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Sample records for 4-hour cocaine infusion

  1. Tolerance to cocaine in brain stimulation reward following continuous cocaine infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudiak, Cindy M; KuoLee, Rhonda; Bozarth, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    This study examined tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect in brain stimulation reward (BSR) following continuous cocaine infusions and secondly, used the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to determine NO's involvement in the development of cocaine tolerance. Animals were continuously infused with saline or cocaine (30 mg/kg per day) via osmotic minipump for 14 days and injected daily with saline or L-NAME (30 mg/kg, i.p.) following BSR testing. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed stable BSR thresholds across the 14-day infusion period. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed markedly lowered BSR thresholds on Day 1 followed by a progressive increase in BSR thresholds across the infusion period - indicating the development of tolerance. L-NAME-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed stimulation thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine. A cocaine challenge injection (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 3 and again at 10 days following minipump removal revealed that saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed lowered BSR thresholds. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine displayed lowered BSR thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-infused animals. L-NAME treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed higher BSR thresholds to a challenge 3 days following pump removal. However, stimulation thresholds for this group failed to reach statistical significance on both days (i.e., Days 3 and 10) following pump removal. Results showed that animals continuously infused with cocaine develop robust tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect during the 14-day infusion period. Tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect was short-lived and dissipated soon after minipump removal. L-NAME treatment failed to significantly

  2. Cocaine but not natural reward self-administration nor passive cocaine infusion produces persistent LTP in the VTA

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Billy T.; Bowers, M Scott; Martin, Miquel; Hopf, F. Woodward; Gilroy, Anitra M.; Carelli, Regina M.; Chou, Jonathan K.; Bonci, Antonello

    2008-01-01

    Persistent drug-seeking behavior is hypothesized to co-opt the brain's natural reward-motivational system. Although ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons represent a crucial component of this system, the synaptic adaptations underlying natural rewards and drug-related motivation have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that self-administration of cocaine, but not passive cocaine infusions, produced a persistent potentiation of VTA excitatory synapses, which was still present ...

  3. Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts NIDA: Commonly Abused Drugs Chart DrugFacts: Cocaine Mind Over Matter Teaching Guide and Series: Cocaine . NIDA Notes Articles: Cocaine ... has. Read More » 5 Comments View ... with young teens how cocaine changes the way nerve cells communicate in the brain and the negative effects the drug can have ...

  4. A Single Amphetamine Infusion Reverses Deficits in Dopamine Nerve-Terminal Function Caused by a History of Cocaine Self-Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Rose, Jamie H; Siciliano, Cody A; Sun, Haiguo; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R

    2015-07-01

    There are ∼ 1.6 million people who meet the criteria for cocaine addiction in the United States, and there are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies. Amphetamine-based dopamine-releasing drugs have shown efficacy in reducing the motivation to self-administer cocaine and reducing intake in animals and humans. It is hypothesized that amphetamine acts as a replacement therapy for cocaine through elevation of extracellular dopamine levels. Using voltammetry in brain slices, we tested the ability of a single amphetamine infusion in vivo to modulate dopamine release, uptake kinetics, and cocaine potency in cocaine-naive animals and after a history of cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/infusion, fixed-ratio 1, 40 injections/day × 5 days). Dopamine kinetics were measured 1 and 24 h after amphetamine infusion (0.56 mg/kg, i.v.). Following cocaine self-administration, dopamine release, maximal rate of uptake (Vmax), and membrane-associated dopamine transporter (DAT) levels were reduced, and the DAT was less sensitive to cocaine. A single amphetamine infusion reduced Vmax and membrane DAT levels in cocaine-naive animals, but fully restored all aspects of dopamine terminal function in cocaine self-administering animals. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate pharmacologically induced, immediate rescue of deficits in dopamine nerve-terminal function in animals with a history of high-dose cocaine self-administration. This observation supports the notion that the DAT expression and function can be modulated on a rapid timescale and also suggests that the pharmacotherapeutic actions of amphetamine for cocaine addiction go beyond that of replacement therapy. PMID:25689882

  5. Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocaine is a white powder. It can be snorted up the nose or mixed with water and injected with a needle. Cocaine can also be made into small white rocks, ... Crack is smoked in a small glass pipe. Cocaine speeds up your whole body. You may feel ...

  6. A Single Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Infusion into the Dorsomedial Prefrontal Cortex Attenuates Cocaine Self-Administration-Induced Phosphorylation of Synapsin in the Nucleus Accumbens during Early Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka; McGinty, Jacqueline F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysregulation in the prefrontal cortex-nucleus accumbens pathway has been implicated in cocaine addiction. We have previously demonstrated that one intra-dorsomedial prefrontal cortex brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) infusion immediately following the last cocaine self-administration session caused a long-lasting inhibition of cocaine-seeking and normalized the cocaine-induced disturbance of glutamate transmission in the nucleus accumbens after extinction and a cocaine pri...

  7. Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cocaine KidsHealth > For Teens > Cocaine Print A A A ...

  8. Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Short-term health effects of cocaine include: extreme happiness and energy mental alertness hypersensitivity to sight, sound, ... include: constricted blood vessels nausea faster heartbeat extreme happiness and energy irritability paranoia Long-term effects include: ...

  9. Short-term abstinence from cocaine self-administration, but not passive cocaine infusion, elevates αCaMKII autophosphorylation in the rat nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffino, Lucia; Cassina, Chiara; Giannotti, Giuseppe; Orrù, Alessandro; Moro, Federico; Di Clemente, Angelo; Racagni, Giorgio; Fumagalli, Fabio; Cervo, Luigi

    2014-02-01

    Increases in alpha calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II (αCaMKII) activity in the nucleus accumbens shell has been proposed as a core component in the motivation to self-administer cocaine and in priming-induced drug-seeking. Since cocaine withdrawal promotes drug-seeking, we hypothesized that abstinence from cocaine self-administration should enhance αCaMKII as well. We found that short-term abstinence from contingent, but not non-contingent, cocaine i.v. self-administration (2 h/d for 14 d; 0.25 mg/0.1 ml, 6 s infusion) elevates αCaMKII autophosphorylation, but not the kinase expression, in a dynamic, time- and brain region-dependent manner. Increased αCaMKII autophosphorylation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not dorsolateral striatum (dlS), was found 24 h, but not immediately, after the last cocaine self-administration session. Notably, in the mPFC, but not NAc and dlS, αCaMKII autophosphorylation was still enhanced 7 d later. The persistent enhancement in the mPFC of abstinent rats may represent a previously unappreciated contribution to initial incubation of cocaine-seeking. PMID:23953174

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cocaine addiction

    OpenAIRE

    McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Whitfield, Timothy W.; Berglind, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on cocaine-seeking are brain region-specific. Infusion of BDNF into subcortical structures, like the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area, enhances cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and cocaine seeking. Conversely, repeated administration of BDNF antiserum into the nucleus accumbens during chronic cocaine self-administration attenuates cocaine-induced reinstatement. In contrast, BDNF infusion into the dorsomedial prefronta...

  11. A Single Amphetamine Infusion Reverses Deficits in Dopamine Nerve-Terminal Function Caused by a History of Cocaine Self-Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Ferris, Mark J.; Calipari, Erin S.; Rose, Jamie H.; Siciliano, Cody A.; Sun, Haiguo; Chen, Rong; JONES, SARA R.

    2015-01-01

    There are ∼1.6 million people who meet the criteria for cocaine addiction in the United States, and there are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies. Amphetamine-based dopamine-releasing drugs have shown efficacy in reducing the motivation to self-administer cocaine and reducing intake in animals and humans. It is hypothesized that amphetamine acts as a replacement therapy for cocaine through elevation of extracellular dopamine levels. Using voltammetry in brain slices, we tested the abi...

  12. Dopamine Uptake Changes Associated with Cocaine Self-Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Oleson, Erik B.; Talluri, Sanjay; Childers, Steven R; Smith, James E.; Roberts, David C.S.; Bonin, Keith D.; Budygin, Evgeny A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was designed to reveal the relationship between cocaine-induced dopamine uptake changes and patterns of cocaine self-administration observed under a fixed ratio schedule. Cocaine was intravenously infused into anesthetized rats, according to inter-infusion intervals obtained from self-administering animals, and dopamine uptake changes (apparent Km ) were assessed in the nucleus accumbens using voltammetry. The data demonstrate that cocaine-induced dopamine transporter (DAT) ...

  13. Examination of cocaine dose in a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Jennifer L; Dykstra, Linda A.; Carelli, Regina M.

    2015-01-01

    In a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine, taste cues elicit aversive taste reactivity when they predict impending but delayed cocaine self-administration. Here, we investigated this negative affective state as a function of cocaine dose. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were given 45 brief intraoral infusions of a 0.15% saccharin solution prior to 2 h cocaine self-administration for 14 days. Rats were video recorded; taste reactivity and patterns of self-administration were qu...

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging of cocaine treated rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Narayana, Ponnada A.; Ahobila-Vajjula, Pallavi; Ramu, Jaivijay; Herrera, Juan; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Studies in cocaine-dependent human subjects have shown differences in white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) compared to non-drug using controls. It is not known whether the FA differences seen on DTI in white matter regions of cocaine-dependent humans result from a pre-existing predilection for drug use or purely from cocaine abuse. To study the effect of cocaine on brain white matter, DTI was performed on 24 rats after continuous infusion of cocaine or saline for 4 weeks, followed b...

  15. fMRI of Cocaine Self-Administration in Macaques Reveals Functional Inhibition of Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Mandeville, Joseph B.; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Jarraya, Bechir; Rosen, Bruce R.; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Vanduffel, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Disparities in cocaine-induced neurochemical and metabolic responses between human beings and rodents motivate the use of non-human primates (NHP) to model consequences of repeated cocaine exposure in human subjects. To characterize the functional response to cocaine infusion in NHP brain, we employed contrast-enhanced fMRI during both non-contingent injection of drug and self-administration of cocaine in the magnet. Cocaine robustly decreased cerebral blood volume (CBV) throughout basal gang...

  16. Effects of mazindol on behavior maintained or occasioned by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbach, R S; Balster, R L

    1993-01-01

    The effects of mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine were studied in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine, and in rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline. Non-contingent intravenous drug injections were administered to monkeys responding under a session consisting of a 5-min period during which lever-pressing produced food reinforcement and a 60-min session in which responding produced i.v. cocaine infusions (10 or 33 micrograms/kg per infusion). Acute i.v. injections of cocaine (0.1-1.7 mg/kg), D-amphetamine (0.1-1 mg/kg) and the dopamine re-uptake inhibitor mazindol (0.03-0.56 mg/kg) given 5 min before the session decreased self-administration of cocaine, but also decreased rates of behavior maintained by the presentation of food. In both rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline in a two-lever, food-maintained procedure, mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine substituted for cocaine in a dose-related manner. Despite a lack of selectivity to decrease cocaine self-administration as compared to behavior maintained by food, the present data provide some rationale for further consideration of mazindol as a potential pharmacotherapy for stimulant abuse, due to its relatively low abuse liability and cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects. PMID:8436063

  17. Alcohol-preferring (P) rats are more sensitive than Wistar rats to the reinforcing effects of cocaine self-administered directly into the nucleus accumbens shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katner, Simon N; Oster, Scott M; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Deehan, Gerald A; Toalston, Jamie E; Hauser, Sheketha R; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2011-10-01

    Wistar rats will self-administer cocaine directly into the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), but not into the nucleus accumbens core. In human and animal literature, there is a genetic association between alcoholism and cocaine dependency. The current experiment examined whether selective breeding for high alcohol preference is also associated with greater sensitivity of the AcbSh to the reinforcing properties of cocaine. P and Wistar rats were given cocaine (0, 100, 200, 400, or 800 pmol/100 nl) to self-infuse into the AcbSh. Rats were given cocaine for the first 4 sessions (acquisition), artificial CSF for sessions 5 and 6 (extinction), and cocaine again in session 7 (reinstatement). During acquisition, P rats self-infused 200-800 pmol cocaine (59 infusions/session), whereas Wistar rats only reliably self-infused 800 pmol cocaine (38 infusions/session). Furthermore, P rats received a greater number of cocaine infusions in the 200, 400 and 800 pmol cocaine groups compared to respective Wistar groups during acquisition. Both P and Wistar rats reduced responding on the active lever when aCSF was substituted for cocaine, and reinstated responding in session 7 when cocaine was restored. However, P rats had significantly greater infusions during session 7 compared to session 4 at all concentrations of cocaine tested, whereas Wistar rats only displayed greater infusions during session 7 compared to session 4 at the 400 and 800 pmol cocaine concentrations. The present results suggest that, compared to Wistar rats, the AcbSh of P rats was more sensitive to the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The reinstatement data suggest that the AcbSh of P rats may have become sensitized to the reinforcing effects of cocaine. Overall, the findings from this study support a genetic association between high alcohol preference and greater sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine. PMID:21723879

  18. Cocaine withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may not be as unstable as withdrawal from alcohol. However, the withdrawal from any chronic substance abuse is very serious. There is a risk of suicide or overdose. Symptoms usually disappear over time. People who have cocaine ...

  19. [Sucrose reward promotes rats' motivation for cocaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Qing; LE, Qiu-Min; Yu, Xiang-Chen; Ma, Lan; Wang, Fei-Fei

    2016-06-25

    Caloric diet, such as fat and sugar intake, has rewarding effects, and has been indicated to affect the responses to addictive substances in animal experiments. However, the possible association between sucrose reward and the motivation for addictive drugs remains to be elucidated. Thus, we carried out behavioral tests after sucrose self-administration training to determine the effects of sucrose experience on rats' motivation for cocaine, locomotor sensitivity to cocaine, basal locomotor activity, anxiety level, and associative learning ability. The sucrose-experienced (sucrose) group exhibited higher lever press, cocaine infusion and break point, as well as upshift of cocaine dose-response curve in cocaine self-administration test, as compared with the control (chow) group. Additionally, despite similar locomotor activity in open field test and comparable score in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, the sucrose group showed higher cocaine-induced locomotor sensitivity as compared with the chow group. The anxiety level and the performance in vocal-cue induced fear memory were similar between these two groups in elevated plus maze and fear conditioning tests, respectively. Taken together, our work indicates that sucrose experience promotes the rats' motivation for cocaine. PMID:27350195

  20. Cocaine. Specialized Information Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles on cocaine includes a report describing cocaine as the recreational drug of the middle class, statistics from the United States Department of Health on health consequences of cocaine use, an article on "speedballing" (use of cocaine and heroin in combination), and a discussion of the various ways cocaine is…

  1. Substance use -- cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rock, snow, speedball, toot. Cocaine's Effects on Your Brain Cocaine is a strong stimulant. They make the messages ... thinking. It is also called the feel-good brain chemical. Using cocaine may cause pleasurable effects such as: Joy (euphoria, ...

  2. Agency in Action: How Teachers Interpret and Implement Arizona's 4-Hour Structured English Immersion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Sarah N.; Collier, Lizabeth C.

    2015-01-01

    Sharing the findings from two qualitative case studies, analyzed together, this article examines various ways educators, both elementary teachers and teacher educators, exercise agency in their interpretation and implementation of Arizona's model of Structured English Immersion (SEI), a 4-hour English Language Development (ELD) block, which…

  3. The selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, D-84, suppresses cocaine self-administration, but does not occasion cocaine-like levels of generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Angela M; Dutta, Aloke K; Reith, Maarten E A; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2010-12-01

    A successful replacement pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine dependency would likely reduce cocaine's abuse, support a low abuse liability, overlap cocaine's subjective effects, and have a long duration of action. Inhibitors with varying selectivity at the dopamine transporter (DAT) have approximated these properties. The objective of the present study was to characterize the behavioural effects of an extremely selective DAT inhibitor, (+) trans-4-(2-Benzhydryloxyethyl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl) piperadin-3-ol (D-84), a 3-hydroxy substituted piperidine derivative of GBR-12935, for its cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, its effects on cocaine self-administration, and for its own self-administration. During cocaine discrimination tests, cocaine occasioned the 10 mg/kg cocaine training stimulus with an ED(50) value of 3.13 (1.54-6.34) mg/kg, and reduced response rates with an ED(50) value of 20.39 (7.24-57.44) mg/kg. D-84 incompletely generalized to the cocaine stimulus occasioning a maximal 76% cocaine-lever responding, while reducing response rates with lower potency than cocaine (ED(50)=30.94 (12.34-77.60) mg/kg). Pretreatment with D-84 (9.6-30.4 mg/kg) significantly (Pcocaine intake at 17.1 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.5 mg/kg/infusion, and at 30.4 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.1, 0.5 .and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. During self-administration tests with D-84 (0.1-1 mg/kg/infusion), numbers of infusions significantly exceeded vehicle levels at 0.3 mg/kg/infusion. These results show that D-84 pretreatment can decrease cocaine intake especially when high doses of cocaine are being self-administered. This observation, combined with its incomplete generalization to the cocaine discriminative stimulus and its reported long duration of action, provides a profile consistent with a potential replacement therapy for treating cocaine-abusing patients. PMID:20840845

  4. Heightened drug-seeking motivation following extended daily access to self-administered cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Shahar, Osnat; Posthumus, Eric J.; Waldroup, Stephanie A.; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Rats allowed extended daily access (6hrs) to cocaine, consume high doses of the drug and escalate their cocaine intake over days, resembling the pattern of cocaine use seen in human addicts. The current study was designed to test whether such animals would also demonstrate the heightened motivation to seek cocaine seen in human addicts. Rats were trained to lever-press for i.v. cocaine (0.25 mg/infusion) over a 5-day period of 1h sessions. Subjects were then assigned to either a brief-access ...

