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Sample records for 4-item clinical risk

  1. Hip and fragility fracture prediction by 4-item clinical risk score and mobile heel BMD: a women cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulesius Hans

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One in four Swedish women suffers a hip fracture yielding high morbidity and mortality. We wanted to revalidate a 4-item clinical risk score and evaluate a portable heel bone mineral density (BMD technique regarding hip and fragility fracture risk among elderly women. Methods In a population-based prospective cohort study we used clinical risk factors from a baseline questionnaire and heel BMD to predict a two-year hip and fragility fracture outcome for women, in a fracture preventive program. Calcaneal heel BMD was measured by portable dual X-ray laser absorptiometry (DXL and compared to hip BMD, measured with stationary dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA technique. Results Seven women suffered hip fracture and 14 women fragility fracture/s (at hip, radius, humerus and pelvis among 285 women; 60% having heel BMD ≤ -2.5 SD. The 4-item FRAMO (Fracture and Mortality Index combined the clinical risk factors age ≥80 years, weight Conclusions In a follow-up study we identified high risk groups for hip and fragility fracture with our plain 4-item risk model. Increased fracture risk was also related to decreasing heel BMD in calcaneal bone, measured with a mobile DXL technique. A combination of high FRAMO Index, prior fragility fracture, and very low BMD restricted the high risk group to 11%, among whom most hip fractures occurred (71%. These practical screening methods could eventually reduce hip fracture incidence by concentrating preventive resources to high fracture risk women.

  2. Clinical high risk for psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Steen, Y; Gimpel-Drees, J; Lataster, T

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess associations between momentary stress and both affective and psychotic symptoms in everyday life of individuals at clinical high risk (CHR), compared to chronic psychotic patients and healthy controls, in search for evidence of early stress sensitiza...

  3. Psychometric Evaluation of 5- and 4-Item Versions of the LATCH Breastfeeding Assessment Tool during the Initial Postpartum Period among a Multiethnic Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Lau

    4-item version demonstrated sound psychometric properties compared to the 5-item version. Health professionals can use the 4-item LATCH as a clinical tool because it is a concise, easy-to-use and valid tool for assessing breastfeeding techniques among a multiethnic population.

  4. 26 CFR 1.117-4 - Items not considered as scholarships or fellowship grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Items not considered as scholarships or... Income § 1.117-4 Items not considered as scholarships or fellowship grants. The following payments or allowances shall not be considered to be amounts received as a scholarship or a fellowship grant for...

  5. Clinical risk and depression (continuing education credit).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, S

    1997-01-22

    This article provides information and guidance to nurses on clinical risks in mental health, particularly that of depression. It relates to UKCC professional development category: Reducing risk and Care enhancement.

  6. Risk Management in the Clinical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests play an integral role in medical decision-making and as such must be reliable and accurate. Unfortunately, no laboratory tests or devices are foolproof and errors can occur at pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases of testing. Evaluating possible conditions that could lead to errors and outlining the necessary steps to detect and prevent errors before they cause patient harm is therefore an important part of laboratory testing. This can be achieved through the practice of risk management. EP23-A is a new guideline from the CLSI that introduces risk management principles to the clinical laboratory. This guideline borrows concepts from the manufacturing industry and encourages laboratories to develop risk management plans that address the specific risks inherent to each lab. Once the risks have been identified, the laboratory must implement control processes and continuously monitor and modify them to make certain that risk is maintained at a clinically acceptable level. This review summarizes the principles of risk management in the clinical laboratory and describes various quality control activities employed by the laboratory to achieve the goal of reporting valid, accurate and reliable test results. PMID:24982831

  7. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  8. Risk communication in the clinical consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Richard; Edwards, Adrian; Grey, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    Modern healthcare and modern societies are facing up to the need for greater engagement of patients in treatment decisions. Shared and informed decision-making is replacing traditional paternalistic approaches to decisions; health policy both reflects and drives these changes. A critical contribution to better informed decisions by patients is the effective communication of risk in the clinical consultation. This is not straightforward, but there is a growing evidence base to improve performance in this area to the benefit of both patients and clinicians. The purpose of this review is to provide an accessible and practical guide to better communication of risk by clinicians.

  9. Potential benefits and risks of clinical xenotransplantation

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    Cooper DKC

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available David KC Cooper,1 David Ayares21Thomas E Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Revivicor, Blacksburg, VA, USAAbstract: The transplantation of organs and cells from pigs into humans could overcome the critical and continuing problem of the lack of availability of deceased human organs and cells for clinical transplantation. Developments in the genetic engineering of pigs have enabled considerable progress to be made in the experimental laboratory in overcoming the immune barriers to successful xenotransplantation. With regard to pig organ xenotransplantation, antibody- and cell-mediated rejection have largely been overcome, and the current major barrier is the development of coagulation dysregulation. This is believed to be due to a combination of immune activation of the vascular endothelial cells of the graft and molecular incompatibilities between the pig and primate coagulation–anticoagulation systems. Pigs with new genetic modifications specifically directed to this problem are now becoming available. With regard to less complex tissues, such as islets (for the treatment of diabetes, neuronal cells (for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and corneas, the remaining barriers are less problematic, and graft survival in nonhuman primate models extends for >1 year in all three cases. In planning the initial clinical trials, consideration will be concentrated on the risk–benefit ratio, based to a large extent on the results of preclinical studies in nonhuman primates. If the benefit to the patient is anticipated to be high, eg, insulin-independent control of glycemia, and the potential risks low, eg, minimal risk of transfer of a porcine infectious agent, then a clinical trial would be justified.Keywords: infection, pigs, genetically-engineered, xenotransplantation, islets, xenotransplantation, organs

  10. Emergency thoracic ultrasound and clinical risk management

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    Interrigi MC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Concetta Interrigi,1 Francesca M Trovato,2,3 Daniela Catalano,3,4 Guglielmo M Trovato3,5 1Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Cannizzaro, Catania, 2Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Civile, Ragusa, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, 4Postgraduate School of Clinical Ultrasound, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, University of Catania, 5Postgraduate School of e-Learning and ICT in Health Sciences, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy Purpose: Thoracic ultrasound (TUS has been proposed as an easy-option replacement for chest X-ray (CXR in emergency diagnosis of pneumonia, pleural effusion, and pneumothorax. We investigated CXR unforeseen diagnosis, subsequently investigated by TUS, considering its usefulness in clinical risk assessment and management and also assessing the sustainability of telementoring. Patients and methods: This observational report includes a period of 6 months with proactive concurrent adjunctive TUS diagnosis telementoring, which was done using freely available smartphone applications for transfer of images and movies. Results: Three hundred and seventy emergency TUS scans (excluding trauma patients were performed and telementored. In 310 cases, no significant chest pathology was detected either by CXR, TUS, or the subsequent work-up; in 24 patients, there was full concordance between TUS and CXR (ten isolated pleural effusion; eleven pleural effusion with lung consolidations; and three lung consolidation without pleural effusion; in ten patients with lung consolidations, abnormalities identified by CXR were not detected by TUS. In 26 patients, only TUS diagnosis criteria of disease were present: in 19 patients, CXR was not diagnostic, ie, substantially negative, but TUS detected these conditions correctly, and these were later confirmed by computed

  11. Clinical practice of risk assessment of sexual violence

    OpenAIRE

    Judge, Joseph Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background: Risk assessment of sexual violence involves evidence based evaluation of the risks posed by sexual offenders. It informs risk management; the provision of treatment that reduces the risk of future sexual violence. Previous research has focused on assessment of the predictive accuracy of different risk assessment tools, as well as the identification of risk factors that are associated with recidivism. In contrast, the clinical practice of risk assessment is a research a...

  12. Emergency thoracic ultrasound and clinical risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interrigi, Maria Concetta; Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Thoracic ultrasound (TUS) has been proposed as an easy-option replacement for chest X-ray (CXR) in emergency diagnosis of pneumonia, pleural effusion, and pneumothorax. We investigated CXR unforeseen diagnosis, subsequently investigated by TUS, considering its usefulness in clinical risk assessment and management and also assessing the sustainability of telementoring. Patients and methods This observational report includes a period of 6 months with proactive concurrent adjunctive TUS diagnosis telementoring, which was done using freely available smartphone applications for transfer of images and movies. Results Three hundred and seventy emergency TUS scans (excluding trauma patients) were performed and telementored. In 310 cases, no significant chest pathology was detected either by CXR, TUS, or the subsequent work-up; in 24 patients, there was full concordance between TUS and CXR (ten isolated pleural effusion; eleven pleural effusion with lung consolidations; and three lung consolidation without pleural effusion); in ten patients with lung consolidations, abnormalities identified by CXR were not detected by TUS. In 26 patients, only TUS diagnosis criteria of disease were present: in 19 patients, CXR was not diagnostic, ie, substantially negative, but TUS detected these conditions correctly, and these were later confirmed by computed tomography (CT). In seven patients, even if chest disease was identified by CXR, such diagnoses were significantly modified by ultrasound, and CT confirmed that TUS was more appropriate. The overall respective individual performances of CXR and TUS for the diagnosis of a pleural–pulmonary disease in emergency are good, with accuracy >95%. Conclusion About 20% of pneumonia cases were detectable only by CXR and 20% only by TUS and not by CXR; ie, about 40% of patients may have been misdiagnosed if, by chance, only one of the two tools had been used. The concurrent use of TUS and CXR increases the overall sensitivity and

  13. Studies on nursing risks and measures of clinical medication.

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    Li, Min; Bai, Jie; Huang, Jie

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the cause analysis of clinical medication nursing risks and propose relevant nursing measures, so as to control and reduce the clinical nursing risks and reach the physical and mental safety of patients and nurses. Clinical nursing risk events with 30 cases in TCM Hospital of Zhengzhou City from June 2010 to April 2012 were underwent statistical analyses. The risk of medication error ranked the first in the direct reasons of nursing risks, accounting for a higher ratio. Moreover, the reasons of nursing risks were also involved in nonstandard operation, disease observation and other relative factors. Nurses must fully understand the relative factors of medication nursing risks, regarding the patients as their own family and always permeating the consciousness of nursing risks into the working process.

  14. Clinical risk management of herb-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, P.A.G.M. de

    2007-01-01

    The concomitant use of conventional and herbal medicines can lead to clinically relevant herb-drug interactions. Clinical risk management offers a systematic approach to minimize the untoward consequences of these interactions by paying attention to: (i) risk identification and assessment; (ii) deve

  15. Clinical options for women at high risk for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L C; Sellers, T A; Schaid, D J; Nayfield, S; Grant, C S; Bjoraker, J A; Woods, J; Couch, F

    1999-10-01

    Women at hereditary risk of breast cancer face a difficult clinical decision. Each of the options available to them has unique advantages and disadvantages that are summarized in Table 9. Many components enter a high-risk woman's decision: her objective risk of breast cancer; clinical features, such as the consistency of breast tissue and resultant ease of examination; breast density on mammography; personal characteristics, including her experience with cancer within her family; her role and [table: see text] responsibilities within her own nuclear family; her values and goals; her experiences with the medical system; and her subjective assessment of risk. It is generally believed that women significantly overestimate their risk of breast cancer. Thus, it is vital that a woman at risk have access to a genetic counselor who can provide accurate assessment of her risk. Women should be encouraged to take time to understand their risk level and the advantages and disadvantages of the options before them.

  16. Risk perception and clinical decision making in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte Marie Lind

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aim to present new knowledge about different perspectives of health care professionals’ risk perceptions and clinical decision making. Furthermore, we intend to discuss differences between professional and personal risk perceptions and the impact on decisions in terms of both short...... and long-term outcomes. Background Insight into healthcare professionals’ perception of risk is a cornerstone for understanding their strategies for practising preventive care. The way people perceive risk can be seen as part of a general personality trait influenced by a mixture of individual...... considerations and the specific context. Most research has been focused on understanding of the concepts of risk. However healthcare professionals’ risk perception and personal attitudes also affect their clinical decision-making and risk communication. The differences between health care professionals’ personal...

  17. Job strain as a risk factor for clinical depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, I. E. H.; Nyberg, S. T.; Magnusson Hanson, L. L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adverse psychosocial working environments characterized by job strain (the combination of high demands and low control at work) are associated with an increased risk of depressive symptoms among employees, but evidence on clinically diagnosed depression is scarce. We examined job strain...... as a risk factor for clinical depression. METHOD: We identified published cohort studies from a systematic literature search in PubMed and PsycNET and obtained 14 cohort studies with unpublished individual-level data from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD...... unpublished datasets we included 120 221 individuals and 982 first episodes of hospital-treated clinical depression. Job strain was associated with an increased risk of clinical depression in both published [relative risk (RR) = 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.47-2.13] and unpublished datasets (RR = 1...

  18. [Clinical risk management in german hospitals - does size really matter?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, S; Jandeck, L M; Zippel, C; Andersen, M; Krummenauer, F

    2011-06-01

    In the last years, German hospitals have implemented different measures to increase patient safety. Special importance has been attached to near miss reporting systems (critical incident reporting system, CIRS) as instruments for risk identification in health care, instruments that promise high potential for organisational learning. To gain insight into the current status of critical incident reporting systems and other instruments for clinical risk management, a survey among 341 hospitals was carried out in 2009. Questions covered a process of six steps: from risk strategy to methods for risk identification, to risk analysis and risk assessment, to risk controlling and risk monitoring. Structured telephone interviews were conducted with 341 German hospitals, featuring in their statutory quality reports certain predefined key terms that indicated the concluded or planned implementation of clinical risk management. The main objective of those interviews was to check the relation between status/organisation of self-reported risk management and both operator (private, public, NPO) and size of hospital. The implementation of near miss reporting systems (CIRS) in German hospitals has been constantly rising since 2004: in 2009, 54 % of the interviewed hospitals reported an implemented CIRS; of these, 72 % reported the system to be hospital-wide. An association between CIRS and private, public or NPO-operator could not be detected (Fisher p = 1.000); however, the degree of CIRS implementation was significantly increasing with the size of the hospital, i.e., the number of beds (Fisher p = 0.008): only 38 % of the hospitals with less than 100 beds reported CIRS implementation against 52 % of those between 100 to 500 beds, and 67 % of those with more than 500 beds. While 62 % of the hospitals interviewed reported the maintenance of a risk management committee, only 14 % reported the implementation of risk analysing techniques. As to clinical risk

  19. Enhanced clinical pharmacy service targeting tools: risk-predictive algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajji, Feras W D; Scullin, Claire; Scott, Michael G; McElnay, James C

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of using a mix of clinical pharmacy data and routine hospital admission spell data in the development of predictive algorithms. Exploration of risk factors in hospitalized patients, together with the targeting strategies devised, will enable the prioritization of clinical pharmacy services to optimize patient outcomes. Predictive algorithms were developed using a number of detailed steps using a 75% sample of integrated medicines management (IMM) patients, and validated using the remaining 25%. IMM patients receive targeted clinical pharmacy input throughout their hospital stay. The algorithms were applied to the validation sample, and predicted risk probability was generated for each patient from the coefficients. Risk threshold for the algorithms were determined by identifying the cut-off points of risk scores at which the algorithm would have the highest discriminative performance. Clinical pharmacy staffing levels were obtained from the pharmacy department staffing database. Numbers of previous emergency admissions and admission medicines together with age-adjusted co-morbidity and diuretic receipt formed a 12-month post-discharge and/or readmission risk algorithm. Age-adjusted co-morbidity proved to be the best index to predict mortality. Increased numbers of clinical pharmacy staff at ward level was correlated with a reduction in risk-adjusted mortality index (RAMI). Algorithms created were valid in predicting risk of in-hospital and post-discharge mortality and risk of hospital readmission 3, 6 and 12 months post-discharge. The provision of ward-based clinical pharmacy services is a key component to reducing RAMI and enabling the full benefits of pharmacy input to patient care to be realized. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Predicting reattendance at a high-risk breast cancer clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormseth, Sarah R; Wellisch, David K; Aréchiga, Adam E; Draper, Taylor L

    2015-10-01

    The research about follow-up patterns of women attending high-risk breast-cancer clinics is sparse. This study sought to profile daughters of breast-cancer patients who are likely to return versus those unlikely to return for follow-up care in a high-risk clinic. Our investigation included 131 patients attending the UCLA Revlon Breast Center High Risk Clinic. Predictor variables included age, computed breast-cancer risk, participants' perceived personal risk, clinically significant depressive symptomatology (CES-D score ≥ 16), current level of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), and survival status of participants' mothers (survived or passed away from breast cancer). A greater likelihood of reattendance was associated with older age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.07, p = 0.004), computed breast-cancer risk (AOR = 1.10, p = 0.017), absence of depressive symptomatology (AOR = 0.25, p = 0.009), past psychiatric diagnosis (AOR = 3.14, p = 0.029), and maternal loss to breast cancer (AOR = 2.59, p = 0.034). Also, an interaction was found between mother's survival and perceived risk (p = 0.019), such that reattendance was associated with higher perceived risk among participants whose mothers survived (AOR = 1.04, p = 0.002), but not those whose mothers died (AOR = 0.99, p = 0.685). Furthermore, a nonlinear inverted "U" relationship was observed between state anxiety and reattendance (p = 0.037); participants with moderate anxiety were more likely to reattend than those with low or high anxiety levels. Demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors were found to be independently associated with reattendance to a high-risk breast-cancer clinic. Explication of the profiles of women who may or may not reattend may serve to inform the development and implementation of interventions to increase the likelihood of follow-up care.

  1. Clinical presentation and risk factors of osteoradionecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chronopoulos, Aristeidis

    2015-03-26

    Introduction: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws is defined as exposed irradiated bone that fails to heal over a period of 3 months without the evidence of a persisting or recurrent tumor. In the previous decades, numerous factors were associated with the risk of ORN development and severity. Aims: The purposes of this study were to present the data of the patients that were treated for ORN in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Munich (LMU), to detect factors that contributed to the onset of ORN, to identify risk factors associated with the severity of ORN and finally, to delineate and correlate these factors with the personal, health and treatment characteristics of the patients. Material and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted during the period from January 2003 until December 2012 that included all ORN cases having been treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Munich (LMU). The total sample was categorized in three groups according to stage and several variables were evaluated in an attempt to identify possible correlations between them and the necrosis severity. Results: One hundred and fifty three cases of ORN were documented. Among them, 23 (15.1%) cases were stage I, 31 (20.2%) were stage II and 99 (64.7%) were stage III and all localised in the mandible. There was a predominance of the disease in the posterior region when compared to the anterior region. The majority of cases was addicted to alcohol and tobacco abuse and was suffering from Diabetes Mellitus (DM). All cases were treated with RT and 80.4% of them with concomitant chemotherapy. The initial tumor was predominantly located in the floor of the mouth, the tongue and the pharynx. Approximately two thirds of the cases occured either after dental treatment or due to a local pathological condition. Logistic regression analysis identified Diabetes Mellitus (OR: 4.955, 95% Cl: 1.965-12.495), active smoking (OR: 13.542, 95% Cl: 2.085-87.947), excessive

  2. Visual Impairment/lntracranial Pressure Risk Clinical Care Data Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Baalen, Mary; Mason, Sara S.; Taiym, Wafa; Wear, Mary L.; Moynihan, Shannan; Alexander, David; Hart, Steve; Tarver, William

    2014-01-01

    Prior to 2010, several ISS crewmembers returned from spaceflight with changes to their vision, ranging from a mild hyperopic shift to frank disc edema. As a result, NASA expanded clinical vision testing to include more comprehensive medical imaging, including Optical Coherence Tomography and 3 Tesla Brain and Orbit MRIs. The Space and Clinical Operations (SCO) Division developed a clinical practice guideline that classified individuals based on their symptoms and diagnoses to facilitate clinical care. For the purposes of clinical surveillance, this classification was applied retrospectively to all crewmembers who had sufficient testing for classification. This classification is also a tool that has been leveraged for researchers to identify potential risk factors. In March 2014, driven in part by a more comprehensive understanding of the imaging data and increased imaging capability on orbit, the SCO Division revised their clinical care guidance to outline in-flight care and increase post-flight follow up. The new clinical guidance does not include a classification scheme

  3. Do pressure ulcer risk assessment scales improve clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kottner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Jan Kottner1, Katrin Balzer21Department of Nursing Science, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; 2Nursing Research Group, Institute for Social Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, GermanyAbstract: Standardized assessment instruments are deemed important for estimating pressure ulcer risk. Today, more than 40 so-called pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are available but still there is an ongoing debate about their usefulness. From a measurement point of view pressure ulcer (PU risk assessment scales have serious limitations. Empirical evidence supporting the validity of PU risk assessment scale scores is weak and obtained scores contain varying amounts of measurement error. The concept of pressure ulcer risk is strongly related to the general health status and severity of illness. A clinical impact due do the application of these scales could also not be demonstrated. It is questionable whether completion of standardized pressure ulcer risk scales in clinical practice is really needed.Keywords: Braden pressure ulcer, prevention, risk assessment, nursing assessment, predictive value, clinical effectiveness, review

  4. Suicide During Perinatal Period: Epidemiology, Risk Factors and Clinical Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Orsolini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal period may pose a great challenge for the clinical management and treatment of psychiatric disorders in women. In fact, several mental illnesses can arise during pregnancy and/or following childbirth. Suicide and infanticide have been considered relatively rare events during the perinatal period. However, in some mental disorders (i.e. postpartum depression, bipolar disorder, postpartum psychosis, etc. have been reported a higher risk of suicidal ideation, suicide attempt or suicide. Therefore, a complete screening of mothers’ mental health should also take into account thoughts of suicide and thoughts about harming infants as well. Clinicians should carefully monitor and early identify related clinical manifestations, potential risk factors and alarm symptoms related to suicide. The present paper aims at providing a focused review about epidemiological data, risk and protective factors and an overview about the main clinical correlates associated with the suicidal behaviour during the pregnancy and postpartum period.

  5. Job strain as a risk factor for clinical depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, I E H; Nyberg, S T; Magnusson Hanson, L L;

    2017-01-01

    as a risk factor for clinical depression. METHOD: We identified published cohort studies from a systematic literature search in PubMed and PsycNET and obtained 14 cohort studies with unpublished individual-level data from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD.......94-1.65), but attenuated on adjustment for a continuous depressive symptoms score (RR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.81-1.32). CONCLUSIONS: Job strain may precipitate clinical depression among employees. Future intervention studies should test whether job strain is a modifiable risk factor for depression.......BACKGROUND: Adverse psychosocial working environments characterized by job strain (the combination of high demands and low control at work) are associated with an increased risk of depressive symptoms among employees, but evidence on clinically diagnosed depression is scarce. We examined job strain...

  6. 分娩方式与不同体重新生儿凝血四项的研究%Study on 4 items of blood coagulation in neonates with childbirth fashions and different body weights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄伟东; 梁贵方; 郭小芳; 方文; 梁永钊; 胡玉转; 何美巧

    2012-01-01

    Objective To probe into the relationship among the 4 items of blood coagulation with the childbirth fashions and the body weights in neonates.The clinical reference basis was provided to analyze the blood coagulation physiology and influence factors in neonates.Methods The 4 items of blood coagulation,which included prothrombin time (PT),activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT),fibrinogen (FIB) and thrombin time (TT),were determined in plasma for 644 neonates with different childbirth fashions and different body weights.Results Compared with control group,the 4 items of blood coagulation in the first groups (<1500 g) of natural childbirth and caesarean section group for neonates with different body weights were all obviously extended (P<0.01); PT,APTT was extended (P<0.05) and TT,FIB was not apparently changed (P>0.05) for second group (1500~2500 g),the 4 items of blood coagulation were all not apparendy changed (P>0.05) for fourth group (>4000 g).First group of to cut the belly open childbirth was compared with first group of natural childbirth,PT,APTT is extended (P<0.05) and TT,FIB is not changed (P>0.05).The 4 items of blood coagulation are not apparently changed (P>0.05) for other corresponding body weights in caesarean section group and natural childbirth.Conclusions The 4 items of blood coagulation of neonates are affected by body weights.The smaller the body weights,the longer time of the blood coagulation.The blood coagulation times gradually shorten with the increasing body weight,but with FIB gradually increased.The childbirth fashions affect the blood coagulation neonates with the weight <1500 g.%目的 探讨新生儿凝血四项功能与分娩方式、体重的关系,分析新生儿凝血生理及其影响因素,为临床提供参考依据.方法 取644例不同分娩方式和体重的新生儿的血浆进行凝血四项即凝血酶原时间(PT)、活化部分凝血活酶时间(APTT)、纤维蛋白原(FIB)和凝

  7. Clinical Profile & Risk Factors in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Yadav, D Joseph, P Joshi, P Sakhi, RK Jha, J Gupta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary Artery Disease (CAD is becoming a major cause of morbidity & mortality burden in the developing world. Indians have been associated with a more severe form of CAD that has its onset at a younger age group with a male predominance. A prospective study was carried out to identify the risk factors and to know the emerging clinical profile in acute coronary syndrome (ACS including S T elevation & Non S T elevation myocardial infarction. We enrolled 200 consecutive patients with typical ECG changes & clinical history, admitted in emergency department from January 2009 to December 2009. A predefined Performa was completed in every patient with a detailed clinical history, physical examinations, and investigation studies. The clinical history revealed information about age, gender, risk factors, and modes of presentation and duration of symptoms. The details of physical examination including anthropometric data, vital signs and complete systemic evaluation were recorded. The regions of infarction and rhythm disturbances were also documented. Our study showed a significant male predominance with mean age being 56 years. Tobacco was identified as major risk factors (65% & obesity (BMI more than 25 is least common risk factor (13%.Patients had typical chest pain (94% and ECG showed anterior wall changes in54%. Forty percent patients developed complications, majority being arrhythmias (60% and least common is mechanical complication (2.5% Thus we conclude that ACS is more common in adult male with tobacco being major risk factors in our population.

  8. Clinical implications of genomics for cancer risk genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David M; James, Paul A; Ballinger, Mandy L

    2015-06-01

    The study of human genetics has provided substantial insight into cancer biology. With an increase in sequencing capacity and a reduction in sequencing costs, genomics will probably transform clinical cancer genetics. A heritable basis for many cancers is accepted, but so far less than half the genetic drivers have been identified. Genomics will increasingly be applied to populations irrespective of family history, which will change the framework of phenotype-directed genetic testing. Panel testing and whole genome sequencing will identify novel, polygenic, and de-novo determinants of cancer risk, often with lower penetrance, which will challenge present binary clinical classification systems and management algorithms. In the future, genotype-stratified public screening and prevention programmes could form part of tailored population risk management. The integration of research with clinical practice will result in so-called discovery cohorts that will help identify clinically significant genetic variation.

  9. Clinical risk factors for gestational hypertensive disorders in pregnant women at high risk for developing preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Tsz Y.; Groen, Henk; Faas, Marijke M.; van Pampus, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate clinical risk factors for the development of gestational hypertensive disorders in a group of pregnant women at high risk for developing preeclampsia. Secondly we evaluated the incidence and recurrence rate of preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. Study design: A

  10. Clinical risk factors for gestational hypertensive disorders in pregnant women at high risk for developing preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Tsz Y.; Groen, Henk; Faas, Marijke M.; van Pampus, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate clinical risk factors for the development of gestational hypertensive disorders in a group of pregnant women at high risk for developing preeclampsia. Secondly we evaluated the incidence and recurrence rate of preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. Study design: A p

  11. Establishing a family risk assessment clinic for breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, Jurgen

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting European women and the leading cause of cancer-related death. A total of 15-20% of women who develop breast cancer have a family history and 5-10% a true genetic predisposition. The identification and screening of women at increased risk may allow early detection of breast cancer and improve prognosis. We established a family risk assessment clinic in May 2005 to assess and counsel women with a family history of breast cancer, to initiate surveillance, and to offer risk-reducing strategies for selected high-risk patients. Patients at medium or high risk of developing breast cancer according to NICE guidelines were accepted. Family history was determined by structured questionnaire and interview. Lifetime risk of developing breast cancer was calculated using Claus and Tyrer-Cuzick scoring. Risk of carrying a breast cancer-related gene mutation was calculated using the Manchester system. One thousand two hundred and forty-three patients have been referred. Ninety-two percent were at medium or high risk of developing breast cancer. Formal assessment of risk has been performed in 368 patients, 73% have a high lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, and 72% a Manchester score >or=16. BRCA1\\/2 mutations have been identified in 14 patients and breast cancer diagnosed in two. Our initial experience of family risk assessment has shown there to be a significant demand for this service. Identification of patients at increased risk of developing breast cancer allows us to provide individuals with accurate risk profiles, and enables patients to make informed choices regarding their follow-up and management.

  12. Clinical Risk Factors for Infective Endocarditis in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, Bikash; Joshi, Astha; Brennessel, Debra J.

    2017-01-01

    Crucial to the management of staphylococcal bacteremia is an accurate evaluation of associated endocarditis, which has both therapeutic and prognostic implications. Because the clinical presentation of endocarditis can be nonspecific, the judicious use of echocardiography is important in distinguishing patients at high risk of developing endocarditis. In the presence of high-risk clinical features, an early transesophageal echocardiogram is warranted without prior transthoracic echocardiography. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical risk factors for staphylococcal infective endocarditis that might warrant earlier transesophageal echocardiography and to describe the incidence of endocarditis in cases of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by means of chart review of 91 patients consecutively admitted to a community hospital from January 2009 through January 2013. Clinical risk factors of patients with staphylococcal bacteremia were compared with risk factors of patients who had definite diagnoses of infective endocarditis. There were 69 patients with bacteremia alone (76%) and 22 patients with endocarditis (24%), as verified by echocardiography. Univariate analysis showed that diabetes mellitus (P=0.024), the presence of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator/pacemaker (P=0.006) or a prosthetic heart valve (P=0.003), and recent hospitalization (P=0.048) were significantly associated with developing infective endocarditis in patients with S. aureus bacteremia. The incidence of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia was similar in the bacteremia and infective-endocarditis groups (P=0.437). In conclusion, identified high-risk clinical factors in the presence of bacteremia can suggest infective endocarditis. Early evaluation with transesophageal echocardiography might well be warranted. PMID:28265207

  13. Cerebrovascular risk factors and clinical classification of strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Antonio; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Fernandez, Paola; Licata, Giuseppe

    2004-08-01

    Cerebrovascular risk represents a progressive and evolving concept owing to the particular distribution of risk factors in patients with ischemic stroke and in light of the newest stroke subtype classifications that account for pathophysiological, instrumental, and clinical criteria. Age represents the strongest nonmodifiable risk factor associated with ischemic stroke, while hypertension constitutes the most important modifiable cerebrovascular risk factor, confirmed by a host of epidemiological data and by more recent intervention trials of primary (HOT, Syst-Eur, LIFE) and secondary (PROGRESS) prevention of stroke in hypertensive patients. To be sure, a curious relationship exists between stroke and diabetes. Although the Framingham Study, The Honolulu Heart Program, and a series of Finnish studies reported a linear relationship between improved glucose metabolism and cerebral ischemia, the clinical and prognostic profile of diabetic patients with ischemic stroke remains to be fully understood. Our group, on the basis of TOAST classification--a diagnostic classification of ischemic stroke developed in 1993 that distinguishes five different clinical subtypes of ischemic stroke: large-artery atherosclerosis (LAAS), cardioembolic infarct (CEI), lacunar infarct (LAC), stroke of other determined origin (ODE), and stroke of undetermined origin (UDE), and now extensively used in clinical and scientific context--analysed the prevalence of cerebrovascular risk factors and the distribution of TOAST subtypes in more 300 patients with acute ischemic stroke in two consecutives studies that reported the significant association between diabetes and the lacunar subtype and a better clinical outcome for diabetic patients, most likely related to the higher prevalence of the lacunar subtype. Well-confirmed are the roles of cigarette smoking, atrial fibrillation, and asymptomatic carotid stenosis as cerebrovascular risk factors. Particularly interesting seems to be the function of

  14. Typhoid fever in children: Clinical presentation and risk factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typhoid fever in children: Clinical presentation and risk factors. ... Objective: The diagnosis of typhoid fever based on widal test is on the rise despite its set back. ... (71.4%), typhoid psychosis 3 (8.6%) and 4 (11.4%) had intestinal perforation.

  15. Solemnity: A Clinical Risk Index for Iron Deficient Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Oski, Frank A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies four groups of infants with iron deficiency but without anemia in an attempt to discover behavioral signs that can be used to index high-risk probability for iron deficiency. Solemnity in well-attached infants is suggested as a clinical sign to indicate the need for biochemical screening for iron deficiency. (AS)

  16. Solemnity: A Clinical Risk Index for Iron Deficient Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Oski, Frank A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies four groups of infants with iron deficiency but without anemia in an attempt to discover behavioral signs that can be used to index high-risk probability for iron deficiency. Solemnity in well-attached infants is suggested as a clinical sign to indicate the need for biochemical screening for iron deficiency. (AS)

  17. Person-Centered Fall Risk Awareness Perspectives: Clinical Correlates and Fall Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe

    2016-12-01

    To identify clinical correlates of person-centered fall risk awareness and their validity for predicting falls. Prospective cohort study. Community. Ambulatory community-dwelling older adults without dementia (N = 316; mean age 78, 55% female). Fall risk awareness was assessed using a two-item questionnaire that asked participants about overall likelihood of someone in their age group having a fall and their own personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. Incident falls were recorded over study follow-up. Fifty-three participants (16.8%) responded positively to the first fall risk awareness question about being likely to have a fall in the next 12 months, and 100 (31.6%) reported being at personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. There was only fair correlation (κ = 0.370) between responses on the two questions. Prior falls and depressive symptoms were associated with positive responses on both fall risk awareness questions. Age and other established fall risk factors were not associated with responses on either fall risk awareness question. The fall risk awareness questionnaire did not predict incident falls or injurious falls. Fall risk awareness is low in older adults. Although person-centered fall risk awareness is not predictive of falls, subjective risk perceptions should be considered when designing fall preventive strategies because they may influence participation and behaviors. © 2016, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Clinical factors influencing mortality risk in hospital acquired sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Mestanza, Cristina; Andaluz-Ojeda, David; Gómez-López, Juan Ramón; Bermejo Martín, Jesús F

    2017-09-04

    Identification of factors that confer an increased risk of mortality in hospital acquired sepsis (HAS) is necessary to help prevent, and improve the outcome of, this condition. To evaluate the clinical characteristics and factors associated with mortality in patients with HAS. Retrospective study of patients with HAS in a major Spanish Hospital from 2011 to 2015. Data from adults receiving any of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes associated with sepsis were collected. Those fulfilling the SEPSIS-2 definition with no evidence of infection during the first 48 hours following hospitalization were included (n=196). A multivariate analysis was employed to identify the risk factors of mortality. HAS patients were found to have many of the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (male sex, ageing, antecedent of cardiac disease, arterial hypertension, dyslipemia, smoking habit) and cancer. Vascular disease or chronic kidney disease were associated with 28 day mortality. Time from hospital admission to sepsis diagnosis, and the presence of organ failure were risk factors for 28-day and hospital mortality. Experiencing more than one episode of sepsis increased the risk of hospital mortality. "Sepsis Code" for the early identification of sepsis was protective against hospital mortality. We have identified a number of major factors associated to mortality in patients suffering from HAS. Implementation of surveillance programmes for the early identification and treatment of sepsis translate into a clear benefit. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical symptoms and risk factors in cerebral microangiopathy patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Okroglic

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although the clinical manifestation and risk factors of cerebral microangiopathy (CM remain unclear, the number of diagnoses is increasing. Hence, patterns of association among lesion topography and severity, clinical symptoms and demographic and disease risk factors were investigated retrospectively in a cohort of CM patients. METHODS: Patients treated at the Department of Neurology, University of Bonn for CM (n = 223; 98m, 125f; aged 77.32±9.09 from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively enrolled. Clinical symptoms, blood chemistry, potential risk factors, demographic data and ratings of vascular pathology in the brain based on the Wahlund scale were analyzed using Pearson's chi square test and one-way ANOVA. RESULTS: Progressive cognitive decline (38.1%, gait apraxia (27.8%, stroke-related symptoms and seizures (24.2%, TIA-symptoms (22% and vertigo (17% were frequent symptoms within the study population. Frontal lobe WMLs/lacunar infarcts led to more frequent presentation of progressive cognitive decline, seizures, gait apraxia, stroke-related symptoms, TIA, vertigo and incontinence. Parietooccipital WMLs/lacunar infarcts were related to higher frequencies of TIA, seizures and incontinence. Basal ganglia WMLs/lacunar infarcts were seen in patients with more complaints of gait apraxia, vertigo and incontinence. Age (p = .012, arterial hypertension (p<.000, obesity (p<.000 and cerebral macroangiopathy (p = .018 were positively related to cerebral lesion load. For increased glucose level, homocysteine, CRP and D-Dimers there was no association. CONCLUSION: This underlines the association of CM with neurological symptoms upon admission in a topographical manner. Seizures and vertigo are symptoms of CM which may have been missed in previous studies. In addition to confirming known risk factors such as aging and arterial hypertension, obesity appears to increase the risk as well. Since the incidence of CM is increasing, future

  20. Risk stratification in non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes: Risk scores, biomarkers and clinical judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corcoran

    2015-09-01

    Clinical guidelines recommend an early invasive strategy in higher risk NSTE-ACS. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE risk score is a validated risk stratification tool which has incremental prognostic value for risk stratification compared with clinical assessment or troponin testing alone. In emergency medicine, there has been a limited adoption of the GRACE score in some countries (e.g. United Kingdom, in part related to a delay in obtaining timely blood biochemistry results. Age makes an exponential contribution to the GRACE score, and on an individual patient basis, the risk of younger patients with a flow-limiting culprit coronary artery lesion may be underestimated. The future incorporation of novel cardiac biomarkers into this diagnostic pathway may allow for earlier treatment stratification. The cost-effectiveness of the new diagnostic pathways based on high-sensitivity troponin and copeptin must also be established. Finally, diagnostic tests and risk scores may optimize patient care but they cannot replace patient-focused good clinical judgment.

  1. Empathy in individuals clinically at risk for psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derntl, B.; Michel, T. M.; Prempeh, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Empathy is a basic human ability, and patients with schizophrenia show dysfunctional empathic abilities on the behavioural and neural level. Aims These dysfunctions may precede the onset of illness; thus, it seems mandatory to examine the empathic abilities in individuals at clinical...... high risk for psychosis. Method Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured 15 individuals at clinical high risk of psychosis (CHR group) and compared their empathy performance with 15 healthy volunteers and 15 patients with schizophrenia. Results Behavioural data analysis indicated...... no significant deficit in the CHR group. Functional data analysis revealed hyperactivation in a frontotemporoparietal network including the amygdala in the CHR group compared with the other two groups. Conclusions Despite normal behavioural performance, the CHR group activated the neural empathy network...

  2. Presumed Perinatal Stroke: Risk Factors, Clinical and Radiological Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilves, Pilvi; Laugesaar, Rael; Loorits, Dagmar; Kolk, Anneli; Tomberg, Tiiu; Lõo, Silva; Talvik, Inga; Kahre, Tiina; Talvik, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    It is unknown why some infants with perinatal stroke present clinical symptoms late during infancy and will be identified as infants with presumed perinatal stroke. The risk factors and clinical and radiological data of 42 infants with presumed perinatal stroke (69% with periventricular venous infarction and 31% with arterial ischemic stroke) from the Estonian Pediatric Stroke Database were reviewed. Children with presumed perinatal stroke were born at term in 95% of the cases and had had no risk factors during pregnancy in 43% of the cases. Children with periventricular venous infarction were born significantly more often (82%) vaginally (P = .0213) compared to children with arterial stroke (42%); nor did they require resuscitation (P = .0212) or had any neurological symptoms after birth (P = .0249). Periventricular venous infarction is the most common type of lesion among infants with the presumed perinatal stroke. Data suggest that the disease is of prenatal origin.

  3. Portal vein thrombosis; risk factors, clinical presentation and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogaard, Kirstine K; Astrup, Lone B; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is increasingly frequently being diagnosed, but systematic descriptions of the natural history and clinical handling of the condition are sparse. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe risk factors, clinical presentation, complications...... and treatment of portal vein thrombosis in a single-centre. METHODS: Sixty-seven patients were identified in the electronic records from 1992 to 2005. All data were obtained from the patient records. RESULTS: One or more risk factors (e.g. prothrombotic disorder or abdominal inflammation) were present in 87......%. Symptoms were abdominalia, splenomegaly, fever, ascites, haematemesis, and weight loss. Abdominalia and fever occurred more frequently in patients with acute PVT. Frequent complications were splenomegaly, oesophageal- and gastric varices with or without bleeding, portal hypertensive gastropathy and ascites...

  4. Clinical investigation of risk factors in ectopic pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-yun HU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To discuss the relative and independent risk factors in ectopic pregnancy. Methods  The clinical data of 870 patients with ectopic pregnancy, admitted from 2005 to 2012, were retrospectively analyzed, with 800 cases of normal pregnancy serving as control. Monofactorial correlation analysis was used to analyze the related risk factor, and logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the independent risk factor. Results  Pelvic adhesion, previous operation, cesarean section delivery, number of pregnancy, artificial abortion, medical abortion, in vitrofertilization and embryo replacement (IVF-ER, and placement of intrauterine device (IUD are the risk factors of ectopic pregnancy, pelvic adhesion, artificial abortion, operation, number of pregnancies and IUD are the independent risk factors, and pelvic adhesion is the major risk factor. Conclusion  Avoidance of unexpected pregnancy as possible, reduction of the number of artificial abortion, prevention and treatment of genital duct inflammation, and standardization of pelvic operation may reduce the incidence of ectopic pregnancy.

  5. Clinical Prediction of Fall Risk and White Matter Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bang-Bon; Bergethon, Peter; Qiu, Wei Qiao; Scott, Tammy; Hussain, Mohammed; Rosenberg, Irwin; Caplan, Louis R.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as determined by the Tinetti scale, have specific patterns of WM abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging. Design, Setting, and Patients Community-based cohort of 125 homebound elderly individuals. Main Outcome Measures Diffusion tensor imaging scans were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics analysis to determine the location of WM abnormalities in subjects with Tinetti scale scores of 25 or higher (without risk of falls) and lower than 25 (with risk of falls). Multivariate linear least squares correlation analysis was performed to determine the association between Tinetti scale scores and local fractional anisotropy values on each skeletal voxel controlling for possible confounders. Results In subjects with risk of falls (Tinetti scale score scores, while the other locations were unrelated to these scores. Conclusions Elderly individuals at risk for falls as determined by the Tinetti scale have WM abnormalities in specific locations on diffusion tensor imaging, some of which correlate with cognitive function scores. PMID:22332181

  6. STUDY OF RISK FACTORS AND CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available `INTRODUCTION: Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed countries after cardiovascular disease and cancer. In India Community Surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate for hemiplegia 200 per 1, 00, 000 population. It accounts for nearly 1.5% of all urban admissions, 4.5 % of all medical and about 20% of neurological cases. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: Identification of risk factors and evaluation of clinical profile of acute stroke. MATERIAL AND METHOD: INCLUSION CRITERIA: Cases of acute stoke admitted in SGMH hospital were selected for the study. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Brain injury cases, infective, neoplastic cases producing stroke were excluded. RESULTS: Stroke was more common in male, 58 % patients were male and 42% patients were female. It was more common in 5th and 6th decade. Most common etiology was infarction. Most common risk factor was hypertension followed by smoking. In addition to limb weakness, headache and vomiting were most common presenting symptoms followed by convulsion. These symptoms were more common in hemorrhagic stroke. Right sided hemiplegia was more common than left sided. Middle cerebral artery was involved in majority of cases in atherothrombotic stroke whereas basal ganglion was most common site of bleed in hemorrhagic stroke. Coma and mortality were more in hemorrhagic stroke. CONCLUSION: The risk factors and clinical profile of acute stroke in India are similar to that of Western countries. Common risk factors are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia

  7. Breast cancer risk prediction using a clinical risk model and polygenic risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Yiwey; Hu, Donglei; Ma, Lin; Huntsman, Scott; Gard, Charlotte C; Leung, Jessica W T; Tice, Jeffrey A; Vachon, Celine M; Cummings, Steven R; Kerlikowske, Karla; Ziv, Elad

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer risk assessment can inform the use of screening and prevention modalities. We investigated the performance of the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk model in combination with a polygenic risk score (PRS) comprised of 83 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified from genome-wide association studies. We conducted a nested case-control study of 486 cases and 495 matched controls within a screening cohort. The PRS was calculated using a Bayesian approach. The contributions of the PRS and variables in the BCSC model to breast cancer risk were tested using conditional logistic regression. Discriminatory accuracy of the models was compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Increasing quartiles of the PRS were positively associated with breast cancer risk, with OR 2.54 (95 % CI 1.69-3.82) for breast cancer in the highest versus lowest quartile. In a multivariable model, the PRS, family history, and breast density remained strong risk factors. The AUROC of the PRS was 0.60 (95 % CI 0.57-0.64), and an Asian-specific PRS had AUROC 0.64 (95 % CI 0.53-0.74). A combined model including the BCSC risk factors and PRS had better discrimination than the BCSC model (AUROC 0.65 versus 0.62, p = 0.01). The BCSC-PRS model classified 18 % of cases as high-risk (5-year risk ≥3 %), compared with 7 % using the BCSC model. The PRS improved discrimination of the BCSC risk model and classified more cases as high-risk. Further consideration of the PRS's role in decision-making around screening and prevention strategies is merited.

  8. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : Systematic review of clinical risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Van Engelen, Klaartje; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Elliott, Perry M.; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a systematic literature review of recommended 'major' and 'possible' clinical risk markers for sudden cardiac death (SCD) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases for articles published between 1971 and 2007. We included English langua

  9. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: systematic review of clinical risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Christiaans; K. van Engelen; I.M. van Langen; E. Birnie; G.J. Bonsel; P.M. Elliott; A.A.M. Wilde

    2010-01-01

    We performed a systematic literature review of recommended 'major' and 'possible' clinical risk markers for sudden cardiac death (SCD) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases for articles published between 1971 and 2007. We included English langua

  10. Untreated periodontal disease in Indonesian adolescents : Longitudinal clinical data and prospective clinical and microbiological risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, MF; Van der Weijden, GA; Abbas, F; Arief, EM; Armand, S; Winkel, EG; Van Winkelhoff, AJ; Van der Velden, U

    2000-01-01

    Background, aims: In order to investigate the role of various putative clinical and microbiological risk markers, a longitudinal study was initiated in a young population deprived of regular dental care. In 1987 all inhabitants in the age range 15-25 years living in a village with approximately 2000

  11. Emerging Comorbidities in Adult Asthma: Risks, Clinical Associations, and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanranta, Hannu; Kauppi, Paula; Tuomisto, Leena E; Ilmarinen, Pinja

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Most studies with asthma have been performed in patients being otherwise healthy. However, in real life, comorbid diseases are very common in adult patients. We review here the emerging comorbid conditions to asthma such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2), and cardiac and psychiatric diseases. Their role as risk factors for incident asthma and whether they affect clinical asthma are evaluated. Obesity, independently or as a part of metabolic syndrome, DM2, and depression are risk factors for incident asthma. In contrast, the effects of comorbidities on clinical asthma are less well-known and mostly studies are lacking. Cross-sectional studies in obese asthmatics suggest that they may have less well controlled asthma and worse lung function. However, no long-term clinical follow-up studies with these comorbidities and asthma were identified. These emerging comorbidities often occur in the same multimorbid adult patient and may have in common metabolic pathways and inflammatory or other alterations such as early life exposures, systemic inflammation, inflammasome, adipokines, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, lung mechanics, mitochondrial dysfunction, disturbed nitric oxide metabolism, and leukotrienes.

  12. Emerging Comorbidities in Adult Asthma: Risks, Clinical Associations, and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu Kankaanranta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Most studies with asthma have been performed in patients being otherwise healthy. However, in real life, comorbid diseases are very common in adult patients. We review here the emerging comorbid conditions to asthma such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2, and cardiac and psychiatric diseases. Their role as risk factors for incident asthma and whether they affect clinical asthma are evaluated. Obesity, independently or as a part of metabolic syndrome, DM2, and depression are risk factors for incident asthma. In contrast, the effects of comorbidities on clinical asthma are less well-known and mostly studies are lacking. Cross-sectional studies in obese asthmatics suggest that they may have less well controlled asthma and worse lung function. However, no long-term clinical follow-up studies with these comorbidities and asthma were identified. These emerging comorbidities often occur in the same multimorbid adult patient and may have in common metabolic pathways and inflammatory or other alterations such as early life exposures, systemic inflammation, inflammasome, adipokines, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, lung mechanics, mitochondrial dysfunction, disturbed nitric oxide metabolism, and leukotrienes.

  13. Risk, diagnostic error, and the clinical science of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Peterson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of new neuroimaging techniques have detected covert awareness in some patients previously thought to be in a vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. This raises worries for patients, families, and physicians, as it indicates that the existing diagnostic error rate in this patient group is higher than assumed. Recent research on a subset of these techniques, called active paradigms, suggests that false positive and false negative findings may result from applying different statistical methods to patient data. Due to the nature of this research, these errors may be unavoidable, and may draw into question the use of active paradigms in the clinical setting. We argue that false positive and false negative findings carry particular moral risks, which may bear on investigators' decisions to use certain methods when independent means for estimating their clinical utility are absent. We review and critically analyze this methodological problem as it relates to both fMRI and EEG active paradigms. We conclude by drawing attention to three common clinical scenarios where the risk of diagnostic error may be most pronounced in this patient group.

  14. Mining disease risk patterns from nationwide clinical databases for the assessment of early rheumatoid arthritis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chu Yu; Weng, Meng Yu; Lin, Tzu Chieh; Cheng, Shyr Yuan; Yang, Yea Huei Kao; Tseng, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease that can cause painful swelling in the joint lining, morning stiffness, and joint deformation/destruction. These symptoms decrease both quality of life and life expectancy. However, if RA can be diagnosed in the early stages, it can be controlled with pharmacotherapy. Although many studies have examined the possibility of early assessment and diagnosis, few have considered the relationship between significant risk factors and the early assessment of RA. In this paper, we present a novel framework for early RA assessment that utilizes data preprocessing, risk pattern mining, validation, and analysis. Under our proposed framework, two risk patterns can be discovered. Type I refers to well-known risk patterns that have been identified by existing studies, whereas Type II denotes unknown relationship risk patterns that have rarely or never been reported in the literature. These Type II patterns are very valuable in supporting novel hypotheses in clinical trials of RA, and constitute the main contribution of this work. To ensure the robustness of our experimental evaluation, we use a nationwide clinical database containing information on 1,314 RA-diagnosed patients over a 12-year follow-up period (1997-2008) and 965,279 non-RA patients. Our proposed framework is employed on this large-scale population-based dataset, and is shown to effectively discover rich RA risk patterns. These patterns may assist physicians in patient assessment, and enhance opportunities for early detection of RA. The proposed framework is broadly applicable to the mining of risk patterns for major disease assessments. This enables the identification of early risk patterns that are significantly associated with a target disease.

  15. Clinical risk factors for the development of consecutive exotropia: a comparative clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylan Sekeroglu, Hande; Erkan Turan, Kadriye; Karakaya, Jale; Sener, Emin Cumhur; Sanac, Ali Sefik

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare a group of patients with consecutive exotropia with patients who had ≤10 prism diopters (PD) esotropia or no deviation postoperatively in terms of probable clinical risk factors for the development of consecutive exotropia. METHODS The study recruited fourteen patients who developed consecutive exodeviation during follow-up period after the correction of esotropia who were categorized as group 1 and thirty-one patients who had still ≤10 PD esotropia or no deviation at the final visit that were considered as group 2. Clinical risk factors leading the development of consecutive deviation were analyzed as the main outcome measures. RESULTS The mean age of patients was 4.57±3.11y in group 1 and 5.10±3.52y in group 2 (P=0.634). There was no significant difference of preoperative near and distant deviations among two groups (P=0.835, 0.928 respectively). The mean amount of medial rectus recession and lateral rectus resection was similar in both groups (P=0.412, 0.648 respectively). Convergence insufficiency and neurological diseases were more frequent in group 1 (P=0.007, 0.045). Accompanying neurological disease was found to be as a significant factor increasing the risk of the development of consecutive exotropia significantly [odds ratios (OR): 5.75 (1.04-31.93)]. CONCLUSION Accompanying neurological disease appears to be a significant clinical risk factor for the development of consecutive exodeviation during postoperative follow-up after the correction of esotropia. However, larger studies are needed in order to interpret the results to the clinical practice and to ascertain other concurrent risk factors. PMID:27366693

  16. Smell identification in individuals at clinical high risk for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kelly Elizabeth; Evans, Elizabeth; Kayser, Jürgen; Ben-David, Shelly; Messinger, Julie; Bruder, Gerard; Malaspina, Dolores; Corcoran, Cheryl Mary

    2014-12-15

    Smell identification deficits exist in schizophrenia, and may be associated with its negative symptoms. Less is known about smell identification and its clinical correlates in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. We examined smell identification, symptoms and IQ in 71 clinical high-risk (CHR) subjects and 36 healthy controls. Smell identification was assessed using both the 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT; Doty, R.L., Shaman, P., Kimmelman, C.P., Dann, M.S., 1984. University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test: a rapid quantitative olfactory function test for the clinic. Laryngoscope 94, 176-178) and its extracted 12-item Brief Smell Identification Test (Goudsmit, N., Coleman, E., Seckinger, R.A., Wolitzky, R., Stanford, A.D., Corcoran, C., Goetz, R.R., Malaspina, D., 2003. A brief smell identification test discriminates between deficit and non-deficit schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research 120, 155-164). Smell identification did not significantly differ between CHR subjects and controls. Among CHR subjects, smell identification did not predict schizophrenia (N=19; 27%) within 2 years, nor was it associated with negative or positive symptoms. This is the third prospective cohort study to examine smell identification in CHR subjects, and overall, findings are inconclusive, similar to what is found for other disorders in adolescents, such as autism spectrum, attention deficit and anxiety disorders. Smell identification deficit may not have clear utility as a marker of emergent schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Emotional Demands at Work and the Risk of Clinical Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vammen, Marianne Agergaard; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Kolstad, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study is a 2-year follow-up study of different dimensions of work-related emotional demands as a predictor for clinical depression. METHODS: In a two-wave study, 3224 (72%) public employees from 474 work-units participated twice by filling in questionnaires. Sixty-two cases of cli....... CONCLUSIONS: The personal perception of emotional demands was a risk factor for clinical depression but specific emotionally demanding work tasks were not.......OBJECTIVE: This study is a 2-year follow-up study of different dimensions of work-related emotional demands as a predictor for clinical depression. METHODS: In a two-wave study, 3224 (72%) public employees from 474 work-units participated twice by filling in questionnaires. Sixty-two cases...... of clinical depression were diagnosed. Emotional demands were examined as perceived and content-related emotional demands, individually reported and work-unit based. Support, meaningful work, and enrichment were considered as potential effect modifiers. RESULTS: Individually reported perceived emotional...

  18. Systematic implementation of clinical risk management in a large university hospital: the impact of risk managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendlhofer, Gerald; Brunner, Gernot; Tax, Christa; Falzberger, Gebhard; Smolle, Josef; Leitgeb, Karina; Kober, Brigitte; Kamolz, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    For health care systems in recent years, patient safety has increasingly become a priority issue. National and international strategies have been considered to attempt to overcome the most prominent hazards while patients are receiving health care. Thereby, clinical risk management (CRM) plays a dominant role in enabling the identification, analysis, and management of potential risks. CRM implementation into routine procedures within complex hospital organizations is challenging, as in the past, organizational change strategies using a top-down approach have often failed. Therefore, one of our main objectives was to educate a certain number of risk managers in facilitating CRM using a bottom-up approach. To achieve our primary purpose, five project strands were developed, and consequently followed, introducing CRM: corporate governance, risk management (RM) training, CRM process, information, and involvement. The core part of the CRM process involved the education of risk managers within each organizational unit. To account for the size of the existing organization, we assumed that a minimum of 1 % of the workforce had to be trained in RM to disseminate the continuous improvement of quality and safety. Following a roll-out plan, CRM was introduced in each unit and potential risks were identified. Alongside the changes in the corporate governance, a hospital-wide CRM process was introduced resulting in 158 trained risk managers correlating to 2.0 % of the total workforce. Currently, risk managers are present in every unit and have identified 360 operational risks. Among those, 176 risks were scored as strategic and clustered together into top risks. Effective meeting structures and opportunities to share information and knowledge were introduced. Thus far, 31 units have been externally audited in CRM. The CRM approach is unique with respect to its dimension; members of all health care professions were trained to be able to identify potential risks. A network of risk

  19. Dimethyl fumarate-associated lymphopenia: Risk factors and clinical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbrake, Erin E; Naismith, Robert T; Parks, Becky J; Wu, Gregory F; Cross, Anne H

    2015-01-01

    Background Dimethyl fumarate (DMF), a disease-modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS), causes lymphopenia in a fraction of patients. The clinical significance of this is unknown. Several cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in lymphopenic fumarate-treated patients have raised concerns about drug safety. Since lymphocytes contribute to MS pathology, lymphopenia may also be a biomarker for response to the drug. Objective The objective of this manuscript is to evaluate risk factors for DMF-induced lymphopenia and drug failure in a real-world population of MS patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 221 patients prescribed DMF at a single academic medical center between March 2013 and February 2015. Results Grade 2–3 lymphopenia developed in 17% of the total cohort and did not resolve during DMF treatment. Older age (>55), lower baseline absolute lymphocyte count and recent natalizumab exposure increased the risk of developing moderate to severe lymphopenia while on DMF. Lymphopenia was not predictive of good clinical response or of breakthrough MS activity on DMF. Conclusions Lymphopenia develops in a significant minority of DMF-treated patients, and if grade 2 or worse, is unlikely to resolve while on the drug. Increased vigilance in lymphocyte monitoring and infection awareness is particularly warranted in older patients and those switching from natalizumab. PMID:26550483

  20. Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach (CARMINA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricarico, Pierfrancesco; Tardivo, Stefano; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Moretti, Francesca; Poletti, Piera; Fiore, Alberto; Monturano, Massimo; Mura, Ida; Privitera, Gaetano; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2016-08-08

    Purpose - The European Union recommendations for patient safety calls for shared clinical risk management (CRM) safety standards able to guide organizations in CRM implementation. The purpose of this paper is to develop a self-evaluation tool to measure healthcare organization performance on CRM and guide improvements over time. Design/methodology/approach - A multi-step approach was implemented including: a systematic literature review; consensus meetings with an expert panel from eight Italian leader organizations to get to an agreement on the first version; field testing to test instrument feasibility and flexibility; Delphi strategy with a second expert panel for content validation and balanced scoring system development. Findings - The self-assessment tool - Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach includes seven areas (governance, communication, knowledge and skills, safe environment, care processes, adverse event management, learning from experience) and 52 standards. Each standard is evaluated according to four performance levels: minimum; monitoring; outcomes; and improvement actions, which resulted in a feasible, flexible and valid instrument to be used throughout different organizations. Practical implications - This tool allows practitioners to assess their CRM activities compared to minimum levels, monitor performance, benchmarking with other institutions and spreading results to different stakeholders. Originality/value - The multi-step approach allowed us to identify core minimum CRM levels in a field where no consensus has been reached. Most standards may be easily adopted in other countries.

  1. Clinical imaging guidelines part 2: Risks, benefits, barriers, and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, James; del Rosario-Perez, Maria; Van Bladel, Lodewijk; Jung, Seung Eun; Holmberg, Ola; Bettmann, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    A recent international meeting was convened by two United Nations bodies to focus on international collaboration on clinical appropriateness/referral guidelines for use in medical imaging. This paper, the second of 4 from this technical meeting, addresses barriers to the successful development/deployment of clinical imaging guidelines and means of overcoming them. It reflects the discussions of the attendees, and the issues identified are treated under 7 headings: ■ Practical Strategy for Development and Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Governance Arrangements and Concerns with Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Finance, Sustainability, Reimbursement, and Related Issues; ■ Identifying Benefits and Radiation Risks from Radiological Examinations; ■ Information Given to Patients and the Public, and Consent Issues; ■ Special Concerns Related to Pregnancy; and ■ The Research Agenda. Examples of topics identified include the observation that guideline development is a global task and there is no case for continuing it as the project of the few professional organizations that have been brave enough to make the long-term commitment required. Advocacy for guidelines should include the expectations that they will facilitate: (1) better health care delivery; (2) lower cost of that delivery; with (3) reduced radiation dose and associated health risks. Radiation protection issues should not be isolated; rather, they should be integrated with the overall health care picture. The type of dose/radiation risk information to be provided with guidelines should include the uncertainty involved and advice on application of the precautionary principle with patients. This principle may be taken as an extension of the well-established medical principle of "first do no harm." Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may prove helpful when assessing the

  3. Population-Attributable Risk Proportion of Clinical Risk Factors for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Natalie J; Golmakani, Marzieh K; Miglioretti, Diana L; Sprague, Brian L; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2017-09-01

    Many established breast cancer risk factors are used in clinical risk prediction models, although the proportion of breast cancers explained by these factors is unknown. To determine the population-attributable risk proportion (PARP) for breast cancer associated with clinical breast cancer risk factors among premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Case-control study with 1:10 matching on age, year of risk factor assessment, and Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) registry. Risk factor data were collected prospectively from January 1, 1996, through October 31, 2012, from BCSC community-based breast imaging facilities. A total of 18 437 women with invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ were enrolled as cases and matched to 184 309 women without breast cancer, with a total of 58 146 premenopausal and 144 600 postmenopausal women enrolled in the study. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density (heterogeneously or extremely dense vs scattered fibroglandular densities), first-degree family history of breast cancer, body mass index (>25 vs 18.5-25), history of benign breast biopsy, and nulliparity or age at first birth (≥30 years vs breast cancer. Of the 18 437 women with breast cancer, the mean (SD) age was 46.3 (3.7) years among premenopausal women and 61.7 (7.2) years among the postmenopausal women. Overall, 4747 (89.8%) premenopausal and 12 502 (95.1%) postmenopausal women with breast cancer had at least 1 breast cancer risk factor. The combined PARP of all risk factors was 52.7% (95% CI, 49.1%-56.3%) among premenopausal women and 54.7% (95% CI, 46.5%-54.7%) among postmenopausal women. Breast density was the most prevalent risk factor for both premenopausal and postmenopausal women and had the largest effect on the PARP; 39.3% (95% CI, 36.6%-42.0%) of premenopausal and 26.2% (95% CI, 24.4%-28.0%) of postmenopausal breast cancers could potentially be averted if all women with heterogeneously or extremely dense

  4. Chocolate intake and risk of clinically apparent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Berg Johansen, Martin; Tjønneland, Anne

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between chocolate intake and incident clinically apparent atrial fibrillation or flutter (AF). METHODS: The Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study is a large population-based prospective cohort study. The present study is based on 55 502 participants (26 400...... men and 29 102 women) aged 50-64 years who had provided information on chocolate intake at baseline. Incident cases of AF were ascertained by linkage with nationwide registries. RESULTS: During a median of 13.5 years there were 3346 cases of AF. Compared with chocolate intake less than once per month.......0001), with similar results for men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Accumulating evidence indicates that moderate chocolate intake may be inversely associated with AF risk, although residual confounding cannot be ruled out....

  5. Clinical, Molecular, and Environmental Risk Factors for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Maggioncalda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest unique occurrence patterns of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL worldwide. In most Western countries there is a clear bimodal age distribution with an early peak in young adults followed by a second peak in older adults, particularly among males. In the Middle East and Asia, HL is more common in early childhood. There also are marked racial differences in the presentations of HL and HL subtypes, and particular single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been identified as etiological factors suggesting that gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are involved. Personal health choices such as exercise and smoking may modify an individual's chances of developing HL. Numerous studies highlight the impact that exposure to Epstein-Barr virus and other environmental factors have on HL risk. Understanding the relative importance of each of these findings and their links to HL development and survival will help clinical researchers expand curative therapies and create preventative strategies for HL.

