele [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Burghammer, Manfred [ESRF-The European Synchrotron, 3800 Grenoble (France); Tromba, Giuliana [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale dell’Università di Genova & AUO San Martino-IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, 16132 Genova (Italy); Cedola, Alessia [CNR NANOTEC-Institute of Nanotechnology, 00195 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    A deeper comprehension of the biomineralization (BM) process is at the basis of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine developments. Several in-vivo and in-vitro studies were dedicated to this purpose via the application of 2D and 3D diagnostic techniques. Here, we develop a new methodology, based on different complementary experimental techniques (X-ray phase contrast tomography, micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence scanning technique) coupled to new analytical tools. A qualitative and quantitative structural investigation, from the atomic to the micrometric length scale, is obtained for engineered bone tissues. The high spatial resolution achieved by X-ray scanning techniques allows us to monitor the bone formation at the first-formed mineral deposit at the organic–mineral interface within a porous scaffold. This work aims at providing a full comprehension of the morphology and functionality of the biomineralization process, which is of key importance for developing new drugs for preventing and healing bone diseases and for the development of bio-inspired materials.

  18. Volumetric characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix on phase contrast x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Coan, Paola; Diemoz, Paul C.; Hobbs, Susan K.; Huber, Markus B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows visualization of cartilage soft tissue, subsequent examination of chondrocyte patterns, and their correlation to osteoarthritis. Previous studies have shown that 2D texture features are effective at distinguishing between healthy and osteoarthritic regions of interest annotated in the radial zone of cartilage matrix on PCI-CT images. In this study, we further extend the texture analysis to 3D and investigate the ability of volumetric texture features at characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the cartilage matrix for purposes of classification. Here, we extracted volumetric texture features derived from Minkowski Functionals and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) from 496 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of human patellar cartilage specimens. The extracted features were then used in a machine-learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with GLCM features correlation (AUC = 0.83 +/- 0.06) and homogeneity (AUC = 0.82 +/- 0.07), which significantly outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p GLCM-derived statistical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  19. X-ray phase contrast imaging of calcified tissue and biomaterial structure in bioreactor engineered tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Garson, Alfred B; Guan, Huifeng; Zhong, Zhong; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Fisher, John P; Anastasio, Mark A; Brey, Eric M

    2015-03-01

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. Techniques that allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. These results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors.

  20. A minute fossil phoretic mite recovered by phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Jason A; Wirth, Stefan; Penney, David; McNeil, Andrew; Bradley, Robert S; Withers, Philip J; Preziosi, Richard F

    2012-06-23

    High-resolution phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) reveals the phoretic deutonymph of a fossil astigmatid mite (Acariformes: Astigmata) attached to a spider's carapace (Araneae: Dysderidae) in Eocene (44-49 Myr ago) Baltic amber. Details of appendages and a sucker plate were resolved, and the resulting three-dimensional model demonstrates the potential of tomography to recover morphological characters of systematic significance from even the tiniest amber inclusions without the need for a synchrotron. Astigmatids have an extremely sparse palaeontological record. We confirm one of the few convincing fossils, potentially the oldest record of Histiostomatidae. At 176 µm long, we believe this to be the smallest arthropod in amber to be CT-scanned as a complete body fossil, extending the boundaries for what can be recovered using this technique. We also demonstrate a minimum age for the evolution of phoretic behaviour among their deutonymphs, an ecological trait used by extant species to disperse into favourable environments. The occurrence of the fossil on a spider is noteworthy, as modern histiostomatids tend to favour other arthropods as carriers.

  1. Information and backaction due to phase contrast imaging measurements of cold atomic gases: beyond Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    We further examine a theory of phase contrast imaging (PCI) of cold atomic gases, first introduced by us in Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 112}, 233602 (2014). We model the PCI measurement by directly calculating the entangled state between the light and the atoms due to the ac Stark shift, which induces a conditional phase shift on the light depending upon the atomic state. By interfering the light that passes through the BEC with the original light, one can obtain information of the atomic state at a single shot level. We derive an exact expression for a measurement operator that embodies the information obtained from PCI, as well as the back-action on the atomic state. By the use of exact expressions for the measurement process, we go beyond the continuous variables approximation such that the non-Gaussian regime can be accessed for both the measured state and the post-measurement state. Features such as the photon probability density, signal, signal variance, Fisher information, error of the measurement, and the b...

  2. Generalized phase contrast-enhanced diffractive coupling to light-driven microtools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling to optically manipulated microtools coined as wave-guided optical waveguides using diffractive techniques on a "point and shoot" approach. These microtools are extended microstructures fabricated using two-photon photopolymerization and function as free-floating optically trapped waveguides. Dynamic coupling of focused light via these structures being moved in three-dimensional space is done holographically. However, calculating the necessary holograms is not straightforward when using counter-propagating trapping geometry. The generation of the coupling spots is done in real time following the position of each microtool with the aid of an object tracking routine. This approach allows continuous coupling of light through the microtools which can be useful in a variety of biophotonics applications. To complement the targeted-light delivery capability of the microtools, the applied spatial light modulator has been illuminated with a properly matched input beam cross section based on the generalized phase contrast method. Our results show a significant gain in the output at the tip of each microtool as measured from the fluorescence signal of the trapping medium. The ability to switch from on-demand to continuous addressing with efficient illumination leverages our microtools for potential applications in stimulation and near-field-based biophotonics on cellular scales.

  3. Hemodynamic evaluation with TURBO BRISK--a rapid phase contrast angiography technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anayiotos, A S; Kortright, E; Doyle, M; Walsh, E G; Fuisz, A R; Pohost, G M

    2000-01-01

    Hemodynamic imaging by phase contrast angiography was significantly accelerated by selective interpolation and segmentation in k-space using TURBO BRISK. The method was tested in vitro on three independent flowfields, representative of human blood rheology: a straight tube simulating the descending aorta, a curved tube simulating the aortic arch and a two-chamber orifice flow model simulating valvular regurgitation. The results were compared to data obtained by Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and showed good agreement. For the straight tube, the flow velocity obtained by five TURBO BRISK methods with increasing segmentation factors and corresponding time savings showed good agreement with LDV. For the curved tube, the velocity showed good general agreement with some differences in the decelerating part of the cycle, and in the low-velocity secondary flow structures. The orifice flow evaluation, the most time consuming case, was performed by the control volume method. It showed good agreement with actual flows through the orifice. Data acquisitions for TURBO-4 BRISK could be performed in 20s for each velocity component. The method shows promise for breath-hold acquisitions in clinical applications, including calculation of blood flow volumes through diseased arteries, measurement of blood backflow volumes through dysfunctional heart valves to time valve replacement operations, and evaluation of arterial wall shear stress, an important factor in the genesis of atherosclerosis.

  4. Laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography enables 3D virtual histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpperwien, Mareike; Krenkel, Martin; Quade, Felix; Salditt, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Due to the large penetration depth and small wavelength hard x-rays offer a unique potential for 3D biomedical and biological imaging, combining capabilities of high resolution and large sample volume. However, in classical absorption-based computed tomography, soft tissue only shows a weak contrast, limiting the actual resolution. With the advent of phase-contrast methods, the much stronger phase shift induced by the sample can now be exploited. For high resolution, free space propagation behind the sample is particularly well suited to make the phase shift visible. Contrast formation is based on the self-interference of the transmitted beam, resulting in object-induced intensity modulations in the detector plane. As this method requires a sufficiently high degree of spatial coherence, it was since long perceived as a synchrotron-based imaging technique. In this contribution we show that by combination of high brightness liquid-metal jet microfocus sources and suitable sample preparation techniques, as well as optimized geometry, detection and phase retrieval, excellent three-dimensional image quality can be obtained, revealing the anatomy of a cobweb spider in high detail. This opens up new opportunities for 3D virtual histology of small organisms. Importantly, the image quality is finally augmented to a level accessible to automatic 3D segmentation.

  5. Phase-contrast tomography of neuronal tissues: from laboratory- to high resolution synchrotron CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpperwien, Mareike; Krenkel, Martin; Müller, Kristin; Salditt, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Assessing the three-dimensional architecture of neuronal tissues with sub-cellular resolution presents a significant analytical challenge. Overcoming the limitations associated with serial slicing, phase-contrast x-ray tomography has the potential to contribute to this goal. Even compact laboratory CT at an optimized liquid-metal jet micro- focus source combined with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms and preparation protocols can yield renderings with single cell sensitivity in millimeter sized brain areas of mouse. Here, we show the capabilities of the setup by imaging a Golgi-Cox impregnated mouse brain. Towards higher resolution we extend these studies at our recently upgraded waveguide-based cone-beam holo-tomography instrument GINIX at DESY. This setup allows high resolution recordings with adjustable field of view and resolution, down to the voxel sizes in the range of a few ten nanometers. The recent results make us confident that important issues of neuronal connectivity can be addressed by these methods, and that 3D (virtual) histology with nanoscale resolution will become an attractive modality for neuroscience research.

  6. Stability estimates for linearized near-field phase retrieval in X-ray phase contrast imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Maretzke, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase contrast enables nanoscale imaging of biological tissue by probing not only the attenuation, but also the real part of the refractive index of the sample. Since only intensities of diffracted waves can be measured, the main mathematical challenge consists in a phase-retrieval problem in the near-field regime. We treat an often used linearized version of this problem known as contract transfer function model. Surprisingly, this inverse problem turns out to be well-posed assuming only a compact support of the imaged object. Moreover, we establish bounds on the Lipschitz stability constant. In general this constant grows exponentially with the Fresnel number of the imaging setup. However, both for homogeneous objects, characterized by a fixed ratio of the induced refractive phase shifts and attenuation, and in the case of measurements at two distances, a much more favorable algebraic dependence on the Fresnel number can be shown. In some cases we establish order optimality of our es...

  7. Synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging of human stomach and gastric cancer: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lei; Li, Gang; Sun, Ying-Shi; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Peng

    2012-05-01

    The electron density resolution of synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging (SR-PCI) is 1000 times higher than that of conventional X-ray absorption imaging in light elements, through which high-resolution X-ray imaging of biological soft tissue can be achieved. For biological soft tissue, SR-PCI can give better imaging contrast than conventional X-ray absorption imaging. In this study, human resected stomach and gastric cancer were investigated using in-line holography and diffraction enhanced imaging at beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. It was possible to depict gastric pits, measuring 50-70 µm, gastric grooves and tiny blood vessels in the submucosa layer by SR-PCI. The fine structure of a cancerous ulcer was displayed clearly on imaging the mucosa. The delamination of the gastric wall and infiltration of cancer in the submucosa layer were also demonstrated on cross-sectional imaging. In conclusion, SR-PCI can demonstrate the subtle structures of stomach and gastric cancer that cannot be detected by conventional X-ray absorption imaging, which prompt the X-ray diagnosis of gastric disease to the level of the gastric pit, and has the potential to provide new methods for the imageology of gastric cancer.

  8. Development of a Digital Control for the Phase Contrast Imaging Alignment Feedback System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, M.; Marinoni, A.; Rost, J. C.; Davis, E. M.; Porkolab, M.

    2016-10-01

    The Phase Contrast Imaging diagnostic is an internal reference interferometer that images density fluctuations on a 32-element linear detector array. Since proper operation of the system requires accurate alignment of a CO2 laser beam on a phase plate, beam motion due to vibrations of the DIII-D vessel need to be compensated up to 1 kHz. The feedback network controlling the steering mirrors currently uses a linear analog controller, but a digital controller can provide improved stability performance and flexibility. A prototype was developed using an Arduino Due, a low-cost microcontroller, to assess performance capabilities. Digital control parameters will be developed based on the measured frequency and phase response of the physical components. Finally, testing of the digital feedback system and the required revisions will be done to achieve successful performance. This upgrade to the linear analog controller is expected to be used routinely on similar diagnostics in fusion devices, especially in view of restricted access to the machine hall. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-94ER54235, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  9. Accelerated phase-contrast cine MRI using k-t SPARSE-SENSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Otazo, Ricardo; Feng, Li; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lee, Vivian S

    2012-04-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) cine MRI is a promising method for assessment of pathologic hemodynamics, including cardiovascular and hepatoportal vascular dynamics, but its low data acquisition efficiency limits the achievable spatial and temporal resolutions within clinically acceptable breath-hold durations. We propose to accelerate PC cine MRI using an approach which combines compressed sensing and parallel imaging (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). We validated the proposed 6-fold accelerated PC cine MRI against 3-fold accelerated PC cine MRI with parallel imaging (generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions). With the programmable flow pump, we simulated a time varying waveform emulating hepatic blood flow. Normalized root mean square error between two sets of velocity measurements was 2.59%. In multiple blood vessels of 12 control subjects, two sets of mean velocity measurements were in good agreement (mean difference = -0.29 cm/s; lower and upper 95% limits of agreement = -5.26 and 4.67 cm/s, respectively). The mean phase noise, defined as the standard deviation of the phase in a homogeneous stationary region, was significantly lower for k-t SPARSE-SENSE than for generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 radians, respectively; P cine MRI pulse sequence with k-t SPARSE-SENSE is a promising investigational method for rapid velocity measurement with relatively high spatial (1.7 mm × 1.7 mm) and temporal (∼35 ms) resolutions.

  10. Phase-contrast imaging using a scanning-double-grating configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterets, Ya I; Wilkins, S W

    2008-04-14

    A new double-grating-based phase-contrast imaging technique is described. This technique differs from the conventional double-grating imaging method by the image acquisition strategy. The novelty of the proposed method is in lateral scanning of both gratings simultaneously while an image is collected. The collected image is not contaminated by a Moiré pattern and can be recorded even by using a high-spatial-resolution integrating detector (e.g. X-ray film), thus facilitating improved resolution and/or contrast in the image. A detailed theoretical analysis of image formation in the scanning-double-grating method is carried out within the rigorous wave-optical formalism. The transfer function for the scanning-double-grating imaging system is derived. An approximate geometrical-optics solution for the image intensity distribution is derived from the exact wave-optical formula using the stationary-phase approach. Based on the present formalism, the effects of finite source size on the preferred operating conditions and of polychromaticity on the image contrast and resolution are investigated.

  11. Sensitive Phase Gratings for X-ray Phase Contrast -- a Simulation-based Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Preusche, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Medical differential phase contrast x-ray imaging (DPCI) promises improved soft-tissue contrast at lower x-ray dose. The dose strongly depends on both the angular sensitivity and on the visibility of a grating-based Talbot-Lau interferometer. Using a conventional x-ray tube, a high sensitivity and a high visibility are somewhat contradicting goals: To increase sensitivity, the grating period has to be reduced and/or the grating distance increased. Technically, this means using a higher Talbot order (3rd or 5th one instead of first one). This however reduces the visibility somewhat, because only a smaller part of the tube spectrum will get used. This work proposes to relax this problem by changing the phase grating geometry. This allows to double sensitivity (i.e., double the Talbot order) without reducing the visibility. One proposed grating geometry is an older binary one (75% of a period $\\pi$-shifting), but applied in a novel way. The second proposed geometry is a novel one, requiring three height levels f...

  12. Cranial MR angiography in children with cerebrovascular diseases; Evaluation of new phase contrast technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Masayuki; Uozumi, Tohru; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Kurisu, Kaoru; Ikawa, Fusao; Satoh, Hideki; Yukawa, Osamu; Migita, Keisuke; Hada, Hiroshi (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-06-01

    We evaluated the phase contrast (PC) method, a new type of MR angiography (MRA), in children with cerebrovascular diseases, and compared it with the time of flight (TOF) method and conventional angiography. The patients were nine children with the following diagnoses: two with arteriovenous malformations (AVM), one with Galenic AVM, one with cavernous angioma, four with moyamoya disease, and one with cerebral infarction. A 1.5 T Signa Advantage and a 3-D PC were used. In AVM and Galenic AVM, feeder, nidus and drainer were demonstrated separately by changing velocity encoding (VENC). In the patient with cavernous angioma, the cortical veins were well demonstrated. In moyamoya disease and infarction, stenosis or obstruction of the main arteries and revascularization after surgery were clearly demonstrated. PC is useful in the diagnosis and follow up of cerebrovascular diseases in children because PC is superior in demonstrating veins and scanning in any direction is possible. However, MRA alone cannot demonstrate small vessels and direction of flow, so preoperative conventional angiography is still necessary. (author).