  5. Examination of cocaine dose in a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer L; Dykstra, Linda A; Carelli, Regina M

    2015-06-01

    In a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine, taste cues elicit aversive taste reactivity when they predict impending but delayed cocaine self-administration. Here, we investigated this negative affective state as a function of cocaine dose. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were given 45 brief intraoral infusions of a 0.15% saccharin solution before 2 h cocaine self-administration for 14 days. Rats were video recorded; taste reactivity and patterns of self-administration were quantified on the first and last days. On day 14, a significant decrease in appetitive taste reactivity and increase in aversive taste reactivity was observed (compared with day 1) that did not vary as a function of cocaine dose. In contrast, patterns of cocaine self-administration (i.e. the total number of lever presses and load-up behavior) varied as a function of dose across days. Further, load-up behavior was positively correlated with aversive taste reactivity (i.e. gapes) on day 14 across all doses tested. Collectively, these findings indicate that the emergence of negative affect in this preclinical model is not dependent on cocaine dose. PMID:25738759

  6. Adolescent-onset of cocaine use is associated with heightened stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai Chong; Marinelli, Michela

    2016-05-01

    Adolescent rats take cocaine more readily than adults, are more sensitive to lower doses of the drug and work harder for it. It remains unknown if adolescent-onset of cocaine use has long-term consequences on adult relapse liability. Therefore, we tested if self-administering cocaine during adolescence impacts subsequent stress-induced reinstatement to cocaine seeking and taking, after a prolonged drug-free period. Adolescent (~P42) or adult (P88) rats self-administered cocaine (0.6 or 1.2 mg/kg/infusion) for 7 or 10 days. Then, they underwent a prolonged drug-free period (21-40 days), after which they were tested for reinstatement of cocaine-seeking (i.e. responding in the absence of cocaine) induced by the stress hormone corticosterone, the pharmacological stressor yohimbine or electric footshock. Studies employed either single extinction session (within-session extinction/reinstatement) or repeated extinction prior to reinstatement (between-session extinction/reinstatement). Finally, in a separate set of experiments, rats underwent a prolonged drug-free period (~40 days) and were then allowed to self-administer cocaine again, using progressive-ratio procedures that appraise the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine. Rats with adolescent-onset of cocaine use showed greater stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking than rats with adult-onset of cocaine use. This was observed across conditions, providing external validity to these results. Groups did not differ on drug taking in progressive-ratio tests. Our studies indicate that experiencing cocaine during adolescence renders subjects particularly responsive to the subsequent effects of stress on drug seeking. This heightened propensity for reinstatement puts adolescent-onset drug users at heightened risk for relapse. PMID:26202521

  7. Steady-State Methadone Blocks Cocaine Seeking and Cocaine-Induced Gene Expression Alterations in the Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Leri, Francesco; Zhou, Yan; Goddard, Benjamin; Levy, AnneMarie; Jacklin, Derek; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of steady-state methadone exposure on responding to cocaine conditioned stimuli and on cocaine-induced alterations in central opioid, hypocretin/orexin, and D2 receptor systems, male Sprague-Dawley rats received intravenous infusions of 1 mg/kg/inf cocaine paired with an audiovisual stimulus over three days of conditioning. Then, mini pumps releasing vehicle or 30 mg/kg/day methadone were implanted (SC), and lever pressing for the stimulus was assessed in the absence ...

  8. The truth about cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2011-01-01

    This leaflet highlights the health risks of cocaine use, such as heart attack, brain haemorrhage and liver damage. It also looks at the social implications of cocaine use, including trouble with the police and debt

  9. Mind Over Matter: Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over Matter Teaching Guide and Series / Cocaine Print Mind Over Matter: Cocaine Order Free Publication in: English ... how drugs affect the brain and nervous system. Mind Over Matter is produced by the National Institute ...

  10. INFUSION LOUNGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Infusion Lounge——颇具亚洲风情的的夜店——坐落于旧金山市区大受追捧的联合广场之上,福森酒店之下。此夜店兼具了酒吧与餐厅的功能,它将提供加州与亚洲风味融为一体的佳肴及优雅的环境和一流的服务。Infusion Lounge不仅为旧金山当地,也将为整个行业重新定义高消费夜生活的概念。

  11. Reinforcer interactions under concurrent schedules of food, water, and intravenous cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, S.I.; Mirkis, S.; Smith, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Rats housed in three-lever, operant-conditioning chambers were trained under a concurrent, chained fixed-ratio 1, fixed-ratio 9 schedule (conc chain FR1 FR9) of food and water deliveries. After stable patterns of food and water intake were observed, the rats were prepared with intravenous catheters and a drug self-administration option was added to the schedule. Cocaine infusions (0.33 mg/infusion) were available for only 6 h (09.00 h-15.00 h), while access to food and water was available for 24 h. Addition of the cocaine option produced a minimal decrease in food and water intake and a considerable disruption ruption of food and water intake patterns. Changes in the cocaine dose (0.08-0.84 mg/infusion) did not alter responding on the levers resulting in either food or water deliveries. Cocaine self-administration, however, showed an inverted "U" shaped function as the dose of cocaine was increased. Drug extinction probes resulted in a significant increase in responding on the levers resulting in food and water deliveries and substantial decreases on the lever previously resulting in cocaine infusions. Twenty-four hour food extinction probes decreased responding on the levers resulting in food and water deliveries and produced a modest decrease in the self-administration of cocaine.

  12. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Effects of Cocaine on Bodies and Brains Previous Index Next Español English Español PDF Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  13. Increased latencies to initiate cocaine self-administration following laterodorsal tegmental nucleus lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, Stephan; Cardiff, Katherine M.; Wise, Roy A.

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic input to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), origin of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system that is critical for cocaine reward, is important for both cocaine seeking and cocaine taking. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg) provides one of the two major sources of excitatory cholinergic input to the VTA, but little is known of the role of the LDTg in cocaine reward. LDTg cholinergic cells express urotensin-II receptors and here we used local microinjections of a conjugate of the endogenous ligand for these receptors with diphtheria toxin (Dtx::UII) to lesion the cholinergic cells of the LDTg in rats previously trained to self-administer cocaine (1 mg/kg/infusion, i.v.). Lesioned rats showed long latencies to initiate cocaine self-administration after treatment with the toxin, which resulted in a reduction in cocaine intake per session. Priming injections reduced latencies to initiate responding for cocaine in lesioned rats, and once they began to respond the rats regulated their moment-to-moment cocaine intake within normal limits. Thus we conclude that while LDTg cholinergic cell loss does not significantly alter the rewarding effects of cocaine, LDTg lesions can reduce the rat’s responsiveness to cocaine-predictive stimuli. PMID:25746513

  14. Cocaine self-administration punished by intravenous histamine in adolescent and adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Nathan A.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a transitional phase marked by a heightened vulnerability to substances of abuse. It has been hypothesized that both increased sensitivity to reward and decreased sensitivity to aversive events may drive drug-use liability during this phase. To investigate possible age-related differences in sensitivity to the aversive consequences of drug use, adolescent and adult rats were compared on self-administration of cocaine before, during, and after a 10-day period in which an aversive agent, histamine, was added to the cocaine solution. Adult and adolescent female rats were trained to self-administer intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) over 10 sessions (2 h/session; 2 sessions/day). Histamine (4 mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution for the next 10 sessions. Finally, the cocaine/histamine solution was replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and rats continued to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) for 20 sessions. Compared with adolescent rats, adult rats showed a greater decrease in cocaine self-administration when it was punished with intravenous histamine compared with their baseline cocaine self-administration rates. These results suggest that differences in the sensitivity to negative consequences of drug use may partially explain developmental differences in drug use vulnerability. PMID:25769092

  15. Characterization of β-endorphin-immunoreactivity in limbic brain structures of rats self-administering heroin or cocaine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweep, C.G.J.; Ree, J.M. van; Wiegant, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of intravenous self-administration of 30 μg infusions of either heroin or cocaine, or saline on the concentrations of β-endorphin-immunoreactivity (βE-IR) in the anterior part of the rat brain limbic system were studied. Self-administration of heroin and cocaine for 5 daily sessions resu

  16. Behavioral and electrophysiological indices of negative affect predict cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Robert A; Twining, Robert C; Jones, Joshua L; Slater, Jennifer M; Grigson, Patricia S; Carelli, Regina M

    2008-03-13

    The motivation to seek cocaine comes in part from a dysregulation of reward processing manifested in dysphoria, or affective withdrawal. Learning is a critical aspect of drug abuse; however, it remains unclear whether drug-associated cues can elicit the emotional withdrawal symptoms that promote cocaine use. Here we report that a cocaine-associated taste cue elicited a conditioned aversive state that was behaviorally and neurophysiologically quantifiable and predicted subsequent cocaine self-administration behavior. Specifically, brief intraoral infusions of a cocaine-predictive flavored saccharin solution elicited aversive orofacial responses that predicted early-session cocaine taking in rats. The expression of aversive taste reactivity also was associated with a shift in the predominant pattern of electrophysiological activity of nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons from inhibitory to excitatory. The dynamic nature of this conditioned switch in affect and the neural code reveals a mechanism by which cues may exert control over drug self-administration. PMID:18341996

  17. Hypocretin-1 receptors regulate the reinforcing and reward-enhancing effects of cocaine: Pharmacological and behavioral genetics evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eHollander

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence suggests that transmission at hypocretin-1 (orexin-1 receptors (Hcrt-R1 plays an important role in the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behaviors in rodents. However, far less is known about the role for hypocretin transmission in regulating ongoing cocaine-taking behavior. Here, we investigated the effects of the selective Hcrt-R1 antagonist SB-334867 on cocaine intake, as measured by intravenous (IV cocaine self-administration in rats. The stimulatory effects of cocaine on brain reward systems contribute to the establishment and maintenance of cocaine-taking behaviors. Therefore, we also assessed the effects of SB-334867 on the reward-enhancing properties of cocaine, as measured by cocaine-induced lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS thresholds. Finally, to definitively establish a role for Hcrt-R1 in regulating cocaine intake, we assessed IV cocaine self-administration in Hcrt-R1 knockout mice. We found that SB-334867 (1-4 mg/kg dose-dependently decreased cocaine (0.5 mg/kg/infusion self-administration in rats but did not alter responding for food rewards under the same schedule of reinforcement. This suggests that SB-334867 decreased cocaine reinforcement without negatively impacting operant performance. SB-334867 (1-4 mg/kg also dose-dependently attenuated the stimulatory effects of cocaine (10 mg/kg on brain reward systems, as measured by reversal of cocaine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds in rats. Finally, we found that Hcrt-R1 knockout mice self-administered far less cocaine than wildtype mice across the entire dose-response function. These data demonstrate that Hcrt-R1 play an important role in regulating the reinforcing and reward-enhancing properties of cocaine, and suggest that hypocretin transmission is likely essential for establishing and maintaining the cocaine habit in human addicts.

  18. Deficits in ventromedial prefrontal cortex group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor function mediate resistance to extinction during protracted withdrawal from an extensive history of cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shahar, Osnat; Sacramento, Arianne D; Miller, Bailey W; Webb, Sierra M; Wroten, Melissa G; Silva, Hannah E; Caruana, Amanda L; Gordon, Evan J; Ploense, Kyle L; Ditzhazy, Jennifer; Kippin, Tod E; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2013-01-01

    Anomalies in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function are posited to underpin difficulties in learning to suppress drug-seeking behavior during abstinence. Because group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) regulate drug-related learning, we assayed the consequences of extended access to intravenous cocaine (6 h/d; 0.25 mg/infusion for 10 d) on the PFC expression of group 1 mGluRs and the relevance of observed changes for cocaine seeking. After protracted withdrawal, cocaine-experienced animals exhibited a time-dependent intensification of cue-induced cocaine-seeking behavior and an impaired extinction of this behavior. These behavioral phenomena were associated with a time-dependent reduction in mGluR1/5 expression within ventromedial PFC (vmPFC) of cocaine-experienced animals exposed to extinction testing but not in untested ones. Interestingly, pharmacological manipulations of vmPFC mGluR1/5 produced no immediate effects on cue-induced cocaine-seeking behavior but produced residual effects on a subsequent test for cocaine seeking. At 3 d withdrawal, cocaine-experienced rats infused intra-vmPFC with mGluR1/5 antagonists, either before or after an initial test for cocaine seeking, persisted in their cocaine seeking akin to cocaine-experienced rats in protracted withdrawal. Conversely, cocaine-experienced rats infused with an mGluR1/5 agonist before the initial test for cocaine-seeking at 30 d withdrawal exhibited a facilitation of extinction learning. These data indicate that cue-elicited deficits in vmPFC group 1 mGluR function mediate resistance to extinction during protracted withdrawal from a history of extensive cocaine self-administration and pose pharmacological stimulation of these receptors as a potential approach to facilitate learned suppression of drug-seeking behavior that may aid drug abstinence.

  19. [Complications of cocaine addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karila, Laurent; Lowenstein, William; Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel

    2009-06-20

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by repetitive and compulsive drug-seeking behavior and drug abuse despite negative health or social consequences. Cocaine addiction is a significant worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. Some of the most frequent complications are cardiovascular effects (acute coronary syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias, increased blood pressure); respiratory effects (fibrosis, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, alveolar haemorrhage, asthma exacerbation; emphysema), neurological effects (strokes, aneurysms, seizures, headaches); risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, sexual transmitted disease and otolaryngologic effects. Other complications are not discussed here. The vast majority of studies indicate that there are cognitive deficits induced by cocaine addiction. Attention, visual and working memories, executive functioning are affected in cocaine users. Psychiatric complications found in clinical practice are major depressive disorders, cocaine-induced paranoia, cocaine-induced compulsive foraging and panic attacks. PMID:19642439

  20. Myocardial ischaemia following cocaine and adrenaline exposure in a child during an ophthalmological procedure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, E

    2015-03-01

    We report a 23-month old girl who presented with bilateral epiphora who underwent bilateral lacrimal probing and syringing, during which a cocaine adrenaline solution was used. Two hours after the procedure she developed acute pulmonary oedema secondary to myocardial ischaemia. The patient was treated with intravenous glyceryltrinitrate and milrinone infusions; cardiac enzymes and left ventricular function normalised over the subsequent 72 hours. Topical administration of cocaine and adrenaline solution may have dangerous systemic cardiac effects and should always be used judiciously.

  1. [Cocaine - Characteristics and addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girczys-Połedniok, Katarzyna; Pudlo, Robert; Jarząb, Magdalena; Szymlak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine use leads to health, social and legal problems. The aim of this paper is to discuss cocaine action, addicts characteristics, use patterns and consequences, as well as addiction treatment methods. A literature review was based on the Medline, PubMed, Polish Medical Bibliography databases and the Silesian Library resources. The Police and Central Statistical Office statistics, as well as the World Health Organization, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction and the National Office for Combating Drug Addiction reports were used. Cocaine leads to mood improvement, appetite decrease, physical and intellectual activity enhancement, euphoria, inflated self-esteem, social networking ease and increased sexual desire. Cocaine hydrochloride is mainly used intranasaly, but also as intravenous and subcutaneous injections. Cocaine use and first addiction treatment fall in later age compared to other psychoactive substances. There is a high men to women ratio among addicts. There is a relationship between cocaine addiction, the presence of other disorders and genetic predisposition to addiction development. Polish reports indicate higher popularity of cocaine among people with a high economic and social status. Although Poland is a country with the low percentage of cocaine use, its popularity is growing. The consequences of cocaine use concern somatic and mental health problems, socioeconomic and legal conditions. The drug plays a role in crimes and traffic accidents. Because of the risks associated with cocaine use, it has been listed in a register of drugs attached to the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction. Addiction treatment includes psychological, pharmacological and harm reduction strategies. Med Pr 2016;67(4):537-544. PMID:27623834

  2. Cocaine Seeking and Taking: Role of Hippocampal Dopamine D1-like Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaohu; Wells, Audrey M.; Fuchs, Rita A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented involvement of dopamine D1-like receptor stimulation in cocaine-induced goal-directed behaviors, little is known about the specific contribution of D1-like receptor populations in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) to drug context-induced cocaine-seeking or drug-reinforced instrumental behaviors. To investigate this question, rats were trained to lever press for un-signaled cocaine infusions in a distinct context followed by extinction training in a different context. Cocaine-seeking behavior (non-reinforced lever responding) was then assessed in the previously cocaine-paired and extinction contexts. SCH23390-induced D1-like receptor antagonism in the DH, but not the overlying trunk region of the somatosensory cortex, dose-dependently inhibited drug context-induced cocaine-seeking behavior, without altering cocaine-reinforced instrumental responding, cocaine intake, food-reinforced instrumental responding, or general motor activity, relative to vehicle treatment. These findings suggest that D1-like receptor stimulation in the DH is critical for the incentive motivational effects and/or memory of cocaine-paired contextual stimuli that contribute to drug-seeking behavior. PMID:24655895

  3. Extended duration of prehydration does not prevent nephrotoxicity or delayed drug elimination in high-dose methotrexate infusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Mamoudou, Aissata Diop; Tuckuviene, Ruta;

    2014-01-01

    Alkalized hydration is used as supportive care to prevent renal toxicity during infusions with high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX). In children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the hydration is commonly initiated 4 hours before start of the methotrexate (MTX) infusion. To test if longer duration...