  6. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 9. Dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R M

    2010-11-27

    Patients have high expectations of dental implants in terms of appearance, function and longevity. It is essential that these expectations are realistically managed and that treatment of the highest standard is provided. This involves very careful evaluation, including clinical and radiographic, and presentation of the pros and cons of treatment alternatives. Provision of a successful implant restoration requires many skills including a surgical procedure to place the implant in the best possible position and prosthodontic techniques to provide an aesthetic restoration in occlusal harmony with the rest of the dentition. Recognition of risk factors and long-term maintenance requirements are equally important. Clinicians involved in these treatments must obtain adequate training and develop skills through treatment of straightforward cases using well established protocols before embarking on more demanding cases.

  7. Cyberbullying in those at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaud, Emilie; Nyman, Karissa; Addington, Jean

    2013-11-01

    Several studies suggest an association between experiences of childhood trauma including bullying and the development of psychotic symptoms. The use of communications technology has created a new media for bullying called 'cyberbullying'. Research has demonstrated associations between traditional bullying and cyberbullying. Negative effects of cyberbullying appear similar in nature and severity to the reported effects of traditional bullying. Our aim was to examine the prevalence and correlates of cyberbullying in those at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. Fifty young people at CHR for psychosis were administered the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire with added questions about cyberbullying. Cyberbullying was reported in 38% of the sample. Those who experienced cyberbullying also reported experiencing previous trauma. It is possible that cyberbullying may be a problem for those at CHR of psychosis, and due to the vulnerable nature of these young people may have longitudinal implications. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Cyberbullying in those at Clinical High Risk for psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaud, Emilie; Nyman, Karissa; Addington, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Aim Several studies suggest an association between experiences of childhood trauma including bullying and the development of psychotic symptoms. The use of communications technology has created a new media for bullying called ‘cyberbullying’. Research has demonstrated associations between traditional bullying and cyberbullying. Negative effects of cyberbullying appear similar in nature and severity to the reported effects of traditional bullying. Our aim was to examine the prevalence and correlates of cyberbullying in those at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. Methods Fifty young people at CHR for psychosis were administered the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire with added questions about cyberbullying. Results Cyberbullying was reported in 38% of the sample. Those who experienced cyberbullying also reported experiencing previous trauma. Conclusion It is possible that cyberbullying may be a problem for those at CHR of psychosis and due to the vulnerable nature of these young people, may have longitudinal implications. PMID:23343259

  9. Assessing hospitals' clinical risk management: Development of a monitoring instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer Yvonne

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical risk management (CRM plays a crucial role in enabling hospitals to identify, contain, and manage risks related to patient safety. So far, no instruments are available to measure and monitor the level of implementation of CRM. Therefore, our objective was to develop an instrument for assessing CRM in hospitals. Methods The instrument was developed based on a literature review, which identified key elements of CRM. These elements were then discussed with a panel of patient safety experts. A theoretical model was used to describe the level to which CRM elements have been implemented within the organization. Interviews with CRM practitioners and a pilot evaluation were conducted to revise the instrument. The first nationwide application of the instrument (138 participating Swiss hospitals was complemented by in-depth interviews with 25 CRM practitioners in selected hospitals, for validation purposes. Results The monitoring instrument consists of 28 main questions organized in three sections: 1 Implementation and organizational integration of CRM, 2 Strategic objectives and operational implementation of CRM at hospital level, and 3 Overview of CRM in different services. The instrument is available in four languages (English, German, French, and Italian. It allows hospitals to gather comprehensive and systematic data on their CRM practice and to identify areas for further improvement. Conclusions We have developed an instrument for assessing development stages of CRM in hospitals that should be feasible for a continuous monitoring of developments in this important area of patient safety.

  10. Corticosteroids in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical benefits and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, C E; Niewoehner, D E

    2000-12-01

    The use of systemic and inhaled corticosteroids for COPD has increased appreciably over the past 20 years. Clearer indications for corticosteroid therapy in COPD are beginning to emerge as the results from large clinical trials become available. Systemic corticosteroids are only modestly effective for acute COPD exacerbations, increase the risk for hyperglycemia, and should be given for no more than 2 weeks. The efficacy of long-term systemic corticosteroid therapy has not been adequately evaluated in this patient population. If longer term use of systemic steroids in COPD should be found to be useful, this conclusion would have to be weighed against the risk for serious adverse effects. High doses of inhaled corticosteroids cause a small sustained increase of the FEV1 in patients with mild and moderately severe COPD, but they do not slow the rate of FEV1 decline. Based on analyses of secondary outcome, inhaled corticosteroids may improve the respiratory symptoms and decrease the number and severity of COPD exacerbations in patients with more advanced disease. Low doses of inhaled corticosteroids appear to be safe, but there is growing awareness that higher doses may not be so benign.

  11. Methyldibromo glutaronitrile: clinical experience and exposure-based risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariae, Claus; Rastogi, Suresh; Devantier, Charlotte; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2003-03-01

    In the year 2000, the level of methyldibromo glutaronitrile (MDGN) allergy in dermatology clinics in Europe exceeded the level of allergies to all other preservatives, with a prevalence of 3.5%. In the present study, cases of primary sensitization and elicitation to MDGN due to cosmetic products were collected over an 8-month period at the Department of Dermatology, Gentofte University Hospital. The aim was to identify the products related to hand eczema, assess exposure to MDGN in these products and relate the findings to results from a newly developed updated risk assessment model for contact allergy. Out of 24 patients with a positive patch test to MDGN, 17 patients with hand eczema were identified. In 11 of these patients, cosmetic products used in relation to the onset of the disease were shown to contain MDGN (65%). In 8 of these 11 cases, primary sensitization was probable, 5 due to hand/body lotions and 3 due to lotions and/or liquid hand soap. Chemical analysis of 12 products showed that lotions contained 149-390 ppm of MDGN, liquid hand soap 144-399 ppm, a rinsing cream 293 ppm and shampoos 78-79 ppm. The shampoo exposure was not of certain relevance to the eczema. Applying the newly developed updated risk assessment model showed that the concentrations of MDGN in lotions of 149-390 ppm exceeded the calculated maximum acceptable exposure level for MDGN, which would be expected to lead to sensitization in consumers using such products, as seen in the current study. The present cases and updated exposure-based risk assessment process add to the evidence and need for re-defining safe-use concentrations of MDGN in cosmetic products.

  12. Nutritional Risk, Micronutrient Status and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study in an Infectious Disease Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Sıtkı Dizdar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status and micronutrient levels of hospitalized patients in an infectious disease clinic and investigate their association with adverse clinical outcomes. The nutritional status of the study participants was assessed using the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002 and micronutrient levels and routine biochemical parameters were tested within the first 24 h of the patient’s admission. The incidence of zinc, selenium, thiamine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 deficiency were 66.7% (n = 40, 46.6% (n = 29, 39.7% (n = 27, 35.3% (n = 24, 14.1% (n = 9, respectively. Selenium levels were significantly higher in patients with urinary tract infections, but lower in soft tissue infections. Copper levels were significantly higher in patients with soft tissue infections. In the Cox regression models, lower albumin, higher serum lactate dehydrogenase levels and higher NRS-2002 scores were associated with increased death. Thiamine, selenium, zinc and vitamin B6 deficiencies but not chromium deficiencies are common in infectious disease clinics. New associations were found between micronutrient levels and infection type and their adverse clinical outcomes. Hypoalbuminemia and a high NRS-2002 score had the greatest accuracy in predicting death, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis on admission.

  13. Nutrition-Related Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors In Chronic Kidney Disease: Relationship With Clinical Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma McMahon

    2012-06-01

    Traditional CV-risk factors in this CKD population were not associated with clinical outcome. Despite being within clinical reference range, serum phosphate and albumin were independently associated with clinical outcome. This may highlight a potential therapeutic target for risk management to delay or prevent renal end-points in CKD.

  14. Biochemical Benefits, Diagnosis, and Clinical Risks Evaluation of Kratom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimy Fluyau

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKratom (Mitragyna speciosa is a tropical tree with a long history of traditional use in parts of Africa and Southeast Asia. Kratom is also known as Thom, Thang, and Biak. Its leaves and the teas brewed from them have long been used by people in that region to manage pain and opioid withdrawal and to stave off fatigue. Kratom is actually consumed throughout the world for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute (in form of tea, chewed, smoked, or ingested in capsules. Some case reports have associated kratom exposure with psychosis, seizures, intrahepatic cholestasis, other medical conditions, and deaths. The clinical manifestations of kratom effects are not well defined and the clinical studies are limited. Data research suggest that both stimulant and sedative dose-dependent effects do exist, in addition to antinociceptive, antidepressant activity, anxiolytic-like effects, and anorectic effects, but a growing concern for the drug’s effects and safety of use has resulted in national and international attention primarily due to an increase in hospital visits and deaths in several countries that are believed to have been caused by extracts of the plant. There is a dearth of double blind controlled studies. In this study, we aim to use existing literature to clarify both benefits and risks of kratom as well as its diagnosis evaluation as kratom misuse is an emerging trend in the Western world.MethodsLiterature review using databases such as Embase, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Mendeley from 2007 to 2017 were evaluated by all authors to analyze current state on benefits, risks, and diagnosis evaluation of kratom (M. speciosa.ResultsData analysis suggested that kratom possesses some benefits such as stimulant and sedative effects as wells as antinociceptive effects. It seems to inhibit pro-inflammatory mediator release and vascular permeability and can enhance immunity. In addition, it may be an antidepressant and

  15. Biochemical Benefits, Diagnosis, and Clinical Risks Evaluation of Kratom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluyau, Dimy; Revadigar, Neelambika

    2017-01-01

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a tropical tree with a long history of traditional use in parts of Africa and Southeast Asia. Kratom is also known as Thom, Thang, and Biak. Its leaves and the teas brewed from them have long been used by people in that region to manage pain and opioid withdrawal and to stave off fatigue. Kratom is actually consumed throughout the world for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute (in form of tea, chewed, smoked, or ingested in capsules). Some case reports have associated kratom exposure with psychosis, seizures, intrahepatic cholestasis, other medical conditions, and deaths. The clinical manifestations of kratom effects are not well defined and the clinical studies are limited. Data research suggest that both stimulant and sedative dose-dependent effects do exist, in addition to antinociceptive, antidepressant activity, anxiolytic-like effects, and anorectic effects, but a growing concern for the drug's effects and safety of use has resulted in national and international attention primarily due to an increase in hospital visits and deaths in several countries that are believed to have been caused by extracts of the plant. There is a dearth of double blind controlled studies. In this study, we aim to use existing literature to clarify both benefits and risks of kratom as well as its diagnosis evaluation as kratom misuse is an emerging trend in the Western world. Literature review using databases such as Embase, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Mendeley from 2007 to 2017 were evaluated by all authors to analyze current state on benefits, risks, and diagnosis evaluation of kratom (M. speciosa). Data analysis suggested that kratom possesses some benefits such as stimulant and sedative effects as wells as antinociceptive effects. It seems to inhibit pro-inflammatory mediator release and vascular permeability and can enhance immunity. In addition, it may be an antidepressant and anorectic. However, kratom can cause

  16. Clinical, psychophysiological and psychological aspects of risk factors of periodontal disease development in clinically healthy persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Nikulina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine risk factors of periodontal disease development, psychophysiological personal types and their interrelations in clinically healthy persons. 47 first-year cadets of St.-Petersburg Military School of radio electronics have been examined. This group of respondents has been chosen by presence of such social stressor as change of place of living (97,9% cadets have arrived in St.-Petersburg from other cities and republics of the Russian Federation and strict disciplinary conditions. The research has revealed a low level of oral hygiene, cases of mild gingivitis in most respondents. The general mental state of group under study is characterized by raised level of personal anxiety and low indices of reactive anxiety. The examined group has demonstrated anxiety, tension, indecision and lowered stress stability. Clinically healthy persons are more liable to develop inflammatory and inflammatory-destructive periodontal diseases. It was possible to determine psychophysiological features correlated with physiological parameters of risk degree of periodontal diseases. It may have a great significance in defining of periodontal disease etiology and pathogenesis

  17. Peri-implantitis in a specialist clinic of periodontology. Clinical features and risk indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcuac, Olivier; Jansson, Leif

    2010-01-01

    Implant therapy has become a widely recognized treatment alternative for replacing missing teeth. Several long term follow-up studies have shown that the survival rate is high. However, complications may appear and risk indcators associated with early and late failures have been identified. The purpose of the present retrospective clinical study was to describe some clinical features of patients with clinical signs of peri-implantitis and to identify risk indicators of peri-implantitis in a population at a specialist clinic of Periodontology. In total,the material consisted of 377 implants in 111 patients with the diagnosis peri-implantitis. The mean age at the examination was found to be 56.3 years (range 22-83) for females and 64.1 years (range 27-85) for males. The mean number of remaining teeth was found to be 10.5 (S.D. 8.89) and the mean number of implants was 5.85 (S.D. 3.42). For a majority of the subjects, more than 50% of the remaining teeth had a marginal bone loss of more than 1/3 of the root length. Forty-sex percent of the patients visited regularly dental hygienists for supportive treatment. The percentage of implants with peri-implantitis was significantly increased for smokers compared to non-smokers (p = 0.04). In the group of non-smokers, 64% of the implants had the diagnosis peri-implantitis, while the corresponding relative frequency for smokers was 78%. A majority of the individuals had a Plaque index and Bleeding on probing index >50%. The median of the follow-up time after implant placement was 7.4 years and the observation period was not significantly correlated to the degree of bone loss around the implants. Among the subjects with a mean bone loss >6 mm at implants with peri-implantitis, more than 70% had a mean marginal bone loss > 1/3 of the root length of the remaining teeth. A positive and significant correlation was found between the degree of marginal bone loss in remaining teeth and the degree of bone loss around implants with peri

  18. A qualitative study on acceptable levels of risk for pregnant women in clinical research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Indira S E van der Zande; Rieke van der Graaf; Martijn A Oudijk; Johannes J M van Delden

    2017-01-01

    Background There is ambiguity with regard to what counts as an acceptable level of risk in clinical research in pregnant women and there is no input from stakeholders relative to such research risks...

  19. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of ocular candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Miki; Saito, Takashi; Doi, Shoichi; Hotta, Gou; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Matsushima, Aki; Ito, Yutaka; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2012-06-01

    Ocular candidiasis is a major complication of Candida bloodstream infection (BSI). This study was performed to reveal the clinical characteristics of ocular candidiasis. Of the 220 patients with Candida BSI, 204 cases received ophthalmology consultations between January 2005 and December 2011 at 2 teaching hospitals. Fifty-four (26.5%) cases had findings consistent with the diagnosis of ocular candidiasis. Of these 54 cases, 43 (79.6%) were diagnosed within 7 days after a positive blood culture. Among ocular candidiasis cases, more cases were due to Candida albicans (P =0.034 odds ratio [OR]; 3.68 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-12.2) and had higher β-d-glucan values (P = 0.001 OR; 9.99 95% CI 2.60-21.3). We need to consider fundoscopic examination to be performed within the first 7 days of therapy, especially for those patients who have C. albicans BSIs and higher β-d-glucan values. Additionally, follow-up fundoscopic examination should be considered before stopping therapy for high-risk patients.

  20. Therapeutic risk management of clinical-legal dilemmas: should it be a core competency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Robert I; Shuman, Daniel W

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic risk management of clinical-legal dilemmas achieves an optimal alignment between clinical competence and an understanding of legal concerns applicable to psychiatric practice. Understanding how psychiatry and law interact in frequently occurring clinical situations is essential for effective patient care. Successful management of clinical-legal dilemmas also avoids unnecessary, counterproductive defensive practices.

  1. Parental Monitoring and Adolescent Alcohol Risk in a Clinic Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Boyle, Jennifer R.; Boekeloo, Bradley O.

    2003-01-01

    Assessed the association between parental monitoring and adolescent alcohol risk. Surveys of adolescents in a managed care setting examined alcohol involvement and forms of parent influence. Frequent monitoring related to less likelihood of being engaged in a variety of alcohol risk behaviors or other risk situations. Choosing to share alcohol…

  2. Facial emotion perception differs in young persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Christian G; Richard, Jan A; Brensinger, Colleen M; Borgmann-Winter, Karin E; Conroy, Catherine G; Moberg, Paul J; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Calkins, Monica E

    2014-05-15

    A large body of literature has documented facial emotion perception impairments in schizophrenia. More recently, emotion perception has been investigated in persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis. This study compared emotion perception abilities in groups of young persons with schizophrenia, clinical high-risk, genetic risk and healthy controls. Groups, ages 13-25, included 24 persons at clinical high-risk, 52 first-degree relatives at genetic risk, 91 persons with schizophrenia and 90 low risk persons who completed computerized testing of emotion recognition and differentiation. Groups differed by overall emotion recognition abilities and recognition of happy, sad, anger and fear expressions. Pairwise comparisons revealed comparable impairments in recognition of happy, angry, and fearful expressions for persons at clinical high-risk and schizophrenia, while genetic risk participants were less impaired, showing reduced recognition of fearful expressions. Groups also differed for differentiation of happy and sad expressions, but differences were mainly between schizophrenia and control groups. Emotion perception impairments are observable in young persons at-risk for psychosis. Preliminary results with clinical high-risk participants, when considered along findings in genetic risk relatives, suggest social cognition abilities to reflect pathophysiological processes involved in risk of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Common clinical practice versus new PRIM score in predicting coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schnohr, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.......To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk....

  4. A method to adjust radiation dose-response relationships for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical risk factors for radiation induced toxicity have been identified in the literature. Here, we present a method to quantify the effect of clinical risk factors on radiation dose-response curves and apply the method to adjust the dose-response for radiation pneumonitis for patients...

  5. Clinical risk factors and urodynamic predictors prior to surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bing, Mette Hornum; Gimbel, Helga; Greisen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Knowledge about clinical risk factors and the value of urodynamic testing is important to optimize treatment strategy and secure true informed consent. METHODS: We reviewed the relevant literature to clarify the evidence regarding clinical risk factors and the predict...

  6. Ankylosing spondylitis confers substantially increased risk of clinical spine fractures : a nationwide case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prieto-Alhambra, D; Muñoz-Ortego, J; De Vries, F; Vosse, D; Arden, N K; Bowness, P; Cooper, C; Diez-Perez, A; Vestergaard, P

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) leads to osteopenia/osteoporosis and spine rigidity. We conducted a case-control study and found that AS-affected patients have a 5-fold and 50 % increased risk of clinical spine and all clinical fractures, respectively. Excess risk of both is highest in the f

  7. Mental disorders and violence risk : epidemiological and clinical cohort studies

    OpenAIRE

    Moberg, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Violence morbidity and mortality has been increasingly recognized to be of importance for public health. The relationship between mental illness and violent crime is complex because of the involvement of several confounding risk factors. Aim The aim of this thesis was to study the risk of interpersonal violence and violent crime in common mental disorders with a focus on the effect of early risk factors, the relationship between interpersonal violence an...

  8. Clinical engineering and risk management in healthcare technological process using architecture framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signori, Marcos R; Garcia, Renato

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a model that aids the Clinical Engineering to deal with Risk Management in the Healthcare Technological Process. The healthcare technological setting is complex and supported by three basics entities: infrastructure (IS), healthcare technology (HT), and human resource (HR). Was used an Enterprise Architecture - MODAF (Ministry of Defence Architecture Framework) - to model this process for risk management. Thus, was created a new model to contribute to the risk management in the HT process, through the Clinical Engineering viewpoint. This architecture model can support and improve the decision making process of the Clinical Engineering to the Risk Management in the Healthcare Technological process.

  9. Cow-specific risk factors for clinical mastitis in Brazilian dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, C S F; Hogeveen, H; Botelho, A M; Maia, P V; Coelho, S G; Haddad, J P A

    2015-01-01

    Information related to mastitis risk factors is useful for the design and implementation of clinical mastitis (CM) control programs. The first objective of our study was to model the risk of CM under Brazilian conditions, using cow-specific risk factors. Our second objective was to explore which ris

  10. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for falls: prevalence and clinical profile of hospitalized patients1

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa de Freitas Luzia; Marco Antonio de Goes Victor; Amália Fátima Lucena

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: to identify the prevalence of the Nursing Diagnosis (ND) Risk for falls in the hospitalizations of adult patients in clinical and surgical units, to characterize the clinical profile and to identify the risk factors of the patients with this ND. Method: a cross-sectional study with 174 patients. The data was collected from the computerized nursing care prescriptions system and on-line hospital records, and analyzed statistically. Results: the prevalence of the ND Risk for falls wa...

  11. Long‐Term Post‐CABG Survival: Performance of Clinical Risk Models Versus Actuarial Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Brendan M.; Romeiser, Jamie; Ruan, Joyce; Gupta, Sandeep; Seifert, Frank C.; Zhu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background/aim Clinical risk models are commonly used to predict short‐term coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) mortality but are less commonly used to predict long‐term mortality. The added value of long‐term mortality clinical risk models over traditional actuarial models has not been evaluated. To address this, the predictive performance of a long‐term clinical risk model was compared with that of an actuarial model to identify the clinical variable(s) most responsible for any differences observed. Methods Long‐term mortality for 1028 CABG patients was estimated using the Hannan New York State clinical risk model and an actuarial model (based on age, gender, and race/ethnicity). Vital status was assessed using the Social Security Death Index. Observed/expected (O/E) ratios were calculated, and the models' predictive performances were compared using a nested c‐index approach. Linear regression analyses identified the subgroup of risk factors driving the differences observed. Results Mortality rates were 3%, 9%, and 17% at one‐, three‐, and five years, respectively (median follow‐up: five years). The clinical risk model provided more accurate predictions. Greater divergence between model estimates occurred with increasing long‐term mortality risk, with baseline renal dysfunction identified as a particularly important driver of these differences. Conclusions Long‐term mortality clinical risk models provide enhanced predictive power compared to actuarial models. Using the Hannan risk model, a patient's long‐term mortality risk can be accurately assessed and subgroups of higher‐risk patients can be identified for enhanced follow‐up care. More research appears warranted to refine long‐term CABG clinical risk models. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12665 (J Card Surg 2016;31:23–30) PMID:26543019

  12. Clinical fracture risk evaluated by hierarchical agglomerative clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Christian; Eiken, P; Vestergaard, P

    2017-01-01

    profiles. INTRODUCTION: The purposes of this study were to establish and quantify patient clusters of high, average and low fracture risk using an unsupervised machine learning algorithm. METHODS: Regional and national Danish patient data on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, medication...... containing less than 250 subjects. Clusters were identified as high, average or low fracture risk based on bone mineral density (BMD) characteristics. Cluster-based descriptive statistics and relative Z-scores for variable means were computed. RESULTS: Ten thousand seven hundred seventy-five women were...... as low fracture risk with high to very high BMD. A mean age of 60 years was the earliest that allowed for separation of high-risk clusters. DXA scan results could identify high-risk subjects with different antiresorptive treatment compliance levels based on similarities and differences in lumbar spine...

  13. The major risk factors for delirium in a clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Harin Kim, Seockhoon Chung, Yeon Ho Joo, Jung Sun Lee Department of Psychiatry, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Objective: We aimed to determine the major risk factors for the development of delirium in patients at a single general hospital by comparison with a control group.Subjects and methods: We reviewed the medical records of 260 delirium patients and 77 control patients. We investigated age, sex, and risk factors for delirium in the total delirium group (n=260, the delirium medical subgroup (n=142, and the delirium surgical subgroup (n=118. Logistic regression analysis adjusting for age and sex was performed to identify the odds ratio.Results: The mean age and the percentage of males were significantly higher in the delirium group compared with the control group (68.9 vs 54.3 years and 70% vs 41.6%, respectively. Risk factors for the delirium group were lower plasma albumin, hypertension, mechanical ventilation, and antipsychotic drug use. Plasma sodium level and hypertension were important risk factors for the delirium medical subgroup. Stroke history, hypertension, ICU care, and medication were important risk factors for the delirium surgical subgroup.Conclusion: Lower plasma albumin, hypertension, mechanical ventilation, and antipsychotic drug use are important risk factors for delirium. Keywords: delirium, acute confusional state, psychiatric consultation, risk factor

  14. Violence risk prediction. Clinical and actuarial measures and the role of the Psychopathy Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, M; Doyle, M

    2000-10-01

    Violence risk prediction is a priority issue for clinicians working with mentally disordered offenders. To review the current status of violence risk prediction research. Literature search (Medline). Key words: violence, risk prediction, mental disorder. Systematic/structured risk assessment approaches may enhance the accuracy of clinical prediction of violent outcomes. Data on the predictive validity of available clinical risk assessment tools are based largely on American and North American studies and further validation is required in British samples. The Psychopathy Checklist appears to be a key predictor of violent recidivism in a variety of settings. Violence risk prediction is an inexact science and as such will continue to provoke debate. Clinicians clearly need to be able to demonstrate the rationale behind their decisions on violence risk and much can be learned from recent developments in research on violence risk prediction.

  15. Timing and risk factors for clinical fractures among postmenopausal women: a 5-year prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinkens Paula ELM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many risk factors for fractures have been documented, including low bone-mineral density (BMD and a history of fractures. However, little is known about the short-term absolute risk (AR of fractures and the timing of clinical fractures. Therefore, we assessed the risk and timing of incident clinical fractures, expressed as 5-year AR, in postmenopausal women. Methods In total, 10 general practice centres participated in this population-based prospective study. Five years after a baseline assessment, which included clinical risk factor evaluation and BMD measurement, 759 postmenopausal women aged between 50 and 80 years, were re-examined, including undergoing an evaluation of clinical fractures after menopause. Risk factors for incident fractures at baseline that were significant in univariate analyses were included in a multivariate Cox survival regression analysis. The significant determinants were used to construct algorithms. Results In the total group, 12.5% (95% confidence interval (CI 10.1–14.9 of the women experienced a new clinical fracture. A previous clinical fracture after menopause and a low BMD (T-score Conclusion In postmenopausal women, clinical fractures cluster in time. One in two women with a recent clinical fracture had a new clinical fracture within 5 years, regardless of BMD. The 5-year AR for a first clinical fracture was much lower and depended on BMD.

  16. Clinical risk stratification for gastrointestinal hemorrhage: still no consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wira, Charles; Sather, John

    2008-01-01

    A lack of consensus exists in the pre-endoscopic risk stratification of patients with upper or lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The work by Das and colleagues in the previous issue of Critical Care serves to externally validate the BLEED criteria. Their results suggest that hemodynamically stable patients without evidence of ongoing bleeding or unstable comorbidities may be at lower risk for hospital complications. While their results reinforce previous studies, further investigation is needed before comprehensive practice guidelines can be established. PMID:18533048

  17. Do pressure ulcer risk assessment scales improve clinical practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Kottner; Katrin Balzer

    2010-01-01

    Jan Kottner1, Katrin Balzer21Department of Nursing Science, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; 2Nursing Research Group, Institute for Social Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, GermanyAbstract: Standardized assessment instruments are deemed important for estimating pressure ulcer risk. Today, more than 40 so-called pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are available but still there is an ongoing debate about their usefulne...

  18. Risk profile for Chlamydia infection in women from public health clinics in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y; Morse, D L; Lawrence, C E; Murphy, D; Hipp, S

    1993-02-01

    The prevalence of chlamydial infection and associated risk factors were studied in 1531 women from ten clinics in New York State excluding New York City. Overall Chlamydia infection rates were 13.6%; 17.6% in eight high risk family planning and STD clinics, and 5.7% in two low risk college and private clinics. Risk factors for Chlamydia infection included: age oral contraceptives (odds ratio 2.0), a history of having more than one sexual partner (odds ratio 1.7) and, in one clinic where data was available, inflammation on Papanicolaou smears (odds ratio 2.1). These data helped secure funding for Chlamydia preventive services and permitted development of a risk profile (score card) of Chlamydia for each age group. Use of such a score card can be most helpful in assigning which patients could benefit most from Chlamydia cultures, especially in those areas where testing is unavailable or too costly to screen all patients.

  19. Nurse Practitioner Perceptions of a Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool in the Retail Clinic Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjama, Kristen L; Oliver, JoAnn S; Hayes, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    IN BRIEF This article describes a study to gain insight into the utility and perceived feasibility of the American Diabetes Association's Diabetes Risk Test (DRT) implemented by nurse practitioners (NPs) in the retail clinic setting. The DRT is intended for those without a known risk for diabetes. Researchers invited 1,097 NPs working in the retail clinics of a nationwide company to participate voluntarily in an online questionnaire. Of the 248 NPs who sent in complete responses, 114 (46%) indicated that they used the DRT in the clinic. Overall mean responses from these NPs indicated that they perceive the DRT as a feasible tool in the retail clinic setting. Use of the DRT or similar risk assessment tools in the retail clinic setting can aid in the identification of people at risk for type 2 diabetes.

  20. Excess risk attributable to traditional cardiovascular risk factors in clinical practice settings across Europe - The EURIKA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borghi Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians involved in primary prevention are key players in CVD risk control strategies, but the expected reduction in CVD risk that would be obtained if all patients attending primary care had their risk factors controlled according to current guidelines is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess risk attributable, firstly, to the presence of CVD risk factors and, secondly, to the lack of control of these risk factors in primary prevention care across Europe. Methods Cross-sectional study using data from the European Study on Cardiovascular Risk Prevention and Management in Daily Practice (EURIKA, which involved primary care and outpatient clinics involved in primary prevention from 12 European countries between May 2009 and January 2010. We enrolled 7,434 patients over 50 years old with at least one cardiovascular risk factor but without CVD and calculated their 10-year risk of CVD death according to the SCORE equation, modified to take diabetes risk into account. Results The average 10-year risk of CVD death in study participants (N = 7,434 was 8.2%. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and diabetes were responsible for 32.7 (95% confidence interval 32.0-33.4, 15.1 (14.8-15.4, 10.4 (9.9-11.0, and 16.4% (15.6-17.2 of CVD risk, respectively. The four risk factors accounted for 57.7% (57.0-58.4 of CVD risk, representing a 10-year excess risk of CVD death of 5.66% (5.47-5.85. Lack of control of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and diabetes were responsible for 8.8 (8.3-9.3, 10.6 (10.3-10.9, 10.4 (9.9-11.0, and 3.1% (2.8-3.4 of CVD risk, respectively. Lack of control of the four risk factors accounted for 29.2% (28.5-29.8 of CVD risk, representing a 10-year excess risk of CVD death of 3.12% (2.97-3.27. Conclusions Lack of control of CVD risk factors was responsible for almost 30% of the risk of CVD death among patients participating in the EURIKA Study.

  1. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 10. Periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P; Needleman, I

    2010-12-11

    A sizeable proportion of patients in clinical practice will have some form of periodontal disease and most of these patients can be well managed in primary care. Unfortunately, dento-legal claims regarding inappropriate periodontal care are increasing rapidly and are now one of the most common reasons for litigation in dentistry. In this paper we will look at aspects of contemporary management of periodontal disease in clinical practice and offer guidance for examination, management and referral.

  2. Risk factors for clinical anastomotic leakage after right hemicolectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Mikkel; Nerstrøm, Malene; Wilbek, Therese Emilie;

    2016-01-01

     = 0.025). Other risk factors for AL were tobacco use (aOR 2.70; 95 % CI 1.06-6.86; P = 0.037) and diabetes (aOR 5.95; 95 % CI 2.23-15.90; P ... after right hemicolectomy were diabetes, tobacco use and stapled compared with handsewn anastomoses....

  3. Radical prostatectomy in clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The optimal therapeutic strategy for high-risk localized prostate cancer (PCa) is controversial. Supported by randomized trials, the combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and endocrine therapy (ET) is advocated by many, while radical prostatectomy (RP) is regar......Abstract Objective. The optimal therapeutic strategy for high-risk localized prostate cancer (PCa) is controversial. Supported by randomized trials, the combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and endocrine therapy (ET) is advocated by many, while radical prostatectomy (RP......) is regarded as primary therapy by others. This study examined the outcome for high-risk localized PCa patients treated with RP. Material and methods. Of 1300 patients who underwent RP, 231 were identified as high-risk. Patients were followed for biochemical recurrence (BCR) (defined as prostate......-specific antigen ≥ 0.2 ng/ml), metastatic disease and survival. Excluding node-positive patients, none of the patients received adjuvant therapy before BCR was confirmed. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models. Results. Median follow-up was 4.4 years...

  4. Risk of arrhythmia induced by psychotropic medications: a proposal for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanoe, Søren; Kristensen, Diana; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf; Toft, Egon; Nielsen, Jimmi; Videbech, Poul; Pehrson, Steen; Bundgaard, Henning

    2014-05-21

    Several drugs used in the treatment of mental diseases are associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). A general cause-relationship between the intake of these drugs and SCD is unattainable, but numerous case reports of drug-induced malignant arrhythmia and epidemiological studies, associating the use of specific drugs with SCD, strongly support the presence of an increased risk. Whereas the absolute risk of drug-induced life-threatening arrhythmia may be relatively low, even small increments in risk of SCD may have a major health impact considering that millions of patients are treated with psychotropics. In subgroups of pre-disposed patients, e.g. patients with cardiac diseases or other co-morbidities, the elderly or patients treated with other negatively interacting drugs, the absolute risk of drug-induced arrhythmia may be considerable. On the other hand, several of the major mental disorders are associated with a large risk of suicide if untreated. The observed risk of malignant arrhythmia associated with treatment with psychotropic drugs calls for clinical guidelines integrating the risk of the individual drug and other potentially interacting risk factors. In this review, data from various authorities on the risk of arrhythmia associated with psychotropic medications were weighted and categorized into three risk categories. Additionally, we suggest a clinically applicable algorithm to reduce the risk of malignant arrhythmia in patients to be treated with psychotropic medications. The algorithm integrates the risk categories of the individual drugs and pre-disposing risk factors and suggests a prudent follow-up for patients with an increased risk. We believe this clinically manageable guideline might improve safety in the many and rapidly increasing number of patients on psychotropic drugs.

  5. Comparison of UMLS terminologies to identify risk of heart disease using clinical notes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shivade, Chaitanya; Malewadkar, Pranav; Fosler-Lussier, Eric; Lai, Albert M

    2015-01-01

    The second track of the 2014 i2b2 challenge asked participants to automatically identify risk factors for heart disease among diabetic patients using natural language processing techniques for clinical notes...

  6. Emerging Comorbidities in Adult Asthma: Risks, Clinical Associations, and Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Most studies with asthma have been performed in patients being otherwise healthy. However, in real life, comorbid diseases are very common in adult patients. We review here the emerging comorbid conditions to asthma such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2), and cardiac and psychiatric diseases. Their role as risk factors for incident ...

  7. 'Benign invigilation': using appreciative inquiry to reposition clinical risk in multi-disciplinary CAMH teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggett, Percy; Messent, Philip; Staines, John

    2013-04-01

    In response to a spate of serious untoward incident enquiries, CAMHS team leaders in East London, UK, embarked on a series of clinical risk workshops with staff teams. Complementary to what might be called retrospective organisational responses to high risk events, these prospective workshops were predicated on the idea that risk reduction is increased when individuals in teams are responsive to one another, when teams are positively risk-aware and when risk awareness is seen as having the capacity to predict what may go wrong in the future.

  8. RISK ANALYSIS FOR OCCUPATIONAL IMPLEMENTATION OF IMPROVEMENT IN A RENAL CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Oliveira de Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research to analyze the occupational risks in a Renal Clinic located in central-RS. From the observational analysis of risk maps and instrument data collection, we implemented improvements in local. Through the results, it was noted that the implementations have been significant and that changes are needed to reduce occupational disorders, promoting better quality of life for clinical professionals.

  9. Assessment of Clinical Risk Management System in Hospitals: An Approach for Quality Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Farokhzadian, Jamileh; Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Borhani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical risks have created major problems in healthcare system such as serious adverse effects on patient safety and enhancing the financial burden for the healthcare. Thus, clinical risk management (CRM) system has been introduced for improving the quality and safety of services to health care. The aim of this study was to assess the status of CRM in the hospitals. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 200 nursing staff from three teaching hospitals affiliated with t...

  10. Psychological and physical pain as predictors of suicide risk: evidence from clinical and neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Iskric, Adam; Calati, Raffaella; Courtet, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Suicide is a multidimensional clinical phenomenon with complex biological, social and psychological risk factors. Therefore, it is imperative for studies to focus on developing a unified understanding of suicide risk that integrates current clinical and neurobiological findings. A recent line of research has implicated different classifications of pain in understanding suicide risk, including the concepts of psychache and pain tolerance. Although psychache is defined as the experience of unbearable psychological pain, pain tolerance refers to the greatest duration or intensity of painful stimuli that one is able to bear. This review will focus on integrating current clinical and neurobiological findings by which psychache and pain tolerance confer suicide risk. Results indicate that psychache has been identified as a significant risk factor for suicide and that psychache may be associated with the neurocircuitry involved in the modulation of physical pain. Converging evidence has also been found linking pain tolerance to self-injurious behaviours and suicide risk. The experience of psychache and physical pain in relation to other predictors of suicide, including reward processing, hopelessness and depression, are further discussed. Future research examining the pain-suicide connection is required to understand the mechanism behind clinically relevant risk factors for suicide, which can ultimately inform the construction of empirically supported suicide risk assessment and intervention techniques.

  11. Differential Profiles of Risk of Self-Harm among Clinically Referred Primary School Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelkovska, Anne; Houghton, Stephen; Hopkins, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Risk of self-harm among clinic referred children aged 6- to 12-years-old was investigated using the recently developed Self-Harm Risk Assessment for Children (SHRAC) instrument which comprises six factors: Affect traits; verbalizing of self-harm; socialization; dissociation; self-directing; and self-appraisal. The SHRAC was completed by the…

  12. The influence of family history on prostate cancer risk : implications for clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Alcaraz, Antonio; Emberton, Mark; Hammerer, Peter; Ponholzer, Anton; Schroeder, Fritz H.; Tubaro, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    A family history of prostate cancer has long been identified as an important risk factor for developing the disease. This risk factor can be easily assessed in clinical practice and current guidelines recommend to initiate prostate cancer early detection 5 years earlier (i.e. around the age of 40 ye

  13. Clinical prediction of fall risk and white matter abnormalities: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective: To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as deter...

  14. Migraine: etiology, risk, triggering, aggravating factors and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Lindemann Carezzato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the etiology and clinical manifestations of migraine. An integrative literature review was performed guided by the question: What is the evidence available in the literature about the etiology, signs and symptoms of migraine? The article search was conducted in the electronic databases PubMed and LILACS, considering publications in the period from 2006 to 2010. The selected articles were categorized and evaluated according to the level of evidence. One found 1,677 articles and 26 were selected for full reading. Most studies (84.6% consisted of a non-experimental design and were classified as evidence level IV. Although the clinical manifestations found in this study confirm the data available in the literature, it is noticed that migraine does not have well-established causes

  15. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 4. Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, J

    2010-08-28

    Endodontic procedures are challenging and technically demanding. In the UK standards of treatment have been shown to have fallen short of acceptable guidelines, laying many dentists open to litigation on questions of clinical negligence by patients who understand and know what should be considered as current best practice in this area. Failure to communicate with patients about the procedure and not obtaining consent for treatment is a key area of complaint, as is inadequate record keeping. When treatment is undertaken within the framework of accepted guidelines it would be very difficult for a patient to open a claim for clinical negligence should a failure occur. This article looks at potential dento-legal problems in endodontics and how, through compliance with best practice, they may be avoided.

  16. A Clinical model to identify patients with high-risk coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yang (Yelin); L. Chen (Li); Y. Yam (Yeung); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); A. Delago (Augustin); A. Dunning (Allison); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); R.P. Karlsberg (Ronald); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); Y.-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); T.M. LaBounty (Troy); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James K.); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives This study sought to develop a clinical model that identifies patients with and without high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). Background Although current clinical models help to estimate a patient's pre-test probability of obstructive CAD, they do not accurately identify th

  17. Risk factors for clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on Dutch dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Wilpshaar, H.; Frankena, K.; Bartels, C.; Barkema, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Risk factors for outbreaks in 1999 of clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on dairy farms were studied in a matched case–control study with 47 case farms and 47 control farms. All 47 case farms experienced a clinical outbreak of salmonellosis which was confirmed

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis B virus infections among visitors to an STD clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.T.H.P. van Duynhoven; M.J.W. van de Laar; W.A. Schop; Ph.H. Rothbarth (Philip); W.I. van der Meijden (Willem); A.M. van Loon (Anton); M.J.W. Sprenger (Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To determine the prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections among individuals attending an STD clinic in a low endemic region. Study design: A total of 1228 women and 1648 men attending the STD clinic at the University Hospital Rotterdam, Netherlands,

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis B virus infections among visitors to an STD clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.T.H.P. van Duynhoven; M.J.W. van de Laar; W.A. Schop; Ph.H. Rothbarth (Philip); W.I. van der Meijden (Willem); A.M. van Loon (Anton); M.J.W. Sprenger (Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To determine the prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections among individuals attending an STD clinic in a low endemic region. Study design: A total of 1228 women and 1648 men attending the STD clinic at the University Hospital Rotterdam, Netherlands, w

  20. A Clinical model to identify patients with high-risk coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yang (Yelin); L. Chen (Li); Y. Yam (Yeung); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); A. Delago (Augustin); A. Dunning (Allison); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); R.P. Karlsberg (Ronald); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); Y.-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); T.M. LaBounty (Troy); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James K.); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives This study sought to develop a clinical model that identifies patients with and without high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). Background Although current clinical models help to estimate a patient's pre-test probability of obstructive CAD, they do not accurately identify th

  1. A probabilistic topic model for clinical risk stratification from electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Duan, Huilong

    2015-12-01

    Risk stratification aims to provide physicians with the accurate assessment of a patient's clinical risk such that an individualized prevention or management strategy can be developed and delivered. Existing risk stratification techniques mainly focus on predicting the overall risk of an individual patient in a supervised manner, and, at the cohort level, often offer little insight beyond a flat score-based segmentation from the labeled clinical dataset. To this end, in this paper, we propose a new approach for risk stratification by exploring a large volume of electronic health records (EHRs) in an unsupervised fashion. Along this line, this paper proposes a novel probabilistic topic modeling framework called probabilistic risk stratification model (PRSM) based on Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). The proposed PRSM recognizes a patient clinical state as a probabilistic combination of latent sub-profiles, and generates sub-profile-specific risk tiers of patients from their EHRs in a fully unsupervised fashion. The achieved stratification results can be easily recognized as high-, medium- and low-risk, respectively. In addition, we present an extension of PRSM, called weakly supervised PRSM (WS-PRSM) by incorporating minimum prior information into the model, in order to improve the risk stratification accuracy, and to make our models highly portable to risk stratification tasks of various diseases. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach on a clinical dataset containing 3463 coronary heart disease (CHD) patient instances. Both PRSM and WS-PRSM were compared with two established supervised risk stratification algorithms, i.e., logistic regression and support vector machine, and showed the effectiveness of our models in risk stratification of CHD in terms of the Area Under the receiver operating characteristic Curve (AUC) analysis. As well, in comparison with PRSM, WS-PRSM has over 2% performance gain, on the experimental dataset, demonstrating that

  2. Clinical Trial Risk in Hepatitis C: Endpoint Selection and Drug Action

    OpenAIRE

    Tillie, Nicole A.; Parker, Jayson L.; Jordan J. Feld

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. This study analyzed the risk of clinical trial failure of new drugs for hepatitis C between January 1998 and January 2015. Methods. Hepatitis C drug development trials that were in phases I–III of clinical trial testing were obtained from the publicly accessible clinical trial repository and other publicly available databases. Drug compounds were excluded from the study if they began their phase I testing before 1998, if they were not industry sponsored, or if they treate...

  3. Mooren ulcer in South India: serology and clinical risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegans, M E; Srinivasan, M; McHugh, T; Whitcher, J P; Margolis, T P; Lietman, T; Jennette, J C; Cunningham, E T

    1999-08-01

    To investigate the rate of undiagnosed rheumatologic diseases and hepatitis C infection among patients with the clinical diagnosis of Mooren ulcer seen at Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai, South India. Twenty-one patients with the clinical diagnosis of Mooren ulcer and 44 control patients underwent a complete ophthalmic history and examination, as well as serologic testing for antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, herpes simplex virus 1 antibodies, and hepatitis C virus antibodies. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of seropositivity for antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, herpes simplex virus 1 antibodies, and hepatitis C virus antibodies between patients with Mooren ulcer and control patients. Two patients with Mooren ulcer and four control patients were found to have a rheumatoid factor titer of greater than 1:20. One of the control patients, but none of the patients with Mooren ulcer, was found to have serologic evidence of hepatitis C infection. A history of corneal trauma, surgery, or infection was reported by 68% of patients with Mooren ulcer, compared with 20% of control patients (P infection.

  4. Data-driven risk identification in phase III clinical trials using central statistical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Catherine; Venet, David; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    Our interest lies in quality control for clinical trials, in the context of risk-based monitoring (RBM). We specifically study the use of central statistical monitoring (CSM) to support RBM. Under an RBM paradigm, we claim that CSM has a key role to play in identifying the "risks to the most critical data elements and processes" that will drive targeted oversight. In order to support this claim, we first see how to characterize the risks that may affect clinical trials. We then discuss how CSM can be understood as a tool for providing a set of data-driven key risk indicators (KRIs), which help to organize adaptive targeted monitoring. Several case studies are provided where issues in a clinical trial have been identified thanks to targeted investigation after the identification of a risk using CSM. Using CSM to build data-driven KRIs helps to identify different kinds of issues in clinical trials. This ability is directly linked with the exhaustiveness of the CSM approach and its flexibility in the definition of the risks that are searched for when identifying the KRIs. In practice, a CSM assessment of the clinical database seems essential to ensure data quality. The atypical data patterns found in some centers and variables are seen as KRIs under a RBM approach. Targeted monitoring or data management queries can be used to confirm whether the KRIs point to an actual issue or not.

  5. Pharmacotherapy in Children and Adolescents at Clinical-High Risk for Psychosis and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, M; Niehaus, V; Correll, C

    2016-11-01

    This review aims to describe the importance of i) detecting individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis (schizophrenia) or bipolar disorder, especially in children and adolescents, in order to enable early intervention, and ii) evaluating different intervention strategies, especially pharmacotherapy, during the subsyndromal or "prodromal" stages of these severe and often debilitating disorders. The different approaches regarding the psychotic and bipolar clinical high-risk state are discussed, including reasons and evidence for early (pharmacological) intervention and risks of treatment vs. non-treatment. Only 10 prospective studies of antipsychotics (randomized=4) and 6 prospective studies of non-antipsychotic pharmacologic agents (randomized=3, i. e., omega-3 fatty acids=2, glycine=1) for the psychotic clinical high-risk state and only 4 prospective studies of mood stabilizing medications for the bipolar clinical high-risk state (randomized=2, i. e., lithium=1, valproate=1) were detected. Based on the minimal efficacy data, adverse effect risks, especially in pediatric populations, nonspecific psychopathology, and unknown true risk for the development of either psychosis or bipolar disorder or of chronically disabling symptoms and disability, medication treatment currently remains second choice after psychosocial intervention. Additional research in this area is clearly needed in order to shed more light on the relevance and predictive value of potentially prodromal symptoms, their identification and most appropriate management options. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. [Down with odds ratios: risk ratios in cohort studies and randomised clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knol, Mirjam J

    2012-01-01

    Various effect measures are available for quantifying the relationship between an intervention or a risk factor and an outcome, such as the risk ratio and the odds ratio. Odds ratios are intended for use in case-control studies in which they are an appropriate measure for estimating the relative risk; however, this measure is also often presented in cohort studies and in randomized clinical trials. When used for cohort studies and randomized clinical trials, the odds ratio is often incorrectly interpreted as the risk ratio; the odds ratio then provides an overestimation of the risk ratio, especially when the outcome is frequent. The use of logistic regression to adjust for confounding is one of the reasons that odds ratios are presented. For cohort studies and randomized clinical trials, however, there are methods to estimate adjusted risk ratios; these include the Mantel-Haenszel method, log-binomial regression, Poisson regression with robust standard error, and 'doubling of cases' method with robust standard error. To avoid misinterpretation of odds ratios, risk ratios should be calculated in cohort studies and randomized clinical trials.

  7. Evaluation of awareness of risk factors for kidney cancer among patients presenting to a urology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alexander S; Arnold, Michelle L; Diehl, Nancy D; Hassan, Lauren; Thiel, David D

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate awareness of risk factors for kidney cancer among patients presenting to a urology clinic. Smoking, obesity and hypertension are widely accepted as risk factors for kidney cancer; however, there are limited data regarding awareness of these risk factors. The researchers prospectively identified 172 patients presenting to a urology clinic between 1 May 2009 and 31 August 2009. Each patient completed a questionnaire that requested responses to whether certain lifestyle factors increased the risk of a variety of cancers. Information on demographics and other covariates was collected via questionnaires and medical chart abstraction. To estimate and compare risk factor awareness levels for different cancers, 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were constructed and Fisher's exact tests performed. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate covariates associated with risk factor awareness. The percentage reporting that smoking increases the risk of kidney cancer (36%, 95% CI 29-44%) was lower than for lung cancer (96%, 95% CI 92-99%). Similarly, the percentage reporting that obesity increases the risk of kidney cancer (32%, 95% CI 25-40%) was lower than for colon cancer (45%, 95% CI 37-53% CI). Only 18% (95% CI 13-25%) identified hypertension as a risk factor for kidney cancer. Female gender and younger age were associated with increased levels of awareness of the association with smoking and obesity, respectively. The data support a low level of awareness of kidney cancer risk factors and underscore an opportunity for urologists to engage in education efforts.

  8. Importance of time in therapeutic range on bleeding risk prediction using clinical risk scores in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Caravaca, José Miguel; Roldán, Vanessa; Esteve-Pastor, María Asunción; Valdés, Mariano; Vicente, Vicente; Lip, Gregory Y H; Marín, Francisco

    2017-09-21

    Bleeding risk with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) is closely related to the quality of anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, reflected by time in therapeutic range (TTR). Here we compared the discrimination performance of different bleeding risk scores and investigated if adding TTR would improve their predictive value and clinical usefulness. We included 1361 AF patients stables on VKA for at least 6 months. Bleeding risk was assessed by the HAS-BLED, ATRIA, ORBIT and HEMORR2HAGES scores. Major bleeding events were recorded after a median of 6.5 years follow-up. In this period 250 patients suffered major bleeds. Comparison of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves demonstrated that HAS-BLED had the best discrimination performance, but adding the 'labile INR' criteria (i.e. TTR <65%) to ATRIA, ORBIT and HEMORR2HAGES increased their ability of discrimination and predictive value, with significant improvements in reclassification and discriminatory performance. Decision curve analyses (DCA) showed improvements of the clinical usefulness and a net benefit of the modified risk scores. In summary, in AF patients taking VKAs, the HAS-BLED score had the best predictive ability. Adding 'labile INR' to ATRIA, ORBIT and HEMORR2HAGES improved their predictive value for major bleeding leading to improved clinical usefulness compared to the original scores.

  9. [Sarcoidosis: etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Éksarenko, O V; Kharlap, S I; Safonova, T N

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic idiopathic multisystem granulomatous inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Prevalence of this condition is approximately 3-5: 100 000 with the highest incidence at the age of 25-40 years old and no gender predomination. Early morbidity, disability and severe prognosis worsen patient's condition and make them socially limited. In some cases ocular involvement and vision loss aggravate general condition of the patients. Ocular involvement in sarcoidosis occurs in 10-75% patients. At the same time some data confirm the fact that in 7% of patients ocular damage is the presenting sign making them come to an ophthalmologist whereas orbital involvement may present in systemic disease only. Unclear etiology and clinical similarity with other conditions cause difficulties in early diagnosis and monitoring of patients with sarcoidosis.

  10. Ethical implications for clinical practice and future research in "at risk" individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Fiza; Mirzakhanian, Heline; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; de la Fuente-Sandoval, Camilo; Cadenhead, Kristin S

    2012-01-01

    The last 15 years have witnessed a shift in schizophrenia research with increasing interest in earlier stages of illness with the hope of early intervention and ultimately prevention of psychotic illness. Large-scale longitudinal studies have identified clinical and biological risk factors associated with increased risk of psychotic conversion, which together with symptomatic and demographic risk factors may improve the power of prediction algorithms for psychotic transition. Despite these advances, 45-70% of at risk subjects in most samples do not convert to frank psychosis, but continue to function well below their age matched counterparts. The issue is of utmost importance in light of the upcoming DSM-V and the possible inclusion of the attenuated psychotic symptoms syndrome (APSS) diagnosis, with clinical and ethical implications. Clinical considerations include feasibility of reliably diagnosing the at risk state in non-academic medical centers, variable psychotic conversion rates, a non-uniform definition of conversion and extensive debate about treatment for individuals with an ill-defined outcome. On the ethical side, diagnosing APSS could lead to unnecessary prescribing of antipsychotics with long-term deleterious consequences, slow research by providing a false sense of comfort in the diagnosis, and have psychosocial implications for those who receive a diagnosis. Thus it may be prudent to engage at risk populations early and to use broad-spectrum treatments with low risk benefit ratios to relieve functional impairments, while simultaneously studying all subsets of the at risk population.

  11. Predicted impact of various clinical practice strategies on cardiovascular risk for the treatment of hypertension: a clinical trial simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuyan; Bies, Robert; Gastonguay, Marc R; Wang, Yaning; Stockbridge, Norman; Gobburu, Jogarao; Madabushi, Rajanikanth

    2014-12-01

    Hypertension control rate in the US is low with the current clinical practice (JNC 7) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) remain is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. A 6-month clinical trial simulation case study testing different virtual clinical practice strategies was performed in an attempt to increase the control rate. The CVD risk was calculated using the Framingham CVD risk model at baseline and 6 months post-treatment. The estimated CVD events for the baseline patient sample without any treatment was 998 (95% CI: 967-1,026) over 6 months in 100,000 patients. Treating these patients for 6 months with current clinical practice, high dose strategy, high dose with low target BP strategy resulted in a reduction in CVD events of 191(95% CI: 169-205), 284 (95% CI: 261-305), and 353 (95% CI: 331-375), respectively. Hence the two alternative strategies resulted in an increase in treatment effect by 49% (95%CI: 44-59%) and 85% (95%CI: 79-99%), respectively. The increased safety with the current low dose strategy may potentially be offset by increased CVD risk in the time necessary to control hypertension.

  12. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P V

    2015-04-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis.

  13. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P V Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM. T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis, usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c 200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis.

  14. Cardiotoxicity of antineoplasic agents: onset, risk factors and clinical manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. Rădulescu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The continuously growing incidence of the neoplasic disease, estimated to be in 2020 themain cause of death in developed countries, has imposed an increasing research to discover newclasses of antineoplasic agents, which alone or in combination with classical chemotherapy agents,may turn cancer into a curable disease for the most of the patients. All these drugs affect the heart inrelation to the presence of risk factors: physiological (age, sex, race, general (malaise, pre-existingchronic diseases, pre-existing cardiovascular affections, previous mediastinal radiation therapy,association with other cardiotoxic substances, as well as in relation to factors related to medication(high daily dose, high cumulative dose, short interval between administrations, bolus injection. Themechanism that produces cardiotoxicity is incompletely elucidated, it appears to be plurifactorial, theproduction of oxygen free radicals being the main cause of morphological alterations. Anthracyclinescardiotoxicity is better known, with its two forms (acute/subacute and late or chronic or even thedelayed cardiotoxicity form in survivors of childhood cancers. There are also presented some cardiacdamage modalities after treatment with alkylating agents, antimetabolites, taxanes, monoclonalantibodies (trastuzumab.

  15. ARAC--The Montreal Jewish General Hospital Alzheimer Risk Assessment Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Hyman M; Liberman, Adrienne; Kelner, Nora; Babins, Lennie; Fried, Lynda; Bilbul, Melanie; Goodman, Rachel

    2011-07-01

    In parallel with robust efforts world-wide to develop effective neuroprotection for established disease, resources are being mobilized to delineate risk factors and implement preventive measures in a concerted effort to forestall the anticipated Alzheimer disease (AD) epidemic. A review of heritable and 'acquired' dementia risk factors, many operating at midlife, is presented in a companion paper. In 2009, an Alzheimer Risk Assessment Clinic (ARAC) was established at the Jewish General Hospital (Montreal) to address the concerns increasingly being voiced by active middle-aged individuals at risk for AD. A positive family history of AD and/or perceived changes in personal cognitive function (predominantly short-term memory) are main reasons for referral. The primary objectives of ARAC are to (i) ascertain, inform and mitigate the risks of developing AD in cognitively-healthy persons aged 40-65 based on best available medical and epidemiological evidence, (ii) conduct scientific research on midlife dementia risk and prevention in this population and (iii) provide instruction in dementia risk assessment and management to health professionals, clinical/research fellows, medical residents and students. ARAC infrastructure, evaluation protocol, risk profile classification scheme, interventions, knowledge dissemination program, case vignettes, and seminal research projects are described. It is hoped that ARAC and similar initiatives will help prevent or delay dementia by innovating effective interventions based on increasingly nuanced estimation of modifiable AD risk in presymptomatic persons.

  16. Health literacy and the perception of risk in a breast cancer family history clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, E J; Kelly, J; Lehane, E A; Livingstone, V; Cotter, B; Butt, A; O'Sullivan, M J; O Connell, F; Redmond, H P; Corrigan, M A

    2016-11-28

    Informed consent is an essential component of medical practice, and especially so in procedural based specialties which entail varying degrees of risk. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women, and as such is the focus of extensive research and significant media attention. Despite this, considerable misperception exists regarding the risk of developing breast cancer. This study aims to examine the accuracy of risk perception of women attending a breast cancer family history clinic, and to explore the relationship between risk perception accuracy and health literacy. A cross-sectional study of women attending a breast cancer family history clinic (n = 86) was carried out, consisting of a patient survey and a validated health literacy assessment. Patients' perception of personal and population breast cancer risk was compared to actual risk as calculated by a validated risk assessment tool. Significant discordance between real and perceived risks was observed. The majority (83.7%) of women overestimated their personal lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, as well as that of other women of the same age (89.5%). Health literacy was considered potentially inadequate in 37.2% of patients; there was a correlation between low health literacy and increased risk perception inaccuracy across both personal ten-year (rs = 0.224, p = 0.039) and general ten-year population estimations. (rs = 0.267, p = 0.013). Inaccuracy in risk perception is highly prevalent in women attending a breast cancer family history clinic. Health literacy inadequacy is significantly associated with this inaccuracy. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Managing Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Clinical Updates and Three Strategic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodara, Ann M; Wattiaux, Aimée; Bartels, Christie M

    2017-04-01

    ᅟ: The increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is well known; however, appropriate management of this elevated risk in rheumatology clinics is less clear. By critically reviewing literature published within the past 5 years, we aim to clarify current knowledge and gaps regarding CVD risk management in RA. We examine recent guidelines, recommendations, and evidence and discuss three approaches: (1) RA-specific management including treat-to-target and medication management, (2) assessment of comprehensive individual risk, and (3) targeting traditional CVD risk factors (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity) at a population level. Considering that 75% of US RA visits occur in specialty clinics, further research is needed regarding evidence-based strategies to manage and reduce CVD risk in RA. This review highlights clinical updates including US cardiology and international professional society guidelines, successful evidence-based population approaches from primary care, and novel opportunities in rheumatology care to reduce CVD risk in RA.

  18. Towards individualized dose constraints: Adjusting the QUANTEC radiation pneumonitis model for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Farr, Katherina P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Understanding the dose-response of the lung in order to minimize the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) is critical for optimization of lung cancer radiotherapy. We propose a method to combine the dose-response relationship for RP in the landmark QUANTEC paper with known clinical risk......-only QUANTEC model and the model including risk factors. Subdistribution cumulative incidence functions were compared for patients with high/low-risk predictions from the two models, and concordance indices (c-indices) for the prediction of RP were calculated. Results. The reference dose- response relationship...... factors, in order to enable individual risk prediction. The approach is validated in an independent dataset. Material and methods. The prevalence of risk factors in the patient populations underlying the QUANTEC analysis was estimated, and a previously published method to adjust dose...

  19. Assessment of volatile organic compounds and particulate matter in a dental clinic and health risks to clinic personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yu-Jue; Huang, Yen-Ching; Lee, I-Long; Chiang, Che-Ming; Lin, Chitsan; Jeng, Hueiwang Anna

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess (1) levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) in a dental clinic in southern Taiwan and (2) dental care personnel's health risks associated with due to chronic exposure to VOCs. An automatic, continuous sampling system and a multi-gas monitor were employed to quantify the air pollutants, along with environmental comfort factors, including temperature, CO2, and relative humidity at six sampling sites in the clinic over eight days. Specific VOC compounds were identified and their concentrations were quantified. Both non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic VOC compounds were assessed based on the US Environmental Protection Agency's Principles of Health Risk Assessment in terms of whether those indoor air pollutants increased health risks for the full-time dental care professionals at the clinic. Increased levels of VOCs were recorded during business hours and exceeded limits recommended by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency. A total of 68 VOC compounds were identified in the study area. Methylene methacrylate (2.8 ppm) and acetone (0.176 ppm) were the only two non-carcinogenic compounds that posed increased risks for human health, yielding hazard indexes of 16.4 and 4.1, respectively. None of the carcinogenic compounds increased cancer risk. All detected PM10 levels ranged from 20 to 150 μg/m(3), which met the Taiwan EPA and international limits. The average PM10 level during business hours was significantly higher than that during non-business hours (P = 0.04). Improved ventilation capacity in the air conditioning system was recommended to reduce VOCs and PM levels.

  20. Nonconsensual clinical trials: a foreseeable risk of offshoring under global corporatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Bethany

    2015-03-01

    This paper explores the connection of offshoring and outsourcing to nonconsensual global pharmaceutical trials in low-income countries. After discussing reasons why the topic of nonconsensual offshored clinical trials may be overlooked in bioethics literature, I suggest that when pharmaceutical corporations offshore clinical trials today, nonconsensual experiments are often foreseeable and not simply the result of aberrant ethical conduct by a few individuals. Offshoring of clinical trials is structured so that experiments can be presented as health care in a unique form of outsourcing from the host country to pharmaceutical corporations. Bioethicists' assessments of the risks and potential benefits of offshore corporate pharmaceutical trials should therefore systematically include not only the hoped for benefits and the risks of the experimental drug but also the risk that subjects will not have consented, as well as the broader international consequences of nonconsensual experimentation.

  1. Actuarial assessment of violence risk in hospital-based partner assault clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, N Zoe; Harris, Grant T; Holder, Norah

    2008-12-01

    Hospital-based partner assault clinics are a relatively recent addition to the community response to partner violence. In this study, 66% of 111 women attending hospital clinics for partner assault were physically injured and 43% reported death threats. Few concurrently used other services (shelters or police) and most relied on female friends and relatives for help. Many participants who currently lived with the perpetrator were contemplating leaving but only a third had made plans to do so. Participants faced an unusually high risk of future assault, according to both victim interview using the ODARA actuarial risk assessment and their own perceptions. Findings imply an important role for partner assault clinics and the feasibility of the victim service sector's using the same actuarial risk assessments as the criminal justice system.

  2. Towards individualized dose constraints: Adjusting the QUANTEC radiation pneumonitis model for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Farr, Katherina P.;

    2014-01-01

    Background. Understanding the dose-response of the lung in order to minimize the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) is critical for optimization of lung cancer radiotherapy. We propose a method to combine the dose-response relationship for RP in the landmark QUANTEC paper with known clinical risk...... factors, in order to enable individual risk prediction. The approach is validated in an independent dataset. Material and methods. The prevalence of risk factors in the patient populations underlying the QUANTEC analysis was estimated, and a previously published method to adjust dose......-response relationships for clinical risk factors was employed. Effect size estimates (odds ratios) for risk factors were drawn from a recently published meta-analysis. Baseline values for D50 and γ50 were found. The method was tested in an independent dataset (103 patients), comparing the predictive power of the dose......-only QUANTEC model and the model including risk factors. Subdistribution cumulative incidence functions were compared for patients with high/low-risk predictions from the two models, and concordance indices (c-indices) for the prediction of RP were calculated. Results. The reference dose- response relationship...