  13. 4D MR phase and magnitude segmentations with GPU parallel computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Robert V; Lin, Hung-Yu; Alexander, Murray E; Bidinosti, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    The increasing size and number of data sets of large four dimensional (three spatial, one temporal) magnetic resonance (MR) cardiac images necessitates efficient segmentation algorithms. Analysis of phase-contrast MR images yields cardiac flow information which can be manipulated to produce accurate segmentations of the aorta. Phase contrast segmentation algorithms are proposed that use simple mean-based calculations and least mean squared curve fitting techniques. The initial segmentations are generated on a multi-threaded central processing unit (CPU) in 10 seconds or less, though the computational simplicity of the algorithms results in a loss of accuracy. A more complex graphics processing unit (GPU)-based algorithm fits flow data to Gaussian waveforms, and produces an initial segmentation in 0.5 seconds. Level sets are then applied to a magnitude image, where the initial conditions are given by the previous CPU and GPU algorithms. A comparison of results shows that the GPU algorithm appears to produce the most accurate segmentation.

  14. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Rack, A.; Nelson, K.

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 μm are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 μm in absorption mode and ˜14 μm in phase contrast mode (z2=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  15. Phase contrast imaging using Betatron x-ray beams produced by a 100 TW high intensity laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Corde, Sebastien; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Lassonde, Philippe; Martin, Francois; Malka, Victor; Rousse, Antoine; Kieffer, Jean

    2011-10-01

    Development of x-ray phase contrast imaging applications with a laboratory scale source have been limited by the long exposure time needed to obtain one image. We demonstrate, using the Betatron x-ray radiation produced when electrons are accelerated and wiggled in the laser-wakefield cavity, the potential of Betatron x-ray radiation for femtosecond phase contrast imaging. We characterize the x-ray source using a knife edge technique and nylon wires for calibration. We then show that high-quality phase contrast images of complex objects located in air, can be obtained with only a single laser shot. The Betatron x-ray source used in this demonstration experiment has a source diameter of 1.7 microns and produces a synchrotron spectrum with critical energy Ec = 12 . 3 + / - 2 . 5 keV and 109 photons per shot in the whole spectrum.

  16. Simultaneous maximum-likelihood reconstruction for x-ray grating based phase-contrast tomography avoiding intermediate phase retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, André; Durst, Jürgen; Gödel, Karl; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Rieger, Jens; Weber, Thomas; Wucherer, Lukas; Anton, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    Phase-wrapping artifacts, statistical image noise and the need for a minimum amount of phase steps per projection limit the practicability of x-ray grating based phase-contrast tomography, when using filtered back projection reconstruction. For conventional x-ray computed tomography, the use of statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms has successfully reduced artifacts and statistical issues. In this work, an iterative reconstruction method for grating based phase-contrast tomography is presented. The method avoids the intermediate retrieval of absorption, differential phase and dark field projections. It directly reconstructs tomographic cross sections from phase stepping projections by the use of a forward projecting imaging model and an appropriate likelihood function. The likelihood function is then maximized with an iterative algorithm. The presented method is tested with tomographic data obtained through a wave field simulation of grating based phase-contrast tomography. The reconstruction result...

  17. Fresnel zone-plate based X-ray microscopy in Zernike phase contrast with sub-50 nm resolution at NSRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Jie; Li Wenjie; Tian Jinping; Liu Longhua; Xiong Ying; Liu Gang; Wu Ziyu; Tian Yangchao [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (China); Liu Yijin [School of Physics (China); Yue Zhengbo; Yu Hanqing [Laboratory of Environmental Engineering, School of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui 230029 (China); Wang Chunru, E-mail: ychtian@ustc.edu.c [Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10060 (China)

    2009-09-01

    A transmission X-ray microscope using Fresnel zone-plates (FZPs) has been installed at U7A beamline of National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The objective FZP with 45 nm outermost zone width delivers a sub-50 nm resolution. A gold phase ring with 2.5 {mu}m thickness and 4 {mu}m width was placed at the focal plane of the objective FZP at 8 keV to produce a negative Zernike phase contrast. A series of samples were used to test the performance of the Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy.

  18. Single-shot x-ray differential phase-contrast and diffraction imaging using two-dimensional transmission gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Harold H; Bennett, Eric E; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F; Pai, Vinay

    2010-06-15

    We describe an x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging method based on two-dimensional transmission gratings that are directly resolved by an x-ray camera. X-ray refraction and diffraction in the sample lead to variations of the positions and amplitudes of the grating fringes on the camera. These effects can be quantified through spatial harmonic analysis. The use of 2D gratings allows differential phase contrast in several directions to be obtained from a single image. When compared to previous grating-based interferometry methods, this approach obviates the need for multiple exposures and separate measurements for different directions and thereby accelerates imaging speed.

  19. Propagator based formalism for optimizing in-line phase contrast imaging in laboratory X-ray setups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balles, Andreas; Zabler, Simon; Ebensperger, Thomas; Fella, Christian; Hanke, Randolf

    2016-09-01

    We derive a propagator based formalism for optimizing phase contrast imaging in laboratory setups as well as in synchrotron setups. We confirm based on five different setups the well known existence of an optimum position for the sample in terms of phase contrast by measuring two types of fibers and evaluating the fringe contrast. Furthermore, we demonstrate for these setups a correlation of our formula and the fringe contrast. Hence, an estimate of this optimum position is given by our formalism which only depends on the source size, the detector blurring, and the total distance between source and detector.

  20. Phase-contrast imaging of a soft biological object using X-pinch as X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Wang, X. X.; Zou, X. B.; Zeng, N. G.; He, L. Y.

    2008-07-01

    The X-ray emission from an X-pinch was measured with diamond photoconducting detectors and a pinhole camera, and the results show that the X-ray source of the X-pinch is extremely small in size and high in brightness. As such, the X-pinch could be considered as an X-ray point source having a high spatial coherence that is required by a simplified scheme of X-ray phase-contrast imaging. The X-pinch was used as X-ray source for the phase-contrast imaging of a weakly X-ray-absorbing mosquito and an image with high contrast was obtained.

  1. X-ray phase contrast imaging of the breast: Analysis of tissue simulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Phase contrast imaging, particularly of the breast, is being actively investigated. The purpose of this work is to investigate the x-ray phase contrast properties of breast tissues and commonly used breast tissue substitutes or phantom materials with an aim of determining the phantom materials best representative of breast tissues. Methods: Elemental compositions of breast tissues including adipose, fibroglandular, and skin were used to determine the refractive index, n= 1 -{delta}+i {beta}. The real part of the refractive index, specifically the refractive index decrement ({delta}), over the energy range of 5-50 keV were determined using XOP software (version 2.3, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France). Calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite were considered to represent the material compositions of microcalcifications in vivo. Nineteen tissue substitutes were considered as possible candidates to represent adipose tissue, fibroglandular tissue and skin, and four phantom materials were considered as possible candidates to represent microcalcifications. For each material, either the molecular formula, if available, or the elemental composition based on weight fraction, was used to determine {delta}. At each x-ray photon energy, the absolute percent difference in {delta} between the breast tissue and the substitute material was determined, from which three candidates were selected. From these candidate tissue substitutes, the material that minimized the absolute percent difference in linear attenuation coefficient {mu}, and hence {beta}, was considered to be best representative of that breast tissue. Results: Over the energy range of 5-50 keV, while the {delta} of CB3 and fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of that of fibroglandular tissue, the {mu} of fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material better approximated the fibroglandular tissue. While the {delta} of BR10 and adipose tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of

  2. Renal stones on portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT: does intravenous contrast interfere with detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dym, R. Joshua; Duncan, Dameon R.; Spektor, Michael; Cohen, Hillel W.; Scheinfeld, Meir H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the sensitivity of portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT for the detection of renal stones. Methods This retrospective study included 97 CT examinations of the abdomen without and with intravenous contrast, including 85 (87.6%) examinations with at least one renal stone on the “gold standard” noncontrast images, as scored by a single radiologist. Three other radiologists each independently reviewed only the contrast-enhanced images from all 97 examinations and recorded all renal stones. Reviewer sensitivity for stones was categorized by stone diameter. Reviewer sensitivity and specificity for stone disease were also calculated on a per-kidney basis. Results The 97 cases included a total of 238 stones ≥1 mm, with a mean (±SD) of 1.2 ± 1.9 stones per kidney and a stone diameter of 3.5 ± 3.0 mm. Pooling data for the three reviewers, sensitivity for all stones was 81%; sensitivity for stones ≥2, ≥3, ≥4, and ≥5 mm was 88%, 95%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. Sensitivity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 94% when considering all stones; when considering only stones ≥2, ≥3, and ≥4 mm, sensitivity was 96%, 99%, and 100%, respectively. Specificity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 98% overall, 99% when considering only stones ≥2 mm, and 100% when considering only stones ≥3 mm. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced CT is highly sensitive for the detection of renal stones ≥3 mm in diameter and less sensitive for smaller stones. In cases where the clinical diagnosis is uncertain and performance of a CT examination is being contemplated, intravenous contrast utilization would allow assessment for stone disease while also optimizing evaluation for other conditions. PMID:24504541

  3. Error analysis of cine phase contrast MRI velocity measurements used for strain calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elisabeth R; Morrow, Duane A; Felmlee, Joel P; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-02

    Cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI offers unique insight into localized skeletal muscle behavior by providing the ability to quantify muscle strain distribution during cyclic motion. Muscle strain is obtained by temporally integrating and spatially differentiating CPC-encoded velocity. The aim of this study was to quantify CPC measurement accuracy and precision and to describe error propagation into displacement and strain. Using an MRI-compatible jig to move a B-gel phantom within a 1.5 T MRI bore, CPC-encoded velocities were collected. The three orthogonal encoding gradients (through plane, frequency, and phase) were evaluated independently in post-processing. Two systematic error types were corrected: eddy current-induced bias and calibration-type error. Measurement accuracy and precision were quantified before and after removal of systematic error. Through plane- and frequency-encoded data accuracy were within 0.4 mm/s after removal of systematic error - a 70% improvement over the raw data. Corrected phase-encoded data accuracy was within 1.3 mm/s. Measured random error was between 1 to 1.4 mm/s, which followed the theoretical prediction. Propagation of random measurement error into displacement and strain was found to depend on the number of tracked time segments, time segment duration, mesh size, and dimensional order. To verify this, theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally calculated displacement and strain error. For the parameters tested, experimental and theoretical results aligned well. Random strain error approximately halved with a two-fold mesh size increase, as predicted. Displacement and strain accuracy were within 2.6 mm and 3.3%, respectively. These results can be used to predict the accuracy and precision of displacement and strain in user-specific applications.

  4. Design of a sensitive grating-based phase contrast mammography prototype (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda Clavijo, Carolina; Wang, Zhentian; Köhler, Thomas; van Stevendaal, Udo; Martens, Gerhard; Bartels, Matthias; Villanueva-Perez, Pablo; Roessl, Ewald; Stampanoni, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Grating-based phase contrast mammography can help facilitate breast cancer diagnosis, as several research works have demonstrated. To translate this technique to the clinics, it has to be adapted to cover a large field of view within a limited exposure time and with a clinically acceptable radiation dose. This indicates that a straightforward approach would be to install a grating interferometer (GI) into a commercial mammography device. We developed a wave propagation based optimization method to select the most convenient GI designs in terms of phase and dark-field sensitivities for the Philips Microdose Mammography (PMM) setup. The phase sensitivity was defined as the minimum detectable breast tissue electron density gradient, whereas the dark-field sensitivity was defined as its corresponding signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). To be able to derive sample-dependent sensitivity metrics, a visibility reduction model for breast tissue was formulated, based on previous research works on the dark-field signal and utilizing available Ultra-Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS) data and the outcomes of measurements on formalin-fixed breast tissue specimens carried out in tube-based grating interferometers. The results of this optimization indicate the optimal scenarios for each metric are different and fundamentally depend on the noise behavior of the signals and the visibility reduction trend with respect to the system autocorrelation length. In addition, since the inter-grating distance is constrained by the space available between the breast support and the detector, the best way we have to improve sensitivity is to count on a small G2 pitch.

  5. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Dan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beck, Thomas J [Quantum Medical Metrics, 1450 South Rolling Road, Baltimore, MD 21227 (United States); Carrino, John A [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Bingham, Clifton O, E-mail: stutman@pha.jhu.edu [Divisions of Rheumatology and Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 {mu}m resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 {mu}m period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at {approx}25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a {approx}2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  6. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutman, Dan; Beck, Thomas J.; Carrino, John A.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2011-09-01

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 µm resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 µm period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at ~25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a ~2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  7. X-ray phase-contrast tomography of renal ischemia-reperfusion damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Velroyen

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate microstructural changes occurring in unilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a murine animal model using synchrotron radiation.The effects of renal ischemia-reperfusion were investigated in a murine animal model of unilateral ischemia. Kidney samples were harvested on day 18. Grating-Based Phase-Contrast Imaging (GB-PCI of the paraffin-embedded kidney samples was performed at a Synchrotron Radiation Facility (beam energy of 19 keV. To obtain phase information, a two-grating Talbot interferometer was used applying the phase stepping technique. The imaging system provided an effective pixel size of 7.5 µm. The resulting attenuation and differential phase projections were tomographically reconstructed using filtered back-projection. Semi-automated segmentation and volumetry and correlation to histopathology were performed.GB-PCI provided good discrimination of the cortex, outer and inner medulla in non-ischemic control kidneys. Post-ischemic kidneys showed a reduced compartmental differentiation, particularly of the outer stripe of the outer medulla, which could not be differentiated from the inner stripe. Compared to the contralateral kidney, after ischemia a volume loss was detected, while the inner medulla mainly retained its volume (ratio 0.94. Post-ischemic kidneys exhibited severe tissue damage as evidenced by tubular atrophy and dilatation, moderate inflammatory infiltration, loss of brush borders and tubular protein cylinders.In conclusion GB-PCI with synchrotron radiation allows for non-destructive microstructural assessment of parenchymal kidney disease and vessel architecture. If translation to lab-based approaches generates sufficient density resolution, and with a time-optimized image analysis protocol, GB-PCI may ultimately serve as a non-invasive, non-enhanced alternative for imaging of pathological changes of the kidney.

  8. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, Taiwan 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Imaging Research Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3440 S. Dearborn Street, E1-116, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  9. Ascending colonic variceal bleeding: utility of phase-contrast MR portography in diagnosis and follow-up after treatment with TIPS and variceal embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallier, P.; Motamedi, J.P.; Oddo, F.; Padovani, B. [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, Hopital Archet II, 06 - Nice (France); Demuth, N.; Caroli-Bosc, F.X. [Department of Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, Hopital Archet II, 06 - Nice (France)

    2000-08-01

    The authors describe the discovery of ascending colonic variceal veins via celiomesenteric diagnostic angiography following a bout of melena in a 44-year-old woman. Magnetic resonance imaging, including phase-contrast MR venography, allowed visualization of the portal and systemic veins immediately after the initial angiograms. The hemorrhagic episode did not resolve until after transjugular intrahepatic shunt insertion and selective variceal embolization through the shunt. At 1 week-, 3 months-, and 6 months post treatment, follow-up MR venography no longer revealed the presence of colonic varices. Colonoscopy at 6 months was normal and the patient did not have any further episodes of bleeding until a liver transplantation was performed after 9 months. (orig.)

  10. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance.

  11. 4D Lung Reconstruction with Phase Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyksborg, Mark; Paulsen, Rasmus; Brink, Carsten;

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates and demonstrates a 4D lung CT reconstruction/registration method which results in a complete volumetric model of the lung that deforms according to a respiratory motion field. The motion field is estimated iteratively between all available slice samples and a reference vol...... than using an optimization which does not correct for phase errors. Knowing how the lung and any tumors located within the lung deforms is relevant in planning the treatment of lung cancer.......This paper investigates and demonstrates a 4D lung CT reconstruction/registration method which results in a complete volumetric model of the lung that deforms according to a respiratory motion field. The motion field is estimated iteratively between all available slice samples and a reference...