  4. Conditioned Contribution of Peripheral Cocaine Actions to Cocaine Reward and Cocaine-Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bin; You, Zhi-Bing; Oleson, Erik B.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Myal, Stephanie; Wise, Roy A.

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine has actions in the peripheral nervous system that reliably precede—and thus predict—its soon-to-follow central rewarding effects. In cocaine-experienced animals, the peripheral cocaine signal is relayed to the central nervous system, triggering excitatory input to the ventral tegmental origin of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, the system that mediates the rewarding effects of the drug. We used cocaine methiodide, a cocaine analog that does not cross the blood–brain barrier, to ...

  5. Selective activation of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 decreases cocaine's reinforcing efficacy and prevents cocaine-induced changes in brain reward thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yue; Mortas, Patrick; Hoener, Marius C; Canales, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    The newly discovered trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) has emerged as a promising target for medication development in stimulant addiction due to its ability to regulate dopamine (DA) function and modulate stimulants' effects. Recent findings indicate that TAAR1 activation blocks some of the abuse-related physiological and behavioral effects of cocaine. However, findings from existing self-administration studies are inconclusive due to the very limited range of cocaine unit doses tested. Here, in order to shed light on the influence of TAAR1 on cocaine's reward and reinforcement, we studied the effects of partial and full activation of TAAR1on (1) the dose-response curve for cocaine self-administration and (2) cocaine-induced changes in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In the first experiment, we examined the effects of the selective full and partial TAAR1 agonists, RO5256390 and RO5203648, on self-administration of five unit-injection doses of cocaine (0.03, 0.1, 0.2, 0.45, and 1mg/kg/infusion). Both agonists induced dose-dependent downward shifts in the cocaine dose-response curve, indicating that both partial and full TAAR1 activation decrease cocaine, reinforcing efficacy. In the second experiment, RO5256390 and the partial agonist, RO5263397, dose-dependently prevented cocaine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TAAR1 stimulation effectively suppresses the rewarding and reinforcing effects of cocaine in self-administration and ICSS models, supporting the candidacy of TAAR1 as a drug discovery target for cocaine addiction. PMID:26048337

  6. Increased Impulsivity Retards the Transition to Dorsolateral Striatal Dopamine Control of Cocaine Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennifer E.; Dilleen, Ruth; Pelloux, Yann; Economidou, Daina; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of maladaptive drug-seeking habits occurs in conjunction with a ventral-to-dorsal striatal shift in dopaminergic control over behavior. Although these habits readily develop as drug use continues, high impulsivity predicts loss of control over drug seeking and taking. However, whether impulsivity facilitates the transition to dorsolateral striatum (DLS) dopamine-dependent cocaine-seeking habits or whether impulsivity and cocaine-induced intrastriatal shifts are additive processes is unknown. Methods High- and low-impulsive rats identified in the five-choice serial reaction-time task were trained to self-administer cocaine (.25 mg/infusion) with infusions occurring in the presence of a cue-light conditioned stimulus. Dopamine transmission was blocked in the DLS after three stages of training: early, transition, and late-stage, by bilateral intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol (0, 5, 10, or 15 μg/side) during 15-min cocaine-seeking test sessions in which each response was reinforced by a cocaine-associated conditioned stimulus presentation. Results In early-stage tests, neither group was affected by DLS dopamine receptor blockade. In transition-stage tests, low-impulsive rats showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in cocaine seeking, whereas high-impulsive rats were still unaffected by α-flupenthixol infusions. In the final, late-stage seeking test, both groups showed dose-dependent sensitivity to dopamine receptor blockade. Conclusions The results demonstrate that high impulsivity is associated with a delayed transition to DLS-dopamine-dependent control over cocaine seeking. This suggests that, if impulsivity confers an increased propensity to addiction, it is not simply through a more rapid development of habits but instead through interacting corticostriatal and striato-striatal processes that result ultimately in maladaptive drug-seeking habits. PMID:24157338

  7. Pantoprazole before Endoscopy in Patients with Gastroduodenal Ulcer Bleeding: Does the duration of Infusion and Ulcer Location Influence the Effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Rácz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preemptive pantoprazole infusion on early endoscopic findings in patients with acute ulcer bleeding. Records of 333 patients admitted with acute ulcer bleeding were analyzed. Ulcer bleeders were given either 80 mg bolus of pantoprazole followed by continuous infusion of 8 mg per hour or saline infusion until endoscopy. In 93 patients saline infusion whereas in 240 patients bolus plus infusion of pantoprazole was administrated with mean (±SD durations of 5.45±12.9 hours and 6.9±13.2 hours, respectively (P=0.29. Actively bleeding ulcers were detected in 46/240 (19.2% of cases in the pantoprazole group as compared with 23/93 (24.7% in the saline infusion group (P=0.26. Different durations of pantoprazole infusion (0–4 hours, >4 hours, and >6 hours had no significant effect on endoscopic and clinical outcome parameters in duodenal ulcer bleeders. Gastric ulcer bleeders on pantoprazole infusion longer than 4 and 6 hours before endoscopy had actively bleeding ulcers in 4.3% and 5% compared to the 19.5% active bleeding rate in the saline group (P=0.02 and P=0.04. Preemptive infusion of high-dose pantoprazole longer than 4 hours before endoscopy decreased the ratio of active bleeding only in gastric but not in duodenal ulcer patients.

  8. Potencies of Cocaine Methiodide on Major Cocaine Targets in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Erik R.; Jinbin Tian; Tilley, Michael R.; Zhu, Michael X.; Gu, Howard H.

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine methiodide (CM), a charged cocaine analog, cannot pass the blood brain barrier. It has been assumed the effects of systemic CM represent cocaine actions in peripheral tissues. However, the IC(50) values of CM have not been clearly determined for the major cocaine targets: dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters, and sodium channels. Using cells transfected with individual transporters from mice and synaptosomes from mouse striatum tissues, we observed that the inhibition ...

  9. Spectroscopic search for new SW Sextantis stars in the 3-4 hour orbital period range -- I

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Gaensicke, B. T.

    2006-01-01

    [Abridged] We report on time-resolved optical spectroscopy of ten non-eclipsing nova-like cataclysmic variables in the orbital period range between 3 and 4 hours. Of the ten systems so far observed, HL Aqr, BO Cet, AH Men, V380 Oph, AH Pic, and LN UMa are identified as new members of the SW Sex class. We present improved orbital period measurements for HL Aqr (Porb = 3.254 +- 0.001 h) and V380 Oph (Porb = 3.69857 +- 0.00002 h). BO Cet and V380 Oph exhibit emission-line flaring with periodicit...

  10. Spastic Paraparesis Following Cocaine Inhalation

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Oluwasefunmi Savage; Malin Roesner; David Cohen

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine use is reaching epidemic proportions in the UK and the consequences are a number of debilitating effects. Strokes may result from a number of mechanisms related to cocaine use. This report describes a case of cocaine induced stroke in an apparently healthy young man with unusual patterns of radiological findings on his brain MRI.

  11. Reinforcement-related regulation of AMPA glutamate receptor subunits in the ventral tegmental area enhances motivation for cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwang Ho; Edwards, Scott; Graham, Danielle L; Larson, Erin B; Whisler, Kimberly N; Simmons, Diana; Friedman, Allyson K; Walsh, Jessica J; Rahman, Zia; Monteggia, Lisa M; Eisch, Amelia J; Neve, Rachael L; Nestler, Eric J; Han, Ming-Hu; Self, David W

    2011-05-25

    Chronic cocaine use produces numerous biological changes in brain, but relatively few are functionally associated with cocaine reinforcement. Here we show that daily intravenous cocaine self-administration, but not passive cocaine administration, induces dynamic upregulation of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 and GluR2 in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rats. Increases in GluR1 protein and GluR1(S845) phosphorylation are associated with increased GluR1 mRNA in self-administering animals, whereas increased GluR2 protein levels occurred despite substantial decreases in GluR2 mRNA. We investigated the functional significance of GluR1 upregulation in the VTA on cocaine self-administration using localized viral-mediated gene transfer. Overexpression of GluR1(WT) in rat VTA primarily infected dopamine neurons (75%) and increased AMPA receptor-mediated membrane rectification in these neurons with AMPA application. Similar GluR1(WT) overexpression potentiated locomotor responses to intra-VTA AMPA, but not NMDA, infusions. In cocaine self-administering animals, overexpression of GluR1(WT) in the VTA markedly increased the motivation for cocaine injections on a progressive ratio schedule of cocaine reinforcement. In contrast, overexpression of protein kinase A-resistant GluR1(S845A) in the VTA reduced peak rates of cocaine self-administration on a fixed ratio reinforcement schedule. Neither viral vector altered sucrose self-administration, and overexpression of GluR1(WT) or GluR1(S845A) in the adjacent substantia nigra had no effect on cocaine self-administration. Together, these results suggest that dynamic regulation of AMPA receptors in the VTA during cocaine self-administration contributes to cocaine addiction by acting to facilitate subsequent cocaine use.

  12. Potencies of cocaine methiodide on major cocaine targets in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik R Hill

    Full Text Available Cocaine methiodide (CM, a charged cocaine analog, cannot pass the blood brain barrier. It has been assumed the effects of systemic CM represent cocaine actions in peripheral tissues. However, the IC(50 values of CM have not been clearly determined for the major cocaine targets: dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters, and sodium channels. Using cells transfected with individual transporters from mice and synaptosomes from mouse striatum tissues, we observed that the inhibition IC(50 values for monoamine uptake by CM were 31-fold to 184-fold higher compared to cocaine at each of the transporters. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, cocaine inhibited sodium channels with an apparent IC(50 of 75 microM, while CM showed no observable effect at concentrations up to 3 mM. These results indicate that an equal dose of CM will not produce an equivalent peripheral effect of cocaine.

  13. When a good taste turns bad: Neural mechanisms underlying the emergence of negative affect and associated natural reward devaluation by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Regina M; West, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    An important feature of cocaine addiction in humans is the emergence of negative affect (e.g., dysphoria, irritability, anhedonia), postulated to play a key role in craving and relapse. Indeed, the DSM-IV recognizes that social, occupational and/or recreational activities become reduced as a consequence of repeated drug use where previously rewarding experiences (e.g., food, job, family) become devalued as the addict continues to seek and use drug despite serious negative consequences. Here, research in the Carelli laboratory is reviewed that examined neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie these processes using a novel animal model. Oromotor responses (taste reactivity) were examined as rats learned that intraoral infusion of a sweet (e.g., saccharin) predicts impending but delayed access to cocaine self-administration. We showed that rats exhibit aversive taste reactivity (i.e., gapes/rejection responses) during infusion of the sweet paired with impending cocaine, similar to aversive responses observed during infusion of quinine, a bitter tastant. Critically, the expression of this pronounced aversion to the sweet predicted the subsequent motivation to self-administer cocaine. Electrophysiology studies show that this shift in palatability corresponds to an alteration in nucleus accumbens (NAc) cell firing; neurons that previously responded with inhibition during infusion of the palatable sweet shifted to excitatory activity during infusion of the cocaine-devalued tastant. This excitatory response profile is typically observed during infusion of quinine, indicating that the once palatable sweet becomes aversive following its association with impending but delayed cocaine, and NAc neurons encode this aversive state. We also review electrochemical studies showing a shift (from increase to decrease) in rapid NAc dopamine release during infusion of the cocaine-paired tastant as the aversive state developed, again, resulting in responses similar to quinine

  14. Phenytoin Toxicity from Cocaine Adulteration

    OpenAIRE

    Roldan, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of phenytoin (PHT) as a cocaine adulterant was reported decades ago;that practice is still current. Ironically PHT has also been used for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A drug smuggler developed PHT toxicity after swallowing several rocks of crack. We investigated the current trends of PHT as a cocaine adulterant and its toxicological implications. We also reviewed the clinical use of PTH in relation to cocaine. The use of PHT as cocaine cut is a current practice. This may affec...

  15. Cocaine self-administration in Warsaw alcohol high-preferring (WHP) and Warsaw alcohol low-preferring (WLP) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acewicz, Albert; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Dyr, Wanda; Jastrzebska, Agata; Korkosz, Izabela; Wyszogrodzka, Edyta; Nauman, Pawel; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Kostowski, Wojciech; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2012-01-15

    Individuals prone to drug self-administration may be vulnerable not only to a single drug reinforcer but to a variety of drug reinforcers. It has been shown that two thirds of alcoholics regularly use drugs other than ethanol (alcohol). Up to 30% of alcohol-dependent patients report concurrent misuse of cocaine. The aim of the present study was to investigate intravenous cocaine self-administration in selectively bred, alcohol-preferring WHP (Warsaw high-preferring) and non-preferring WLP (Warsaw low-preferring) rats. It was hypothesized that WHPs could be more prone to cocaine self-administration in comparison to WLPs. Rats from both lines were allowed to nose-poke for cocaine infusions (0.33 mg/kg/infusion) under the FR-1, FR-2, and FR-3 schedule of reinforcement. Dose-response curves were assessed with increasing doses of cocaine (0.03, 0.1, 0.33, 1.0mg/kg/infusion). The WHP and WLP rats did not differ in cocaine self-administration. Both groups quickly acquired nose-poke responding for cocaine, presented a similar response profile when the schedule of reinforcement was increased from FR-1 to FR-3, and similar sensitivity to cocaine in the dose-response test. The present results may indicate that the selective breeding of alcohol-preferring WHP and alcohol non-preferring WLP rats did not lead to differences in cocaine's rewarding effects as assessed in the self-administration procedure. PMID:22101231

  16. Cocaine-Induced Reinstatement of a Conditioned Place Preference in Developing Rats: Involvement of the D2 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Badanich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Reinstatement of conditioned place preferences have been used to investigate physiological mechanisms mediating drug-seeking behavior in adolescent and adult rodents; however, it is still unclear how psychostimulant exposure during adolescence affects neuron communication and whether these changes would elicit enhanced drug-seeking behavior later in adulthood. The present study determined whether the effects of intra-ventral tegmental area (VTA or intra-nucleus accumbens septi (NAcc dopamine (DA D2 receptor antagonist infusions would block (or potentiate cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preferences. Adolescent rats (postnatal day (PND 28–39 were trained to express a cocaine place preference. The involvement of D2 receptors on cocaine-induced reinstatement was determined by intra-VTA or intra-NAcc infusion of the DA D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride (100 μM during a cocaine-primed reinstatement test (10 mg/kg cocaine, i.p.. Infusion of sulpiride into the VTA but not the NAcc blocked reinstatement of conditioned place preference. These data suggest intrinsic compensatory mechanisms in the mesolimbic DA pathway mediate responsivity to cocaine-induced reinstatement of a conditioned place preference during development.