  3. Effect of clinical and social risk factors on hospital profiling for stroke readmission: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyhani, Salomeh; Myers, Laura J; Cheng, Eric; Hebert, Paul; Williams, Linda S; Bravata, Dawn M

    2014-12-02

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and Veterans Health Administration (VA) will report 30-day stroke readmission rates as a measure of hospital quality. A national debate on whether social risk factors should be included in models developed for hospital profiling is ongoing. To compare a CMS-based model of 30-day readmission with a more comprehensive model that includes measures of social risk (such as homelessness) or clinical factors (such as stroke severity and functional status). Data from a retrospective cohort study were used to develop a CMS-based 30-day readmission model that included age and comorbid conditions based on codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (model 1). This model was then compared with one that included administrative social risk factors (model 2). Finally, the CMS model (model 1) was compared with a model that included social risk and clinical factors from chart review (model 3). These 3 models were used to rank hospitals by 30-day risk-standardized readmission rates and examine facility rankings among the models. Hospitals in the VA. Patients hospitalized with stroke in 2007. 30-day readmission rates. The 30-day readmission rate was 12.8%. The c-statistics for the 3 models were 0.636, 0.646, and 0.661, respectively. All hospitals were classified as performing "as expected" using all 3 models (that is, performance did not differ from the VA national average); therefore, the addition of detailed clinical information or social risk factors did not alter assessment of facility performance. A predominantly male veteran cohort limits the generalizability of these findings. In the VA, more comprehensive models that included social risk and clinical factors did not affect hospital comparisons based on 30-day readmission rates. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  4. A novel neural-inspired learning algorithm with application to clinical risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Darwin; Poh, Chueh Loo; Kitney, Richard I

    2015-04-01

    Clinical risk prediction - the estimation of the likelihood an individual is at risk of a disease - is a coveted and exigent clinical task, and a cornerstone to the recommendation of life saving management strategies. This is especially important for individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) given the fact that it is the leading causes of death in many developed counties. To this end, we introduce a novel learning algorithm - a key factor that influences the performance of machine learning-based prediction models - and utilities it to develop CVD risk prediction tool. This novel neural-inspired algorithm, called the Artificial Neural Cell System for classification (ANCSc), is inspired by mechanisms that develop the brain and empowering it with capabilities such as information processing/storage and recall, decision making and initiating actions on external environment. Specifically, we exploit on 3 natural neural mechanisms responsible for developing and enriching the brain - namely neurogenesis, neuroplasticity via nurturing and apoptosis - when implementing ANCSc algorithm. Benchmark testing was conducted using the Honolulu Heart Program (HHP) dataset and results are juxtaposed with 2 other algorithms - i.e. Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Evolutionary Data-Conscious Artificial Immune Recognition System (EDC-AIRS). Empirical experiments indicate that ANCSc algorithm (statistically) outperforms both SVM and EDC-AIRS algorithms. Key clinical markers identified by ANCSc algorithm include risk factors related to diet/lifestyle, pulmonary function, personal/family/medical history, blood data, blood pressure, and electrocardiography. These clinical markers, in general, are also found to be clinically significant - providing a promising avenue for identifying potential cardiovascular risk factors to be evaluated in clinical trials.

  5. Clinical values dataset processing through cluster analysis to find cardiovascular risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, C. M.; Legnani, W. E.; Armentano, R. L.

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this work is to show another way to grouping population with clinical variables measured in health centres and to assign a cardiovascular risk indicator. To do this, two different datasets were used, one coming from France and another coming from Uruguay. The well proved Framingham index was used to validate the results. The preliminary results are very auspicious to encourage the research and get deeper knowledge of the cardiovascular risk indicators.

  6. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for falls: prevalence and clinical profile of hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzia, Melissa de Freitas; Victor, Marco Antonio de Goes; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2014-01-01

    to identify the prevalence of the Nursing Diagnosis (ND) Risk for falls in the hospitalizations of adult patients in clinical and surgical units, to characterize the clinical profile and to identify the risk factors of the patients with this ND. a cross-sectional study with 174 patients. The data was collected from the computerized nursing care prescriptions system and on-line hospital records, and analyzed statistically. the prevalence of the ND Risk for falls was 4%. The patients' profile indicated older adults, males (57%), those hospitalized in the clinical units (63.2%), with a median length of hospitalization of 20 (10-24) days, with neurological illnesses (26%), cardio-vascular illnesses (74.1%) and various co-morbidities (3±1.8). The prevalent risk factors were neurological alterations (43.1%), impaired mobility (35.6%) and extremes of age (10.3%). the findings contributed to evidencing the profile of the patients with a risk of falling hospitalized in clinical and surgical wards, which favors the planning of interventions for preventing this adverse event.

  7. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for falls: prevalence and clinical profile of hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa de Freitas Luzia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to identify the prevalence of the Nursing Diagnosis (ND Risk for falls in the hospitalizations of adult patients in clinical and surgical units, to characterize the clinical profile and to identify the risk factors of the patients with this ND.METHOD: a cross-sectional study with 174 patients. The data was collected from the computerized nursing care prescriptions system and on-line hospital records, and analyzed statistically.RESULTS: the prevalence of the ND Risk for falls was 4%. The patients' profile indicated older adults, males (57%, those hospitalized in the clinical units (63.2%, with a median length of hospitalization of 20 (10-24 days, with neurological illnesses (26%, cardio-vascular illnesses (74.1% and various co-morbidities (3±1.8. The prevalent risk factors were neurological alterations (43.1%, impaired mobility (35.6% and extremes of age (10.3%.CONCLUSION: the findings contributed to evidencing the profile of the patients with a risk of falling hospitalized in clinical and surgical wards, which favors the planning of interventions for preventing this adverse event.

  8. Clinical Risk Assessment in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Current Landscape and Emerging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Shruti; McCrae, Keith R

    2017-07-01

    Laboratory criteria for the classification of antiphospholipid syndrome include the detection of a lupus anticoagulant and/or anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies. However, the majority of patients who test positive in these assays do not have thrombosis. Current risk-stratification tools are largely limited to the antiphospholipid antibody profile and traditional thrombotic risk factors. Novel biomarkers that correlate with disease activity and potentially provide insight into future clinical events include domain 1 specific anti-β2GPI antibodies, antibodies to other phospholipids or phospholipid/protein antigens (such as anti-PS/PT), and functional/biological assays such as thrombin generation, complement activation, levels of circulating microparticles, and annexin A5 resistance. Clinical risk scores may also have value in predicting clinical events. Biomarkers that predict thrombosis risk in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies have been long sought, and several biomarkers have been proposed. Ultimately, integration of biomarkers with established assays and clinical characteristics may offer the best chance of identifying patients at highest risk of APS-related complications.

  9. Youth-caregiver Agreement on Clinical High-risk Symptoms of Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golembo-Smith, Shana; Bachman, Peter; Senturk, Damla; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2014-01-01

    Early identification of individuals who will go on to develop schizophrenia is a difficult endeavor. The variety of symptoms experienced by clinical high-risk youth make it difficult to identify who will eventually develop schizophrenia in the future. Efforts are being made, therefore, to more accurately identify at-risk individuals and factors that predict conversion to psychosis. As in most assessments of children and adolescents, however, both youth and parental report of symptomatology and resulting dysfunction are important to assess. The goals of the current study were to assess the extent of cross-informant agreement on the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS), a widely-used tool employed to determine clinical high-risk status. A total of 84 youth-caregiver pairs participated. Youth and caregiver raters displayed moderate overall agreement on SIPS-rated symptoms. Both youth and caregiver ratings of youth symptomatology contributed significantly to predicting conversion to psychosis. In addition, youth age and quality of youth-caregiver relationships appear to be related to cross-informant symptom ratings. Despite differences on individual SIPS domains, the majority of dyads agreed on youth clinical high-risk status. Results highlight the potential clinical utility of using caregiver informants to determine youth psychosis risk. PMID:24092494

  10. PRE-MARKET CLINICAL EVALUATIONS OF INNOVATIVE HIGH-RISK MEDICAL DEVICES IN EUROPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulstaert, F.; Neyt, M.; Vinck, I.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: High-quality clinical evidence is most often lacking when novel high-risk devices enter the European market. At the same time, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) is often initiated as a requirement for obtaining market access in the US. Should coverage in Europe be postponed until RCT...... Bodies, Ethics Committees, and HTA agencies were consulted. We also discuss patient safety and the transparency of information. Results: In contrast to the US, there is no requirement in Europe to demonstrate the clinical efficacy of high-risk devices in the premarket phase. Patients in Europe can thus...

  11. External model validation of binary clinical risk prediction models in cardiovascular and thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Graeme L; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2016-08-01

    Clinical risk-prediction models serve an important role in healthcare. They are used for clinical decision-making and measuring the performance of healthcare providers. To establish confidence in a model, external model validation is imperative. When designing such an external model validation study, thought must be given to patient selection, risk factor and outcome definitions, missing data, and the transparent reporting of the analysis. In addition, there are a number of statistical methods available for external model validation. Execution of a rigorous external validation study rests in proper study design, application of suitable statistical methods, and transparent reporting.

  12. An automatic system to identify heart disease risk factors in clinical texts over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingcai; Li, Haodi; Tang, Buzhou; Wang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Liu, Zengjian; Liu, Shu; Wang, Weida; Deng, Qiwen; Zhu, Suisong; Chen, Yangxin; Wang, Jingfeng

    2015-12-01

    Despite recent progress in prediction and prevention, heart disease remains a leading cause of death. One preliminary step in heart disease prediction and prevention is risk factor identification. Many studies have been proposed to identify risk factors associated with heart disease; however, none have attempted to identify all risk factors. In 2014, the National Center of Informatics for Integrating Biology and Beside (i2b2) issued a clinical natural language processing (NLP) challenge that involved a track (track 2) for identifying heart disease risk factors in clinical texts over time. This track aimed to identify medically relevant information related to heart disease risk and track the progression over sets of longitudinal patient medical records. Identification of tags and attributes associated with disease presence and progression, risk factors, and medications in patient medical history were required. Our participation led to development of a hybrid pipeline system based on both machine learning-based and rule-based approaches. Evaluation using the challenge corpus revealed that our system achieved an F1-score of 92.68%, making it the top-ranked system (without additional annotations) of the 2014 i2b2 clinical NLP challenge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Coronary risk assessment among intermediate risk patients using a clinical and biomarker based algorithm developed and validated in two population cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, D S; McCarty, C A; Hytopoulos, E; Beggs, M; Nolan, N; Harrington, D S; Hastie, T; Tibshirani, R; Tracy, R P; Psaty, B M; McClelland, R; Tsao, P S; Quertermous, T

    2012-11-01

    Many coronary heart disease (CHD) events occur in individuals classified as intermediate risk by commonly used assessment tools. Over half the individuals presenting with a severe cardiac event, such as myocardial infarction (MI), have at most one risk factor as included in the widely used Framingham risk assessment. Individuals classified as intermediate risk, who are actually at high risk, may not receive guideline recommended treatments. A clinically useful method for accurately predicting 5-year CHD risk among intermediate risk patients remains an unmet medical need. This study sought to develop a CHD Risk Assessment (CHDRA) model that improves 5-year risk stratification among intermediate risk individuals. Assay panels for biomarkers associated with atherosclerosis biology (inflammation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, chemotaxis, etc.) were optimized for measuring baseline serum samples from 1084 initially CHD-free Marshfield Clinic Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP) individuals. A multivariable Cox regression model was fit using the most powerful risk predictors within the clinical and protein variables identified by repeated cross-validation. The resulting CHDRA algorithm was validated in a Multiple-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) case-cohort sample. A CHDRA algorithm of age, sex, diabetes, and family history of MI, combined with serum levels of seven biomarkers (CTACK, Eotaxin, Fas Ligand, HGF, IL-16, MCP-3, and sFas) yielded a clinical net reclassification index of 42.7% (p definition with the MESA samples and inability to include PMRP fatal CHD events. A novel risk score of serum protein levels plus clinical risk factors, developed and validated in independent cohorts, demonstrated clinical utility for assessing the true risk of CHD events in intermediate risk patients. Improved accuracy in cardiovascular risk classification could lead to improved preventive care and fewer deaths.

  14. Integrating clinical features and genetic lesions in the risk assessment of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena, Chiara; Gallì, Anna; Such, Esperanza; Meggendorfer, Manja; Germing, Ulrich; Rizzo, Ettore; Cervera, Jose; Molteni, Elisabetta; Fasan, Annette; Schuler, Esther; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Lopez-Pavia, Maria; Zibellini, Silvia; Kuendgen, Andrea; Travaglino, Erica; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; Catricalà, Silvia; Vicente, Ana I.; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Cazzola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm with variable clinical course. To predict the clinical outcome, we previously developed a CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) based on clinical parameters and cytogenetics. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that accounting for gene mutations would further improve risk stratification of CMML patients. We therefore sequenced 38 genes to explore the role of somatic mutations in disease phenotype and clinical outcome. Overall, 199 of 214 (93%) CMML patients carried at least 1 somatic mutation. Stepwise linear regression models showed that these mutations accounted for 15% to 24% of variability of clinical phenotype. Based on multivariable Cox regression analyses, cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations in RUNX1, NRAS, SETBP1, and ASXL1 were independently associated with overall survival (OS). Using these parameters, we defined a genetic score that identified 4 categories with significantly different OS and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution. In multivariable analyses, genetic score, red blood cell transfusion dependency, white blood cell count, and marrow blasts retained independent prognostic value. These parameters were included into a clinical/molecular CPSS (CPSS-Mol) model that identified 4 risk groups with markedly different median OS (from >144 to 18 months, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.69) and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution (from 0% to 48% at 4 years, HR = 3.84) (P < .001). The CPSS-Mol fully retained its ability to risk stratify in an independent validation cohort of 260 CMML patients. In conclusion, integrating conventional parameters and gene mutations significantly improves risk stratification of CMML patients, providing a robust basis for clinical decision-making and a reliable tool for clinical trials. PMID:27385790

  15. Do bib clips pose a cross-contamination risk at the dental clinic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt-Holland, Addy; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Lucier, Rebekah; Kublin, Claire L; Fong, Jennifer M; Goldfein, Joshua; Baker, David L; Park, Angel; Finkelman, Matthew; Kawai, Toshihisa; Paster, Bruce J; Kugel, Gerard

    2012-07-01

    Although multiple-use dental napkin holders have a relatively low risk of transmitting infection, they do require disinfection between patients. This study sought to: 1) determine the presence of bacterial load on two types of clips of reusable bib chains after dental procedures at the Endodontics and Orthodontics clinics at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine; and 2) evaluate the effectiveness of disinfecting the clips. These specialty clinics represent a wide spectrum of patients, procedures, and appointment times. Bacterial load on the bib clips was determined immediately following dental treatments-both before and after their disinfection-during morning and afternoon sessions. The results revealed that, after treatments, there was a statistically significant difference when comparing the two clinics for bacterial burden on the clips. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant difference in bacterial load on the two types of clips. Disinfection of the bib clips was highly effective in both clinics. Clinically, the results suggest that due to the nature of the treatment, the demographic population, and the type of bib clips used, patients in different clinics may be exposed to varying bacterial concentrations on the bib clips, and thus to different possible cross-contamination risks. Future analyses will be performed to identify the bacterial species in samples from both pre- and post-disinfected clips, and to determine if they harbor disease-causing bacterial species that can pose a potential, yet undetermined risk for cross-contamination.

  16. Decision theory and the evaluation of risks and benefits of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabe, Rosemarie D C; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; Raaijmakers, Jan A M; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2012-12-01

    Research ethics committees (RECs) are tasked to assess the risks and the benefits of a clinical trial. In previous studies, it was shown that RECs find this task difficult, if not impossible, to do. The current approaches to benefit-risk assessment (i.e. Component Analysis and the Net Risk Test) confound the various risk-benefit tasks, and as such, make balancing impossible. In this article, we show that decision theory, specifically through the expected utility theory and multiattribute utility theory, enable for an explicit and ethically weighted risk-benefit evaluation. This makes a balanced ethical justification possible, and thus a more rationally defensible decision making. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Building a normative decision support system for clinical and operational risk management in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornalba, Chiara; Bellazzi, Roberto G; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a decision support system for risk management in hemodialysis (HD) departments. The proposed system exploits a domain ontology to formalize the problem as a Bayesian network. It also relies on a software tool, able to automatically collect HD data, to learn the network conditional probabilities. By merging prior knowledge and the available data, the system allows to estimate risk profiles both for patients and HD departments. The risk management process is completed by an influence diagram that enables scenario analysis to choose the optimal decisions that mitigate a patient's risk. The methods and design of the decision support tool are described in detail, and the derived decision model is presented. Examples and case studies are also shown. The tool is one of the few examples of normative system explicitly conceived to manage operational and clinical risks in health care environments.

  18. Clinical Risk Factors For Central Line Associated Venous Thrombosis (CLAVT In Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir H Shah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: Identifying risk factors related to Central Venous Line (CVL placement could potentially minimize Central Line-Associated Venous Thrombosis (CLAVT. We sought to identify the clinical factors associated with CLAVT in children. Methods: Over a 3-year period, 3,733 CVLs were placed at a tertiary-care children’s hospital. Data were extracted from the electronic medical records of patients with clinical signs and symptoms of venous thromboembolism (VTE, diagnosed using Doppler ultrasonography and/or echocardiography. Statistical analyses examined differences in CLAVT occurrence between groups based on patient and CVL characteristics (type, brand, placement site, and hospital unit. Results: Femoral CVL placement was associated with greater risk for developing CLAVT (OR 11.1, 95% CI 3.9-31.6, p<0.0001. CVLs placed in the NICU were also associated with increased CLAVT occurrence (OR 5.3, 95% CI 2.1-13.2, p=0.0003. CVL brand was also significantly associated with risk of CLAVT events. Conclusion: Retrospective analyses identified femoral CVL placement and catheter type as independent risk factors for CLAVT, suggesting increased risks due to mechanical reasons. Placement of CVLs in the NICU also led to an increased risk of CLAVT, suggesting that small infants are at increased risk of thrombotic events. Alternative strategies for CVL placement, thromboprophylaxis, and earlier diagnosis may be important for reducing CLAVT events.

  19. Caries risk and prevention: Evaluation of a preventive program in a clinic for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Correia Sampaio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to verify the use of the Nexø caries risk assessment system together with the Cariogram® (School of Dentistry, Malmö, Sweden, in a preventive program for children at the cariology clinic at Federal University of Paraíba. Methods: A sample of 107 children (2- to 14-year-old was attended on two occasions. The patients’ clinical data (DMF-T, dmf-t, Bleeding index, OHI-S and those from the preventive procedures performed (professional cleaning, fluoride application, Cariogram® (School of Dentistry, Malmö, Sweden, Nexø caries risk were collected twice: first from the clinical record cards and on the second occasion by exams. Parents and guardians evaluated the clinical attendance in an interview and the children, by means of a VAS scale. According to the Nexø caries risk assessment system, 53 children (49.5% were classified at low risk (6. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS (11.0. Results: A positive correlation was observed between the two risk systems: Nexø and Cariogram® (School of Dentistry, Malmö, Sweden of chances of avoiding new caries lesions. The possibility of avoiding new caries lesions increased 5% in both groups and a discrete increase was observed in the other parameters. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the Nexø system associated with the Cariogram® (School of Dentistry, Malmö, Sweden, contributed to the assessment of the patients’ caries risk profile and to the success of the preventive program for children at the cariology clinic at Universidade Federal da Paraíba.

  20. A Mobile Clinical Decision Support Tool for Pediatric Cardiovascular Risk-Reduction Clinical Practice Guidelines: Development and Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Widespread application of research findings to improve patient outcomes remains inadequate, and failure to routinely translate research findings into daily clinical practice is a major barrier for the implementation of any evidence-based guideline. Strategies to increase guideline uptake in primary care pediatric practices and to facilitate adherence to recommendations are required. Objective Our objective was to operationalize the US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents into a mobile clinical decision support (CDS) system for healthcare providers, and to describe the process development and outcomes. Methods To overcome the difficulty of translating clinical practice guidelines into a computable form that can be used by a CDS system, we used a multilayer framework to convert the evidence synthesis into executable knowledge. We used an iterative process of design, testing, and revision through each step in the translation of the guidelines for use in a CDS tool to support the development of 4 validated modules: an integrated risk assessment; a blood pressure calculator; a body mass index calculator; and a lipid management instrument. Results The iterative revision process identified several opportunities to improve the CDS tool. Operationalizing the integrated guideline identified numerous areas in which the guideline was vague or incorrect and required more explicit operationalization. Iterative revisions led to workable solutions to problems and understanding of the limitations of the tool. Conclusions The process and experiences described provide a model for other mobile CDS systems that translate written clinical practice guidelines into actionable, real-time clinical recommendations. PMID:28270384

  1. Cow-specific risk factors for clinical mastitis in Brazilian dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C S F; Hogeveen, H; Botelho, A M; Maia, P V; Coelho, S G; Haddad, J P A

    2015-10-01

    Information related to mastitis risk factors is useful for the design and implementation of clinical mastitis (CM) control programs. The first objective of our study was to model the risk of CM under Brazilian conditions, using cow-specific risk factors. Our second objective was to explore which risk factors were associated with the occurrence of the most common pathogens involved in Brazilian CM infections. The analyses were based on 65 months of data from 9,789 dairy cows and 12,464 CM cases. Cow-specific risk factors that could easily be measured in standard Brazilian dairy farms were used in the statistical analyses, which included logistic regression and multinomial logistic regression. The first month of lactation, high somatic cell count, rainy season and history of clinical mastitis cases were factors associated with CM for both primiparous and multiparous cows. In addition, parity and breed were also associated risk factors for multiparous cows. Of all CM cases, 54% showed positive bacteriological culturing results from which 57% were classified as environmental pathogens, with a large percentage of coliforms (35%). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (16%), Streptococcus uberis (9%), Streptococcus agalactiae (7%) and other Streptococci (9%) were also common pathogens. Among the pathogens analyzed, the association of cow-specific risk factors, such as Zebu breed (OR=5.84, 95%CI 3.77-10.77) and accumulated history of SCC (1.76, 95%CI 1.37-2.27), was different for CM caused by Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and S. agalactiae in comparison to CM caused by coliforms. Our results suggest that CM control programs in Brazil should specially consider the recent history of clinical mastitis cases and the beginning of the lactations, mainly during the rainy season as important risk factor for mastitis.

  2. Clinical outcomes and risk factors for perforation in gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Tomita, Toshihiko; Toyoshima, Fumihiko; Sakurai, Jun; Kondo, Takashi; Asano, Haruki; Yamasaki, Takahisa; Okugawa, Takuya; Ikehara, Hisatomo; Oshima, Tadayuki; Fukui, Hirokazu; Miwa, Hiroto

    2013-06-16

    To evaluate clinical outcomes and risk factors for endoscopic perforation during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in a prospective study. We investigated the clinical outcomes and risk factors for the development of perforation in 98 consecutive gastric neoplasms undergoing ESD regarding. Demographic and clinical parameters including patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors, clinical parameters, and duration of hospital stay were analyzed for risk factors for perforation. In subgroup analysis, we also compared the clinical outcomes between perforation and "silent" free air without endoscopically visible perforation detected only by computed tomography. Perforation was identified in 8.2% of patients. All patients were managed conservatively by the administration of antibiotics. The mean procedure time was significantly longer in patients with endoscopic perforation than in those without. According to the receiver-operating characteristic analysis, the resulting cutoff value of the procedure time for perforation was 115 min (87.5% sensitivity, 56.7% specificity). Prolonged procedure time (≥ 115 min) was associated with an increased risk of perforation (odds ratio 9.15; 95%CI: 1.08-77.54; P = 0.04). Following ESD, body temperature and C-reactive protein level were significantly higher in patients with perforation than in those without (P = 0.02), whereas there was no difference between these patient groups on the starting day of oral intake or of hospitalization. In subgroup analysis, the post-ESD clinical course was not different between endoscopic perforation and silent free air. Only prolonged procedure time (≥ 115 min) was significantly associated with perforation. The clinical outcomes of perforation are favorable and are comparable to those of patients with or without silent free air.

  3. Correlation between Timi Risk Score and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Unstable Angina Pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savovic Zorica

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Given Taking that the TIMI score is a major predictor of MACE, this study aimed to determine the value of the TIMI risk score in predicting poor outcomes (death, myocardial infarction, recurrent pain in patients presenting with unstable angina pectoris in short-term observation. A total of 107 patients with APns were examined at the Clinical Centre Kragujevac and were included in the investigation. The TIMI score was determined on the first day of hospitalization. During hospitalization, the following factors were also observed: troponin, ECG evolution, further therapy (pharmacologic therapy and/or emergency PCI or CABG, age, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. The low-risk group (TIMI 0 - 2 included 30.8% of patients, whereas 47.6% of patients were in the intermediate-risk group (TIMI 3 - 4, and 21.5% of patients were in the high-risk group (TIMI 5 - 7. Good outcomes (without adverse event and poor outcomes (death, myocardial infarction, and recurring chest pain were dependent on the TIMI risk score. The increase in TIMI risk score per one unit increased the risk of a poor outcome by 54%. Troponin and TIMI risk score were positively correlated. Our results suggest that the TIMI risk score may be a reliable predictor of a poor outcome (MACE during the short-term observation of patients with APns. Moreover, patients identified as high-risk benefit from early invasive PCI, enoxaparin and Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitors. Th us, routine use of the TIMI risk score at admission may reduce the number of patients not recognized as high-risk.

  4. Assessment of risk of bias in randomized clinical trials in surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurusamy, K S; Gluud, C; Nikolova, D;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with low risk of bias is considered the highest level of evidence available for evaluating an intervention. Bias in RCTs may overestimate or underestimate the true effectiveness of an intervention. METHODS: The causes of bias...

  5. Clinical picture and risk prediction of short-term mortality in cardiogenic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Lassus, Johan; Sionis, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical picture and outcome of cardiogenic shock and to develop a risk prediction score for short-term mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: The CardShock study was a multicentre, prospective, observational study conducted between 2010 and 2012. Patie...

  6. Risk Factors for Clinically Significant Intimate Partner Violence among Active-Duty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Slep, Amy M.; Foran, Heather M.; Heyman, Richard E.; Snarr, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesized risk factors for men's and women's clinically significant intimate partner violence (CS-IPV) from four ecological levels (i.e., individual, family, workplace, community) were tested in a representative sample of active-duty U.S. Air Force members (N = 42,744). When considered together, we expected only individual and family factors to…

  7. Evaluation of the Cochrane tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars; Paludan-Müller, Asger Sand; Laursen, David R. T.;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials was introduced in 2008 and has frequently been commented on and used in systematic reviews. We wanted to evaluate the tool by reviewing published comments on its strengths and challenges and by describing and analysing how ...

  8. Towards patient-centered colorectal cancer surgery : focus on risks, decisions and clinical auditing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Heleen Simone

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explore several aspects of both clinical decision making and quality assessment in colorectal cancer surgery. Part one focusses on benefits and risks of treatment options, preoperative information provision and Shared Decision Making (SDM); part two investigates changes

  9. Advanced echocardiography and clinical surrogates to risk stratify and manage patients with structural heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debonnaire, Philippe Jean Marc Rita

    2016-01-01

    Part I focuses on the potential role of 3-dimensional echocardiography. At first a clinical risk score model for prediction of outcome in patients undergoing TAVI is presented (Chapter 2). Second the role of 3D-echocardiography is explored in depth in patients with mitral valve disease. Different no

  10. EPA guidance on the early detection of clinical high risk states of psychoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze-Lutter, F; Michel, C; Schmidt, S J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this guidance paper of the European Psychiatric Association is to provide evidence-based recommendations on the early detection of a clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis in patients with mental problems. To this aim, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies reporting on conversion rat...

  11. EPA guidance on the early intervention in clinical high risk states of psychoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, S J; Schultze-Lutter, F; Schimmelmann, B G

    2015-01-01

    This guidance paper from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) aims to provide evidence-based recommendations on early intervention in clinical high risk (CHR) states of psychosis, assessed according to the EPA guidance on early detection. The recommendations were derived from a meta-analysi...

  12. Advanced echocardiography and clinical surrogates to risk stratify and manage patients with structural heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debonnaire, Philippe Jean Marc Rita

    2016-01-01

    Part I focuses on the potential role of 3-dimensional echocardiography. At first a clinical risk score model for prediction of outcome in patients undergoing TAVI is presented (Chapter 2). Second the role of 3D-echocardiography is explored in depth in patients with mitral valve disease. Different

  13. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  14. Attachment and At-Risk Infants: Theoretical Perspectives and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Rick; Wallach, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Reviews and discusses the basic dimensions of Bowlby's theory of infant attachment. Provides an overview of the basic definitions and propositions of his theory, in addition to the clinical applications of his theory to the field of early education and intervention with at-risk children and their families. (EV)

  15. Evaluation of the Cochrane tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L; Paludan-Müller, A. S.; Laursen, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials was introduced in 2008 and has frequently been commented on and used in systematic reviews. We wanted to evaluate the tool by reviewing published comments on its strengths and challenges and by describing and analysing how ...

  16. The risk of unblinding was infrequently and incompletely reported in 300 randomized clinical trial publications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bello, Segun; Moustgaard, Helene; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    for unblinding was perceptible physical properties of the treatments, for example, a difference in the taste and odor of a typhoid vaccine compared with its placebo. CONCLUSION: Published articles on randomized clinical trials infrequently reported risk of unblinding. This may reflect a tendency for avoiding...

  17. Incidence of shoulder pain after neck dissection : A clinical explorative study for risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; van Wilgen, PC; Brendeke, W; de Goede, CJT; Kerst, A; Koolstra, M; Marinus, J; Schoppink, EM; Stuiver, MM; van de Velde, CF; Roodenburg, JLN

    2001-01-01

    Background. It is the purpose of this study to determine the incidence of shoulder pain and restricted range of motion of the shoulder after neck dissection, and to identify risk factors for the development of shoulder pain and restricted range of motion. Methods. Clinical patients who underwent a n

  18. Caries Risk Assessment for Determination of Focus and Intensity of Prevention in a Dental School Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Michael W. J.; Suddick, Richard P.

    1995-01-01

    A study at the University of Texas, San Antonio's dental school resulted in development of a system of caries risk assessment, applied to all undergraduate clinic patients. The rationale, structure, elements, and application of the system are outlined, and course content supporting the system is noted. Need for validation and other improvements is…

  19. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattiya Teawtrakul

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload.

  20. clinical risk index for babies (crib) ii score as a predictor of neonatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    Jan 1, 2011 ... Among them is the scoring system Clinical Risk Index for Babies also known as CRIB II score. .... strongly with hospital neonatal mortality, the cost of ... analysis was obtained using standard procedure ... then labelled and transported to the laboratory ... labor, the babies' details – the components of CRIB.

  1. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  2. A clinical and echocardiographic score for assigning risk of major events after dobutamine echocardiograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Marwick (Thomas); L. Case (Laura); D. Poldermans (Don); H. Boersma (Eric); J.J. Bax (Jeroen); T. Sawada (Takahiro); J.D. Thomas (James)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjectives We sought to develop and validate a risk score combining both clinical and dobutamine echocardiographic (DbE) features in 4,890 patients who underwent DbE at three expert laboratories and were followed for death or myocardial infarction for up to five years. Background In cont

  3. Clinical profile of high-risk febrile neutropenia in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan V Bhojaraja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Infection in the immunocompromised host has been a reason of concern in the clinical setting and a topic of debate for decades. In this study, the aim was to analyse the clinical profile of high-risk febrile neutropenic patients. Aims To study the clinical profile of high risk febrile neutropenia patients with the objective of identifying the most common associated malignancy, most common associated pathogen, the source of infection, to correlate the treatment and management with that of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA 2010 guidelines and to assess the clinical outcome. Methods A cross-sectional time bound study was carried out and a total of 80 episodes of high-risk febrile neutropenia were recorded among patients with malignancies from September 2011 to July 2013 with each episode being taken as a new case. Results Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (30 per cent was the most common malignancy associated, commonest source of infection was due to central venous catheters, the commonest pathogens were gram negative (52 per cent the treatment and management of each episode of high risk febrile neutropenia correlated with that of IDSA 2010 guidelines and the mortality rate was 13.75 per cent. Conclusion Febrile neutropenia is one of the major complications and cause of mortality in patients with malignancy and hence understanding its entire spectrum can help us reduce morbidity and mortality.

  4. Risk stratification by endocrinologists of patients with type 2 diabetes in a Danish specialised outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Lene; Arreskov, Anne B; Sperling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To target optimised medical care the Danish guidelines for diabetes recommend stratification of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) into three levels according to risk and complexity of treatment. The aim was to describe the T2D population in an outpatient clinic, measure the complian...

  5. The inclusion of cognition in vascular risk factor clinical practice guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Kenneth; Middleton, Laura E; Moorhouse, Paige K; Skoog, Ingmar; Black, Sandra E

    2009-01-01

    Background: People with vascular risk factors are at increased risk for cognitive impairment as well as vascular disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether vascular risk factor clinical practice guidelines consider cognition as an outcome or in connection with treatment compliance. Methods: Articles from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were assessed by at least two reviewers and were included if: (1) Either hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, or atrial fibrillation was targeted; (2) The guideline was directed at physicians; (3) Adult patients (aged 19 years or older) were targeted; and (4) The guideline was published in English. Of 91 guidelines, most were excluded because they were duplicates, older versions, or focused on single outcomes. Results: Of the 20 clinical practice guidelines that met inclusion criteria, five mentioned cognition. Of these five, four described potential treatment benefits but only two mentioned that cognition may affect compliance. No guidelines adequately described how to screen for cognitive impairment. Conclusion: Despite evidence that links cognitive impairment to vascular risk factors, only a minority of clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of vascular risk factors consider cognition as either an adverse outcome or as a factor to consider in treatment. PMID:19966911

  6. High heart rate: more than a risk factor. Lessons from a clinical practice survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Vivencio; Escobar, Carlos; Bertomeu, Vicente; Murga, Nekane; de Pablo, Carmen; Asín, Enrique

    2009-11-12

    Several epidemiological studies have reported that an elevated heart rate (HR) is associated with coronary atherosclerosis independently of other risk factors. Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether HR is itself the cause or there is merely an association between HR and mortality in this population. A total of 1686 patients with hypertension and chronic ischemic heart disease were included in this study. According to the resting HR, the patients were distributed in 3 groups (group 1: HR82 bpm). 580 patients (34.4%) belonged to group 1; 936 (55.5%) to group 2 and 170 (10.1%) to group 3. Patients with high HR exhibited a poorer prognosis not only due to a worse clinical profile (more concomitant cardiovascular risk factors and organ damage), but suggestively because despite the use of a similar number of drugs, patients with higher HR were associated with lesser risk control rates in daily clinical practice. Despite current guidelines that do not still recognize HR as a cardiovascular risk factor, it appears that physicians should pay more attention to it in clinical practice since high HR is warning about an increased risk.

  7. Risk factors for treatment related clinical fluctuations in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Dutch Guillain-Barré study group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H. Visser (Leendert); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); J. Meulstee (Jan); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe risk factors for treatment related clinical fluctuations, relapses occurring after initial therapeutic induced stabilisation or improvement, were evaluated in a group of 172 patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features

  8. Hepatitis B virus infection risk factors and immunity among sexually transmitted disease clinic clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Weisbord, Joanna S; Zhang, Guoyan; Brewer, Toye

    2003-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a sexually transmitted infection that can be prevented with hepatitis B vaccination. The goal was to determine prevalence and risk factors for HBV infection and immunity among sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic clients. In this cross-sectional study, consenting adult STD clinic clients were interviewed regarding HBV risk factors and vaccination history, and blood was drawn for HBV serologic testing. Of the 682 participants, 154 (22.6%) had antibody to hepatitis B core antigen, indicating previous infection, and 64 (9.4%) had only antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen, indicating immunity as a result of hepatitis B vaccination. Only 130 (19.1%) of all participants reported receiving at least one dose of hepatitis B vaccine. The majority of clients were susceptible to HBV, were at high risk for HBV infection, and would benefit from hepatitis B vaccination.

  9. Dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease risk profiles of patients attending an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Danai Tavonga; Kodogo, Vitaris; Chokuona, Kudzai Fortunate Vongai; Gomo, Exnevia; Oektedalen, Olav; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2015-01-01

    The chronic inflammation induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contributes to increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in HIV-infected individuals. HIV-infected patients generally benefit from being treated with antiretroviral drugs, but some antiretroviral agents have side effects, such as dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. There is general consensus that antiretroviral drugs induce a long-term risk of CHD, although the levels of that risk are somewhat controversial. The intention of this cross-sectional study was to describe the lipid profile and the long-term risk of CHD among HIV-positive outpatients at an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe. Two hundred and fifteen patients were investigated (females n=165, mean age 39.8 years; males n=50; mean age 42.0 years). Thirty of the individuals were antiretroviral-naïve and 185 had been on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for a mean 3.9±3.4 years. All participants had average lipid and glucose values within normal ranges, but there was a small difference between the ART and ART-for total cholesterol (TC) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Those on a combination of D4T or ZDV/NVP/3TC and PI-based ART were on average oldest and had the highest TC levels. Framingham risk showed 1.4% prevalence of high CHD risk within the next ten years. After univariate analysis age, sex, TC/HDL ratio, HDL, economic earnings and systolic BP were associated with medium to high risk of CHD. After multivariate regression analysis and adjusting for age or sex only age, sex and economic earnings were associated with medium to high risk of CHD. There is small risk of developing CHD, during the next decade in HIV infected patients at an HIV treatment clinic in Harare.

  10. Clinical signs, therapy and zoonotic risk of pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, A; Hein, J; Heusinger, A; Mueller, R S

    2013-03-01

    Systematic studies about pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis are rare. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical signs, therapy and zoonotic risk of pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis. Questionnaires from both owners (n = 74) of pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis and their veterinarians (n = 101) were analysed regarding clinical signs, therapy and data pertinent to zoonotic potential. Trichophyton (T.) mentagrophytes was found in 97% of cases. In the weeks preceding the onset of the clinical signs, a new guinea pig joined the household in 43% of cases. One third of the affected guinea pigs had lived in the household for less than 3 months. Predominant clinical signs were alopecia (83%), scaling (73%) and crusting (70%). The most commonly affected body site was the head (75%). In approximately one quarter of the cases humans showed clinical signs of dermatophytosis, in half the households, only children were affected. Skin lesions were seen most often on the face, the neck and the arms. Pet guinea pigs carrying dermatophytes must be considered a serious zoonotic risk for their owners, especially for children. A major risk factor for dermatophytosis seems to be a recent acquisition of a new guinea pig.

  11. Clinical characterization and risk profile of individuals seeking genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Edenir Inez; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; da Rocha, José Cláudio C; Vargas, Fernando Regla; Kalakun, Luciane; Blom, Melissa Brauner; Azevedo, Sérgio J; Caleffi, Maira; Giugliani, Roberto; Schüler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2007-06-01

    Hereditary breast cancer (HBC) accounts for 5-10% of breast cancer cases and it significantly increases the lifetime risk of cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the sociodemographic variables, family history of cancer, breast cancer (BC) screening practices and the risk profile of cancer affected or asymptomatic at-risk women that undergo genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer in public Brazilian cancer genetics services. Estimated lifetime risk of BC was calculated for asymptomatic women using the Gail and Claus models. The majority of women showed a moderate lifetime risk of developing BC, with an average risk of 19.7% and 19.9% by the Gail and Claus models, respectively. The average prior probability of carrying a BRCA1/2 gene mutation was 16.7% and overall only 32% fulfilled criteria for a hereditary breast cancer syndrome as assessed by family history. We conclude that a significant number of individuals at high-risk for HBC syndromes may not have access to the benefits of cancer genetic counseling in these centers. Contributing factors may include insufficient training of healthcare professionals, disinformation of cancer patients; difficult access to genetic testing and/or resistance in seeking such services. The identification and understanding of these barriers is essential to develop specific strategies to effectively achieve cancer risk reduction in this and other countries were clinical cancer genetics is not yet fully established.

  12. Predictor characteristics necessary for building a clinically useful risk prediction model: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Schummers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compelled by the intuitive appeal of predicting each individual patient’s risk of an outcome, there is a growing interest in risk prediction models. While the statistical methods used to build prediction models are increasingly well understood, the literature offers little insight to researchers seeking to gauge a priori whether a prediction model is likely to perform well for their particular research question. The objective of this study was to inform the development of new risk prediction models by evaluating model performance under a wide range of predictor characteristics. Methods Data from all births to overweight or obese women in British Columbia, Canada from 2004 to 2012 (n = 75,225 were used to build a risk prediction model for preeclampsia. The data were then augmented with simulated predictors of the outcome with pre-set prevalence values and univariable odds ratios. We built 120 risk prediction models that included known demographic and clinical predictors, and one, three, or five of the simulated variables. Finally, we evaluated standard model performance criteria (discrimination, risk stratification capacity, calibration, and Nagelkerke’s r2 for each model. Results Findings from our models built with simulated predictors demonstrated the predictor characteristics required for a risk prediction model to adequately discriminate cases from non-cases and to adequately classify patients into clinically distinct risk groups. Several predictor characteristics can yield well performing risk prediction models; however, these characteristics are not typical of predictor-outcome relationships in many population-based or clinical data sets. Novel predictors must be both strongly associated with the outcome and prevalent in the population to be useful for clinical prediction modeling (e.g., one predictor with prevalence ≥20 % and odds ratio ≥8, or 3 predictors with prevalence ≥10 % and odds ratios ≥4. Area

  13. Risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis: a clinic-based case control study in The Gambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adegbola Richard A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tuberculosis (TB epidemic in Africa is on the rise, even in low-HIV prevalence settings. Few studies have attempted to identify possible reasons for this. We aimed to identify risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis in those attending a general outpatients clinic in The Gambia, a sub-Saharan African country with relatively low HIV prevalence in the community and in TB patients. Methods We conducted a case control study at the Medical Research Council Outpatients' clinic in The Gambia. Pulmonary TB cases were at least 15 years old, controls were age and sex matched clinic attendees. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results 100 sputum smear positive TB cases and 200 clinic controls were recruited. HIV prevalence was 6.1% in cases and 3.3% in controls. Multivariable assessment of host factors showed that risk of TB was increased among the Jola ethnic group and smokers, and decreased in those in a professional occupation. Assessment of environmental factors showed an increased risk with household crowding, history of household exposure to a known TB case, and absence of a ceiling in the house. In a combined multivariable host-environment model, the risk of TB increased with crowding, exposure to a known TB case, as well as amongst the Jola ethnic group. Conclusion In The Gambia, household crowding and past household exposure to a known TB case are the standout risk factors for TB disease. Further research is needed to identify why risk of TB seems to differ according to ethnicity.

  14. Predictive capacity of risk assessment scales and clinical judgment for pressure ulcers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Agreda, J Javier Soldevilla

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review with meta-analysis was completed to determine the capacity of risk assessment scales and nurses' clinical judgment to predict pressure ulcer (PU) development. Electronic databases were searched for prospective studies on the validity and predictive capacity of PUs risk assessment scales published between 1962 and 2010 in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, German, and Greek. We excluded gray literature sources, integrative review articles, and retrospective or cross-sectional studies. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to the guidelines of the Critical Appraisal Skills Program. Predictive capacity was measured as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. When 2 or more valid original studies were found, a meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model and sensitivity analysis. We identified 57 studies, including 31 that included a validation study. We also retrieved 4 studies that tested clinical judgment as a risk prediction factor. Meta-analysis produced the following pooled predictive capacity indicators: Braden (RR = 4.26); Norton (RR = 3.69); Waterlow (RR = 2.66); Cubbin-Jackson (RR = 8.63); EMINA (RR = 6.17); Pressure Sore Predictor Scale (RR = 21.4); and clinical judgment (RR = 1.89). Pooled analysis of 11 studies found adequate risk prediction capacity in various clinical settings; the Braden, Norton, EMINA (mEntal state, Mobility, Incontinence, Nutrition, Activity), Waterlow, and Cubbin-Jackson scales showed the highest predictive capacity. The clinical judgment of nurses was found to achieve inadequate predictive capacity when used alone, and should be used in combination with a validated scale.

  15. Carcinogenic risk assessment for emissions from clinical waste incineration and road traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Andrew; Sadhra, Steven

    2010-10-01

    The most significant potentially carcinogenic substances arising from a state-of-the-art clinical waste incinerator (CWI) and vehicle emissions were identified as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene, 1-butadiene, arsenic, cadmium, chromium and nickel. Long-term exposures of the notional maximum exposed individual (MEI) in the local environment, together with aggregate emissions from transport of clinical waste, were estimated. Mass emission rates of PAHs from the CWI to air were compared with previously published estimates of mass emissions to land from CWI bottom ash. Aggregate emissions from road transport of clinical waste were of a similar order to stack emissions from incineration. Mass emissions of PAHs to landfill generally greatly exceeded those from stack emissions. Emissions associated with operation of the CWI present a negligible contribution to overall cancer risk from PAHs and other carcinogens. Uncertainty in the quantitative risk estimates presented here is discussed in the context of these findings.

  16. Can Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Clinical Trials Close the Risk Management Gap Between Diabetes and Prediabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perreault, Leigh; Færch, Kristine; Gregg, Edward W

    2017-01-01

    a continuous relationship between A1c and CVD-even below the current levels of A1c-defined prediabetes and after adjustment for known risk factors for CVD. Clinical trials have demonstrated a reduction in CV morbidity and/or mortality when interventions are invoked in the prediabetic A1c range. Guidelines...... advocating CV risk factor management in prediabetes have not been widely adopted, subsequently leading to comparable coronary heart disease risk between people with prediabetes (HR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.7-2.1 vs normoglycemia) and diabetes itself (HR=2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.2 vs no diabetes). This review highlights......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We reviewed published literature to determine the relationship between A1c and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and summarize the need and implications for CVD risk reduction with interventions, focusing in the prediabetic A1c range (

  17. Impact of registration on clinical trials on infection risk in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, David; Aplenc, Richard; Bowes, Lynette; Cellot, Sonia; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Feusner, Jim; Gillmeister, Biljana; Johnston, Donna L; Lewis, Victor; Michon, Bruno; Mitchell, David; Portwine, Carol; Price, Victoria; Silva, Mariana; Stobart, Kent; Yanofsky, Rochelle; Zelcer, Shayna; Beyene, Joseph; Sung, Lillian

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the impact of enrollment on therapeutic clinical trials on adverse event rates. Primary objective was to describe the impact of clinical trial registration on sterile site microbiologically documented infection for children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted a multicenter cohort study that included children aged ≤18 years with de novo AML. Primary outcome was microbiologically documented sterile site infection. Infection rates were compared between those registered and not registered on clinical trials. Five hundred seventy-four children with AML were included of which 198 (34.5%) were registered on a therapeutic clinical trial. Overall, 400 (69.7%) had at least one sterile site microbiologically documented infection. In multiple regression, registration on clinical trials was independently associated with a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.53; p = 0.040] and viridans group streptococcal infection (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.98; p = 0.015). Registration on trials was not associated with Gram-negative or invasive fungal infections. Children with newly diagnosed AML enrolled on clinical trials have a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection. This information may impact on supportive care practices in pediatric AML.

  18. Clinical trial registration was not an indicator for low risk of bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Cynthia M; Showell, Marian G; Showell, Emily A E; Beetham, Penny; Baak, Nora; Mourad, Selma; Jordan, Vanessa M B

    2017-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of registered trials and to evaluate the risk of bias between registered and unregistered clinical trials. The Cochrane Gynecology and Fertility Group's specialized register was searched on November 5, 2015, for randomized controlled trials published from 2010 to 2014. Studies were selected if they had randomized women or men for fertility treatments, were published in full text and written in English. Two reviewers then independently assessed trial registration status for each trial, by searching the publication, trial registries, and by contacting the original authors. Of 693 eligible randomized controlled trials, only 44% were found to be registered. Unregistered clinical trials had smaller sample sizes than registered trials (P risk of bias using five of the Cochrane Risk of Bias "domains." Registered and unregistered trials differed in their risk of bias for random sequence generation (P = 0.001), allocation concealment (P = 0.003), and selective reporting (P  0.05) domains. Only 54 (43.2%) of the 125 registered trials were registered prospectively. This study has the following limitations. Only English language trials were included in this review. We were unable to obtain protocols for the unregistered trials and therefore were unable to assess the risk of bias in the selective reporting domain. All available trials should be included in systematic reviews and assessed for risk of bias as there are both registered trials with high risk of bias and unregistered trials with low risk of bias and by excluding unregistered trials more than half of the available evidence will be lost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An analytics based clinical decision support system for CVD risk assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Shreya; Patil, Ravindra B; Krishnamoorthy, P

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of disability and premature death throughout the world. Acute coronary events and other cardiovascular events frequently occur suddenly, and are often fatal before medical care can be given. Risk factor modification can reduce clinical events and premature death in people with established cardiovascular disease as well as in those who are at high cardiovascular risk due to one or more risk factors. In this work, India specific World Health Organization-International Society of Hypertension (WHO-ISH) guidelines has been implemented to stratify the subjects by their risk profile. It provides simplified approach to detect those people at high risk and provides guidance on what should be done for prevention of heart attack. Further, based on the risk stratification, lifestyle coaching, medication management and the next tests are advised to the subjects. This approach will help in early detection of cardiovascular risk subjects and provide necessary interventions at appropriate time frame. Also, it acts as motivation to the individuals to comply with recommended lifestyle changes.

  20. The Clinical, Environmental, and Behavioral Factors That Foster Early Childhood Caries: Evidence for Caries Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Caries risk assessment, an essential component of targeted health care delivery for young children, is of paramount importance in the current environment of increasing health care costs and resource constraints. The purpose of this manuscript was to review recent best available evidence behind the factors that influence caries risk assessment and the validity of strategies to assess the caries risk of young children. Moderate to weak evidence supports the following recommendations: (1) Children should have a caries risk assessment done in their first year (or as soon as their first tooth erupts) as part of their overall health assessment, and this should be reassessed periodically over time. (2) Multiple clinical, environmental, and behavioral factors should be considered when assessing caries risk in young children, including factors associated with the primary caregiver. (3) The use of structured forms, although most may not yet be validated, may aid in systematic assessment of multiple caries risk factors and in objective record-keeping. (4) Children from low socioeconomic status groups should be considered at increased risk when developing community preventive programs.

  1. Dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease risk profiles of patients attending an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou DT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Danai Tavonga Zhou,1,2 Vitaris Kodogo,1 Kudzai Fortunate Vongai Chokuona,1 Exnevia Gomo,1 Olav Oektedalen,3 Babill Stray-Pedersen21Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Avondale, Zimbabwe; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University in Oslo, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: The chronic inflammation induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV contributes to increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD in HIV-infected individuals. HIV-infected patients generally benefit from being treated with antiretroviral drugs, but some antiretroviral agents have side effects, such as dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. There is general consensus that antiretroviral drugs induce a long-term risk of CHD, although the levels of that risk are somewhat controversial. The intention of this cross-sectional study was to describe the lipid profile and the long-term risk of CHD among HIV-positive outpatients at an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe. Two hundred and fifteen patients were investigated (females n=165, mean age 39.8 years; males n=50; mean age 42.0 years. Thirty of the individuals were antiretroviral-naïve and 185 had been on antiretroviral therapy (ART for a mean 3.9±3.4 years. All participants had average lipid and glucose values within normal ranges, but there was a small difference between the ART and ART- for total cholesterol (TC and high-density lipoprotein (HDL.Those on a combination of D4T or ZDV/NVP/3TC and PI-based ART were on average oldest and had the highest TC levels. Framingham risk showed 1.4% prevalence of high CHD risk within the next ten years. After univariate analysis age, sex, TC/HDL ratio, HDL, economic earnings and systolic BP were associated with medium to high risk of CHD. After multivariate regression analysis and adjusting for age or sex only age, sex and economic earnings

  2. The Prioritization of Clinical Risk Factors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Using Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaya Maranate

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a problem of shortage of sleep laboratories that can accommodate the patients in a timely manner. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to worse outcomes particularly in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. For this reason, the prioritization in polysomnography (PSG queueing should be endorsed based on disease severity. To date, there have been conflicting data whether clinical information can predict OSA severity. The 1,042 suspected OSA patients underwent diagnostic PSG study at Siriraj Sleep Center during 2010-2011. A total of 113 variables were obtained from sleep questionnaires and anthropometric measurements. The 19 groups of clinical risk factors consisting of 42 variables were categorized into each OSA severity. This study aimed to array these factors by employing Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process approach based on normalized weight vector. The results revealed that the first rank of clinical risk factors in Severe, Moderate, Mild, and No OSA was nighttime symptoms. The overall sensitivity/specificity of the approach to these groups was 92.32%/91.76%, 89.52%/88.18%, 91.08%/84.58%, and 96.49%/81.23%, respectively. We propose that the urgent PSG appointment should include clinical risk factors of Severe OSA group. In addition, the screening for Mild from No OSA patients in sleep center setting using symptoms during sleep is also recommended (sensitivity = 87.12% and specificity = 72.22%.

  3. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ≥6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient.

  4. Genetic and clinical risk factors for fluid overload following open-heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enger, T B; Pleym, H; Stenseth, R; Wahba, A; Videm, V

    2014-05-01

    Post-operative fluid overload following cardiac surgery is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We hypothesised that genetic variations and pre-operative clinical factors predispose some patients to post-operative fluid overload. Perioperative variables were collected prospectively for 1026 consecutive adults undergoing open-heart surgery at St. Olavs University Hospital, Norway from 2008-2010. Post-operative fluid overload was defined as a post-operative fluid balance/kg ≥ the 90th percentile of the study population. Genotyping was performed for 31 single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to inflammatory/vascular responses or previously associated with complications following open-heart surgery. Data were analysed using logistic regression modelling, and the findings were internally validated by bootstrapping (n = 100). Homozygous carriers of the common G allele of rs12917707 in the UMOD gene had a 2.2 times greater risk of post-operative fluid overload (P = 0.005) after adjustment for significant clinical variables (age, duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, and intraoperative red cell transfusion). A genetic risk score including 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms was independently associated with post-operative fluid overload (P = 0.001). The number of risk alleles was linearly associated with the frequency of fluid overload (odds ratio per risk allele 1.153, 95 % confidence interval 1.056-1.258). Nagelkerke's R(2) increased with 7.5% to a total of 25% for the combined clinical and genetic model. Hemofiltration did not reduce the risk. A common variation in the UMOD gene previously shown to be related to renal function was associated with increased risk of post-operative fluid overload following cardiac surgery. Our findings support a genetic susceptibility to disturbed fluid handling following cardiac surgery. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A fuzzy logic decision support system for assessing clinical nutritional risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Hadianfard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies have indicated a global high prevalence of hospital malnutrition on admission and during hospitalization. Clinical Nutritional Risk Screen (CNRS is a way to identify malnutrition and manage nutritional interventions. Several traditional and non-computer based tools have been suggested for screening nutritional risk levels. The present study was an attempt to employ a computer based fuzzy model decision support system as a nutrition-screening tool for inpatients. Method: This is an applied modeling study. The system architecture was designed based on the fuzzy logic model including input data, inference engine, and output. A clinical nutritionist entered nineteen input variables using a windows-based graphical user interface. The inference engine was involved with knowledge obtained from literature and the construction of ‘IF-THEN’ rules. The output of the system was stratification of patients into four risk levels from ‘No’ to ‘High’ where a number was also allocated to them as a nutritional risk grade. All patients (121 people admitted during implementing the system participated in testing the model. The classification tests were used to measure the CNRS fuzzy model performance. IBM SPSS version 21 was utilized as a tool for data analysis with α = 0.05 as a significance level. Results: Results showed that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and precision of the fuzzy model performance were 91.67% (±4.92, 76% (±7.6, 88.43% (±5.7, and 93.62% (±4.32, respectively. Instant performance on admission and very low probability of mistake in predicting malnutrition risk level may justify using the model in hospitals. Conclusion: To conclude, the fuzzy model-screening tool is based on multiple nutritional risk factors, having the capability of classifying inpatients into several nutritional risk levels and identifying the level of required nutritional intervention.

  6. Clinical features of venous insufficiency and the risk of venous thrombosis in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Marissa J; Karasu, Alev; Blom, Jeanet W; Cushman, Mary; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Venous thrombosis is common in older age, with an incidence of 0·5-1% per year in those aged >70 years. Stasis of blood flow is an important contributor to the development of thrombosis and may be due to venous insufficiency in the legs. The risk of thrombosis associated with clinical features of venous insufficiency, i.e., varicose veins, leg ulcers and leg oedema, obtained with a standardized interview was assessed in the Age and Thrombosis Acquired and Genetic risk factors in the Elderly (AT-AGE) study. The AT-AGE study is a case-control study in individuals aged 70 years and older (401 cases with a first-time venous thrombosis and 431 control subjects). We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age, sex and study centre. Varicose veins and leg ulcer were associated with a 1·6-fold (95% CI 1·2-2·3) and 3·3-fold increased risk of thrombosis (95% CI 1·6-6·7), respectively, while the risk was increased 3·0-fold (95% CI 2·1-4·5) in the presence of leg oedema. The risk of thrombosis was highest when all three risk factors occurred simultaneously (OR: 10·5; 95% CI 1·3-86·1). In conclusion, clinical features of venous insufficiency, i.e., varicose veins, leg ulcers and leg oedema, are risk factors for venous thrombosis in older people.

  7. Clinical potentials of methylator phenotype in stage 4 high-risk neuroblastoma: an open challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Banelli

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of stage 4 high-risk neuroblastoma patients are alive and disease-free 5 years after disease onset while the remaining experience rapid and fatal progression. Numerous findings underline the prognostic role of methylation of defined target genes in neuroblastoma without taking into account the clinical and biological heterogeneity of this disease. In this report we have investigated the methylation of the PCDHB cluster, the most informative member of the "Methylator Phenotype" in neuroblastoma, hypothesizing that if this epigenetic mark can predict overall and progression free survival in high-risk stage 4 neuroblastoma, it could be utilized to improve the risk stratification of the patients, alone or in conjunction with the previously identified methylation of the SFN gene (14.3.3sigma that can accurately predict outcome in these patients. We have utilized univariate and multivariate models to compare the prognostic power of PCDHB methylation in terms of overall and progression free survival, quantitatively determined by pyrosequencing, with that of other markers utilized for the patients' stratification utilizing methylation thresholds calculated on neuroblastoma at stage 1-4 and only on stage 4, high-risk patients. Our results indicate that PCDHB accurately distinguishes between high- and intermediate/low risk stage 4 neuroblastoma in agreement with the established risk stratification criteria. However PCDHB cannot predict outcome in the subgroup of stage 4 patients at high-risk whereas methylation levels of SFN are suggestive of a "methylation gradient" associated with tumor aggressiveness as suggested by the finding of a higher threshold that defines a subset of patients with an extremely severe disease (OS <24 months. Because of the heterogeneity of neuroblastoma we believe that clinically relevant methylation markers should be selected and tested on homogeneous groups of patients rather than on patients at all stages.

  8. Risk factors associated with clinical mastitis in low somatic cell count British dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, E J; Green, M J; Fitzpatrick, J L; Morgan, K L; Green, L E

    2000-11-01

    A cross-sectional survey of dairy farms with low bulk milk somatic cell counts was carried out to assess the level of clinical mastitis and to quantify risk factors associated with the incidence rate of clinical mastitis. Questionnaires were sent to 3009 milk operations with an annual mean bulk milk somatic cell count of less than 100,000 cells/ml during 1997. A response rate was 61%. The mean incidence of clinical mastitis reported was 22.8 cases per 100 cows/yr. Negative binomial regression models were used to assess statistically significant risk factors associated with the incidence of clinical mastitis. The incidence increased when farmers reported that they had straw yard housing for milking cows (compared with cubicle housing), mucked out the calving area less frequently than once per month, kept cows standing in a yard after milking, always practiced postmilking teat disinfection, had greater than 50% replacement rate, had some cows that leaked milk on entry to the parlor, had some cows that leaked milk at other times, and foremilked before cluster attachment. The incidence of clinical mastitis was lower on farms when the gathering yard used before milking was scraped at least twice a day, cows were offered feed after both milkings, rubber gloves were not worn during milking, teat liners were changed after 6000 milkings, and the average dry period was less than 40 d. The study has identified areas of the environment in which efforts to improve hygiene should be focused.