  12. 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Andrew J.; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2014-11-01

    An overview of the theory of 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography is given along with a review of the current state of the art, covering both positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). By viewing 4D image reconstruction as a matter of either linear or non-linear parameter estimation for a set of spatiotemporal functions chosen to approximately represent the radiotracer distribution, the areas of so-called ‘fully 4D’ image reconstruction and ‘direct kinetic parameter estimation’ are unified within a common framework. Many choices of linear and non-linear parameterization of these functions are considered (including the important case where the parameters have direct biological meaning), along with a review of the algorithms which are able to estimate these often non-linear parameters from emission tomography data. The other crucial components to image reconstruction (the objective function, the system model and the raw data format) are also covered, but in less detail due to the relatively straightforward extension from their corresponding components in conventional 3D image reconstruction. The key unifying concept is that maximum likelihood or maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of either linear or non-linear model parameters can be achieved in image space after carrying out a conventional expectation maximization (EM) update of the dynamic image series, using a Kullback-Leibler distance metric (comparing the modeled image values with the EM image values), to optimize the desired parameters. For MAP, an image-space penalty for regularization purposes is required. The benefits of 4D and direct reconstruction reported in the literature are reviewed, and furthermore demonstrated with simple simulation examples. It is clear that the future of reconstructing dynamic or functional emission tomography images, which often exhibit high levels of spatially correlated noise, should ideally exploit these 4D

  13. From Femtochemistry to 4D Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Nobel Prize for Femtochemistry,the field is overviewed with several classic examples and the new extension to Femtobiology. The revolutionary breakthrough in 4D electron microscopy is briefly introduced here and a new age to structural dynamics is rising on the horizon,an exciting time and a great opportunity for China and for the world.

  14. Detectability index of differential phase contrast CT compared with conventional CT: a preliminary channelized Hotelling observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2013-03-01

    Under the framework of model observer with signal and background exactly known (SKE/BKE), we investigate the detectability of differential phase contrast CT compared with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT. Using the channelized Hotelling observer and the radially symmetric difference-of-Gaussians channel template , we investigate the detectability index and its variation over the dimension of object and detector cells. The preliminary data show that the differential phase contrast CT outperforms the conventional attenuation-based CT significantly in the detectability index while both the object to be detected and the cell of detector used for data acquisition are relatively small. However, the differential phase contrast CT's dominance in the detectability index diminishes with increasing dimension of either object or detector cell, and virtually disappears while the dimension of object or detector cell approaches a threshold, respectively. It is hoped that the preliminary data reported in this paper may provide insightful understanding of the differential phase contrast CT's characteristic in the detectability index and its comparison with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT.

  15. Experimental Realisation of High-sensitivity Laboratory X-ray Grating-based Phase-contrast Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Velroyen, Astrid; Marschner, Mathias; Hipp, Alexander; Meiser, Jan; Koch, Frieder; Schröter, Tobias; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-04-04

    The possibility to perform high-sensitivity X-ray phase-contrast imaging with laboratory grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) setups is of great interest for a broad range of high-resolution biomedical applications. However, achieving high sensitivity with laboratory gbPC-CT setups still poses a challenge because several factors such as the reduced flux, the polychromaticity of the spectrum, and the limited coherence of the X-ray source reduce the performance of laboratory gbPC-CT in comparison to gbPC-CT at synchrotron facilities. In this work, we present our laboratory X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry setup operating at 40 kVp and describe how we achieve the high sensitivity yet unrivalled by any other laboratory X-ray phase-contrast technique. We provide the angular sensitivity expressed via the minimum resolvable refraction angle both in theory and experiment, and compare our data with other differential phase-contrast setups. Furthermore, we show that the good stability of our high-sensitivity setup allows for tomographic scans, by which even the electron density can be retrieved quantitatively as has been demonstrated in several preclinical studies.

  16. Estimation of age based on tooth cementum annulations: A comparative study using light, polarized, and phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Prabhpreet; Astekar, Madhusudan; Singh, Jappreet; Arora, Karandeep Singh; Bhalla, Gagandeep

    2015-01-01

    The identification of living or deceased persons using unique traits and characteristics of the teeth and jaws is a cornerstone of forensic science. Teeth have been used to estimate age both in the young and old, as well as in the living and dead. Gradual structural changes in teeth throughout life are the basis for age estimation. Tooth cementum annulation (TCA) is a microscopic method for the determination of an individual's age based on the analysis of incremental lines of cementum. To compare ages estimated using incremental lines of cementum as visualized by bright field microscopy, polarized microscopy, and phase contrast microscopy with the actual age of subject and to determine accuracy and feasibility of the method used. Cementum annulations of 60 permanent teeth were analyzed after longitudinal ground sections were made in the mesiodistal plane. The incremental lines were counted manually using a light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy. Ages were estimated and then compared with the actual age of individual. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's t-test, the Pearson product-moment corre (PPMCC) and regression analysis were performed. PPMCC value r = 0.347, 0.542 and 0.989 were obtained using light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy methods respectively. It was concluded that incremental lines of cementum were most clearly visible under a phase contrast microscope, followed by a polarized microscope, and then a light microscope when used for age estimation.

  17. Matched filtering Generalized Phase Contrast using binary phase for dynamic spot- and line patterns in biophotonics and structured lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas; Palima, Darwin

    2013-01-01

    as a combination of Generalized Phase Contrast and phase-only correlation. Such an analysis makes it convenient to optimize an mGPC system for different setup conditions. Results showing binary-only phase generation of dynamic spot arrays and line patterns are presented. © 201 Optical Society of America...

  18. In vivo x-ray phase contrast analyzer-based imaging for longitudinal osteoarthritis studies in guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coan, Paola [Faculty of Medicine and Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Wagner, Andreas; Mollenhauer, Juergen [Department of Orthopaedics of the University of Jena, Rudolf-Elle-Hospital Eisenberg (Germany); Bravin, Alberto; Diemoz, Paul C; Keyrilaeinen, Jani, E-mail: Paola.Coan@physik.uni-muenchen.d [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble (France)

    2010-12-21

    Over the last two decades phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques have been extensively studied for applications in the biomedical field. Published results demonstrate the high capability of these imaging modalities of improving the image contrast of biological samples with respect to standard absorption-based radiography and routinely used clinical imaging techniques. A clear depiction of the anatomic structures and a more accurate disease diagnosis may be provided by using radiation doses comparable to or lower than those used in current clinical methods. In the literature many works show images of phantoms and excised biological samples proving the high sensitivity of the phase contrast imaging methods for in vitro investigations. In this scenario, the applications of the so-called analyzer-based x-ray imaging (ABI) phase contrast technique are particularly noteworthy. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo x-ray ABI phase contrast imaging for biomedical applications and in particular with respect to joint anatomic depiction and osteoarthritis detection. ABI in planar and tomographic modes was performed in vivo on articular joints of guinea pigs in order to investigate the animals with respect to osteoarthritis by using highly monochromatic x-rays of 52 keV and a low noise detector with a pixel size of 47 x 47 {mu}m{sup 2}. Images give strong evidence of the ability of ABI in depicting both anatomic structures in complex systems as living organisms and all known signs of osteoarthritis with high contrast, high spatial resolution and with an acceptable radiation dose. This paper presents the first proof of principle study of in vivo application of ABI. The technical challenges encountered when imaging an animal in vivo are discussed. This experimental study is an important step toward the study of clinical applications of phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques.

  19. Investigation of the effect of tube voltage and imaging geometry on phase contrast imaging for a micro-CT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui Jianbao; Zou Jing; Rong Junyan [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Key Lab for Biomedical Informatics and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Hu Zhanli [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Key Lab for Biomedical Informatics and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Zhang Qiyang; Zheng Hairong [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Key Lab for Biomedical Informatics and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Xia Dan, E-mail: dan.xia@siat.ac.cn [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Key Lab for Biomedical Informatics and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China)

    2012-03-21

    Based upon a bench-top micro-CT system, propagation-based phase-contrast imaging has been investigated using insects and a thin plastic sheet. The system mainly includes a micro-focus source with focal spot size of 13-20 {mu}m and a cooled X-ray CCD detector with pixel size of 24 {mu}m. The edge-enhancement effect can be found clearly in the acquired images. With a 0.5 mm thickness plastic edge phantom, the effects of X-ray tube voltage and imaging geometry on the phase-contrast imaging were investigated, and quantitative index, edge-enhancement index (EEI), were also calculated. In our study, an interesting phenomenon was observed that the phase-contrast effect becomes more pronounced as the tube voltage increases from 20 kVp to 90 kVp. Further investigation indicates that smaller focal spot size resulting from the reduction of tube current at higher tube voltage, has caused the unexpected phenomenon. Inferred from our results, phase-contrast effect is insensitive to the tube voltage in the range of 20-90 kVp (widely used in medical diagnosis); however, it is sensitive to the focal spot size. In addition, for the investigation of the effect of imaging geometry, an optimal geometric magnification range of 2.5-4.5 is suggested to get a good phase-contrast imaging for a micro-CT system with source-to-detector distance of 720 mm.

  20. Investigation of the effect of tube voltage and imaging geometry on phase contrast imaging for a micro-CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Jianbao; Zou, Jing; Rong, Junyan; Hu, Zhanli; Zhang, Qiyang; Zheng, Hairong; Xia, Dan

    2012-03-01

    Based upon a bench-top micro-CT system, propagation-based phase-contrast imaging has been investigated using insects and a thin plastic sheet. The system mainly includes a micro-focus source with focal spot size of 13-20 μm and a cooled X-ray CCD detector with pixel size of 24 μm. The edge-enhancement effect can be found clearly in the acquired images. With a 0.5 mm thickness plastic edge phantom, the effects of X-ray tube voltage and imaging geometry on the phase-contrast imaging were investigated, and quantitative index, edge-enhancement index (EEI), were also calculated. In our study, an interesting phenomenon was observed that the phase-contrast effect becomes more pronounced as the tube voltage increases from 20 kVp to 90 kVp. Further investigation indicates that smaller focal spot size resulting from the reduction of tube current at higher tube voltage, has caused the unexpected phenomenon. Inferred from our results, phase-contrast effect is insensitive to the tube voltage in the range of 20-90 kVp (widely used in medical diagnosis); however, it is sensitive to the focal spot size. In addition, for the investigation of the effect of imaging geometry, an optimal geometric magnification range of 2.5-4.5 is suggested to get a good phase-contrast imaging for a micro-CT system with source-to-detector distance of 720 mm.

  1. In vivo x-ray phase contrast analyzer-based imaging for longitudinal osteoarthritis studies in guinea pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Paola; Wagner, Andreas; Bravin, Alberto; Diemoz, Paul C.; Keyriläinen, Jani; Mollenhauer, Juergen

    2010-12-01

    Over the last two decades phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques have been extensively studied for applications in the biomedical field. Published results demonstrate the high capability of these imaging modalities of improving the image contrast of biological samples with respect to standard absorption-based radiography and routinely used clinical imaging techniques. A clear depiction of the anatomic structures and a more accurate disease diagnosis may be provided by using radiation doses comparable to or lower than those used in current clinical methods. In the literature many works show images of phantoms and excised biological samples proving the high sensitivity of the phase contrast imaging methods for in vitro investigations. In this scenario, the applications of the so-called analyzer-based x-ray imaging (ABI) phase contrast technique are particularly noteworthy. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo x-ray ABI phase contrast imaging for biomedical applications and in particular with respect to joint anatomic depiction and osteoarthritis detection. ABI in planar and tomographic modes was performed in vivo on articular joints of guinea pigs in order to investigate the animals with respect to osteoarthritis by using highly monochromatic x-rays of 52 keV and a low noise detector with a pixel size of 47 × 47 µm2. Images give strong evidence of the ability of ABI in depicting both anatomic structures in complex systems as living organisms and all known signs of osteoarthritis with high contrast, high spatial resolution and with an acceptable radiation dose. This paper presents the first proof of principle study of in vivo application of ABI. The technical challenges encountered when imaging an animal in vivo are discussed. This experimental study is an important step toward the study of clinical applications of phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques.

  2. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD

  3. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N.; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-07-01

    Multiple-image radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging method, which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to CT

  4. Practical aspects of Boersch phase contrast electron microscopy of biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany); Muzik, Heiko; Vieker, Henning; Turchanin, Andrey; Beyer, Andre; Goelzhaeuser, Armin [University of Bielefeld, Physics of Supramolecular Systems and Surfaces, Universitaetsstr. 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Lacher, Manfred; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Schmitz, Sam; Holik, Peter [Caesar Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, D-53175 Bonn (Germany); Kuehlbrandt, Werner [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany); Rhinow, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.rhinow@biophys.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Implementation of physical phase plates into transmission electron microscopes to achieve in-focus contrast for ice-embedded biological specimens poses several technological challenges. During the last decade several phase plates designs have been introduced and tested for electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), including thin film (Zernike) phase plates and electrostatic devices. Boersch phase plates (BPPs) are electrostatic einzel lenses shifting the phase of the unscattered beam by an arbitrary angle. Adjusting the phase shift to 90 Degree-Sign achieves the maximum contrast transfer for phase objects such as biomolecules. Recently, we reported the implementation of a BPP into a dedicated phase contrast aberration-corrected electron microscope (PACEM) and demonstrated its use to generate in-focus contrast of frozen-hydrated specimens. However, a number of obstacles need to be overcome before BPPs can be used routinely, mostly related to the phase plate devices themselves. CryoEM with a physical phase plate is affected by electrostatic charging, obliteration of low spatial frequencies, and mechanical drift. Furthermore, BPPs introduce single sideband contrast (SSB), due to the obstruction of Friedel mates in the diffraction pattern. In this study we address the technical obstacles in detail and show how they may be overcome. We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to identify contaminants responsible for electrostatic charging, which occurs with most phase plates. We demonstrate that obstruction of low-resolution features is significantly reduced by lowering the acceleration voltage of the microscope. Finally, we present computational approaches to correct BPP images for SSB contrast and to compensate for mechanical drift of the BPP. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Various obstacles need to be overcome before Boersch phase plates can be used routinely. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technical problems include

  5. Spectroscopic evidence against Rh 4d itinerant ferromagnetism in CeRh3B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumaran, E. V.; Kaindl, G.; Laubschat, C.; Krone, W.; Wortmann, G.

    1985-03-01

    Valence-band photoemission and IIII-edge x-ray absorption studies were performed on RRh3B2 (R = La, Ce, and Pr) compounds in order to explore the origin of the anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature of CeRh3B2. From the low density of Rh 4d states at EF and the approximate trivalency of Ce, itinerant magnetism in the Rh 4d band can be excluded. Instead, the magnetism is proposed to originate from Ce moments, enhanced by 4f hybridization with Rh d orbitals.

  6. Cinema 4D R14 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This book is written in a Cookbook style with short recipes designed to effectively teach tools in the minimum amount of time. Each recipe hits on a topic that can be combined or incorporated with other recipes to give you the building blocks you need to start making great designs with Cinema 4D. Rather than demonstrating how to make a few specific and extensive projects, the recipes create a solid base of knowledge to help the reader understand the tools available to foster their own creativity.This book is for professional artists working in architecture, design, production, or games and wan

  7. Motion4D-library extended

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    The new version of the Motion4D-library now also includes the integration of a Sachs basis and the Jacobi equation to determine gravitational lensing of pointlike sources for arbitrary spacetimes.New version program summaryProgram title: Motion4D-libraryCatalogue identifier: AEEX_v3_0Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEX_v3_0.htmlProgram obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. IrelandLicensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.htmlNo. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 219 441No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 968 223Distribution format: tar.gzProgramming language: C++Computer: All platforms with a C++ compilerOperating system: Linux, WindowsRAM: 61 MbytesClassification: 1.5External routines: Gnu Scientic Library (GSL) (http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/)Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEX_v2_0Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 703Does the new version supersede the previous version?: YesNature of problem: Solve geodesic equation, parallel and Fermi-Walker transport in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Determine gravitational lensing by integration of Jacobi equation and parallel transport of Sachs basis.Solution method: Integration of ordinary differential equations.Reasons for new version: The main novelty of the current version is the extension to integrate the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. In combination, the change of the cross section of a light bundle and thus the gravitational lensing effect of a spacetime can be determined. Furthermore, we have implemented several new metrics.Summary of revisions: The main novelty of the current version is the integration of the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. The corresponding set of equations readd2xμdλ2=-Γρ

  8. 4D geomorphological evolution of intertropical islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastier, Anne-Morwenn; Bezos, Antoine; Husson, Laurent; Pedoja, Kevin; Arias, Camilo; Elliot, Mary; Lacroix, Pascal; Imran, Andi Muhammad

    2017-04-01

    Coral reef terraces record joint variations of sea level and surface elevation. U/Th ratings on corals along with topographic/bathymetric profiles and eustatic reconstitutions allow to locally determine the vertical rate of ground motion, while numerical modelling of reef sequences allows to unravel the processes controlling the architecture of sequences, and high-resolution DEMs facilitates the detailed mapping of the sequences of reef terraces. Alltogether, these methods allow to extrapolate the local vertical rates towards an unprecedented resolution for 4D kinematics. We applied our method to uplifting islands of the tectonically active Buton Archipelago, SE Sulawesi, Indonesia. The area undergoes a general uplift revealed by the ubiquitous occurrence of uplifted and folded reef sequences. We dated some 40 samples using U/Th, acquired sonar and dGPS profiles, and constructed high-res DEMs (Pleiades). Local vertical rates (from 0.2 to 0.28 mm/yr) were determined. Detailed geomorphological mapping of the lateral variations of the terraces are converted into time and space variations of uplift rates. Extrapolating the higher, undated terraces permits to reconstruct the overall 4D geomorphology history over the last Ma. In turns, these results give a unique view on the structural kinematics.