  17. Environmental enrichment counters cocaine abstinence-induced stress and brain reactivity to cocaine cues but fails to prevent the incubation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Kenneth J.; Painter, Michael R.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Mitroi, Danut; Crawford, Cynthia A.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) during a period of forced abstinence attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine-paired stimuli. Here we examined whether EE during forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration would prevent time-dependent increases in cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior (i.e., the incubation effect). Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, which was paired with light/tone cues, for 15 days while living in isolated conditions (IC). Controls received yoked saline infusions. Subsequently, rats were assigned to live in either continued IC or EE for either 1 or 21 days of forced abstinence prior to a test for cocaine-seeking behavior. During testing, responding resulted only in presentation of the light/tone cues. Contrary to our prediction, cocaine-seeking behavior increased over time regardless of living condition during abstinence; however, EE attenuated cocaine-seeking behavior relative to IC regardless of length of abstinence. Brains were harvested and trunk blood was collected immediately after the 60-min test and later assayed. Results indicated that short-term EE elevated hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reduced plasma corticosterone compared to IC. Furthermore, 21 days of EE during forced abstinence prevented increases in the cue-elicited amygdala phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression that was observed in IC rats. These findings suggest that EE attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues through a mechanism other than preventing the incubation effect, perhaps involving reduction of stress and neural activity in response to cocaine-paired cues during acute withdrawal. PMID:21812872

  18. Cocaine-Induced Synaptic Alterations in Thalamus to Nucleus Accumbens Projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Peter A; Wang, Yicun; Yan, Yijin; Wang, Yao; Ishikawa, Masago; Cui, Ranji; Huang, Yanhua H; Sesack, Susan R; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dong, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to cocaine induces addiction-associated behaviors partially through remodeling neurocircuits in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The paraventricular nucleus of thalamus (PVT), which projects to the NAc monosynaptically, is activated by cocaine exposure and has been implicated in several cocaine-induced emotional and motivational states. Here we show that disrupting synaptic transmission of select PVT neurons with tetanus toxin activated via retrograde trans-synaptic transport of cre from NAc efferents decreased cocaine self-administration in rats. This projection underwent complex adaptations after self-administration of cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/infusion; 2 h/d × 5 d, 1d overnight training). Specifically, 1d after cocaine self-administration, we observed increased levels of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-silent glutamatergic synapses in this projection, accompanied by a decreased ratio of AMPAR-to-NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated EPSCs. Furthermore, the decay kinetics of NMDAR EPSCs was significantly prolonged, suggesting insertion of new GluN2B-containing NMDARs to PVT-to-NAc synapses. After 45-d withdrawal, silent synapses within this projection returned to the basal levels, accompanied by a return of the AMPAR/NMDAR ratio and NMDAR decay kinetics to the basal levels. In amygdala and infralimbic prefrontal cortical projections to the NAc, a portion of cocaine-generated silent synapses becomes unsilenced by recruiting calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) after drug withdrawal. However, the sensitivity of PVT-to-NAc synapses to CP-AMPAR-selective antagonists was not changed after withdrawal, suggesting that CP-AMPAR trafficking is not involved in the evolution of cocaine-generated silent synapses within this projection. Meanwhile, the release probability of PVT-to-NAc synapses was increased after short- and long-term cocaine withdrawal. These results reveal complex and profound alterations at PVT-to-NAc synapses after cocaine exposure and withdrawal. PMID:27074816

  19. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Activation in the Ventral Tegmental Area Decreases the Reinforcing Efficacy of Cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heath D; Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; Ige, Kelsey Y; Maurer, John J; Reiner, David J; Zimmer, Derek J; Van Nest, Duncan S; Guercio, Leonardo A; Wimmer, Mathieu E; Olivos, Diana R; De Jonghe, Bart C; Hayes, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    Cocaine addiction continues to be a significant public health problem for which there are currently no effective FDA-approved treatments. Thus, there is a clear need to identify and develop novel pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction. Recent evidence indicates that activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reduces intake of highly palatable food. As the neural circuits and neurobiological mechanisms underlying drug taking overlap to some degree with those regulating food intake, these findings suggest that activation of central GLP-1 receptors may also attenuate cocaine taking. Here, we show that intra-VTA administration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (0.05 μg) significantly reduced cocaine, but not sucrose, self-administration in rats. We also demonstrate that cocaine taking is associated with elevated plasma corticosterone levels and that systemic infusion of cocaine activates GLP-1-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), a hindbrain nucleus that projects monosynaptically to the VTA. To determine the potential mechanisms by which cocaine activates NTS GLP-1-expressing neurons, we microinjected corticosterone (0.5 μg) directly into the hindbrain fourth ventricle. Intraventricular corticosterone attenuated cocaine self-administration and this effect was blocked in animals pretreated with the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (10 μg) in the VTA. Finally, AAV-shRNA-mediated knockdown of VTA GLP-1 receptors was sufficient to augment cocaine self-administration. Taken together, these findings indicate that increased activation of NTS GLP-1-expressing neurons by corticosterone may represent a homeostatic response to cocaine taking, thereby reducing the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine. Therefore, central GLP-1 receptors may represent a novel target for cocaine addiction pharmacotherapies. PMID:26675243

  20. Emotion recognition during cocaine intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, K P C; Steenbergen, L; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-11-01

    Chronic or repeated cocaine use has been linked to impairments in social skills. It is not clear whether cocaine is responsible for this impairment or whether other factors, like polydrug use, distort the observed relation. We aimed to investigate this relation by means of a placebo-controlled experimental study. Additionally, associations between stressor-related activity (cortisol, cardiovascular parameters) induced by the biological stressor cocaine, and potential cocaine effects on emotion recognition were studied. Twenty-four healthy recreational cocaine users participated in this placebo-controlled within-subject study. Participants were tested between 1 and 2 h after treatment with oral cocaine (300 mg) or placebo. Emotion recognition of low and high intensity expressions of basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, and happiness) was tested. Findings show that cocaine impaired recognition of negative emotions; this was mediated by the intensity of the presented emotions. When high intensity expressions of Anger and Disgust were shown, performance under influence of cocaine 'normalized' to placebo-like levels while it made identification of Sadness more difficult. The normalization of performance was most notable for participants with the largest cortisol responses in the cocaine condition compared to placebo. It was demonstrated that cocaine impairs recognition of negative emotions, depending on the intensity of emotion expression and cortisol response.

  1. The Neuropsychology of Cocaine Addiction: Recent Cocaine Use Masks Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Woicik, Patricia A.; Moeller, Scott J.; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Maloney, Thomas; Lukasik, Tanya M; Yeliosof, Olga; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2008-01-01

    Individuals with current cocaine use disorders (CUD) form a heterogeneous group, making sensitive neuropsychological (NP) comparisons with healthy individuals difficult. The current study examined the effects on NP functioning of four factors that commonly vary among CUD: urine status for cocaine (positive vs negative on study day), cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and dysphoria. Sixty-four cocaine abusers were matched to healthy comparison subjects on gender and race; the groups also ...

  2. Enhanced Choice for Viewing Cocaine Pictures in Cocaine Addiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, S.J.; Goldstein, R.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T. Parvaz, M.A.; Dunning, J.P.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Hajcak, G.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2009-02-01

    Individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD) chose cocaine over nondrug rewards. In two newly designed laboratory tasks with pictures, we document this modified choice outside of a cocaine administration paradigm. Choice for viewing cocaine, pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral pictures-under explicit contingencies (choice made between two fully visible side-by-side images) and under more implicit contingencies (selections made between pictures hidden under flipped-over cards)-was examined in 20 CUD and 20 matched healthy control subjects. Subjects also provided self-reported ratings of each picture's pleasantness and arousal. Under both contingencies, CUD subjects chose to view more cocaine pictures than control subjects, group differences that were not fully explained by the self-reported picture ratings. Furthermore, whereas CUD subjects choice for viewing cocaine pictures exceeded choice for viewing unpleasant pictures (but did not exceed choice for viewing pleasant pictures, in contrast to their self-reported ratings), healthy control subjects avoided viewing cocaine pictures as frequently as, or even more than, unpleasant pictures. Finally, CUD subjects with the most cocaine viewing selections, even when directly compared with selections of the pleasant pictures, also reported the most frequent recent cocaine use. Enhanced drug-related choice in cocaine addiction can be demonstrated even for nonpharmacologic (pictorial) stimuli. This choice, which is modulated by alternative stimuli, partly transcends self-reports (possibly indicative of a disconnect in cocaine addiction between self-reports and objective behavior) to provide an objective marker of addiction severity. Neuroimaging studies are needed to establish the neural underpinnings of such enhanced cocaine-related choice.

  3. Enhanced Choice for Viewing Cocaine Pictures in Cocaine Addiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD) chose cocaine over nondrug rewards. In two newly designed laboratory tasks with pictures, we document this modified choice outside of a cocaine administration paradigm. Choice for viewing cocaine, pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral pictures-under explicit contingencies (choice made between two fully visible side-by-side images) and under more implicit contingencies (selections made between pictures hidden under flipped-over cards)-was examined in 20 CUD and 20 matched healthy control subjects. Subjects also provided self-reported ratings of each picture's pleasantness and arousal. Under both contingencies, CUD subjects chose to view more cocaine pictures than control subjects, group differences that were not fully explained by the self-reported picture ratings. Furthermore, whereas CUD subjects choice for viewing cocaine pictures exceeded choice for viewing unpleasant pictures (but did not exceed choice for viewing pleasant pictures, in contrast to their self-reported ratings), healthy control subjects avoided viewing cocaine pictures as frequently as, or even more than, unpleasant pictures. Finally, CUD subjects with the most cocaine viewing selections, even when directly compared with selections of the pleasant pictures, also reported the most frequent recent cocaine use. Enhanced drug-related choice in cocaine addiction can be demonstrated even for nonpharmacologic (pictorial) stimuli. This choice, which is modulated by alternative stimuli, partly transcends self-reports (possibly indicative of a disconnect in cocaine addiction between self-reports and objective behavior) to provide an objective marker of addiction severity. Neuroimaging studies are needed to establish the neural underpinnings of such enhanced cocaine-related choice.

  4. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stanley J; Kearns, David N; Cohn, Scott I; Schindler, Charles W; Panlilio, Leigh V

    2003-01-01

    Environmental stimuli that set the occasion wherein drugs are acquired can "trigger" drug-related behavior. Investigating the stimulus control of drug self-administration in laboratory animals should help us better understand this aspect of human drug abuse. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration was generated here for the first time using multiple and chained schedules with short, frequently-alternating components--like those typically used to study food-maintained responding. The procedures and results are presented along with case histories to illustrate the strategies used to produce this stimulus control. All these multicomponent schedules contained variable-interval (VI) components as well as differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) or extinction components. Schedule parameters and unit dose were adjusted for each rat to produce stable, moderate rates in VI components, with minimal postreinforcement (infusion) pausing, and response cessation in extinction and DRO components. Whole-body drug levels on terminal baselines calculated retrospectively revealed that all rats maintained fairly stable drug levels (mean, 2.3 to 3.4 mg/kg) and molar rates of intake (approximately 6.0 mg/kg/hr). Within this range, no relation between local VI response rates and drug level was found. The stimulus control revealed in cumulative records was indistinguishable from that achieved with food under these schedules, suggesting that common mechanisms may underlie the control of cocaine- and food-maintained behavior.

  5. Anti-cocaine antibody and butyrylcholinesterase-derived cocaine hydrolase exert cooperative effects on cocaine pharmacokinetics and cocaine-induced locomotor activity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Brimijoin, Stephen; Orson, Frank; Kosten, Tom; Kinsey, Berma; Shen, Xiao Yun; White, Sarah J.; Gao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    We are investigating treatments for cocaine abuse based on viral gene transfer of a cocaine hydrolase (CocH) derived from human butyrylcholinesterase, which can reduce cocaine-stimulated locomotion and cocaine-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior in rats for many months. Here, in mice, we explored the possibility that anti-cocaine antibodies can complement the actions of CocH to reduce cocaine uptake in brain and block centrally-evoked locomotor stimulation. Direct injections of test...

  6. Novel C-1 Substituted Cocaine Analogs Unlike Cocaine or Benztropine

    OpenAIRE

    Reith, Maarten E.A.; Ali, Solav; Hashim, Audrey; Sheikh, Imran S.; Theddu, Naresh; Gaddiraju, Narendra V.; Mehrotra, Suneet; Schmitt, Kyle C.; Murray, Thomas F.; Sershen, Henry; Unterwald, Ellen M.; Davis, Franklin A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a wealth of information on cocaine-like compounds, there is no information on cocaine analogs with substitutions at C-1. Here, we report on (R)-(−)-cocaine analogs with various C-1 substituents: methyl (2), ethyl (3), n-propyl (4), n-pentyl (5), and phenyl (6). Analog 2 was equipotent to cocaine as an inhibitor of the dopamine transporter (DAT), whereas 3 and 6 were 3- and 10-fold more potent, respectively. None of the analogs, however, stimulated mouse locomotor activity, in contrast...

  7. Phenytoin Toxicity from Cocaine Adulteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. Roldan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of phenytoin (PHT as a cocaine adulterant was reported decades ago;that practice is still current. Ironically PHT has also been used for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A drug smuggler developed PHT toxicity after swallowing several rocks of crack. We investigated the current trends of PHT as a cocaine adulterant and its toxicological implications. We also reviewed the clinical use of PTH in relation to cocaine. The use of PHT as cocaine cut is a current practice. This may affect the clinical manifestations and the management of the cocaine-related visits to the emergency department. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:127–130.

  8. Cocaine-Induced Recurrent Leukoencephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    González-Duarte, Alejandra; Williams, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine-induced leukoencephalopathy is a rare neurological complication. It is most likely related to the substances used to adulterate the cocaine. Levamisole is one of the most common adulterants of cocaine and causes reversible leukoencephalopathy. Patients display severe neurological symptoms that resolve at termination of the exposure. MRI shows diffuse white matter involvement with sparing of the U fibers, without brain stem or cerebellar involvement. We describe the case of a woman wit...

  9. Correlation of 2 hour, 4 hour, 8 hour and 12 hour urine protein with 24 hour urinary protein in preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Rani Singhal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To find shortest and reliable time period of urine collection for determination of proteinuria.It is a prospective study carried out on 125 pregnant women with preeclampsia after 20 weeks of gestation having urine albumin >1 using dipstick test. Urine was collected in five different time intervals in colors labeled containers with the assistance of nursing staff; the total collection time was 24 hours. Total urine protein of two-hour, four-hour, eight-hour, 12-hour and 24-hour urine was measured and compared with 24-hour collection. Data was analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient.There was significant correlation (p value < 0.01 in two, four, eight and 12-hour urine protein with 24-urine protein, with correlation coefficient of 0.97, 0.97, 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. When a cut off value of 25 mg, 50 mg. 100 mg, and 150 mg for urine protein were used for 2-hour, 4-hours, 8-hour and 12-hour urine collection, a sensitivity of 92.45%, 95.28%, 91.51%, and 96.23% and a specificity of 68.42%, 94.74%, 84.21% and 84.21% were obtained, respectively.Two-hour urine proteins can be used for assessment of proteinuria in preeclampsia instead of gold standard 24-hour urine collection for early diagnosis and better patient compliance.

  10. Spectroscopic search for new SW Sextantis stars in the 3-4 hour orbital period range -- I

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Gil, P; Gänsicke, B T

    2006-01-01

    [Abridged] We report on time-resolved optical spectroscopy of ten non-eclipsing nova-like cataclysmic variables in the orbital period range between 3 and 4 hours. Of the ten systems so far observed, HL Aqr, BO Cet, AH Men, V380 Oph, AH Pic, and LN UMa are identified as new members of the SW Sex class. We present improved orbital period measurements for HL Aqr (Porb = 3.254 +- 0.001 h) and V380 Oph (Porb = 3.69857 +- 0.00002 h). BO Cet and V380 Oph exhibit emission-line flaring with periodicities of 20 min and 47 min, respectively. The Halpha line of HL Aqr shows significant blueshifted absorption modulated at the orbital period. Similarly to the emission S-wave of the high-inclination SW Sex stars, this absorption S-wave has its maximum blue velocity at orbital phase ~0.5. We estimate an orbital inclination for HL Aqr in the range 19 < i < 27 deg, which is much lower than that of the emission-dominated, non-eclipsing SW Sex stars (i ~ 60-70 deg). This gives rise to the interesting possibility of many lo...

  11. Pneumorachis after cocaine sniffing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Challita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Air in the epidural space is called pneumorachis. The usual mechanism of pneumorachis is air diffusion from the mediastinal tissue layers through the inter-vertebral foramen. Alternatively, air can diffuse directly after spine traumas (e.g., blunt deceleration with vertebral dislocation or medical procedures. Several mechanisms could explain pneumomediastinum and pneumorachis after cocaine sniffing. Passive apnea and/or cough that occur after sniffing can cause intra alveolar hyper-pressure, which is responsible for alveolar rupture and air diffusion. Another mechanism is alveolar wall fragility and rupture induced by repeated cocaine sniffing, in turn causing air diffusion to the mediastinum, sub-cutaneous tissues and the epidural space. The diagnosis is usually made on Chest tomography scan. Management consists in close monitoring in the intensive care unit to detect aggravation of pneumomediastinum and pneumorachis, which would require surgical management. Supplemental nasal oxygen can be given to accelerate nitrogen washout. We present a case of a 28 years old male who presented to the emergency department for chest pain directly after sniffing cocaine. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and sub-cutaneous emphysema. The patient was admitted for 24 h: after that delay, surveillance chest tomodensitometry showed stability, and he could be discharged without further treatment.