  9. Predicting PTSD using the New York Risk Score with genotype data: potential clinical and research opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Joseph A Boscarino,1,2 H Lester Kirchner,3,4 Stuart N Hoffman,5 Porat M Erlich1,4 1Center for Health Research, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, 2Department of Psychiatry, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, 3Division of Medicine, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, 4Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, 5Department of Neurology, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, USA Background: We previously developed a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD screening instrument, ie, the New York PTSD Risk Score (NYPRS, that was effective in predicting PTSD. In the present study, we assessed a version of this risk score that also included genetic information. Methods: Utilizing diagnostic testing methods, we hierarchically examined different prediction variables identified in previous NYPRS research, including genetic risk-allele information, to assess lifetime and current PTSD status among a population of trauma-exposed adults. Results: We found that, in predicting lifetime PTSD, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC for the Primary Care PTSD Screen alone was 0.865. When we added psychosocial predictors from the original NYPRS to the model, including depression, sleep disturbance, and a measure of health care access, the AUC increased to 0.902, which was a significant improvement (P = 0.0021. When genetic information was added in the form of a count of PTSD risk alleles located within FKBP, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genetic loci (coded 0–6, the AUC increased to 0.920, which was also a significant improvement (P = 0.0178. The results for current PTSD were similar. In the final model for current PTSD with the psychosocial risk factors included, genotype resulted in a prediction weight of 17 for each risk allele present, indicating that a person with six risk alleles or more would receive a PTSD risk score of 17 × 6 = 102, the highest risk score for any of the predictors studied. Conclusion: Genetic

  10. Improving Clinical Risk Stratification at Diagnosis in Primary Prostate Cancer: A Prognostic Modelling Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J Gnanapragasam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Over 80% of the nearly 1 million men diagnosed with prostate cancer annually worldwide present with localised or locally advanced non-metastatic disease. Risk stratification is the cornerstone for clinical decision making and treatment selection for these men. The most widely applied stratification systems use presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA concentration, biopsy Gleason grade, and clinical stage to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk. There is, however, significant heterogeneity in outcomes within these standard groupings. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP has recently adopted a prognosis-based pathological classification that has yet to be included within a risk stratification system. Here we developed and tested a new stratification system based on the number of individual risk factors and incorporating the new ISUP prognostic score.Diagnostic clinicopathological data from 10,139 men with non-metastatic prostate cancer were available for this study from the Public Health England National Cancer Registration Service Eastern Office. This cohort was divided into a training set (n = 6,026; 1,557 total deaths, with 462 from prostate cancer and a testing set (n = 4,113; 1,053 total deaths, with 327 from prostate cancer. The median follow-up was 6.9 y, and the primary outcome measure was prostate-cancer-specific mortality (PCSM. An external validation cohort (n = 1,706 was also used. Patients were first categorised as low, intermediate, or high risk using the current three-stratum stratification system endorsed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE guidelines. The variables used to define the groups (PSA concentration, Gleason grading, and clinical stage were then used to sub-stratify within each risk category by testing the individual and then combined number of risk factors. In addition, we incorporated the new ISUP prognostic score as a discriminator. Using this approach, a

  11. Improving Clinical Risk Stratification at Diagnosis in Primary Prostate Cancer: A Prognostic Modelling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Karen A.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Gavin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over 80% of the nearly 1 million men diagnosed with prostate cancer annually worldwide present with localised or locally advanced non-metastatic disease. Risk stratification is the cornerstone for clinical decision making and treatment selection for these men. The most widely applied stratification systems use presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration, biopsy Gleason grade, and clinical stage to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk. There is, however, significant heterogeneity in outcomes within these standard groupings. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) has recently adopted a prognosis-based pathological classification that has yet to be included within a risk stratification system. Here we developed and tested a new stratification system based on the number of individual risk factors and incorporating the new ISUP prognostic score. Methods and Findings Diagnostic clinicopathological data from 10,139 men with non-metastatic prostate cancer were available for this study from the Public Health England National Cancer Registration Service Eastern Office. This cohort was divided into a training set (n = 6,026; 1,557 total deaths, with 462 from prostate cancer) and a testing set (n = 4,113; 1,053 total deaths, with 327 from prostate cancer). The median follow-up was 6.9 y, and the primary outcome measure was prostate-cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). An external validation cohort (n = 1,706) was also used. Patients were first categorised as low, intermediate, or high risk using the current three-stratum stratification system endorsed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. The variables used to define the groups (PSA concentration, Gleason grading, and clinical stage) were then used to sub-stratify within each risk category by testing the individual and then combined number of risk factors. In addition, we incorporated the new ISUP prognostic score as a discriminator

  12. Genome-wide association study of clinically defined gout identifies multiple risk loci and its association with clinical subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Chiba, Toshinori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Takada, Yuzo; Danjoh, Inaho; Shimizu, Seiko; Abe, Junko; Kawamura, Yusuke; Terashige, Sho; Ogata, Hiraku; Tatsukawa, Seishiro; Yin, Guang; Okada, Rieko; Morita, Emi; Naito, Mariko; Tokumasu, Atsumi; Onoue, Hiroyuki; Iwaya, Keiichi; Ito, Toshimitsu; Takada, Tappei; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Kato, Yukio; Nakamura, Yukio; Sakurai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Ituro; Kubo, Michiaki; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gout, caused by hyperuricaemia, is a multifactorial disease. Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of gout have been reported, they included self-reported gout cases in which clinical information was insufficient. Therefore, the relationship between genetic variation and clinical subtypes of gout remains unclear. Here, we first performed a GWAS of clinically defined gout cases only. Methods A GWAS was conducted with 945 patients with clinically defined gout and 1213 controls in a Japanese male population, followed by replication study of 1048 clinically defined cases and 1334 controls. Results Five gout susceptibility loci were identified at the genome-wide significance level (p<5.0×10−8), which contained well-known urate transporter genes (ABCG2 and SLC2A9) and additional genes: rs1260326 (p=1.9×10−12; OR=1.36) of GCKR (a gene for glucose and lipid metabolism), rs2188380 (p=1.6×10−23; OR=1.75) of MYL2-CUX2 (genes associated with cholesterol and diabetes mellitus) and rs4073582 (p=6.4×10−9; OR=1.66) of CNIH-2 (a gene for regulation of glutamate signalling). The latter two are identified as novel gout loci. Furthermore, among the identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we demonstrated that the SNPs of ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were differentially associated with types of gout and clinical parameters underlying specific subtypes (renal underexcretion type and renal overload type). The effect of the risk allele of each SNP on clinical parameters showed significant linear relationships with the ratio of the case–control ORs for two distinct types of gout (r=0.96 [p=4.8×10−4] for urate clearance and r=0.96 [p=5.0×10−4] for urinary urate excretion). Conclusions Our findings provide clues to better understand the pathogenesis of gout and will be useful for development of companion diagnostics. PMID:25646370

  13. Investigating the connections between health lean management and clinical risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate connections and overlaps between health lean management (HLM) and clinical risk management (CRM) understanding whether and how these two approaches can be combined together to pursue efficiency and patient safety improvements simultaneously. A systematic literature review has been carried out. Searching in academic databases, papers that focus not only on HLM, but also on clinical errors and risk reduction, were included. The general characteristics of the selected papers were analysed and a content analysis was conducted. In most of the papers, pursing objectives of HLM and CRM and adopting tools and practices of both approaches, results of quality and, particularly, of safety improvements were obtained. A two-way arrow between HLM and CRM emerged but so far, none of the studies has been focused on the relationship between HLM and CRM. Results highlight an emerging research stream, with many useful theoretical and practical implications and opportunities for further research.

  14. Clinical prediction of fall risk and white matter abnormalities: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bang-Bon; Bergethon, Peter; Qiu, Wei Qiao; Scott, Tammy; Hussain, Mohammed; Rosenberg, Irwin; Caplan, Louis R; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A

    2012-06-01

    The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as determined by the Tinetti scale, have specific patterns of WM abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging. Community-based cohort of 125 homebound elderly individuals. Diffusion tensor imaging scans were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics analysis to determine the location of WM abnormalities in subjects with Tinetti scale scores of 25 or higher (without risk of falls) and lower than 25 (with risk of falls).Multivariate linear least squares correlation analysis was performed to determine the association between Tinetti scale scores and local fractional anisotropy values on each skeletal voxel controlling for possible confounders. In subjects with risk of falls (Tinetti scale score scores, while the other locations were unrelated to these scores. Elderly individuals at risk for falls as determined by the Tinetti scale have WM abnormalities in specific locations on diffusion tensor imaging, some of which correlate with cognitive function scores.

  15. Treatment referral for sex offenders based on clinical judgment versus actuarial risk assessment: match and analysis of mismatch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, W.J.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Wever, E.C.; van Beek, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Risk Need Responsivity (RNR) principles (Andrews & Bonta, 2010) dictate that higher risk sex offenders should receive more intensive treatment. The present study investigates how clinically based treatment assignment relates to risk level in a sex offender sample from The Netherlands. Correlatio

  16. 78 FR 48173 - Guidance for Industry on Oversight of Clinical Investigations-A Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Investigations--A Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Oversight of Clinical Investigations--A Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring.'' This guidance assists sponsors in developing risk-based monitoring strategies and plans for...

  17. Risk stratification by endocrinologists of patients with type 2 diabetes in a Danish specialised outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Lene; Arreskov, Anne B; Sperling, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To target optimised medical care the Danish guidelines for diabetes recommend stratification of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) into three levels according to risk and complexity of treatment. The aim was to describe the T2D population in an outpatient clinic, measure the compliance......, the endocrinologists stratified less patients at level 3 compared to objective assessments (p diabetes patients, newly referred to or allocated for long-term follow-up in the out...

  18. Understanding and De-risking the Dependencies between Operator and Manufacturer of Clinical IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despotou, George; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; White, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Health IT, in addition to benefits can also have unintended consequences both in terms of operational and business risks. Understanding the dependencies between operator and manufacturer as well as issues that need to be addressed during procurement is essential to increase confidence in the operation of health IT. The paper provides the context, and a number of issues health IT operators such as clinical organisations, need to investigate during acquisition of health IT.

  19. Clinical pathological evaluation and risk factors of oral cancer cases of east coast of peninsular Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Farini, M. S.; Azlina, A; Rushdan, I.; Manoharan, M; Zain, R. B.; Samsudin, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Oral cancer is one of the common cancers m Malaysia. Tile population of east coast of Peninsular Malaysia has a different hfestyle and Malay is the predominant race. Oral cancer research in this area started since the Malaysian National Oral Cancer group was established. The am: of this study is to evaluate the clinical pathological findings and to investigate the role of tobacco smoking, alcohol consurnption and betel quid chewing as tile risk factors among oral cancer cases m ...

  20. Using local lexicalized rules to identify heart disease risk factors in clinical notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karystianis, George; Dehghan, Azad; Kovacevic, Aleksandar; Keane, John A; Nenadic, Goran

    2015-12-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death globally and a significant part of the human population lives with it. A number of risk factors have been recognized as contributing to the disease, including obesity, coronary artery disease (CAD), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and family history of premature CAD. This paper describes and evaluates a methodology to extract mentions of such risk factors from diabetic clinical notes, which was a task of the i2b2/UTHealth 2014 Challenge in Natural Language Processing for Clinical Data. The methodology is knowledge-driven and the system implements local lexicalized rules (based on syntactical patterns observed in notes) combined with manually constructed dictionaries that characterize the domain. A part of the task was also to detect the time interval in which the risk factors were present in a patient. The system was applied to an evaluation set of 514 unseen notes and achieved a micro-average F-score of 88% (with 86% precision and 90% recall). While the identification of CAD family history, medication and some of the related disease factors (e.g. hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia) showed quite good results, the identification of CAD-specific indicators proved to be more challenging (F-score of 74%). Overall, the results are encouraging and suggested that automated text mining methods can be used to process clinical notes to identify risk factors and monitor progression of heart disease on a large-scale, providing necessary data for clinical and epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical features and risk factors of patients with fatty liver in Guangzhou area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Kui Chen; Hai-Ying Chen; Kai-Hong Huang; Ying-Qiang Zhong; Ji-Ao Han; Zhao-Hua Zhu; Xiao-Dong Zhou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: There is still no accepted conclusion regarding the clinical features and related risk factors of patients with fatty liver. The large-scale clinical studies have not carried out yet in Guangzhou area. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical features and related risk factors of patients with fatty liver in Guangzhou area. METHODS: A total of 413 cases with fatty liver were enrolled in the study from January 1998 to May 2002. Retrospective case-control study was used to evaluate the clinical featuresand related risk factors of fatty liver with logistic regression.RESULTS: Obesity (OR: 21.204), alcohol abuse (OR: 18.601),type 2 diabetes mellitus (OR: 4.461), serum triglyceride (TG)(OR: 3.916), serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)(OR: 1.840) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (OR: 1.535)were positively correlated to the formation of the fatty liver. The levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gammaglutamyltransferase (GGT) increased mildly in the patients withfatty liver and were often less than 2-fold of the normal limit.The higher abnormalities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST)levels (42.9%) with Asr/ALT more than 2(17.9%) were found in patients with alcoholic fatty liver (AFL) than those with nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) (16.9% and 5.0% respectively). The elevation of serum TG, cholesterol (CHOL), LDL-C was more common in patients with NAFL than with AFL.CONCLUSION: Obesity, alcohol abuse, type 2 diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia may be independent risk factors of fatty liver. The mildly abnormal hepatic functions can be found in patients with fatty liver. More obvious damages of liver function with AST/ALT usually more than 2 were noted in patients with AFL.

  2. Rocky milieu: Challenges of effective integration of clinical risk management into hospitals in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Farokhzadian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare risks and clinical risks have been recognized as a major challenge in healthcare. Clinical risks can never be eliminated and can have serious adverse effects on patient safety. Thus, a clinical risk management (CRM system has been introduced in the healthcare system to improve quality services. The aim of this study was to explore nurses’ experiences related to the challenges of implementing CRM in the organizational context. This qualitative study was based on the conventional content analysis of the Lundman and Graneheim approach, and it consisted of 22 interview sessions with 20 nurses. The purposive sampling method was used to choose the participants from three hospitals affiliated with the Kerman University of Medical Sciences. We used semi-structured interviews and review of relevant documents to collect data. The analysis of the data led to the emergence of “rocky milieu” as the main theme, and it consisted of three categories that, along with their subcategories, explain the challenges of implementing CRM. The three categories and their subcategories were (1 organizational culture and leadership challenges (decision and performance of leadership and cultural resistance to change, (2 limitation of resources (financial, human, and physical and equipment resources, and (3 variations and complexities in working conditions (the emotional, psychological, and social atmosphere and the heaviness of workload. Attempts have been made to establish CRM through clinical governance and accreditation, but organizational challenges have created a rocky milieu for implementing CRM. However, from an organizational context concerning the suitability of healthcare in Iran, there are obvious needs to move toward quality improvement and safe practices through the effective implementation of CRM.

  3. Lifetime Increased Cancer Risk in Mice Following Exposure to Clinical Proton Beam–Generated Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerweck, Leo E., E-mail: lgerweck@mgh.harvard.edu; Huang, Peigen; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald; Zhou, Yenong

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the life span and risk of cancer following whole-body exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a passively scattered clinical spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) proton beam. Methods and Materials: Three hundred young adult female FVB/N mice, 152 test and 148 control, were entered into the experiment. Mice were placed in an annular cassette around a cylindrical phantom, which was positioned lateral to the mid-SOBP of a 165-MeV, clinical proton beam. The average distance from the edge of the mid-SOBP to the conscious active mice was 21.5 cm. The phantom was irradiated with once-daily fractions of 25 Gy, 4 days per week, for 6 weeks. The age at death and cause of death (ie, cancer and type vs noncancer causes) were assessed over the life span of the mice. Results: Exposure of mice to a dose of 600 Gy of proton beam–generated neutrons, reduced the median life span of the mice by 4.2% (Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival, P=.053). The relative risk of death from cancer in neutron exposed versus control mice was 1.40 for cancer of all types (P=.0006) and 1.22 for solid cancers (P=.09). For a typical 60 Gy dose of clinical protons, the observed 22% increased risk of solid cancer would be expected to decrease by a factor of 10. Conclusions: Exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a proton dose that exceeds a typical course of radiation therapy by a factor of 10, resulted in a statistically significant increase in the background incidence of leukemia and a marginally significant increase in solid cancer. The results indicate that the risk of out-of-field second solid cancers from SOBP proton-generated neutrons and typical treatment schedules, is 6 to 10 times less than is suggested by current neutron risk estimates.

  4. Asthma and atopic dermatitis are associated with increased risk of clinical Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrant, Magali; Loucoubar, Cheikh; Bassène, Hubert; Gonçalves, Bronner; Boufkhed, Sabah; Diene Sarr, Fatoumata; Fontanet, Arnaud; Tall, Adama; Baril, Laurence; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Mécheri, Salaheddine; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Paul, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of atopy and allergy on the risk of clinical malaria. Design A clinical and immunological allergy cross-sectional survey in a birth cohort of 175 children from 1 month to 14 years of age followed for up to 15 years in a longitudinal open cohort study of malaria in Senegal. Malaria incidence data were available for 143 of these children (aged 4 months to 14 years of age) for up to 15 years. Mixed-model regression analysis was used to determine the impact of allergy status on malaria incidence, adjusting for age, gender, sickle-cell trait and force of infection. Main outcome measures Asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis status, the number of clinical Plasmodium falciparum malaria episodes since birth and associated parasite density. Results 12% of the children were classified as asthmatic and 10% as having atopic dermatitis. These groups had respectively a twofold (OR 2.12 95%; CI 1.46 to 3.08; p=8×10−5) and threefold (OR 3.15; 1.56 to 6.33; p=1.3×10−3) increase in the risk of clinical P falciparum malaria once older than the age of peak incidence of clinical malaria (3–4 years of age). They also presented with higher P falciparum parasite densities (asthma: mean 105.3 parasites/μL±SE 41.0 vs 51.3±9.7; p=6.2×10−3. Atopic dermatitis: 135.4±70.7 vs 52.3±11.0; p=0.014). There was no effect of allergy on the number of non-malaria clinical presentations. Individuals with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis did not have an increased risk of clinical malaria nor any difference in parasite densities. Conclusions These results demonstrate that asthma and atopic dermatitis delay the development of clinical immunity to P falciparum. Despite the encouraging decrease in malaria incidence rates in Africa, a significant concern is the extent to which the increase in allergy will exacerbate the burden of malaria. Given the demonstrated antiparasitic effect of antihistamines, administration to atopic

  5. A clinically useful risk-score for chronic kidney disease in HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Mocroft

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Development of a simple, widely applicable risk score for chronic kidney disease (CKD allows comparisons of risks or benefits of starting potentially nephrotoxic antiretrovirals (ARVs as part of a treatment regimen. Materials and Methods: A total of 18,055 HIV-positive persons from the Data on Adverse Drugs (D:A:D study with >3 estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs >1/1/2004 were included. Persons with use of tenofovir (TDF, atazanavir (ritonavir boosted (ATV/r and unboosted (ATV, lopinavir (LPV/r and other boosted protease inhibitors (bPIs before baseline (first eGFR >60 ml/min/1.73 m2 after 1/1/2004 were excluded. CKD was defined as confirmed (>3 months apart eGFR 5 points risk of developing CKD. Increased incidence of CKD associated with starting ARVs was modelled by including ARVs as time-updated variables. The risk score was externally validated on two independent cohorts. Results: A total of 641 persons developed CKD during 103,278.5 PYFU (incidence 6.2/1000 PYFU, 95% CI 5.7–6.7. Older age, intravenous drug use, HCV+ antibody status, lower baseline eGFR, female gender, lower CD4 nadir, hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease predicted CKD and were included in the risk score (Figure 1. The incidence of CKD in those at low, medium and high risk was 0.8/1000 PYFU (95% CI 0.6–1.0, 5.6 (95% CI 4.5–6.7 and 37.4 (95% CI 34.0–40.7 (Figure 1. The risk score showed good discrimination (Harrell's c statistic 0.92, 95% CI 0.90–0.93. The number needed to harm (NNTH in patients starting ATV or LPV/r was 1395, 142 or 20, respectively, among those with low, medium or high risk. NNTH were 603, 61 and 9 for those with a low, medium or high risk starting TDF, ATV/r or bPIs. The risk score was externally validated on 2603 persons from the Royal Free Hospital clinic cohort (94 events, incidence 5.1/1000 PYFU; 95% CI 4.1–6.1 and 2013 persons from the control arms of SMART/ESPRIT (32 events, incidence 3.8/1000 PYFU

  6. Risk assessment of clinical reactions to legumes in peanut-allergic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Bjerremann; Andersen, Milene; Skov, Per Stahl

    2008-01-01

    Peanut-allergic children might be at risk for reactions to other legumes. However, it is not always possible to perform multiple oral food challenges in children. On the basis of patient case history, in vitro diagnostic tests, and eventually food challenges, we aimed at developing an algorithm...... for risk assessment of possible clinical reactions to other legumes (soybean, lupine, fresh, and blanched green pea). Seventy-five consecutive patients with a positive oral food challenge to peanut were included in the study. All tests were run as part of the routine allergy examination. A high proportion...... of patients and/or caretakers refused the administered legume oral food challenges. Obtained diagnoses from histamine release did not correlate significantly to the outcome of the algorithm. Interestingly, threshold from peanut challenges did not correlate with the risk assessment.The algorithm presented...

  7. Risk factors associated with positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of preoperative and surgical parameters, including nerve-sparing technique, on the risk of positive surgical margins (PSM) following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective...... consecutive single-institution Danish cohort of 1148 patients undergoing RP between 1995 and 2011 was investigated. To analyse the impact of covariates on risk of PSM, a multivariate logistic regression model was used, including cT category, biopsy Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), percentage...... positive biopsies for cancer (PPB), surgeon and surgical technique. RESULTS: The overall rate of PSM was 31.4%. The risk of PSM depended (p value for Wald χ(2)) on PSA (p PSM...

  8. Risk assessment of clinical reactions to legumes in peanut-allergic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Bjerremann; Andersen, Milene; Skov, Per Stahl

    2008-01-01

    Peanut-allergic children might be at risk for reactions to other legumes. However, it is not always possible to perform multiple oral food challenges in children. On the basis of patient case history, in vitro diagnostic tests, and eventually food challenges, we aimed at developing an algorithm...... for risk assessment of possible clinical reactions to other legumes (soybean, lupine, fresh, and blanched green pea). Seventy-five consecutive patients with a positive oral food challenge to peanut were included in the study. All tests were run as part of the routine allergy examination. A high proportion...... of patients and/or caretakers refused the administered legume oral food challenges. Obtained diagnoses from histamine release did not correlate significantly to the outcome of the algorithm. Interestingly, threshold from peanut challenges did not correlate with the risk assessment.The algorithm presented...

  9. A Panel of Cancer Testis Antigens and Clinical Risk Factors to Predict Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer

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    Ramyar Molania

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third common carcinoma with a high rate of mortality worldwide and several studies have investigated some molecular and clinicopathological markers for diagnosis and prognosis of its malignant phenotypes. The aim of this study is to evaluate expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer testis antigen (CTA genes as well as some clinical risk markers to predict liver metastasis of colorectal cancer patients. The expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer/testis antigen (CTA genes was obtained using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay in 90 colorectal tumor samples including both negative and positive liver metastasis tumors. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the association of three studied genes and clinical risk factors with CRC liver metastasis. The frequency of PAGE4 and SCP-1 genes expression was significantly higher in the primary tumours with liver metastasis when statistically compared with primary tumors with no liver metastasis (P<0.05. Among all clinical risk factors studied, the lymph node metastasis and the depth of invasion were statistically correlated with liver metastasis of CRC patients. In addition, using multiple logistic regression, we constructed a model based on PAGE4 and lymph node metastasis to predict liver metastasis of CRC.

  10. The prevalence, risk factors and clinical correlates of obesity in Chinese patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiongzhen; Du, Xiangdong; Zhang, Yingyang; Yin, Guangzhong; Zhang, Guangya; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Quevedo, João; Soares, Jair C; Xia, Haishen; Li, Xiaosi; Zheng, Yingjun; Ning, Yuping; Zhang, Xiang Yang

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a common comorbidity in schizophrenia. Few studies have addressed obesity in Chinese schizophrenia patients. The aims of this current study were to evaluate the prevalence, risk factors and clinical correlates of obesity in Chinese patients with schizophrenia. A total of 206 patients were recruited from a hospital in Beijing. Their clinical and anthropometric data together with plasma glucose and lipid parameters were collected. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was rated for all patients. Overall, 43 (20.9%) patients were obese and 67 (32.5%) were overweight. The obese patients had significantly higher glucose levels, triglyceride levels than non-obese patients. Females and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus had increased risk for obesity. Correlation analysis showed that BMI was associated with sex, education levels, negative symptoms, total PANSS score, triglyceride levels and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further stepwise regression analysis showed that sex, type 2 diabetes, education level, triglyceride and amount of smoking/day were significant predictors for obesity. Our study showed that the prevalence of obesity in Chinese patients with schizophrenia is higher than that in the general population. Some demographic and clinical variables are risk factors for obesity in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors for long term complications among patients of endocrine clinic in Hospital Penang, Malaysia

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    Syed Wasif Gillani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase and an estimated 239 million people worldwide are expected to have the condition by the year 2020 (1. Diabetes mellitus (DM represents a serious healthcare challenge. The aim of the study was to evaluate the patient clinical characteristics and risk factors for long term complications in the endocrine clinic of Hospital Penang, Malaysia.Methods: Descriptive Prospective cross-sectional study design was chosen. To achieve a power of 0.7 with alpha set at 0.05, 186 subjects were required for the study but researcher increase the sample to 297 in caseof drop out. Self-developed data collection form was used to collect the patient information.Results: 297 (100% patients were enrolled from OPD diabetic clinic of Hospital Palau Pinang. Among the sample 150 (50.5% were males and rest 147 (49.5% females. Malay males mean weight at the time of diagnosis significantly higher (pshowed that hypertension found among all the classes of diagnosis. Signifi cant variable are diagnosis class and medication consideration.Conclusion of the study suggested that majority of patients are at high risk of long-term complications and comorbidies. It has been found that increased rate of risk factors have been found among the study population and non-significant to sociodemographic differences.

  12. Effectiveness of physical exercise to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in youths: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesa, Claudia Ciceri; Barbiero, Sandra Mari; Petkowicz, Rosemary de Oliveira; Martins, Carla Correa; Marques, Renata das Virgens; Andreolla, Allana Abreu Martins; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to test the effectiveness of a physical activity and exercise-based program in a clinical context to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents. A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a pediatric preventive outpatient clinic. Intervention was 14 weeks of exercise for the intervention group or general health advice for the control group. The primary and the secondary outcomes were reduction of cardiovascular risk factors and the feasibility and the effectiveness of clinical advice plan to practice physical exercises at home. A total of 134 children were screened; 26 met eligibility criteria. Of these, 10 were allocated in the exercise intervention group and nine were included in the control group until the end of the intervention. Those patients who discontinued the intervention had the lowest scores of z-BMI (P = 0.033) and subscapular skin fold (P = 0.048). After 14 weeks of intervention, no statistical differences were found between the groups. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was higher in the exercise group, with a mild tendency to be significant (P = 0.066). Patients who adhere to treatment had diastolic blood pressure decreased from baseline to the end of the follow-up period in the control group (P = 0.013). Regardless of this result, the other comparisons within the group were not statistically different between T0 and T14. A low-cost physical activity advice intervention presented many barriers for implementation in routine clinical care, limiting its feasibility and evaluation of effectiveness to reduce cardiovascular risk factors.

  13. Hepatitis B vaccine antibody response and the risk of clinical AIDS or death.

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    Michael L Landrum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whether seroresponse to a vaccine such as hepatitis B virus (HBV vaccine can provide a measure of the functional immune status of HIV-infected persons is unknown.This study evaluated the relationship between HBV vaccine seroresponses and progression to clinical AIDS or death. METHODS AND FINDINGS: From a large HIV cohort, we evaluated those who received HBV vaccine only after HIV diagnosis and had anti-HBs determination 1-12 months after the last vaccine dose. Non-response and positive response were defined as anti-HBs <10 and ≥ 10 IU/L, respectively. Participants were followed from date of last vaccination to clinical AIDS, death, or last visit. Univariate and multivariable risk of progression to clinical AIDS or death were evaluated with Cox regression models. A total of 795 participants vaccinated from 1986-2010 were included, of which 41% were responders. During 3,872 person-years of observation, 122 AIDS or death events occurred (53% after 1995. Twenty-two percent of non-responders experienced clinical AIDS or death compared with 5% of responders (p<0.001. Non-response to HBV vaccine was associated with a greater than 2-fold increased risk of clinical AIDS or death (HR 2.47; 95% CI, 1.38-4.43 compared with a positive response, after adjusting for CD4 count, HIV viral load, HAART use, and delayed type hypersensitivity skin test responses (an in vivo marker of cell-mediated immunity. This association remained evident among those with CD4 count ≥ 500 cells/mm³ (HR 3.40; 95% CI, 1.39-8.32. CONCLUSIONS: HBV vaccine responses may have utility in assessing functional immune status and risk stratificating HIV-infected individuals, including those with CD4 count ≥ 500 cells/mm³.

  14. A clinical approach to obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease

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    Maeder MT

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Micha T Maeder,1 Otto D Schoch,2 Hans Rickli1 1Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kantonsspital St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland Abstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular diseases, and increased mortality. Epidemiological studies have established these associations, and there are now numerous experimental and clinical studies which have provided information on the possible underlying mechanisms. Mechanistic proof-of-concept studies with surrogate endpoints have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP has the potential to reverse or at least to attenuate not only OSA but also the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with OSA. However, no randomized studies have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by CPAP improves clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular risk factors and/or established cardiovascular disease and concomitant OSA. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of OSA as a potential cardiovascular risk factor, the impact of OSA on cardiac function, the role of OSA as a modifier of the course of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure, and the insights from studies evaluating the impact of CPAP therapy on the cardiovascular features associated with OSA. Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular, risk, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, hypertension

  15. Risks to the fetus from diagnostic imaging during pregnancy: review and proposal of a clinical protocol

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    Gomes, Mafalda; Matias, Alexandra [University of Porto, Faculty of Medicine, Porto (Portugal); Macedo, Filipe [SMIC, Porto (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    Every day, medical practitioners face the dilemma of exposing pregnant or possibly pregnant patients to radiation from diagnostic examinations. Both doctors and patients often have questions about the risks of radiation. The most vulnerable period is between the 8th and 15th weeks of gestation. Deterministic effects like pregnancy loss, congenital malformations, growth retardation and neurobehavioral abnormalities have threshold doses above 100-200 mGy. The risk is considered negligible at 50 mGy and in reality no diagnostic examination exceeds this limit. The risk of carcinogenesis is slightly higher than in the general population. Intravenous iodinated contrast is discouraged, except in highly selected patients. Considering all the possible noxious effects of radiation exposure, measures to diminish radiation are essential and affect the fetal outcome. Nonionizing procedures should be considered whenever possible and every radiology center should have its own data analysis on fetal radiation exposure. In this review, we analyze existing literature on fetal risks due to radiation exposure, producing a clinical protocol to guide safe radiation use in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  16. CLINICAL STUDY OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN WOMEN WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO RISK FACTORS

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    Anand Betdur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM To study the clinical profile of coronary artery disease in women and to identify the influence of the risk factors. METHODS We conducted a prospective observational study in Vydehi Institute of Medical Science and Research Centre (VIMS & RC, Bengaluru during the period June 2012 to Dec 2013. Patients admitted with history suggestive of coronary artery disease were evaluated clinically and investigated for risk factors. Prognosis with regards to morbidity and mortality following the standard treatment protocol was documented. RESULTS Out of 100 cases of coronary artery disease (CAD, 32 had Acute Myocardial infarction (AMI, 23 with Unstable Angina and 45 patients had Stable Angina. Nearly half of the patients had the traditional risk factors, namely hypertension (HTN, diabetes mellitus (DM, hyperlipidaemia and obesity. Chest pain was the most common symptom. Mortality was 14% which was observed predominantly in post-menopausal women who presented after 24 hours of the onset of symptoms. CONCLUSION Coronary artery disease is no longer a disease of men. Men and women share the same traditional risk factors like HTN, DM, Obesity, and Hyperlipidaemia. Increased incidence of complications and mortality occurred in those who presented after 24 hours of the symptoms. Our study highlights the importance of early recognition of CAD and initiation of thrombolytic therapy, to reduce significant morbidity and mortality.

  17. Cardiovascular Risk Factor Analysis in Patients with a Recent Clinical Fracture at the Fracture Liaison Service

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    Caroline E. Wyers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a low bone mineral density have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD and venous thromboembolic events (VTE. The aim of our retrospective chart review was to investigate the prevalence of CVD, VTE, hypertension (HT, and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2 in patients with a recent clinical fracture visiting the Fracture Liaison Service (FLS. Out of 3057 patients aged 50–90 years, 1359 consecutive patients, who agreed and were able to visit the FLS for fracture risk evaluation, were included (71.7% women; mean age 65.2 yrs. Based on medical history, 29.9% had a history of CVD (13.7%, VTE (1.7%, HT (14.9%, and DM2 (7.1% or a combination. Their prevalence increased with age (21% in patients aged 50–59 years to 48% in patients aged >80 years and was higher in men than in women (36% versus 27%, but independent of bone mineral density and fracture type. Careful evaluation of medical history with respect to these risk factors should be performed in patients with a recent clinical fracture before starting treatment with medications that increase the risk of VTE or cardiovascular events, such as raloxifene, strontium ranelate, or NSAIDs.

  18. Treatment referral for sex offenders based on clinical judgment versus actuarial risk assessment: match and analysis of mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Wineke J; Kamphuis, Jan Henk; Wever, Edwin C; Van Beek, Daan

    2013-07-01

    The Risk Need Responsivity (RNR) principles (Andrews & Bonta, 2010) dictate that higher risk sex offenders should receive more intensive treatment. The present study investigates how clinically based treatment assignment relates to risk level in a sex offender sample from The Netherlands. Correlational analyses served to identify sources of mismatches: that is, variables differing significantly in their relation between treatment selection and risk level. Our study sample consisted of 194 convicted rapists and 214 convicted child molesters. All participants' criminal files were retrospectively coded in terms of the items of the STATIC-99R, PCL: SV, and SVR-20. A low to moderate correlation was observed between clinical treatment selection and actuarial risk levels. A substantial part of the sex offenders, especially child molesters, received overly intensive treatment and another substantial part, especially rapists, received treatment of lesser intensity than indicated by their risk levels. General violent and antisocial risk factors seemed to be underemphasized in the clinical evaluation of sex offenders, especially rapists. A negative attitude toward intervention was negatively associated with clinical treatment selection. It is concluded that clinical treatment selection leads to an insufficient match between risk level and treatment level and systematic use of validated structured risk assessment instruments is necessary to ensure optimal adherence to the risk principle.

  19. DNA Methylation-Guided Prediction of Clinical Failure in High-Risk Prostate Cancer.

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    Kirill Litovkin

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a very heterogeneous disease with respect to clinical outcome. This study explored differential DNA methylation in a priori selected genes to diagnose PCa and predict clinical failure (CF in high-risk patients.A quantitative multiplex, methylation-specific PCR assay was developed to assess promoter methylation of the APC, CCND2, GSTP1, PTGS2 and RARB genes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 42 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and radical prostatectomy specimens of patients with high-risk PCa, encompassing training and validation cohorts of 147 and 71 patients, respectively. Log-rank tests, univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to investigate the prognostic value of the DNA methylation.Hypermethylation of APC, CCND2, GSTP1, PTGS2 and RARB was highly cancer-specific. However, only GSTP1 methylation was significantly associated with CF in both independent high-risk PCa cohorts. Importantly, trichotomization into low, moderate and high GSTP1 methylation level subgroups was highly predictive for CF. Patients with either a low or high GSTP1 methylation level, as compared to the moderate methylation groups, were at a higher risk for CF in both the training (Hazard ratio [HR], 3.65; 95% CI, 1.65 to 8.07 and validation sets (HR, 4.27; 95% CI, 1.03 to 17.72 as well as in the combined cohort (HR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.42 to 5.27 in multivariate analysis.Classification of primary high-risk tumors into three subtypes based on DNA methylation can be combined with clinico-pathological parameters for a more informative risk-stratification of these PCa patients.

  20. Clinical risk factors associated with anti-epileptic drug responsiveness in canine epilepsy.

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    Rowena M A Packer

    Full Text Available The nature and occurrence of remission, and conversely, pharmacoresistance following epilepsy treatment is still not fully understood in human or veterinary medicine. As such, predicting which patients will have good or poor treatment outcomes is imprecise, impeding patient management. In the present study, we use a naturally occurring animal model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy to investigate clinical risk factors associated with treatment outcome. Dogs with idiopathic epilepsy, for which no underlying cause was identified, were treated at a canine epilepsy clinic and monitored following discharge from a small animal referral hospital. Clinical data was gained via standardised owner questionnaires and longitudinal follow up data was gained via telephone interview with the dogs' owners. At follow up, 14% of treated dogs were in seizure-free remission. Dogs that did not achieve remission were more likely to be male, and to have previously experienced cluster seizures. Seizure frequency or the total number of seizures prior to treatment were not significant predictors of pharmacoresistance, demonstrating that seizure density, that is, the temporal pattern of seizure activity, is a more influential predictor of pharmacoresistance. These results are in line with clinical studies of human epilepsy, and experimental rodent models of epilepsy, that patients experiencing episodes of high seizure density (cluster seizures, not just a high seizure frequency pre-treatment, are at an increased risk of drug-refractoriness. These data provide further evidence that the dog could be a useful naturally occurring epilepsy model in the study of pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  1. Risk factors for clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on Dutch dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, J; Wilpshaar, H; Frankena, K; Bartels, C; Barkema, H W

    2002-06-25

    Risk factors for outbreaks in 1999 of clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on dairy farms were studied in a matched case-control study with 47 case farms and 47 control farms. All 47 case farms experienced a clinical outbreak of salmonellosis which was confirmed with a positive bacteriologic culture for serovar Typhimurium in one or more samples. Serovar Typhimurium phage type 401 and 506 (definitive type 104, DT104) were the most frequently isolated phage types (13 isolates). On most farms (66%), clinical signs were seen only among adult cows. The most frequently reported clinical signs were diarrhoea (in 92% of the farms) and depression (in 79% of the farms). Control farms were matched on region and had no history of salmonellosis. A questionnaire was used to collect data on case and control farms. The relationship between serovar Typhimurium status of the farm and possible risk factors was tested using conditional logistic regression. Significant factors in the final model were presence of cats on the farm (OR=0.06), purchase of manure (OR=21.5), feeding colostrum only from own dam (OR=0.08), a non-seasonal calving pattern (OR=25), unrestricted grazing of lactating cows (OR=0.07), and a high mean mowing percentage of pasture (OR=1.02).

  2. Processes influencing the development of graduate nurse capabilities in clinical risk management: an Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2006-01-01

    To explore and describe key processes influencing the development of graduate nurse capabilities in clinical risk management (CRM). This study was undertaken using an exploratory descriptive case study method. Four sample units of analysis were used, notably: 2 cohorts of graduate nurses (n = 11) undertaking a 12-month graduate nurse transition program; key stakeholders (n = 34), that is, nurse unit managers, clinical teachers, preceptors, a quality manager, a librarian, and senior nurse administrators employed by the participating health service; patient outcome data; and pertinent literature. Data strongly suggested that graduate nurse capabilities in CRM were most influenced not by their supposed lack of clinical knowledge and skills but by their lack of corporate knowledge. The failure to provide new graduate nurses with pertinent information on CRM at the beginning of their employment and thereafter at pertinent intervals during the graduate nurse year program aslo hindered the development of their capabilities to manage clinical risk. Management and educational processes pertinent to informing and involving new graduate nurses in a hospital's local CRM program (including information about the organization's local policies and procedures) need to be implemented systematically at the very beginning of a new graduate's employment and thereafter throughout the remainder of the graduate nurse year.

  3. Weighing the evidence: risks and benefits of participatory documentary in corporatized clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Helena

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the effects of one U.S.-based public psychiatry clinic's shift to a centralized, corporate style of management, in response to pressures to cut expenditures by focusing on "evidence based" treatments. Participant observation research conducted between 2008 and 2012 for a larger study involving 127 interviews with policy makers, clinic managers, clinical practitioners and patients revealed that the shift heralded the decline of arts based therapies in the clinic, and of the social networks that had developed around them. It also inspired a participatory video self-documentary project among art group members, to portray the importance of arts-based therapies and garner public support for such therapies. Group members found a way to take action in the face of unilateral decision making, but experienced subsequent restrictions on clinic activities and discharge of core members from the clinic. The paper ends with a discussion of biopolitics, central legibility through corporate standardization, and the potential and risks of participatory documentaries to resist these trends.

  4. Modeling tumor control probability for spatially inhomogeneous risk of failure based on clinical outcome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Armin; Löck, Steffen; Jakobi, Annika; Stützer, Kristin; Bandurska-Luque, Anna; Vogelius, Ivan Richter; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild

    2017-07-01

    Objectives of this work are (1) to derive a general clinically relevant approach to model tumor control probability (TCP) for spatially variable risk of failure and (2) to demonstrate its applicability by estimating TCP for patients planned for photon and proton irradiation. The approach divides the target volume into sub-volumes according to retrospectively observed spatial failure patterns. The product of all sub-volume TCPi values reproduces the observed TCP for the total tumor. The derived formalism provides for each target sub-volume i the tumor control dose (D50,i) and slope (γ50,i) parameters at 50% TCPi. For a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) prescription for 45 advanced head and neck cancer patients, TCP values for photon and proton irradiation were calculated and compared. The target volume was divided into gross tumor volume (GTV), surrounding clinical target volume (CTV), and elective CTV (CTVE). The risk of a local failure in each of these sub-volumes was taken from the literature. Convenient expressions for D50,i and γ50,i were provided for the Poisson and the logistic model. Comparable TCP estimates were obtained for photon and proton plans of the 45 patients using the sub-volume model, despite notably higher dose levels (on average +4.9%) in the low-risk CTVE for photon irradiation. In contrast, assuming a homogeneous dose response in the entire target volume resulted in TCP estimates contradicting clinical experience (the highest failure rate in the low-risk CTVE) and differing substantially between photon and proton irradiation. The presented method is of practical value for three reasons: It (a) is based on empirical clinical outcome data; (b) can be applied to non-uniform dose prescriptions as well as different tumor entities and dose-response models; and (c) is provided in a convenient compact form. The approach may be utilized to target spatial patterns of local failures observed in patient cohorts by prescribing different doses to

  5. Refitting of the UKPDS 68 risk equations to contemporary routine clinical practice data in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, P; Bennett, H; Ward, T; Bergenheim, K

    2015-02-01

    Economic evaluations of new diabetes therapies rely heavily upon the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) equations for prediction of cardiovascular events; however, concerns persist regarding their relevance to current clinical practice and appropriate use in populations other than newly diagnosed patients. This study refits the UKPDS 68 event equations, using contemporary data describing low- and intermediate-risk patients. Anonymized patient data describing demographics, risk factors and incidence of cardiovascular and microvascular events were extracted from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database over the 10-year period from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2009. Following multiple imputation of missing values, accelerated failure-time Weibull regression equations were refitted to produce new coefficients for each risk group. Discriminatory performance was assessed and compared with both UKPDS 68 and UKPDS 82 risk equations, and the implication of coefficient choice within an economic evaluation was assessed using the Cardiff type 2 diabetes model. When applied to patient-level data, the three sets of coefficients (UKPDS, THIN low-risk and intermediate-risk) lead to fairly consistent predictions of the 5-year risk of events. Exceptions include lower predicted rates of myocardial infarction and higher rates of ischaemic heart disease, congestive heart failure and end-stage renal disease with both sets of revised THIN coefficients compared with UKPDS. Over a modelled lifetime, the coefficients derived from the low-risk data predict fewer total cardiovascular events compared with UKPDS, while those from the intermediate-risk data predict a greater number. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves demonstrated a marginal improvement in the discriminatory performance of the refitted equations. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio associated with dapagliflozin versus sulphonylurea in addition to metformin changed from £7,708 to £7

  6. A clinical model to identify patients with high-risk coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yelin; Chen, Li; Yam, Yeung; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Berman, Daniel S; Budoff, Matthew J; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor Y; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Jörg; Karlsberg, Ronald P; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; LaBounty, Troy; Lin, Fay; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert L; Shaw, Leslee J; Villines, Todd C; Min, James K; Chow, Benjamin J W

    2015-04-01

    This study sought to develop a clinical model that identifies patients with and without high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). Although current clinical models help to estimate a patient's pre-test probability of obstructive CAD, they do not accurately identify those patients with and without high-risk coronary anatomy. Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected multinational coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) cohort was conducted. High-risk anatomy was defined as left main diameter stenosis ≥50%, 3-vessel disease with diameter stenosis ≥70%, or 2-vessel disease involving the proximal left anterior descending artery. Using a cohort of 27,125, patients with a history of CAD, cardiac transplantation, and congenital heart disease were excluded. The model was derived from 24,251 consecutive patients in the derivation cohort and an additional 7,333 nonoverlapping patients in the validation cohort. The risk score consisted of 9 variables: age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, hyperlipidemia, family history of CAD, history of peripheral vascular disease, and chest pain symptoms. Patients were divided into 3 risk categories: low (≤7 points), intermediate (8 to 17 points) and high (≥18 points). The model was statistically robust with area under the curve of 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75 to 0.78) in the derivation cohort and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.69 to 0.74) in the validation cohort. Patients who scored ≤7 points had a low negative likelihood ratio (risk CAD was 1% in patients with ≤7 points and 16.7% in those with ≥18 points. We propose a scoring system, based on clinical variables, that can be used to identify patients at high and low pre-test probability of having high-risk CAD. Identification of these populations may detect those who may benefit from a trial of medical therapy and those who may benefit most from an invasive strategy. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  7. Comprehensive coronary risk determination in primary prevention: an imaging and clinical based definition combining computed tomographic coronary artery calcium score and national cholesterol education program risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Khurram; Vasamreddy, Chandra; Blumenthal, Roger S; Rumberger, John A

    2006-06-16

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and a major cause of morbidity. Coronary heart disease (CHD) accounts for nearly half of all CVD deaths. Currently estimation of risk in primary prevention is based on the Framingham risk equations, which inputs traditional risk factors and is helpful in predicting the development of CHD in asymptomatic individuals. However many individuals suffer events in the absence of established risk factors for atherosclerosis and broad based population risk estimations may have little precision when applied to a given individual. To meet the challenge of CHD risk assessment, several tools have been developed to identify atherosclerotic disease in its preclinical stages. This paper aims to incorporate information from coronary artery calcification (CAC) scoring from a computed tomographic "heartscan" (using Electron Beam Tomography (EBT) as the validated prototype) along with current Framingham risk profiling in order to refine risk on an absolute scale by combining imaging and clinical data to affect a more comprehensive calculation of absolute risk in a given individual. For CAC scores above the 75th percentile but or =55 years, women> or =65 years) a CAC = 0 will result in an age point score corresponding to the age-group whose median CAC score is zero i.e., 40-44 years for men and 55-59 years for women. The utilization of CAC scores allows the inclusion of sub-clinical disease definition into the context of modifiable risk factors as well as identifies high-risk individuals requiring aggressive treatment.

  8. Environmental and Clinical Risk Factors for Delirium in a Neurosurgical Center: A Prospective Study.

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    Matano, Fumihiro; Mizunari, Takayuki; Yamada, Keiko; Kobayashi, Shiro; Murai, Yasuo; Morita, Akio

    2017-07-01

    Few reports of delirium-related risk factors have focused on environmental risk factors and clinical risk factors, such as white matter signal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging fluid attenuated inversion recovery images. We prospectively enrolled 253 patients admitted to our neurosurgical center between December 2014 and June 2015 and analyzed 220 patients (100 male patients; mean age, 64.1 years; age range, 17-92 years). An Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist score ≥4 points indicated delirium. We evaluated patient factors consisting of baseline characteristics and related factors, such as white matter lesions (WMLs), as well as the surrounding environment. Delirium occurred in 29/220 cases (13.2%). Regarding baseline characteristics, there were significant statistical correlations between delirium and age (P = 0.0187), Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised score (P = 0.0022) on admission, and WMLs (P delirium and stay in a neurosurgical care unit (P = 0.0245). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed statistically significant correlations of delirium with WMLs (P delirium (P = 0.026). WMLs in patients and the surrounding environment are risk factors for delirium in a neurosurgical center. To prevent delirium, clinicians must recognize risk factors, such as high-grade WMLs, and manage environmental factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical analysis of the risk factors for recurrence of HCC and its relationship with HBV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di-Peng Ou; Lian-Yue Yang; Geng-Wen Huang; Yi-Ming Tao; Xiang Ding; Zhi-Gang Chang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To comprehend the risk factors of recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its relationship with the infection patterns of hepatitis B virus (HBV). METHODS: All materials of 270 cases of postoperative HCC were statistically analyzed by SPSS software. Recurrence and metastasis were classified into early (≤2 years) and late phase (>2 years). Risk factors for recurrence and metastasis after surgery in each group were analyzed.RESULTS: Out of 270 cases of HCC, 162 cases were followed up in which recurrence and metastasis occurred in 136 cases. There were a lot of risk factors related to recurrence and metastasis of HCC; risk factors contributing to early phase recurrence were serum AFP level, vascular invasion, incisal margin and operative transfusion, gross tumor classification and number of intrahepatic node to late phase recurrence. The HBV infective rate of recurrent HCC was 94.1%, in which "HBsAg, HBeAb, HBcAb" positive pattern reached 45.6%. The proportion of HBV infection in solitary large hepatocellular carcinoma (SLHCC) evidently decreased compared to nodular hepatocellular carcinoma (NHCC) (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The early and late recurrence and metastasis after hepatectomy of HCC were associated with different risk factors. The early recurrence may be mediated by vascular invasion and remnant lesion, the late recurrence by tumor's clinical pathology propert, as multicentric carcinogenesis or intrahepatic carcinoma denovo. HBV replication takes a great role in this process. From this study, we found that SLHCC has more satisfactory neoplasm biological behavior than NHCC.

  10. Risk assessment of deep-vein thrombosis after acute stroke: a prospective study using clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Ping; Zheng, Hua-Guang; Wang, David Z; Wang, Yi-Long; Hussain, Mohammed; Sun, Hai-Xin; Wang, An-Xin; Zhao, Xing-Quan; Dong, Ke-Hui; Wang, Chun-Xue; He, Wen; Ning, Bin; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) represents a serious complication in acute stroke patients with pulmonary embolus (PE) as a potential outcome. Prediction of DVT may help with formulating a proper prevention strategy. To assess of the risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in acute stroke patients, we developed and validated a clinical score in a cohort study. Incidence of Deep Venous Thrombosis after Acute Stroke in China (INVENT-China) is a multicenter prospective cohort study. The potential predictive variables for DVT at baseline were collected, and the presence of DVT was evaluated using ultrasonography on the 14 ± 3 days. Data were randomly assigned to either a training data set or a test data set. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop risk scores to predict DVT in the training data set and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to validate the score in the test data set. From 2006-2007, 862 hospital-based acute stroke patients were enrolled in China. The overall incidence of DVT after acute stroke within two weeks was 12.4% (95%CI 10.3-14.7%). A seven-point score derived in the training data set (age [≥65 years = 1], sex [female gender = 1]), obesity [BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) = 1], active cancer [yes = 2], stroke subtype [cerebral hemorraghe = 1], muscle weakness [≥2 on Lower limb NIHSS score = 1] was highly predictive of 14-day risk of DVT(c statistic = 0.70, 95% CI, 0.64-0.76, P < 0.001), in the overall study population(c statistic = 0.65, 95% CI 0.59-0.70, P < 0.001). This clinical score may help identify acute stroke patients with high risk of DVT. In addition, it also serves as a platform to develop further models of DVT prediction in stroke patients based on clinical factors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Risk factors for long term complications among patients of endocrine clinic in Hospital Penang, Malaysia

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    Syed Wasif Gillani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase and an estimated 239 million people worldwide are expected to have the condition by the year 2020 (1. Diabetes mellitus (DM represents a serious healthcare challenge. The aim of the study was to evaluate the patient clinical characteristics and risk factors for long term complications in the endocrine clinic of Hospital Penang, Malaysia.Methods: Descriptive Prospective cross-sectional study design was chosen. To achieve a power of 0.7 with alpha set at 0.05, 186 subjects were required for the study but researcher increase the sample to 297 in caseof drop out. Self-developed data collection form was used to collect the patient information.Results: 297 (100% patients were enrolled from OPD diabetic clinic of Hospital Palau Pinang. Among the sample 150 (50.5% were males and rest 147 (49.5% females. Malay males mean weight at the time of diagnosis significantly higher (p<0.001, as compared to other ethnics, same results found among Malay females (p<0.001. Findings suggested increased number of risk factors among the study population. Finding alsoshowed that hypertension found among all the classes of diagnosis. Signifi cant variable are diagnosis class and medication consideration.Conclusion of the study suggested that majority of patients are at high risk of long-term complications and comorbidies. It has been found that increased rate of risk factors have been found among the study population and non-significant to sociodemographic differences.

  12. Theory of Mind in Patients at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

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    Stanford, Arielle D.; Messinger, Julie; Malaspina, Dolores; Corcoran, Cheryl M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with schizophrenia have a decreased ability to interpret the intentions of other individuals, called Theory of Mind (ToM). As capacity for ToM normally advances with brain maturation, research on ToM in individuals at heightened clinical risk for psychosis may reveal developmental differences independent of disease based differences. Methods We examined ToM in at clinical high risk and schizophrenia patients as well as healthy controls: 1) 63 clinical high risk (CHR) patients and 24 normal youths ascertained by a CHR program; and 2) in 13 schizophrenia cases and 14 normal adults recruited through a schizophrenia program. ToM measures included first- and second-order false belief cartoon tasks (FBT) and two “higher order” tasks (“Strange Stories Task” (SST) and the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” task). In the first study, CHR patients and normal youths were also assessed for cognition, “prodromal” symptoms and social function. Results Errors on first- and second-order false belief tasks were made primarily by patients. CHR patients and their young comparison group had equivalent performance on higher order ToM, which was not significantly different from the worse ToM performance of schizophrenia patients and the higher performance of normal adult controls. In the combined dataset from both studies, all levels of ToM were associated with IQ, controlling for age and sex. ToM bore no relation to explicit memory, prodromal symptoms, social function, or later transition to psychosis. Conclusions Higher order ToM capacity was equally undeveloped in high risk cases and younger controls, suggesting performance on these tasks is not fully achieved until adulthood. This study also replicates the association of IQ with ToM performance described in previous studies of schizophrenia. PMID:21757324

  13. Clinical features and risk factors for atazanavir (ATV-associated urolithiasis: a case-control study.

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    Matthieu Lafaurie

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Clinical features and risk factors for atazanavir (ATV-associated urolithiasis have not been fully investigated. METHODS: We reviewed all cases of ATV-containing urolithiasis identified by infrared spectrophotometry among HIV-infected patients over a 5-year period to describe their clinical features and outcome. A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors associated with ATV-associated urolithiasis using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: 30 cases of ATV-associated urolithiasis were analyzed. Patients were mostly men (87%, median age: 45.5 years, median CD4 cell count: 443 cells/µL and 97% had plasma HIV RNA level <50 cp/mL. Median time between the initiation of ATV-containing regimen and the diagnosis of urolithiasis was 3.1 years. Patients presented with flank pain in 90% and macroscopic hematuria in 82.6%, 34% had renal dysfunction and 44.8% needed ureteroscopic treatment. In univariate analysis, chronic hepatitis C, a history of urolithiasis, prior use of indinavir, ATV duration, undetectable plasma HIV RNA, use of ritonavir as a booster and serum free bilirubin level were associated with ATV-urolithiasis. Multivariate models retained serum free bilirubin level (OR: 2.31, p<0.02 and either ATV duration (OR:  = 1.42, p = <0.03 or a history of urolithiasis (OR = 4.79, p<0.02 when adjusting on serum free bilirubin level as risk factors associated with urolithiasis. CONCLUSIONS: ATV-containing urolithiasis are associated with frank clinical symptoms and may require surgical intervention. A high serum bilirubin level, a long exposure to ATV and a history of urolithiasis are risk factors for this rare adverse event.

  14. Clinical analysis and risk stratification of ventricular septal rupture following acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao-ying; QIU Hong; QIAO Shu-bin; KANG Lian-ming; SONG Lei; ZHANG Jun; TAN Xiao-yan

    2013-01-01

    Background Ventricular septal rupture (VSR) remains an infrequent but devastating complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI).The best time to undergo surgical repair is controversial and there is currently no risk stratification for patients with VSR to guide treatment.The purpose of this study was to review the clinical outcomes of 70 patients with VSR,to analyze the short-term prognosis factors of VSR following AMI,and to make a risk stratification for patients with VSR.Methods A total of 70 consecutive VSR patients following AMI treated in our hospital from January 2002 to October 2010 were enrolled in this study retrospectively.The difference of clinical characteristics were observed between patients with VSR who survived <30 days and survived >30 days.We analyzed the short-term prognosis factors of VSR and established the short-term prognosis index of VSR (SPIV) based on the Logistic regression analysis to stratify patients with VSR.Results Among 12 354 patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction,70 (0.57%) patients (33 males and 37 females) were found to have VSR.The average age was (68.1±8.5) years.Fifty-four (77.1%) patients were diagnosed with an acute anterior infarction.Patients with VSR selected for surgical repair had better outcomes than patients treated conservatively; 1-year mortality 9.5% versus 87.8%,P <0.005.Logistic regression analysis revealed that female (P=-0.013),anterior AMI (P=0.023),non-ventricular aneurysm (P=0.023),non-diabetes (P=0.009),Killip class 3 or 4 (P=0.022) and time from AMI to VSR less than 4 days (P=0.027) were independent risk determinants for shortterm mortality.SPIV >9 indicates a high risk as the 30-day mortality is 77.4%; SPIV <8 indicates a low risk as the 30-day mortality is 28.6%; SPIV between 8 and 9 indicates a moderate risk.Conclusions VSR remains a rare but devastating complication of AMI.The independent risk determinants for short-term mortality of VSR were female

  15. Characteristics of Pseudoaneurysms in Southern India; Risk Analysis, Clinical Profile, Surgical Management and Outcome

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    Hafeezulla Lone

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the risk factors, clinical characteristics, surgical management and outcome of pseudoaneurysm secondary to iatrogenic or traumatic vascular injury. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study being performed in department of cardiovascular and thoracic surgery skims soura during a 4-year period. We included all the patients referring to our center with primary diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm. The pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed with angiography and color Doppler sonography. The clinical and demographic characteristics were recorded and the risk factors were identified accordingly. Patients with small swelling (less than 5-cm and without any complication were managed conservatively. They were followed for progression and development of complications in relation to swelling. Others underwent surgical repair and excision. The outcome of the patients was also recorded. Results: Overall we included 20 patients with pseudoaneurysm. The mean age of the patients was 42.1±0.6 years. Among them there were 11 (55% men and 9 (45% women. Nine (45% patients with end stage renal disease developed pseudoaneurysm after inadvertent femoral artery puncture for hemodialysis; two patients after interventional cardiology procedure; one after femoral embolectomy; one developed after fire arm splinter injury and one formed femoral artery related pseudoaneurysm after drainage of right inguinal abscess. The most common site of pseudoaneurysm was femoral artery followed by brachial artery. Overall surgical intervention was performed in 17 (85% patients and 3 (15% were managed conservatively. Conclusion: End stage renal disease is a major risk factor for pseudoaneurysm formation. Coagulopathy, either therapeutic or pathological is also an important risk factor. Patients with these risk factors need cannulation of venous structures for hemodialysis under ultrasound guide to prevent inadvertent arterial injury. Patients with end stage renal disease who

  16. Bladder Carcinoma Data with Clinical Risk Factors and Molecular Markers: A Cluster Analysis

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    Enrique Redondo-Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer occurs in the epithelial lining of the urinary bladder and is amongst the most common types of cancer in humans, killing thousands of people a year. This paper is based on the hypothesis that the use of clinical and histopathological data together with information about the concentration of various molecular markers in patients is useful for the prediction of outcomes and the design of treatments of nonmuscle invasive bladder carcinoma (NMIBC. A population of 45 patients with a new diagnosis of NMIBC was selected. Patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, muscle invasive bladder carcinoma (MIBC, carcinoma in situ (CIS, and NMIBC recurrent tumors were not included due to their different clinical behavior. Clinical history was obtained by means of anamnesis and physical examination, and preoperative imaging and urine cytology were carried out for all patients. Then, patients underwent conventional transurethral resection (TURBT and some proteomic analyses quantified the biomarkers (p53, neu, and EGFR. A postoperative follow-up was performed to detect relapse and progression. Clusterings were performed to find groups with clinical, molecular markers, histopathological prognostic factors, and statistics about recurrence, progression, and overall survival of patients with NMIBC. Four groups were found according to tumor sizes, risk of relapse or progression, and biological behavior. Outlier patients were also detected and categorized according to their clinical characters and biological behavior.

  17. Predicting the risk of suicide by analyzing the text of clinical notes.

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    Chris Poulin

    Full Text Available We developed linguistics-driven prediction models to estimate the risk of suicide. These models were generated from unstructured clinical notes taken from a national sample of U.S. Veterans Administration (VA medical records. We created three matched cohorts: veterans who committed suicide, veterans who used mental health services and did not commit suicide, and veterans who did not use mental health services and did not commit suicide during the observation period (n = 70 in each group. From the clinical notes, we generated datasets of single keywords and multi-word phrases, and constructed prediction models using a machine-learning algorithm based on a genetic programming framework. The resulting inference accuracy was consistently 65% or more. Our data therefore suggests that computerized text analytics can be applied to unstructured medical records to estimate the risk of suicide. The resulting system could allow clinicians to potentially screen seemingly healthy patients at the primary care level, and to continuously evaluate the suicide risk among psychiatric patients.

  18. Characterization of Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors Associated with Dyslipidemia after Kidney Transplantation

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    Kazuyuki Numakura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the prevalence of dyslipidemia in a Japanese cohort of renal allograft recipients and investigated clinical and genetic characteristics associated with having the disease. In total, 126 patients that received renal allograft transplants between February 2002 and August 2011 were studied, of which 44 recipients (34.9% were diagnosed with dyslipidemia at 1 year after transplantation. Three clinical factors were associated with a risk of having dyslipidemia: a higher prevalence of disease observed among female than male patients P=0.021 and treatment with high mycophenolate mofetil P=0.012 and prednisolone P=0.023 doses per body weight at 28 days after transplantation. The genetic association between dyslipidemia and 60 previously described genetic polymorphisms in 38 putative disease-associated genes was analyzed. The frequency of dyslipidemia was significantly higher in patients with the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1 Bcl1 G allele than in those with the CC genotype P=0.001. A multivariate analysis revealed that the NR3C1 Bcl1 G allele was a significant risk factor for the prevalence of dyslipidemia (odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.8–12.2. These findings may aid in predicting a patient’s risk of developing dyslipidemia.

  19. Predicting the Risk of Suicide by Analyzing the Text of Clinical Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Paul; Vepstas, Linas; Young-Xu, Yinong; Goertzel, Benjamin; Watts, Bradley; Flashman, Laura; McAllister, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We developed linguistics-driven prediction models to estimate the risk of suicide. These models were generated from unstructured clinical notes taken from a national sample of U.S. Veterans Administration (VA) medical records. We created three matched cohorts: veterans who committed suicide, veterans who used mental health services and did not commit suicide, and veterans who did not use mental health services and did not commit suicide during the observation period (n = 70 in each group). From the clinical notes, we generated datasets of single keywords and multi-word phrases, and constructed prediction models using a machine-learning algorithm based on a genetic programming framework. The resulting inference accuracy was consistently 65% or more. Our data therefore suggests that computerized text analytics can be applied to unstructured medical records to estimate the risk of suicide. The resulting system could allow clinicians to potentially screen seemingly healthy patients at the primary care level, and to continuously evaluate the suicide risk among psychiatric patients. PMID:24489669

  20. Mining heart disease risk factors in clinical text with named entity recognition and distributional semantic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, Jay

    2015-12-01

    We present the design, and analyze the performance of a multi-stage natural language processing system employing named entity recognition, Bayesian statistics, and rule logic to identify and characterize heart disease risk factor events in diabetic patients over time. The system was originally developed for the 2014 i2b2 Challenges in Natural Language in Clinical Data. The system's strengths included a high level of accuracy for identifying named entities associated with heart disease risk factor events. The system's primary weakness was due to inaccuracies when characterizing the attributes of some events. For example, determining the relative time of an event with respect to the record date, whether an event is attributable to the patient's history or the patient's family history, and differentiating between current and prior smoking status. We believe these inaccuracies were due in large part to the lack of an effective approach for integrating context into our event detection model. To address these inaccuracies, we explore the addition of a distributional semantic model for characterizing contextual evidence of heart disease risk factor events. Using this semantic model, we raise our initial 2014 i2b2 Challenges in Natural Language of Clinical data F1 score of 0.838 to 0.890 and increased precision by 10.3% without use of any lexicons that might bias our results.

  1. Correlation between classification in risk categories and clinical aspects and outcomes 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gabriella Novelli; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to correlate classification in risk categories with the clinical profiles, outcomes and origins of patients. Method: analytical cross-sectional study conducted with 697 medical forms of adult patients. The variables included: age, sex, origin, signs and symptoms, exams, personal antecedents, classification in risk categories, medical specialties, and outcome. The Chi-square and likelihood ratio tests were used to associate classifications in risk categories with origin, signs and symptoms, exams, personal antecedents, medical specialty, and outcome. Results: most patients were women with an average age of 44.5 years. Pain and dyspnea were the symptoms most frequently reported while hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most common comorbidities. Classifications in the green and yellow categories were the most frequent and hospital discharge the most common outcome. Patients classified in the red category presented the highest percentage of ambulance origin due to surgical reasons. Those classified in the orange and red categories also presented the highest percentage of hospitalization and death. Conclusion: correlation between clinical aspects and outcomes indicate there is a relationship between the complexity of components in the categories with greater severity, evidenced by the highest percentage of hospitalization and death. PMID:27982310

  2. Identifying risk factors for clinically significant diabetic macula edema in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, Kyuzi; Takeda, Keiji; Hashimoto, Kaoru; Tanaka, Reiko; Okuyama, Shinya

    2013-05-01

    It is known that clinic blood pressure (BP), gender, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, anemia and thiazolidenediones (TZD) treatment are predictors for clinically significant diabetic macula edema (CSDME). We examined a most risky factor for CSDME in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) confirmed using optical coherence tomography by multiple regression analysis (MRA). As the risk factors, wakening-up BP was added to such factors. Seven diabetic Japanese patients with CSDME (group 1) and 124 subjects without CSDME (group 2) assonated with DR using optical coherence tomography were studied. The durations of T2DM in groups 1 and 2 were 15±10 years and 20±15 years, respectively. There was no statistically difference in means of gender, duration, age, body mass index (BMI), HbA1c, TC, LDL and TC/HDL, serum creatinine, urinary albumin excretion rate, and clinic BP between two groups. Morning systolic home BP (MSHBP), cigarette smoking and foveal thickness were significantly (ppioglitazone as TZD treatment were significantly positive predictors for CSDME, while BMI had a significantly negative predictor. Other variables were not significantly correlated to CSDME. The review summarizes a multiple regression analysis revealed that MSHBP makes an addition to predictive factors for CSDME among risk factors reported previously in patient with T2DM.