  9. Supercurrent anomalies in 4d SCFTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2017-07-01

    We use holographic renormalization of minimal N=2 gauged supergravity in order to derive the general form of the quantum Ward identities for 3d N=2 and 4d N=1 superconformal theories on general curved backgrounds, including an arbitrary fermionic source for the supercurrent. The Ward identities for 4d N=1 theories contain both bosonic and fermionic global anomalies, which we determine explicitly up to quadratic order in the supercurrent source. The Ward identities we derive apply to any superconformal theory, independently of whether it admits a holographic dual, except for the specific values of the a and c anomaly coefficients, which are equal due to our starting point of a two-derivative bulk supergravity theory. We show that the fermionic anomalies lead to an anomalous transformation of the supercurrent under rigid supersymmetry on backgrounds admitting Killing spinors, even if all superconformal anomalies are numerically zero on such backgrounds. The anomalous transformation of the supercurrent under rigid supersymmetry leads to an obstruction to the Q-exactness of the stress tensor in supersymmetric vacua, and may have implications for the applicability of localization techniques. We use this obstruction to the Q-exactness of the stress tensor, together with the Ward identities, in order to determine the general form of the stress tensor and R-current one-point functions in supersymmetric vacua, which allows us to obtain general expressions for the supersymmetric Casimir charges and partition function.

  10. Active origami by 4D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qi; Dunn, Conner K.; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in three dimensional (3D) printing technology that allow multiple materials to be printed within each layer enable the creation of materials and components with precisely controlled heterogeneous microstructures. In addition, active materials, such as shape memory polymers, can be printed to create an active microstructure within a solid. These active materials can subsequently be activated in a controlled manner to change the shape or configuration of the solid in response to an environmental stimulus. This has been termed 4D printing, with the 4th dimension being the time-dependent shape change after the printing. In this paper, we advance the 4D printing concept to the design and fabrication of active origami, where a flat sheet automatically folds into a complicated 3D component. Here we print active composites with shape memory polymer fibers precisely printed in an elastomeric matrix and use them as intelligent active hinges to enable origami folding patterns. We develop a theoretical model to provide guidance in selecting design parameters such as fiber dimensions, hinge length, and programming strains and temperature. Using the model, we design and fabricate several active origami components that assemble from flat polymer sheets, including a box, a pyramid, and two origami airplanes. In addition, we directly print a 3D box with active composite hinges and program it to assume a temporary flat shape that subsequently recovers to the 3D box shape on demand.

  11. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  12. Basic system design of a broad-band real-time phase contrast wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.

    2005-08-01

    The most common wavefront sensor for real-time use in high-order adaptive optics systems is the Shack-Hartmann, in part because it is sensitive to a broad optical band. An alternative possibility is based on Zernike's phase contrast technique. Though quite sensitive in principle, at least for monochromatic light, there had been no simple way to obtain the broadband performance needed for competitive sensitivity in an actual adaptive optics system. Recently, we proposed a general achromatization scheme that relies upon the innate π/2 phase shift between the transmitted and reflected beams in a beam splitter. Here, a more detailed study of this broad-band phase contrast wavefront sensor is presented, along with some practical issues concerning component tolerances. These results offer encouraging indications that broad-wavelength-band implementations will be feasible in practice.

  13. Soft tissue small avascular tumor imaging with x-ray phase-contrast micro-CT in-line holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterets, Yakov; Gureyev, Tim; Stevenson, Andrew; Pogany, Andrew; Wilkins, Steve; Kincaid, Russell; Ye, Hongwei; Vogelsang, Levon; Lipson, Edward; Coman, Ioana; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Krol, Andrzej

    2008-03-01

    To assess the feasibility of small soft tissue avascular tumor micro-CT imaging with x-ray phase-contrast in-line holography, we have studied micro-CT imaging with in-line geometry of small spheroidal avascular tumor models with quiescent cell core (< 250 μm) and various distributions of the proliferating cell density (PCD) forming the outer shell. We have simulated imaging with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source with a Mo target. We observe phase-contrast enhancement of the tumor boundaries in the reconstructed transaxial images, resulting in improved detection of small soft tissue tumors, providing that the PCD density gradient is sufficiently large.

  14. Progress in biomedical application of phase-contrast x-ray imaging and fluorescent x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu, Jin; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Yoneyama, Akio; Hirai, Yasuharu; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Minami, Manabu; Kose, Katsumi; Akatsuka, Takao

    2006-08-01

    X-ray CT system with phase-contrast and fluorescent techniques are being developed for biomedical researches. We have applied these techniques for in-vivo and ex-vivo imaging. The phase-contrast x-ray CT enables to reveal the detailed morphological information of cancer lesion, and image quality of ex-vivo specimen was excellent comparing to 4.74T micro-MRI. Fluorescent x-ray CT could depict the functional information with high spatial resolution, and its image quality was almost the same as autoradiogram. Improvement of imaging system with much high-speed data acquisition will enable to use these techniques for new biomedical researches.

  15. Application of X-ray phase-contrast tomography in quantative studies of heat induced structural changes in meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miklos, R.; Nielsen, M. S.; Einarsdottir, Hildur;

    2013-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography is increasingly used in the studies of food structure. This paper describes the perspectives of use of phase contrast computed tomography in studies of heat induced structural changes in meat. From the data it was possible to obtain reconstructed images of the sample str...... structure for visualization and qualitative studies of the sample structure. Further data segmentation allowed structural changes to be quantified.......X-ray computed tomography is increasingly used in the studies of food structure. This paper describes the perspectives of use of phase contrast computed tomography in studies of heat induced structural changes in meat. From the data it was possible to obtain reconstructed images of the sample...

  16. Phase contrast without phase plates and phase rings--optical solutions for improved imaging of phase structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Timm; Piper, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    Using the optical methods described, phase specimens can be observed with a modified light microscope in enhanced clarity, purified from typical artifacts which are apparent in standard phase contrast illumination. In particular, haloing and shade-off are absent, lateral and vertical resolution are maximized and the image quality remains constant even in problematic preparations which cannot be well examined in normal phase contrast, such as specimens beyond a critical thickness or covered by obliquely situated cover slips. The background brightness and thus the range of contrast can be continuously modulated and specimens can be illuminated in concentric-peripheral, axial or paraxial light. Additional contrast effects can be achieved by spectral color separation. Normal glass or mirror lenses can be used; they do not need to be fitted with a phase plate or a phase ring. The methods described should be of general interest for all disciplines using phase microscopy.

  17. High-resolution short-exposure small-animal laboratory x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Vågberg, William; Yaroshenko, Andre; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray computed tomography of small animals and their organs is an essential tool in basic and preclinical biomedical research. In both phase-contrast and absorption tomography high spatial resolution and short exposure times are of key importance. However, the observable spatial resolutions and achievable exposure times are presently limited by system parameters rather than more fundamental constraints like, e.g., dose. Here we demonstrate laboratory tomography with few-ten μm spatial resolution and few-minute exposure time at an acceptable dose for small-animal imaging, both with absorption contrast and phase contrast. The method relies on a magnifying imaging scheme in combination with a high-power small-spot liquid-metal-jet electron-impact source. The tomographic imaging is demonstrated on intact mouse, phantoms and excised lungs, both healthy and with pulmonary emphysema.

  18. Soft tissue small avascular tumor imaging with x-ray phase-contrast micro-CT in-line holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterets, Yakov; Gureyev, Tim; Stevenson, Andrew; Pogany, Andrew; Wilkins, Steve; Kincaid, Russell; Ye, Hongwei; Vogelsang, Levon; Lipson, Edward; Coman, Ioana; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of small soft tissue avascular tumor micro-CT imaging with x-ray phase-contrast in-line holography, we have studied micro-CT imaging with in-line geometry of small spheroidal avascular tumor models with quiescent cell core (< 250 μm) and various distributions of the proliferating cell density (PCD) forming the outer shell. We have simulated imaging with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source with a Mo target. We observe phase-contrast enhancement of the tumor boundaries in the reconstructed transaxial images, resulting in improved detection of small soft tissue tumors, providing that the PCD density gradient is sufficiently large. PMID:20052303

  19. High spatial resolution hard X-ray microscope using X-ray refractive lens and phase contrast imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kohmura, Y; Takeuchi, A; Takano, H; Suzuki, Y; Ishikawa, T; Ohigashi, T; Yokosuka, H

    2001-01-01

    A high spatial resolution X-ray microscope was constructed using an X-ray refractive lens as an objective. The spatial resolution was tested using 18 keV X-ray. A 0.4 mu m line and 0.4 mu m space tantalum test pattern was successfully resolved. Using the similar setup with the addition of a phase plate, a Zernike type phase-contrast microscopy experiment was carried out for the phase retrieval of the samples. Two-dimensional phase-contrast images were successfully taken for the first time in the hard X-ray region. Images of a gold mesh sample were analyzed and the validity of this method was indicated. An improvement of the lens, however, is required for the precise phase retrieval of the samples.

  20. A LabVIEW based user-friendly X-ray phase-contrast imaging system software platform

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shenghao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Wu, Zhao; Marcelli, Augusto; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide greatly improved contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging for weakly absorbing samples, such as biological soft tissues and fibre composites. In this manuscript, we introduce an easy and fast way to develop a user-friendly system software platform dedicated for the newly built grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China. Unified management and control upon 21 motorized positioning stages, an ultra-precision piezoelectric translation stage and an X-ray tube are achieved with this platform, the software also covers automatic image acquisition with a flat panel detector for phase-stepping scanning. Moreover, data post-processing module for signals retrieval and other custom features could be realized on it. With a seamless integration of all the necessary functions into an organism, this software platform greatly facilitate activity of the users during experimen...

  1. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part II - 4D treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-12-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle - an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part II – 4D Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle – an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems. PMID:22796324

  3. Method for automatization of the alignment of a laboratory based x-ray phase contrast edge illumination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, T P; Endrizzi, M; Ignatyev, K; Hagen, C K; Munro, P R T; Speller, R D; Olivo, A

    2013-08-01

    Here we present a general alignment algorithm for an edge illumination x-ray phase contrast imaging system, which is used with the laboratory systems developed at UCL. It has the flexibility to be used with all current mask designs, and could also be applied to future synchrotron based systems. The algorithm has proved to be robust experimentally, and can be used for the automatization of future commercial systems through automatic alignment and alignment correction.

  4. Simulation study of spatial resolution in phase-contrast X-ray imaging with Takagi-Taupin equation

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, I

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate attainable spatial resolution of phase-contrast X-ray imaging using an LLL X-ray interferometer with a thin crystal wafer, a computer simulation study with Takagi-Taupin equation was performed. Modulation transfer function of the wafer for X-ray phase was evaluated. For a polyester film whose thickness is 0.1 mm, it was concluded that the spatial resolution can be improved up to 3 mu m by thinning the wafer, under our experimental condition.

  5. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allner, S.; Koehler, T.; Fehringer, A.; Birnbacher, L.; Willner, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Noël, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields.

  6. Novel X-ray phase-contrast tomography method for quantitative studies of heat induced structural changes in meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miklos, Rikke; Nielsen, Mikkel Schou; Einarsdottir, Hildur;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of X-ray phase-contrast tomography combined with 3D image segmentation to investigate the heat induced structural changes in meat. The measurements were performed at the Swiss synchrotron radiation light source using a grating interferometric se...... in a qualitative and quantitative manner without prior sample preparation as isolation of single muscle components, calibration or histology....

  7. Phase-contrast computed tomography for quantification of structural changes in lungs of asthma mouse models of different severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullin, Christian, E-mail: christian.dullin@med.uni-goettingen.de [University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany); Larsson, Emanuel [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, Basovizza (Trieste) 34149 (Italy); University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Tromba, Giuliana [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, Basovizza (Trieste) 34149 (Italy); Markus, Andrea M. [University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany); Alves, Frauke [University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany); University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany); Max Planck Institut for Experimental Medicine, Hermann-Rein-Strasse 3, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany)

    2015-06-17

    Synchrotron inline phase-contrast computed tomography in combination with single-distance phase retrieval enables quantification of morphological alterations in lungs of mice with mild and severe experimental allergic airways disease in comparison with healthy controls. Lung imaging in mouse disease models is crucial for the assessment of the severity of airway disease but remains challenging due to the small size and the high porosity of the organ. Synchrotron inline free-propagation phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) with its intrinsic high soft-tissue contrast provides the necessary sensitivity and spatial resolution to analyse the mouse lung structure in great detail. Here, this technique has been applied in combination with single-distance phase retrieval to quantify alterations of the lung structure in experimental asthma mouse models of different severity. In order to mimic an in vivo situation as close as possible, the lungs were inflated with air at a constant physiological pressure. Entire mice were embedded in agarose gel and imaged using inline free-propagation phase-contrast CT at the SYRMEP beamline (Synchrotron Light Source, ‘Elettra’, Trieste, Italy). The quantification of the obtained phase-contrast CT data sets revealed an increasing lung soft-tissue content in mice correlating with the degree of the severity of experimental allergic airways disease. In this way, it was possible to successfully discriminate between healthy controls and mice with either mild or severe allergic airway disease. It is believed that this approach may have the potential to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies that target airway remodelling processes in asthma.

  8. Twin-beams digital holography for 3D tracking and quantitative phase-contrast microscopy in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Finizio, Andrea; Paturzo, Melania; Miccio, Lisa; Ferraro, Pietro

    2011-12-05

    We report on a compact twin-beam interferometer that can be adopted as a flexible diagnostic tool in microfluidic platforms with twofold functionality. The novel configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and, at same time, can simultaneously furnish Quantitative Phase-contrast maps of tracked micro-objects by interference microscopy, without changing the configuration. Experimental demonstration is given on for in vitro cells in a microfluidic environment.

  9. Instability of Solution of Phase Retrieval in Direct Diffraction Phase-Contrast Imaging with Partially Coherent X-Ray Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hua; HAN Shen-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    The theoretical model of direct diffraction phase-contrast imaging with partially coherent x-ray source is expressedby an operator of multiple integral. It is presented that the integral operator is linear. The problem of its phaseretrieval is described by solving an operator equation of multiple integral. It is demonstrated that the solution ofthe phase retrieval is unstable. The numerical simulation is performed and the result validates that the solutionof the phase retrieval is unstable.

  10. Monitoring Rates and Heterogeneity of High-Pressure Germination of Bacillus Spores by Phase-Contrast Microscopy of Individual Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The germination of multiple individual Bacillus subtilis spores by a high pressure (HP) of 140-150 (unless noted...otherwise) megaPascals (MPa) that activates spore germinant receptors (GRs) was monitored by phase contrast microscopy in a diamond anvil cell. Major...conclusions were that: i) >95% of spores germinated in 40 min; ii) individual spore’s HP germination kinetics were very similar to those for nutrient

  11. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allner, S; Koehler, T; Fehringer, A; Birnbacher, L; Willner, M; Pfeiffer, F; Noël, P B

    2016-05-21

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields.