  12. Copper thiocyanato complexes and cocaine - a case of 'black cocaine'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laussmann, Tim; Grzesiak, Ireneus; Krest, Alexander; Stirnat, Kathrin; Meier-Giebing, Sigrid; Ruschewitz, Uwe; Klein, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of a black powder confiscated by German customs was elucidated. Black powders are occasionally used as a 'transporter' for cocaine and are obviously especially designed to cloak the presence of the drug. The material consisting of cocaine, copper, iron, thiocyanate, and graphite was approached by analytical tools and chemical modelling. Graphite is added to the material probably with the intention of masking the typical infrared (IR) fingerprints of cocaine and can be clearly detected by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Cu(2+) and NCS(-) ions, when carefully reacted with cocaine hydrochloride, form the novel compound (CocH)2 [Cu(NCS)4 ] (CocH(+)  = protonated cocaine), which has been characterised by single crystal XRD, IR, NMR, UV/Vis absorption and EPR spectroscopy. Based on some further experiments the assumed composition of the original black powder is discussed. PMID:24753444

  13. Dopaminergic mechanisms of cocaine use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeneman - Rijkens, M.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is an enormous medical problem for which there is currently no effective pharmacotherapy. In order to develop treatments for this disorder, it is essential to understand the neurobiological underpinnings of cocaine addiction. One of the behavioral characteristics of addiction is an

  14. Influence of cue-conditioning on acquisition, maintenance and relapse of cocaine intravenous self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique; Piat, Frédéric; Le Moal, Michel; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo

    2002-04-01

    Conditioning theories propose that, through a Pavlovian associative process, discrete stimuli acquire the ability to elicit neural states involved in the maintenance and relapse of a drug-taking behaviour. Experimental evidence indicates that drug-related cues play a role in relapse, however, their influence on the development and maintenance of drug self-administration has been poorly investigated. In this report, we analysed the effects of a drug-associated cue light on acquisition, maintenance and reinstatement of intravenous cocaine self-administration. The results show that a cocaine-associated cue light can act as an incentive in absence of the drug, but does not directly modify drug-reinforcing effects. Contingent and non-contingent presentations of a cocaine-associated cue light reinstated an extinguished self-administration behaviour. However, regardless of whether or not a cue light was associated with cocaine infusions, rats acquire cocaine intravenous self-administration reaching the same levels of intake. Furthermore, after self-administration has been acquired in presence of the cue light, the omission of the cue light or its non-contingent presentation did not modify rat behaviour. In conclusion, our work shows that cocaine-associated explicit cues do not directly interfere with the reinforcing effects of the drug.

  15. Heavy cocaine use by adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D E; Schwartz, R H; Martin, D M

    1989-04-01

    Adolescents are susceptible to becoming cocaine users. Twenty-eight teenagers in a drug rehabilitation program were identified as heavy cocaine users and questioned about their experiences. They reported family conflict leading to running away (86%), school drop-out (24%) and delinquent behaviors such as stealing (96%) and vandalism (57%). Cocaine use started at 14 years for 21%, with progression from onset to at least weekly use within eight weeks (54%). Side effects included sleep disturbance (18%) and tolerance to cocaine (25%). Withdrawal was characterized by cocaine craving up to one month later (93%). The majority (96%) were polydrug abusers. Possible causes of teen substance abuse are discussed, and the importance of prevention is emphasized. PMID:2927994

  16. Impairment of acquisition of intravenous cocaine self-administration by RNA-interference of dopamine D1-receptors in the nucleus accumbens shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanu, Augusta; Lecca, Daniele; Valentini, Valentina; Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc; Cacciapaglia, Fabio; Scifo, Andrea; Piras, Giovanna; Cadoni, Cristina; Di Chiara, Gaetano

    2015-02-01

    Microdialysis during i.v. drug self-administration (SA) have implicated nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell DA in cocaine and heroin reinforcement. However, this correlative evidence has not been yet substantiated by experimental evidence obtained by studying the effect of selective manipulation of NAc shell DA transmission on cocaine and heroin SA. In order to investigate this issue, DA D1a receptor (D1aR) expression was impaired in the NAc shell and core by locally infusing lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing specific D1aR-siRNAs (LV-siRNAs). Control rats were infused in the same areas with LV expressing GFP. Fifteen days later, rats were trained to acquire i.v. cocaine or heroin self-administration (SA). At the end of behavioral experiments, in order to evaluate the effect of LV-siRNA on D1aR expression, rats were challenged with amphetamine and the brains were processed for immunohistochemical detection of c-Fos and D1aR. Control rats acquired i.v. cocaine and heroin SA. Infusion of LV-siRNAs in the medial NAc shell reduced D1aR density and the number of c-Fos positive nuclei in the NAc shell, while sparing the core, and prevented the acquisition of cocaine, but not heroin SA. In turn, LV-siRNAs infusion in the core reduced D1aR density and the number of c-Fos positive nuclei in the same area, while sparing the shell, and failed to affect acquisition of cocaine. The differential effect of LV impairment of NAc shell D1aR on cocaine and heroin SA indicates that NAc shell DA acting on D1aR specifically mediates cocaine reinforcement. PMID:25446574

  17. Cocaine – Characteristics and addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Girczys-Połedniok

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine use leads to health, social and legal problems. The aim of this paper is to discuss cocaine action, addicts characteristics, use patterns and consequences, as well as addiction treatment methods. A literature review was based on the Medline, PubMed, Polish Medical Bibliography databases and the Silesian Library resources. The Police and Central Statistical Office statistics, as well as the World Health Organization, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction and the National Office for Combating Drug Addiction reports were used. Cocaine leads to mood improvement, appetite decrease, physical and intellectual activity enhancement, euphoria, inflated self-esteem, social networking ease and increased sexual desire. Cocaine hydrochloride is mainly used intranasaly, but also as intravenous and subcutaneous injections. Cocaine use and first addiction treatment fall in later age compared to other psychoactive substances. There is a high men to women ratio among addicts. There is a relationship between cocaine addiction, the presence of other disorders and genetic predisposition to addiction development. Polish reports indicate higher popularity of cocaine among people with a high economic and social status. Although Poland is a country with the low percentage of cocaine use, its popularity is growing. The consequences of cocaine use concern somatic and mental health problems, socioeconomic and legal conditions. The drug plays a role in crimes and traffic accidents. Because of the risks associated with cocaine use, it has been listed in a register of drugs attached to the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction. Addiction treatment includes psychological, pharmacological and harm reduction strategies. Med Pr 2016;67(4:537–544

  18. Dopamine Transporter Levels in Cocaine Dependent Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Newberg, Andrew; Wintering, Nancy; Ploessl, Karl; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; RING-KURTZ, SARAH; Gallop, Robert; Present, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine use is a significant problem in the US and it is well established that cocaine binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT) in the brain. This study was designed to determine if the DAT levels measured by 99mTc TRODAT SPECT brain scans are altered in cocaine dependent subjects and to explore clinical correlates of such alterations. SPECT brain scans were acquired on 21 cocaine dependent subjects and 21 healthy matched controls. There were significantly higher DAT levels in cocaine dependen...

  19. Anti-Cocaine Vaccine Based on Coupling a Cocaine Analog to a Disrupted Adenovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Koob, George; Hicks, Martin J.; Wee, Sunmee; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; De, Bishnu P.; Kaminksy, Stephen M.; Moreno, Amira; Kim D. Janda; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    The challenge in developing an anti-cocaine vaccine is that cocaine is a small molecule, invisible to the immune system. Leveraging the knowledge that adenovirus (Ad) capsid proteins are highly immunogenic in humans, we hypothesized that linking a cocaine hapten to Ad capsid proteins would elicit high-affinity, high-titer antibodies against cocaine, sufficient to sequester systemically administered cocaine and prevent access to the brain, thus suppressing cocaine-induced behaviors. Based on t...

  20. Striatal 5-HT6 Receptors Regulate Cocaine Reinforcement in a Pathway-Selective Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Matthew; Gibson, Alec W; Smirnov, Denis; Nair, Sunila G; Neumaier, John F

    2016-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the ventral striatum integrates many neurochemical inputs including dopamine and serotonin projections from midbrain nuclei to modulate drug reward. Although D1 and D2 dopamine receptors are differentially expressed in the direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons (dMSNs and iMSNs, respectively), 5-HT6 receptors are expressed in both pathways, more strongly than anywhere else in the brain, and are an intriguing target for neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we used viral vectors utilizing dynorphin or enkephalin promoters to drive expression of 5-HT6 receptors or green fluorescent protein (GFP) selectively in the dMSNs or iMSNs of the NAc shell. Rats were then trained to self-administer cocaine. Increased 5-HT6 receptor expression in dMSNs did not change any parameter of cocaine self-administration measured. However, increasing 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs reduced the amount of cocaine self-administered under fixed-ratio schedules, especially at low doses, increased the time to the first response and the length of the inter-infusion interval, but did not alter motivation as measured by progressive ratio 'break point' analysis. Modeling of cocaine pharmacokinetics in NAc showed that increased 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs reduced the rat's preferred tissue cocaine concentration at each dose. Finally, increased 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs facilitated conditioned place preference for a low dose of cocaine. We conclude that 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs of NAcSh increase the sensitivity to the reinforcing properties of cocaine, particularly at low doses, suggesting that these receptors may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:27032690

  1. Effects of prenatal cocaine on the ventilatory response to hypoxia in newborn rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese-Mayer, D E; Klemka-Walden, L M; Barkov, G A; Gingras, J L

    1992-01-01

    Recently, investigators have reported an alteration of postnatal respiratory pattern, deficient hypoxic arousal from sleep, and an increased incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) among human infants exposed to cocaine prenatally, thus suggesting that prenatal cocaine exposure may perturb the maturation of respiratory control thereby increasing the risk for SIDS. To investigate the effects of prenatal cocaine on postnatal respiration, we evaluated the ventilatory response to 0.21 FIO2 (baseline) and at 0.15, 0.10, and 0.08 FIO2 by the barometric method on days 4-5 of life in 23 New Zealand White rabbit pups born to cocaine-exposed (30 mg/kg/day of cocaine HCl by continuous subcutaneous infusion), pair-fed and free-fed does. The chamber pressure deflection (proportional to VT after appropriate calculation) was computer-sampled at 200 Hz when the unanesthetized pups were resting quietly with no gross body movements. Recording was made after 10 min acclimatization to a specific FIO2. We found that baseline ventilation did not differ significantly among study groups. However, minute ventilation (VI), inspiratory flow (VT/TI), tidal volume (VT), increased significantly with hypoxia to peak values at 0.08 FIO2 in pair-fed and free-fed pups but these measurements did not increase significantly in cocaine-exposed pups. Our finding of a deficient second phase of the hypoxic ventilatory response among cocaine-exposed pups supports the hypothesis that prenatal cocaine perturbs the maturation of respiratory control.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1483357

  2. Cocaine tolerance in honey bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Søvik

    Full Text Available Increasingly invertebrates are being used to investigate the molecular and cellular effects of drugs of abuse to explore basic mechanisms of addiction. However, in mammals the principle factors contributing to addiction are long-term adaptive responses to repeated drug use. Here we examined whether adaptive responses to cocaine are also seen in invertebrates using the honey bee model system. Repeated topical treatment with a low dose of cocaine rendered bees resistant to the deleterious motor effects of a higher cocaine dose, indicating the development of physiological tolerance to cocaine in bees. Cocaine inhibits biogenic amine reuptake transporters, but neither acute nor repeated cocaine treatments caused measurable changes in levels of biogenic amines measured in whole bee brains. Our data show clear short and long-term behavioural responses of bees to cocaine administration, but caution that, despite the small size of the bee brain, measures of biogenic amines conducted at the whole-brain level may not reveal neurochemical effects of the drug.

  3. Individual differences in discount rate are associated with demand for self-administered cocaine, but not sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Woods, James H

    2013-01-01

    Substance abusers, including cocaine abusers, discount delayed rewards to a greater extent than do matched controls. In the current experiment, individual differences in discounting of delayed rewards in rats (choice of one immediate over three delayed sucrose pellets) were assessed for associations with demand for either sucrose pellets or an intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg/infusion cocaine. Twenty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were split into three groups based on sensitivity to delay to reinforcement. Then, demand for sucrose pellets and cocaine was determined across a range of fixed-ratio values. Delay discounting was then reassessed to determine the stability of this measure over the course of the experiment. Individual differences in impulsive choice were positively associated with elasticity of demand for cocaine, a measure of reinforcer value, indicating that rats having higher discount rates also valued cocaine more. Impulsive choice was not associated with the level of cocaine consumption as price approached 0 or with any parameter associated with demand for sucrose. Individual sensitivity to delay was correlated with the initial assessment when reassessed at the end of the experiment, although impulsive choice increased for this cohort of rats as a whole. These findings suggest that impulsive choice in rats is positively associated with valuation of cocaine, but not sucrose. PMID:21812874

  4. Sign-tracking Predicts Increased Choice of Cocaine Over Food in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunstall, Brendan J.; Kearns, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the tendency to sign-track to a food cue was predictive of rats’ choice of cocaine over food. First, rats were trained on a procedure where insertion of a retractable lever was paired with food. A sub-group of rats – sign-trackers – primarily approached and contacted the lever, while another subgroup – goal-trackers – approached the site of food delivery. Rats were then trained on a choice task where they could choose between an infusion of cocaine (1.0 mg/kg) and a food pellet (45 mg). Sign-trackers chose cocaine over food significantly more often than did goal-trackers. These results support the incentive-salience theory of addiction and add to a growing number of studies which suggest that sign-trackers may model an addiction-prone phenotype. PMID:25541036

  5. Cocaine depresses GABAA current of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J H; Liu, P L; Wu, W H; McArdle, J J

    1997-10-01

    Although blockade of dopamine re-uptake and the resulting elevation of excitatory agonists is commonly thought the primary mechanism of cocaine-induced seizures, it is possible that other neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are involved. To examine this possibility, the effects of cocaine on the whole cell GABA current (IGABA) of freshly isolated rat hippocampal neurons were investigated with the patch-clamp technique. Preincubation or acute application of cocaine reversibly suppressed IGABA. The IC50 was 127 microM when cocaine was applied before the application of GABA. The concentration-response relations of cocaine in various GABA concentrations revealed that cocaine inhibited IGABA non-competitively. This effect of cocaine appeared to be independent of voltage. The present study suggests that the GABA receptor/channel complex is also a target for cocaine's action. The suppression of IGABA may contribute to cocaine-induced seizures.

  6. Evidence for habitual and goal-directed behavior following devaluation of cocaine: a multifaceted interpretation of relapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H Root

    with the cocaine infusion. Non-discriminative stimulus cues were weak correlates of the infusion, which failed to evoke a representation of the value of cocaine and led to habitual behavior. However, the discriminative stimulus-nearly perfectly correlated with the infusion-likely evoked a representation of the value of the infusion and led to goal-directed behavior. These data indicate that abstinent cue-induced responding is multifaceted, dynamically engendering habitual or goal-directed behavior. Moreover, since goal-directed behavior terminated habitual behavior during testing, therapeutic approaches aimed at reducing the perceived value of cocaine in addicted individuals may reduce the capacity of cues to induce relapse.

  7. Cocaine Tolerance in Honey Bees

    OpenAIRE

    Eirik Søvik; Jennifer L. Cornish; Barron, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly invertebrates are being used to investigate the molecular and cellular effects of drugs of abuse to explore basic mechanisms of addiction. However, in mammals the principle factors contributing to addiction are long-term adaptive responses to repeated drug use. Here we examined whether adaptive responses to cocaine are also seen in invertebrates using the honey bee model system. Repeated topical treatment with a low dose of cocaine rendered bees resistant to the deleterious motor...