  3. Clinical risk of stigma and discrimination of mental illnesses: Need for objective assessment and quantification.

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    Shrivastava, Amresh; Bureau, Yves; Rewari, Nitika; Johnston, Megan

    2013-04-01

    Stigma and discrimination continue to be a reality in the lives of people suffering from mental illness, particularly schizophrenia, and prove to be one of the greatest barriers to regaining a normal lifestyle and health. Research advances have defined stigma and assessed its implications and have even examined intervention strategies for dealing with stigma. We are of the opinion that stigma is a potential clinical risk factor. It delays treatment seeking, worsens course and outcome, reduces compliance, and increases the risk of relapse; causing further disability, discrimination, and isolation even in persons who have accessed mental health services. The delay in treatment due to stigma causes potential complications like suicide, violence, harm to others, and deterioration in capacity to look after one's physical health. These are preventable clinical complications. In order to deal with the impact of stigma on an individual basis, it needs to be (i) assessed during routine clinical examination, (ii) assessed for quantification in order to obtain measurable objective deliverables, and (iii) examined if treatment can reduce stigma and its impact on individuals. New and innovative anti-stigma programs are required that are clinically driven in order to see the change in life of an individual by removing potential risks. The basic requirement for dealing with an individual's stigma perception/experience is its proper assessment for origin and impact in both a qualitative and quantitative manner. We further argue that quantification would allow for regular assessment and offer more effective intervention for patients. It will also be helpful in identifying modifiable social factors to enhance quality of care planning for management in hospitals and communities. The objective of quantification is to facilitate developing an approach to bring the assessment of stigma into clinical work and formulating customized strategies to deal with stigma at the patient level. It

  4. Complex fibroadenoma and breast cancer risk: a Mayo Clinic Benign Breast Disease Cohort Study.

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    Nassar, Aziza; Visscher, Daniel W; Degnim, Amy C; Frank, Ryan D; Vierkant, Robert A; Frost, Marlene; Radisky, Derek C; Vachon, Celine M; Kraft, Ruth A; Hartmann, Lynn C; Ghosh, Karthik

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the breast cancer risk overall among women with simple fibroadenoma or complex fibroadenoma and to examine the association of complex fibroadenoma with breast cancer through stratification of other breast cancer risks. The study included women aged 18-85 years from the Mayo Clinic Benign Breast Disease Cohort who underwent excisional breast biopsy from 1967 through 1991. Within this cohort, women who had fibroadenoma were compared to women who did not have fibroadenoma. Breast cancer risk (observed versus expected) across fibroadenoma levels was assessed through standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) by using age- and calendar-stratified incidence rates from the Iowa Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. Analyses were performed overall, within subgroups of involution status, with other demographic characteristics (age, year of biopsy, indication for biopsy, and family history), and with histologic characteristics, including overall impression [nonproliferative disease, proliferative disease without atypia (PDWA), or atypical hyperplasia]. Fibroadenoma was identified in 2136 women [noncomplex, 1835 (85.9%); complex, 301 (14.1%)]. SIR for noncomplex fibroadenoma was 1.49 (95% CI 1.26-1.74); for complex fibroadenoma, it was 2.27 (95% CI 1.63-3.10) (test for heterogeneity in SIR, P = .02). However, women with complex fibroadenoma were more likely to have other, concomitant high-risk histologic characteristics (e.g., incomplete involution and PDWA). In analyses stratified by involution status and PDWA, complex fibroadenoma was not an independent risk marker for breast cancer. Complex fibroadenoma does not confer increased breast cancer risk beyond other established histologic characteristics.

  5. Can machine-learning improve cardiovascular risk prediction using routine clinical data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Stephen F; Reps, Jenna; Kai, Joe; Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Qureshi, Nadeem

    2017-01-01

    Current approaches to predict cardiovascular risk fail to identify many people who would benefit from preventive treatment, while others receive unnecessary intervention. Machine-learning offers opportunity to improve accuracy by exploiting complex interactions between risk factors. We assessed whether machine-learning can improve cardiovascular risk prediction. Prospective cohort study using routine clinical data of 378,256 patients from UK family practices, free from cardiovascular disease at outset. Four machine-learning algorithms (random forest, logistic regression, gradient boosting machines, neural networks) were compared to an established algorithm (American College of Cardiology guidelines) to predict first cardiovascular event over 10-years. Predictive accuracy was assessed by area under the 'receiver operating curve' (AUC); and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) to predict 7.5% cardiovascular risk (threshold for initiating statins). 24,970 incident cardiovascular events (6.6%) occurred. Compared to the established risk prediction algorithm (AUC 0.728, 95% CI 0.723-0.735), machine-learning algorithms improved prediction: random forest +1.7% (AUC 0.745, 95% CI 0.739-0.750), logistic regression +3.2% (AUC 0.760, 95% CI 0.755-0.766), gradient boosting +3.3% (AUC 0.761, 95% CI 0.755-0.766), neural networks +3.6% (AUC 0.764, 95% CI 0.759-0.769). The highest achieving (neural networks) algorithm predicted 4,998/7,404 cases (sensitivity 67.5%, PPV 18.4%) and 53,458/75,585 non-cases (specificity 70.7%, NPV 95.7%), correctly predicting 355 (+7.6%) more patients who developed cardiovascular disease compared to the established algorithm. Machine-learning significantly improves accuracy of cardiovascular risk prediction, increasing the number of patients identified who could benefit from preventive treatment, while avoiding unnecessary treatment of others.

  6. Identification of occupational risk factors by interviewing injured workers in an out-patient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Lund

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: To prevent injuries, identification of the involved risk factors is necessary. Two recent in-depth investigations were carried out in the health service of Oslo on workers seeking treatment of severe occupational injuries. The interviews were rather time-consuming, and hence rather costly. The aim of thepresent study was to find a less time-consuming method which nevertheless would identify preventable risk actors.

    Methods: In-depth investigations of 15 injuries with nail guns and 28 injuries related to scaffolding were onducted in an out-patient clinic in Trondheim, Norway. Patients were interviewed by health personnel just efore or after the treatment based on specifically designed questionnaires. A group of specialists analysed the information collected.

    Results: Some risk factors were identified: design weaknesses inherent in nail guns, presence of snow and ice at the injury location, foreign body in the eye and lack of control/inspection of scaffolding when erected. On average, about two man hours were used for each injury. The most relevant questions were those directly related to the narrative, in particular how the injury occurred, and if any special conditions were involved. Quite a few data elements require epidemiological representative studies in order to assess them as potential risk factors.

    Conclusions: This relatively low time-consuming method revealed some risk factors. However, it could be more effective if the interviews were conducted by telephone a few days after the treatment by a specialist in that particular injury type; such as an experienced labour inspector, in order to probe more deeply into the technical risk factors.

  7. Identification of patients at low risk of dying after acute myocardial infarction, by simple clinical and submaximal exercise test criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S; A'Hern, R; Quigley, P; Vincent, R; Jewitt, D; Chamberlain, D

    1988-09-01

    A consecutive series of 559 hospital survivors of acute myocardial infarction aged less than 66 years were studied; 93 were designated prospectively as low-risk because they were suitable for early submaximal exercise testing and had none of the following clinical or exercise test 'risk factors': (1) angina for at least one month prior to infarction; (2) symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias, or (3) recurrent ischaemic pain, both after the first 24 h of infarction; (4) cardiac failure; (5) cardiomegaly; and (6) an abnormal exercise test (angina, ST-depression or poor blood pressure response). Altogether 301 patients were exercised; their mortality over a median follow-up of 2.4 years was 10.2%, versus 24.6% in the 258 patients not exercised (P = 0.0005). Absence of clinical 'risk factors' alone, in the exercised patients, identified 156 with a mortality of 5.4% versus 15.6% in the 145 with at least one clinical 'risk factor' (P = 0.004). The fully defined low-risk group comprised 93 of the former patients who had neither clinical nor exercise test 'risk factors'. None of these patients died compared with 19 of those with at least one 'risk factor' (mortality = 14.7%; P = 0.002). Their respective rates of non-fatal reinfarction were similar and never exceeded 5% per annum. Therefore, simple clinical and exercise test criteria can positively identify low-risk patients after infarction in whom secondary prevention may be inappropriate.

  8. Clinical-Genetic Associations in the Prospective Huntington at Risk Observational Study (PHAROS): Implications for Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglan, Kevin Michael; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Oakes, David; Kayson, Elise; Shinaman, M Aileen; Zhao, Hongwei; Romer, Megan; Young, Anne; Hersch, Steven; Penney, Jack; Marder, Karen; Paulsen, Jane; Quaid, Kimberly; Siemers, Eric; Tanner, Caroline; Mallonee, William; Suter, Greg; Dubinsky, Richard; Gray, Carolyn; Nance, Martha; Bundlie, Scott; Radtke, Dawn; Kostyk, Sandra; Baic, Corrine; Caress, James; Walker, Francis; Hunt, Victoria; O'Neill, Christine; Chouinard, Sylvain; Factor, Stewart; Greenamyre, Timothy; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Song, David; Peavy, Guerry; Moskowitz, Carol; Wesson, Melissa; Samii, Ali; Bird, Thomas; Lipe, Hillary; Blindauer, Karen; Marshall, Frederick; Zimmerman, Carol; Goldstein, Jody; Rosas, Diana; Novak, Peter; Caviness, John; Adler, Charles; Duffy, Amy; Wheelock, Vicki; Tempkin, Teresa; Richman, David; Seeberger, Lauren; Albin, Roger; Chou, Kelvin L; Racette, Brad; Perlmutter, Joel S; Perlman, Susan; Bordelon, Yvette; Martin, Wayne; Wieler, Marguerite; Leavitt, Blair; Raymond, Lynn; Decolongon, Joji; Clarke, Lorne; Jankovic, Joseph; Hunter, Christine; Hauser, Robert A; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Furtado, Sarah; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klimek, Mary Lou; Guttman, Mark; Sethna, Rustom; Feigin, Andrew; Cox, Marie; Shannon, Barbara; Percy, Alan; Dure, Leon; Harrison, Madaline; Johnson, William; Higgins, Donald; Molho, Eric; Nickerson, Constance; Evans, Sharon; Hobson, Douglas; Singer, Carlos; Galvez-Jimenez, Nestor; Shannon, Kathleen; Comella, Cynthia; Ross, Christopher; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H; Testa, Claudia; Rosenblatt, Adam; Hogarth, Penelope; Weiner, William; Como, Peter; Kumar, Rajeev; Cotto, Candace; Stout, Julie; Brocht, Alicia; Watts, Arthur; Eberly, Shirley; Weaver, Christine; Foroud, Tatiana; Gusella, James; MacDonald, Marcy; Myers, Richard; Fahn, Stanley; Shults, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Identifying measures that are associated with the cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) expansion in individuals before diagnosis of Huntington disease (HD) has implications for designing clinical trials. To identify the earliest features associated with the motor diagnosis of HD in the Prospective Huntington at Risk Observational Study (PHAROS). A prospective, multicenter, longitudinal cohort study was conducted at 43 US and Canadian Huntington Study Group research sites from July 9, 1999, through December 17, 2009. Participants included 983 unaffected adults at risk for HD who had chosen to remain unaware of their mutation status. Baseline comparability between CAG expansion (≥37 repeats) and nonexpansion (Huntington disease mutation status in individuals with CAG expansion vs without CAG expansion. Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale motor (score range, 0-124; higher scores indicate greater impairment), cognitive (symbol digits modality is the total number of correct responses in 90 seconds; lower scores indicate greater impairment), behavioral (score range, 0-176; higher scores indicate greater behavioral symptoms), and functional (Total Functional Capacity score range, 0-13; lower scores indicate reduced functional ability) domains were assessed at baseline and every 9 months up to a maximum of 10 years. Among the 983 research participants at risk for HD in the longitudinal cohort, 345 (35.1%) carried the CAG expansion and 638 (64.9%) did not. The mean (SD) duration of follow-up was 5.8 (3.0) years. At baseline, participants with expansions had more impaired motor (3.0 [4.2] vs 1.9 [2.8]; P < .001), cognitive (P < .05 for all measures except Verbal Fluency, P = .52), and behavioral domain scores (9.4 [11.4] vs 6.5 [8.5]; P < .001) but not significantly different measures of functional capacity (12.9 [0.3] vs 13.0 [0.2]; P = .23). With findings reported as mean slope (95% CI), in the longitudinal analyses, participants with CAG expansions

  9. Incarceration and Unstable Housing Interact to Predict Sexual Risk Behaviors among African American STD Clinic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widman, Laura; Noar, Seth M.; Golin, Carol E.; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Crosby, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Given dramatic racial disparities in rates of HIV/STDs among African Americans, understanding broader structural factors that increase the risk for HIV/STDs is crucial. This study investigated incarceration history and unstable housing as two structural predictors of HIV risk behavior among 293 African Americans (159 men/134 women, Mage=27). Participants were recruited from an urban STD clinic in the southeastern U.S. Approximately half the sample had been incarcerated in their lifetime (54%), and 43% had been unstably housed in the past 6 months. Incarceration was independently associated with number of sex partners and the frequency of unprotected sex. Unstable housing was independently associated with the frequency of unprotected sex. However, these main effects were qualified by significant interactions: individuals with a history of incarceration and more unstable housing had more sex partners and more unprotected sex in the past three months than individuals without these structural barriers. Implications for structural-level interventions are discussed. PMID:24060677

  10. Abstract bodies, concrete risks: clinical devices and the health of ova donors in Argentine reproductive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Ariza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Using a methodological perspective grounded in science and technology studies, this article analyzes two sociotechnical devices used in Argentine reproductive medicine (biostatistical measures and donation registries with the aim of controlling both the so-called “genetic risk” arising from the use of donated ova as well as the health risks to female donors. By examining how the deployment of monitoring criteria disregards the specificity of ova donation, the article suggests that it is not the absence of control measures and clinical criteria that produces an inadequate monitoring of such risks, but rather the concrete ways in which such measures are implemented that results in potential harms to the health of female donors.

  11. Muscle cramping in athletes--risk factors, clinical assessment, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwellnus, Martin P; Drew, Nichola; Collins, Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    Exercise associated muscle cramping (EAMC) is defined as a painful, spasmodic, and involuntary contraction of skeletal muscle that occurs during or immediately after exercise. There is a high lifetime prevalence of EAMC in athletes, specifically in endurance athletes. The most important risk factors for EAMC in athletes are a previous history of EAMC, and performing exercise at a higher relative exercise intensity or duration, when compared with normal training and participating in hot and humid environmental conditions. The diagnosis of EAMC is made clinically, and the most effective immediate management of EAMC is rest and passive stretching. The key to the prevention of EAMC is to reduce the risk of developing premature muscle fatigue.

  12. A single hospital study on portal vein thrombosis in cirrhotic patients - clinical characteristics & risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huisong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Discrepancies exist in the reported prevalence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT, and its clinical characteristics and sites of occurrence need to be elucidated. The risk factors for PVT are also poorly understood. This single centre study was undertaken to determine the clinical characteristics, sites of occurrence, and risk factors associated with PVT in patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: Hospitalized cirrhotic patients (N = 162 were segregated into the PVT and non-PVT groups. Indices possibly associated with PVT were measured and PVT was detected by both Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomography portal angiography. The portal vein diameter and flow velocity and splenic thickness were measured by ultrasonography. Results: PVT was found in 40 patients (24.7%; in 34 PVT patients (85%, the liver cirrhosis resulted from hepatitis B virus infections. Most (90% patients were Child-Pugh classes B and C, with similar distribution between the groups. PVT was seen in 20 patients in the portal and superior mesenteric veins; ascites, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and jaundice were common findings in PVT patients. Haemoglobin levels and blood platelet counts (BPCs were significantly lower and splenic thickness was greater in PVT than in non-PVT patients (P<0.01. There was a significant positive correlation between BPCs and platelet aggregation rates (R = 0.533, P<0.01. Interpretation & conclusions: The occurrence of PVT was 24.7 per cent, primarily in post-hepatitis B liver cirrhosis patients. PVT occurred mainly in the portal vein trunk and superior mesenteric vein. Different PVT sites may account for the differing clinical presentations. The lower levels of haemoglobin and BPCs as well as splenic thickening were associated with PVT. Splenic thickening may be a risk factor for PVT.

  13. Radiation risk and protection of patients in clinical SPECT/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, Gunnar; Nekolla, Elke A.; Nosske, Dietmar [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Borowski, Markus [Klinikum Braunschweig, Institute of Radiation Diagnostics and Nuclear Medicine, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that hybrid single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT for various diagnostic issues has an added value as compared to SPECT alone. However, the combined acquisition of functional and anatomical images can substantially increase radiation exposure to patients, in particular when using a hybrid system with diagnostic CT capabilities. It is, therefore, essential to carefully balance the diagnostic needs and radiation protection requirements. To this end, the evidence on health effects induced by ionizing radiation is outlined. In addition, the essential concepts for estimating radiation doses and lifetime attributable cancer risks associated with SPECT/CT examinations are presented taking into account both the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) as well as the most recent radiation risk models. Representative values of effective dose and lifetime attributable risk are reported for ten frequently used SPECT radiopharmaceuticals and five fully diagnostic partial-body CT examinations. A diagnostic CT scan acquired as part of a combined SPECT/CT examination contributes considerably to, and for some applications even dominates, the total patient exposure. For the common SPECT and CT examinations considered in this study, the lifetime attributable risk of developing a radiation-related cancer is less than 0.27 %/0.37 % for men/women older than 16 years, respectively, and decreases markedly with increasing age at exposure. Since there is no clinical indication for a SPECT/CT examination unless an emission scan has been indicated, the issue on justification comes down to the question of whether it is necessary to additionally acquire a low-dose CT for attenuation correction and anatomical localization of tracer uptake or even a fully diagnostic CT. In any case, SPECT/CT studies have to be optimized, e.g. by adapting dose reduction measures from state-of-the-art CT practice, and

  14. Influences of intermittent preventive treatment and persistent multiclonal Plasmodium falciparum infections on clinical malaria risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Liljander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT of malaria involves administration of curative doses of antimalarials at specified time points to vulnerable populations in endemic areas, regardless whether a subject is known to be infected. The effect of this new intervention on the development and maintenance of protective immunity needs further understanding. We have investigated how seasonal IPT affects the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum infections and the risk of subsequent clinical malaria. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 2227 Ghanaian children (3-59 months who were given sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP bimonthly, artesunate plus amodiaquine (AS+AQ monthly or bimonthly, or placebo monthly for six months spanning the malaria transmission season. Blood samples collected at three post-interventional surveys were analysed by genotyping of the polymorphic merozoite surface protein 2 gene. Malaria morbidity and anaemia was monitored during 12 months follow-up. RESULTS: Monthly IPT with AS+AQ resulted in a marked reduction in number of concurrent clones and only children parasite negative just after the intervention period developed clinical malaria during follow-up. In the placebo group, children without parasites as well as those infected with ≥2 clones had a reduced risk of subsequent malaria. The bimonthly SP or AS+AQ groups had similar number of clones as placebo after intervention; however, diversity and parasite negativity did not predict the risk of malaria. An interaction effect showed that multiclonal infections were only associated with protection in children without intermittent treatment. CONCLUSION: Molecular typing revealed effects of the intervention not detected by ordinary microscopy. Effective seasonal IPT temporarily reduced the prevalence and genetic diversity of P. falciparum infections. The reduced risk of malaria in children with multiclonal infections only seen in untreated children suggests that

  15. Extended heart failure clinic follow-up in low-risk patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Videbaek, Lars

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundOutpatient follow-up in specialized heart failure clinics (HFCs) is recommended by current guidelines and implemented in most European countries, but the optimal duration of HFC programmes has not been established. Nor is it known whether all or only high-risk patients, e.g. identified ......-up in a specialized HFC in a publicly funded universal access healthcare system. Heart failure patients on optimal medical therapy with mild or moderate symptoms are safely managed by their personal GP.Trial Registration: www.Centerwatch.com: 173491 (NorthStar)....

  16. Extended heart failure clinic follow-up in low-risk patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Videbaek, Lars

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundOutpatient follow-up in specialized heart failure clinics (HFCs) is recommended by current guidelines and implemented in most European countries, but the optimal duration of HFC programmes has not been established. Nor is it known whether all or only high-risk patients, e.g. identified ......-up in a specialized HFC in a publicly funded universal access healthcare system. Heart failure patients on optimal medical therapy with mild or moderate symptoms are safely managed by their personal GP.Trial Registration: www.Centerwatch.com: 173491 (NorthStar)....

  17. Osteoporosis in patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure: Prevalence and clinical risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Louis; Skallerup, Anders; Olesen, Søren Schou; Køhler, Marianne; Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Kruse, Christian; Vestergaard, Peter; Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard

    2017-08-05

    Intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure are associated with malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients that may negatively influence bone metabolism and increase the risk for developing osteoporosis. However, information regarding prevalence and contribution of individual risk factors is scarce. We investigated the prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure and identified associated risk factors. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study including 167 clinically stable outpatients with intestinal insufficiency or intestinal failure. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry and the prevalence of osteoporosis was compared to a gender and age matched population. Several clinical and demographic parameters, including body mass index (BMI), vitamin-D, smoking habits and medications, were analyzed for association with BMD. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 56.9% in the combined patient group compared to 24.1% in the control group (OR 4.2 [95% CI, 2.3 to 7.7]; p < 0.001). BMD in the hip was independently associated with BMI (0.13 [95% CI, 0.09 to 0.18]; p < 0.001) and vitamin-D levels (-0.41 [95% CI, -0.76 to -0.06]; p = 0.03). Similar associations were seen for BMD in the spine (0.15 [95% CI, 0.08 - 0.22]; p < 0.001) and (-0.60 [95% CI, -0.76 to -0.06]; p = 0.02), respectively. Trends for low BMD were observed in smokers, and in patients using glucocorticoids, opioids, and proton pump inhibitors. Patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure are at immense risk of developing osteoporosis. Low BMI and vitamin-D deficiency were identified as independent risk factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  18. Algorithm of clinical protocol lowering the risk of systemic Mycosis infections in allografts recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda-Kopec, E; Netsvyetayeva, I; Paczek, L; Dabkowska, M; Kwiatkowski, A; Jaworska-Zaremba, M; Mierzwinska-Nastalska, E; Sikora, M; Blachnio, S; Mlynarczyk, G; Fiedor, P

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the study was to describe a diagnostic protocol to lower the risk of a mycotic invasive infection among allotransplant recipients and to suggest the use of preoperative prophylaxis and/or empiric therapy. We chose a group of 268 allograft recipients with transient or constant yeast colonization or confirmed yeast infection. Among 7744 clinical samples, 475 were positive for fungi. We used conventional fungal laboratory diagnosis, enzymatic activity tests, serologic tests, molecular diagnosis of samples from sterile body sites, and histopathologic examinations. The following clinical samples were examined: blood samples; swabs from mouth lesions, throat, and rectum; and sputum, urine, and fecal samples from kidney transplant recipients and simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation recipients who are highly predisposed to mycotic infections. We established microbiologic criteria of a systemic mycosis and principles to distinguish colonization from infection.

  19. Clinical prediction model to aid emergency doctors managing febrile children at risk of serious bacterial infections: Diagnostic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G. Nijman (Ruud); Y. Vergouwe (Yvonne); M.J. Thompson (Matthew); M.V. Veen (Mirjam Van); A.H.J. van Meurs (Alfred); J. van der Lei (Johan); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To derive, cross validate, and externally validate a clinical prediction model that assesses the risks of different serious bacterial infections in children with fever at the emergency department. Design: Prospective observational diagnostic study. Setting: Three paediatric em

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: effects on risk factors, molecular pathways, and clinical events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Wu, Jason H Y

    2011-11-08

    We reviewed available evidence for cardiovascular effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) consumption, focusing on long chain (seafood) n-3 PUFA, including their principal dietary sources, effects on physiological risk factors, potential molecular pathways and bioactive metabolites, effects on specific clinical endpoints, and existing dietary guidelines. Major dietary sources include fatty fish and other seafood. n-3 PUFA consumption lowers plasma triglycerides, resting heart rate, and blood pressure and might also improve myocardial filling and efficiency, lower inflammation, and improve vascular function. Experimental studies demonstrate direct anti-arrhythmic effects, which have been challenging to document in humans. n-3 PUFA affect a myriad of molecular pathways, including alteration of physical and chemical properties of cellular membranes, direct interaction with and modulation of membrane channels and proteins, regulation of gene expression via nuclear receptors and transcription factors, changes in eicosanoid profiles, and conversion of n-3 PUFA to bioactive metabolites. In prospective observational studies and adequately powered randomized clinical trials, benefits of n-3 PUFA seem most consistent for coronary heart disease mortality and sudden cardiac death. Potential effects on other cardiovascular outcomes are less-well-established, including conflicting evidence from observational studies and/or randomized trials for effects on nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, atrial fibrillation, recurrent ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Research gaps include the relative importance of different physiological and molecular mechanisms, precise dose-responses of physiological and clinical effects, whether fish oil provides all the benefits of fish consumption, and clinical effects of plant-derived n-3 PUFA. Overall, current data provide strong concordant evidence that n-3 PUFA are bioactive compounds that reduce risk of cardiac

  1. Clinical applications of schizophrenia genetics: genetic diagnosis, risk, and counseling in the molecular era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costain G

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Costain1,2, Anne S Bassett1–41Clinical Genetics Research Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 2Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, 3Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Schizophrenia is a complex neuropsychiatric disease with documented clinical and genetic heterogeneity, and evidence for neurodevelopmental origins. Driven by new genetic technologies and advances in molecular medicine, there has recently been concrete progress in understanding some of the specific genetic causes of this serious psychiatric illness. In particular, several large rare structural variants have been convincingly associated with schizophrenia, in targeted studies over two decades with respect to 22q11.2 microdeletions, and more recently in large-scale, genome-wide case-control studies. These advances promise to help many families afflicted with this disease. In this review, we critically appraise recent developments in the field of schizophrenia genetics through the lens of immediate clinical applicability. Much work remains in translating the recent surge of genetic research discoveries into the clinic. The epidemiology and basic genetic parameters (such as penetrance and expression of most genomic disorders associated with schizophrenia are not yet well characterized. To date, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the only established genetic subtype of schizophrenia of proven clinical relevance. We use this well-established association as a model to chart the pathway for translating emerging genetic discoveries into clinical practice. We also propose new directions for research involving general genetic risk prediction and counseling in schizophrenia.Keywords: schizophrenia, genetics, 22q11 deletion syndrome, copy number variation, genetic counseling, genetic predisposition to disease

  2. Clinical Features and Risk Factors of Patients with Presumed Ocular Toxoplasmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Ukamaka Celestina; Omoti, Afekhide E.; Enock, Malachi E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical features and risk factors of presumed ocular toxoplasmosis (POT) in patients affected with the condition at Irrua, Nigeria. Methods: The study included 69 patients with POT, and 69 age and sex matched subjects who served as the control group. Data was obtained using interviewer administered questionnaires. Examination included measurement of visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure (IOP), slit lamp examination, gonioscopy and dilated fundus examination. Results: Mean age of cases and control subjects was 57.16 ± 18.69 and 56.09 ± 16.01 years respectively. The peak age group in patients with POT was 60 years and above. The most common presenting complaint was blurred vision occurring in 100% of cases. Drinking unfiltered water in 58 (84.1%) patients was the most common risk factor. Other risk factors included post cataract surgery status in 32 (46.4%) subjects, ingestion of poorly cooked meat in 30 (43.5%) cases and exposure to cats in 9 (13.0%) patients. All risk factors were more common in POT patients (P < 0.05). Out of 69 patients, 62 (89.9%) had unilateral while 7 (10.1%) had bilateral involvement. Out of 76 eyes with uveitis, 53 (69.7%) were blind. Active disease was significantly more common with increasing age (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Patients with POT were rather old and some risk factors were modifiable, therefore health education for preventing the transmission of toxoplasmosis and provision of sanitary water may help reduce the incidence of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:27195085

  3. Adherence with antihypertensive drug therapy and the risk of heart failure in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, Giovanni; Rea, Federico; Ghirardi, Arianna; Soranna, Davide; Merlino, Luca; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Randomized clinical trials have shown that antihypertensive treatment reduces the risk of heart failure (HF). Limited evidence exists, however, on whether and to what extent this benefit is translated into real-life practice. A nested case-control study was carried out by including the cohort of 76 017 patients from Lombardy (Italy), aged 40 to 80 years, who were newly treated with antihypertensive drugs during 2005. Cases were the 622 patients who experienced hospitalization for HF from initial prescription until 2012. Up to 5 controls were randomly selected for each case. Logistic regression was used to model the HF risk associated with adherence to antihypertensive drugs, which was measured by the proportion of days covered by treatment (PDC). Data were adjusted for several covariates. Sensitivity analyses were performed to account for possible sources of systematic uncertainty. Compared with patients with very low adherence (PDC, ≤25%), low, intermediate, and high adherences were associated with progressively lower risk of HF, reduction in the high-adherence group (>75%) being 34% (95% confidence interval, 17%-48%). Similar effects were observed in younger (40-70 years) and older (71-80 years) patients and between patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and diuretics. There was no evidence that adherence with calcium-channel blockers reduced the HF risk. Antihypertensive treatment lowers the HF risk in real-life practice, but adherence to treatment is necessary for a substantial benefit to take place. This is the case with a variety of antihypertensive drugs. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. CRIB (clinical risk index for babies) in relation to nosocomial bacteraemia in very low birthweight or preterm infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Fowlie, P. W.; Gould, C. R.; Parry, G J; Phillips, G.; Tarnow-Mordi, W O

    1996-01-01

    Positive blood cultures in very low birthweight or preterm infants usually reflect bacteraemia, septicaemia, or failure of asepsis during sampling and lead to increased costs and length of stay. Rates of nosocomial, or hospital acquired, bacteraemia may therefore be important indicators of neonatal unit performance, if comparisons are adjusted for differences in initial risk. In a preliminary study the risk of nosocomial bacteraemia was related to initial clinical risk and illness severity me...

  5. Predictive value of clinical risk indicators in child development: final results of a study based on psychoanalytic theory

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Cristina Machado Kupfer; Alfredo Nestor Jerusalinsky; Leda Mariza Fischer Bernardino; Daniele Wanderley; Paulina Schmidtbauer Barbosa Rocha; Silvia Eugenia Molina; Léa Martins Sales; Regina Stellin; M. Eugênia Pesaro; Rogerio Lerner

    2010-01-01

    We present the final results of a study using the IRDI (Clinical Risk Indicators in Child Development). Based on a psychoanalytic approach, 31 risk signs for child development were constructed and applied to 726 children between the ages of 0 and 18 months. One sub-sample was evaluated at the age of three. The results showed a predictive capacity of IRDIs to indicate developmental problems; 15 indicators for the IRDI were also highlighted that predict psychic risk for the constitution of the ...

  6. Can routine clinical data identify older patients at risk of poor healthcare outcomes on admission to hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Kinda; Owen, Charlotte; Patel, Harnish P; May, Carl; Baxter, Mark; Sayer, Avan A; Roberts, Helen C

    2017-08-10

    Older patients who are at risk of poor healthcare outcomes should be recognised early during hospital admission to allow appropriate interventions. It is unclear whether routinely collected data can identify high-risk patients. The aim of this study was to define current practice with regard to the identification of older patients at high risk of poor healthcare outcomes on admission to hospital. Interviews/focus groups were conducted to establish the views of 22 healthcare staff across five acute medicine for older people wards in one hospital including seven nurses, four dieticians, seven doctors, and four therapists. In addition, a random sample of 60 patients' clinical records were reviewed to characterise the older patients, identify risk assessments performed routinely on admission, and describe usual care. We found that staff relied on their clinical judgment to identify high risk patients which was influenced by a number of factors such as reasons for admission, staff familiarity with patients, patients' general condition, visible frailty, and patients' ability to manage at home. "Therapy assessment" and patients' engagement with therapy were also reported to be important in recognising high-risk patients. However, staff recognised that making clinical judgments was often difficult and that it might occur several days after admission potentially delaying specific interventions. Routine risk assessments carried out on admission to identify single healthcare needs included risk of malnutrition (completed for 85% patients), falls risk (95%), moving and handling assessments (85%), and pressure ulcer risk assessments (88%). These were not used collectively to highlight patients at risk of poor healthcare outcomes. Thus, patients at risk of poor healthcare outcomes were not explicitly identified on admission using routinely collected data. There is a need for an early identification of these patients using a valid measure alongside staff clinical judgment to

  7. Strongyloidiasis: prevalence, risk factors, clinical and laboratory features among diarrhea patients in Ibadan Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada-Adegbola, H O; Oluwatoba, O A; Bakare, R A

    2010-12-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic infection caused by Strongyloides stercoralis. The infection is usually mild or asymptomatic in normal immunocompetent individuals, but could be very severe or even fatal due to hyper infection in individuals who are immunosuppressed. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors and features of strongyloidiasis among diarrhea patients in Ibadan. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study of diarrhea patients from a teaching hospital, three major government hospitals and one mission hospital in Ibadan. Self administered questionnaire, clinical assessment and laboratory investigations were used to confirm health status and presence of S. stercoralis. Diagnosis was made by microscopic examination of stool in saline preparation and formol-ether concentration. One thousand and ninety patients, (562 (51.6%) males and 528 (48.4%) females) consisting 380 (34.9%) children and 710 (65.1%) adults who had diarrhea were studied. The prevalence rate for the parasite among diarrhea patients was 3.0%. While the risk factor for infection remains contact with contaminated soil, malnutrition, steroid therapy, HIV/AIDS, lymphomas, tuberculosis, and chronic renal failure. Others are maleness, institutionalism and alcoholism. Predominant clinical presentations are abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, and bloating and weight loss, Strongyloides stercoralis should be considered in diarrhea patients who are either malnourished or immunosuppressed.

  8. Cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome in childhood: clinical features and risk of seizure recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, J G; duPlessis, A J; Barnes, P D; Riviello, J J

    1998-07-01

    Cyclosporin A is associated with an acute encephalopathy including seizures and alterations in mental status, herein referred to as cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome. The clinical history, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging findings in 19 children with cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome over a 10-year period were reviewed in order to delineate clinical characteristics, imaging features, and to determine the risk of seizure recurrence in this population. All 19 had motor seizures associated with other features of cortical and subcortical dysfunction. The acute mean cyclosporin A level was 342 microg/L, but was within the "therapeutic" range in five cases. Brain imaging by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute or subacute phase revealed lesions characteristic of cyclosporin A toxicity in 14 cases. Acute EEG abnormalities were present in all and included epileptiform discharges or focal slowing. Patients were followed for a median of 49 months (1-9 years). Follow-up imaging (n = 10) showed lesion resolution or improvement in the majority while EEG (n = 10) had normalized in only three. Seizures recurred in six patients and only in those with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities. No patient had a second episode of cyclosporin A associated neurotoxicity or seizure. It appears that a significant risk of seizure recurrence exists following cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome and primarily in those children with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities.

  9. Employing New Mathematical Models and Equations to Evaluate Risk-Benefit Criteria of Clinical Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Y. Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Current preclinical and clinical evaluation of a drugs or therapy is at first to find out a maximum toxicity tolerance, which is overall fixed. The potential therapeutic dosage will be ranged just lower or within the periphery of these maximum tolerant data. A hidden acceptance among general researchers lies as the toxicity concentration of a drug is always the same and can be referred as a fixed data. However, practical therapeutics is not very strictly following this doctrine. Even using many strict well-formed mathematical models and toxicity evaluating systems, the disputes and lawsuits of some newly-developed drugs are increasing dramatically nowadays. In this work, a mathematical equation and a dynamic parameter  are generated to help improving this situation. This new mathematic model combines and integrates effective, toxicity and no effective data as a whole, which fits to evaluate the risk-benefits of therapeutics in dynamic and changeable states. We need no more to deduce therapeutic dosage from fixed tolerance data regardless different therapeutic modes of action and toxicity of drugs acting on different organs and physiological systems. We hypothesize and equation that risk-benefit ratios are varied with drug dosages. It is a new start to help the understanding of effects and toxicities of therapeutic same time in a single clinical practice and well compliment with previous mathematical models.

  10. Phenobarbitone-induced haematological abnormalities in idiopathic epileptic dogs: prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersan, E; Volk, H A; Ros, C; De Risio, L

    2014-09-13

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome of phenobarbitone induced haematological abnormalities (PBIHA) in dogs. The medical records of two veterinary referral institutions were searched for dogs diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy and treated with PB as monotherapy or polytherapy between March 2003 and September 2010. Sixteen dogs had PBIHA; the median age at diagnosis was 69.5 months. Phenobarbitone was administered at a median dose of 3 mg/kg twice a day for a median period of 100.5 days and the median serum phenobarbitone level was 19 μg/ml. Two dogs had neutropenia, three had anaemia and thrombocytopenia, two had anaemia and neutropenia; the remaining nine had pancytopenia. All dogs were referred for non-specific clinical signs. Phenobarbitone was discontinued after diagnosis, and the median time to resolution of PBIHA was 17 days. The prevalence and risk factors for PBIHA were evaluated from a questionnaire survey of referring practices to obtain more detailed follow-up on cases diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy. The prevalence rate of PBIHA was 4.2%, and the condition occurred in dogs treated with standard therapeutic doses often within the first three months after starting treatment. Serial haematological evaluations should be therefore considered from the beginning of phenobarbitone therapy to allow early diagnosis and treatment of PBIHA.

  11. Clinical responsibility, accountability, and risk aversion in mental health nursing: a descriptive, qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Jenni; Crowe, Marie

    2014-08-01

    A number of recent, highly-publicized, perceived health-care service failures have raised concerns about health professionals' accountabilities. Relevant to these concerns, the present study sought to examine how mental health nurses understood clinical responsibility and its impact on their practice. A descriptive, qualitative design was used, and a convenience sample of 10 mental health nurses was recruited from specialist inpatient and outpatient mental health settings in Canterbury, New Zealand. Data were collected using semistructured interviews, and the transcriptions were analysed using an inductive, descriptive approach. Three major themes were identified: being accountable, fostering patient responsibility, and shifting responsibility. Being accountable involved weighing up patients' therapeutic needs against the potential for blame in an organizational culture of risk management. Fostering patient responsibility described the process of deciding in what situations patients could take responsibility for their behaviour. Shifting responsibility described the culture of defensive practice fostered by the organizational culture of risk aversion. The present study highlighted the challenges mental health nurses experience in relation to clinical responsibility in practice, including the balancing required between the needs of patients, the needs of the organization, and the perceived need for self-protection. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. A risk management approach for imaging biomarker-driven clinical trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; deSouza, Nandita M; Shankar, Lalitha K; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Trattnig, Siegfried; Collette, Sandra; Chiti, Arturo

    2015-12-01

    Imaging has steadily evolved in clinical cancer research as a result of improved conventional imaging methods and the innovation of new functional and molecular imaging techniques. Despite this evolution, the design and data quality derived from imaging within clinical trials are not ideal and gaps exist with paucity of optimised methods, constraints of trial operational support, and scarce resources. Difficulties associated with integrating imaging biomarkers into trials have been neglected compared with inclusion of tissue and blood biomarkers, largely because of inherent challenges in the complexity of imaging technologies, safety issues related to new imaging contrast media, standardisation of image acquisition across multivendor platforms, and various postprocessing options available with advanced software. Ignorance of these pitfalls directly affects the quality of the imaging read-out, leading to trial failure, particularly when imaging is a primary endpoint. Therefore, we propose a practical risk-based framework and recommendations for trials driven by imaging biomarkers, which allow identification of risks at trial initiation to better allocate resources and prioritise key tasks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Study of Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors for Aspirin-induced Gastric Mucosal Injury

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    Yun Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current knowledge about clinical and genetic risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury is not sufficient to prevent these gastric mucosal lesions. Methods: We recruited aspirin takers as the exposed group and healthy volunteers as the control group. The exposed group was categorized into two subgroups such as subgroup A as gastric mucosal injury diagnosed by gastroscopy, including erosion, ulcer or bleeding of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum; subgroup B as no injury of the gastric mucosa was detected by gastroscopy. Clinical information was collected, and 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms were evaluated. Results: Among 385 participants, 234 were in the aspirin-exposed group. According to gastroscopy, 82 belonged to subgroup A, 91 belonged to subgroup B, and gastroscopic results of 61 participants were not available. Using the Chi-square test and logistic regression, we found that peptic ulcer history (odds ratio [OR] = 5.924, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 2.115-16.592, dual anti-platelet medication (OR = 3.443, 95% CI: 1.154-10.271, current Helicobacter pylori infection (OR = 2.242, 95% CI: 1.032-4.870, male gender (OR = 2.211, 95% CI: 1.027-4.760, GG genotype of rs2243086 (OR = 4.516, 95% CI: 1.180-17.278, and AA genotype of rs1330344 (OR = 2.178, 95% CI: 1.016-4.669 were more frequent in subgroup A than subgroup B. In aspirin users who suffered from upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the frequency of the TT genotype of rs2238631 and TT genotype of rs2243100 was higher than in those without upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Conclusions: Peptic ulcer history, dual anti-platelet medication, H. pylori current infection, and male gender were possible clinical risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury. GG genotype of rs2243086 and AA genotype of rs1330344 were possible genetic risk factors. TT genotype of rs2238631 and TT genotype of rs2243100 may be risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in

  14. Study of Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors for Aspirin-induced Gastric Mucosal Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Wu; Ying Hu; Peng You; Yu-Jing Chi; Jian-Hua Zhou; Yuan-Yuan Zhang; Yu-Lan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Current knowledge about clinical and genetic risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury is not sufficient to prevent these gastric mucosal lesions.Methods:We recruited aspirin takers as the exposed group and healthy volunteers as the control group.The exposed group was categorized into two subgroups such as subgroup A as gastric mucosal injury diagnosed by gastroscopy,including erosion,ulcer or bleeding of the esophagus,stomach,or duodenum;subgroup B as no injury of the gastric mucosa was detected by gastroscopy.Clinical information was collected,and 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms were evaluated.Results:Among 385 participants,234 were in the aspirin-exposed group.According to gastroscopy,82 belonged to subgroup A,91 belonged to subgroup B,and gastroscopic results of 61 participants were not available.Using the Chi-square test and logistic regression,we found that peptic ulcer history (odds ratio [OR] =5.924,95% confidence intervals [CI]:2.115-16.592),dual anti-platelet medication (OR =3.443,95% CI:1.154-10.271),current Helicobacterpylori infection (OR =2.242,95% CI:1.032-4.870),male gender (OR =2.211,95% CI:1.027-4.760),GG genotype ofrs2243086 (OR =4.516,95% CI:1.180-17.278),and AA genotype ofrs 1330344 (OR =2.178,95% CI:1.016-4.669) were more frequent in subgroup A than subgroup B.In aspirin users who suffered from upper gastrointestinal bleeding,the frequency of the TT genotype ofrs2238631 and TT genotype ofrs2243100 was higher than in those without upper gastrointestinal bleeding.Conclusions:Peptic ulcer history,dual anti-platelet medication,H.pylori current infection,and male gender were possible clinical risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury.GG genotype of rs2243086 and AA genotype of rs 1330344 were possible genetic risk factors.TT genotype ofrs2238631 and TT genotype of rs2243100 may be risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in aspirin users.

  15. Risk factors and clinical presentation of craniocervical arterial dissection: A prospective study

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    Thomas Lucy C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Craniocervical arterial dissection is a major cause of ischaemic stroke in young adults. The pathogenesis is not fully understood but is thought to be related to a combination of an intrinsic weakness in the arterial wall and an external trigger. Intrinsic susceptibility is thought to be a generalised arteriopathy, vascular anomaly or genetic predisposition. Proposed extrinsic factors include recent viral infection and minor mechanical trauma to the neck, including neck manipulation, which has raised concerns amongst manual practitioners in particular as to the appropriate screening of patients and avoidance of more vigorous therapeutic techniques. The presenting features of dissection may mimic a musculoskeletal presentation, creating a diagnostic dilemma for primary care practitioners. Early recognition is critical so that appropriate management can be commenced. The aims of this study are to prospectively investigate young patients ≤55 years admitted to hospital with radiologically diagnosed craniocervical arterial dissection compared to matched controls with stroke but not dissection, to identify risk factors and early presenting clinical features, so these may be more readily identified by primary care practitioners. Methods Patients ≤ 55 years presenting to hospital with craniocervical arterial dissection and controls will have their medical records reviewed and be interviewed and questioned about possible risk factors, preceding events to admission such as recent neck trauma, and presenting clinical features including any preceding transient ischaemic features. Clinical assessment will include a connective tissue screening examination to identify subclinical connective tissue disorders. Radiology and blood screening will be reviewed for typical features and inflammatory markers. Functional outcome will be reviewed to determine the burden of the stroke. Discussion This study will provide descriptive and

  16. Clinical Risk Factors for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Single-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Myoung; Park, Seon-Young; Choi, Jung-Ho; Kim, Uh-Jin; Rew, Soo-Jung; Cho, Jae Yeong; Ahn, Youngkeun; Lim, Sung-Wook; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is often performed therapeutically, and antithrombotic treatment is required for at least 12 months after stent implantation. However, the development of post-PCI upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) increases morbidity and mortality. We investigated the incidence and risk factors for UGIB in Korean patients within 1 year after PCI. The medical records of 3,541 patients who had undergone PCI between January 2006 and June 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 40 cases of UGIB. We analyzed the incidence and clinical risk factors associated with UGIB occurring within 1 year after PCI by comparing the results for each case to matched controls. The propensity score matching method using age and sex was utilized. UGIB occurred in 40 patients (1.1%). Two independent risk factors for UGIB were a history of peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio [OR], 12.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.70 to 59.66; p=0.001) and the use of anticoagulants (OR, 7.76; 95% CI, 2.10 to 28.66; p=0.002). UGIB after PCI occurred at a rate of 1.1% in the study population. Clinicians must remain vigilant for the possibility of UGIB after PCI and should consider performing timely endoscopy in patients who have undergone PCI and are suspected of having an UGIB.

  17. [Clinical guideline for management of patients with low risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan José; Oleaga, Amelia; Álvarez-Escolá, Cristina; Martín, Tomás; Galofré, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing in Spain and worldwide. Overall thyroid cancer survival is very high, and stratification systems to reliably identify patients with worse prognosis have been developed. However, marked differences exist between the different specialists in clinical management of low-risk patients with thyroid carcinoma. Almost half of all papillary thyroid carcinomas are microcarcinomas, and 90% are tumors < 2 cm that have a particularly good prognosis. However, they are usually treated more aggressively than needed, despite the lack of adequate scientific support. Surgery remains the gold standard treatment for these tumors. However, lobectomy may be adequate in most patients, without the need for total thyroidectomy. Similarly, prophylactic lymph node dissection of the central compartment is not required in most cases. This more conservative approach prevents postoperative complications such as hypoparathyroidism or recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Postoperative radioiodine remnant ablation and strict suppression of serum thyrotropin, although effective for the more aggressive forms of thyroid cancer, have not been shown to be beneficial for the treatment of low risk patients, and may impair their quality of life. This guideline provides recommendations from the task force on thyroid cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition for adequate management of patients with low-risk thyroid cancer.

  18. Can genetic pleiotropy replicate common clinical constellations of cardiovascular disease and risk?

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    Omri Gottesman

    Full Text Available The relationship between obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD is established when looked at from a clinical, epidemiological or pathophysiological perspective. Yet, when viewed from a genetic perspective, there is comparatively little data synthesis that these conditions have an underlying relationship. We sought to investigate the overlap of genetic variants independently associated with each of these commonly co-existing conditions from the NHGRI genome-wide association study (GWAS catalog, in an attempt to replicate the established notion of shared pathophysiology and risk. We used pathway-based analyses to detect subsets of pleiotropic genes involved in similar biological processes. We identified 107 eligible GWAS studies related to CVD and its established comorbidities and risk factors and assigned genes that correspond to the associated signals based on their position. We found 44 positional genes shared across at least two CVD-related phenotypes that independently recreated the established relationship between the six phenotypes, but only if studies representing non-European populations were included. Seven genes revealed pleiotropy across three or more phenotypes, mostly related to lipid transport and metabolism. Yet, many genes had no relationship to each other or to genes with established functional connection. Whilst we successfully reproduced established relationships between CVD risk factors using GWAS findings, interpretation of biological pathways involved in the observed pleiotropy was limited. Further studies linking genetic variation to gene expression, as well as describing novel biological pathways will be needed to take full advantage of GWAS results.

  19. Dependency Traits, Relationship Power, and Health Risks in Women Receiving Sexually-Transmitted Infection Clinic Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benotsch, Eric G; Sawyer, Ashlee N; Martin, Aaron M; Allen, Elizabeth S; Nettles, Christopher D; Richardson, Doug; Rietmeijer, Cornelis A

    2017-01-01

    In prior research, having traits consistent with a personality disorder has been shown to be related to substance use and high-risk sexual activity; however, few studies have examined relationships between dependency traits and health-jeopardizing behaviors. Individuals with traits consistent with dependent personality disorder may be more likely to be in a primary relationship characterized by unhealthy conditions, including physical abuse from a partner, low assertiveness in sexual situations, and partner infidelity. In addition, dependency traits may be associated with unhealthy coping (e.g., through substance use). To examine associations between dependent personality traits and these types of health-related behaviors, 198 women seeking sexually transmitted infection clinic services completed a computer-assisted assessment of dependent personality traits, substance use, unhealthy conditions in primary relationships, perceived sexual and relationship power, and sexual risk related to condom use. Dependency trait scores were correlated with the use of cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine. Participants high in dependency traits reported low perceived power within their relationships and less say in sexual behaviors, including condom use. In a series of multivariate analyses, dependency traits significantly predicted having been hit by a partner, staying with a partner after he cheated, having sex because of threats, and fear of asking a partner to use a condom. Dependency traits were also associated with lower past condom use and lower future condom use intentions. Results suggest that dependent personality traits may place women at higher risk for physical abuse and harmful health behaviors.

  20. Psychiatric morbidity, functioning and quality of life in young people at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Christy; Morcillo, Carmen; Russo, Debra A; Stochl, Jan; Shelley, Gillian F; Painter, Michelle; Jones, Peter B; Perez, Jesus

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that psychotic-like experiences may also act as markers for non-psychotic psychiatric disorders, which may indicate that the focus of research in individuals at high risk (HR) for psychosis needs updating. In this study we thoroughly examined the clinical and functional characteristics of a consecutive cohort of young people at HR for psychosis and compared them to a matched sample of healthy volunteers. Between February 2010 and September 2012 60 help-seeking HR individuals, aged 16-35, were recruited from CAMEO Early Intervention in Psychosis Service, Cambridgeshire, UK. Forty-five age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were randomly recruited from the same geographical area. Sociodemographic, psychiatric morbidity, functioning and quality of life measures were compared between both groups. HR individuals suffered a wide range of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders, mainly within the affective and anxiety diagnostic spectra. In comparison to healthy volunteers, young people at HR reported more suicidal ideation/intention, depressive and anxiety symptoms and presented with remarkably poor functioning and quality of life. The presence of co-morbid moderate or severe depressive and anxiety symptoms was common in our sample of young people at enhanced risk for psychosis. A HR mental state may be associated not only with an increased risk for psychosis, but also other psychiatric disorders. Our findings may have implications for the future implementation of therapeutic interventions that this population could benefit from. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictable risk factors and clinical courses for prolonged transient tachypnea of the newborn

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    Ji Young Chang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN is usually benign and improves within 72 hours. However, it can also progress to prolonged tachypnea over 72 hours, profound hypoxemia, respiratory failure, and even death. The aim of this study is to find predictable risk factors and describe the clinical courses and outcomes of prolonged TTN (PTTN. Methods : The medical records of 107 newborns, &gt;35+0 weeks of gestational age with TTN, who were admitted to the NICU at Seoul Asan Medical Center from January 2001 to September 2007 were reviewed. They were divided into 2 groups based on duration of tachypnea. PTTN was defined as tachypnea ?#247;2 hours of age, and simple TTN (STTN as tachypnea &lt;72 hours of age. We randomly selected 126 healthy-term newborns as controls. We evaluated neonatal and maternal demographic findings, and various clinical factors. Results : Fifty-five infants (51% with total TTN were PTTN. PTTN infants had grunting, tachypnea &gt;90/min, FiO2 &gt;0.4, and required ventilator care more frequently than STTN infants. PTTN had lower level of serum total protein and albumin than STTN. The independent predictable risk factors for PTTN were grunting, maximal respiration rate &gt;90/min, and FiO2 &gt;0.4 within 6 hours of life. Conclusion : When a newborn has grunting, respiration rate &gt;90/min, and oxygen requirement &gt;0.4 of FiO2 within 6 hours of life, the infant is at high risk of having persistent tachypnea ?#247;2 hours. We need further study to find the way to reduce PTTN.

  2. Clinical features, risk factors, and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tehran, Iran

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    Samira Yadegari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite increasing the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST has remained an under-diagnosed condition. In this study, characteristics and frequency of various risk factors of CVST patients in a tertiary referral hospital were closely assessed. Methods: Patients with an unequivocal diagnosis of CVST confirmed by MRI and magnetic resonance venography during 6 years of the study were included. All data from the onset of symptoms regarding clinical signs and symptoms, hospital admission, seasonal distribution, medical and drug history, thrombophilic profile, D-dimer, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid findings, mortality, and outcome were collected and closely analyzed. Result: A total of 53 patients with female to male ratio of 3.07 and mean age of 33.7 years were included in the study. Headache and papilledema were the most frequent clinical features (44 and 36 patients, respectively. An underlying disease (diagnosed previously or after admission was the most common identified risk factor for CVST in both females and males (21 patients. A total of 15 women used the oral contraceptive pill (OCP where 12 of them had simultaneously other predisposing factors. Overall, 19 patients (36% had more than one contributing factor. D-dimer had a sensitivity of 71.4% in CVST patients. The mortality of patients in this study was 3.7% (n = 2. Focal neurologic deficit and multicranial nerve palsy were associated with poor outcome which defined as death, recurrence, and massive intracranial hemorrhage due to anticoagulation (P = 0.050 and 0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Unlike most of the CVST studies in which OCP was the main factor; in this study, an underlying disease was the most identified cause. Considering the high probability of multiple risk factors in CVST that was shown by this study, appropriate work up should be noted to uncover them.

  3. Clinical features and risk factor analysis for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in Chinese neurosurgical patients

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    Fuyou Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality of neurosurgical patients; however, no data regarding lower extremity DVT in postoperative Chinese neurosurgical patients have been reported. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 to December 2013, 196 patients without preoperative DVT who underwent neurosurgical operations were evaluated by color Doppler ultrasonography and D-dimer level measurements on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th days after surgery. Follow-up clinical data were recorded to determine the incidence of lower extremity DVT in postoperative neurosurgical patients and to analyze related clinical features. First, a single factor analysis, Chi-square test, was used to select statistically significant factors. Then, a multivariate analysis, binary logistic regression analysis, was used to determine risk factors for lower extremity DVT in postoperative neurosurgical patients. Results: Lower extremity DVT occurred in 61 patients, and the incidence of DVT was 31.1% in the enrolled Chinese neurosurgical patients. The common symptoms of DVT were limb swelling and lower extremity pain as well as increased soft tissue tension. The common sites of venous involvement were the calf muscle and peroneal and posterior tibial veins. The single factor analysis showed statistically significant differences in DVT risk factors, including age, hypertension, smoking status, operation time, a bedridden or paralyzed state, the presence of a tumor, postoperative dehydration, and glucocorticoid treatment, between the two groups (P < 0.05. The binary logistic regression analysis showed that an age greater than 50 years, hypertension, a bedridden or paralyzed state, the presence of a tumor, and postoperative dehydration were risk factors for lower extremity DVT in postoperative neurosurgical patients. Conclusions: Lower extremity DVT was a common complication following craniotomy in the enrolled Chinese neurosurgical

  4. Bone diseases associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection: pathogenesis, risk factors and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Marco; Tincati, Camilla

    2006-06-01

    Bone disorders such as osteopenia and osteoporosis have been recently reported in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but their etiology remains still unknown. The prevalence estimates vary widely among the different studies and can be affected by concomitant factors such as the overlapping of other possible conditions inducing bone loss as lypodystrophy, advanced HIV-disease, advanced age, low body weight or concomitant use of other drugs. All the reports at the moment available in the literature showed a higher than expected prevalence of reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected subjects both naïve and receiving potent antiretroviral therapy compared to healthy controls. This controversial can suggest a double role played by both antiretroviral drugs and HIV itself due to immune activation and/or cytokines disregulation. An improved understanding of the pathogenesis of bone disorders can result in better preventative and therapeutic measures. However, the clinical relevance and the risk of fractures remains undefined in HIV-population. The clinical management of osteopenia and osteoporosis in HIV-infected subjects is still being evaluated. Addressing potential underlying bone disease risk factors (e.g., smoking and alcohol intake, use of corticosteroids, advanced age, low body weight), evaluating calcium and vitamin D intake, and performing dual x-ray absorptiometry in HIV-infected individuals who have risk factors for bone disease can be important strategies to prevent osteopenia and osteoporosis in this population. The administration of bisphosphonates (e.g., alendronate), with calcium and vitamin D supplementation, may be a reasonable and effective option to treat osteoporosis in these subjects.

  5. Chiari-related hydrocephalus: assessment of clinical risk factors in a cohort of 297 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Brockmeyer, Douglas L

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients treated for Chiari I malformation (CM-I) with posterior fossa decompression (PFD) may occasionally and unpredictably develop postoperative hydrocephalus. The clinical risk factors predictive of this type of Chiari-related hydrocephalus (CRH) are unknown. The authors' objective was to evaluate their experience to identify risk factors that may predict which of these patients undergoing PFD will develop CRH after surgery. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective clinical chart review of all patients who underwent PFD surgery and duraplasty for CM-I at the Primary Children's Hospital in Utah from June 1, 2005, through May 31, 2015. Patients were dichotomized based on the need for long-term CSF diversion after PFD. Analysis included both univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. RESULTS The authors identified 297 decompressive surgeries over the period of the study, 22 of which required long-term postoperative CSF diversion. On multivariable analysis, age < 6 years old (OR 3.342, 95% CI 1.282-8.713), higher intraoperative blood loss (OR 1.003, 95% CI 1.001-1.006), and the presence of a fourth ventricular web (OR 3.752, 95% CI 1.306-10.783) were significantly associated with the need for long-term CSF diversion after decompressive surgery. CONCLUSIONS Younger patients, those with extensive intraoperative blood loss, and those found during surgery to have a fourth ventricular web were at higher risk for the development of CRH. Clinicians should be alert to evidence of CRH in this patient population after PFD surgery.

  6. Analysis of risk factors and clinical manifestations associated with Clostridium difficile disease in Serbian hospitalized patients

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    Stojanović Predrag

    Full Text Available Abstract Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious diarrhoea in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors important for the development of hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile-associated disease and clinical manifestations of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. The clinical trial group included 37 hospitalized patients who were selected according to the inclusion criteria. A control group of 74 hospitalized patients was individually matched with cases based on hospital, age (within 4 years, sex and month of admission.Clostridium difficile-associated disease most commonly manifested as diarrhoea (56.76% and colitis (32%, while in 8.11% of patients, it was diagnosed as pseudomembranous colitis, and in one patient, it was diagnosed as fulminant colitis. Statistically significant associations (p < 0.05 were found with the presence of chronic renal failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular accident (stroke and haemodialysis. In this study, it was confirmed that all the groups of antibiotics, except for tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, were statistically significant risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated disease (p < 0.05. However, it was difficult to determine the individual role of antibiotics in the development of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Univariate logistic regression also found that applying antibiotic therapy, the duration of antibiotic therapy, administration of two or more antibiotics to treat infections, administering laxatives and the total number of days spent in the hospital significantly affected the onset of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (p < 0.05, and associations were confirmed using the multivariate model for the application of antibiotic therapy (p = 0.001, duration of antibiotic treatment (p = 0.01, use of laxatives (p = 0.01 and total number of days spent in the hospital (p = 0.001. In this study

  7. Clinical characterization and risk factors of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly patients in a Chinese hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihua, Zhang; Danfeng, Dong; Cen, Jiang; Xuefeng, Wang; Yibing, Peng

    2015-04-15

    Clostridium difficile is a common cause of nosocomial diarrhea, especially in elderly patients. This study aimed to analyze the clinical features and assess the risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in elderly hospitalized patients. A retrospective case-control study was conducted among elderly hospitalized patients (> 60 years of age) in a Chinese tertiary hospital between 2010 and 2013. Fifty-two CDI patients and 150 randomly selected non-CDI patients were included in the study. Clinical features of CDI and non-CDI patients were compared by appropriate statistical tests. Logistic regression analyses were performed on a series of factors to determine the risk factors for CDI among the elderly hospitalized patients. The elderly CDI patients showed higher leukocyte counts, lower serum albumin levels, longer duration of hospital stay, and higher mortality compared to the non-CDI patients. The proportion of patients admitted to the intensive care unit or exposed to gastric acid suppressants was also significantly different (p < 0.05) between the two groups. Multivariate analysis indicated that serum creatinine (OR 1.004; 95% CI 1.001-1.008), surgical intervention (OR 6.132; 95% CI 2.594-14.493), the number of comorbidities (OR 2.573; 95% CI 1.353-4.892), gastrointestinal disease (OR 4.670; 95% CI 2.002-10.895), and antibiotic use (OR 6.718; 95% CI 2.846-15.859) were independently associated with CDI. This study revealed several risk factors for CDI among elderly hospitalized patients. These findings will increase the knowledge concerning this disease and provide information regarding the control and prevention of CDI in the elderly.

  8. Clinical features, risk factors, and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadegari, Samira; Ghorbani, Askar; Miri, S. Roohollah; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rostami, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite increasing the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has remained an under-diagnosed condition. In this study, characteristics and frequency of various risk factors of CVST patients in a tertiary referral hospital were closely assessed. Methods: Patients with an unequivocal diagnosis of CVST confirmed by MRI and magnetic resonance venography during 6 years of the study were included. All data from the onset of symptoms regarding clinical signs and symptoms, hospital admission, seasonal distribution, medical and drug history, thrombophilic profile, D-dimer, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid findings, mortality, and outcome were collected and closely analyzed. Result: A total of 53 patients with female to male ratio of 3.07 and mean age of 33.7 years were included in the study. Headache and papilledema were the most frequent clinical features (44 and 36 patients, respectively). An underlying disease (diagnosed previously or after admission) was the most common identified risk factor for CVST in both females and males (21 patients). A total of 15 women used the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) where 12 of them had simultaneously other predisposing factors. Overall, 19 patients (36%) had more than one contributing factor. D-dimer had a sensitivity of 71.4% in CVST patients. The mortality of patients in this study was 3.7% (n = 2). Focal neurologic deficit and multicranial nerve palsy were associated with poor outcome which defined as death, recurrence, and massive intracranial hemorrhage due to anticoagulation (P = 0.050 and 0.004, respectively). Conclusion: Unlike most of the CVST studies in which OCP was the main factor; in this study, an underlying disease was the most identified cause. Considering the high probability of multiple risk factors in CVST that was shown by this study, appropriate work up should be noted to uncover them. PMID:27695236

  9. A Clinical Analysis of Risk Factors for Interstitial Lung Disease in Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Cen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a common and severe complication of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM. The aim of our study was to identify risk factors for ILD by evaluating both clinical and biochemical features in IIM patients with or without ILD. From January 2008 to December 2011, medical records of 134 IIM patients in our rheumatology unit were reviewed. The patients were divided into ILD group (83 patients and non-ILD group (51 patients. The clinical features and laboratory findings were compared. The univariable analyses indicated that arthritis/arthralgia (54.2% versus 17.6%, P<0.05, Mechanic’s hand (16.9% versus 2.0%, P<0.05, Raynaud’s phenomenon (36.1% versus 2.0%, P<0.05, heliotrope rash (44.6% versus 19.6%, P<0.05, fever (43.4% versus 21.6%, P<0.05, elevated ESR (60.2% versus 35.3%, P<0.05, elevated CRP (55.4% versus 31.4%, P<0.05, or anti-Jo-1 antibody (20.5% versus 5.9%, P<0.05 were risk factors for developing ILD in IIM. Multivariable unconditional logistic regression analysis that showed arthritis/arthralgia (OR 7.1, 95% CI 2.8–18.1, Raynaud’s phenomenon (OR 29.1, 95% CI 3.6–233.7, and amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM (OR 20.2, 95% CI 2.4–171.2 were the independent risk factors for developing ILD in IIM.