  12. Investigation of the signature of lung tissue in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Thomas; Haas, Wilhelm; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Wucherer, Lukas; Braun, Jan Matthias; Durst, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising modality increasing the soft tissue contrast in medical imaging. In this work, the signature of lung tissue in X-ray grating-based physe-contrast imaging is investigated. Methods: We used a Talbot-Lau interferometer for our investigations of two C57BL/6 mice. Both underwent projection imaging and computed tomography. Results: The results show that the three images obtained by X-ray phase-contrast imaging show complementary anatomical structures. Especially the dark field image allows a more-exact determination of the position of the lung in the chest cavity. Conclusion: Due to its sensitivity to granular structures, the dark field image may be used for the diagnosis of lung diseases in earlier stages or without a CT scan. Furthermore, X-ray phase-contrast imaging may also have great potential in the application of animal laboratory sciences to reduce the number of required animals used in long-term translational, toxicity, and regenerative med...

  13. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabler, S. [Institute for Materials Science, Technical University of Berlin, EB 13, Strasse des 17, Juni 135, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Rack, T.; Nelson, K. [Clinic for Oral and Maxifacial Surgery, Charite University Medicine, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Rack, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2010-10-15

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 {mu}m are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 {mu}m in absorption mode and {approx}14 {mu}m in phase contrast mode (z{sub 2}=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  14. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, Timothy J., E-mail: tpennycook@gmail.com [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lupini, Andrew R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Yang, Hao [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Murfitt, Matthew F. [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Jones, Lewys [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D. [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    We demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. Finally, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe. - Highlights: • Ptychographic high efficiency phase contrast imaging is demonstrated in STEM. • We rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations. • High efficiency is achieved by collecting all the relevant interference. • Use of a pixelated detector allows comparison of bright field modes post acquisition. • Ptychography provides the clearest images among the STEM bright field modes tested.

  15. Single shot x-ray phase contrast imaging using a direct conversion microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagias, M.; Cartier, S.; Wang, Z.; Stampanoni, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-06-06

    X-ray phase contrast imaging enables the measurement of the electron density of a sample with high sensitivity compared to the conventional absorption contrast. This is advantageous for the study of dose-sensitive samples, in particular, for biological and medical investigations. Recent developments relaxed the requirement for the beam coherence, such that conventional X-ray sources can be used for phase contrast imaging and thus clinical applications become possible. One of the prominent phase contrast imaging methods, Talbot-Lau grating interferometry, is limited by the manufacturing, alignment, and photon absorption of the analyzer grating, which is placed in the beam path in front of the detector. We propose an alternative improved method based on direct conversion charge integrating detectors, which enables a grating interferometer to be operated without an analyzer grating. Algorithms are introduced, which resolve interference fringes with a periodicity of 4.7 μm recorded with a 25 μm pitch Si microstrip detector (GOTTHARD). The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by an experiment at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source on a polyethylene sample.

  16. A user-friendly LabVIEW software platform for grating based X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghao; Han, Huajie; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Wu, Zhao; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide greatly improved contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging for weakly absorbing samples, such as biological soft tissues and fibre composites. In this study, we introduced an easy and fast way to develop a user-friendly software platform dedicated to the new grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the University of Science and Technology of China. The control of 21 motorized stages, of a piezoelectric stage and of an X-ray tube are achieved with this software, it also covers image acquisition with a flat panel detector for automatic phase stepping scan. Moreover, a data post-processing module for signals retrieval and other custom features are in principle available. With a seamless integration of all the necessary functions in one software package, this platform greatly facilitate users' activities during experimental runs with this grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging setup.

  17. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Guiwen; Yu, Jing; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2011-05-01

    This protocol describes a method combining phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers to characterize the germination of single bacterial spores. The characterization consists of the following steps: (i) loading heat-activated dormant spores into a temperature-controlled microscope sample holder containing a germinant solution plus a nucleic acid stain; (ii) capturing a single spore with optical tweezers; (iii) simultaneously measuring phase-contrast images, Raman spectra and fluorescence images of the optically captured spore at 2- to 10-s intervals; and (iv) analyzing the acquired data for the loss of spore refractility, changes in spore-specific molecules (in particular, dipicolinic acid) and uptake of the nucleic acid stain. This information leads to precise correlations between various germination events, and takes 1-2 h to complete. The method can also be adapted to use multi-trap Raman spectroscopy or phase-contrast microscopy of spores adhered on a cover slip to simultaneously obtain germination parameters for multiple individual spores.

  18. A new method for information retrieval in two-dimensional grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Li; Gao Kun; Chen Jian; Ge Xin; Zhu Pei-Ping; Tian Yang-Chao; Wu Zi-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to be an extremely powerful phase-sensitive imaging technique.By using two-dimensional (2D) gratings,the observable contrast is extended to two refraction directions.Recently,we have developed a novel reverse-projection (RP) method,which is capable of retrieving the object information efficiently with one-dimensional (1D) grating-based phase contrast imaging.In this contribution,we present its extension to the 2D grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging,named the two-dimensional reverseprojection (2D-RP) method,for information retrieval.The method takes into account the nonlinear contributions of two refraction directions and allows the retrieval of the absorption,the horizontal and the vertical refraction images.The obtained information can be used for the reconstruction of the three-dimensional phase gradient field,and for an improved phase map retrieval and reconstruction.Numerical experiments are carried out,and the results confirm the validity of the 2D-RP method.

  19. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, M; Kaeppler, S; Hauke, C; Horn, F; Pelzer, G; Rieger, J; Michel, T; Riess, C; Anton, G

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  20. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, M.; Kaeppler, S.; Hauke, C.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Michel, T.; Riess, C.; Anton, G.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  1. Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy reveals 100 kDa component in a protein complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Min; Wang, Chun-Hsiung; Chang, Jen-wei; Chen, Yi-yun; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chang, Wei-Hau

    2013-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a powerful technique for obtaining near atomic structures for large protein assemblies or large virus particles, but the application to protein particles smaller than 200-300 kDa has been hampered by the feeble phase contrast obtained for such small samples and the limited number of electrons tolerated by them without incurring excessive radiation damage. By implementing a thin-film quarter-wave phase plate to a cryo-EM, Nagayama, one of the present authors, has recently restored the long-lost very low spatial frequencies, generating in-focus phase contrast superior to that of conventional defocusing phase contrast, and successfully applied the so-called Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM to target various biological samples in native state. Nevertheless, the sought-after goal of using enhanced phase contrast to reveal a native protein as small as 100 kDa waits to be realized. Here, we report a study in which 200 kV Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM with a plate cut-on periodicity of 36 nm was applied to visualize 100 kDa components of various protein complexes, including the small domains on the surface of an icosahedral particle of ˜38 nm derived from the dragon grouper nervous necrosis virus (DGNNV) and the labile sub-complex dissociated from yeast RNA polymerase III of 17 nm. In the former case, we observed a phase contrast reversal phenomenon at the centre of the icosahedral particle and traced its root cause to the near matching of the cut-on size and the particle size. In summary, our work has demonstrated that Zernike phase-plate implementation can indeed expand the size range of proteins that can be successfully investigated by cryo-EM, opening the door for countless proteins. Finally, we briefly discuss the possibility of using a transfer lens system to enlarge the cut-on periodicity without further miniaturizing the plate pinhole.

  2. Ideal-observer detectability in photon-counting differential phase-contrast imaging using a linear-systems approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Danielsson, Mats; Stayman, J. Webster; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Aslund, Magnus [Research and Development, Philips Women' s Healthcare, Smidesvaegen 5, SE-171 41 Solna, Sweden and Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Research and Development, Philips Women' s Healthcare, Smidesvaegen 5, SE-171 41 Solna (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To provide a cascaded-systems framework based on the noise-power spectrum (NPS), modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) for quantitative evaluation of differential phase-contrast imaging (Talbot interferometry) in relation to conventional absorption contrast under equal-dose, equal-geometry, and, to some extent, equal-photon-economy constraints. The focus is a geometry for photon-counting mammography. Methods: Phase-contrast imaging is a promising technology that may emerge as an alternative or adjunct to conventional absorption contrast. In particular, phase contrast may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio compared to absorption contrast because the difference in phase shift between soft-tissue structures is often substantially larger than the absorption difference. We have developed a comprehensive cascaded-systems framework to investigate Talbot interferometry, which is a technique for differential phase-contrast imaging. Analytical expressions for the MTF and NPS were derived to calculate the NEQ and a task-specific ideal-observer detectability index under assumptions of linearity and shift invariance. Talbot interferometry was compared to absorption contrast at equal dose, and using either a plane wave or a spherical wave in a conceivable mammography geometry. The impact of source size and spectrum bandwidth was included in the framework, and the trade-off with photon economy was investigated in some detail. Wave-propagation simulations were used to verify the analytical expressions and to generate example images. Results: Talbot interferometry inherently detects the differential of the phase, which led to a maximum in NEQ at high spatial frequencies, whereas the absorption-contrast NEQ decreased monotonically with frequency. Further, phase contrast detects differences in density rather than atomic number, and the optimal imaging energy was found to be a factor of 1.7 higher than for absorption

  3. Early and Delayed Myocardial Enhancement in Myocardial Infarction Using Two-Phase Contrast-Enhanced Multidetector-Row CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Whan; Han, Seong-Wook; Seo, Joon-Beom

    2007-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the myocardial enhancement patterns in patients with myocardial infarction using two-phase contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Materials and Methods Twenty-three patients with clinically proven myocardial infarction (17 acute myocardial infarction [AMI] and 6 chronic myocardial infarction [CMI]) were examined with two-phase contrast-enhanced ECG-gated MDCT. The presence, location, and patterns of myocardial enhancement on two-phase MDCT images were compared with infarcted myocardial territories determined by using electrocardiogram, echocardiography, thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography, catheter and MDCT coronary angiography. Results After clinical assessment, the presence of myocardial infarctions were found in 27 territories (19 AMI and 8 CMI) of 23 patients. Early perfusion defects were observed in 30 territories of all 23 patients. Three territories not corresponding to a myocardial infarction were detected in three patients with AMI and were associated with artifacts. Fourteen of perfusion defects were in the left anterior descending artery territory, four in the left circumflex artery territory, and nine in the right coronary artery territory. Delayed enhancement was observed in 25 territories (17 AMI and 8 CMI) of 21 patients. Delayed enhancement patterns were variable. Transmural early perfusion defects (n =12) were closely associated with transmural late enhancement (n = 5) and subendocardial residual defect with subepicardial late enhancement (n = 5). Conclusion Myocardial infarction showed early perfusion defects and variable delayed enhancement patterns on two-phase contrast-enhanced MDCT. Delayed enhancement technique of MDCT could provide additional information of the location and extent of infarcted myocardium, and could be useful to plan appropriate therapeutic strategies in patients with AMI. PMID:17420626

  4. Dose efficiency consideration for volume-of-interest breast imaging using x-ray differential phase-contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola

    2009-02-01

    The newly developed differential phase-contrast (DPC) imaging technique has attracted increasing interest among researchers. In a DPC system, the self-imaging effect and the phase-stepping method are implemented through three gratings to manifest phase contrast, and differentiated phase images can be obtained. An important advantage of this technique is that hospital-grade x-ray tubes can be used, allowing much higher x-ray output power and faster image processing than with micro-focus in-line phase-contrast imaging. A DPC-CT system can acquire images from different view angles along a circular orbit, and tomographic images can be reconstructed. However, the principle of DPC imaging requires multiple exposures to compute any differentiated phase image at each view angle, which raises concerns about radiation exposure via x-ray dose. Computer simulations are carried out to study the dose efficiency for DPC-CT for volume-of-interest breast imaging. A conceptual CBCT/DPC-CT hybrid imaging system and a numerical breast phantom are designed for this study. A FBP-type reconstruction algorithm is optimized for the VOI reconstruction. Factors including the x-ray flux and detector pixel size are considered and their effects on reconstruction image quality in terms of noise level and contrast-to-noise ratio are investigated. The results indicate that with a pixel size of 20 microns and a dose level of 5.7mGy, which is equivalent to the patient dose of a two-view mammography screening or a dedicated CBCT breast imaging scan, much better tissue contrast and spatial resolution can be achieved using the DPC-CT technique. It is very promising for possible application at pathology-level in vivo study for human breasts.

  5. Early and Delayed Myocardial Enhancement in Myocardial Infarction Using Two-Phase Contrast-Enhanced Multidetector-Row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Sung-Min; Kim, Young-Whan; Han, Seong-Wook [University of Keimyung College of Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Joon-Beom [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the myocardial enhancement patterns in patients with myocardial infarction using two-phase contrast enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Twenty-three patients with clinically proven myocardial infarction (17 acute myocardial infarction [AMI] and 6 chronic myocardial infarction [CMI]) were examined with two-phase contrast-enhanced ECG-gated MDCT. The presence, location, and patterns of myocardial enhancement on two phase MDCT images were compared with infarcted myocardial territories determined by using electrocardiogram, echocardiography, thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography, catheter and MDCT coronary angiography. After clinical assessment, the presence of myocardial infarctions were found in 27 territories (19 AMI and 8 CMI) of 23 patients. Early perfusion defects were observed in 30 territories of all 23 patients. Three territories not corresponding to a myocardial infarction were detected in three patients with AMI and were associated with artifacts. Fourteen of perfusion defects were in the left anterior descending artery territory, four in the left circumflex artery territory, and nine in the right coronary artery territory. Delayed enhancement was observed in 25 territories (17 AMI and 8 CMI) of 21 patients. Delayed enhancement patterns were variable. Transmural early perfusion defects (n =12) were closely associated with transmural late enhancement (n = 5) and subendocardial residual defect with subepicardial late enhancement (n = 5). Myocardial infarction showed early perfusion defects and variable delayed enhancement patterns on two-phase contrast-enhanced MDCT. Delayed enhancement technique of MDCT could provide additional information of the location and extent of infarcted myocardium, and could be useful to plan appropriate therapeutic strategies in patients with AMI.

  6. Microscopic identification of Chinese medicinal materials based on X-ray phase contrast imaging: from qualitative to quantitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y.; Liang, Z.; Tan, H.; Ni, L.; Zhao, Z.; Xiao, T.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    Although a variety of methods, ranging from simple morphological examination to physical and chemical analysis, and DNA molecular biology, exist for authenticating Chinese medicinal materials(CMMs), no methods can achieve both the source species identification and quality evaluation of CMMs simultaneously. Furthermore, the methods that are currently available for the identification of CMMs, including both optical and electronic microscopy, usually entail strict requirements for sample preparation or testing environment, such as the slicing of super-thin sections, or processing with specific chemical reagents. These treatments not only damage the CMMs but may also cause some of the original microstructures to be missed. Additionally, they may even yield false results. Owing to the unique penetrating character of X-rays, X-ray phase contrast imaging(XPCI) can be used to realize the inner microstructures of CMMs through nondestructive imaging. With the higher flux and luminance of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facility, XPCI can provides clearer and finer microstructures of CMMs, which are mainly composed of C, H, O, and N elements, with better spatial and density resolutions. For more than ten years, the X-ray imaging group at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics has investigated the microstructures of CMMs by XPCI and they have established and developed a quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT for investigating the characteristic microstructures of CMMs. During this period, a variety of typical CMMs have been investigated, from two-dimensional (2D) radiography to three-dimensional (3D) micro-CT, from qualitative to quantitative. Taken together, these results verify that quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT is a practical tool for the microscopic investigation of CMMs. Additionally, further efforts are being made to find the relationship between the microstructures' quantitative factors and active chemical components. At present

  7. 3D tracking and phase-contrast imaging by twin-beams digital holographic microscope in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Finizio, A.; Paturzo, M.; Merola, F.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2012-06-01

    A compact twin-beam interferometer that can be adopted as a flexible diagnostic tool in microfluidic platforms is presented. The devise has two functionalities, as explained in the follow, and can be easily integrated in microfluidic chip. The configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and, at same time, furnishes Quantitative Phase-Contrast maps of tracked micro-objects by interference microscopy. Experimental demonstration of its effectiveness and compatibility with biological field is given on for in vitro cells in microfluidic environment. Nowadays, several microfluidic configuration exist and many of them are commercially available, their development is due to the possibility for manipulating droplets, handling micro and nano-objects, visualize and quantify processes occurring in small volumes and, clearly, for direct applications on lab-on-a chip devices. In microfluidic research field, optical/photonics approaches are the more suitable ones because they have various advantages as to be non-contact, full-field, non-invasive and can be packaged thanks to the development of integrable optics. Moreover, phase contrast approaches, adapted to a lab-on-a-chip configurations, give the possibility to get quantitative information with remarkable lateral and vertical resolution directly in situ without the need to dye and/or kill cells. Furthermore, numerical techniques for tracking of micro-objects needs to be developed for measuring velocity fields, trajectories patterns, motility of cancer cell and so on. Here, we present a compact holographic microscope that can ensure, by the same configuration and simultaneously, accurate 3D tracking and quantitative phase-contrast analysis. The system, simple and solid, is based on twin laser beams coming from a single laser source. Through a easy conceptual design, we show how these two different functionalities can be accomplished by the same optical setup. The working principle, the optical setup and the mathematical

  8. Investigation of pure- and aerated-liquid jets using ultra-fast X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kuo-Cheng, E-mail: Kuo-Cheng.Lin@wpafb.af.mil [Taitech, Inc., Beavercreek, OH 45430 (United States); Rajnicek, Christopher; McCall, Jonathan; Carter, Campbell [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Fezzaa, Kamel [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Pure- and aerated-liquid jets were observed using the ultra-fast X-ray phase contrast imaging technique. Highly convoluted wrinkle structures were seen on the column surface of a turbulent pure-liquid jet, gas bubbles were discovered inside droplets and ligaments of aerated-liquid sprays, and apparently homogenous two-phase mixtures were observed inside the aerated-liquid injector. The major limitation of this X-ray technique lies in its line-of-sight nature, which can create overlapped objects/interfaces on the X-ray images.