  8. mTOR signalling in the nucleus accumbens shell is critical for augmented effect of TFF3 on behavioural response to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi-Xiao; Han, Hua; Shao, Juan; Gao, Yuan; Yin, Xi; Zhu, Wei-Li; Han, Ying; Shi, Hai-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play important roles in modulating the rewarding value of abused drugs. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) was recently reported to modulate withdrawal syndrome of morphine, but the effects of TFF3 on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes are still elusive. In the present study, cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) rat paradigms were provided to investigate the role of TFF3 in the reward response to cocaine. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was used to analyse the dopamine concentration. The results showed that systemic TFF3 administration (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) significantly augmented cocaine- induced hyperlocomotion and CPP formation, without any effects on locomotor activity and aversive or rewarding effects per se. TFF3 significantly augmented the increment of the dopamine concentration in the NAc and the activity of the mTOR signalling pathway induced by acute cocaine exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the NAc shell, but not the core. The Intra-NAc shell infusion of rapamycin blocked TFF3-induced hyperactivity in cocaine-treatment rats. These findings indicated that TFF3 could potentiate behavioural response to cocaine, which may be associated with regulating dopamine concentration. Furthermore, the findings indicated that mTOR signalling pathway in the NAc shell is important for TFF3-induced enhancement on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes. PMID:27282818

  9. Cocaine treatment alters oxytocin receptor binding but not mRNA production in postpartum rat dams☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, T.M.; McMurray, M.S.; Walker, C.H.; Johns, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Gestational cocaine treatment in rat dams results in decreased oxytocin (OT) levels, up-regulated oxytocin receptor (OTR) binding density and decreased receptor affinity in the whole amygdala, all concomitant with a significant increase in maternal aggression on postpartum day six. Rat dams with no gestational drug treatment that received an infusion of an OT antagonist directly into the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) exhibited similarly high levels of maternal aggression towards intruders. Additionally, studies indicate that decreased OT release from the hypothalamic division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is coincident with heightened maternal aggression in rats. Thus, it appears that cocaine-induced alterations in OT system dynamics (levels, receptors, production, and/or release) may mediate heightened maternal aggression following cocaine treatment, but the exact mechanisms through which cocaine impacts the OT system have not yet been determined. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that two likely mechanisms of cocaine’s action would be, increased OTR binding specifically in the CeA, and decreased OT mRNA production in the PVN. Autoradiography and in situ hybridization assays were performed on targeted nuclei in brain regions of rat dams on postpartum day six, following gestational treatment twice daily with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or normal saline (1 ml/kg). We now report cocaine-induced reductions in OTR binding density in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), but not the CeA. There was no significant change in OT mRNA production in the PVN following cocaine treatment. PMID:16677710

  10. Molecular mechanisms of cocaine reward: Combined dopamine and serotonin transporter knockouts eliminate cocaine place preference

    OpenAIRE

    Sora,Ichiro; Hall, F. Scott; Andrews, Anne M.; Itokawa, Masanari; Li, Xiao-Fei; Wei, Hong-Bing; Wichems, Christine; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L.; Uhl, George R.

    2001-01-01

    Cocaine blocks uptake by neuronal plasma membrane transporters for dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT), and norepinephrine (NET). Cocaine reward/reinforcement has been linked to actions at DAT or to blockade of SERT. However, knockouts of neither DAT, SERT, or NET reduce cocaine reward/reinforcement, leaving substantial uncertainty about cocaine's molecular mechanisms for reward. Conceivably, the molecular bases of cocaine reward might display sufficient redundancy th...

  11. Catalytic activities of a cocaine hydrolase engineered from human butyrylcholinesterase against (+)- and (−)-cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Wenchao YANG; Fang, Lei; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2012-01-01

    It can be argued that an ideal anti-cocaine medication would be one that accelerates cocaine metabolism producing biologically inactive metabolites via a route similar to the primary cocaine-metabolizing pathway, i.e. hydrolysis catalyzed by butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in plasma. However, wild-type BChE has a low catalytic efficiency against naturally occurring (−)cocaine. Interestingly, wild-type BChE has a much higher catalytic activity against unnatural (+)cocaine. According to available ...

  12. Acute Brain Metabolic Effects of Cocaine in Rhesus Monkeys with a History of Cocaine Use

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Porche’Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin; Votaw, John R.; Howell, Leonard L.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N=6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of i.v. drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute i.m. cocaine-induced changes in brain metabol...

  13. Lack of Cocaine Self-Administration in Mice Expressing a Cocaine-Insensitive Dopamine Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Morgane; Han, Dawn D; Gu, Howard H.; Caine, S. Barak

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a worldwide public health problem for which there are no established treatments. The dopamine transporter (DAT) is suspected as the primary target mediating cocaine's abuse-related effects based on numerous pharmacological studies. However, in a previous study, DAT knockout mice were reported to self-administer cocaine, generating much debate regarding the importance of the DAT in cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we show that mice expressing a “knockin” of a cocaine...

  14. Temporal Pattern of Cocaine Intake Determines Tolerance vs Sensitization of Cocaine Effects at the Dopamine Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Calipari, Erin S.; Ferris, Mark J.; Zimmer, Benjamin A.; Roberts, David CS; JONES, SARA R.

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is responsible for terminating dopamine (DA) signaling and is the primary site of cocaine's reinforcing actions. Cocaine self-administration has been shown previously to result in changes in cocaine potency at the DAT. To determine whether the DAT changes associated with self-administration are due to differences in intake levels or temporal patterns of cocaine-induced DAT inhibition, we manipulated cocaine access to produce either continuous or intermittent ele...

  15. Cocaine and "pharmacological kindling" in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, J S

    1983-11-01

    The concept of "pharmacological kindling" has been used to explain the behavioral sensitization to cocaine produced by repeated administration of subconvulsive doses. This idea was tested by the repeated administration of cocaine to rats followed by electrical kindling of the olfactory bulb (a site at which cocaine has prominent electrophysiologic effects). No significant effect of cocaine on kindling was found. The relationship of this finding to studies using other drugs is discussed.

  16. Antibody-Catalyzed Degradation of Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Donald W.; Zhao, Kang; Yang, Ginger X.-Q.; Glickman, Michael; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M.

    1993-03-01

    Immunization with a phosphonate monoester transition-state analog of cocaine provided monoclonal antibodies capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of the cocaine benzoyl ester group. An assay for the degradation of radiolabeled cocaine identified active enzymes. Benzoyl esterolysis yields ecgonine methyl ester and benzoic acid, fragments devoid of cocaine's stimulant activity. Passive immunization with such an artificial enzyme could provide a treatment for dependence by blunting reinforcement.

  17. Citalopram enhances cocaine's subjective effects in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, Paul L; Hiranita, Takato; Katz, Jonathan L.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been shown to enhance the locomotor stimulatory, discriminative-stimulus, and convulsive effects of cocaine in rodents. A pharmacokinetic mechanism for the interaction is supported by increases in the brain levels of cocaine by fluoxetine treatment. Furthermore, the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine in rodents are enhanced by fluoxetine and fluvoxamine, SSRIs known to inhibit cocaine-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes, whereas citalo...

  18. Cocaine Modulates Locomotion Behavior in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Ward; Walker, Vyvyca J.; Zhaoyang Feng(Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, P.R. China); Shawn Xu, X. Z.

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine, a potent addictive substance, is an inhibitor of monoamine transporters, including DAT (dopamine transporter), SERT (serotonin transporter) and NET (norepinephrine transporter). Cocaine administration induces complex behavioral alterations in mammals, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we tested the effect of cocaine on C. elegans behavior. We show for the first time that acute cocaine treatment evokes changes in C. elegans locomotor activity. Interestingly,...

  19. Differentiating the rapid actions of cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Roy A.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2011-01-01

    The subjective effects of intravenous cocaine are felt almost immediately, and this immediacy plays an important part in the drug’s rewarding impact. The primary rewarding effect of cocaine involves blockade of dopamine reuptake; however, the onset of this action is too late to account for the drug’s initial effects. Recent studies suggest that cocaine-predictive cues — including peripheral interoceptive cues generated by cocaine itself — come to cause more direct and earlier reward signallin...

  20. Prenatal Stress Enhances Responsiveness to Cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Kippin, Tod E.; Szumlinski, Karen K.; Kapasova, Zuzana; Rezner, Betsy; See, Ronald E.

    2007-01-01

    Early environmental events have profound influences on a wide range of adult behavior. In the current study, we assessed the influence of maternal stress during gestation on psychostimulant and neurochemical responsiveness to cocaine, cocaine self-administration, and reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in adult offspring. Pregnant, female Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to either no treatment or to restraint stress three times per day for the last 7 days of gestation and cocaine-related behav...

  1. Tips for Teens: The Truth about Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rock (Crack) Get the Facts… Cocaine affects your brain. The word “cocaine” refers to the drug in both a powder ( ... when you’re not high. Cocaine is addictive. Cocaine interferes with the way your brain processes chemicals that create feelings of pleasure, so ...

  2. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed,…

  3. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis

  4. Dopamine D4 receptors linked to protein kinase G are required for changes in dopamine release followed by locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Dong Kun; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Ryu, In Soo; Seo, Su Yeon; Kim, Jieun; Yang, Ju Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Wook; Choe, Eun Sang

    2015-05-01

    We previously found that the dopamine D2-type receptors (D2 and D3 receptors), coupled to protein kinase G (PKG), upregulate locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. In this study, D4 receptors, another type of D2 receptor also coupled to PKG, were examined to determine their requirement in the regulation of locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. The results demonstrated that repeated injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg), given once a day for seven consecutive days, significantly increased extracellular dopamine concentrations. Intra-caudate infusion of the D4 receptor agonist, PD168077 (10 nmol), and the PKG inhibitor, KT5823 (2 nmol), significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine levels and locomotor activity. However, intra-caudate infusion of KT5823, but not PD168077, decreased ∆FosB immunoreactivity elevated by repeated cocaine administration. These findings suggest that D4 receptors linked to PKG could be a key modulator for dopamine release required for changes in locomotor activity caused by repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:25702161

  5. The neuropathology of cocaine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Andreas; Mall, Gita; Penning, Randolph; Sachs, Hans; Weis, Serge

    2003-03-01

    Cocaine abuse represents a worldwide significant forensic issue as it is becoming widely recognized as one of the most dangerous illicit drugs in common use today. Besides cardiovascular complications, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms are the most common manifestations of cocaine toxicity. The latter include seizures, movement disorders and cerebrovascular complications. In chronic cocaine abusers morphological, physiological, and neurochemical abnormalities have been demonstrated by using neuroradiological techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography. The spectrum of neuropathologic changes encountered in the brains of cocaine abusers is broad, but the major findings consist of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhages and cerebral ischemia. Especially persons with underlying arteriovenous malformation or aneurysm are at risk for such events. Except for a few instances of vasculitis, the etiology of cocaine-related cerebrovascular accidents is still unclear. Besides pharmacologically-induced vasospasm, impaired hemostasis and platelet function and decreased cerebral blood flow have been proposed. At the cellular level, abnormalities in the expression of transcription factors and changes of brain neurotransmitter systems have been reported. PMID:12935600

  6. Development and validation of a direct-comparison method for cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine washout rates derived from late 3-hour and 4-hour imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Koichi; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa [Kanazawa Medical University, Department of Physics, Kahoku, Ishikawa (Japan); Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Taki, Junichi; Kinuya, Seigo [Kanazawa University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Sugino, Shuichi [Okayama Kyokuto Hospital, Department of Radiology, Okayama, Okayama (Japan); Kirihara, Yumiko [FUJIFILM RI Pharma Co., Ltd., Chuo-Ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    The washout rate (WR) has been used in {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging to evaluate cardiac sympathetic innervation. However, WR varies depending on the time between the early and late MIBG scans. Late scans are performed at either 3 or 4 hours after injection of MIBG. The aim of this study was to directly compare the WR at 3 hours (WR{sub 3h}) with the WR at 4 hours (WR{sub 4h}). We hypothesized that the cardiac count would reduce linearly between the 3-hour and 4-hour scans. A linear regression model for cardiac counts at two time-points was generated. We enrolled a total of 96 patients who underwent planar {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy early (15 min) and during the late phase at both 3 and 4 hours. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: a model-creation group (group 1) and a clinical validation group (group 2). Cardiac counts at 15 minutes (count{sub early}), 3 hours (count{sub 3h}) and 4 hours (count{sub 4h}) were measured. Cardiac count{sub 4h} was mathematically estimated using the linear regression model from count{sub early} and count{sub 3h}. In group 1, the actual cardiac count{sub 4h}/count{sub early} was highly significantly correlated with count{sub 3h}/count{sub early} (r = 0.979). In group 2, the average estimated count{sub 4h} was 92.8 ± 31.9, and there was no significant difference between this value and the actual count{sub 4h} (91.9 ± 31.9). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a small bias of -0.9 with 95 % limits of agreement of -6.2 and +4.3. WR{sub 4h} calculated using the estimated cardiac count{sub 4h} was comparable to the actual WR{sub 4h} (24.3 ± 9.6 % vs. 25.1 ± 9.7 %, p = ns). Bland-Altman analysis and the intraclass correlation coefficient showed that there was excellent agreement between the estimated and actual WR{sub 4h}. The linear regression model that we used accurately estimated cardiac count{sub 4h} using count{sub early} and count{sub 3h}. Moreover, WR{sub 4h} that was mathematically calculated using

  7. Behavioral momentum of cocaine self-administration: effects of frequency of reinforcement on resistance to extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Stacey L; Shahan, Timothy A

    2009-07-01

    Persistent drug seeking is a defining property of substance abuse and is generally thought to depend, in part, on exposure to drug-associated contexts. Behavioral momentum theory provides a set of methods and a theoretical framework for understanding how stimulus contexts contribute to the persistence of operant behavior. Earlier research has extended behavioral momentum theory to alcohol self-administration, but not to intravenous drug self-administration. This experiment extended behavioral momentum theory to cocaine self-administration by examining the effects of frequency of cocaine reinforcement in a context on resistance to extinction. Rats self-administered 0.32 mg/kg infusions of cocaine in a multiple schedule of reinforcement arranging two distinct contexts. Responding in a Rich context was reinforced by cocaine infusions at a higher frequency (i.e. variable interval 120 s) and in a Lean context at a lower frequency (variable interval 360 s). After establishment of responding in the two contexts, resistance to extinction was examined. Preextinction response rates for cocaine were similar in the Rich and Lean contexts. Nonetheless, relative resistance to extinction was greater in the Rich context than in the Lean context. The difference in resistance to extinction in the two contexts was well described by a quantitative model of behavioral momentum. These results suggest that the frequency of drug reinforcement in a context contributes to the persistence of drug seeking in that context, and that behavioral momentum theory might be useful for understanding how drug-associated contexts contribute to the persistence of drug seeking. PMID:19571742

  8. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Carlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser.

  9. II Infused Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR-α plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR-α agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400 ng/kg/min. Ten to twelve week old male PPAR-α KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR-α KO mice compared to WT (161±4 mmHg versus 145±4 mmHg and fenofibrate (145 mg/kg/day reduced MAP in WT + Ang II mice (134±7 mmHg. Plasma IL-6 levels were higher in PPAR-α KO mice on day 12 of Ang II infusion (30±4 versus 8±2 pg/mL and fenofibrate reduced plasma IL-6 in Ang II-treated WT mice (10±3 pg/mL. Fenofibrate increased renal expression of CYP4A, restored renal CYP2J expression, reduced the elevation in renal ICAM-1, MCP-1 and COX-2 in WT + Ang II mice. Our results demonstrate that activation of PPAR-α attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension through up-regulation of CYP4A and CYP2J and an attenuation of inflammatory markers such as plasma IL-6, renal MCP-1, renal expression of ICAM-1 and COX-2.

  10. Cocaine abuse among heroin addicts in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, M; San, L; Peri, J M; Olle, J M

    1991-01-01

    Abuse of cocaine is becoming a major problem among heroin addicts in Spain. Between 1987 and 1988, 75% of patients admitted as inpatients for detoxification from opiate dependence had consumed cocaine during the 6 months prior to admission and 25% had abused cocaine daily or several times/week. These cocaine abusers showed more toxicologic and psychopathologic problems than opiate addicts who did not abuse cocaine. The opiate addicts who also abused cocaine had begun using illicit drugs earlier and showed a higher frequency of anti-HIV antibodies. They also had more antisocial personality disorders and persistence of depressive symptoms during opiate detoxification than heroin addicts who did not abuse cocaine. Based on these findings, we insist on the need to develop different treatments for detoxifying patients with this dual addiction. PMID:2029857

  11. Cocaine and Sleep: Early Abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Morgan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Compulsive cocaine use is associated with a profound dysregulation of sleep. Perhaps the result of chronic use, a significant deterioration in sleep is apparent over the first 3 weeks of abstinence, with no indication of recovery. Interestingly, the diminished sleep is not accompanied by subjective reports of poor or worsening sleep. Rather, subjective reports actually improve over abstinence, while sleep-related cognitive performance declines. A mechanistic understanding of the apparent difference in objective and subjective measures is currently lacking. Here we review the relevant literature on cocaine use and sleep, and discuss the possible relevance of this sleep disturbance in relationship to the underlying disorder and its treatment.