  10. Estimating the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus : a clinical prediction model based on patient characteristics and medical history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Opmeer, B. C.; Zweers, E. J. K.; van Ballegooie, E.; ter Brugge, H. G.; de Valk, H. W.; Visser, G. H. A.; Mol, B. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop a clinical prediction rule that can help the clinician to identify women at high and low risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) early in pregnancy in order to improve the efficiency of GDM screening. Design We used data from a prospective cohort study to develop the clinic

  11. Novel target for high-risk neuroblastoma identified in pre-clinical research | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pre-clinical research by investigators at the Center for Cancer Research and their colleagues have identified a number of novel epigenetic targets for high-risk neuroblastoma and validated a promising new targeted inhibitor in pre-clinical models.  Read more...

  12. Treatment in rheumatoid arthritis and mortality risk in clinical practice: the role of biologic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Leon, Leticia; Ivorra-Cortes, Jose; Gómez, Alejandro; Lamas, Jose Ramon; Pato, Esperanza; Jover, Juan Ángel; Abásolo, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    To assess the mortality rate (MR) and the mortality risk of a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) inception cohort, with and without biologic agents (BAs). Other factors associated to mortality were also investigated. Retrospective longitudinal study of RA patients, attending the rheumatology outpatient clinic of a tertiary Hospital (Madrid), collected over 5 years (2000-2004), and followed from the diagnosis of RA up to the patients' death, lost to follow-up or September 2013. The dependent variable was death and the independent variable was exposure to BAs. Covariables: sociodemographic, clinical and therapy variables. MR was expressed per 1,000 patient-years with the 95% confidence interval [CI]. BA influence on MR was analysed by multivariable Cox models. Clinical and therapy variables were used in a time-dependent manner. The results are expressed in hazard ratio (HR) and [CI]. We included 576 patients and 711 courses of therapy. 19.6% were taking BA, 86% disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) (70% on methotrexate - MTX), and 12% were untreated. There were 133 deaths during 4,981.64 patient-years at risk. The MR for BA was 12.6 [6-26], for DMARDs was 22.3 [18.4-27.1], and for those without treatment was 89.1 [61.9-128.2]. The adjusted HR for mortality in those exposed to BA versus those not exposed was 0.75 [0.32-1.71]). Other variables independently associated with mortality were: age, rheumatoid factor, hospital admissions, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and MTX use (HR: 0.44 [0.29-0.66]). BAs and standard DMARDs are more effective in decreasing mortality compared to no therapy. Patients exposed to Bas were not associated with a significant increase or decrease in mortality when compared to patients with non-biological DMARDs. The use of MTX remains the only drug that has independently shown a beneficial effect on mortality.

  13. Clinical and subclinical mastitis in smallholder dairy farms in Tanzania: risk, intervention and knowledge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimuribo, E D; Fitzpatrick, J L; Bell, C E; Swai, E S; Kambarage, D M; Ogden, N H; Bryant, M J; French, N P

    2006-04-17

    In a cross-sectional study of 400 randomly selected smallholder dairy farms in the Tanga and Iringa regions of Tanzania, 14.2% (95% confidence interval (CI)=11.6-17.3) of cows had developed clinical mastitis during the previous year. The point prevalence of subclinical mastitis, defined as a quarter positive by the California Mastitis Test (CMT) or by bacteriological culture, was 46.2% (95% CI=43.6-48.8) and 24.3% (95% CI=22.2-26.6), respectively. In a longitudinal disease study in Iringa, the incidence of clinical mastitis was 31.7 cases per 100 cow-years. A randomised intervention trial indicated that intramammary antibiotics significantly reduced the proportion of bacteriologically positive quarters in the short-term (14 days post-infusion) but teat dipping had no detectable effect on bacteriological infection and CMT positive quarters. Other risk and protective factors were identified from both the cross-sectional and longitudinal included animals with Boran breeding (odds ratio (OR)=3.40, 95% CI=1.00-11.57, Pmastitis, and OR=3.51, 95% CI=1.29-9.55, PCMT positive quarter), while the practice of residual calf suckling was protective for a bacteriologically positive quarter (OR=0.63, 95% CI=0.48-0.81, PCMT positive quarter (OR=0.69, 95% CI=0.63-0.75, Pmastitis training course for farmers and extension officers was held, and the knowledge gained and use of different methods of dissemination were assessed over time. In a subsequent randomised controlled trial, there were strong associations between knowledge gained and both the individual question asked and the combination of dissemination methods (village meeting, video and handout) used. This study demonstrated that both clinical and subclinical mastitis is common in smallholder dairying in Tanzania, and that some of the risk and protective factors for mastitis can be addressed by practical management of dairy cows following effective knowledge transfer.

  14. [A new joint approach to drug management: clinical pharmacy services and risk management unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Vardit; Kravitz, Martine Szyper

    2015-04-01

    According to the "To Err is Human" report, medication-related errors are common in medicine and may have several and different effects. Clinical Pharmacy is a leading worldwide established pharmacy service which has been improving the quality of care for the last 30 years. The accumulated experience shows improved quality of care, improved patient safety and economic benefit. These understandings led to the definition and expansion of the Clinical Pharmacist Intervention Program and a joint project with the Risk Management Unit was created. A characterization process was conducted, parameters were defined for monitoring and surveillance and interventions were devised. The relevant data requiring pharmacist intervention was defined (e.g., dose adjustments, contraindications, side-effects); a report was devised, based on the patient's electronic medical record; daily follow-up included analysis, stratification, quantification and understanding of the different types of pharmacist interventions. The pharmacist interventions were summed up and assessed for performance and quality control. Between March 2013 and February 2014 the medical records of 14,499 patients were examined in our hospital Only in 16% of the records an active pharmacist intervention was performed, according to the parameters defined. Interventions for potentially high risk events such as therapeutic duplication, drug administration in spite of contraindication and in spite of documented allergy were very rare, less than 2% of all the pharmacist interventions. This joint venture, which is based on an existing platform, reflects an up-to-date view of an important facet of the clinical work performed at the hospital, helps identify trends, potential failures and vulnerabilities with regard to medication treatment and allows the formulation of intervention programs to improve the quality and safety of drug therapy.

  15. Comparison between clinical gait and daily-life gait assessments of fall risk in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Matthew A; Coppens, Milou J; Ejupi, Andreas; Gschwind, Yves J; Annegarn, Janneke; Schoene, Daniel; Wieching, Rainer; Lord, Stephen R; Delbaere, Kim

    2017-02-08

    Falls are a leading cause of disability in older people. Here we investigate if daily-life gait assessments are better than clinical gait assessments at discriminating between older people with and without a history of falls. A total of 96 independent-living participants (age 75.5 ± 7.8) underwent sensorimotor, psychological and cognitive assessments, and the Timed Up and Go and 10-m walk tests. Participants wore a small pendant sensor device for a week in their home environment, from which the new remote assessments of daily-life gait were determined. During daily-life, fallers had significantly lower gait quality (lower gait endurance, higher within-walk variability and lower between-walk adaptability), but not reduced gait quantity (total steps) or gait intensity (mean cadence). In the clinic, fallers had slower Timed Up and Go, but not 10-m walk test times. After adjusting for demographics, only the daily-life assessments of gait endurance and within-walk variability remained significant. Reduced daily-life gait assessments were significantly correlated with older age, higher body mass index, multiple medications, disability, more concern about falling, poor executive function and higher physiological fall risk. The new daily-life gait assessments were better than the clinical gait assessments at identifying fall risk in our sample of independent living older people. However, further research is required to validate these findings in other populations or those living in residential aged care. Daily-life gait was not only associated with demographics and physiological capacity, but also general health, executive function and the ability to undertake a variety of activities of daily living without excessive concern about falling. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  16. [Drop-out risk factors in mood disorder: a clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando, Marco; Bensi, Marco; Brandizzi, Martina; Censi, Viviana; Lindau, Juliana Fortes; Fiori Nastro, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are (i) to assess the drop-out rate in an outpatient sample with mood disorder diagnosis in a psychotherapy unit; (ii) to focus clinical and sociodemographic variables related with drop-out; (iii) to delineate a psychopathological profile of the dropping-out patient through the SCL-90-R and OPD scores. The sample of this study includes 90 depressive patients, which came to our service for a psychotherapy. The outcome is classified as drop-out and non drop-out. Each patient is submitted to the multidimensional scale SCL-90-R in the course of the first interview. At the end of the first visit each patient has been evaluated through the first and the fourth OPD axis. A descriptive analysis of all the data collected was made and the principal links between clinical and sociodemographic variables and dropout, between SCL-90-R score and drop-out, and between OPD scores and drop-out were detected. About 42% of the patients were drop-out, of which 89% by the third session. The variables associated with drop-out are: pathological score in the paranoic and interpersonal sensibility scale of SCL-90-R, low compliance scores, low integration of defences, self perception, object's perception and link. The drop-out rate in depressive patients turned out to be frequent. The patient's resources in terms of relationship, self-perception and object's perception are strongly related to the drop-out risk. These results are suggestive for the idea that the evaluation of drop-out risk in psychiatric patients must considerate the subjective aspects of the patient besides the clinical features.

  17. Bipolar at-risk criteria : an examination of which clinical features have optimal utility for identifying youth at risk of early transition from depression to bipolar disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Jan; Marwaha, Steven; Ratheesh, Aswin; Macmillan, Iain; Yung, R.; Morriss, R. K.; Hickie, Ian; Bendolf, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background:\\ud A clinical and research challenge is to identify which depressed youth are at risk of “early transition to bipolar disorders (ET-BD).” This 2-part study (1) examines the clinical utility of previously reported BD at-risk (BAR) criteria in differentiating ET-BD cases from unipolar depression (UP) controls; and (2) estimates the Number Needed to Screen (NNS) for research and general psychiatry settings.\\ud Methods:\\ud Fifty cases with reliably ascertained, ET-BD I and II cases we...

  18. Analysis of risk factor and clinical characteristics of angiodysplasia presenting as upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Bum; Chung, Woo Chul; Lee, Seok Jong; Sung, Hea Jung; Woo, Seokyung; Kim, Hyo Suk; Jeong, Yeon Oh; Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Yeon-Ji

    2016-07-01

    Angiodysplasia is important in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), but the clinical features and outcomes associated with UGIB from angiodysplasia have not been characterized. We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and outcomes of angiodysplasia presented as UGIB. Between January 2004 and December 2013, a consecutive series of patients admitted with UGIB were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-five patients with bleeding from angiodysplasia were enrolled. We compared them with an asymptomatic control group (incidental finding of angiodysplasia in health screening, n = 58) and bleeding control group (simultaneous finding of angiodysplasia and peptic ulcer bleeding, n = 28). When patients with UGIB from angiodysplasia were compared with the asymptomatic control group, more frequent rates of nonantral location and large sized lesion (≥ 1 cm) were evident in multivariate analysis. When these patients were compared with the bleeding control group, they were older (mean age: 67.94 ± 9.16 years vs.55.07 ± 13.29 years, p = 0.03) and received less transfusions (p = 0.03). They also had more frequent rate of recurrence (40.0% vs. 20.7%, p = 0.02). Non-antral location and large lesions (≥ 1 cm) could be risk factors of UGIB of angiodysplasia. UGIB due to angiodysplasia was more common in older patients. Transfusion requirement would be less and a tendency of clinical recurrence might be apparent.

  19. Pilot Clinical Trial of Indocyanine Green Fluorescence-Augmented Colonoscopy in High Risk Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul A. Sheth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available White light colonoscopy is the current gold standard for early detection and treatment of colorectal cancer, but emerging data suggest that this approach is inherently limited. Even the most experienced colonoscopists, under optimal conditions, miss at least 15–25% of adenomas. There is an unmet clinical need for an adjunctive modality to white light colonoscopy with improved lesion detection and characterization. Optical molecular imaging with exogenously administered organic fluorochromes is a burgeoning imaging modality poised to advance the capabilities of colonoscopy. In this proof-of-principle clinical trial, we investigated the ability of a custom-designed fluorescent colonoscope and indocyanine green, a clinically approved fluorescent blood pool imaging agent, to visualize polyps in high risk patients with polyposis syndromes or known distal colonic masses. We demonstrate (1 the successful performance of real-time, wide-field fluorescence endoscopy using off-the-shelf equipment, (2 the ability of this system to identify polyps as small as 1 mm, and (3 the potential for fluorescence imaging signal intensity to differentiate between neoplastic and benign polyps.

  20. Oral surgery in elderly patients: clinical/surgical considerations and risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Ribeiro Barros de Alencar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The need for oral surgery has been considerably increasing in elderly population in order to allow the balance of their masticatory, aesthetic, and phonetic functions through adapting the oral tissues for the appropriate placement of the prosthetic devices, thereby impacting positively on the subject’s health. Objective: This article aimed to review the literature on both clinical and surgical considerations required to the satisfactory treatment of elderly patients in clinical routine practice, focusing particularly on cases whose treatment choice is a surgical procedure. Literature review: The most commonly performed surgeries in elderly patients, nowadays, are tooth extractions, pre-prosthetic surgeries and osseointegrated implants. Therefore, the physiological features inherent to such cases should be considered, especially those that involve the monitoring of glycemic and blood pressure levels, osteoporosis, medication use, and many other conditions demanding special attention for elderly patient treatment at dental office. Conclusion: Due to the fragility intrinsic to elderly individuals, the surgery at this stage of life requires caution in relation to a comprehensive clinical examination and also to a careful evaluation of the surgical risks in order to analyze the correct indication of the surgery and thereby to ensure patient’s well-being.

  1. READMIT: a clinical risk index to predict 30-day readmission after discharge from acute psychiatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigod, Simone N; Kurdyak, Paul A; Seitz, Dallas; Herrmann, Nathan; Fung, Kinwah; Lin, Elizabeth; Perlman, Christopher; Taylor, Valerie H; Rochon, Paula A; Gruneir, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to create a clinically useful risk index, administered prior to discharge, for determining the probability of psychiatric readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge for general psychiatric inpatients. We used population-level sociodemographic and health administrative data to develop a predictive model for 30-day readmission among adults discharged from an acute psychiatric unit in Ontario, Canada (2008-2011), and converted the final model into a risk index system. We derived the predictive model in one-half of the sample (n = 32,749) and validated it in the other half of the sample (n = 32,750). Variables independently associated with 30-day readmission (forming the mnemonic READMIT) were: (R) Repeat admissions; (E) Emergent admissions (i.e. harm to self/others); (D) Diagnoses (psychosis, bipolar and/or personality disorder), and unplanned Discharge; (M) Medical comorbidity; (I) prior service use Intensity; and (T) Time in hospital. Each 1-point increase in READMIT score (range 0-41) increased the odds of 30-day readmission by 11% (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.10-1.12). The index had moderate discriminative capacity in both derivation (C-statistic = 0.631) and validation (C-statistic = 0.630) datasets. Determining risk of psychiatric readmission for individual patients is a critical step in efforts to address the potentially avoidable high rate of this negative outcome. The READMIT index provides a framework for identifying patients at high risk of 30-day readmission prior to discharge, and for the development, evaluation and delivery of interventions that can assist with optimizing the transition to community care for patients following psychiatric discharge.

  2. Weight change, obesity and risk of prostate cancer progression among men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerman, Barbra A; Ahearn, Thomas U; Giovannucci, Edward; Stampfer, Meir J; Nguyen, Paul L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Wilson, Kathryn M

    2017-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of fatal prostate cancer. We aimed to elucidate the importance and relevant timing of obesity and weight change for prostate cancer progression. We identified 5,158 men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (clinical stage T1/T2) from 1986 to 2012 in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men were followed for biochemical recurrence and lethal prostate cancer (development of distant metastasis or prostate cancer-specific mortality) until 2012. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for body mass index (BMI) at age 21, BMI at diagnosis, "long-term" weight change from age 21 to diagnosis and "short-term" weight change over spans of 4 and 8 years preceding diagnosis. Because weight, weight change and mortality are strongly associated with smoking, we repeated analyses among never smokers only (N = 2,559). Among all patients, neither weight change nor BMI (at age 21 or at diagnosis) was associated with lethal prostate cancer. Among never smokers, long-term weight gain was associated with an increased risk of lethal disease (HR for gaining >30 pounds vs. stable weight [±10 pounds] 1.59, 95% CI, 1.01-2.50, p-trend = 0.06). Associations between weight change, BMI and lethal prostate cancer were stronger for men with BMI ≥ 25 at age 21 compared to those with BMI obesity were not associated with an increased risk of biochemical recurrence. Our findings among never smoker men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer suggest a positive association between long-term weight gain and risk of lethal prostate cancer. Metabolic changes associated with weight gain may promote prostate cancer progression. © 2017 UICC.

  3. Prostate cancer risk-associated genetic markers and their potential clinical utility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Xu; Jielin Sun; S Lilly Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common cancers among men in Western developed countries and its incidence has increased considerably in many other parts of the world,including China.The etiology of PCa is largely unknown but is thought to be multifactorial,where inherited genetics plays an important role.In this article,we first briefly review results from studies of familial aggregation and genetic susceptibility to PCa.We then recap key findings of rare and high-penetrance PCa susceptibility genes from linkage studies in PCa families.We devote a significant portion of this article to summarizing discoveries of common and low-penetrance PCa risk-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genetic association studies in PCa cases and controls,especially those from genome-wide association studies (GWASs).A strong focus of this article is to review the literature on the potential clinical utility of these implicated genetic markers.Most of these published studies described PCa risk estimation using a genetic score derived from multiple risk-associated SNPs and its utility in determining the need for prostate biopsy.Finally,we comment on the newly proposed concept of genetic score; the notion is to treat it as a marker for genetic predisposition,similar to family history,rather than a diagnostic marker to discriminate PCa patients from non-cancer patients.Available evidence to date suggests that genetic score is an objective and better measurement of inherited risk of PCa than family history.Another unique feature of this article is the inclusion of genetic association studies of PCa in Chinese and Japanese populations.

  4. Clinically relevant risk factors for suicide: Comparison between clinical group with passive suicidal ideation, active suicidal ideation and without suicidal ideation

    OpenAIRE

    Miloseva, Lence; Cuijpers, Pim; Stojcev, Saso; Niklewski, Gunter; Richter, Kneginja; Jovevska, Svetlana; Arsova, Roza; Serafimov, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, researchers and clinicians do not treat passive suicidal ideation as a clinically relevant risk factor for suicide, while underestimating the strength of this desire to die, compared with making a plan for suicide in individuals having active suicidal ideation. This research study is clinically prospective, cross-sequential, but also partly retrospective because it involves also variables from the past, such as patients’ history data (number of suicidal attempts...

  5. Development of a Simple Clinical Risk Score for Early Prediction of Severe Dengue in Adult Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing-Kit Lee

    , irrespective of the day of illness onset, suggesting that our simple risk score can be easily implemented in resource-limited countries for early prediction of dengue patients at risk of SD provided that they have rapid dengue confirmed tests. For patients with other acute febrile illnesses or bacterial infections usually have SD risk score of >1. Thus, these scoring algorithms cannot totally replace good clinical judgement of the physician, and most importantly, early differentiating dengue from other febrile illnesses is critical for appropriate monitoring and management.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Prodromal Risk Syndromes in Young Adolescents in the Community: A Population-Based Clinical Interview Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    While a great deal of research has been conducted on prodromal risk syndromes in relation to help-seeking individuals who present to the clinic, there is a lack of research on prodromal risk syndromes in the general population. The current study aimed first to establish whether prodromal risk syndromes could be detected in non-help-seeking community-based adolescents and secondly to characterize this group in terms of Axis-1 psychopathology and general functioning. We conducted in-depth clinical interviews with a population sample of 212 school-going adolescents in order to assess for prodromal risk syndromes, Axis-1 psychopathology, and global (social\\/occupational) functioning. Between 0.9% and 8% of the community sample met criteria for a risk syndrome, depending on varying disability criteria. The risk syndrome group had a higher prevalence of co-occurring nonpsychotic Axis-1 psychiatric disorders (OR = 4.77, 95% CI = 1.81-12.52; P < .01) and poorer global functioning (F = 24.5, df = 1, P < .0001) compared with controls. Individuals in the community who fulfill criteria for prodromal risk syndromes demonstrate strong similarities with clinically presenting risk syndrome patients not just in terms of psychotic symptom criteria but also in terms of co-occurring psychopathology and global functioning.

  7. Clinically low-risk prostate cancer: evaluation with transrectal doppler ultrasound and functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Novis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate transrectal ultrasound, amplitude Doppler ultrasound, conventional T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in localizing and locally staging low-risk prostate cancer. INTRODUCTION: Prostate cancer has been diagnosed at earlier stages and the most accepted classification for low-risk prostate cancer is based on clinical stage T1c or T2a, Gleason score <6, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA <10 ng/ml. METHODS: From 2005 to 2006, magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 42 patients, and transrectal ultrasound in 26 of these patients. Seven patients were excluded from the study. Mean patient age was 64.94 years and mean serum PSA was 6.05 ng/ml. The examinations were analyzed for tumor identification and location in prostate sextants, detection of extracapsular extension, and seminal vesicle invasion, using surgical pathology findings as the gold standard. RESULTS: Sixteen patients (45.7% had pathologically proven organ-confined disease, 11 (31.4% had positive surgical margin, 8 (28.9% had extracapsular extension, and 3 (8.6% presented with extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy values for localizing low-risk prostate cancer were 53.1%, 48.3%, 63.4%, 37.8% and 51.3% for transrectal ultrasound; 70.4%, 36.2%, 65.1%, 42.0% and 57.7% for amplitude Doppler ultrasound; 71.5%, 58.9%, 76.6%, 52.4% and 67.1% for magnetic resonance imaging; 70.4%, 58.7%, 78.4%, 48.2% and 66.7% for magnetic resonance spectroscopy; 67.2%, 65.7%, 79.3%, 50.6% and 66.7% for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy values for detecting extracapsular extension were 33.3%, 92%, 14.3%, 97.2% and 89.7% for transrectal ultrasound and 50.0%, 77.6%, 13.7%, 95.6% and 75.7% for magnetic resonance imaging

  8. Genomic risk profiling: attitudes and use in personal and clinical care of primary care physicians who offer risk profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Susanne B; Carrig, Madeline M; O'Daniel, Julianne M; Orlando, Lori A; Killeya-Jones, Ley A; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Cho, Alex

    2011-08-01

    Genomic risk profiling involves the analysis of genetic variations linked through statistical associations to a range of disease states. There is considerable controversy as to how, and even whether, to incorporate these tests into routine medical care. To assess physician attitudes and uptake of genomic risk profiling among an 'early adopter' practice group. We surveyed members of MDVIP, a national group of primary care physicians (PCPs), currently offering genomic risk profiling as part of their practice. All physicians in the MDVIP network (N = 356) We obtained a 44% response rate. One third of respondents had ordered a test for themselves and 42% for a patient. The odds of having ordered personal testing were 10.51-fold higher for those who felt well-informed about genomic risk testing (p risk profiling. Educational and interpretive support may enhance uptake of genomic risk profiling.

  9. Care zoning. A pragmatic approach to enhance the understanding of clinical needs as it relates to clinical risks in acute in-patient unit settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kris; Guy, Stuart; Stewart, Linda; Ayling, Mark; Miller, Graham; Anthony, Anne; Bajuk, Anne; Brun, Jo Le; Shearer, Dianne; Gregory, Rebecca; Thomas, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The process of risk assessment which should inform and help identify clinical needs is often seen as a tick box and task-focussed approach. While on the surface this provides a sense of security that forms have been completed, we often fail to communicate in a meaningful manner about the clinical needs identified, which would assist in supporting the care planning delivery processes. A clinical practice improvement (CPI) project implemented a care zoning framework as an evidenced-based process that provides pragmatic support to nurses who are required to continually assess, implement, and evaluate plans to address clinical need across three acute mental health inpatient settings. Risk descriptors informed by the New South Wales (NSW) Mental Health Assessment & Outcome Tools (MHAOT) criteria were developed and described in behavioural contexts in order to improve the project's reliability and translation. A pragmatic traffic light tool was used to share clinical information across three agreed care zones, red (high clinical need), amber (medium clinical need), and green (low clinical need). Additionally nurses were asked to utilise a shift review form in the context of supporting the recording of care zoning and promoting action-orientated note writing. The introduction of care zoning has enthused the nursing teams and the mental health service to adopt care zoning as a supervisory framework that increases their capacity to communicate clinical needs, share information, and gain invaluable support from one another in addressing clinical needs. This includes increased opportunities for staff to feel supported in asking for assistance in understanding and addressing complex clinical presentations.

  10. Ontology-Based Clinical Decision Support System for Predicting High-Risk Pregnant Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Manzoor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available According to Pakistan Medical and Dental Council (PMDC, Pakistan is facing a shortage of approximately 182,000 medical doctors. Due to the shortage of doctors; a large number of lives are in danger especially pregnant woman. A large number of pregnant women die every year due to pregnancy complications, and usually the reason behind their death is that the complications are not timely handled. In this paper, we proposed ontology-based clinical decision support system that diagnoses high-risk pregnant women and refer them to the qualified medical doctors for timely treatment. The Ontology of the proposed system is built automatically and enhanced afterward using doctor’s feedback. The proposed framework has been tested on a large number of test cases; experimental results are satisfactory and support the implementation of the solution.

  11. [Cervicitis--epidemiological and clinical risk for Chlamydia trachomatis infection in university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, A; Stevenson, M

    1994-01-01

    Fifty volunteer, asymptomatic sexually active university female students were examined and inquired, in order to find risk factors predictive of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Epidemiologic and behavioral factors (age, number of sexual partners, oral contraceptives use and history of previous sexually transmitted diseases) were found to be similar among the studied group and published data for North American female college students, but barrier contraceptive methods use was found to be different. Twenty two per cent of the sample had clinical cervicitis, and 30% had subclinical. If the screening models proposed by different authors would have been applied, between a 32% and 72% of the sample would have been selectively for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis. It is concluded that international sugerences about Chlamydia trachomatis screening should be adopted until national experiences are made.

  12. Atherosclerotic risk factors are increased in clinically healthy subjects with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Borch-Johnsen, K; Jensen, G

    1995-01-01

    Increased morbidity and mortality from atherosclerotic vascular disease were observed in subjects with slightly elevated urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER), known as microalbuminuria. Therefore, the association between microalbuminuria and established atherogenic risk factors was studied...... in clinically healthy subjects. All healthy 40-65 year-old participants with microalbuminuria, examined within the first 21 months of The Copenhagen City Heart Study, were invited, and 28 were studied. An age- and sex-matched group of 60 randomly chosen subjects with normoalbuminuria served as control......Hg; P = 0.008, respectively), and serum apolipoprotein (apo) A-1 concentration was lower (1.30 (1.20-1.37) vs. 1.42 (1.36-1.47) milligrams; P = 0.02) in comparison with the normoalbuminuric group. Furthermore, serum HDL-cholesterol concentration tended to be lower, whereas body weight, body mass index...

  13. Clinical risk scores predict procedural complications of primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadi, László; Şerban, Razvan Constantin; Scridon, Alina; Şuş, Ioana; Lakatos, Éva Katalin; Demjén, Zoltán; Dobreanu, Dan

    2017-04-01

    The predictive value of five risk score models containing clinical (PAMI-PMS, GRACE-GRS, and modified ACEF-ACEFm-scores), angiographic SYNTAX score (SXS) and combined Clinical SYNTAX score (CSS) variables were evaluated for the incidence of three procedural complications of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI): iatrogenic coronary artery dissection, angiographically visible distal embolization and angiographic no-reflow phenomenon. The mentioned scores and the incidence of procedural complications were retrospectively analyzed in 399 consecutive patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction who underwent pPCI. Coronary dissection, distal embolization and no-reflow occurred in 39 (9.77%), 71 (17.79%), and 108 (27.07%) subjects, respectively. Coronary dissections were significantly associated with higher GRS, ACEFm, and CSS values (all p<0.05). PMS, GRS, ACEFm, and CSS were significantly higher in patients with no-reflow (all p<0.05), while distal embolization was not predicted by any of the calculated scores. In multiple logistic regression models, GRS and ACEFm remained independent predictors of both coronary dissections (OR 3.20, 95% CI 1.56-6.54, p<0.01 and OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.27-6.45, p=0.01, respectively) and no-reflow (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.04-2.82, p=0.03 and OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.10-3.14, p=0.01, respectively). Whereas SXS failed to predict procedural complications related to pPCI, two simple, noninvasive risk models, GRS and ACEFm, independently predicted coronary dissections and no-reflow. Pre-interventional assessment of these scores may help the interventional cardiologist to prepare for procedural complications during pPCI.

  14. Clinical risk factors of febrile seizure in children in a university hospital in Bushehr port

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    Anahita Sanaei Dashty

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the majority of febrile seizures are benign, it is clinically important to understand the underlying mechanism. In this study, we investigated characteristics of febrile convulsion and factors related to its recurrence and its relapse during a hospital course. Methods: A total of 102 patients with febrile seizure who were admitted serially at Fatemeh Zahra (S University Hospital in Bushehr port were investigated. Demographic information and data of the history and physical examination were recorded. Children under the age of five with temperature of more than 37.8C or with history of fever accompanied by seizure entered the study those with meningitis or encephalitis according to the results of lumbar puncture or clinical diagnosis were ruled out. Results: Mean age of patients was 24±13.1 months, the most frequent type of convulsion was tonic-clonic (60.5%, and the least were atonic and myoclonic (each 7.9%. Focal convulsion was determined in 13.0% and complex type was observed in 32.5% of patients. Family history of febrile seizure was found in 59.0%. Female sex (RR=2.68, 95% CI: 1.20-5.99, history of previous febrile seizure (RR=2.56, 95% CI: 1.11-5.95, age at initial febrile seizure (RR=2.7, 95% CI: 1.16-6.29, and complex type of seizure (RR=3.86, 95% CI: 1-14.97 increased the risk of seizure relapses in a hospital course (P<0.05. Conclusion: Gender, history of previous febrile seizure, age at initial febrile seizure, and complex type of seizure increase the risk of recurrence of febrile seizure during hospital course. Further studies for assessing the long term effects of these factors on recurrence will determine children who need more medical attention in the future.

  15. Liver cirrhosis and diabetes: Risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical implications and management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diego Garcia-Compean; Joel Omar Jaquez-Quintana; Jose Alberto Gonzalez-Gonzalez; Hector Maldonado-Garza

    2009-01-01

    About 30% of patients with cirrhosis have diabetes mellitus (DM). Nowadays, it is a matter for debate whether type 2 DM in the absence of obesity and hypertriglyceridemia may be a risk factor for chronic liver disease. DM,which develops as a complication of cirrhosis, is known as "hepatogenous diabetes". Insulin resistance in muscular and adipose tissues and hyperinsulinemia seem to be the pathophysiologic bases of diabetes in liver disease. An impaired response of the islet β-cells of the pancreas and hepatic insulin resistance are also contributory factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and hemochromatosis are more frequently associated with DM. Insulin resistance increases the failure of the response to treatment in patients with CHC and enhances progression of fibrosis. DM in cirrhotic patients may be subclinical.Hepatogenous diabetes is clinically different from that of type 2 DM, since it is less frequently associated with microangiopathy and patients more frequently suffer complications of cirrhosis. DM increases the mortality of cirrhotic patients. Treatment of the diabetes is complex due to liver damage and hepatotoxicity of oral hypoglycemic drugs. This manuscript will review evidence that exists in relation to: type 2 DM alone or as part of the metabolic syndrome in the development of liver disease;factors involved in the genesis of hepatogenous diabetes;the impact of DM on the clinical outcome of liver disease; the management of DM in cirrhotic patients and the role of DM as a risk factor for the occurrence and exacerbation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Social and clinically-relevant cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Americans adults: NHANES 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Sandra E; Mustafa, Mehnaz; Pentakota, Sir Ram; Kim, Soyeon; Hastings, Katherine; Amadi, Chioma; Palaniappan, Latha

    2017-02-17

    Little evidence exists examining cardiovascular risk factors among Asian Americans and how social determinants such as nativity status and education pattern risk in the United States (U.S.) context. We used the 2011-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which purposely oversampled Asian Americans from 2011 to 2014, and examined prevalence of Type II diabetes, smoking and obesity for Asian Americans (n=1363) and non-Latino Whites (n=4121). We classified Asian Americans as U.S. or foreign-born and by years in the U.S. Obesity status was based on standard body mass index (BMI) cut points of ≥30kg/m(2) and Asian-specific cut points (BMI≥25kg/m(2)) that may be more clinically relevant for this population. We fit separate logistic regression models for each outcome using complex survey design methods and tested for the joint effect of race, nativity and education on each outcome.Diabetes and obesity prevalence (applying Asian-specific BMI cut points) were higher among Asian Americans when compared to non-Latino Whites but smoking prevalence was lower. These patterns remained in fully adjusted models and showed small increases with longer duration in the U.S. Joint effects models showed higher odds of prevalent Type II diabetes and obesity (Asian-specific) for foreign-born Asians, regardless of years in the U.S. and education, when compared to non-Latino Whites with high education. Smoking models showed significant interaction effects between race and education for non-Latino Whites only. Our study supports the premise that social as well as clinical factors should be considered when developing health initiatives for Asian Americans.

  17. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus After Heart Transplantation - Incidence, Risk Factors and Impact on Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Jin; Jung, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Joong; Yun, Tae-Jin; Kim, Joon Bum; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2017-05-25

    New-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) can occur as a serious complication after heart transplantation, but the comparative data on its clinical impact on survival and on transplant-related adverse events are limited.Methods and Results:We reviewed a total of consecutive 391 patients aged ≥17 years undergoing isolated orthotopic heart transplantation at the present institution from 1992 to 2013. The entire cohort was divided into 3 groups: (1) no diabetes (n=257); (2) pre-existing DM (n=46); and (3) new-onset DM (n=88). Early and long-term clinical outcomes were compared across the 3 groups. Early death occurred in 8 patients (2.0%). Of the 345 non-diabetic patients before transplantation, 88 (25.5%) developed new-onset DM postoperatively. During follow-up, 83 (21.2%) died. On time-varying Cox analysis, new-onset DM was associated with increased risk for overall death (HR, 2.11; 95% CI: 1.26-3.55) and tended to have a greater risk for severe chronic kidney disease (HR, 1.77; 95% CI: 0.94-3.44). Compared with the no-diabetes group, the new-onset DM group had a worse survival rate (P=0.035), but a similar survival rate to that of the pre-existing DM group (P=0.364). New-onset DM has a negative effect on long-term survival and kidney function after heart transplantation. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the relevance of early diagnosis and timely control of new-onset DM to improve long-term survival.

  18. Risk factors and clinical outcomes for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Zhang, Y; Yao, X; Xian, H; Liu, Y; Li, H; Chen, H; Wang, X; Wang, R; Zhao, C; Cao, B; Wang, H

    2016-10-01

    This study was aimed to determine the risk factors of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) nosocomial infections and assess the clinical outcomes. A case-case-control design was used to compare two groups of case patients with control patients from March 2010 to November 2014 in China. Risk factors for the acquisition of CRE infections and clinical outcomes were analyzed by univariable and multivariable analysis. A total of 94 patients with CRE infections, 93 patients with Carbapenem-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CSE) infections, and 93 patients with organisms other than Enterobacteriaceae infections were enrolled in this study. Fifty-five isolates were detected as the carbapenemase gene. KPC-2 was the most common carbapenemase (65.5 %, 36/55), followed by NDM-1 (16.4 %, 9/55), IMP-4 (14.5 %, 8/55), NDM-5 (1.8 %, 1/55), and NDM-7 (1.8 %, 1/55). Multivariable analysis implicated previous use of third or fourth generation cephalosporins (odds ratio [OR], 4.557; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.971-10.539; P Enterobacteriaceae with a high meropenem MIC (≥8 mg/L) was shorter than that of patients with a low meropenem MIC (2,4, and ≤ 1 mg/L). In conclusion, CRE nosocomial infections are associated with prior exposure to third or fourth generation cephalosporins and carbapenems. Patients infected with CRE had poor outcome and high mortality, especially high meropenem MIC (≥8 mg/L). Appropriate definitive treatment to CRE infections in the patient is essential.

  19. Clinical prediction rule for stratifying risk of pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Dalila; Heudebert, Gustavo; Seas, Carlos; Henostroza, German; Rodriguez, Martin; Zamudio, Carlos; Centor, Robert M; Herrera, Cesar; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Estrada, Carlos

    2010-08-11

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampin, is a worldwide problem. To develop a clinical prediction rule to stratify risk for MDR-TB among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Derivation and internal validation of the rule among adult patients prospectively recruited from 37 health centers (Perú), either a) presenting with a positive acid-fast bacillus smear, or b) had failed therapy or had a relapse within the first 12 months. Among 964 patients, 82 had MDR-TB (prevalence, 8.5%). Variables included were MDR-TB contact within the family, previous tuberculosis, cavitary radiologic pattern, and abnormal lung exam. The area under the receiver-operating curve (AUROC) was 0.76. Selecting a cut-off score of one or greater resulted in a sensitivity of 72.6%, specificity of 62.8%, likelihood ratio (LR) positive of 1.95, and LR negative of 0.44. Similarly, selecting a cut-off score of two or greater resulted in a sensitivity of 60.8%, specificity of 87.5%, LR positive of 4.85, and LR negative of 0.45. Finally, selecting a cut-off score of three or greater resulted in a sensitivity of 45.1%, specificity of 95.3%, LR positive of 9.56, and LR negative of 0.58. A simple clinical prediction rule at presentation can stratify risk for MDR-TB. If further validated, the rule could be used for management decisions in resource-limited areas.

  20. Clinical prediction rule for stratifying risk of pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Martínez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB, resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampin, is a worldwide problem. OBJECTIVE: To develop a clinical prediction rule to stratify risk for MDR-TB among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: Derivation and internal validation of the rule among adult patients prospectively recruited from 37 health centers (Perú, either a presenting with a positive acid-fast bacillus smear, or b had failed therapy or had a relapse within the first 12 months. RESULTS: Among 964 patients, 82 had MDR-TB (prevalence, 8.5%. Variables included were MDR-TB contact within the family, previous tuberculosis, cavitary radiologic pattern, and abnormal lung exam. The area under the receiver-operating curve (AUROC was 0.76. Selecting a cut-off score of one or greater resulted in a sensitivity of 72.6%, specificity of 62.8%, likelihood ratio (LR positive of 1.95, and LR negative of 0.44. Similarly, selecting a cut-off score of two or greater resulted in a sensitivity of 60.8%, specificity of 87.5%, LR positive of 4.85, and LR negative of 0.45. Finally, selecting a cut-off score of three or greater resulted in a sensitivity of 45.1%, specificity of 95.3%, LR positive of 9.56, and LR negative of 0.58. CONCLUSION: A simple clinical prediction rule at presentation can stratify risk for MDR-TB. If further validated, the rule could be used for management decisions in resource-limited areas.

  1. Stroke Mortality, Clinical Presentation and Day of Arrival: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC Study

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    Emily C. O'Brien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent studies report that acute stroke patients who present to the hospital on weekends have higher rates of 28-day mortality than similar patients who arrive during the week. However, how this association is related to clinical presentation and stroke type has not been systematically investigated. Methods and Results. We examined the association between day of arrival and 28-day mortality in 929 validated stroke events in the ARIC cohort from 1987–2004. Weekend arrival was defined as any arrival time from midnight Friday until midnight Sunday. Mortality was defined as all-cause fatal events from the day of arrival through the 28th day of followup. The presence or absence of thirteen stroke signs and symptoms were obtained through medical record review for each event. Binomial logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (OR; 95% CI for the association between weekend arrival and 28-day mortality for all stroke events and for stroke subtypes. The overall risk of 28-day mortality was 9.6% for weekday strokes and 10.1% for weekend strokes. In models controlling for patient demographics, clinical risk factors, and event year, weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day mortality (0.87; 0.51, 1.50. When stratified by stroke type, weekend arrival was not associated with increased odds of mortality for ischemic (1.17, 0.62, 2.23 or hemorrhagic (0.37; 0.11, 1.26 stroke patients. Conclusions. Presence or absence of thirteen signs and symptoms was similar for weekday patients and weekend patients when stratified by stroke type. Weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day all-cause mortality or differences in symptom presentation for strokes in this cohort.

  2. Association between markers of cardiovascular risk and clinical parameters of periodontitis

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    José Eduardo Gomes Domingues

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Periodontal disease is an inflammatory response to bacteria that reside in the gum tissue and can have systemic repercussion. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between periodontitis and markers of cardiovascular risk. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Ninety selected patients were assigned into two groups in accordance with their levels of probing pocket depth (PPD and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL: control group, n= 45 (< 4 sites with PPD ≥ 4.0 mm and CAL ≥ 3.0 mm and case group, n= 45 (≥ 30% of sites with PPD ≥ 4.0 mm and CAL ≥3.0 mm. Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein, high sensitive CRP, high-density lipoproteins (HDL-c and electronegative low density lipoproteins (LDL were assessed in all participants. Data from medical history and socioeconomic level were also collected from patients. RESULT: Plasma levels of HDL-c were lower in subjects with periodontal disease (p = 0.016 and were inversely associated with the number of sites with PPD ≥ 3 mm (rho= -0.325 and number of sites with PPD ≥ 3 mm and CAL ≥ 3 mm (rho= -0.216. These associations remained significant after adjustments for dental plaque and smoking using Univariate Analysis of Covariance (p < 0.05. Adjusted odds ratio between periodontal disease and levels of HDL-c was 0.94 (CI95% 0.88-0.99 after adjusting for age, smoking and dental plaque. Other investigated markers of cardiovascular risk were not related to periodontal disease. CONCLUSION: Clinical parameters of periodontitis were inversely associated with plasma concentrations of HDL-c.

  3. The clinical expression of hereditary protein C and protein S deficiency: : a relation to clinical thrombotic risk-factors and to levels of protein C and protein S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkens, C. M. A.; van der Meer, J.; Hillege, J. L.; Bom, V. J. J.; Halie, M. R.; van der Schaaf, W.

    We investigated 103 first-degree relatives of 13 unrelated protein C or protein S deficient patients to assess the role of additional thrombotic risk factors and of protein C and protein S levels in the clinical expression of hereditary protein C and protein S deficiency. Fifty-seven relatives were

  4. Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Clinical Features of Intracerebral Hemorrhage: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sang Joon; Kim, Tae Jung; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the second most common subtype of stroke and a critical disease usually leading to severe disability or death. ICH is more common in Asians, advanced age, male sex, and low- and middle-income countries. The case fatality rate of ICH is high (40% at 1 month and 54% at 1 year), and only 12% to 39% of survivors can achieve long-term functional independence. Risk factors of ICH are hypertension, current smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, hypocholesterolemia, and drugs. Old age, male sex, Asian ethnicity, chronic kidney disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) increase the risk of ICH. Clinical presentation varies according to the size and location of hematoma, and intraventricular extension of hemorrhage. Patients with CAA-related ICH frequently have concomitant cognitive impairment. Anticoagulation related ICH is increasing recently as the elderly population who have atrial fibrillation is increasing. As non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are currently replacing warfarin, management of NOAC-associated ICH has become an emerging issue. PMID:28178408

  5. Hospital-associated funguria: analysis of risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Carvalho

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal urinary tract infections are an increasing problem in hospitalized patients. Funguria may be a result of contamination of the urine specimen, colonization of the urinary tract, or may be indicative of true invasive infection. In this study, we report the risk factors, clinical features, treatments and outcome in a group of 68 hospitalized patients (adults and children with fungal isolates recovered from 103 urinary samples. Underlying medical conditions were present in most patients. In the pediatric group, urinary tract abnormalities (86% and prematurity (19% accounted for the majority of the cases. Diabetes mellitus (28%, nephrolithiasis, and benign prostatic hyperplasia were the most common diseases in adults. Indwelling urethral catheters were noted in 38% of the pediatric patients and in 43% of adults during hospitalization. Candida albicans strains were responsible for 97% and 75% of positive cultures in children and adults, respectively. Symptoms such as fever, dysuria, frequency and flank pain were generally absent in both groups. Fluconazole was the most frequent antifungal utilized (61% in children and ketoconazole in the adult group (42%. Removing the urinary catheter was attempted in 6 pediatric patients (29% and in only 8 adults (17%. One patient (4% in the pediatric group died compared to 10 in the adult group (21%, p=0.04. Successful diagnosis and treatment of funguria depends on a clear understanding of the risk factors and awareness of fungal epidemiology.

  6. Community care of individuals at risk of suicide: the Life Promotion Clinic model

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    Kairi Kolves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Assistance to suicidal patients is problematic both at the hospital and community care level. Inadequacy of facilities, pressured personnel, long waiting time, and professional and social stigmatization are just some of the many issues that interfere with successful treatment. The goal of this paper is to present the functioning of the Life Promotion Clinic (LPC, Australia, and describe its users. The LPC is the first specialized outpatient service in Australia dedicated to the treatment of individuals with suicidal thoughts and behaviors. A description of the service and characteristics of its clients (demographic, psychopathology, risk of suicide are herein presented. Data were collected for 63 male and 175 female patients who attended the LPC over a three-year period. Patients were mostly single females, aged up to 44 years, poorly educated, unemployed or on a pension/benefit. The majority of patients reported at least one suicide attempt, severe depression and anxiety scores, moderate-severe feelings of hopelessness, and high impulsiveness scores. Compared to females, male patients presented with more active desire to kill themselves and higher level of suicidal ideation. We can conclude that establishing a specialist service for treatment of individuals at increased risk for suicide requires consideration of both patient and clinicians needs. The LPC presents an innovative model of community service, capable of engaging patients with serious mental health issues, while making the service accessible to people from various social categories.

  7. Clinical relevancy and risks of potential drug–drug interactions in intensive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Aline Teotonio; Stahlschmidt, Rebeca; Granja, Silvia; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Moriel, Patricia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the potential Drug–Drug Interactions (pDDI) found in prescription orders of adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Brazilian public health system hospital; quantify and qualify the pDDI regarding their severity and risks to the critical patient, using the database from Micromedex®. Methods Prospective study (January–December of 2011) collecting and evaluating 369 prescription orders (convenient sampling), one per patient. Results During the study 1844 pDDIs were identified and distributed in 405 pairs (medication A × medication B combination). There was an average of 5.00 ± 5.06 pDDIs per prescription order, the most prevalent being moderate and important interactions, present in 74% and 67% of prescription orders, respectively. In total, there were 9 contraindicated, 129 important and 204 moderate pDDIs. Among them 52 had as management recommendation to “avoid concomitant use” or “suspension of medication”, while 306 had as recommendation “continuous and adequate monitoring”. Conclusion The high number of pDDIs found in the study combined with the evaluation of the clinical relevancy of the most frequent pDDIs in the ICU shows that moderate and important interactions are highly incident. As the majority of them demand monitoring and adequate management, being aware of these interactions is major information for the safe and individualized risk management. PMID:27134536

  8. [Trends in risk factors, clinical characteristics and prognosis in primary intracerebral haemorrhage (1986-2004)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboix, Adrià; Massons, Joan; García-Eroles, Luís; Grau-Olivares, Marta; Targa, Cecília; Comes, Emili; Oliveres, Montserrat

    2014-01-07

    Cardiovascular risk factors, clinical features and early outcome of first-ever primary intracerebral haemorrhage (PIH) from 1986 to 2004 using the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry were assessed, and compared with data from patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. The study population consisted of 380 patients with PIH and 2,082 patients with ischemic stroke. Secular trends for the periods 1986-1992, 1993-1998 and 1999-2004 were analyzed. Age increased significantly (P<.001) throughout the 3 study periods and there was a significant increase in the percentage of patients with atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lobar topography. The use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also increased significantly throughout the study periods. In comparison with ischemic stroke in-hospital death was more frequent (28,2 vs. 12%) and lacunar syndrome (9,5 vs. 31,4%) and symptom-free patients at discharge were less frequent in the intracerebral haemorrhage group (6,1 vs. 18,3%). Significant changes over a 19-year period included an increase in the patient's age, frequency of COPD and atrial fibrillation and use of MRI imaging studies. PIH is a severe subtype of stroke with a higher risk of early death and lower asymptomatic frequency at discharge than ischemic cerebral infarct. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Sharp mandibular bone irregularities after lower third molar extraction: Incidence, clinical features and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Pereira, Daniela; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Laskin, Daniel M.; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and clinical symptoms associated with sharp mandibular bone irregularities (SMBI) after lower third molar extraction and to identify possible risk factors for this complication. Study Design: A mixed study design was used. A retrospective cohort study of 1432 lower third molar extractions was done to determine the incidence of SMBI and a retrospective case-control study was done to determine potential demographic and etiologic factors by comparing those patients with postoperative SMBI with controls. Results: Twelve SMBI were found (0.84%). Age was the most important risk factor for this complication. The operated side and the presence of an associated radiolucent image were also significantly related to the development of mandibular bone irregularities. The depth of impaction of the tooth might also be an important factor since erupted or nearly erupted third molars were more frequent in the SMBI group. Conclusions: SMBI are a rare postoperative complication after lower third molar removal. Older patients having left side lower third molars removed are more likely to develop this problem. The treatment should be the removal of the irregularity when the patient is symptomatic. Key words:Third molar, postoperative complication, bone irregularities, age. PMID:23524429

  10. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic respiratory diseases: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yonghua; Liu, Chunli; Lu, Wenju; Li, Mengxi; Hadadi, Cyrus; Wang, Elizabeth Wenqian; Yang, Kai; Lai, Ning; Huang, Junyi; Li, Shiyue; Zhong, Nanshan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic respiratory disease-associated pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an important subtype of PH, which lacks clinical epidemiological data in China. Methods Six hundred and ninety three patients hospitalized from 2010 to 2013 were classified by echocardiography according to pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP): mild (36≤ PASP 20 mm) were associated with moderate-to-severe PH, while RV [odds ratio (OR) =3.53, 95% CI, 2.17–5.74], NT-proBNP (OR=2.44, 95% CI, 1.51–3.95), HCT (OR=1.03, 95% CI, 1.00–1.07) and PaCO2 (OR=1.01, 95% CI, 1.00–1.03) were independent risk factors. Conclusions PH related to respiratory diseases is mostly mild to moderate, and the severity is associated with the category of respiratory disease. Increased HCT can be an independent risk factor for PH related to chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:27076929

  11. Breast cancer risk and clinical implications for germline PTEN mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Joanne; Sesock, Kaitlin; Eng, Charis

    2017-08-01

    PTEN Hamartoma Tumor syndrome (PHTS) encompasses a clinical spectrum of heritable disorders including Cowden syndrome (CS), Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and Proteus and Proteus-like syndrome that are associated with germline mutations in the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. Breast cancer risk estimates (67-85 %) for women with germline PTEN mutations are similar to those quoted for patients with germline mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes. With PTEN on several germline gene testing panels, finding PTEN mutations and variants have increased exponentially. PHTS can be differentiated from other hereditary cancer syndromes including Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, and hamartomatous polyposis syndromes based on personal as well as family history. However, many of the benign features of CS are common in the general population, making the diagnosis of CS challenging. Breast cancer patients with an identified germline PTEN mutation are at increased risk of endometrial, thyroid, renal, and colorectal cancers as well as a second breast cancer. Increased screening for the various component cancers as well as predictive testing in first-degree relatives is recommended. Prophylactic mastectomy may be considered especially if breast tissue is dense or if repeated breast biopsies have been necessary. Management of women with breast cancer suspected of CS who test negative for germline PTEN mutations should be managed as per a mutation carrier if she meets CS diagnostic criteria, and should be offered enrollment in research to identify other predisposition genes.

  12. Fatherhood and depression: a review of risks, effects, and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Aaron Z

    2006-10-01

    This literature review attempted to compile a complete evaluation of the presentation, risks, and subsequent effects upon a family in relation to paternal depression. Clinical applications are reviewed as well. As with women, fathers will present with a dysphoric mood, but unlike their female counterparts, depressed men often experience a change in social behavior. Withdrawal from social situations, indecisiveness, cynicism, and an irritable mood are often found as hallmark signs of depression in the adult male. Life stress, or family stress and low social support, are risk factors associated with depression among fathers. Marital difficulties may be the most common trigger for first-time depression in husbands just as divorce amplifies depressive episodes, especially when children are involved. A variety of treatments have proven effective for depressed fathers including traditional psycho-dynamic, CBT, and group therapy. Therapy is effective when it can be initiated and continued but research repeatedly showed that men seek it out far less than women. Effective outreach programs to encourage treatment among depressed fathers are recommended.

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Delirium in Acute Stroke Patients. A Retrospective 5-Years Clinical Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Perez, Francisco José; Paiva, Fatima

    2017-03-01

    Delirium is characterized by disturbances of attention and cognition that cause functional decline and complications. The predisposing factors of delirium are age, male gender, systemic or metabolic disorders, dementia, and stroke. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of delirium and to identify risk factors. This is a retrospective study that includes patients admitted over 5 years with acute stroke. Patients with transient ischemic attack or venous thrombosis were excluded. Delirium was defined according the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Demographical characteristics, clinical-radiological profile, dependence on discharge (modified Rankin Scale score of ≥3 and Barthel Index delirium. A total of 1161 patients were admitted (910 ischemic and 162 hemorrhagic). During hospitalization, 118 patients presented with delirium (10.2%) and 93 died (8%). On discharge, 517 patients were dependent (44.5%). Delirium was significantly associated with age, male gender, cortical infarcts in anterior circulation, higher leukocyte count, cholesterol and fibrinogen levels, lower albumin, atrial fibrillation, previous diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, and hemorrhagic stroke. Logistic regression results showed that only previous Alzheimer's disease was related to delirium (odds ratio 21.68 [95% confidence interval 1.190-395.026, P = .038]). Dependence on discharge was associated with delirium. Ten percent of the patients presented with delirium associated with older age, Alzheimer's disease, and cortical anterior stroke. Patients with delirium had a higher risk of functional dependence on discharge. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: risk factors, clinical features and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paño Pardo, José Ramón; Serrano Villar, Sergio; Ramos Ramos, Juan Carlos; Pintado, Vicente

    2014-12-01

    Infections caused by carbapenem-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) can present as several infectious syndromes, but they primarily present as respiratory, urinary and blood stream infections (primary or catheter-related) that are usually found as nosocomial or healthcare-associated infections. The risk of CPE infection is influenced by individual factors, such as the length of the hospital stay and their exposure to invasive procedures and/or to antimicrobials. Of note, exposure to several antimicrobials, not only carbapenems, has been linked to CPE colonization; the duration of antibiotic exposure is one of the primary drivers of CPE acquisition. Individual risk factors must be considered jointly with the local epidemiology of these microorganisms in healthcare institutions. Overall, these infections have a high associated mortality. Mortality is influenced by host factors (e.g., age, comorbidity and immune deficiency), infection-related variables (e.g., type and severity of the infection) and treatment-related factors such as the delay in the initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and the use or monotherapy or combined antimicrobial therapy. Gaining knowledge concerning the epidemiology, clinical features and prognostic features of CPE infection could be useful for improving infection prevention and for the management of patients with infections caused by these microorganisms.

  15. Neuropsychological Profiles in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis: Relationship to Psychosis and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodberry, Kristen A.; Seidman, Larry J.; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Verdi, Mary B.; Cook, William L.; McFarlane, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Characterizing neuropsychological (NP) functioning of individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis may be useful for prediction of psychosis and understanding functional outcome. The degree to which NP impairments are associated with general cognitive ability and/or later emergence of full psychosis in CHR samples requires study with well-matched controls. Methods We assessed NP functioning across eight cognitive domains in a sample of 73 CHR youth, 13 of whom developed psychotic-level symptoms after baseline assessment, and 34 healthy comparison (HC) subjects. Groups were matched on age, sex, ethnicity, handedness, subject and parent grade attainment, and median family income, and were comparable on WRAT-3 Reading, an estimate of premorbid IQ. Profile analysis was used to examine group differences and the role of IQ in profile shape. Results The CHR sample demonstrated a significant difference in overall magnitude of NP impairment but only a small and nearly significant difference in profile shape, primarily due to a large impairment in olfactory identification. Individuals who subsequently developed psychotic-level symptoms demonstrated large impairments in verbal IQ, verbal memory and olfactory identification comparable in magnitude to first episode samples. Conclusions CHR status may be associated with moderate generalized cognitive impairments marked by some degree of selective impairment in olfaction and verbal memory. Impairments were greatest in those who later developed psychotic symptoms. Future study of olfaction in CHR samples may enhance early detection and specification of neurodevelopmental mechanisms of risk. PMID:20692125

  16. Change in Neuropsychological Functioning over One Year in Youth at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodberry, Kristen A.; McFarlane, William R.; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Verdi, Mary B.; Cook, William L.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Seidman, Larry J.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders are associated with significant neuropsychological (NP) impairments. Yet the onset and developmental evolution of these impairments remains incompletely characterized. This study examined NP functioning over one year in a sample of youth at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis participating in a treatment study. We assessed functioning across six cognitive domains at two time points in a sample of 53 CHR and 32 healthy comparison (HC) subjects. Linear regression of HC one-year scores was used to predict one-year performance for CHR from baseline scores and relevant demographic variables. We used raw scores and MANOVAs of the standardized residuals to test for progressive impairment over time. NP functioning of CHR at one year fell significantly below predicted levels. Effects were largest and most consistent for a failure of normative improvement on tests of executive function. CHR who reached the highest positive symptom rating (6, severe and psychotic) on the Structured Interview of Prodromal Syndromes after the baseline assessment (n = 10/53) demonstrated a particularly large (d= −1.89), although non-significant, discrepancy between observed and predicted one-year verbal memory test performance. Findings suggest that, although much of the cognitive impairment associated with psychosis is present prior to the full expression of the psychotic syndrome, some progressive NP impairments may accompany risk for psychosis and be greatest for those who develop psychotic level symptoms. PMID:23434505

  17. Short sleep is a questionable risk factor for obesity and related disorders: statistical versus clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Jim

    2008-03-01

    Habitually insufficient sleep could contribute towards obesity, metabolic syndrome, etc., via sleepiness-related inactivity and excess energy intake; more controversially, through more direct physiological changes. Epidemiological studies in adult/children point to small clinical risk only in very short (around 5h in adults), or long sleepers, developing over many years, involving hundreds of hours of 'too little' or 'too much' sleep. Although acute 4h/day sleep restriction leads to glucose intolerance and incipient metabolic syndrome, this is too little sleep and cannot be sustained beyond a few days. Few obese adults/children are short sleepers, and few short sleeping adults/children are obese or suffer obesity-related disorders. For adults, about 7h uninterrupted daily sleep is 'healthy'. Extending sleep, even with hypnotics, to lose weight, may take years, compared with the rapidity of utilising extra sleep time to exercise and evaluate one's diet. The real health risk of inadequate sleep comes from a sleepiness-related accident.

  18. Approval of high-risk medical devices in the US: implications for clinical cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Benjamin N; Kramer, Daniel B; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-01-01

    Since 1976, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has used the premarket approval (PMA) process to approve high-risk medical devices, including implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), coronary stents, and artificial heart valves. The PMA process is widely viewed as a rigorous evaluation of device safety and effectiveness, though recent recalls-most notably related to underperforming ICD leads-have raised concerns about whether physicians and patients should sometimes be more wary about devices approved via this pathway. The FDA must utilize a "least burdensome" approach to approve new medical devices, and many widely used device models have been approved as supplements to existing PMA-approved devices with limited clinical testing. A recent Supreme Court ruling has made it difficult for patients harmed by unsafe PMA-approved devices to seek damages in court. Cardiologists who utilize high-risk medical devices should be aware that FDA approval of new devices relies on variable levels of evidence and does not necessarily indicate improved effectiveness over existing models. Clinician and patient engagement in postmarket surveillance and comparative effectiveness research remains imperative.