  9. Phase contrast X-ray microtomography of the Rhodnius prolixus head: Comparison of direct reconstruction and phase retrieval approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Soares, J.; Cardoso, S. C.; Garcia, E. S.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Mohammadi, S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-02-01

    We have used phase-contrast X-ray microtomography (PPC-μCT) to study the head of the blood-feeding bug, Rhodnius prolixus, which is one of the most important insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, ethiologic agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. Images reconstructed from phase-retrieved projections processed by ANKA phase are compared to those obtained through direct tomographic reconstruction of the flat-field-corrected transmission radiographs. It should be noted that the relative locations of the important morphological internal structures are observable with a precision that is difficult to obtain without the phase retrieval approach.

  10. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  11. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a) Each...

  12. Advanced treatment planning using direct 4D optimisation for pencil-beam scanned particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatowicz, Kinga; Zhang, Ye; Perrin, Rosalind; Weber, Damien C.; Lomax, Antony J.

    2017-08-01

    We report on development of a new four-dimensional (4D) optimisation approach for scanned proton beams, which incorporates both irregular motion patterns and the delivery dynamics of the treatment machine into the plan optimiser. Furthermore, we assess the effectiveness of this technique to reduce dose to critical structures in proximity to moving targets, while maintaining effective target dose homogeneity and coverage. The proposed approach has been tested using both a simulated phantom and a clinical liver cancer case, and allows for realistic 4D calculations and optimisation using irregular breathing patterns extracted from e.g. 4DCT-MRI (4D computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging). 4D dose distributions resulting from our 4D optimisation can achieve almost the same quality as static plans, independent of the studied geometry/anatomy or selected motion (regular and irregular). Additionally, current implementation of the 4D optimisation approach requires less than 3 min to find the solution for a single field planned on 4DCT of a liver cancer patient. Although 4D optimisation allows for realistic calculations using irregular breathing patterns, it is very sensitive to variations from the planned motion. Based on a sensitivity analysis, target dose homogeneity comparable to static plans (D5-D95  <5%) has been found only for differences in amplitude of up to 1 mm, for changes in respiratory phase  <200 ms and for changes in the breathing period of  <20 ms in comparison to the motions used during optimisation. As such, methods to robustly deliver 4D optimised plans employing 4D intensity-modulated delivery are discussed.

  13. Complex flow patterns in a real-size intracranial aneurysm phantom: phase contrast MRI compared with particle image velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ooij, P; Guédon, A; Poelma, C; Schneiders, J; Rutten, M C M; Marquering, H A; Majoie, C B; VanBavel, E; Nederveen, A J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the flow patterns measured by high-resolution, time-resolved, three-dimensional phase contrast MRI in a real-size intracranial aneurysm phantom. Retrospectively gated three-dimensional phase contrast MRI was performed in an intracranial aneurysm phantom at a resolution of 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.3 mm(3) in a solenoid rat coil. Both steady and pulsatile flows were applied. The phase contrast MRI measurements were compared with particle image velocimetry measurements and computational fluid dynamics simulations. A quantitative comparison was performed by calculating the differences between the magnitude of the velocity vectors and angles between the velocity vectors in corresponding voxels. Qualitative analysis of the results was executed by visual inspection and comparison of the flow patterns. The root-mean-square errors of the velocity magnitude in the comparison between phase contrast MRI and computational fluid dynamics were 5% and 4% of the maximum phase contrast MRI velocity, and the medians of the angle distribution between corresponding velocity vectors were 16° and 14° for the steady and pulsatile measurements, respectively. In the phase contrast MRI and particle image velocimetry comparison, the root-mean-square errors were 12% and 10% of the maximum phase contrast MRI velocity, and the medians of the angle distribution between corresponding velocity vectors were 19° and 15° for the steady and pulsatile measurements, respectively. Good agreement was found in the qualitative comparison of flow patterns between the phase contrast MRI measurements and both particle image velocimetry measurements and computational fluid dynamics simulations. High-resolution, time-resolved, three-dimensional phase contrast MRI can accurately measure complex flow patterns in an intracranial aneurysm phantom. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. 4D flow preliminary investigation of a direct carotid cavernous fistula due to a ruptured intracavernous aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Murai, Yasuo; Wada, Takeshi; Tateyama, Kojiro

    2015-01-22

    Inadequate information is available about the cerebral blood flow and surgical strategies of a direct aneurysmal carotid cavernous fistula (daCCF). We report a quantitative analysis of flow velocity and volume using preoperative time-resolved phase-contrast MRI (four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI) in a daCCF. This is the first report of 4D flow findings with a daCCF. A 55-year-old woman developed a sudden headache and bruit of the right orbit, and MRI suggested the presence of a daCCF. Quantitative analysis using preoperative 4D flow MRI revealed the flow volume of the right internal carotid artery. The daCCF was successfully treated by high-flow bypass using a radial artery graft and internal carotid artery trapping. Postoperative angiography showed a complete obliteration of the daCCF. Studies to collect data from additional cases are required so that 4D flow findings can be further used in the management of daCCFs. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Flexible retrospective phase stepping in x-ray scatter correction and phase contrast imaging using structured illumination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wen

    Full Text Available The development of phase contrast methods for diagnostic x-ray imaging is inspired by the potential of seeing the internal structures of the human body without the need to deposit any harmful radiation. An efficient class of x-ray phase contrast imaging and scatter correction methods share the idea of using structured illumination in the form of a periodic fringe pattern created with gratings or grids. They measure the scatter and distortion of the x-ray wavefront through the attenuation and deformation of the fringe pattern via a phase stepping process. Phase stepping describes image acquisition at regular phase intervals by shifting a grating in uniform steps. However, in practical conditions the actual phase intervals can vary from step to step and also spatially. Particularly with the advent of electromagnetic phase stepping without physical movement of a grating, the phase intervals are dependent upon the focal plane of interest. We describe a demodulation algorithm for phase stepping at arbitrary and position-dependent (APD phase intervals without assuming a priori knowledge of the phase steps. The algorithm retrospectively determines the spatial distribution of the phase intervals by a Fourier transform method. With this ability, grating-based x-ray imaging becomes more adaptable and robust for broader applications.

  16. A compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm for synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melli, Seyed Ali, E-mail: sem649@mail.usask.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wahid, Khan A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Babyn, Paul [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Montgomery, James [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Snead, Elisabeth [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); El-Gayed, Ali [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Pettitt, Murray; Wolkowski, Bailey [College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wesolowski, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2016-01-11

    Synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is increasingly used in pre-clinical imaging. However, it typically requires a large number of projections, and subsequently a large radiation dose, to produce high quality images. To improve the applicability of this imaging technique, reconstruction algorithms that can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time without degrading image quality are needed. The proposed research focused on using a novel combination of Douglas–Rachford splitting and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms to solve large-scale total variation based optimization in a compressed sensing framework to reconstruct 2D images from a reduced number of projections. Visual assessment and quantitative performance evaluations of a synthetic abdomen phantom and real reconstructed image of an ex-vivo slice of canine prostate tissue demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in reconstruction process compared with other well-known algorithms. An additional potential benefit of reducing the number of projections would be reduction of time for motion artifact to occur if the sample moves during image acquisition. Use of this reconstruction algorithm to reduce the required number of projections in synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is an effective form of dose reduction that may pave the way for imaging of in-vivo samples.

  17. Clinical application of low-dose phase contrast breast CT: methods for the optimization of the reconstruction workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacilè, S.; Brun, F.; Dullin, C.; Nesterest, Y. I.; Dreossi, D.; Mohammadi, S.; Tonutti, M.; Stacul, F.; Lockie, D.; Zanconati, F.; Accardo, A.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented of a feasibility study of three-dimensional X-ray tomographic mammography utilising in-line phase contrast. Experiments were performed at SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron. A specially designed plastic phantom and a mastectomy sample containing a malignant lesion were used to study the reconstructed image quality as a function of different image processing operations. Detailed evaluation and optimization of image reconstruction workflows have been carried out using combinations of several advanced computed tomography algorithms with different pre-processing and post-processing steps. Special attention was paid to the effect of phase retrieval on the diagnostic value of the reconstructed images. A number of objective image quality indices have been applied for quantitative evaluation of the results, and these were compared with subjective assessments of the same images by three experienced radiologists and one pathologist. The outcomes of this study provide practical guidelines for the optimization of image processing workflows in synchrotron-based phase-contrast mammo-tomography. PMID:26309770

  18. An efficient reconstruction algorithm for differential phase-contrast tomographic images from a limited number of views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaguchi, Naoki [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Yuasa, Tetsuya [Graduate School of Engineering and Science, Yamagata University, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Gupta, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Ando, Masami [Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2015-12-21

    The main focus of this paper is reconstruction of tomographic phase-contrast image from a set of projections. We propose an efficient reconstruction algorithm for differential phase-contrast computed tomography that can considerably reduce the number of projections required for reconstruction. The key result underlying this research is a projection theorem that states that the second derivative of the projection set is linearly related to the Laplacian of the tomographic image. The proposed algorithm first reconstructs the Laplacian image of the phase-shift distribution from the second-derivative of the projections using total variation regularization. The second step is to obtain the phase-shift distribution by solving a Poisson equation whose source is the Laplacian image previously reconstructed under the Dirichlet condition. We demonstrate the efficacy of this algorithm using both synthetically generated simulation data and projection data acquired experimentally at a synchrotron. The experimental phase data were acquired from a human coronary artery specimen using dark-field-imaging optics pioneered by our group. Our results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reduce the number of projections to approximately 33% as compared with the conventional filtered backprojection method, without any detrimental effect on the image quality.

  19. Geometric calibration and correction for a lens-coupled detector in x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Alex; Chen, Peter Y; Morales-Martinez, Alejandro; Panna, Alireza; Gomella, Andrew A; Bennett, Eric E; Wen, Han

    2017-01-01

    A lens-coupled x-ray camera with a tilted phosphor collects light emission from the x-ray illuminated (front) side of phosphor. Experimentally, it has been shown to double x-ray photon capture efficiency and triple the spatial resolution along the phosphor tilt direction relative to the same detector at normal phosphor incidence. These characteristics benefit grating-based phase-contrast methods, where linear interference fringes need to be clearly resolved. However, both the shallow incident angle on the phosphor and lens aberrations of the camera cause geometric distortions. When tiling multiple images of limited vertical view into a full-field image, geometric distortion causes blurring due to image misregistration. Here, we report a procedure of geometric correction based on global polynomial transformation of image coordinates. The corrected image is equivalent to one obtained with a single full-field flat panel detector placed at the sample plane. In a separate evaluation scan, the position deviations in the horizontal and vertical directions were reduced from 0.76 and 0.028 mm, respectively, to 0.006 and 0.009 mm, respectively, by the correction procedure, which were below the 0.028-mm pixel size of the imaging system. In a demonstration of a phase-contrast imaging experiment, the correction reduced blurring of small structures.

  20. Three-dimensional mouse brain cytoarchitecture revealed by laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpperwien, Mareike; Krenkel, Martin; Vincenz, Daniel; Stöber, Franziska; Oelschlegel, Anja M.; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Salditt, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Studies of brain cytoarchitecture in mammals are routinely performed by serial sectioning of the specimen and staining of the sections. The procedure is labor-intensive and the 3D architecture can only be determined after aligning individual 2D sections, leading to a reconstructed volume with non-isotropic resolution. Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography offers a unique potential for high-resolution 3D imaging of intact biological specimen due to the high penetration depth and potential resolution. We here show that even compact laboratory CT at an optimized liquid-metal jet microfocus source combined with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms and a novel tissue preparation can provide cellular and subcellular resolution in millimeter sized samples of mouse brain. We removed water and lipids from entire mouse brains and measured the remaining dry tissue matrix in air, lowering absorption but increasing phase contrast. We present single-cell resolution images of mouse brain cytoarchitecture and show that axons can be revealed in myelinated fiber bundles. In contrast to optical 3D techniques our approach does neither require staining of cells nor tissue clearing, procedures that are increasingly difficult to apply with increasing sample and brain sizes. The approach thus opens a novel route for high-resolution high-throughput studies of brain architecture in mammals.

  1. Linear information retrieval method in X-ray grating-based phase contrast imaging and its interchangeability with tomographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z.; Gao, K.; Wang, Z. L.; Shao, Q. G.; Hu, R. F.; Wei, C. X.; Zan, G. B.; Wali, F.; Luo, R. H.; Zhu, P. P.; Tian, Y. C.

    2017-06-01

    In X-ray grating-based phase contrast imaging, information retrieval is necessary for quantitative research, especially for phase tomography. However, numerous and repetitive processes have to be performed for tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we report a novel information retrieval method, which enables retrieving phase and absorption information by means of a linear combination of two mutually conjugate images. Thanks to the distributive law of the multiplication as well as the commutative law and associative law of the addition, the information retrieval can be performed after tomographic reconstruction, thus simplifying the information retrieval procedure dramatically. The theoretical model of this method is established in both parallel beam geometry for Talbot interferometer and fan beam geometry for Talbot-Lau interferometer. Numerical experiments are also performed to confirm the feasibility and validity of the proposed method. In addition, we discuss its possibility in cone beam geometry and its advantages compared with other methods. Moreover, this method can also be employed in other differential phase contrast imaging methods, such as diffraction enhanced imaging, non-interferometric imaging, and edge illumination.

  2. Visualization of microvasculature by x-ray in-line phase contrast imaging in rat spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Zhong; Wu, Tian-Ding; Zeng, Lei; Liu, Hui-Qiang; He, You; Du, Guo-Hao; Lu, Hong-Bin

    2012-03-01

    Computed tomography combined with angiography has recently been developed to visualize three-dimensional (3D) vascular structure in experi-mental and clinical studies. However, there remain difficulties in using conventional x-ray angiography to detect small vessels with a diameter less than 200 µm. This study attempted to develop a novel method for visualizing the micro-angioarchitecture of rat spinal cord. Herein, synchrotron radiation-based x-ray in-line phase contrast computed tomography (IL-XPCT) was used to obtain 3D micro-vessel structure without angiography. The digital phase contrast images were compared with conventional histological sections. Our results clearly demonstrated that the resolution limit of the spatial blood supply network in the normal rat thoracic cord appeared to be as small as ∼10 µm. The rendered images were consistent with that obtained from histo-morphology sections. In summary, IL-XPCT is a potential tool to investigate the 3D neurovascular morphology of the rat spinal cord without the use of contrast agents, and it could help to evaluate the validity of the pro- or anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategies on microvasculature repair or regeneration.