  12. Lesions of cholinergic pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus neurons fail to affect cocaine or heroin self-administration or conditioned place preference in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Steidl

    Full Text Available Cholinergic input to the ventral tegmental area (VTA is known to contribute to reward. Although it is known that the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg provides an important source of excitatory input to the dopamine system, the specific role of PPTg cholinergic input to the VTA in cocaine reward has not been previously determined. We used a diphtheria toxin conjugated to urotensin-II (Dtx::UII, the endogenous ligand for urotensin-II receptors expressed by PPTg cholinergic but not glutamatergic or GABAergic cells, to lesion cholinergic PPTg neurons. Dtx::UII toxin infusion resulted in the loss of 95.78 (±0.65% of PPTg cholinergic cells but did not significantly alter either cocaine or heroin self-administration or the development of cocaine or heroin conditioned place preferences. Thus, cholinergic cells originating in PPTg do not appear to be critical for the rewarding effects of cocaine or of heroin.

  13. A thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase rapidly eliminates cocaine from brain in nonhuman primates

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, L L; Nye, J A; Stehouwer, J S; Voll, R J; Mun, J; D. Narasimhan; Nichols, J.; Sunahara, R; Goodman, M. M.; Carroll, F I; Woods, J H

    2014-01-01

    A long-acting, thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) has been identified that rapidly degrades cocaine with a KM of 1.33+0.085 μM. In vivo evaluation of CocE has shown protection against convulsant and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents, confirming the therapeutic potential of CocE against cocaine overdose. However, the current study is the first to evaluate the effects of CocE on cocaine brain levels. Positron emission tomogrpahy neuroimaging of [11C]cocaine was used to evaluate t...

  14. Cocaine Hoppers : The Nigerian Involvement in the Global Cocaine Trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oboh, Jude Roys

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, Nigerian criminal drug ‘barons’ and ‘gangs’ have come to dominate international cocaine trafficking via West Africa to destination countries globally, a trend that presents a serious security threat to Africa and the world. This work provides empirical evidence to define and expla

  15. Predictive Value of a 4-Hour Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol in Patients with Suspected Ischemic Chest Pain Presenting to an Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatha P.R. Rao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Currently recommended risk stratification protocols for suspected ischemic chest pain in the emergency department (ED includes point-of-care availability of exercise treadmill/nuclear tests or CT coronary angiograms. These tests are not widely available for most of the ED’s. This study aims to prospectively validate the safety of a predefined 4-hour accelerated diagnostic protocol (ADP using chest pain, ECG, and troponin T among suspected ischemic chest pain patients presenting to an ED of a tertiary care hospital in Oman.Methods: One hundred and thirty-two patients aged over 18 years with suspected ischemic chest pain presenting within 12 hours of onset along with normal or non-diagnostic first ECG and negative first troponin T (<0.010 μg/l were recruited from September 2008 to February 2009. Low-probability acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients at 4-hours defined as absent chest pain and negative ECG or troponin tests were discharged home and observed for 30-days for major adverse cardiac events (MACE (Group I: negative ADP. High-probability ACS patients at 4-hours were defined by recurrent or persistent chest pain, positive ECG or troponin tests and were admitted and observed for in-hospital MACE (Group II: positive ADP.Results: One hundred and thirty-two patients were recruited and 110 patients completed the study. The overall 30-day MACE in this cohort was 15% with a mortality of less than 1%. 30-days MACE occurred in 8/95 of group I patients (8.4% and 9/15 of the in-hospital MACE patients in group II. The ADP had a sensitivity of 52% (95% CI: 0.28-0.76, specificity of 93% (0.85-0.97, a negative predictive value of 91% (0.83-0.96, a positive predictive value of 60% (0.32-0.82, negative likelihood ratio of 0.5 (0.30-0.83 and a positive likelihood ratio of 8.2 (3.3-20 in predicting MACE.Conclusion: A 4-hour ADP using chest pain, ECG, and troponin T had high specificity and negative predictive value in predicting 30-day MACE

  16. A therapeutic combination of metyrapone and oxazepam increases brain levels of GABA-active neurosteroids and decreases cocaine self-administration in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoutz, Christopher D; Guerin, Glenn F; Runyon, Scott P; Dhungana, Suraj; Goeders, Nicholas E

    2015-09-15

    In rodents, the behavioral and neurochemical effects resulting from the pharmacological blockade of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are unclear. Metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor, has been demonstrated to reduce cocaine-related behaviors, especially in a low-dose combination with oxazepam, a benzodiazepine. Although this combination therapy (MET/OX) also reduces drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors in both rodents and cocaine-dependent humans, these effects are not correlated with plasma glucocorticoid levels. In this brief report, we present data demonstrating that this MET/OX combination enhances brain levels of the GABA-active steroid metabolites, tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) and allopregnanolone. Male rats, trained to self-administer cocaine or that received yoked-saline infusions, were pretreated with MET/OX, at doses that reduced cocaine-motivated responding, or vehicle. Allopregnanolone and THDOC were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala in the brains from these rats. THDOC levels were enhanced following MET/OX pretreatment in both brain regions, regardless of cocaine self-administration experience. However, allopregnanolone was selectively enhanced in the rats that self-administered cocaine, but not in rats in the yoked-saline group. Thus, the MET/OX combination increased neurosteroid content in brain regions important for drug addiction. These neurosteroids have been shown to reduce cocaine-related behaviors and may contribute to the behavioral effects of MET/OX combination therapy. PMID:26003946

  17. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of both cocaine and sucrose seeking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guercio, Leonardo A; Schmidt, Heath D; Pierce, R Christopher

    2015-03-15

    Stimuli previously associated with drug taking can become triggers that can elicit craving and lead to relapse of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we examined the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the nucleus accumbens shell on cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, an animal model of relapse. Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.254 mg, i.v.) for 2 h daily for 21 days, with each infusion of cocaine being paired with a cue light. After 21 days of self-administration, cocaine-taking behavior was extinguished by replacing cocaine with saline in the absence of the cue light. Next, during the reinstatement phase, DBS was administered bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens shell through bipolar stainless steel electrodes immediately prior to re-exposure to cues previously associated with cocaine reinforcement. DBS continued throughout the 2 h reinstatement session. Parallel studies examined the influence of accumbens shell DBS on reinstatement induced by cues previously associated with sucrose reinforcement. Results indicated that DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell significantly attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine and sucrose seeking. Together, these results indicate that DBS of the accumbens shell disrupts cue-induced reinstatement associated with both a drug and a natural reinforcer. PMID:25529183

  18. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction.

  19. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the “addiction phase” examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNF’s potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. PMID:25449839

  20. [Continuous-infusion ketamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, P G; Caggese, G; Di Fabio, A; Di Nino, G F; Cocchi, V

    1980-08-01

    An investigation was made of the employment of ketamin as the sole anaesthetic in general surgery, using continuous infusion of a 1% solution for both induction and maintenance in 118 cases. ECG was monitored and arterial pressure was measured invasively. Central venous pressure was also determined in 10 cases. Changes in serum enzyme values during and after surgery were examined in 35 patients. Blood samples were withdrawn before induction, after the return to consciousness, and 24 hr after the operation. Side-effects were common, but slight. Five patients suffered from nightmares, but these were persons with marked imaginative activity and a melancholic nature. Cardiocirculatory function was satisfactory. In particular, peripheral perfusion was excellent in all cases.

  1. Infusion's greenfield subsidiary in Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Williams; W. van Eerde; D. The

    2012-01-01

    The president of Infusion Development Corporation was reviewing the progress of the new subsidiary the company had set up 15 months earlier in Krakow, Poland. The purpose of the subsidiary was to work with other Infusion offices around the world to provide innovative software development services to

  2. Resurgence of Sucrose and Cocaine Seeking in Free-Feeding Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahan, Timothy A.; Craig, Andrew R.; Sweeney, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    Resurgence is relapse of an extinguished operant response following the removal of alternative reinforcement. In animal models of resurgence to date, rats have been food deprived and food is used as the source of alternative reinforcement. Thus, when the alternative reinforcer is removed, the only remaining source of food during experimental sessions is no longer available. Acute food deprivation is known to produce reinstatement of drug seeking, thus such deprivation has been suggested a potential mechanism of resurgence. The present experiments examined whether resurgence of sucrose and cocaine seeking could be obtained with rats that were not food deprived. Free feeding rats were trained to press a lever for either sucrose (Exp 1) or cocaine infusions (Exp 2). Next, lever pressing was extinguished and an alternative response (nose poking) was reinforced with sucrose. When nose poking was also placed on extinction, resurgence of both sucrose and cocaine seeking were observed. Thus, resurgence of both sucrose and cocaine seeking can be obtained in rats that are not food restricted and it appears unlikely that an acute hunger state is responsible for resurgence. In addition, the present procedures for studying resurgence in the absence of interpretive complexities introduced by the use of food-deprivation may prove useful for further investigations of the neurobiological mechanisms of resurgence. PMID:25446761

  3. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction induced by cocaine and cocaine plus morphine in brain and liver mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    cunha-oliveira, teresa; Silva, Lisbeth; Silva, Ana Maria; Moreno, António J.; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Santos, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are affected in brains of human cocaine abusers. Cocaine is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac and hepatic tissues, but its effects on brain bioenergetics are less documented. Furthermore, the combination of cocaine and opioids (speedball) was also shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work, we compared the effects of cocaine and/or morphine on the bioenergetics of isolated brain and liver mitochondria, to understand ...

  4. Cocaine produces conditioned place aversion in mice with a cocaine insensitive dopamine transporter

    OpenAIRE

    O’Neill, Brian; Tilley, Michael R.; Gu, Howard H.

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is an inhibitor of the dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin reuptake transporters. Because its administration would therefore elevate signaling of all these three neurotransmitters, many studies have been aimed at attributing individual effects of cocaine to specific transmitter systems. Using mice with a cocaine insensitive dopamine transporter (DAT-CI mice), we previously showed that cocaine-induced dopamine elevations were necessary for its rewarding and stimulating effects. In ...

  5. Reduced attentional scope in cocaine polydrug users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza S Colzato

    Full Text Available Cocaine is Europe's second preferred recreational drug after cannabis but very little is known about possible cognitive impairments in the upcoming type of recreational cocaine user (monthly consumption. We asked whether recreational use of cocaine impacts early attentional selection processes. Cocaine-free polydrug controls (n = 18 and cocaine polydrug users (n = 18 were matched on sex, age, alcohol consumption, and IQ (using the Raven's progressive matrices, and were tested by using the Global-Local task to measure the scope of attention. Cocaine polydrug users attended significantly more to local aspects of attended events, which fits with the idea that a reduced scope of attention may be associated with the perpetuation of the use of the drug.

  6. Impaired insight in cocaine addiction: laboratory evidence and effects on cocaine-seeking behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, S.J.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-04-15

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are often characterized by impaired insight into behaviour. Such an insight deficit has been suggested, but never directly tested, in drug addiction. Here we tested for the first time this impaired insight hypothesis in drug addiction, and examined its potential association with drug-seeking behaviour. We also tested potential modulation of these effects by cocaine urine status, an individual difference known to impact underlying cognitive functions and prognosis. Sixteen cocaine addicted individuals testing positive for cocaine in urine, 26 cocaine addicted individuals testing negative for cocaine in urine, and 23 healthy controls completed a probabilistic choice task that assessed objective preference for viewing four types of pictures (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine). This choice task concluded by asking subjects to report their most selected picture type; correspondence between subjects self-reports with their objective choice behaviour provided our index of behavioural insight. Results showed that the urine positive cocaine subjects exhibited impaired insight into their own choice behaviour compared with healthy controls; this same study group also selected the most cocaine pictures (and fewest pleasant pictures) for viewing. Importantly, however, it was the urine negative cocaine subjects whose behaviour was most influenced by insight, such that impaired insight in this subgroup only was associated with higher cocaine-related choice on the task and more severe actual cocaine use. These findings suggest that interventions to enhance insight may decrease drug-seeking behaviour, especially in urine negative cocaine subjects, potentially to improve their longer-term clinical outcomes.

  7. Prospective associations between brain activation to cocaine and no-go cues and cocaine relapse*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, James J.; Myrick, Hugh; Henderson, Scott; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to predict potential for relapse to substance use following treatment could be very useful in targeting aftercare strategies. Recently, a number of investigators have focused on using neural activity measured by fMRI to predict relapse propensity. The purpose of the present study was to use fMRI to investigate prospective associations between brain reactivity to cocaine and response inhibition cues and relapse to cocaine use. Methods Thirty cocaine-dependent participants with clean cocaine urine drug screens (UDS) completed a baseline fMRI scan, including a cocaine-cue reactivity task and a go/no-go response inhibition task. After participating in a brief clinical trial of D-cycloserine for the facilitation of cocaine cue extinction, they returned for a one-week follow-up UDS. Associations between baseline activation to cocaine and inhibition cues and relapse to cocaine use were explored. Results Positive cocaine UDS was significantly associated with cocaine cue activation in the right putamen and insula, as well as bilateral occipital regions. Associations between positive cocaine UDS and activation to no-go cues were concentrated in the postcentral gyri, a region involved in response execution. Conclusions Although preliminary, these results suggest that brain imaging may be a useful tool for predicting risk for relapse in cocaine-dependent individuals. Further, larger-scale naturalistic studies are needed to corroborate and extend these findings. PMID:23683790

  8. Cocaine self-administration disrupts mesolimbic dopamine circuit function and attenuates dopaminergic responsiveness to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Cody A; Ferris, Mark J; Jones, Sara R

    2015-08-01

    Dopaminergic projections from the ventral midbrain to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) have long been implicated in encoding associations between reward availability and environmental stimuli. As such, this circuit is instrumental in guiding behaviors towards obtaining maximal rewards based on previous experience. Cocaine acts on the dopamine system to exert its reinforcing effects and it is thought that cocaine-induced dysregulation of dopamine neurotransmission contributes to the difficulty that cocaine addicts exhibit in selecting environmentally appropriate behaviors. Here we used cocaine self-administration combined with in vivo fast scan cyclic voltammetry in anesthetised rats to examine the function of the ventral tegmental area to NAc projection neurons. Over 5 days of cocaine self-administration (fixed-ratio 1; 1.5 mg/kg/injection; 40 injections/day), animals increased their rate of intake. Following cocaine self-administration, there was a marked reduction in ventral tegmental area-stimulated NAc dopamine release. Additionally, there was a decreased augmentation of stimulated dopamine overflow in response to a cocaine challenge. These findings demonstrate that cocaine induces a hypodopaminergic state, which may contribute to the inflexible drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors observed in cocaine abusers. Additionally, tolerance to the ability of cocaine to elevate dopamine may lead to increased cocaine intake in order to overcome decreased effects, another hallmark of cocaine abuse. PMID:26037018

  9. Cocaine challenge enhances release of neuroprotective amino acid taurine in the striatum of chronic cocaine treated rats: a microdialysis study

    OpenAIRE

    Yablonsky-Alter, Elena; Agovic, Mervan S.; Gashi, Eleonora; Lidsky, Theodore I.; Friedman, Eitan; Banerjee, Shailesh P.

    2009-01-01

    Drug addiction is a serious public health problem. There is increasing evidence on the involvement of augmented glutamatergic transmission in cocaine-induced addiction and neurotoxicity. We investigated effects of acute or chronic cocaine administration and cocaine challenge following chronic cocaine exposure on the release of excitotoxic glutamate and neuroprotective taurine in the rat striatum by microdialysis. Cocaine challenge, following withdrawal after repeated cocaine exposure markedly...

  10. NMDA receptor blockade in the basolateral amygdala disrupts consolidation of stimulus-reward memory and extinction learning during reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in an animal model of relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltenstein, Matthew W; See, Ronald E

    2007-11-01

    Previous research from our laboratory has implicated the basolateral amygdala (BLA) complex in the acquisition and consolidation of cue-cocaine associations, as well as extinction learning, which may regulate the long-lasting control of conditioned stimuli (CS) over drug-seeking behavior. Given the well established role of NMDA glutamate receptor activation in other forms of amygdalar-based learning, we predicted that BLA-mediated drug-cue associative learning would be NMDA receptor dependent. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered i.v. cocaine (0.6 mg/kg/infusion) in the absence of explicit CS pairings (2-h sessions, 5 days), followed by a single 1-h classical conditioning (CC) session, during which they received passive infusions of cocaine discretely paired with a light+tone stimulus complex. Following additional cocaine self-administration sessions in the absence of the CS (2-h sessions, 5 days) and extinction training sessions (no cocaine or CS presentation, 2-h sessions, 7 days), the ability of the CS to reinstate cocaine-seeking on three test days was assessed. Rats received bilateral intra-BLA infusions (0.5 microl/hemisphere) of vehicle or the selective NMDA receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5), immediately prior to the CC session (acquisition), immediately following the CC session (consolidation), or immediately following reinstatement testing (consolidation of conditioned-cued extinction learning). AP-5 administered before or after CC attenuated subsequent CS-induced reinstatement, whereas AP-5 administered immediately following the first two reinstatement tests impaired the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior. These results suggest that NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms within the BLA play a crucial role in the consolidation of drug-CS associations into long-term memories that, in turn, drive cocaine-seeking during relapse. PMID:17613253

  11. How Might Cocaine Interfere with Brain Development?

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Ting Lee; Jia Chen; Teruo Hayashi; Shang-Yi Tsai; Sanchez, Joseph F.; Errico, Stacie L.; Rose Amable; Tsung-Ping Su; Lowe, Ross H.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; James Shen; Becker, Kevin G.; Geller, Herbert M.; Freed, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Every year, cocaine abuse by mothers during pregnancy exposes thousands of unborn infants (fetuses) to this powerful and addictive stimulant. Maternal cocaine abuse during early pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage; its use during late pregnancy slows the baby's growth and can trigger premature labor. Babies exposed to cocaine shortly before birth are often irritable and have disturbed sleep patterns. They can also be very sensitive to sound and touch and c...