  19. Development and evaluation of the "BRISK Scale," a brief observational measure of risk communication competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Paul K J; Joekes, Katherine; Mills, Greg; Gutheil, Caitlin; Smith, Kahsi; Cochran, Nancy E; Elwyn, Glyn

    2016-12-01

    To develop and evaluate a brief observational measure of clinical risk communication competence. A 4-item checklist-type measure, the BRISK (Brief Risk Information Skill) Scale, was developed by selecting and refining items from a more comprehensive measure of clinical risk communication competence. Six volunteer raters received brief training on the measure and then used the BRISK Scale to evaluate 52 video-recorded encounters between 2nd-year medical students and standardized patients conducted as part of an Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) involving a risk communication task. Internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, and criterion validity were assessed. Raters reported no difficulties using the BRISK Scale; scores across all raters and subjects ranged from 0 to 16 with a mean score of 6.49 (SD=3.17). The BRISK Scale showed good internal consistency reliability (α=0.64), and inter-rater reliability at the scale level (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC)=0.79 for consistency, and 0.75 for absolute agreement) and individual-item level (ICC range: 0.62-.91). Novice raters' BRISK Scale scores were highly correlated (r=0.84, pCommunication Content measure, a more comprehensive measure of risk communication competence. The BRISK Scale is a promising new brief observational measure of clinical risk communication competence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding Clinicians' Use of Cues When Assessing the Future Risk of Violence: A Clinical Judgement Analysis in the Psychiatric Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barbara; Rakow, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Research is sparse on how clinicians' judgement informs their violence risk assessments. Yet, determining preferences for which risk factors are used, and how they are weighted and combined, is important to understanding such assessments. This study investigated clinicians' use of static and dynamic cues when assessing risk in individual patients and for dynamic cues considered in the recent and distant past. Clinicians provided three violence risk assessments for 41 separate hypothetical cases of hospitalized patients, each defined by eight cues (e.g., psychopathy and past violence severity/frequency). A clinical judgement analysis, using regression analysis of judgements for multiple cases, created linear models reflecting the major influences on each individual clinician's judgement. Risk assessments could be successfully predicted by between one and four cues, and there was close agreement between different clinicians' models regarding which cues were relevant for a given assessment. However, which cues were used varied between assessments: history of recent violence predicted assessments of in-hospital risk, whereas violence in the distant past predicted the assessed risk in the community. Crucially, several factors included in actuarial/structured risk assessment tools had little influence on clinicians' assessments. Our findings point to the adaptivity in clinicians' violence risk assessments, with a preference for relying on information consistent with the setting for which the assessment applies. The implication is that clinicians are open to using different structured assessment tools for different kinds of risk assessment, although they may seek greater flexibility in their assessments than some structured risk assessment tools afford (e.g., discounting static risk factors). Across three separate violence risk assessments, clinicians' risk assessments were more strongly influenced by dynamic cues that can vary over time (e.g., level of violence) than by

  1. Risk Factors and Clinical Outcomes of Bacterial and Fungal Scleritis at a Tertiary Eye Care Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jagadesh C.; Murthy, Somasheila I.; Reddy, Ashok K.; Garg, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to analyze demographics, risk factors, pathogenic organisms, and clinical outcome in cases with microbiologically proven bacterial or fungal scleritis. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of all the medical records of patients with microbiologically proven infectious scleritis examined from March 2005 to December 2009 in the cornea services of L. V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India was done. Results: Forty-two eyes of 42 patients were included in this study. The mean age at presentation was 48.52 ± 14.10 years (range: 12-70). Surgery was the major risk factor seen in 24 eyes (58.5%). Scleral infection was noted after vitreoretinal surgery (with scleral buckle) in 15 eyes, cataract surgery in 3 eyes, pterygium surgery in 3 eyes, corneoscleral tear repair and scleral buckle surgery in 3 eyes. Sixteen eyes (39%) were on systemic or topical steroids at the time of presentation. History of injury was noted in 9 eyes (22%) and diabetes mellitus in 7 patients (17%). Associated keratitis was noted in 9 eyes (21.4%). The scleral abscess was unifocal in 33 eyes (78.5%), multifocal in 6 eyes (14.2%) and diffuse in 3 eyes (7.14%). The final follow-up ranged from 24 days to 37 months. The final visual acuity was better in 18 eyes (42.8%), stable in 13 (30.9%), and deteriorated in 7 eyes (16.6%). Recurrence was seen in 4 eyes (9.5%). Conclusions: Surgery is a major risk factor for infectious scleritis in our series. Fungus was the most common organism isolated. Thorough debridement and intensive use of medications have improved the outcome. PMID:25949079

  2. Paresthesia and sensory disturbances associated with 2009 pandemic vaccine receipt: Clinical features and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Serres, Gaston; Rouleau, Isabelle; Skowronski, Danuta M; Ouakki, Manale; Lacroix, Kevin; Bédard, Fernand; Toth, Eveline; Landry, Monique; Dupré, Nicolas

    2015-08-26

    Paresthesia was the third-most-common adverse event following immunization (AEFI) with 2009 monovalent AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine in Quebec, Canada and was also frequently reported in Europe. This study assessed clinical features and risk factors associated with this unexpected AEFI. Reports to the passive surveillance system were summarized. A case-control study was conducted to assess risk factors and additional investigations were undertaken among cases with symptoms persisting ≥12 months. There were 328 reports of paresthesia affecting the vaccinated arm (58%), but also face (45%), lower limbs (40%) and back/thorax (23%) with numbness but also muscle weakness (61%), motor impairment (61%), generalized myalgia (37%), visual (14%) and/or speech effects (15%). Reporting rate was highest in women of reproductive age, peaking at 30-39 years-old (28/100,000 doses administered) and exceeding that of men of the same age (7/100,000 doses) by 4-fold. Median time to onset was 2h. Symptoms subsided within one week in 37% but lasted ≥6 months in 26%. No consistent or objective neurological findings were identified. Risk was increased with allergy history, respiratory illness the day of vaccination, depressive symptoms and family history of pulmonary disease, but decreased with physical activity the day of vaccination, and regular weekly alcohol consumption. Paresthesia following 2009 pandemic vaccine receipt lasted several weeks and included other motor-sensory disturbances in an important subset of patients. Although it does not correspond with known neurological disease, and causality remains uncertain, further investigation is warranted to understand the nature and frequency of paresthesia as a possible AEFI with influenza vaccines. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. A PROSPECTIVE CLINICAL STUDY TO EVALUATE RISK FACTORS FOR AGE RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Age related macular degeneration (AMD is a leadi ng cause of irreversible blindness among the elderly worldwide affecting 30 - 50 million individuals. AMD is more common in developed world. AMD is characterized by central visual loss. Advanced AMD can be classified in broadly into two types: dry and wet fo rm. Several clear risk factors for the development and progression of age related macular degeneration have been established are advancing age, genetic factors, history of smoking ,white race, obesity, high dietary intake of vegetable fat, low dietary inta ke of antioxidants and zinc. This prospective non - interventional study was conducted from February 2011 to October 2012 in the Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, included patients who attended the eye OPD, retina clinic and eye ward and were diagnosed as a case of AMD. Present study included 174 patients out of which patients 79(45.39% were above the age of 70 years, with 51 (29.31% patients between 61 - 70 years and 44 cases (25.28% in the sixth decade. Male: female ratio was 0 .75: 1. 21 (12.06% patients have a positive family history of AMD. Most common risk factor identified in our study was chronic sun exposure (49.42% followed by hypertension in 41.8% patients. 25.26% cases gave history of smoking and raised serum cholest erol levels were seen in 14.28% cases. History of alcoholism was positive in 19.54% patients. Of the 174 cases in our present study 90 patients (51.72% were hypermetropic. Conclusion: Age related macular degeneration is a disease of elderly with risk fact ors, most of them are preventable. If timely proper measures are taken, a major cause of blindness can be prevented in elderly age group.

  4. Benefits, risks and ethical considerations in translation of stem cell research to clinical applications in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Zubin; McLeod, Marcus; Mendez, Ivar

    2007-03-01

    Stem cells are likely to be used as an alternate source of biological material for neural transplantation to treat Parkinson's disease in the not too distant future. Among the several ethical criteria that must be fulfilled before proceeding with clinical research, a favourable benefit to risk ratio must be obtained. The potential benefits to the participant and to society are evaluated relative to the risks in an attempt to offer the participants a reasonable choice. Through examination of preclinical studies transplanting stem cells in animals and the transplantation of fetal tissue in patients with Parkinson's disease, a current set of potential benefits and risks for neural transplantation of stem cells in clinical research of Parkinson's disease are derived. The potential benefits to research participants undergoing stem cell transplantation are relief of parkinsonian symptoms and decreasing doses of parkinsonian drugs. Transplantation of stem cells as a treatment for Parkinson's disease may benefit society by providing knowledge that can be used to help determine better treatments in the future. The risks to research participants undergoing stem cell transplantation include tumour formation, inappropriate stem cell migration, immune rejection of transplanted stem cells, haemorrhage during neurosurgery and postoperative infection. Although some of these risks are general to neurosurgical transplantation and may not be reduced for participants, the potential risk of tumour formation and inappropriate stem cell migration must be minimised before obtaining a favourable potential benefit to risk calculus and to provide participants with a reasonable choice before they enroll in clinical studies.

  5. Cardiovascular Risk and Level of Statin Use Among Women With Breast Cancer in a Cardio-Oncology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Kelly; Solivan, Amber; Parto, Parham; Polin, Nichole; Jahangir, Eiman

    2016-01-01

    Because of the improvements in survival rates, patients with breast cancer are now more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than from cancer. Thus, providing appropriate preventive cardiovascular care to patients with cancer is of the utmost importance. We retrospectively compared the cardiovascular risk and management of 146 women treated at the Cardio-Oncology (Cardio-Onc) and the Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob-Gyn) clinics. We calculated cardiovascular risk using the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk calculator and the Framingham Risk Score Calculator. We also determined the prevalence of appropriate statin use according to both the 2013 ACC/AHA and the 2002 Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III lipid guidelines. The 10-year ASCVD risk score was not significantly different between the 2 cohorts. More patients in the Ob-Gyn cohort with an ASCVD risk score >7.5% were already appropriately on statins compared to patients in the Cardio-Onc cohort (60.9% vs 31.0%, respectively, P=0.003), but after the first Cardio-Onc visit, 4 additional patients with breast cancer were prescribed statins (44.8% total). Fourteen (19.2%) Cardio-Onc patients had a high Framingham Risk Score compared to 6 (8.2%) Ob-Gyn patients. We demonstrated that the ASCVD risk is similar between women with breast cancer attending the Cardio-Onc clinic and the women without breast cancer attending the Ob-Gyn clinic, but the Cardio-Onc cohort had significantly more patients with a high Framingham Risk Score. Both clinics had similarly poor rates of appropriate statin prescribing rates according to the ATP III guidelines.

  6. Impact of educational strategies in low-risk prenatal care: systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Esther Pereira da; Lima, Roberto Teixeira de; Osório, Mônica Maria

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze the impact of educational strategies developed in low-risk prenatal care on obstetric outcomes from a systematic literature review. This review consulted databases PubMed, Medline, SciELO and Lilacs, analyzing randomized clinical trials with the following birth outcomes: birth weight, prematurity and breastfeeding, using the following combination of keywords: pre-natal, antenatal visits, education, health education, pregnancy outcomes, birth weight, prematurity, breastfeeding and randomized clinical trial. Nine studies were included following quality evaluation. Actions prove to be more effective when extended to the postpartum period. Most of them occurred during home visits and had a positive impact on breastfeeding and birth weight. The establishment of groups of pregnant women contributed to lower prevalence of prematurity. Breastfeeding was found to be the outcome most sensitive to educational strategies. Educational practices during the prenatal period contributed to favorable obstetric outcomes as they minimized pregnant women concerns and anxiety during the pregnancy process, preparing them for childbirth and postpartum, and should be incorporated into health services' work process.

  7. The biopharmaceutics risk assessment roadmap for optimizing clinical drug product performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selen, Arzu; Dickinson, Paul A; Müllertz, Anette; Crison, John R; Mistry, Hitesh B; Cruañes, Maria T; Martinez, Marilyn N; Lennernäs, Hans; Wigal, Tim L; Swinney, David C; Polli, James E; Serajuddin, Abu T M; Cook, Jack A; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2014-11-01

    The biopharmaceutics risk assessment roadmap (BioRAM) optimizes drug product development and performance by using therapy-driven target drug delivery profiles as a framework to achieve the desired therapeutic outcome. Hence, clinical relevance is directly built into early formulation development. Biopharmaceutics tools are used to identify and address potential challenges to optimize the drug product for patient benefit. For illustration, BioRAM is applied to four relatively common therapy-driven drug delivery scenarios: rapid therapeutic onset, multiphasic delivery, delayed therapeutic onset, and maintenance of target exposure. BioRAM considers the therapeutic target with the drug substance characteristics and enables collection of critical knowledge for development of a dosage form that can perform consistently for meeting the patient's needs. Accordingly, the key factors are identified and in vitro, in vivo, and in silico modeling and simulation techniques are used to elucidate the optimal drug delivery rate and pattern. BioRAM enables (1) feasibility assessment for the dosage form, (2) development and conduct of appropriate "learning and confirming" studies, (3) transparency in decision-making, (4) assurance of drug product quality during lifecycle management, and (5) development of robust linkages between the desired clinical outcome and the necessary product quality attributes for inclusion in the quality target product profile.

  8. Persistent suicide risk in clinically improved schizophrenia patients: challenge of the suicidal dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amresh Shrivastava

    2010-09-01

    reported previous significant suicidality at baseline. No sociodemographic and clinical variables at baseline were predictive of suicidal status at the end of the 10-year follow-up.Conclusion: Schizophrenia is a complex neurobehavioral disorder that appears to be closely associated with suicidal behavior. Adequate assessment and management of suicidality needs to be a continual process, even in patients who respond well to treatment.Keywords: schizophrenia, suicide risk, prevention 

  9. Plasma Total Antioxidant Capacity and Cardiometabolic Risk in Non-Obese and Clinically Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jamille Oliveira; Vásquez, Cecília M Passos; Santana, Gleiciane de Jesus; Silva, Natanael de Jesus; Braz, Juciene de Matos; Jesus, Amélia M Ribeiro de; Silva, Danielle Góes da; Cunha, Luana Celina Seraphim; Barbosa, Kiriaque Barra Ferreira

    2017-07-10

    The oxidative biomarkers play an important role in the genesis of cardiometabolic risk-related processes. To investigate the total antioxidant capacity of plasma and its association with cardiometabolic risk in non-obese and clinically healthy young adults. University students of the state of Sergipe, Brazil, aged between 18 and 25 years, were recruited for this study from May of 2013 and October of 2014. Anthropometric, clinical and biochemical parameters were measured and analyzed using protocols which were previously standardized and described in the literature. The measurement of plasma total antioxidant capacity was based on the ability that all the antioxidants present in the sample (plasma) have to inhibit the oxidation of the oxidizable substrate ABTS (2,2`- Azino-di-[3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulphonate]) to ABTS•+ by metmyoglobin. Approximately 25% of the sample presented more than one component of cardiometabolic risk. Low HDL-cholesterol was the most prevalent component. Compared to absence of components, the subjects with at least one component presented greater body weight and waist circumference, higher levels of diastolic blood pressure and fasting glucose, greater total cholesterol/HDL-c ratio, and lower levels of HDL-c (p literatura. A medida da capacidade antioxidante total do plasma baseou-se na capacidade de todos os antioxidantes presentes na amostra (plasma) em inibir a oxidação do substrato oxidável ABTS (2,2-Azino-bis-(3-etilbenzotiazolina-6-sulfonato) a ABTS•+ pela metamioglobina. Aproximadamente 25% da amostra apresentaram mais de um componente do risco cardiometabólico. Valores baixos de HDL foram o componente mais prevalente. Em comparação à ausência de componentes, os indivíduos com pelo menos um componente apresentou valores mais altos de peso corporal, circunferência da cintura, pressão sanguínea diastólica, glicemia de jejum e razão colesterol total/HDL-c, e valores mais baixos de HDL-c (p < 0,05). A glicemia de jejum

  10. [Stratification of clinical risk groups in a population over 65 years: features and nursing assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Vidal, Ruth; López-Pisa, Rosa M; Boyero-Granados, Ana; Recio-Ramos, Sandra; Padín-Minaya, Cristina; Garzón-Quiñones, Marina; Rodríguez-Latre, Luisa M

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the characteristics of the population over 65 years served in a Basic Health Area, according to the Clinical Risk Group (CRG) classification and geriatric assessment test performed by the nurse in relation to their complexity. A descriptive, cross-sectional and observational prevalence study was conducted on the population over 65 years served in a Basic Health Area. The variables collected were: socio-demographic, CRG classification, diseases (ICD-10), healthcare activity, geriatric assessment, and preventive activities. The CRG classification was used as a measurement tool. Data was collected from the Primary Care computerized clinical history (e-CAP). Population over 65 years: 3,219 people; served at home, 130 (4%), and in residential institutions, 92 (2.85%). The population was grouped into: CRG 1-2: 83 (2.5%); CRG 3: 62 (2%); CRG 4: 99 (3%); CRG 5: 537 (17%); CRG 6: 2,077 (64.5%); CRG 7: 276 (8.6%); CRG 8: 61 (2%); CRG 9: 14 (0.4%). Most frequent chronic diseases: 69.12% AHT; 24.94% DM; 19.51% depression; 11.09% kidney failure. The groups 6-7-8 that were analyzed included 2,414 people (75%). Of those within CRG 6-7-8, only 570 (24%) had tests carried out by the geriatric nurse. The mean number of individuals assigned by a nurse for CRG 6-7-8 was 302. The introduction of classification systems in clinical practice, such as the CRG, along with the use of the new information and communication technologies, helps to incorporate predictive models of health needs. It also promotes proactive actions by nurses and the team to prevent complications of diseases, as well as improving efficiency in the use of services and in care of the complex patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical characteristics of destructive periodontitis in a risk group of Swedish urban adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söder, B; Jin, L J; Söder, P O; Wikner, S

    1995-01-01

    An initial screening investigation of 1681 Swedish urban adults aged 31-40 years with untreated periodontitis showed that 17.2% (289) had at least one site with probing depth > or = 5 mm. The 289 subjects were offered a complete clinical examination and treatment. 144 subjects, 85 men and 59 women, agreed to participate and 145 were non-responding subjects and used as a drop out sample. The results from the screening data showed that the attendants had poorer oral hygiene status and more severe periodontitis than the drop out subjects. The present report describes clinical data of this representative sample with adult periodontitis. Clinical indices were recorded and bone height (BH%) for all teeth was measured with a computer digitizing system. In the 144 attendants, Plaque Index was > 1 in 56.2%, Calculus Index was > 1 in 57.0%, Gingival Index was > 1 in 97.2% and bleeding on probing was found in 89.1% of the sites. 11.1% of the subjects had 1-3 teeth with probing depth > or = 5 mm, 59.0% 4-10 teeth, 25.7% 11-20 teeth and 4.2% > 20 teeth. 47.9% of the subjects had mean BH% less than 80. 45.1% of the subjects had at least one site with an intrabony defect, of which 20% had 3-4 sites and 27.7% > or = 5 sites. It is concluded that advanced generalized periodontitis exists in a limited number of 31-40 year-olds in Sweden. Specific risk factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  12. Evaluation of clinical and laboratory markers of cardiometabolic risk in overweight and obese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Marcelina da Cunha Palhares

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study analyzed the frequency of cardiometabolic risk markers and metabolic syndrome occurrence in overweight and obese children and adolescents. METHODS: The participants included 161 overweight (n=65 and obese (n=96 individuals aged between 5 and 19 years. Clinical markers were assessed (body mass index, body fat percentage, waist circumference, acanthosis, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, laboratory parameters [glucose, insulin, cholesterol (total and fractions and triglyceride levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index] and leptin and adiponectin levels. The frequency of changes, odds ratios and correlations among markers were determined. Metabolic syndrome was assessed according to International Diabetes Federation criteria. RESULTS: A high frequency of acanthosis (51.6%; increased waist circumference (45.4%, systolic blood pressure / diastolic blood pressure (8.1% / 9.3%, glucose (10%, insulin (36.9% and HOMA-IR (44.3% values; and reduced high-density lipoprotein levels (47.2% were observed. Leptin levels were increased in 95% of obese and in 66% of overweight subjects. Adiponectin was decreased in 29.5% of obese and in 34% of overweight subjects. An odd ratio analysis revealed a greater probability of increased waist circumference (9.0, systolic blood pressure (4.1, triglyceride (2.3 and insulin (2.9 levels and HOMA-IR (3.0 in the obese group than in the overweight group. The clinical and laboratory parameters and leptin levels exhibited significant correlations, whereas adiponectin was negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure. The occurrence rate of metabolic syndrome was 13.6%. CONCLUSIONS: The high frequency of changes in clinical, laboratory and adipokine markers indicates the need for early interventions aimed at preventing cardiometabolic complications in adulthood.

  13. Clinical utility of early amplitude integrated EEG in monitoring term newborns at risk of neurological injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina A. Toso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to test the clinical utility of an early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG to predict short-term neurological outcome in term newborns at risk of neurology injury. METHODS: this was a prospective, descriptive study. The inclusion criteria were neonatal encephalopathy, neurologic disturbances, and severe respiratory distress syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed. Neurological outcome was defined as the sum of clinical, electroimaging, and neuroimaging findings. RESULTS: ten of the 21 monitored infants (48% presented altered short-term neurologic outcome. The aEEG had 90% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% positive predictive value, and 90% negative predictive value. The positive LR was 4.95, and the negative LR was 0.12. In three of 12 (25% encephalopathic infants, the aEEG allowed for a better definition of the severity of their condition. Seizures were detected in eight infants (38%, all subclinical at baseline, and none had a normal aEEG background pattern. The status of three infants (43% evolved and required two or more drugs for treatment. CONCLUSIONS: in infants with encephalopathy or other severe illness, aEEG disturbances occur frequently. aEEG provided a better classification of the severity of encephalopathy, detected early subclinical seizures, and allowed for monitoring of the response to treatment. aEEG was a useful tool at the neonatal intensive care unit for predicting poor short-term neurological outcomes for all sick newborn.

  14. Minimizing repolarization-related proarrhythmic risk in drug development and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Attila S; Nattel, Stanley

    2010-03-26

    Proarrhythmia, the development of new or worse arrhythmias in response to drug therapy, is a major limitation to the development and use of new drugs. There are different types of drug-induced proarrhythmia, including long-QT syndrome (LQTS), short-QT syndrome and proarrhythmia related to Na+-channel blockade/conduction impairment. By far the most important form of proarrhythmia at present is drug-induced LQTS and its associated characteristic tachyarrhythmia, torsades de pointes (TdP). TdP arises when cellular action potentials (APs) are excessively prolonged, leading to arrhythmogenic afterdepolarizations, especially early afterdepolarizations (EADs), which trigger complex re-entry in a substrate involving increased transmural dispersion of repolarization. In vitro screening, increasingly involving high-throughput assays, is used to assess potential candidate molecules and eliminate potentially problematic structures at an early stage of development. The most commonly used screening assays assess drug block of the K+ current carried by human ether-à-go-go (hERG) subunits, corresponding to the rapid delayed-rectifier K+ channel, the overwhelmingly most common target of TdP-inducing drugs. In addition, the effects of drugs on AP duration or the in vivo equivalent, QT interval, are often assessed in animal models. Methods available for repolarization-related proarrhythmic risk assessment include in vitro (Langendorff-perfused rabbit or guinea pig hearts) and in vivo models (such as alpha-adrenoceptor-stimulated rabbits, rabbits with reduced repolarization reserve due to block of slow delayed-rectifier current, animals with chronic atrioventricular block or animals with cardiac remodelling caused by congestive heart failure). In silico modelling may be helpful for molecular design of non-hERG blocking candidates and for optimization of compound selection (at the molecular and pharmacological profile levels). Finally, clinical evaluation of effects on

  15. Two approaches to incorporate clinical data uncertainty into multiple criteria decision analysis for benefit-risk assessment of medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shihua; Zhang, Lanju; Yang, Bo

    2014-07-01

    The Problem formulation, Objectives, Alternatives, Consequences, Trade-offs, Uncertainties, Risk attitude, and Linked decisions (PrOACT-URL) framework and multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) have been recommended by the European Medicines Agency for structured benefit-risk assessment of medicinal products undergoing regulatory review. The objective of this article was to provide solutions to incorporate the uncertainty from clinical data into the MCDA model when evaluating the overall benefit-risk profiles among different treatment options. Two statistical approaches, the δ-method approach and the Monte-Carlo approach, were proposed to construct the confidence interval of the overall benefit-risk score from the MCDA model as well as other probabilistic measures for comparing the benefit-risk profiles between treatment options. Both approaches can incorporate the correlation structure between clinical parameters (criteria) in the MCDA model and are straightforward to implement. The two proposed approaches were applied to a case study to evaluate the benefit-risk profile of an add-on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (drug X) relative to placebo. It demonstrated a straightforward way to quantify the impact of the uncertainty from clinical data to the benefit-risk assessment and enabled statistical inference on evaluating the overall benefit-risk profiles among different treatment options. The δ-method approach provides a closed form to quantify the variability of the overall benefit-risk score in the MCDA model, whereas the Monte-Carlo approach is more computationally intensive but can yield its true sampling distribution for statistical inference. The obtained confidence intervals and other probabilistic measures from the two approaches enhance the benefit-risk decision making of medicinal products. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A clinical risk model for the evaluation of bronchopleural fistula in non-small cell lung cancer after pneumonectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xue-fei; Duan, Liang; Jiang, Ge-ning; Wang, Hao; Liu, Hong-cheng; Chen, Chang

    2013-08-01

    There are no reliable risk factors to predict bronchopleural fistula (BPF) formation in patients undergoing pneumonectomy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study aims to create a validated clinical model based on the risk factors for BPF after pneumonectomy. The model to estimate the risk of BPF may help select patients for intervention therapy to reduce the rate of BPF after pneumonectomy. This retrospective analysis included 684 patients with NSCLC who underwent pneumonectomy at our institution from 1995 to 2012. The rates of BPF were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent risk factors for the BPF and based on which a clinical model for the prediction of the incidence of BPF was formed. The incidence of BPF was 4.4% (30 of 684 patients). Three factors were independently associated with BPF after pneumonectomy for NSCLC: neoadjuvant therapy (hazard ratio, 2.479), diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio, 1.061), and age 70 years or older (hazard ratio, 1.175). A scoring system for BPF was developed by assigning 2 points for a major risk factor (neoadjuvant therapy) and 1 point for each minor risk factor (diabetes mellitus and age ≥ 70 years). The 684 patients were divided into a low-risk group (score, 0 to 1), moderate-risk group (score, 2), and high-risk group (score, ≥ 3), with respective incidences of early BPF after pneumonectomy of 2.4%, 18.2%, and 58.3% This model, based on readily available clinical characteristics, can estimate the risk of BPF after pneumonectomy in the NSCLC patients, independent of early BPF and late BPF classifications. This model could be used to select patients for intervention therapy (parenteral alimentation, control of blood glucose level, oxygen therapy, and strengthening the antibiotic treatment) if validated in independent data sets. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences and clinical risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li W

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wei Li,1 Su Zeng,2 Lu-Shan Yu,2 Quan Zhou31Division of Medical Affairs, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis and Drug Metabolism, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pharmacy, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI, is widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and functional dyspepsia. Polypharmacy is common in patients receiving omeprazole. Drug toxicity and treatment failure resulting from inappropriate combination therapy with omeprazole have been reported sporadically. Systematic review has not been available to address the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences, the factors determining the degree of DDI between omeprazole and comedication, and the corresponding clinical risk management.Methods: Literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1988 to March 2013. The full text of each article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed.Results: Omeprazole has actual adverse influences on the pharmacokinetics of medications such as diazepam, carbamazepine, clozapine, indinavir, nelfinavir, atazanavir, rilpivirine, methotrexate, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, clopidogrel, digoxin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and oral iron supplementation. Meanwhile, low efficacy of omeprazole treatment would be anticipated, as omeprazole elimination could be significantly induced by comedicated efavirenz and herb medicines such as St John's wort, Ginkgo biloba, and yin zhi huang. The mechanism for DDI involves induction or inhibition of cytochrome P450, inhibition of P-glycoprotein or breast

  18. Breast Cancer Risk Assessment at the Time of Screening Mammography: Perceptions and Clinical Management Outcomes for Women at High Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Nichole A; Byrne, Lindsey; Collins, Christy; Reynolds, Kelly; Bell, Jeffrey G

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of a breast cancer risk assessment (BCRA) at the time of screening mammogram. Women whose BCRA indicated a high risk for cancer received a letter with instructions for breast health care and genetic counseling if appropriate. After 6 months this group received surveys to evaluate their risk perception and their recall of, and compliance with, recommendations. We also explored the impact of other variables such as a recommendation for genetic counseling and physician communication with the women. After the BCRA, the majority of high risk women reported no change in their perceived risk of cancer. A woman's perceived risk of cancer after a BCRA was significantly associated with her recall of recommendations for breast health care, but not with compliance. A recommendation for genetic counseling was not significantly related to women's perceived risk of cancer after the BCRA. Ten percent of women who should have obtained genetic counseling actually completed an appointment. Women who discussed their BCRA results with their physicians were more compliant with a six month breast exam with a doctor (53% vs 17%, p = 0.018). Overall, women felt that the BCRA was helpful and did not cause undue stress or anxiety. Although the cohort's compliance with recommendations was suboptimal, physicians' interactions with their patients may have a positive influence on their compliance.

  19. Sex Differences in the Excess Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases Associated with Type 2 Diabetes: Potential Explanations and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sanne A E; Huxley, Rachel R; Sattar, Naveed; Woodward, Mark

    Strong evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes confers a stronger excess risk of cardiovascular diseases in women than in men; with women having a 27 % higher relative risk of stroke and a 44 % higher relative risk of coronary heart disease compared with men. The mechanisms that underpin these sex differences in the associations between diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk are not fully understood. Some of the excess risk may be the result of a sex disparity in the management and treatment of diabetes, to the detriment of women. However, accruing evidence suggests that real biological differences between men and women underpin the excess risk of diabetes-related cardiovascular risk in women such that there is a greater decline in risk factor status in women than in men in the transition from normoglycemia to overt diabetes. This greater risk factor decline appears to be associated with women having to put on more weight than men, and thus attain a higher body mass index, to develop diabetes. Further studies addressing the mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the excess risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with diabetes are needed to improve the prevention and management of diabetes in clinical practise.

  20. Descriptive and numeric estimation of risk for psychotic disorders among affected individuals and relatives: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Jehannine C; Hippman, Catriona; Honer, William G

    2012-03-30

    Studies show that individuals with psychotic illnesses and their families want information about psychosis risks for other relatives. However, deriving accurate numeric probabilities for psychosis risk is challenging, and people have difficulty interpreting probabilistic information; thus, some have suggested that clinicians should use risk descriptors, such as "moderate" or "quite high", rather than numbers. Little is known about how individuals with psychosis and their family members use quantitative and qualitative descriptors of risk in the specific context of chance for an individual to develop psychosis. We explored numeric and descriptive estimations of psychosis risk among individuals with psychotic disorders and unaffected first-degree relatives. In an online survey, respondents numerically and descriptively estimated risk for an individual to develop psychosis in scenarios where they had: A) no affected family members; and B) an affected sibling. Participants comprised 219 affected individuals and 211 first-degree relatives participated. Affected individuals estimated significantly higher risks than relatives. Participants attributed all descriptors between "very low" and "very high" to probabilities of 1%, 10%, 25% and 50%+. For a given numeric probability, different risk descriptors were attributed in different scenarios. Clinically, brief interventions around risk (using either probabilities or descriptors alone) are vulnerable to miscommunication and potentially negative consequences-interventions around risk are best suited to in-depth discussion.

  1. Environmental risk factors for clinical malaria: a case-control study in the Grau region of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthmann, J P; Hall, A J; Jaffar, S; Palacios, A; Lines, J; Llanos-Cuentas, A

    2001-01-01

    The role of environmental risk factors in clinical malaria has been studied mainly in Africa and Asia, few investigations have been carried out in Latin America. Field observations in northern coastal Peru, where the prevalence of malaria is high during the agricultural season, suggested that the risk of disease varied according to the characteristics of the house and the house environment. Environmental determinants of the risk of clinical malaria were therefore investigated through a case-control study: 323 clinical cases of malaria, recruited through community-based active case-finding, and 969 age-, sex- and village-matched controls were recruited into the study over a period of 12 months ending June 1997. Residual spraying of houses in the previous 6 months, living more than 100 m from a canal, a level of education equal to primary school or above and working in agriculture conferred significant protection from the risk of developing clinical malaria. The presence of spaces between the wall and roof in the subject's bedroom (eaves) and a house aged > 4 years statistically significantly increased the risk of disease. Based on these results we discuss possible control measures for malaria in this area of the country.

  2. Clinical Evaluation of a New Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Instrument, the Pressure Ulcer Risk Primary or Secondary Evaluation Tool (PURPOSE T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Susanne; Smith, Isabelle L; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Keen, Justin; Muir, Delia; Wilson, Lyn; Stubbs, Nikki; Dealey, Carol; Brown, Sarah; Nelson, E Andrea; Nixon, Jane

    2017-08-23

    To test the psychometric properties and clinical usability of a new Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Instrument including inter-rater and test-retest reliability, convergent validity and data completeness. Methodological and practical limitations associated with traditional Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Instruments, prompted a programme to work to develop a new instrument, as part of the National Institute for Health Research funded, Pressure UlceR Programme Of reSEarch (RP-PG-0407-10056). Observational field test. For this clinical evaluation 230 patients were purposefully sampled across four broad levels of pressure ulcer risk with representation from 4 secondary care and 4 community NHS Trusts in England. Blinded and simultaneous paired (ward/community nurse and expert nurse) PURPOSE-T assessments were undertaken. Follow-up retest was undertaken by the expert nurse. Field notes of PURPOSE-T use were collected. Data were collected October 2012-Jan 2013. The clinical evaluation demonstrated 'very good' (kappa) inter-rater and test-retest agreement for PURPOSE-T assessment decision overall. The percentage agreement for 'problem/no problem' was over 75% for the main risk factors. Convergent validity demonstrated moderate to high associations with other measures of similar constructs. The PURPOSE-T evaluation facilitated the initial validation and clinical usability of the instrument and demonstrated that PURPOSE-T is suitable of use in clinical practice. Further study is needed to evaluate the impact of using the instrument on care processes and outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. The clinical course of acute otitis media in high-risk Australian Aboriginal children: a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Skull Susan A; Carapetis Jonathan R; Morris Peter S; Gibney Katherine B; Smith-Vaughan Heidi C; Stubbs Elizabeth; Leach Amanda J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background It is unclear why some children with acute otitis media (AOM) have poor outcomes. Our aim was to describe the clinical course of AOM and the associated bacterial nasopharyngeal colonisation in a high-risk population of Australian Aboriginal children. Methods We examined Aboriginal children younger than eight years who had a clinical diagnosis of AOM. Pneumatic otoscopy and video-otoscopy of the tympanic membrane (TM) and tympanometry was done every weekday if possible. We ...

  4. Plasma HIV-1 tropism and risk of short-term clinical progression to AIDS or death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Casadellà Fontdevila

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is uncertain if plasma HIV-1 tropism is an independent predictor of short-term risk of clinical progression / death, in addition to the CD4 count and HIV RNA level. We conducted a nested case-control study within EuroSIDA to assess this question amongst people with current HIV RNA level >1000 copies/mL, including both people on ART and those ART naïve. Methods: People with an AIDS diagnosis or who died from any causes for whom there was a stored plasma sample with HIV-1 RNA (VL≥1,000 copies/mL available in the time window of 3–12 months prior to the event were identified. At least one control was selected for each case matched for age, VL and HCV status at the time of sampling. Controls were event-free after a matched duration of time from the date of sampling. Plasma HIV tropism was estimated using 454 and population sequencing (PS. Non-R5 HIV was defined as: (a ≥2% of sequences with a Geno2Pheno (G2P FPR≤3.75% by 454, and (b a G2P FPR≤10% by PS. We also compared CD4 slopes over the 12 months following the date of sampling using a linear mixed model with random intercept according to HIV tropism and ART status. Results: The study included 266 subjects, 100 cases and 166 controls, with sample taken on average in 2006; 23% and 24% had non-R5 HIV by 454 and PS respectively. There were 19% women, 25% MSM, 92% Caucasians, 22% HCV+. At the time of sampling, 26% were ART-naïve, 25% had started but were off ART and 49% were receiving ART. The median age, CD4 and viral load was 41 years, 350 cells/mm3 and 4.81 log c/mL, respectively. Baseline characteristics were well balanced by tropism. Factors independently associated with clinical progression or death were female gender (OR=2.12; 95% CI=1.04, 4.36; p=0.038, CD4+ count (OR=0.90 per 100 cells/mm3 higher; 95% CI 0.80, 1.00; p=0.058, being on ART (OR=2.72; 95% CI 1.15, 6.41; p=0.022 and calendar year of sample (OR=0.84 per more recent year; 95% CI=0.77, 0.91; p<0

  5. Clinical and non-clinical depressive symptoms and risk of long-term sickness absence among female employees in the Danish eldercare sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarsbech, PU; Andersen, Rikke Voss; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2011-01-01

    Background: Depression has a high point and life time prevalence and is a major cause of reduced work ability and long-term sickness absence (LTSA). Less is known of the extent to which non-clinical depressive symptoms are related to the risk of LTSA. The aim of this study was to investigate how...... non-clinical and clinical depressive symptoms are prospectively associated to subsequent LTSA. Methods: In a cohort study of 6985 femaleemployees fromthe Danish eldercare sector depressive symptoms were measured by the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and scores (0–50) were divided into groups of 0......–4, 5–9, 10–14, 15–19,=20 points and clinical depression. Datawas linked to a national register with information on LTSA (=3 weeks). Hazard ratios (HR) for LTSA during a 1-year follow-up were calculated by Cox's proportional hazards model. Results: Compared to the reference group (0–4) the HR...

  6. The validation and clinical implementation of BRCAplus: a comprehensive high-risk breast cancer diagnostic assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansook Kim Chong

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women, with 10% of disease attributed to hereditary factors. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for a high percentage of hereditary cases, there are more than 25 susceptibility genes that differentially impact the risk for breast cancer. Traditionally, germline testing for breast cancer was performed by Sanger dideoxy terminator sequencing in a reflexive manner, beginning with BRCA1 and BRCA2. The introduction of next-generation sequencing (NGS has enabled the simultaneous testing of all genes implicated in breast cancer resulting in diagnostic labs offering large, comprehensive gene panels. However, some physicians prefer to only test for those genes in which established surveillance and treatment protocol exists. The NGS based BRCAplus test utilizes a custom tiled PCR based target enrichment design and bioinformatics pipeline coupled with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH to identify mutations in the six high-risk genes: BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, TP53, CDH1, and STK11. Validation of the assay with 250 previously characterized samples resulted in 100% detection of 3,025 known variants and analytical specificity of 99.99%. Analysis of the clinical performance of the first 3,000 BRCAplus samples referred for testing revealed an average coverage greater than 9,000X per target base pair resulting in excellent specificity and the sensitivity to detect low level mosaicism and allele-drop out. The unique design of the assay enabled the detection of pathogenic mutations missed by previous testing. With the abundance of NGS diagnostic tests being released, it is essential that clinicians understand the advantages and limitations of different test designs.

  7. Serum fructosamine and glycated albumin and risk of mortality and clinical outcomes in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Tariq; Sozio, Stephen M; Plantinga, Laura C; Jaar, Bernard G; Kim, Edward T; Parekh, Rulan S; Steffes, Michael W; Powe, Neil R; Coresh, Josef; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    Assays for serum total glycated proteins (fructosamine) and the more specific glycated albumin may be useful indicators of hyperglycemia in dialysis patients, either as substitutes or adjuncts to standard markers such as hemoglobin A1c, as they are not affected by erythrocyte turnover. However, their relationship with long-term outcomes in dialysis patients is not well described. We measured fructosamine and glycated albumin in baseline samples from 503 incident hemodialysis participants of a national prospective cohort study, with enrollment from 1995-1998 and median follow-up of 3.5 years. Outcomes were all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and morbidity (first CVD event and first sepsis hospitalization) analyzed using Cox regression adjusted for demographic and clinical characteristics, and comorbidities. Mean age was 58 years, 64% were white, 54% were male, and 57% had diabetes. There were 354 deaths (159 from CVD), 302 CVD events, and 118 sepsis hospitalizations over follow-up. Both fructosamine and glycated albumin were associated with all-cause mortality; adjusted HR per doubling of the biomarker was 1.96 (95% CI 1.38-2.79) for fructosamine and 1.40 (1.09-1.80) for glycated albumin. Both markers were also associated with CVD mortality [fructosamine 2.13 (1.28-3.54); glycated albumin 1.55 (1.09-2.21)]. Higher values of both markers were associated with trends toward a higher risk of hospitalization with sepsis [fructosamine 1.75 (1.01-3.02); glycated albumin 1.39 (0.94-2.06)]. Serum fructosamine and glycated albumin are risk factors for mortality and morbidity in hemodialysis patients.

  8. Clinical characteristics and risk factors for mortality in adult patients with persistent candidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung Ji; Kim, Seong Eun; Kim, Uh Jin; Jang, Hee-Chang; Park, Kyung-Hwa; Shin, Jong Hee; Jung, Sook In

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the clinical characteristics and risk factors for mortality in adults with persistent candidemia. All patients ≥18 years old with candidemia in two Korean tertiary hospitals from 2007 to 2014 were investigated. Persistent candidemia was defined as isolation of the same Candida species ≥5 days after initiation of antifungal therapy. Non-persistent candidemia was defined as candidemia persisting for ≤3 days after initiation of antifungal therapy. Candida tropicalis (29.2%) was the most common pathogen in persistent candidemia, and Candida albicans (35.9%) was the most common in non-persistent candidemia. Central venous catheter (CVC) (OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.05-3.78; P = 0.034), longer hospital stay (OR 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01-1.02; P = 0.025), and severe sepsis (OR 2.25; 95% CI, 1.11-4.56; P = 0.024) were independent risk factors for persistent candidemia. C. tropicalis was independently related to 30-day mortality (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.27-13.36; P = 0.018), together with septic shock (OR, 5.81; 95% CI, 1.32-24.70; P = 0.017) and use of a corticosteroids (OR, 5.31; 95% CI, 1.07-26.29; P = 0.041) in persistent candidemia. C. tropicalis is the predominant pathogen and cause of death in patients with persistent candidemia. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurological complications after neonatal bacteremia: the clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ming Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neonates with bacteremia are at risk of neurologic complications. Relevant information warrants further elucidation. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort study of neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications (BNCs in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. A systemic chart review was performed conducted to identify clinical characteristics and outcomes. A cohort of related conditions was constructed as the control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for BNC. RESULTS: Of 1037 bacteremia episodes, 36 (3.5% had BNCs. Twenty-four cases of BNCs were related to meningitis, five were presumed meningitis, and seven occurred after septic shock. The most common causative pathogens were Group B streptococcus (41.7% and E. coli (16.7%. The major BNCs consisted of seizures (28, hydrocephalus (20, encephalomalacia (11, cerebral infarction (7, subdural empyema (6, ventriculitis (8, and abscess (4. Eight (22.8% neonates died and six (16.7% were discharged in critical condition when the family withdrew life-sustaining treatment. Among the 22 survivors, eight had neurologic sequelae upon discharge. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, neonates with meningitis caused by Group B streptococcus (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 8.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.20-36.08; p = 0.002 and combined meningitis and septic shock (OR, 5.94; 95% CI: 1.53-23.15; p = 0.010 were independently associated with BNCs. CONCLUSIONS: Neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications are associated with adverse outcomes or sequelae. Better strategies aimed at early detection and reducing the emergence of neurologic complications and aggressive treatment of Group B streptococcus sepsis are needed in neonates with meningitis and septic shock.

  10. Dissecting the association between metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer risk: analysis of a large clinical cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhindi, Bimal; Locke, Jennifer; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Kulkarni, Girish S; Margel, David S; Hamilton, Robert J; Finelli, Antonio; Trachtenberg, John; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Toi, Ants; Hersey, Karen M; Evans, Andrew; van der Kwast, Theodorus H; Fleshner, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    A biologic rationale exists for the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prostate cancer (PCa). However, epidemiologic studies have been conflicting. To evaluate the association between MetS and the odds of PCa diagnosis in men referred for biopsy. Patients without prior PCa diagnosis undergoing prostate biopsy were identified from a large prostate biopsy cohort (in Toronto, Canada). The definition of MetS was based on the most recent interim joint consensus definition, requiring any three of five components (obesity, elevated blood pressure, diabetes or impaired fasting glucose, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia). Both the individual components of MetS and the cumulative number of MetS components were evaluated. The outcomes were PCa detection overall, clinically significant PCa (CSPC; defined as any Gleason pattern ≥ 4, >50% involvement of a single biopsy core, or more than one of three total number of cores involved), and intermediate- or high-grade PCa (I-HGPC; Gleason 7-10). Tests for trend and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. Of 2235 patients, 494 (22.1%) had MetS. No individual MetS component was independently associated with PCa. However, increasing number of MetS components was associated with higher PCa grade (pcancer grade. Metabolic syndrome is a collection of metabolic abnormalities that increases one's risk for heart disease. Our study shows that an increasing degree of metabolic abnormality is also associated with an increased risk of diagnosis of overall and aggressive prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A clinic-based youth development program to reduce sexual risk behaviors among adolescent girls: prime time pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieving, Renee E; Bernat, Debra H; Resnick, Michael D; Oliphant, Jennifer; Pettingell, Sandra; Plowman, Shari; Skay, Carol

    2012-07-01

    Multifaceted, sustained efforts are needed to reduce early pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases among high-risk adolescents. An important area for research is testing youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful and few efforts have rigorously evaluated a dual approach of building protective factors while addressing risk. This article presents findings from a pilot study of Prime Time, a clinic-based youth development intervention to reduce sexual risk behaviors among girls at risk for early pregnancy. Girls aged 13 to 17 years meeting specified risk criteria were assigned to Prime Time treatment groups. The Prime Time intervention included a combination of case management services and peer leadership groups. Participants completed self-report surveys at baseline, 12 and 18 months following enrollment. At 12 months, the intervention group reported significantly fewer sexual partners than the control group. At 18 months, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent condom use with trends toward more consistent hormonal and dual method use. Dose-response analyses suggested that relatively high levels of exposure to a youth development intervention were needed to change contraceptive use behaviors among adolescents at risk for early pregnancy. Given promising findings, further testing of the Prime Time intervention is warranted.

  12. Syncope: Assessment of risk and an approach to evaluation in the emergency department and urgent care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Akdemir

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is among the most frequent forms of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC, and is characterized by a relatively brief and self-limited loss of consciousness that by definition is triggered by transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Most often, syncope is caused by a temporary drop of systemic arterial pressure below that required to maintain cerebral function, but brief enough not to cause permanent structural brain injury. Currently, approximately one-third of syncope/collapse patients seen in the emergency department (ED or urgent care clinic are admitted to hospital for evaluation. The primary objective of developing syncope/TLOC risk stratification schemes is to provide guidance regarding the immediate prognostic risk of syncope patients presenting to the ED or clinic; thereafter, based on that risk assessment physicians may be better equipped to determine which patients can be safely evaluated as outpatients, and which require hospital care. In general, the need for hospitalization is determined by several key issues: i the patient's immediate (usually considered 1 week to 1 month mortality risk and risk for physical injury (e.g., falls risk, ii the patient's ability to care for him/herself, and iii whether certain treatments inherently require in-hospital initiation (e.g., pacemaker implantation. However, at present no single risk assessment protocol appears to be satisfactory for universal application, and development of a consensus recommendation is an essential next step.

  13. Clinical outcomes and risk factors for technical and clinical failures of self-expandable metal stent insertion for malignant colorectal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin Young; Jung, Yoon Suk; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2011-10-01

    Although self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) insertion is widely used for relief of malignant colorectal obstructions, the immediate technical and clinical failure rates of SEMSs and the associated risk factors remain largely unknown. To identify rates and factors predictive of technical and clinical failure of SEMSs when their use is attempted for the decompression of malignant colorectal obstruction. Retrospective chart review. A tertiary-care academic medical center in South Korea. This study involved a total of 412 patients with malignant colorectal obstruction in whom SEMS insertion was attempted. Placement of colonic SEMSs. Technical success and immediate and long-term clinical success rates. Technical and clinical failures were found in 36 of 276 patients (13.0%) and 39 of 240 patients (16.3%) in the palliative group, respectively, and in 3 of 136 patients (2.2%) and 7 of 133 patients (5.3%) in the preoperative group, respectively. Factors associated with technical failure were extracolonic origin of tumor, the presence of carcinomatosis, and a proximal obstruction site. Factors associated with long-term clinical failure in the palliative group were combined dilation procedure, no additional chemotherapy, and extracolonic origin of the tumor. In the preoperative group, only older patients had both higher technical failure and clinical failure rates. This was a single-institution, retrospective analysis. Although colorectal SEMS placement is generally safe and effective, it is associated with clinically important technical and clinical failure rates. The identification of risk factors for the failure of colorectal SEMSs found in this study might help physicians decide between surgical decompression and endoscopic stenting in patients with malignant colorectal obstruction. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Real-World Assessment of Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Lower-Risk Myelofibrosis Receiving Treatment with Ruxolitinib

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    Keith L. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Few trial-based assessments of ruxolitinib in patients with lower-risk myelofibrosis (MF have been conducted, and no studies have made such assessments in a real-world population. We assessed changes in spleen size and constitutional symptoms during ruxolitinib treatment using a retrospective, observational review of anonymized US medical record data of patients diagnosed with IPSS low-risk (n=25 or intermediate-1-risk (n=83 MF. The majority of patients were male (low risk, 60%; intermediate-1 risk, 69%. Most patients (92% and 77% were still receiving ruxolitinib at the medical record abstraction date (median observation/exposure time, 8 months. The proportion of patients with moderate or severe palpable splenomegaly (≥10 cm decreased from diagnosis (56% to best response (12%. Fatigue was reported in 47% of patients and was the most common constitutional symptom. For most symptoms in both risk groups, shifts in the distribution of severity from more to less severe from diagnosis to best response were observed. Both patients with low-risk and intermediate-1-risk MF experienced a substantial decrease in spleen size with ruxolitinib treatment in real-world settings. For most symptoms examined, there were distinct improvements in the distribution of severity during ruxolitinib treatment. These findings suggest that patients with lower-risk MF may benefit clinically from ruxolitinib treatment.

  15. Baseline risk has greater influence over behavioral attrition on the real-world clinical effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Aviroop; Oh, Paul I; Faulkner, Guy E; Alter, David A

    2016-11-01

    Few studies have examined the correlates of real-world cardiac rehabilitation (CR) effectiveness. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between baseline risk, behavioral attrition, and the number needed to treat (NNT) associated with CR. A retrospective study was conducted among 16,061 CR patients between 1995 and 2011 in Canada. Multiple logistic regression models were derived from patient characteristics and measured baseline risk (individual's risk of death within 3 years) and behavioral attrition (individual's risk of premature dropout). We examined the treatment efficacy of CR among nondropouts using a 20% relative risk reduction. Further sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of our assumptions. We assumed no efficacy among dropouts. Both baseline risk and behavioral attrition were independently associated with NNT, although baseline risk had a stronger association with NNT than behavioral attrition. Increasing age, lower baseline fitness, history of diabetes, hypertension, and greater comorbidities were associated with lower NNT. Being female, living alone, living in the lowest neighborhood income quintile, and greater adiposity were associated with higher NNT. The clinical effectiveness of CR is largely driven by the baseline risk rather than the behavioral attrition of the populations they serve. These findings have implications for risk stratification among those with greatest survival yields and programmatic needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving risk assessment of violence among military veterans: an evidence-based approach for clinical decision-making.

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    Elbogen, Eric B; Fuller, Sara; Johnson, Sally C; Brooks, Stephanie; Kinneer, Patricia; Calhoun, Patrick S; Beckham, Jean C

    2010-08-01

    Increased media attention to post-deployment violence highlights the need to develop effective models to guide risk assessment among military Veterans. Ideally, a method would help identify which Veterans are most at risk for violence so that it can be determined what could be done to prevent violent behavior. This article suggests how empirical approaches to risk assessment used successfully in civilian populations can be applied to Veterans. A review was conducted of the scientific literature on Veteran populations regarding factors related to interpersonal violence generally and to domestic violence specifically. A checklist was then generated of empirically-supported risk factors for clinicians to consider in practice. To conceptualize how these known risk factors relate to a Veteran's violence potential, risk assessment scholarship was utilized to develop an evidence-based method to guide mental health professionals. The goals of this approach are to integrate science into practice, overcome logistical barriers, and permit more effective assessment, monitoring, and management of violence risk for clinicians working with Veterans, both in Department of Veteran Affairs settings and in the broader community. Research is needed to test the predictive validity of risk assessment models. Ultimately, the use of a systematic, empirical framework could lead to improved clinical decision-making in the area of risk assessment and potentially help prevent violence among Veterans.

  17. Postoperative meralgia paresthetica after posterior spine surgery: incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Hua; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chen, Po-Quang

    2005-09-15

    A prospective study on postoperative meralgia paresthetica after posterior thoracolumbar spine surgery on the Relton-Hall frame. To assess the incidence of postoperative lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) neuralgia and to investigate its risk factors and clinical outcomes. Postoperative meralgia paresthetica is a common complication of posterior thoracolumbar spine surgery. The injury mechanism is external compression to the LFCN near the anterior superior iliac spine in the prone position. A total of 252 patients were examined for signs of meralgia paresthetica before and after surgery. Patients with a LFCN injury were followed regularly until sensory impairment resolved. Several possible contributing factors were assessed to evaluate the correlations. Postoperative meralgia paresthetica was experienced by 60 patients (23.8%). Patients with an LFCN injury had a significantly greater body mass index (23.6 vs. 22.4 kg/m2) and a longer surgical time (3.7 vs. 3.2 hours). Overweight/obese patients had a significantly greater incidence (odds ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-3.29). Patients operated for degenerative spinal disorders also had a significantly higher incidence of LFCN injury (odds ratio, 2.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-5.13). Recovery took 10.5 days on average (range, 2 days to 2 months). Thirty-two patients (53%) recovered completely within the first week and every patient recovered within 2 months. Postoperative meralgia paresthetica is a common but benign complication of posterior thoracolumbar spine surgery. Degenerative spinal disorders, overweight/obesity, and longer surgical time are factors related to a higher incidence of LFCN injury. The clinical outcome is always excellent, and complete recovery can be expected within 2 months.

  18. Low back pain in school-age children: risk factors, clinical features and diagnostic managment.

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    Boćkowski, L; Sobaniec, W; Kułak, W; Smigielska-Kuzia, J; Sendrowski, K; Roszkowska, M

    2007-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is common in adult population, and it is becoming a serious health concern in adolescents. On surveys, about every fifth child in the school-age reports LBP. The study objective was to analysis the natural history, risk factors, clinical symptoms, causes and diagnostic management in school-age children hospitalized with LBP. The study group consisted of 36 patients at the age between 10 and 18 years, 22 girls and 14 boys suffering from LBP hospitalized in our Department of Pediatric Neurology and Rehabilitation in years 2000-2004. The mean age of clinical onset of LBP in our group was 14.7 years, earlier in girls, later in boys. We find the family history of LBP in 50% children. Most frequent factors associated with LBP were: spina bifida (16.7%) and incorrect posture (13.9%). Half of patients pointed the factor initialising LBP: rapid, incoordinated move (39%) or heavy load rise (11%). 58% of patients present the symptoms of ischialgia. Diagnostic imaging showed disc protrusion in 11 children (31%) 6 in computed tomography, 4 in magnetic resonance imaging and 1 in X-Ray examination only. Other causes of LBP included: spondylolysis in 2 patients, Scheuermann disease in one case and juvenile reumatoid arthritis in one case. Some school-age children suffering on low back pain, particulary with sciatic neuralgia symptoms seek medical care in hospital. Althought the main causes are mechanical, associated with lack of physical activity or strenous exercise, serious diagnostic managment is strongly recommended.

  19. Difficult laryngoscopy and intubation in the Indian population: An assessment of anatomical and clinical risk factors

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    Smita Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Differences in patient characteristics due to race or ethnicity may influence the incidence of difficult airway. Our purpose was to determine the incidence of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation, as well as the anatomical features and clinical risk factors that influence them, in the Indian population. Methods: In 330 adult patients receiving general anaesthesia with tracheal intubation, airway characteristics and clinical factors were determined and their association with difficult laryngoscopy (Cormack and Lehane grade 3 and 4 was analysed. Intubation Difficulty Scale score was used to identify degree of difficult laryngoscopy. Results: The incidence of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation was 9.7% and 4.5%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age and weight, male gender, modified Mallampati class (MMC 3 and 4 in sitting and supine positions, inter-incisor distance (IID ≤3.5 cm, thyromental (TMD and sternomental distance, ratio of height and TMD, short neck, limited mandibular protrusion, decreased range of neck movement, history of snoring, receding mandible and cervical spondylosis were associated with difficult laryngoscopy. Multivariate analysis identified four variables that were independently associated with difficult laryngoscopy: MMC class 3 and 4, range of neck movement <80°, IID ≤ 3.5 cm and snoring. Conclusions: We found an incidence of 9.7% and 4.5% for difficult laryngoscopy and difficult intubation, respectively, in Indian patients with apparently normal airways. MMC class 3 and 4, range of neck movement <80°, IID ≤ 3.5 cm and snoring were independently related to difficult laryngoscopy. There was a high incidence (48.5% of minor difficulty in intubation.

  20. Difficult laryngoscopy and intubation in the Indian population: An assessment of anatomical and clinical risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Smita; Kumar, Amitabh; Bhandari, Shyam; Mullick, Parul; Singh, Rajvir; Gogia, Anoop Raj

    2013-11-01

    Differences in patient characteristics due to race or ethnicity may influence the incidence of difficult airway. Our purpose was to determine the incidence of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation, as well as the anatomical features and clinical risk factors that influence them, in the Indian population. In 330 adult patients receiving general anaesthesia with tracheal intubation, airway characteristics and clinical factors were determined and their association with difficult laryngoscopy (Cormack and Lehane grade 3 and 4) was analysed. Intubation Difficulty Scale score was used to identify degree of difficult laryngoscopy. The incidence of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation was 9.7% and 4.5%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age and weight, male gender, modified Mallampati class (MMC) 3 and 4 in sitting and supine positions, inter-incisor distance (IID) ≤3.5 cm, thyromental (TMD) and sternomental distance, ratio of height and TMD, short neck, limited mandibular protrusion, decreased range of neck movement, history of snoring, receding mandible and cervical spondylosis were associated with difficult laryngoscopy. Multivariate analysis identified four variables that were independently associated with difficult laryngoscopy: MMC class 3 and 4, range of neck movement <80°, IID ≤ 3.5 cm and snoring. We found an incidence of 9.7% and 4.5% for difficult laryngoscopy and difficult intubation, respectively, in Indian patients with apparently normal airways. MMC class 3 and 4, range of neck movement <80°, IID ≤ 3.5 cm and snoring were independently related to difficult laryngoscopy. There was a high incidence (48.5%) of minor difficulty in intubation.

  1. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in high-risk pulmonary infections: a clinical review

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    Antonio M. Esquinas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to review the role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV in acute pulmonary infectious diseases, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, H1N1 and tuberculosis, and to assess the risk of disease transmission with the use of NIV from patients to healthcare workers. We performed a clinical review by searching Medline and EMBASE. These databases were searched for articles on ‘‘clinical trials’’ and ‘‘randomised controlled trials’’. The keywords selected were non-invasive ventilation pulmonary infections, influenza-A (H1N1, SARS and tuberculosis. These terms were cross-referenced with the following keywords: health care workers, airborne infections, complications, intensive care unit and pandemic. The members of the International NIV Network examined the major results regarding NIV applications and SARS, H1N1 and tuberculosis. Cross-referencing mechanical ventilation with SARS yielded 76 studies, of which 10 studies involved the use of NIV and five were ultimately selected for inclusion in this review. Cross-referencing with H1N1 yielded 275 studies, of which 27 involved NIV. Of these, 22 were selected for review. Cross-referencing with tuberculosis yielded 285 studies, of which 15 involved NIV and from these seven were selected. In total 34 studies were selected for this review. NIV, when applied early in selected patients with SARS, H1N1 and acute pulmonary tuberculosis infections, can reverse respiratory failure. There are only a few reports of infectious disease transmission among healthcare workers.

  2. Noninvasive prenatal testing in routine clinical practice for a high-risk population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guijie; Yi, Jianping; Han, Baosheng; Liu, Heng; Guo, Wanru; Shi, Chong; Yin, Lirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to summarize the effects of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) on aneuploidy among high-risk participants in Tangshan Maternal and Children Health Hospital. NIPT or invasive prenatal diagnosis was recommended to patients with a high risk of fetal aneuploidy from February 2013 to February 2014. Patients who exhibited eligibility and applied for NIPT from January 2012 to January 2013 were included in a comparison group. The rates of patients who underwent invasive testing, declined to undergo further testing, and manifested trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were compared between two groups. Follow-up data were obtained from the participants who underwent NIPT from 2013 to 2014. A total of 7223 patients (3018 and 4205 individuals before and after NIPT) were eligible for analysis. After NIPT was introduced in 2013 to 2014, 727 patients (17.3%) underwent invasive testing, 2828 preferred NIPT (67.3%), and 650 declined to undergo further testing (15.5%). A total of 34 cases of trisomies 21, 18, and 13 (0.8%) were found. In 2012 to 2013, 565 patients (18.7%) underwent invasive testing and 2453 declined to undergo further testing (81.3%). A total of 7 cases of trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were documented (0.2%). Of these cases, 24 were found from NIPT and 10 cases were found from invasive testing. The number of participants who declined to undergo further testing significantly decreased after NIPT was introduced (81.3% vs. 15.5%, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of NIPT for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were 100% and 99.9%, respectively. The detection rates of NIPT for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 also significantly increased (0.2% vs. 0.8%, P < 0.001). By contrast, the overall rates of invasive testing remained unchanged (18.7% vs. 17.3%, P = 0.12). The positive predictive values of NIPT for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were 100%, 83.3%, and 50.0%, respectively. The false positive rates of NIPT were 0% and 0.04%. With NIPT implementation in clinical

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in women with autoimmune rheumatic disease: prevalence, risk factors, and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadou, Sarah P; Gamaletsou, Maria N; Mpanaka, Ioanna; Vlachou, Aggeliki; Goules, Andreas V; Ziogas, Dimitrios C; Syriou, Vassiliki; Tektonidou, Maria G; Kaltsas, Gregory; Manoussakis, Menelaos N; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2015-03-15

    Data regarding the prevalence and clinical significance of asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) in women with autoimmune rheumatic disease (ARD) are scarce. In this prospective, case-control study, consecutive female outpatients with ARD were screened for AB. For each patient, demographics, type, duration, and treatment of underlying ARD, and risk factors for urinary tract infection (UTI), were recorded. Age-matched women with endocrine disease, without any autoimmune disease, not receiving immunosuppressive agents were used as controls. Subjects were followed up for 1 year for the development of symptomatic UTI. Two hundred sixty patients with ARD (mean age, 52.4 [standard deviation {SD}, 14.6] years) and 238 controls (mean age, 51.2 [SD, 16.5] years) were enrolled. The majority of patients with ARD (93.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 89.7%-95.9%) were receiving immunosuppressive agents. AB was detected in 24 patients with ARD (9.2%; 95% CI, 6.2%-13.4%) and in 22 controls (9.2%; 95% CI, 5.5%-12.9%) (P = 1.000). The most prevalent pathogen was Escherichia coli (16/24 [66%]). Independent predictors for AB among patients were diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 6.6; P = .008) and a longer ARD duration (>84 months; OR, 4.3; P = .018). During the 1-year follow-up, 9 patients with baseline AB remained persistently bacteriuric, whereas 11 were intermittently bacteriuric. Symptomatic UTI developed in 4 of 24 patients (16.7%; 95% CI, 6.1%-36.5%) with baseline AB vs 29 of 236 (12.3%; 95% CI, 8.6%-17.1%) without AB (P = .522). In our study, the prevalence of AB among women with ARD was not higher than that of controls, and AB was not associated with higher risk for symptomatic UTI. Risk factors for AB were longer duration of ARD and diabetes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Cardiovascular effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors: from risk factors to clinical outcomes.