  3. Computational cell quantification in the human brain tissues based on hard x-ray phase-contrast tomograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieber, Simone E.; Bikis, Christos; Khimchenko, Anna; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Thalmann, Peter; Chicherova, Natalia; Rack, Alexander; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Zanette, Irene; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Cell visualization and counting plays a crucial role in biological and medical research including the study of neurodegenerative diseases. The neuronal cell loss is typically determined to measure the extent of the disease. Its characterization is challenging because the cell density and size already differs by more than three orders of magnitude in a healthy cerebellum. Cell visualization is commonly performed by histology and fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are limited to resolve complex microstructures in the third dimension. Phase- contrast tomography has been proven to provide sufficient contrast in the three-dimensional imaging of soft tissue down to the cell level and, therefore, offers the basis for the three-dimensional segmentation. Within this context, a human cerebellum sample was embedded in paraffin and measured in local phase-contrast mode at the beamline ID19 (ESRF, Grenoble, France) and the Diamond Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, Didcot, UK). After the application of Frangi-based filtering the data showed sufficient contrast to automatically identify the Purkinje cells and to quantify their density to 177 cells per mm3 within the volume of interest. Moreover, brain layers were segmented in a region of interest based on edge detection. Subsequently performed histological analysis validated the presence of the cells, which required a mapping from the two- dimensional histological slices to the three-dimensional tomogram. The methodology can also be applied to further tissue types and shows potential for the computational tissue analysis in health and disease.

  4. Comparison of global cerebral blood flow measured by phase-contrast mapping MRI with (15) O-H2 O positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob;

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare mean global cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by phase-contrast mapping magnetic resonance imaging (PCM MRI) and by (15) O-H2 O positron emission tomography (PET) in healthy subjects. PCM MRI is increasingly being used to measure mean global CBF, but has not been validated...... of the arterial input function. Flow was measured in the internal carotid and vertebral arteries by a noncardiac triggered PCM MRI sequence at 3T. The measured flow was normalized to total brain weight determined from a volume-segmented 3D T1 -weighted anatomical MR-scan. RESULTS: Mean CBF was 34.9 ± 3.4 mL/100 g...... in vivo against an accepted reference technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Same-day measurements of CBF by (15) O-H2 O PET and subsequently by PCM MRI were performed on 22 healthy young male volunteers. Global CBF by PET was determined by applying a one-tissue compartment model with measurement...

  5. Development operators on 4D moving object databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUN Sung-woo; LEE Yang-koo; KIM Sang-ho; CHI Jeong-hee; RYU Keun-ho

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose four-dimensional (4D) operators, which can be used to deal with sequential changes of topological relationships between 4D moving objects and we call them 4D development operators. In contrast to the existing operators, we can apply the operators to real applications on 4D moving objects. We also propose a new approach to define them. The approach is based on a dimension-separated method, which considers x-y coordinates and z coordinates separately. In order to show the applicability of our operators, we show the algorithms for the proposed operators and development graph between 4D moving objects.

  6. 4D electron microscopy: principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-10-16

    achievable with short intense pulses containing a large number of electrons, however, are limited to tens of nanometers and nanoseconds, respectively. This is because Coulomb repulsion is significant in such a pulse, and the electrons spread in space and time, thus limiting the beam coherence. It is therefore not possible to image the ultrafast elementary dynamics of complex transformations. The challenge was to retain the high spatial resolution of a conventional TEM while simultaneously enabling the temporal resolution required to visualize atomic-scale motions. In this Account, we discuss the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) and summarize techniques and applications that illustrate the power of the approach. In UEM, images are obtained either stroboscopically with coherent single-electron packets or with a single electron bunch. Coulomb repulsion is absent under the single-electron condition, thus permitting imaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy, all with high spatiotemporal resolution, the atomic scale (sub-nanometer and femtosecond). The time resolution is limited only by the laser pulse duration and energy carried by the electron packets; the CCD camera has no bearing on the temporal resolution. In the regime of single pulses of electrons, the temporal resolution of picoseconds can be attained when hundreds of electrons are in the bunch. The applications given here are selected to highlight phenomena of different length and time scales, from atomic motions during structural dynamics to phase transitions and nanomechanical oscillations. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging methods, which include scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM) with convergent beams, and time-resolved imaging of biological structures at ambient conditions with environmental cells.

  7. Sex-differential genetic effect of phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D on carotid atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yuh-Cherng

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D gene was reported as a susceptibility gene to stroke. The genetic effect might be attributed to its role in modulating the atherogenic process in the carotid arteries. Using carotid intima-media thickness (IMT and plaque index as phenotypes, the present study sought to determine the influence of this gene on subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods Carotid ultrasonography was performed on 1013 stroke-free subjects who participated in the health screening programs (age 52.6 ± 12.2; 47.6% men. Genotype distribution was compared among the high-risk (plaque index ≥ 4, low-risk (index = 1-3, and reference (index = 0 groups. We analyzed continuous IMT data and further dichotomized IMT data using mean plus one standard deviation as the cutoff level. Because the plaque prevalence and IMT values displayed a notable difference between men and women, we carried out sex-specific analyses in addition to analyzing the overall data. Rs702553 at the PDE4D gene was selected because it conferred a risk for young stroke in our previous report. Previous young stroke data (190 cases and 211 controls with an additional 532 control subjects without ultrasonic data were shown as a cross-validation for the genetic effect. Results In the overall analyses, the rare homozygote of rs702553 led to an OR of 3.1 (p = 0.034 for a plaque index ≥ 4. When subjects were stratified by sex, the genetic effect was only evident in men but not in women. Comparing male subjects with plaque index ≥ 4 and those with plaque index = 0, the TT genotype was over-represented (27.6% vs. 13.4%, p = 0.008. For dichotomized IMT data in men, the TT genotype had an OR of 2.1 (p = 0.032 for a thicker IMT at the common carotid artery compared with the (AA + AT genotypes. In women, neither IMT nor plaque index was associated with rs702553. Similarly, SNP rs702553 was only significant in young stroke men (OR = 1.8, p = 0.025 but not in women (p = 0

  8. A feasibility study of X-ray phase-contrast mammographic tomography at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E; Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Thompson, Darren; Brown, Jeremy M C; Kitchen, Marcus J; Pavlov, Konstantin M; Lockie, Darren; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented of a recent experiment at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron intended to contribute to the implementation of low-dose high-sensitivity three-dimensional mammographic phase-contrast imaging, initially at synchrotrons and subsequently in hospitals and medical imaging clinics. The effect of such imaging parameters as X-ray energy, source size, detector resolution, sample-to-detector distance, scanning and data processing strategies in the case of propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) have been tested, quantified, evaluated and optimized using a plastic phantom simulating relevant breast-tissue characteristics. Analysis of the data collected using a Hamamatsu CMOS Flat Panel Sensor, with a pixel size of 100 µm, revealed the presence of propagation-based phase contrast and demonstrated significant improvement of the quality of phase-contrast CT imaging compared with conventional (absorption-based) CT, at medically acceptable radiation doses.

  9. Degradation of Li/S Battery Electrodes On 3D Current Collectors Studied Using X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, L; Barchasz, C; Waluś, S; Alloin, F; Leprêtre, J-C; Spettl, A; Schmidt, V; Hilger, A; Manke, I; Banhart, J; Zengerle, R; Thiele, S

    2015-06-04

    Lithium/sulphur batteries are promising candidates for future energy storage systems, mainly due to their high potential capacity. However low sulphur utilization and capacity fading hinder practical realizations. In order to improve understanding of the system, we investigate Li/S electrode morphology changes for different ageing steps, using X-ray phase contrast tomography. Thereby we find a strong decrease of sulphur loading after the first cycle, and a constant loading of about 15% of the initial loading afterwards. While cycling, the mean sulphur particle diameters decrease in a qualitatively similar fashion as the discharge capacity fades. The particles spread, migrate into the current collector and accumulate in the upper part again. Simultaneously sulphur particles lose contact area with the conducting network but regain it after ten cycles because their decreasing size results in higher surface areas. Since the capacity still decreases, this regain could be associated with effects such as surface area passivation and increasing charge transfer resistance.

  10. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Cusatis, C.; Rigon, L.; Menk, R.-H.; Arfelli, F.; Foerster, L. A.; Rosado-Neto, G. H.

    2010-08-01

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures ( Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  11. Influence of tube voltage and current on in-line phase contrast imaging using a microfocus x-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng; Yu Ai-Min; Li Cheng-Quan

    2007-01-01

    In-line x-ray phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention due to two major advantages:its effectiveness in imaging weakly absorbing materials,and the simplicity of its facilities.In this paper a comprehensive theory based on Wigner distribution developed by Wu and Liu [Med.Phys.31 2378-2384(2004)] is reviewed.The influence of x-ray source and detector on the image is discussed.Experiments using a microfocus x-ray source and a CCD detector are conducted,which show the role of two key factors on imaging:the tube voltage and tube current.High tube current and moderate tube voltage are suggested for imaging.

  12. Iterative reconstruction for few-view grating-based phase-contrast CT —An in vitro mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaass, T.; Potdevin, G.; Bech, M.; Noël, P. B.; Willner, M.; Tapfer, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Haase, A.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the improvement of image quality in few-view grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) applications via compressed sensing (CS) inspired iterative reconstruction on an in vitro mouse model. PCCT measurements are performed on a grating-based PCCT setup using a high-brilliance synchrotron source and a conventional tube source. The sampling density of the data is reduced by a factor of up to 20 and iteratively reconstructed. It is demonstrated that grating-based PCCT intrinsically meets the major conditions for a successful application of CS. Contrast fidelity and the reproduction of details is presented in all reconstructed objects. The feasibility of the iterative reconstruction on data generated with a conventional X-ray source is illustrated on a fluid phantom and a mouse specimen, undersampled by a factor of up to 20.

  13. Measurement and simulation of ICRF wave intensity with a recalibrated phase contrast imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujii, N., E-mail: tsujii@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Green, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are one of the major tools to heat fusion plasmas. Full-wave simulations are essential to predict the wave propagation and absorption quantitatively, and it is important that these codes be validated against actual experimental measurements. In this work, the absolute intensity of the ICRF waves previously measured with a phase contrast imaging diagnostic was recalibrated and compared once more with full-wave predictions. In the earlier work, significant discrepancies were found between the measured and the simulated mode converted wave intensity [N. Tsujii et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082508]. With the new calibration of the detector array, the measured mode converted wave intensity is now in much better agreement with the full-wave predictions. The agreement is especially good for comparisons performed close to the antenna.

  14. Phase contrast imaging of high-intensity laser hole boring of solid-density wires at LCLS-MEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, W.; Brown, S.; Curry, C.; Gauthier, M.; Gamboa, E.; Goede, S.; Fletcher, L.; Kim, J.; MacDonald, M.; Mishra, R.; Roedel, C.; Glenzer, S.; Fiuza, F.; Granados, E.; Nagler, B.; Zhou, Z.; MacKinnon, A.; Obst, L.; Ziel, K.; Pak, A.; Williams, G.; Fajardo, M.

    2016-10-01

    High-intensity, relativistic (a0 > 1) laser plasma interactions on solid surfaces produce a rich mix of dynamics on the laser timescale (Weibel instabilities, surface effects, sheath formation, etc.) and hydrodynamic timescale (hole-boring, shocks, etc.). Probing these interactions optically is difficult due to critical density layer obscuring the surface of the target, whereas probing with hard X-rays from K-alpha sources does not sufficiently resolve these interactions temporally as they are typically many ps in duration. Presented here are the first experimental measurements of laser hole-boring on a carbon wire surfaces performed at the LCLS-MEC facility. With laser intensities of up to 1019 W / cm2 , we observe the dissociation of micron-sized wires over 100 ps timescale with peak hole boring velocities up to 0.001 c using phase-contrast imaging. This work was funded by DOE FES under FWP #100182.

  15. Automated method for the rapid and precise estimation of adherent cell culture characteristics from phase contrast microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license.

  16. Employing temporal information for cell segmentation using max-flow/min-cut in phase-contrast video microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoudi, Amir; Sowmya, Arcot; Mele, Katarina; Semenovich, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Cell segmentation is a crucial step in many bio-medical image analysis applications and it can be considered as an important part of a tracking system. Segmentation in phase-contrast images is a challenging task since in this imaging technique, the background intensity is approximately similar to the cell pixel intensity. In this paper we propose an interactive automatic pixel level segmentation algorithm, that uses temporal information to improve the segmentation result. This algorithm is based on the max-flow/min-cut algorithm and can be solved in polynomial time. This method is not restricted to any specific cell shape and segments cells of various shapes and sizes. The results of the proposed algorithm show that using the temporal information does improve segmentation considerably.

  17. Strategies for fast and low-dose laboratory-based phase contrast tomography for microstructural scaffold analysis in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Totonelli, Giorgia; Diemoz, Paul C.; Endrizzi, Marco; Zamir, Anna; Coan, Paola; Bravin, Alberto; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    The application of x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (PCT) to the field of tissue engineering is dis- cussed. Specific focus is on the edge illumination PCT method, which can be adapted to weakly coherent x-ray sources, permitting PCT imaging in standard (non-synchrotron) laboratory environments. The method was applied to a prominent research topic in tissue engineering, namely the development of effective and reliable decellularization protocols to derive scaffolds from native tissue. Results show that edge illumination PCT provides sufficient image quality to evaluate the microstructural integrity of scaffolds and, thus, to assess the performance of the used decellularization technique. In order to highlight that edge illumination PCT can ultimately comply with demands on a high specimen throughput and low doses of radiation, recently developed strategies for scan time and dose reduction are discussed.

  18. Matched-filtering generalized phase contrast using LCoS pico-projectors for beam-forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new beam-forming system for generating high intensity programmable optical spikes using so-called matched-filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC) applying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low-cost alternative for optical trapping and manipulation......, optical lattices and other beam-shaping applications usually implemented with high-end spatial light modulators. Portable pico-projectors based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices are used as binary phase-only spatial light modulators by carefully setting the appropriate polarization of the laser...... patterns suited for different requirements. Despite imperfections in these consumer pico-projectors, the mGPC approach tolerates phase aberrations that would have otherwise been hard to overcome by standard phase projection....

  19. Fast one-dimensional wave-front propagation for x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Johannes; Malecki, Andreas; Sperl, Jonathan; Chabior, Michael; Schüttler, Markus; Bequé, Dirk; Cozzini, Cristina; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-10-01

    Numerical wave-optical simulations of X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging using grating interferometry require the oversampling of gratings and object structures in the range of few micrometers. Consequently, fields of view of few millimeters already use large amounts of a computer's main memory to store the propagating wave front, limiting the scope of the investigations to only small-scale problems. In this study, we apply an approximation to the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory to overcome these restrictions by dividing the two-dimensional wave front up into 1D lines, which are processed separately. The approach enables simulations with samples of clinically relevant dimensions by significantly reducing the memory footprint and the execution time and, thus, allows the qualitative comparison of different setup configurations. We analyze advantages as well as limitations and present the simulation of a virtual mammography phantom of several centimeters of size.

  20. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoennicke, M.G., E-mail: mhonnicke@bnl.go [NSLS II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica-UFPR, Curitiba (Brazil); Rigon, L. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy); Menk, R.-H. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCPa, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Arfelli, F. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy); Dipartamento di Fisica-Universita di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Foerster, L.A.; Rosado-Neto, G.H. [Departamento de Zoologia-UFPR, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2010-08-21

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures (Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  1. Towards tender X-rays with Zernike phase-contrast imaging of biological samples at 50 nm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Warmer, Martin; Goeries, Dennis; Herker, Eva; Reimer, Rudolph; David, Christian; Meents, Alke

    2014-07-01

    X-ray microscopy is a commonly used method especially in material science application, where the large penetration depth of X-rays is necessary for three-dimensional structural studies of thick specimens with high-Z elements. In this paper it is shown that full-field X-ray microscopy at 6.2 keV can be utilized for imaging of biological specimens with high resolution. A full-field Zernike phase-contrast microscope based on diffractive optics is used to study lipid droplet formation in hepatoma cells. It is shown that the contrast of the images is comparable with that of electron microscopy, and even better contrast at tender X-ray energies between 2.5 keV and 4 keV is expected.

  2. Zernike phase-contrast x-ray microscope with pseudo-Kohler illumination generated by sectored (polygon) condenser plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio, E-mail: take@spring8.or.j [JASRI / SPring-8, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2009-09-01

    Zernike phase contrast x-ray microscope has been developed at the undulator beamline 20XU and 47XU of SPring-8. The system consists of a pseudo-Koehler-illuminating system, a Fresnel zone plate objective with outermost zone width of 100 nm, a Zernike phase plate (0.96-{mu}m-thick tantalum, {lambda}/4 or 3{lambda}/4 phase-shifter at 8 keV) installed at the back-focal plane of the objective, and a visible-light conversion type cooled CCD camera as an image detector. A sectored (polygon) condenser plate is employed as the condenser in order to secure a large and flat field of view. Details and experimental results of the system will be shown.

  3. Using digital inline holographic microscopy and quantitative phase contrast imaging to assess viability of cultured mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missan, Sergey; Hrytsenko, Olga

    2015-03-01

    Digital inline holographic microscopy was used to record holograms of mammalian cells (HEK293, B16, and E0771) in culture. The holograms have been reconstructed using Octopus software (4Deep inwater imaging) and phase shift maps were unwrapped using the FFT-based phase unwrapping algorithm. The unwrapped phase shifts were used to determine the maximum phase shifts in individual cells. Addition of 0.5 mM H2O2 to cell media produced rapid rounding of cultured cells, followed by cell membrane rupture. The cell morphology changes and cell membrane ruptures were detected in real time and were apparent in the unwrapped phase shift images. The results indicate that quantitative phase contrast imaging produced by the digital inline holographic microscope can be used for the label-free real time automated determination of cell viability and confluence in mammalian cell cultures.

  4. Digital reconstruction based on angular spectrum diffraction with the ridge of wavelet transform in holographic phase-contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jiawen; Zhong, Jiangang; Hu, Cuiying

    2008-12-22

    A numerical reconstruction technique of digital holography based on angular spectrum diffraction by means of the ridge of Gabor wavelet transform (GWT) is presented. Appling the GWT, the object wave can be reconstructed by calculating the wavelet coefficients of the hologram at the ridge of the GWT automatically even if the spectrum of the virtual image is disturbed by the other spectrum. It provides a way to eliminate the effect of the zero-order and the twin-image terms without the spatial filtering. In particular, based on the angular spectrum theory, GWT is applied to the digital holographic phase-contrast microscopy on biological specimens. The theory, the results of a simulation and an experiment of an onion specimen are shown.

  5. Phase contrast imaging measurements of reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes during sawteeth in Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, E. M.; Porkolab, M.; Kramer, G. J.; Lin, L.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2009-05-01

    Reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAEs) have been observed with the phase contrast imaging diagnostic and Mirnov coils during the sawtooth cycle in Alcator C-mod [M. Greenwald et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S109 (2005)] plasmas with minority ion-cyclotron resonance heating. Both down-chirping RSAEs and up-chirping RSAEs have been observed during the sawtooth cycle. Experimental measurements of the spatial structure of the RSAEs are compared to theoretical models based on the code NOVA [C. Z. Cheng and M. S. Chance, J. Comput. Phys. 71, 124 (1987)] and used to derive constraints on the q profile. It is shown that the observed RSAEs can be understood by assuming a reversed shear q profile (up chirping) or a q profile with a local maximum (down chirping) with q ≈1.

  6. Using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging for the investigation of nude mouse hepatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qiang; Li, Dongyue; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI). The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT) were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM). Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors.

  7. Using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging for the investigation of nude mouse hepatic tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Tao

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI. The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM. Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors.

  8. A phase-contrast microscopy-based method for modeling the mechanical behavior of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mayssam; Sharabani-Yosef, Orna; Weihs, Daphne; Gefen, Amit

    2016-10-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of single, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), generated from images obtained by optical phase-contrast microscopy and used to quantify the structural responses of the studied cells to externally applied mechanical loads. Mechanical loading has been shown to affect cell morphology and structure, phenotype, motility and other biological functions. Cells experience mechanical loads naturally, yet under prolonged or sizable loading, damage and cell death may occur, which motivates research regarding the structural behavior of loaded cells. For example, near the weight-bearing boney prominences of the buttocks of immobile persons, tissues may become highly loaded, eventually leading to massive cell death that manifests as pressure ulcers. Cell-specific computational models have previously been developed by our group, allowing simulations of cell deformations under compressive or stretching loads. These models were obtained by reconstructing specific cell structures from series of 2D fluorescence, confocal image-slices, requiring cell-specific fluorescent-staining protocols and costly (confocal) microscopy equipment. Alternative modeling approaches represent cells simply as half-spheres or half-ellipsoids (i.e. idealized geometries), which neglects the curvature details of the cell surfaces associated with changes in concentrations of strains and stresses. Thus, we introduce here for the first time an optical image-based FE modeling, where loads are simulated on reconstructed 3D geometrical cell models from a single 2D, phase-contrast image. Our novel modeling method eliminates the need for confocal imaging and fluorescent staining preparations (both expensive), and makes cell-specific FE modeling affordable and accessible to the biomechanics community. We demonstrate the utility of this cost-effective modeling method by performing simulations of compression of MSCs embedded in a gel.

  9. Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast tomography of atherosclerotic plaque at high photon energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetterich, Holger; Fill, Sandra [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Herzen, Julia [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Dept. und Inst. fuer Medizintechnik; Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Geesthacht (Germany). Zentrum fuer Materialforschung] [and others

    2013-10-01

    Background: Tissue characterization of atherosclerosis by absorption-based imaging methods is limited due to low soft-tissue contrast. Grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) may become an alternative for plaque assessment if the phase signal can be retrieved at clinically applicable photon energies. The aims of this feasibility study were (i) to characterize arterial vessels at low and high photon energies, (ii) to extract qualitative features and (iii) quantitative phase-contrast Hounsfield units (HU-phase) of plaque components at 53 keV using histopathology as gold standard. Materials and methods: Five human carotid artery specimens underwent grating-based PC-CT using synchrotron radiation of either 23 keV or 53 keV and histological work-up. Specimens without advanced atherosclerosis were used to extract signal criteria of vessel layers. Diseased specimens were screened for important plaque components including fibrous tissue (FT), lipid (LIP), necrotic core (NEC), intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH), inflammatory cell infiltration (INF) and calcifications (CA). Qualitative features as well as quantitative HU-phase were analyzed. Results: Thirty-three regions in 6 corresponding PC-CT scans and histology sections were identified. Healthy samples had the same signal characteristics at 23 keV and 53 keV with bright tunica intima and adventitia and dark media. Plaque components showed differences in signal intensity and texture at 53 keV. Quantitative analysis demonstrated the highest HU-phase of soft plaque in dense FT. Less organized LIP, NEC and INF were associated with lower HU-phase values. The highest HU-phase were measured in CA. Conclusion: PC-CT of atherosclerosis is feasible at high, clinically relevant photon energies and provides detailed information about plaque structure including features of high risk vulnerable plaques. (orig.)

  10. In-line phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis: a phantom feasibility study at a synchrotron radiation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliznakova, K.; Russo, P.; Kamarianakis, Z.; Mettivier, G.; Requardt, H.; Bravin, A.; Buliev, I.

    2016-08-01

    The major objective is to adopt, apply and test developed in-house algorithms for volumetric breast reconstructions from projection images, obtained in in-line phase-contrast mode. Four angular sets, each consisting of 17 projection images obtained from four physical phantoms, were acquired at beamline ID17, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France. The tomosynthesis arc was  ±32°. The physical phantoms differed in complexity of texture and introduced features of interest. Three of the used phantoms were in-house developed, and made of epoxy resin, polymethyl-methacrylate and paraffin wax, while the fourth phantom was the CIRS BR3D. The projection images had a pixel size of 47 µm  ×  47 µm. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed with standard shift-and-add (SAA) and filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. It was found that the edge enhancement observed in planar x-ray images is preserved in tomosynthesis images from both phantoms with homogeneous and highly heterogeneous backgrounds. In case of BR3D, it was found that features not visible in the planar case were well outlined in the tomosynthesis slices. In addition, the edge enhancement index calculated for features of interest was found to be much higher in tomosynthesis images reconstructed with FBP than in planar images and tomosynthesis images reconstructed with SAA. The comparison between images reconstructed by the two reconstruction algorithms shows an advantage for the FBP method in terms of better edge enhancement. Phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis realized in in-line mode benefits the detection of suspicious areas in mammography images by adding the edge enhancement effect to the reconstructed slices.

  11. 4d/5d Correspondence for the Black Hole Potential and its Critical Points

    CERN Document Server

    Ceresole, A; Marrani, A

    2007-01-01

    We express the d=4, N=2 black hole effective potential for cubic holomorphic F functions and generic dyonic charges in terms of d=5 real special geometry data. The 4d critical points are computed from the 5d ones, and their relation is elucidated. For symmetric spaces, we identify the BPS and non-BPS classes of attractors and the respective entropies. These are related by simple formulae, interpolating between four and five dimensions, depending on the volume modulus and on the 4d magnetic (or electric) charges, and holding true also for generic field configurations and for non-symmetric cubic geometries.

  12. Four-dimensional (4D) tracking of high-temperature microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhehui; Liu, Q.; Waganaar, W.; Fontanese, J.; James, D.; Munsat, T.

    2016-11-01

    High-speed tracking of hot and molten microparticles in motion provides rich information about burning plasmas in magnetic fusion. An exploding-wire apparatus is used to produce moving high-temperature metallic microparticles and to develop four-dimensional (4D) or time-resolved 3D particle tracking techniques. The pinhole camera model and algorithms developed for computer vision are used for scene calibration and 4D reconstructions. 3D positions and velocities are then derived for different microparticles. Velocity resolution approaches 0.1 m/s by using the local constant velocity approximation.

  13. Chaos synchronization between two different 4D hyperchaotic Chen systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yang-Zheng; Jiang Chang-Sheng; Lin Chang-Sheng; Jiang Yao-Mei

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents chaos synchronization between two different four-dimensional (4D) hyperchaotic Chen systems by nonlinear feedback control laws.A modified 4D hyperchaotic Chen system is obtained by changing the nonlinear function of the 4D hyperchaotic Chen system,furthermore,an electronic circuit to realize two different 4D hyperchaotic Chen systems is designed.With nonlinear feedback control method,chaos synchronization between two different 4D hyperchaotic Chen systems is achieved.Based on the stability theory,the functions of the nonlinear feedback control for synchronization of two different 4D hyperchaotic Chen systems is derived,the range of feedback gains is determined.Numerical simulations are shown to verify the theoretical results.

  14. Biokinetic Analysis and Metabolic Fate of 2,4-D in 2,4-D-Resistant Soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Joshua J; Simpson, David M; Peterson, Mark A; Riechers, Dean E

    2017-07-26

    The Enlist weed control system allows the use of 2,4-D in soybean but slight necrosis in treated leaves may be observed in the field. The objectives of this research were to measure and compare uptake, translocation, and metabolism of 2,4-D in Enlist (E, resistant) and non-AAD-12 transformed (NT, sensitive) soybeans. The adjuvant from the Enlist Duo herbicide formulation (ADJ) increased 2,4-D uptake (36%) and displayed the fastest rate of uptake (U50= 0.2 h) among treatments. E soybean demonstrated a faster rate of 2,4-D metabolism (M50= 0.2 h) compared to NT soybean, but glyphosate did not affect 2,4-D metabolism. Metabolites of 2,4-D in E soybean were qualitatively different than NT. Applying 2,4-D-ethylhexyl ester instead of 2,4-D choline (a quaternary ammonium salt) eliminated visual injury to E soybean, likely due to the time required for initial de-esterification and bioactivation. Excessive 2,4-D acid concentrations in E soybean resulting from ADJ-increased uptake may significantly contribute to foliar injury.

  15. 3D/4D ultrasound registration of bone

    CERN Document Server

    Schers, Jonathan; Daanen, Vincent; Fouard, Céline; Plaskos, Christopher; Kilian, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method to reduce the invasiveness of Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS) using ultrasound. In this goal, we need to develop a method for 3D/4D ultrasound registration. The premilinary results of this study suggest that the development of a robust and ``realtime'' 3D/4D ultrasound registration is feasible.

  16. Beyond ICT4D: new media research in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovink, G.

    2011-01-01

    Beyond ICT4D: New Media Research in Uganda is a collection of ethnographic reports from diverse perspectives of those living at the other end of the African ICT pyramid. Crucially, these texts refocus on the so-called "ICT4D" debate away from the standard western lens, which depicts users in the

  17. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  18. Beyond ICT4D: new media research in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovink, G.

    2011-01-01

    Beyond ICT4D: New Media Research in Uganda is a collection of ethnographic reports from diverse perspectives of those living at the other end of the African ICT pyramid. Crucially, these texts refocus on the so-called "ICT4D" debate away from the standard western lens, which depicts users in the dev

  19. Assessment of hemodynamic changes in the systemic and pulmonary arterial circulation in patients with cystic fibrosis using phase-contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, Sebastian; Eichinger, Monika [DKFZ, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg University, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Puderbach, Michael; Fink, Christian; Plathow, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [DKFZ, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Teiner, Susanne [University of Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiebel, Matthias [Thoraxklinik am Universitaetsklinikum, Department of Pulmonology, Heidelberg (Germany); Mueller, Frank-Michael [University of Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to disabling lung disease and pulmonary hypertension (PH). The goal of this study was to assess the hemodynamics in the systemic and pulmonary arterial circulation of patients with CF using MRI. Ten patients with CF and 15 healthy volunteers were examined (1.5-T MRI). Phase-contrast flow measurements were assessed in the ascending aorta, pulmonary trunc, and the left and right pulmonary arteries (PA), resulting in the following parameters: peak velocity (PV) (centimeters per second) velocity rise gradient (VRG), time to PV (milliseconds), and the average area (centimeters squared). The blood flow ratio between the right and left lungs and the bronchosystemic shunt were calculated. For the ascending aorta and pulmonary trunc no parameter was significantly different between both populations. In the right PA a significantly lower PV (p=0.001) and VRG (p=0.02) was found. In the left PA there was a significantly (p=0.007) lower PV but no significant (p=0.07) difference between the VRG. The areas of the right (p=0.08) and left (p=0.5) PA were not significantly enlarged. For the volunteers a linear increase of PV in both PA was found with age, while it decreased in patients with CF. The blood flow distribution (right/left lung) showed no significant (p=0.7) difference between the groups. There was a significantly (p<0.001) higher bronchosystemic shunt volume in patients with CF (1.3 l/min) than in volunteers (0.1 l/min). Magnetic resonance based flow measurements in the right and left PA showed first indications for early development of PH. The significant increase in bronchosystemic shunt volume might be indicative fo the extent of parenchymal changes. (orig.)

  20. High-resolution phase-contrast MRI of aortic and pulmonary blood flow during rest and physical exercise using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Tim Frederik, E-mail: tim.weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von, E-mail: hendrik.tengg-kobligk@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, Annette, E-mail: kopp@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia, E-mail: julia.ley-zaporozhan@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 430, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hans-ulrich.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ley, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.ley@med.uni.heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Pediatric Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 430, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To establish high-resolution phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer to quantify aortic and pulmonary blood flow during resting conditions and exercise. Materials and methods: In 20 healthy volunteers (mean age, 26.8 {+-} 5.0 years) high-resolution PC-MRI (mean temporal resolution, 7.4 {+-} 3.2 ms) was performed in the ascending aorta (AA) and main pulmonary artery (PA) during physical rest and three exercise stages: stage 1, no-load operation; stage 2, heart rate increase 40% compared to rest; stage 3, heart rate increase 80% compared to rest. Flow quantification in AA and PA included flow volume (FV), average velocity (AV), peak velocity (PV) and time to PV (TP). Results: In stage 1 only TP demonstrated a significant change. With progression to stage 2, all parameters altered significantly. Flow measurements during stage 3 evidenced further alterations only of AV and TP regarding both AA and PA. The deviation of the heart rate from the desired target value was significantly higher for stage 3 compared to stage 2, and 15% of the subjects did not reach the desired target heart rate of stage 3 at all. Conclusion: Flow quantification by high-resolution PC-MRI during exercise using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer is feasible. Medium exercise stages are necessary and sufficient to demonstrate flow alterations in healthy volunteers. PC-MRI ergometry may give insights into aberrant hemodynamic conditions in patients with cardiovascular and pulmonary disease.