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    Scheen, André J

    2013-05-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) are oral incretin-based glucose-lowering agents with proven efficacy and safety in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition, preclinical data and mechanistic studies suggest a possible additional non-glycemic beneficial action on blood vessels and the heart, via both glucagon-like peptide-1-dependent and glucagon-like peptide-1-independent effects. As a matter of fact, DPP-4 inhibitors improve several cardiovascular risk factors: they improve glucose control (mainly by reducing the risk of postprandial hyperglycemia) and are weight neutral; may lower blood pressure somewhat; improve postprandial (and even fasting) lipemia; reduce inflammatory markers; diminish oxidative stress; improve endothelial function; and reduce platelet aggregation in patients with T2DM. In addition, positive effects on the myocardium have been described in patients with ischemic heart disease. Results of post hoc analyses of phase 2/3 controlled trials suggest a possible cardioprotective effect with a trend (sometimes significant) toward lower incidence of major cardiovascular events with sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, or alogliptin compared with placebo or other active glucose-lowering agents. However, the definite relationship between DPP-4 inhibition and better cardiovascular outcomes remains to be proven. Major prospective clinical trials involving various DPP-4 inhibitors with predefined cardiovascular outcomes are under way in patients with T2DM and a high-risk cardiovascular profile: the Sitagliptin Cardiovascular Outcome Study (TECOS) on sitagliptin, the Saxagliptin Assessment of Vascular Outcomes Recorded in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (SAVOR-TIMI) 53 trial on saxagliptin, the Cardiovascular Outcomes Study of Alogliptin in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndrome (EXAMINE) trial on alogliptin, and the Cardiovascular Outcome

  5. CLINICAL AND SOCIAL RISK FACTORS OF TARDIVE DYSKINESIA IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA DURING ANTIPSYCHOTIC TREATMENT

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    Ye. G. Kornetova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work was to study the clinical features and risk factors of tardive dyskinesia among     the     schizophrenia     patients     who     durably     receive     the     antipsychotic     therapy. 180 of the 18 to 65 age bracket schizophrenia patients, who were treated in a residential psychiatric treatment facility, were examined with the use of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS, and the basic chart of formalized sociodemographic and clinico-dynamic features developed at the Tomsk Mental Health Research Institute. The acquired data were processed by the Mann–Whitney U-Test and χ2. The average age of the tardive dyskinesia patients  turned out to be conclusively older than that of the patients without this derangement. People who have tardive dyskinesia statistically often happen to be single in comparison with other variants of marital status. It was found out that women happen to have tardive dyskinesia more often, which allows us to see the female gender as a risk factor. The tardive dyskinesia patients had certain negative symptoms. The patients were arranged into groups according to the prepotency of symptom-complexes over the subgroups: with orofacial, thoracolumbar and combined tardive dyskinesia. The average age of the orofacial dyskinesia patients turned out to be conclusively older than that of the patients without tardive dyskinesia. The negative symptoms level in the subgroup was conclusively higher than among those without tardive dyskinesia. The average age of the thoracolumbar dyskinesia patients was conclusively older than that of the patients without tardive dyskinesia. The average age of the combined dyskinesia patients was conclusively older than the patients without the tardive dyskinesia. The patients having schizophrenia for longer than 10 years prevailed in the combined dyskinesia group. Such characteristics as education

  6. Impact of interactions between risk alleles on clinical endpoints in hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Samantha; Kumar, Rahul; Gupta, Mohit; Tyagi, Sanjay; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Impairment of the renin-angiotensinogen-aldosterone system (RAAS), one of the characteristics of essential hypertension (EH), imbalances vascular homeostasis. Despite inconsistent reports on individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as a major predictor of EH, interactions among RAAS genetic variants are rarely investigated. Methods Using SNP markers, we studied potential interactions between angiotensin 1 converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin II-type 1 receptor (AGTR1), and α adducin (ADD1) variants and their correlation with clinical endpoints in 545 individuals with hypertension and 400 age- and ethnicity-matched unrelated controls. Generalised multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) analysis identified the models for genotype interaction. Results Although the results on single genes were significant, gene-gene interactions were more reliable and promising as markers in predisposing hypertension. The best models to represent association of multi-locus interactions with augmented hypertension susceptibility were: (a) within gene 4-locus model comprised of AGT SNPs −217G/A, −20A/C, −6G/A and 235M/T (p=0.022, OR 6.1); and (b) between genes 5-locus model comprised of AGT −217G/A, −20A/C, −6G/A, 235M/T and ACE I/D (p=0.05, OR 4.6). Stratification of 4- and 5-locus GMDR models on the basis of risk alleles from ≤1 to ≥7 increased the ORs from 2.8 to 36.1 and from 0.9 to 16.1, respectively. Moreover, compared to ≤1 risk alleles the ≥7 interacting risk alleles in both 4- and 5-locus models showed an increment of 14.2% and 11.1% in systolic blood pressure, 7.7% and 1.1% in diastolic blood pressure, and 10.5% and 5.1% in mean arterial pressure, respectively, in patients. Conclusions Interactions among the genetic loci of RAAS components may be used as a predictor for susceptibility to hypertension. PMID:27326240

  7. [Clinical characteristics and risk factors for recurrence of anal fistula patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaqin; Yang, Wei; Huang, Zhijian; Mei, Zubing; Yang, Dacheng; Wu, Haiyan; Wang, Qingming

    2016-12-25

    To investigate the epidemiology, internal opening location, and risk factors associated with recurrence of anal fistula. Clinical data of 1783 hospitalized patients admitted for anal fistula treatment to Shanghai Shuguang Hospital from January 2013 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Fistula passing through anorectal ring or locating above was defined as high anal fistula (n=125). Internal opening location was defined as follows: posterior (5 to 7 o'clock), front(11 to 1 o'clock), left (2 to 4 o'clock) and right (8 to 10 o'clock). Among 1783 cases, 1526 were male with a median age of 36 years, 257 were female with a median age of 35 years, and the ratio of male to female was 5.9 vs 1.0. In high anal fistula cases, this ratio of male to female was 7.3 vs 1.0. Posterior internal opening accounted for 51.4%(884/1720), while this percentage was 66.4%(83/125) in high anal fistula cases, which was significantly higher than 50.2%(801/1595) in low anal fistula cases(P=0.002). Postoperative recurrence rate was 2.6%(45/1720) and the rates in high anal fistula and low anal fistula were 13.6%(17/125) and 1.8%(28/1595) respectively, with significant difference(P=0.000). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that fistula height(OR=5.475, 95%CI:2.230 to 13.445, P=0.000), treatment history(OR=2.671, 95% CI:1.315 to 5.424, P=0.007), seton placement history (OR=4.707, 95%CI:1.675 to 13.232, P=0.003) and concomitant colitis(OR=10.300, 95%CI:1.187 to 89.412, P=0.034) were independent risk factors for anal fistula recurrence. Seton placement history was an independent risk factor for high anal fistula recurrence (OR=6.476, 95%CI:1.116 to 37.589, P=0.037). Anal fistula occurs in young and middle-aged male patient. Internal opening locates in posterior more commonly, especially in high anal fistula patients. Postoperative recurrence rate of high anal fistula is quite high. Patient with both high anal fistula and seton placement history has significantly high rate

  8. Three-tiered risk stratification model to predict progression in Barrett's esophagus using epigenetic and clinical features.

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    Fumiaki Sato

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the value of endoscopic surveillance in Barrett's esophagus has been debated because of the low incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. Moreover, high inter-observer and sampling-dependent variation in the histologic staging of dysplasia make clinical risk assessment problematic. In this study, we developed a 3-tiered risk stratification strategy, based on systematically selected epigenetic and clinical parameters, to improve Barrett's esophagus surveillance efficiency.We defined high-grade dysplasia as endpoint of progression, and Barrett's esophagus progressor patients as Barrett's esophagus patients with either no dysplasia or low-grade dysplasia who later developed high-grade dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma. We analyzed 4 epigenetic and 3 clinical parameters in 118 Barrett's esophagus tissues obtained from 35 progressor and 27 non-progressor Barrett's esophagus patients from Baltimore Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care Systems and Mayo Clinic. Based on 2-year and 4-year prediction models using linear discriminant analysis (area under the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC curve: 0.8386 and 0.7910, respectively, Barrett's esophagus specimens were stratified into high-risk (HR, intermediate-risk (IR, or low-risk (LR groups. This 3-tiered stratification method retained both the high specificity of the 2-year model and the high sensitivity of the 4-year model. Progression-free survivals differed significantly among the 3 risk groups, with p = 0.0022 (HR vs. IR and p<0.0001 (HR or IR vs. LR. Incremental value analyses demonstrated that the number of methylated genes contributed most influentially to prediction accuracy.This 3-tiered risk stratification strategy has the potential to exert a profound impact on Barrett's esophagus surveillance accuracy and efficiency.

  9. Women Up, Men Down: The Clinical Impact of Replacing the Framingham Risk Score with the Reynolds Risk Score in the United States Population

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    Tattersall, Matthew C.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Karmali, Kunal N.; Keevil, Jon G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Reynolds Risk Score (RRS) is one alternative to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) for cardiovascular risk assessment. The Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) integrated the FRS a decade ago, but with the anticipated release of ATP IV, it remains uncertain how and which risk models will be integrated into the recommendations. We sought to define the effects in the United States population of a transition from the FRS to the RRS for cardiovascular risk assessment. Methods Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, we assessed FRS and RRS in 2,502 subjects representing approximately 53.6 Million (M) men (ages 50–79) and women (ages 45–79), without cardiovascular disease or diabetes. We calculated the proportion reclassified by RRS and the subset whose LDL-C goal achievement changed. Results Compared to FRS, the RRS assigns a higher risk category to 13.9% of women and 9.1% of men while assigning a lower risk to 35.7% of men and 2% of women. Overall, 4.7% of women and 1.1% of men fail to meet newly intensified LDL-C goals using the RRS. Conversely, 10.5% of men and 0.6% of women now meet LDL-C goal using RRS when they had not by FRS. Conclusion In the U.S. population the RRS assigns a new risk category for one in six women and four of nine men. In general, women increase while men decrease risk. In conclusion, adopting the RRS for the 53.6 million eligible U.S. adults would result in intensification of clinical management in 1.6 M additional women and 2.10 M fewer men. PMID:22984495

  10. Women up, men down: the clinical impact of replacing the Framingham Risk Score with the Reynolds Risk Score in the United States population.

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    Matthew C Tattersall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Reynolds Risk Score (RRS is one alternative to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS for cardiovascular risk assessment. The Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III integrated the FRS a decade ago, but with the anticipated release of ATP IV, it remains uncertain how and which risk models will be integrated into the recommendations. We sought to define the effects in the United States population of a transition from the FRS to the RRS for cardiovascular risk assessment. METHODS: Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, we assessed FRS and RRS in 2,502 subjects representing approximately 53.6 Million (M men (ages 50-79 and women (ages 45-79, without cardiovascular disease or diabetes. We calculated the proportion reclassified by RRS and the subset whose LDL-C goal achievement changed. RESULTS: Compared to FRS, the RRS assigns a higher risk category to 13.9% of women and 9.1% of men while assigning a lower risk to 35.7% of men and 2% of women. Overall, 4.7% of women and 1.1% of men fail to meet newly intensified LDL-C goals using the RRS. Conversely, 10.5% of men and 0.6% of women now meet LDL-C goal using RRS when they had not by FRS. CONCLUSION: In the U.S. population the RRS assigns a new risk category for one in six women and four of nine men. In general, women increase while men decrease risk. In conclusion, adopting the RRS for the 53.6 million eligible U.S. adults would result in intensification of clinical management in 1.6 M additional women and 2.10 M fewer men.

  11. Discriminatory accuracy and potential clinical utility of genomic profiling for breast cancer risk in BRCA-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comen, E; Balistreri, L; Gönen, M; Dutra-Clarke, A; Fazio, M; Vijai, J; Stadler, Z; Kauff, N; Kirchhoff, T; Hudis, C; Offit, K; Robson, M

    2011-06-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. The clinical utility of genotyping individuals at these loci is not known. Subjects were 519 unaffected women without BRCA mutations. Gail, Claus, and IBIS models were used to estimate absolute breast cancer risks. Subjects were then genotyped at 15 independent risk loci. Published per-allele and genotype-specific odds ratios were used to calculate the composite cumulative genomic risk (CGR) for each subject. Affected age- and ethnicity-matched BRCA mutation-negative women were also genotyped as a comparison group for the calculation of discriminatory accuracy. The CGR was used to adjust absolute breast cancer risks calculated by Gail, Claus and IBIS models to determine the proportion of subjects whose recommendations for chemoprevention or MRI screening might be altered (reclassified) by such adjustment. Mean lifetime breast cancer risks calculated using the Gail, Claus, and IBIS models were 19.4, 13.0, and 17.7%, respectively. CGR did not correlate with breast cancer risk as calculated using any model. CGR was significantly higher in affected women (mean 3.35 vs. 3.12, P = 0.009). The discriminatory accuracy of the CGR alone was 0.55 (SE 0.019; P = 0.006). CGR adjustment of model-derived absolute risk estimates would have altered clinical recommendations for chemoprevention in 11-19% of subjects and for MRI screening in 8-32%. CGR has limited discriminatory accuracy. However, the use of a genomic risk term to adjust model-derived estimates has the potential to alter individual recommendations. These observations warrant investigation to evaluate the calibration of adjusted risk estimates.

  12. Job strain as a risk factor for clinical depression: systematic review and meta-analysis with additional individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, I E H; Nyberg, S T; Magnusson Hanson, L L; Ferrie, J E; Ahola, K; Alfredsson, L; Batty, G D; Bjorner, J B; Borritz, M; Burr, H; Chastang, J-F; de Graaf, R; Dragano, N; Hamer, M; Jokela, M; Knutsson, A; Koskenvuo, M; Koskinen, A; Leineweber, C; Niedhammer, I; Nielsen, M L; Nordin, M; Oksanen, T; Pejtersen, J H; Pentti, J; Plaisier, I; Salo, P; Singh-Manoux, A; Suominen, S; Ten Have, M; Theorell, T; Toppinen-Tanner, S; Vahtera, J; Väänänen, A; Westerholm, P J M; Westerlund, H; Fransson, E I; Heikkilä, K; Virtanen, M; Rugulies, R; Kivimäki, M

    2017-06-01

    Adverse psychosocial working environments characterized by job strain (the combination of high demands and low control at work) are associated with an increased risk of depressive symptoms among employees, but evidence on clinically diagnosed depression is scarce. We examined job strain as a risk factor for clinical depression. We identified published cohort studies from a systematic literature search in PubMed and PsycNET and obtained 14 cohort studies with unpublished individual-level data from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium. Summary estimates of the association were obtained using random-effects models. Individual-level data analyses were based on a pre-published study protocol. We included six published studies with a total of 27 461 individuals and 914 incident cases of clinical depression. From unpublished datasets we included 120 221 individuals and 982 first episodes of hospital-treated clinical depression. Job strain was associated with an increased risk of clinical depression in both published [relative risk (RR) = 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.47-2.13] and unpublished datasets (RR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.04-1.55). Further individual participant analyses showed a similar association across sociodemographic subgroups and after excluding individuals with baseline somatic disease. The association was unchanged when excluding individuals with baseline depressive symptoms (RR = 1.25, 95% CI 0.94-1.65), but attenuated on adjustment for a continuous depressive symptoms score (RR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.81-1.32). Job strain may precipitate clinical depression among employees. Future intervention studies should test whether job strain is a modifiable risk factor for depression.

  13. Clinical risk assessment for gastric cancer in asymptomatic population after a health check-up: An individualized consideration of the risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Mi; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Baik, Su Jung; Park, Jae Jun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin

    2016-11-01

    For the prevention of gastric cancer, the detection of risk factors associated with precancerous conditions may be more informative. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors of gastric cancer, including precancerous conditions: atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), and dysplasia.The clinical and endoscopic findings of 60,261 adults who underwent gastroduodenoscopy as part of a health check-up were reviewed retrospectively. Subgroup analysis was conducted according to age, sex, cancer stage, and histology based on Lauren classification.Gastric cancer was diagnosed in 75 patients (0.12%). Both IM and AG were independent risk factors for gastric cancer in all subgroups. Male, older age, obesity, diabetes mellitus (DM), a salty and spicy diet, and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were significantly associated with precancerous conditions. However, risk factors related to precancerous conditions were different according to age and sex. In obesity was significant risk factor for precancerous conditions as well as H. pylori infection.AG and IM are independent risk factors for gastric cancer. To prevent gastric cancer, H. pylori eradication may be more useful in obesity, salty and spicy diet may be important in female or ≥40 years.

  14. Chocolate intake and risk of clinically apparent atrial fibrillation: the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Berg Johansen, Martin; Tjønneland, Anne; Chahal, Harpreet S; Mittleman, Murray A; Overvad, Kim

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the association between chocolate intake and incident clinically apparent atrial fibrillation or flutter (AF). The Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study is a large population-based prospective cohort study. The present study is based on 55 502 participants (26 400 men and 29 102 women) aged 50-64 years who had provided information on chocolate intake at baseline. Incident cases of AF were ascertained by linkage with nationwide registries. During a median of 13.5 years there were 3346 cases of AF. Compared with chocolate intake less than once per month, the rate of AF was lower for people consuming 1-3 servings/month (hazard ratio (HR) 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82 to 0.98), 1 serving/week (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.92), 2-6 servings/week (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.91) and ≥1 servings/day (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.09; p-linear trend chocolate intake may be inversely associated with AF risk, although residual confounding cannot be ruled out. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Designing and delivering clinical risk management education for graduate nurses: an Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga; Currie, Tracey; Smith, Enid; McGennisken, Chris

    2007-07-01

    In order to enhance their capabilities in clinical risk management (CRM) and to be integrated into safe and effective patient safety organisational processes and systems, neophyte graduate nurses need to be provided with pertinent information on CRM at the beginning of their employment. What and how such information should be given to new graduate nurses, however, remains open to question and curiously something that has not been the subject either of critique or systematic investigation in the nursing literature. This article reports the findings of the third and final cycle of a 12 month action research (AR) project that has sought to redress this oversight by developing, implementing and evaluating a CRM education program for neophyte graduate nurses. Conducted in the cultural context of regional Victoria, Australia, the design, implementation and evaluation of the package revealed that it was a useful resource, served the intended purpose of ensuring that neophyte graduate nurses were provided with pertinent information on CRM upon the commencement and during their graduate nurse year, and enabled graduate nurses to be facilitated to translate that information into their everyday practice.

  16. N100 Repetition Suppression Indexes Neuroplastic Defects in Clinical High Risk and Psychotic Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly penetrant mutations leading to schizophrenia are enriched for genes coding for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling complex (NMDAR-SC, implicating plasticity defects in the disease’s pathogenesis. The importance of plasticity in neurodevelopment implies a role for therapies that target these mechanisms in early life to prevent schizophrenia. Testing such therapies requires noninvasive methods that can assess engagement of target mechanisms. The auditory N100 is an obligatory cortical response whose amplitude decreases with tone repetition. This adaptation may index the health of plasticity mechanisms required for normal development. We exposed participants aged 5 to 17 years with psychosis n=22, at clinical high risk (CHR for psychosis n=29, and healthy controls n=17 to an auditory tone repeated 450 times and measured N100 adaptation (mean amplitude during first 150 tones − mean amplitude during last 150 tones. N100 adaptation was reduced in CHR and psychosis, particularly among participants <13 years old. Initial N100 blunting partially accounted for differences. Decreased change in the N100 amplitude with tone repetition may be a useful marker of defects in neuroplastic mechanisms measurable early in life.

  17. The genetic basis of familial adenomatous polyposis and its implications for clinical practice and risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoz ML

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria Liz Leoz, Sabela Carballal, Leticia Moreira, Teresa Ocaña, Francesc Balaguer Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Clínic, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain Abstract: Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is an inherited disorder that represents the most common gastrointestinal polyposis syndrome. Germline mutations in the APC gene were initially identified as responsible for FAP, and later, several studies have also implicated the MUTYH gene as responsible for this disease, usually referred to as MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP. FAP and MAP are characterized by the early onset of multiple adenomatous colorectal polyps, a high lifetime risk of colorectal cancer (CRC, and in some patients the development of extracolonic manifestations. The goal of colorectal management in these patients is to prevent CRC mortality through endoscopic and surgical approaches. Individuals with FAP and their relatives should receive appropriate genetic counseling and join surveillance programs when indicated. This review is focused on the description of the main clinical and genetic aspects of FAP associated with germline APC mutations and MAP. Keywords: colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis, MAP, APC, MUTYH

  18. [Clinical trial with educational intervention in perimenopausal women with cardiovascular risk factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rodríguez, Anxela; García-Soidán, José Luís; de Toro-Santos, Manuel; Rodríguez-González, Manuel; Arias-Gómez, M Jesús; Pérez-Fernández, María Reyes

    To assess whether an educational intervention in women in perimenopausal age with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and/or dyslipidemia could improve aspects of quality of life and exercise. A randomized clinical trial. physical activity, quality of life and weight in women aged 45-60 years (n = 320) at time 0 and 12 months after surgery. intervention group (IG): 3 interactive workshops on cardiovascular disease prevention and control group (CG): information by mail. The IG obtained better scores on the mental component of quality of life one year later (p < 0.05) and showed a significant increase in physical activity (p < 0.01). GI women maintained their weight while in CG women it increased (p < 0.01). A simple educational intervention in premenopausal women with a cardiovascular risk factor improves aspects of quality of life and of healthy habits such as physical activity. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma HIV-1 tropism and risk of short-term clinical progression to AIDS or death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontdevila, Maria Casadellà; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is uncertain if plasma HIV-1 tropism is an independent predictor of short-term risk of clinical progression / death, in addition to the CD4 count and HIV RNA level. We conducted a nested case-control study within EuroSIDA to assess this question amongst people with current HIV RNA...... level >1000 copies/mL, including both people on ART and those ART naïve. METHODS: People with an AIDS diagnosis or who died from any causes for whom there was a stored plasma sample with HIV-1 RNA (VL)≥1,000 copies/mL available in the time window of 3-12 months prior to the event were identified....... At least one control was selected for each case matched for age, VL and HCV status at the time of sampling. Controls were event-free after a matched duration of time from the date of sampling. Plasma HIV tropism was estimated using 454 and population sequencing (PS). Non-R5 HIV was defined as: (a) ≥2...

  20. N100 Repetition Suppression Indexes Neuroplastic Defects in Clinical High Risk and Psychotic Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph; Enlow, Michelle Bosquet; D'Angelo, Eugene; Seidman, Larry J; Gumlak, Sarah; Kim, April; Woodberry, Kristen A; Rober, Ashley; Tembulkar, Sahil; O'Donnell, Kyle; Hamoda, Hesham M; Kimball, Kara; Rotenberg, Alexander; Oberman, Lindsay M; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Duffy, Frank H

    2016-01-01

    Highly penetrant mutations leading to schizophrenia are enriched for genes coding for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling complex (NMDAR-SC), implicating plasticity defects in the disease's pathogenesis. The importance of plasticity in neurodevelopment implies a role for therapies that target these mechanisms in early life to prevent schizophrenia. Testing such therapies requires noninvasive methods that can assess engagement of target mechanisms. The auditory N100 is an obligatory cortical response whose amplitude decreases with tone repetition. This adaptation may index the health of plasticity mechanisms required for normal development. We exposed participants aged 5 to 17 years with psychosis (n = 22), at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis (n = 29), and healthy controls (n = 17) to an auditory tone repeated 450 times and measured N100 adaptation (mean amplitude during first 150 tones - mean amplitude during last 150 tones). N100 adaptation was reduced in CHR and psychosis, particularly among participants <13 years old. Initial N100 blunting partially accounted for differences. Decreased change in the N100 amplitude with tone repetition may be a useful marker of defects in neuroplastic mechanisms measurable early in life.

  1. Clinical study on magnetic resonance imaging of lacunar infarcts and cerebrovascular high-risk group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hironaka, Masatoshi (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was performed in 32 patients with recent lacunar stroke. T2-weighted images showed ischemic lesions more clearly than T1-weighted images. Sixty-six percent of 32 patients had periventricular lesions. Eighty-four percent had subcortical white matter lesions. Sixty-nine percent had lesions in basal ganglia. Twenty-eight percent had lesions in brainstem. Periventricular lesions were revealed symmetrically. On the other hand, lesions in other areas were not detected symmetrically. Severe periventricular lesions on MRI were similar to those of Binswanger's disease. Patients with severe periventricular lesions had often hypertension. Moreover, two of them had dementia. Twenty-three patients with transient ischemic attack had less remarkable lesions than patients with lacunar stroke. Thirty-seven patients with a history of cerebrovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus) had severer lesions compared with normal controls. Sixty-one percent of controls, who had no cerebrovascular symptoms and signs, had MRI lesions. These results suggest that MRI is useful for detection of cerebral ischemic lesions with no associated clinical symptoms or signs. (author).

  2. N100 Repetition Suppression Indexes Neuroplastic Defects in Clinical High Risk and Psychotic Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph; Bosquet Enlow, Michelle; D'Angelo, Eugene; Seidman, Larry J.; Gumlak, Sarah; Kim, April; Woodberry, Kristen A.; Rober, Ashley; Tembulkar, Sahil; O'Donnell, Kyle; Hamoda, Hesham M.; Kimball, Kara; Rotenberg, Alexander; Oberman, Lindsay M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Duffy, Frank H.

    2016-01-01

    Highly penetrant mutations leading to schizophrenia are enriched for genes coding for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling complex (NMDAR-SC), implicating plasticity defects in the disease's pathogenesis. The importance of plasticity in neurodevelopment implies a role for therapies that target these mechanisms in early life to prevent schizophrenia. Testing such therapies requires noninvasive methods that can assess engagement of target mechanisms. The auditory N100 is an obligatory cortical response whose amplitude decreases with tone repetition. This adaptation may index the health of plasticity mechanisms required for normal development. We exposed participants aged 5 to 17 years with psychosis (n = 22), at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis (n = 29), and healthy controls (n = 17) to an auditory tone repeated 450 times and measured N100 adaptation (mean amplitude during first 150 tones − mean amplitude during last 150 tones). N100 adaptation was reduced in CHR and psychosis, particularly among participants <13 years old. Initial N100 blunting partially accounted for differences. Decreased change in the N100 amplitude with tone repetition may be a useful marker of defects in neuroplastic mechanisms measurable early in life. PMID:26881109

  3. Left ventricular ejection fraction normalization in cardiac resynchronization therapy and risk of ventricular arrhythmias and clinical outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin H; Solomon, Scott D; Foster, Elyse

    2014-01-01

    within 2.2 years of follow-up. Risk of inappropriate ICD therapy is still present, and these patients could be considered for downgrade from CRT-defibrillator to CRT-pacemaker at the time of battery depletion if no VTAs have occurred. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique...

  4. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors of Left Ventricular Thrombus after Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Matched Case-control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Xin Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This study indicated that lower LVEF, extensive anterior myocardial infarction, severe RWMA, and left ventricular aneurysm were independent risk factors of LVT after AMI. It also suggested that further efforts are needed for the LVT diagnosis after AMI in clinical practice.

  5. Incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of unexplained visual loss after intraocular silicone oil for macula-on retinal detachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerlinck, Laura M.; Schellekens, Peter A.; Liem, Albert T.; Steijns, Daan; van Leeuwen, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of unexplained visual loss after macula-on rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods: Retrospective cohort of patients with primary macula-on rhegmatogenous retinal detachment treated by vitrectomy with gas or s

  6. Potential causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in households with preschool children : prevalence, risk factors, clinical relevance and household transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, M.; Mughini-Gras, L.; Pijnacker, R.; Vennema, H.; Scholts, R.; van Huisstede-Vlaanderen, K. W.; Kortbeek, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; van Pelt, W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) morbidity remains high amongst preschool children, posing a significant societal burden. Empirical data on AGE-causing agents is needed to gauge their clinical relevance and identify agent-specific targets for control. We assessed the prevalence, risk factors and associat

  7. Potential causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in households with preschool children : prevalence, risk factors, clinical relevance and household transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, M.; Mughini-Gras, L.; Pijnacker, R.; Vennema, H.; Scholts, R.; van Huisstede-Vlaanderen, K. W.; Kortbeek, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; van Pelt, W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) morbidity remains high amongst preschool children, posing a significant societal burden. Empirical data on AGE-causing agents is needed to gauge their clinical relevance and identify agent-specific targets for control. We assessed the prevalence, risk factors and

  8. Delayed Cord Clamping in Newborns Born at Term at Risk for Resuscitation: A Feasibility Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katheria, Anup C; Brown, Melissa K; Faksh, Arij; Hassen, Kasim O; Rich, Wade; Lazarus, Danielle; Steen, Jane; Daneshmand, Shahram Sean; Finer, Neil N

    2017-08-01

    Infants may benefit if resuscitation could be provided with an intact umbilical cord. Infants identified at risk for resuscitation were randomized to 1- or 5-minute cord clamping. The 5-minute group had greater cerebral oxygenation and blood pressure. Studies are needed to determine whether this translates into improved outcomes. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02827409. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in households with preschool children : prevalence, risk factors, clinical relevance and household transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, M.; Mughini-Gras, L.; Pijnacker, R.; Vennema, H.; Scholts, R.; van Huisstede-Vlaanderen, K. W.; Kortbeek, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; van Pelt, W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) morbidity remains high amongst preschool children, posing a significant societal burden. Empirical data on AGE-causing agents is needed to gauge their clinical relevance and identify agent-specific targets for control. We assessed the prevalence, risk factors and associat

  10. Incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of unexplained visual loss after intraocular silicone oil for macula-on retinal detachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerlinck, Laura M.; Schellekens, Peter A.; Liem, Albert T.; Steijns, Daan; van Leeuwen, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of unexplained visual loss after macula-on rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods: Retrospective cohort of patients with primary macula-on rhegmatogenous retinal detachment treated by vitrectomy with gas or

  11. Effectiveness of a risk-based visitor-prioritizing system at a sexually transmitted infection outpatient clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, T.L.J.; van der Bij, A.K.; de Vries, H.J.C.; van Leent, E.J.M.; Thiesbrummel, H.F.J.; Fennema, H.S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to study the efficacy/effectiveness of a risk-based visitor-prioritizing system at a sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic aimed to improve screening capacity by providing tailored service. Study Design: In April 2004, a prioritizing system was implem

  12. Risk factors associated with the introduction of acute clinical infectious bursal disease among Danish broiler chickens in 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensburg, Mimi Folden; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate risk factors associated with the introduction of acute clinical infectious bursal disease (IBD) among Danish broiler chickens in 1998. Data on 218 flocks were collected from hatcheries, abattoirs, farmers and veterinarians; 49 of the flocks had...

  13. Risk profile of walk-in triage compared with an appointment-based phone-triage evening clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongeling, S; Chen, M Y; Bush, M R; Bradshaw, C S; Fairley, C K

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study is to compare risk factors in new clients attending the walk-in triage-based day clinic (WITS) to those attending a telephone-triage appointment-based evening clinic of a sexual health service. The method involves an audit of computerized medical records of new clients attending between July 2002 and December 2007. There were 37,833 new clients of which 37,223 (98.4%) attended WITS and 610 (1.6%) attended the evening clinic. WITS clients were significantly older (31% vs. 30%, P < 0.041), more likely to be male (58% vs. 43%, P < 0.001), sex workers (6% vs. 3%, P < 0.001), not employed (34% vs. 10%, P < 0.001), diagnosed with gonorrhoea (1.7% vs. 0.7%, P < 0.041), herpes (4% vs. 2%, P < 0.000), non-specific urethritis (6% vs. 2%, P < 0.000) and less likely asymptomatic (35.1% vs. 53.4%, P < 0.001). Men attending WITS had significantly more female partners in the 12 months (3.9 vs. 3.0, P < 0.001), but other risks were similar in both clinics. A telephone-triage appointment-based evening clinic is important for asymptomatic high-risk individuals.

  14. Preoperatively Assessable Clinical and Pathological Risk Factors for Parametrial Involvement in Surgically Treated FIGO Stage IB-IIA Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaz, Emel; Ozyurek, Eser Sefik; Erdem, Baki; Aldikactioglu Talmac, Merve; Yildiz Ozaydin, Ipek; Akbayir, Ozgur; Numanoglu, Ceyhun; Ulker, Volkan

    2017-06-14

    Determining the risk factors associated with parametrial involvement (PMI) is of paramount importance to decrease the multimodality treatment in early-stage cervical cancer. We investigated the preoperatively assessable clinical and pathological risk factors associated with PMI in surgically treated stage IB1-IIA2 cervical cancer. A retrospective cohort study of women underwent Querleu-Morrow type C hysterectomy for cervical cancer stage IB1-IIA2 from 2001 to 2015. All patients underwent clinical staging examination under anesthesia by the same gynecological oncologists during the study period. Evaluated variables were age, menopausal status, body mass index, smoking status, FIGO (International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology) stage, clinically measured maximal tumor diameter, clinical presentation (exophytic or endophytic tumor), histological type, tumor grade, lymphovascular space invasion, clinical and pathological vaginal invasion, and uterine body involvement. Endophytic clinical presentation was defined for ulcerative tumors and barrel-shaped morphology. Two-dimensional transvaginal ultrasonography was used to measure tumor dimensions. Of 127 eligible women, 37 (29.1%) had PMI. On univariate analysis, endophytic clinical presentation (P = 0.01), larger tumor size (P PMI. In multivariate analysis endophytic clinical presentation (odds ratio, 11.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-95.85; P = 0.02) and larger tumor size (odds ratio, 32.31; 95% confidence interval, 2.46-423.83; P = 0.008) were the independent risk factors for PMI. Threshold of 31 mm in tumor size predicted PMI with 71% sensitivity and 75% specificity. We identified 18 patients with tumor size of more than 30 mm and endophytic presentation; 14 (77.7%) of these had PMI. Endophytic clinical presentation and larger clinical tumor size (>3 cm) are independent risk factors for PMI in stage IB-IIA cervical cancer. Approximately 78% of the patients with a tumor size of more than 3 cm and endophytic

  15. Impact of preoperative nutritional support on clinical outcome in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jie, Bin; Jiang, Zhu-Ming; Nolan, Marie T

    2012-01-01

    This multicenter, prospective cohort study evaluated the effect of preoperative nutritional support in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk as defined by the Nutritional Risk Screening Tool 2002 (NRS-2002)....

  16. Sexual Health Outcomes at 24 Months for a Clinic-Linked Intervention to Prevent Pregnancy Risk Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieving, Renee E.; McRee, Annie-Laurie; McMorris, Barbara J.; Beckman, Kara J.; Pettingell, Sandra L.; Bearinger, Linda H.; Garwick, Ann W.; Oliphant, Jennifer A.; Plowman, Shari; Resnick, Michael D.; Secor-Turner, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Importance Preventing early pregnancy among vulnerable adolescents requires innovative and sustained approaches. Prime Time, a youth development intervention, aims to reduce pregnancy risk among adolescent girls seeking clinic services who are at high risk for pregnancy. Objective To evaluate sexual risk behaviors and related outcomes with a 24-month postbaseline survey, 6 months after the conclusion of the Prime Time intervention. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Community and school-based primary care clinics. Participants Of 253 sexually active 13- to 17-year-old girls meeting specified risk criteria, 236 (93.3%) completed the 24-month follow-up survey. Intervention Offered during an 18-month period, Prime Time includes case management and youth leadership programs. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported consistency of condom, hormonal, and dual-method contraceptive use with most recent male sex partner and number of male sex partners in the past 6 months. Results At 24-month follow-up, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent use of condoms, hormonal contraception, and dual-method contraception than the control group. Intervention participants also reported improvements in family connectedness and self-efficacy to refuse unwanted sex, and reductions in the perceived importance of having sex. No between-group differences were found in the number of recent male sex partners. Conclusions and Relevance This study contributes to what has been a dearth of evidence regarding youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful but few efforts have emphasized a dual approach of strengthening sexual and nonsexual protective factors while addressing risk. Findings suggest that health services grounded in a youth development framework can lead to long-term reductions in sexual risk among vulnerable youth. PMID:23440337

  17. Risk-Taking and Reasons for Living in Non-Clinical Italian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Lester, David; Innamorati, Marco; Narciso, Valentina; Vento, Alessandro; De Pisa, Eleonora; Tatarelli, Roberto; Girardi, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The associations between risk-taking, hopelessness, and reasons for living were explored in a sample of 312 Italian students. Respondents completed the Physical Risk Assessment Inventory, the Physical Risk-Taking Behavior Inventory, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and the Reasons for Living Inventory. Students with lower scores on the Reasons for…

  18. Audit of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Supported Adults with Intellectual Disability Attending an Ageing Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Robyn A.; Schluter, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile for older adults with intellectual disability (ID). As many CVD risk factors are treatable by lifestyle changes, confirmation of the risk factor profile for older adults with ID could substantially impact upon preventive health practices for this group. Method:…

  19. Assessing Violence Risk and Psychopathy in Juvenile and Adult Offenders: A Survey of Clinical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Jodi L.; McLachlan, Kaitlyn; Vincent, Gina M.

    2010-01-01

    This study surveyed 199 forensic clinicians about the practices that they use in assessing violence risk in juvenile and adult offenders. Results indicated that the use of risk assessment and psychopathy tools was common. Although clinicians reported more routine use of psychopathy measures in adult risk assessments compared with juvenile risks…

  20. Specialist antenatal clinics for women at high risk of preterm birth: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, Reem; Redshaw, Maggie

    2017-02-02

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Women with previous prenatal loss are at higher risk of preterm birth. A specialist antenatal clinic is considered as one approach to improve maternity and pregnancy outcomes. A systematic review of quantitative, qualitative and mixed method studies conducted on women at high risk of preterm birth (PTB). The review primary outcomes were to report on the specialist antenatal clinics effect in preventing or reducing preterm birth, perinatal mortality and morbidity and women's perceptions and experiences of a specialist clinic whether compared or not compared with standard antenatal care. Other secondary maternal, infant and economic outcomes were also determined. A comprehensive search strategy was carried out in English within electronic databases as far back as 1980. The reviewers selected studies, assessed the quality, and extracted data independently. Results were summarized and tabulated. Eleven studies fully met the review inclusion criteria, ten were quantitative design studies and only one was a qualitative design study. No mixed method design study was included in the review. All were published after 1989, seven were conducted in the USA and four in the UK. Results from five good to low quality randomised controlled trials (RCTs), all conducted before 1990, did not illustrate the efficacy of the clinic in reducing preterm birth. Whereas results from more recent low quality cohort studies showed some positive neonatal outcomes. Themes from one good quality qualitative study reflected on the emotional and psychological need to reduce anxiety and stress of women referred to such a clinic. Women expressed their negative emotional responses at being labelled as high risk and positive responses to being assessed and treated in the clinic. Women also reported that their partners were struggling to cope emotionally. Findings from this review were mixed. Evidence from cohort studies

  1. [Clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoantibody before 20 weeks pregnancy and risk of preterm birth: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Li, Min; Chu, Defa; Liang, Lin; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhang, Junrong

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the relationship between clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism and positive thyroid autoantibody before 20 weeks pregnancy and risk of preterm birth. Literature search was done in PubMed, EMBASE, Wanfang Medical Database, China Academic Journal Network Publishing Database and China Biology Medicine disc databases from January 1st, 1980 to December 31th, 2013. The following search terms were used:hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, hypothyroxinnism, thyroid antibody, preterm labor, preterm birth, etc. (1) Criteria for inclusion:cohort studies and clinical studies were included; only articles that described at least 10 patients were eligible;the exposure was clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism and positive thyroid autoantihody, and outcome was preterm birth. (2) The excluded subjects were articles that described less than 10 patients; controls were pregnant women without eurothyrodisim. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 5. The relationship between clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism and positive thyroid autoantibody and risk of preterm birth was evaluated by OR or RR. (1) Twenty cohort studies were enrolled. A total of 39 596 cases of preterm birth occurred among 498 418 pregnant women. The controls in these studies were pregnant women with eurothyrodisim. (2) Clinical hypothyroidism in pregnancy: eight studies were included, reported data on 478 418 pregnant women (5 473 women with clinical hypothyroidism and 472 945 euthyroid pregnant women). The risk of preterm birth in pregnant women with clinical hypothyroidism was higher than those eurothyroid pregnant women in control group (OR = 1.25, 95% CI:1.15-1.36, P hypothyroidism in pregnancy: ten studies were included, reported data on 277 531 pregnant women (5 257 women with subclinical hypothyroidism and 272 274 euthyroid pregnant women). The risk of preterm birth in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism was higher than those in control group by random effects analysis (OR = 1

  2. Lupus cystitis in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: risk factors and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J H; Lee, J; Jung, S M; Ju, J H; Park, S-H; Kim, H-Y; Kwok, S-K

    2015-10-01

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of lupus cystitis and determine the risk factors and clinical outcomes of lupus cystitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We retrospectively reviewed 1064 patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from 1998 to 2013. Twenty-four patients had lupus cystitis. Lupus cystitis was defined as unexplained ureteritis and/or cystitis as detected by imaging studies, cystoscopy, or bladder histopathology without urinary microorganisms or stones. Three-fourths of patients with lupus cystitis had concurrent lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV). The initial symptoms were gastrointestinal in nature for most patients (79.2%). High-dose methylprednisolone was initially administered to most patients (91.7%) with lupus cystitis. Two patients (8.3%) died of urinary tract infections. Sixty-five age- and sex-matched patients with SLE who were admitted with other manifestations were included as the control group. Patients with lupus cystitis showed a lower C3 level (p = 0.031), higher SLE Disease Activity Index score (p = 0.006), and higher ESR (p = 0.05) upon admission; more frequently had a history of LMV prior to admission (p lupus (p = 0.031) than did patients with SLE but without lupus cystitis. The occurrence of lupus cystitis was associated with a history of LMV (OR, 21.794; 95% CI, 4.061-116.963). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years, and the cumulative one-year mortality rate was 20%. Complications developed in 33.3% of patients with lupus cystitis and were related to survival (log-rank p = 0.021). Our results suggest that the possibility of lupus cystitis should be considered when a patient with SLE and history of LMV presents with gastrointestinal symptoms or lower urinary tract symptoms. Development of complications in patients with lupus cystitis can be fatal. Thus, intensive treatment and follow-up are needed, especially in the presence of

  3. Drug adverse events and drop-out risk: a clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoyni, R M; Aiello, L; Trani, I; Felli, B; Masin, A M R; Camponi, V; Dignazio, L; Cortese, M; Pacitti, M T; Carratelli, D; Morocutti, C

    2007-01-01

    We report a brief discussion on a clinical case of a female patient, 85 years old, affected by severe cognitive impairment and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The patient was not taking drugs at home (apart from promazine: 10 drops when necessary to control her behavioral diseases). A previous neuropsychological evaluation had shown a severe cognitive impairment MMSE=16/30; ADL=3/6; IADL=0/8) due to multiple brain ischemic areas (confirmed in 2003 by MRI neuroimaging). When the patient was admitted to our center she was able to perform some basic activities of daily living such as eating and walking and was not too confused. She was included in cognitive rehabilitation groups. Since she showed signs of Parkinsonism, a therapy based on omeprazol 20mg, acetylsalicylic acid, donepezil 10mg, pramipexol 0.18 mg, nimodipine 10 drops, levodopa+carbidopa 100/25mg was started. A few days later she became sleepy during daytime and, once, she lost her balance and fell. She was not self-sufficient any more. At first this was attributed to a lung infection that the patient had, but her state continue after the infection was completely cured with appropriate antibiotics therapy. At that point an adverse drug reaction was suspected and therapy with pramipexol 0.18 mg was interrupted. In a few days the patient regained her previous level of consciousness and self-sufficiency. We consider this a typical case of complex management in a patient with dementia and comorbidity in which adverse drug reactions can play an important role in lowering the level of cognitive functions. In this case the relationship with the family of the patient was made difficult by the attitude of the patient's daughter who decided, after the onset of the adverse drug reaction, to interrupt her mother's stay in our center even at risk of the worst consequences.

  4. Educational intervention on cardiovascular parameters in perimenopausal women with a cardiovascular risk factor. Randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Rodríguez, Anxela; García Soidán, José Luís; Arias Gómez, María Jesús; Del Álamo Alonso, Alberto; Leirós Rodríguez, Raquel; Pérez Fernández, María Reyes

    2017-07-22

    Randomised clinical trial performed in two urban health centres in Spain. To evaluate if educational intervention in women of perimenopausal age with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidaemia could achieve significant changes in the reduction of biochemical and haemodynamic risk parameters. The study included 320 women aged between 45 and 60 years old who were diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidaemia. They were randomly assigned to the experimental group (n=160) and the control group (n=160). The intervention group received three educational sessions and the control group received an informative leaflet sent by mail. Haemodynamic and biochemical variables were evaluated at baseline and one year later in both groups. Women in the intervention group showed a decrease in low density lipoprotein (P=.034), (-5.89±29.8; 95% CI: -13.1/0.27) and an increase in high density lipoprotein (P=.013), (2.71±10.6; 95% CI: -1.36/6.20), as well as improvements in systolic blood pressure (P=.016), (-2.16±11.8; 95% CI: -4.4/0.01) and frequency (P=.003), (-1.46±10.3; 95% CI: -3.34/0.42) compared to women in the control group. Women in the control group significantly increased glucose (P=.04), (4.84±15.5; 95% CI: -0.75/31.3) and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (P=.031), (3.61±14.7; 95% CI: 0.87/6.36) levels more than those in the experimental group. An educational intervention can be an effective method of reducing the parameters associated with an increased likelihood of cardiovascular disease in women at perimenopausal age with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidaemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of uncertainties in radiation-induced cancer risk predictions at clinically relevant doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Physics, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69117 (Germany); Moteabbed, M.; Paganetti, H., E-mail: hpaganetti@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Theoretical dose–response models offer the possibility to assess second cancer induction risks after external beam therapy. The parameters used in these models are determined with limited data from epidemiological studies. Risk estimations are thus associated with considerable uncertainties. This study aims at illustrating uncertainties when predicting the risk for organ-specific second cancers in the primary radiation field illustrated by choosing selected treatment plans for brain cancer patients. Methods: A widely used risk model was considered in this study. The uncertainties of the model parameters were estimated with reported data of second cancer incidences for various organs. Standard error propagation was then subsequently applied to assess the uncertainty in the risk model. Next, second cancer risks of five pediatric patients treated for cancer in the head and neck regions were calculated. For each case, treatment plans for proton and photon therapy were designed to estimate the uncertainties (a) in the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for a given treatment modality and (b) when comparing risks of two different treatment modalities. Results: Uncertainties in excess of 100% of the risk were found for almost all organs considered. When applied to treatment plans, the calculated LAR values have uncertainties of the same magnitude. A comparison between cancer risks of different treatment modalities, however, does allow statistically significant conclusions. In the studied cases, the patient averaged LAR ratio of proton and photon treatments was 0.35, 0.56, and 0.59 for brain carcinoma, brain sarcoma, and bone sarcoma, respectively. Their corresponding uncertainties were estimated to be potentially below 5%, depending on uncertainties in dosimetry. Conclusions: The uncertainty in the dose–response curve in cancer risk models makes it currently impractical to predict the risk for an individual external beam treatment. On the other hand, the ratio

  6. Risk factors for level V lymph node metastases in solitary papillary thyroid carcinoma with clinically lateral lymph node metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Gong, Yanping; Yan, Shuping; Zhu, Jingqiang; Li, Zhihui; Gong, Rixiang

    2016-08-01

    The extent of lateral neck dissection (LND) in surgical resection of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with clinically lateral LNM (LLNM) remains controversial. We aimed to explore the frequency of and risk factors for level V LNM in patients with solitary PTC and clinically LLNM. To analyze the frequency and risk factors for level V LNM, we retrospectively reviewed 220 solitary PTC patients who underwent total thyroidectomy, bilateral central neck dissection, and therapeutic LND. LLNM were present in 82.3% patients, and levels II-V LNM were present in 45.9%, 62.7%, 55.5%, and 12.3% patients, respectively. Ipsilateral level V LNM was significantly associated with tumor size >10 mm, extrathyroidal extension, ipsilateral central LNM ratio ≥50%, and contralateral central LNM (CLNM), bilateral CLNM, and simultaneous levels II-IV LNM. Contralateral CLNM was an independent risk factor for level V LNM. In patients with solitary PTC and clinically LLNM, level V LNM was relatively uncommon. Therefore, routine level V lymphadenectomy may be unnecessary in these patients unless level V LNM is suspected on preoperative examination or associated risk factors, especially contralateral CLNM, are present.

  7. The future of monitoring in clinical research - a holistic approach: linking risk-based monitoring with quality management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, Eva B; Hecht, Arthur; Henn, Doris K; Leptien, Sabine; Stelzer, Hans Günther

    2013-01-01

    Since several years risk-based monitoring is the new "magic bullet" for improvement in clinical research. Lots of authors in clinical research ranging from industry and academia to authorities are keen on demonstrating better monitoring-efficiency by reducing monitoring visits, monitoring time on site, monitoring costs and so on, always arguing with the use of risk-based monitoring principles. Mostly forgotten is the fact, that the use of risk-based monitoring is only adequate if all mandatory prerequisites at site and for the monitor and the sponsor are fulfilled.Based on the relevant chapter in ICH GCP (International Conference on Harmonisation of technical requirements for registration of pharmaceuticals for human use - Good Clinical Practice) this publication takes a holistic approach by identifying and describing the requirements for future monitoring and the use of risk-based monitoring. As the authors are operational managers as well as QA (Quality Assurance) experts, both aspects are represented to come up with efficient and qualitative ways of future monitoring according to ICH GCP.

  8. Endoscopic findings in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding clinically classified into three risk groups prior to endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonardo Tammaro; Maria Carla Di Paolo; Angelo Zullo; Cesare Hassan; Sergio Morini; Sebastiano Caliendo; Lorella Pallotta

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate in a prospective study whether a simplified clinical score prior to endoscopy in upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) patients was able to predict endoscopic findings at urgent endoscopy.METHODS: All consecutive UGIB patients referred to a single endoscopic center during a 16 mo period were enrolled. Before endoscopy patients were stratified according to a simple clinical score (T-score),including T1 (high-risk), T2 (intermediate-risk) and T3 (low-risk). Endoscopy was performed in all cases within 2 h, and high-risk stigmata were considered for further analysis.RESULTS: Out of the 436 patients included into the study, 126 (29%) resulted to be T1, 135 (31%) T2,and 175 (40%) T3. Overall, stigmata of recent haernorrhage (SRH) were detected in 118 cases (27%). SRH occurred more frequently in Tt patients than in T2/T3 cases (85% vs 3.2%; x2 = 304.5309, P < 0.001). Older age (t = 3.311; P <0.01) and presence of comorbidities (x2 = 14.7458; P < 0.01) were more frequently detected in T1 than in T2/T3 patients.CONCLUSION: Our simplified clinical score appeared to be associated with the detection of endoscopic findings which may deserve urgent endoscopy. A further,randomised study is needed to assess its accuracy in safely scheduling endoscopy in UGIB patients.

  9. Screening schizotypal personality disorder for detection of clinical high risk of psychosis in Chinese mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, TianHong; Li, HuiJun; Tang, YingYing; Li, Hui; Zheng, LiNa; Guo, Qian; Zhao, ShanShan; Zhuo, KaiMing; Qian, ZhenYing; Wang, LanLan; Dai, YunFei; Chow, Annabelle; Li, ChunBo; Jiang, KaiDa; Wang, JiJun; Xiao, ZePing

    2015-08-30

    Schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) is viewed as a marker of prodromal psychosis. However, information regarding genetic risk (e.g. SPD) is often overlooked in the identification process. This study assessed whether SPD screening questionnaire help the prodromal psychosis (also widely applied "clinical high risk" (CHR) for clinical sample) detection in Chinese mental health service. This work also examined whether SPD had higher frequency in genetic risk population and CHR subjects. Two wave studies concerning the SPD identification was used for analysis. Wave 1 survey: 3075 subjects were assessed by Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire for SPD (PDQ-SPD) and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II (SCID-II). Wave 2 survey: 2113 subjects screened with the prodromal questionnaire -brief version (PQ-B), PDQ-SPD, and interviewed by Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS). Subjects with family history of mental disorders or with psychosis reported significantly higher scores in SPD. Receiver operating characteristic curves suggested that PDQ-SPD had moderate sensitivity and specificity for identifying CHR subjects. There was significant higher on SPD features in subjects with early stage (Course less than 1 year) of psychosis. Identifying SPD may be useful in early detection of psychosis especially in detecting the genetic risk syndromes and can be integrated with existing prodromal screen tools to improve its efficiency.

  10. Mediators of the Relation Between Community Violence and Sexual Risk Behavior Among Adults Attending a Public Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Theresa E; Walsh, Jennifer L; Carey, Michael P

    2016-07-01

    Prior research shows that violence is associated with sexual risk behavior, but little is known about the relation between community violence (i.e., violence that is witnessed or experienced in one's neighborhood) and sexual risk behavior. To better understand contextual influences on HIV risk behavior, we asked 508 adult patients attending a publicly funded STI clinic in the U.S. (54 % male, M age = 27.93, 68 % African American) who were participating in a larger trial to complete a survey assessing exposure to community violence, sexual risk behavior, and potential mediators of the community violence-sexual risk behavior relation (i.e., mental health, substance use, and experiencing intimate partner violence). A separate sample of participants from the same trial completed measures of sexual behavior norms, which were aggregated to create measures of census tract sexual behavior norms. Data analyses controlling for socioeconomic status revealed that higher levels of community violence were associated with more sexual partners for men and with more episodes of unprotected sex with non-steady partners for women. For both men and women, substance use and mental health mediated the community violence-sexual risk behavior relation; in addition, for men only, experiencing intimate partner violence also mediated this relation. These results confirm that, for individuals living in communities with high levels of violence, sexual risk reduction interventions need to address intimate partner violence, substance use, and mental health to be optimally effective.

  11. [Post-marketing reevaluation for potential quality risk and quality control in clinical application of traditional Chinese medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-jiao; He, Li-yun; Liu, Bao-yan

    2015-06-01

    The effective quality control in clinical practices is an effective guarantee for the authenticity and scientificity of the findings. The post-marketing reevaluation for traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) focuses on the efficacy, adverse reaction, combined medication and effective dose of drugs in the market by expanded clinical trials, and requires a larger sample size and a wider range of patients. Therefore, this increases the difficulty of quality control in clinical practices. With the experience in quality control in clinical practices for the post-marketing reevaluation for Kangbingdu oral for cold, researchers in this study reviewed the study purpose, project, scheme design and clinical practice process from an overall point of view, analyzed the study characteristics of the post-marketing reevaluation for TCMs and the quality control risks, designed the quality control contents with quality impacting factors, defined key review contents and summarized the precautions in clinical practices, with the aim to improve the efficiency of quality control of clinical practices. This study can provide reference to clinical units and quality control-related personnel in the post-marketing reevaluation for TCMs.

  12. Death from pulmonary thromboembolism in severe obesity: lack of association with established genetic and clinical risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszyk, H; Wollan, P C; Witkiewicz, A K; Björnsson, J

    1999-06-01

    Several clinical and environmental conditions are causally related to sudden death from acute pulmonary thromboembolism (APT). Morbid obesity, despite its frequency and association with adverse health effects, is usually considered at most only an additive risk factor for APT. We reviewed protocols and histories from 7227 consecutive autopsies performed between 1985 and 1996 at the Mayo Clinic, including all deaths from APT where no clinical or environmental risk factor could be identified in the study. Body mass indices (BMI) were calculated and compared with those of age- and sex-matched controls who had died suddenly and naturally without evidence of APT. Resistance to activated protein C is the most common molecular clotting defect predisposing to APT, and it is caused by a point mutation in the factor V gene (R506Q). Genomic DNA was extracted from archival tissues of all cases and controls, and the R506Q status was determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification, restriction endonuclease digestion, and direct sequencing. APT was found as the immediate cause of death in 433 patients, with 36 (8%) having no previously established risk factors. Twenty-four of these persons (67%) were morbidly obese (BMI >30 kg/m2). compared with only five controls (14%, P<0.0001). Four patients in both groups, each with a BMI <30 kg/m2. had at least one allele positive for R506Q. Morbid obesity is an independent risk factor in cases of sudden death from APT after the exclusion of previously established clinical, environmental, and molecular risk factors.

  13. [Suicide Risk Assessment in the Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Depression in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; Gil Lemus, Laura Marcela; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; García Valencia, Jenny; Bravo Narváez, Eliana; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Palacio, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the most serious complications of depression. It has high associated health costs and causes millions of deaths worldwide per year. Given its implications, it is important to know the factors that increase the risk of its occurrence and the most useful tools for addressing it. To identify the signs and symptoms that indicate an increased risk of suicide, and factors that increase the risk in patients diagnosed with depression. To establish the tools best fitted to identify suicide risk in people with depression. Clinical practice guidelines were developed, following those of the methodmethodological guidelines of the Ministry of Social Protection, to collect evidence and to adjust recommendations. Recommendations from the NICE90 and CANMAT guidelines were adopted and updated for questions found in these guidelines, while new recommendations were developed for questions not found in them. Basic points and recommendations are presented from a chapter of the clinical practice guidelines on depressive episodes and recurrent depressive disorder related to suicide risk assessment. Their corresponding recommendation levels are included. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Risk Factors for the Presence and Development of Vertebral Fractures in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Fiona; Spoorenberg, Anneke; van der Slik, Boukje P. G.; van der Veer, Eveline; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bos, Reinhard; Wink, Freke R.; Arends, Suzanne

    IntroductionTo investigate the prevalence and incidence of radiographic vertebral fractures and the association with patient characteristics, clinical assessments, and medication use in a large prospective cohort of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in daily clinical practice.

  15. Clinical and community risk models of incident tooth loss in postmenopausal women from the Buffalo Osteo Perio Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Christopher; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Hovey, Kathleen M; Genco, Robert J; Hausmann, Ernest

    2010-12-01

      While risk factors for tooth loss in adults have been identified, limited studies describing factors associated with incident tooth loss in postmenopausal women exist. This study assessed both clinical and non-clinical risk factors for incident tooth loss. Postmenopausal women (N = 1341) were recruited between 1997 and 2000 from 1847 eligible Observational Study participants of the Buffalo, NY center of the Women's Health Initiative who had complete dental examinations to assess alveolar bone height, soft tissue attachment and general oral health, and completed questionnaires concerning demographics, general health, lifestyle and oral health (72.6% participation rate). Five years later (2002-2005), 1021 women (76.1%) repeated these examinations and questionnaires. Incident tooth loss was determined by oral examination. After an average 5.1 years of follow-up (SD, 0.38), a total of 323 teeth were lost in 293 women, resulting in 28.7% of women with incident loss of at least one tooth. In multivariable models, diabetes history, gum disease history, smoking, previous tooth loss, BMI and plaque index, baseline clinical measures including alveolar crestal height (ACH) (OR = 1.22 per mm loss, 95% CI 1.11, 1.35), clinical attachment loss (CAL) (OR = 1.13 per mm loss, 95% CI 1.05, 1.23), and pocket depth (PD) (OR = 1.26 per mm loss, 95% CI 1.13, 1.41) were significant risk factors of incident tooth loss. In a community model that included no clinical measures, diabetes history (OR = 2.45, 95% CI 1.26, 4.77), prior gum disease (OR = 1.97, 95% CI 1.43, 2.70), ever smoking (OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.06, 1.89), number of teeth lost at baseline (OR = 1.05 per tooth, 95% CI 1.02, 1.08), and BMI (OR = 1.15 per 5 km/m(2) increase, 95% CI 1.01, 1.33) were associated with an increased risk of incident tooth loss. Clinical and questionnaire-based models were found to provide similar risk estimates for incident tooth loss in postmenopausal women. These models identified high-risk

  16. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 2. Benefits versus risk of CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, Sjirk J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In order to personalize the communication of the CT risk, we need to describe the risk in the context of the clinical benefit of CT, which will generally be much higher, provided a CT scan has a well-established clinical indication. However as pediatric radiologists we should be careful not to overstate the benefit of CT, being aware that medico-legal pressures and the realities of health care economics have led to overutilization of the technology. And even though we should not use previously accumulated radiation dose to a child as an argument against conducting a clinically indicated scan (the ''sunk-cost'' bias), we should consider patients' radiation history in the diagnostic decision process. As a contribution to future public health, it makes more sense to look for non-radiating alternatives to CT in the much larger group of basically healthy children who are receiving occasional scans for widely prevalent conditions such as appendicitis and trauma than to attempt lowering CT use in the smaller group of patients with chronic conditions with a limited life expectancy. When communicating the CT risk with individual patients and their parents, we should acknowledge and address their concerns within the framework of informed decision-making. When appropriate, we may express the individual radiation risk, based on estimates of summated absorbed organ dose, as an order of magnitude rather than as an absolute number, and compare this with the much larger natural cancer incidence over a child's lifetime, and with other risks in medicine and daily life. We should anticipate that many patients cannot make informed decisions on their own in this complex matter, and we should offer our guidance while maintaining respect for patient autonomy. Proper documentation of the informed decision process is important for future reference. In concert with our referring physicians, pediatric radiologists are well-equipped to tackle the complexities

  17. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine: part 2: benefits versus risk of CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Sjirk J

    2014-10-01

    In order to personalize the communication of the CT risk, we need to describe the risk in the context of the clinical benefit of CT, which will generally be much higher, provided a CT scan has a well-established clinical indication. However as pediatric radiologists we should be careful not to overstate the benefit of CT, being aware that medico-legal pressures and the realities of health care economics have led to overutilization of the technology. And even though we should not use previously accumulated radiation dose to a child as an argument against conducting a clinically indicated scan (the "sunk-cost" bias), we should consider patients' radiation history in the diagnostic decision process. As a contribution to future public health, it makes more sense to look for non-radiating alternatives to CT in the much larger group of basically healthy children who are receiving occasional scans for widely prevalent conditions such as appendicitis and trauma than to attempt lowering CT use in the smaller group of patients with chronic conditions with a limited life expectancy. When communicating the CT risk with individual patients and their parents, we should acknowledge and address their concerns within the framework of informed decision-making. When appropriate, we may express the individual radiation risk, based on estimates of summated absorbed organ dose, as an order of magnitude rather than as an absolute number, and compare this with the much larger natural cancer incidence over a child's lifetime, and with other risks in medicine and daily life. We should anticipate that many patients cannot make informed decisions on their own in this complex matter, and we should offer our guidance while maintaining respect for patient autonomy. Proper documentation of the informed decision process is important for future reference. In concert with our referring physicians, pediatric radiologists are well-equipped to tackle the complexities associated with the communication

  18. [Open clinical trial with oral acyclovir for the prophylaxis of disease by Cytomegalovirus in low risk liver transplant recipients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J; Montero, J L; Gavilán, F; Costán, G; Herrero, C; Cárdenas, M; Sánchez-Guijo, P; Torre-Cisneros, J

    1999-10-01

    Checking the first 70 low risk liver transplantation performed in our hospital, who did not receive prophylaxis for Cytomegalovirus, we found that the incidence of Cytomegalovirus-infection and Cytomegalovirus-disease were 47% and 16% respectively. For this reason we started a prospective, open clinical study, to address the safety of acyclovir prophylaxis in low-risk liver transplant patients. Seventy patients did not receive acyclovir. Fifty patients received oral acyclovir during 3 months (800-3,200 mg/day). The occurrence of Cytomegalovirus infection was not modified (40%) but Cytomegalovirus disease decreased dramatically (4%, p Varicela-zoster symptomatic disease in this group of patients.

  19. Risk assessment models in genetics clinic for array comparative genomic hybridization: Clinical information can be used to predict the likelihood of an abnormal result in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Rachel M; Mercurio, Laura; Kanter, Rebecca; Doyle, Richard; Abuelo, Dianne; Morrow, Eric M; Shur, Natasha

    2013-03-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) testing can diagnose chromosomal microdeletions and duplications too small to be detected by conventional cytogenetic techniques. We need to consider which patients are more likely to receive a diagnosis from aCGH testing versus patients that have lower likelihood and may benefit from broader genome wide scanning. We retrospectively reviewed charts of a population of 200 patients, 117 boys and 83 girls, who underwent aCGH testing in Genetics Clinic at Rhode Island hospital between 1 January/2008 and 31 December 2010. Data collected included sex, age at initial clinical presentation, aCGH result, history of seizures, autism, dysmorphic features, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia and failure to thrive. aCGH analysis revealed abnormal results in 34 (17%) and variants of unknown significance in 24 (12%). Patients with three or more clinical diagnoses had a 25.0% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings, while patients with two or fewer clinical diagnoses had a 12.5% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings. Currently, we provide families with a range of 10-30% of a diagnosis with aCGH testing. With increased clinical complexity, patients have an increased probability of having an abnormal aCGH result. With this, we can provide individualized risk estimates for each patient.

  20. Characteristics and risk factors of major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding in cancer patients receiving anticoagulant treatment for acute venous thromboembolism-the CATCH study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuisen, P.W.; Lee, A.Y.Y.; Meyer, Guy; Bauersachs, R.; Janas, M.S.; Jarner, M.F.; Khorana, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) receiving anticoagulant treatment have a substantial risk of bleeding complications. Aims: To assess the rate, site and risk factors of clinically relevant bleeding (CRB; major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding) in cancer pa

  1. Non-genetic risk factors and their influence on the management of patients in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Teresa; Soto, Immaculada; Astermark, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The development of inhibitors is the most serious iatrogenic complication affecting patients with haemophilia. This complication is associated with impaired vital or functional prognosis, reduced quality of life and increased cost of treatment. The reasons why some patients develop antibodies to factor replacement and others do not remain unclear. It is however clear that inhibitor development results from a complex multifactorial interaction between genetic and non-genetic risk factors. Environmental i