  12. Cocaine, Appetitive Memory and Neural Connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Suchismita

    2012-01-01

    This review examines existing cognitive experimental and brain imaging research related to cocaine addiction. In section 1, previous studies that have examined cognitive processes, such as implicit and explicit memory processes in cocaine users are reported. Next, in section 2, brain imaging studies are reported that have used chronic users of cocaine as study participants. In section 3, several conclusions are drawn. They are: (a) in cognitive experimental literature, no study has examined b...

  13. Epigenetic Inheritance of a Cocaine Resistance Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Vassoler, Fair M.; White, Samantha L; Schmidt, Heath D.; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Pierce, R Christopher

    2012-01-01

    A heritable phenotype resulting from the self-administration of cocaine in rats was delineated. We observed delayed acquisition and reduced maintenance of cocaine self-administration in male, but not female, offspring of sires that self-administered cocaine. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein were increased in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and there was an increased association of acetylated histone H3 with BDNF promoters only in the male offspring of cocaine-expe...

  14. Sleep Regulates Incubation of Cocaine Craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Wang, Yao; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Zheng; Dong, Yan; Huang, Yanhua H

    2015-09-30

    After withdrawal from cocaine, chronic cocaine users often experience persistent reduction in total sleep time, which is accompanied by increased sleep fragmentation resembling chronic insomnia. This and other sleep abnormalities have long been speculated to foster relapse and further drug addiction, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, we report that after prolonged withdrawal from cocaine self-administration, rats exhibited persistent reduction in nonrapid-eye-movement (NREM) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, as well as increased sleep fragmentation. In an attempt to improve sleep after cocaine withdrawal, we applied chronic sleep restriction to the rats during their active (dark) phase of the day, which selectively decreased the fragmentation of REM sleep during their inactive (light) phase without changing NREM or the total amount of daily sleep. Animals with improved REM sleep exhibited decreased incubation of cocaine craving, a phenomenon depicting the progressive intensification of cocaine seeking after withdrawal. In contrast, experimentally increasing sleep fragmentation after cocaine self-administration expedited the development of incubation of cocaine craving. Incubation of cocaine craving is partially mediated by progressive accumulation of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). After withdrawal from cocaine, animals with improved REM sleep exhibited reduced accumulation of CP-AMPARs in the NAc, whereas increasing sleep fragmentation accelerated NAc CP-AMPAR accumulation. These results reveal a potential molecular substrate that can be engaged by sleep to regulate cocaine craving and relapse, and demonstrate sleep-based therapeutic opportunities for cocaine addiction. Significance statement: Sleep abnormalities are common symptoms in chronic drug users long after drug withdrawal. These withdrawal-associated sleep symptoms, particularly reduction in total sleep time and deteriorating sleep quality, have been

  15. Molecular approaches to treatments for cocaine abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippen-Anderson, Judith L.; George, Clifford; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.

    2003-02-01

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant of the central nervous system with severe addiction potential. Its abuse is a major problem worldwide. The exact mechanism of action of cocaine is still uncertain but it is known that its reinforcing and stimulant effects are related to its ability to inhibit the membrane bound dopamine transporter (DAT). This paper discusses efforts that are underway to identify ligands for possible use in the treatment of cocaine abuse. Much of this effort has been focussed on understanding cocaine interactions at DAT receptor sites.

  16. Cocaine: from addiction to functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocaine is wrongly held as a benign recreative drug whereas it is a highly addictive substance with possible dreadful cardiac a neurologic complications. Cocaine abuse results in patchy cerebral hypoperfusion and hypo-metabolism, clearly demonstrated by PET and SPECT imaging. Improvement after drug withdrawal is still unclear. Cocaine binds with a very high affinity to the dopamine reuptake transporter. Labelled cocaine congeners can be used to assess dopaminergic pathways, especially nigrostriatal neurons that play a key role in movement control. 123I labelled beta-CIT can reproducibly be used to measure dopamine transporter density in the striatum, in one day. This approach seems very promising. (authors)

  17. Adolescent Atomoxetine Treatment in a Rodent Model of ADHD: Effects on Cocaine Self-Administration and Dopamine Transporters in Frontostriatal Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkuwar, Sucharita S; Jordan, Chloe J; Kantak, Kathleen M; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are often comorbid. Preclinical research indicates that medial prefrontal (mPFC) and orbitofrontal (OFC) cortices are important neural substrates for both disorders. Using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model of ADHD, we reported that adolescent treatment with the stimulant methylphenidate, a dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporter inhibitor, enhanced cocaine self-administration during adulthood, and was associated with increased DAT function in mPFC. This study investigates the effects of atomoxetine ((R)-N-methyl-γ-(2-methylphenoxy)-benzenepropanamine hydrochloride) treatment, a selective NET inhibitor, during adolescence on cocaine self-administration and on DAT function and cell-surface expression in mPFC and OFC during adulthood. SHR acquired cocaine self-administration faster than Wistar–Kyoto and Wistar. Across cocaine doses, SHR earned more cocaine infusions and had higher progressive-ratio breakpoints than Wistar–Kyoto and Wistar, demonstrating that the SHR phenotype models comorbid ADHD and cocaine abuse. Prior atomoxetine treatment did not augment cocaine self-administration in SHR, but acquisition was enhanced in Wistar–Kyoto. No strain differences were found for DAT kinetic parameters or cellular localization in the vehicle controls. Atomoxetine did not alter DAT kinetic parameters or localization in SHR mPFC. Rather, atomoxetine decreased Vmax and DAT cell surface expression in SHR OFC, indicating that inhibition of NET by atomoxetine treatment during adolescence indirectly reduced DAT function and trafficking to the cell surface in OFC, specifically in the ADHD model. Thus, atomoxetine, unlike methylphenidate, does not enhance vulnerability to cocaine abuse in SHR and may represent an important alternative for teens with ADHD when drug addiction is a concern. PMID:23822950

  18. Higher rate alternative non-drug reinforcement produces faster suppression of cocaine seeking but more resurgence when removed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Andrew R; Nall, Rusty W; Madden, Gregory J; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Relapse following removal of an alternative source of reinforcement introduced during extinction of a target behavior is called resurgence. This form of relapse may be related to relapse of drug taking following loss of alternative non-drug reinforcement in human populations. Laboratory investigations of factors mediating resurgence with food-maintained behavior suggest higher rates of alternative reinforcement produce faster suppression of target behavior but paradoxically generate more relapse when alternative reinforcement is discontinued. At present, it is unknown if a similar effect occurs when target behavior is maintained by drug reinforcement and the alternative is a non-drug reinforcer. In the present experiment three groups of rats were trained to lever press for infusions of cocaine during baseline. Next, during treatment, cocaine reinforcement was suspended and an alternative response was reinforced with either high-rate, low-rate, or no alternative food reinforcement. Finally, all reinforcement was suspended to test for relapse of cocaine seeking. Higher rate alternative reinforcement produced faster elimination of cocaine seeking than lower rates or extinction alone, but when treatment was suspended resurgence of cocaine seeking occurred following only high-rate alternative reinforcement. Thus, although higher rate alternative reinforcement appears to more effectively suppress drug seeking, should it become unavailable, it can have the unfortunate effect of increasing relapse. PMID:26988268

  19. Social Stress and Escalated Drug Self-administration in Mice II. Cocaine and Dopamine in Nucleus Accumbens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Albrechet-Souza, Lucas; Doyle, Michelle R.; Shimamoto, Akiko; DeBold, Joseph F.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Social defeat stress results in escalation of cocaine taking and long-term neural adaptations in rats. How the intensity and timing of social defeat stress determine these effects, particularly in mice, have not been well characterized. Objective This study investigated the effects of mild vs. moderate intensities and durations of social stress on intravenous cocaine self-administration as well as on dopamine (DA) release in nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) by using in vivo microdialysis. Methods Adult male CFW mice experienced 10 days of social defeat stress, either mild (15 attack bites in ca. 1.8 min) or moderate (30 attack bites in ca. 3.6 min), and compared to controls that were handled daily. Subsequently, the socially stressed mice were assessed for either (1) intravenous cocaine self-administration, using several unit doses (0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.0 mg/kg/infusion) under limited access conditions, or (2) neural sensitization, as determined by in vivo microdialysis of DA in the NAcSh in response to acute d-amphetamine challenge. Results Social defeat stress resulted in escalated cocaine self-administration in both mild and moderate socially stressed groups. In addition, social defeat stress led to increased DA release after d-amphetamine challenge. Conclusions These data suggest that both mild and moderate socially stressed mice exhibit increased cocaine taking compared to controls, and this increase is associated with escalated dopaminergic responses in the NAcSh. PMID:25216798

  20. [Cocaine-related gastric perforation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, A; Stein, E; Stern, J

    2010-06-01

    Since the 1980s the abuse of cocaine has been -associated with gastroduodenal perforations in the United States. Here, we report the case of a 28-year-old man who came to our hospital with severe abdominal pain after smoking cocaine. Physical examination revealed generalised abdominal guarding. His X-ray did not show any free intraperitoneal air. However, there was a slightly elevated white blood cell count. Upon laparoscopic exploration of the abdomen, the -patient was found to have a generalised peritonitis secondary to a perforation of the prepyloric anterior wall. The operative procedure consisted of ulcer excision and primary closure with a pyloroplasty as well as an extensive abdominal irrigation after laparotomy.

  1. Diazepam alters cocaine self-administration, but not cocaine-stimulated locomotion or nucleus accumbens dopamine

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Esther Y.; Ledesma, Ramon T.; Seiwell, Andrew P.; Duvauchelle, Christine L.

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is known to enhance nucleus accumbens dopamine (NAcc DA), serve as a positive reinforcer and produce negative effects, such as anxiety. The influence of diazepam on cocaine intake, cocaine-stimulated behavioral activity and NAcc DA was investigated using self-administration and experimenter-administered intravenous (i.v.) cocaine. In Experiment 1, rats were pretreated with diazepam (0.25 mg/kg) or saline (0.1 ml) 30 minutes prior to 20 daily 1-hr cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/inj) self-administ...

  2. Shortening Infusion Time for High-Dose Methotrexate Alters Antileukemic Effects: A Randomized Prospective Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Torben S.; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Yinmei; Boyett, James M.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Panetta, John C.; Bowman, W. Paul; Sandlund, John T.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether shortening the infusion duration of high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX; 1 g/m2) affects the in vivo accumulation of active methotrexate polyglutamates (MTXPG1-7) in leukemia cells and whether this differs among major acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) subtypes. Methods From June 2000 through October 2007, 356 children with ALL were randomly assigned to receive initial single-agent treatment with HDMTX (1 g/m2) as either a 24-hour infusion or a 4-hour infusion at two pediatric hospitals in the United States. The primary outcome measures were the accumulation of MTXPG1-7 in leukemia cells and the antileukemic effects (eg, inhibition of de novo purine synthesis in bone marrow ALL cells, and decrease in circulating ALL cells). Results The 24-hour infusion resulted in significantly higher amounts of MTXPG1-7 in bone marrow leukemia cells (median: 1,695 v 1,150 pmol/109 cells, P = .0059), and better antileukemic effects. The 24-hour infusion had the greatest effect on MTXPG1-7 accumulation in hyperdiploid ALL (median: 3,919 v 2,417 pmol/109 cells, P = .0038); T-cell ALL exhibited smaller differences in MTXPG1-7 but greater antileukemic effects with the longer infusion (median decrease in leukemia cells: 88.4% v 51.8%, P = .0075). In contrast, infusion duration had no significant impact on MTXPG1-7 accumulation or antileukemic effects in ALL with the t(12;21)/(ETV6-RUNX1) chromosomal translocation. Conclusion Shortening the infusion time of HDMTX reduces accumulation of active methotrexate in leukemia cells and decreases antileukemic effects, with differing consequences among major ALL subtypes. PMID:21444869

  3. Intense sweetness surpasses cocaine reward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalie Lenoir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Refined sugars (e.g., sucrose, fructose were absent in the diet of most people until very recently in human history. Today overconsumption of diets rich in sugars contributes together with other factors to drive the current obesity epidemic. Overconsumption of sugar-dense foods or beverages is initially motivated by the pleasure of sweet taste and is often compared to drug addiction. Though there are many biological commonalities between sweetened diets and drugs of abuse, the addictive potential of the former relative to the latter is currently unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that when rats were allowed to choose mutually-exclusively between water sweetened with saccharin-an intense calorie-free sweetener-and intravenous cocaine-a highly addictive and harmful substance-the large majority of animals (94% preferred the sweet taste of saccharin. The preference for saccharin was not attributable to its unnatural ability to induce sweetness without calories because the same preference was also observed with sucrose, a natural sugar. Finally, the preference for saccharin was not surmountable by increasing doses of cocaine and was observed despite either cocaine intoxication, sensitization or intake escalation-the latter being a hallmark of drug addiction. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings clearly demonstrate that intense sweetness can surpass cocaine reward, even in drug-sensitized and -addicted individuals. We speculate that the addictive potential of intense sweetness results from an inborn hypersensitivity to sweet tastants. In most mammals, including rats and humans, sweet receptors evolved in ancestral environments poor in sugars and are thus not adapted to high concentrations of sweet tastants. The supranormal stimulation of these receptors by sugar-rich diets, such as those now widely available in modern societies, would generate a supranormal reward signal in the brain, with the potential to override self

  4. Role of oxidative stress in cocaine-induced cardiotoxicity and cocaine-related death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerretani, D; Fineschi, V; Bello, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Neri, M

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine-induced cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension, thrombosis, myocardial dysfunction, cardiac dysrhythmias and endocarditis have received widespread attention in the context of cocaine abuse. The number of sudden deaths from cardiac causes, including myocardial infarction, ventricular tachyarrhythmia or aortic dissection, is also increasing. This manuscript will highlight the recent employment of study about cocaine cardiotoxicity and oxidative stress. Evidence has revealed that cardiac oxidative stress is a prominent early event of cocaine administration, which severely compromises the cardiac antioxidant cellular system and causes cardiac antioxidant cellular system injuries. Oxidative damage such as peroxidation of membrane phospholipids and depletion of nonenzymatic antioxidants such as glutathione have been found in the myocardium of chronic cocaine-treated animals and in patients. The data indicate that cocaine administration compromised the heart's antioxidant defense system. About the mechanisms involved in the cellular damage, the evidence that cocaine causes apoptosis in the heart comes from in vivo study. In animals model after short-term and long term-cocaine administration, the investigators demonstrates the role of Reactive Oxygen Species as a trigger of cardiac injury induced by cocaine. Cocaine also increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the heart, and apoptotic cells were predominantly found near inflammatory cells. The role of oxidative stress in cocaine-induced apoptosis in the heart is wide studied and documented. PMID:22856662

  5. A thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase rapidly eliminates cocaine from brain in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, L L; Nye, J A; Stehouwer, J S; Voll, R J; Mun, J; Narasimhan, D; Nichols, J; Sunahara, R; Goodman, M M; Carroll, F I; Woods, J H

    2014-01-01

    A long-acting, thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) has been identified that rapidly degrades cocaine with a K(M) of 1.33+0.085 μM. In vivo evaluation of CocE has shown protection against convulsant and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents, confirming the therapeutic potential of CocE against cocaine overdose. However, the current study is the first to evaluate the effects of CocE on cocaine brain levels. Positron emission tomogrpahy neuroimaging of [(11)C]cocaine was used to evaluate the time course of cocaine elimination from brain in the presence and absence of CocE in nonhuman primates. Systemic administration of CocE eliminated cocaine from the rhesus-monkey brain approximately three times faster than control conditions via peripheral actions through attenuating the input function from blood plasma. The efficiency of this process is sufficient to alleviate or prevent adverse central nervous system effects induced by cocaine. Although the present study used tracer doses of cocaine to access brain clearance, these findings further support the development of CocE for the treatment of acute cocaine toxicity. PMID:24984194

  6. Manipulating a "cocaine engram" in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, Hwa-Lin Liz; Epp, Jonathan R; van den Oever, Michel C; Yan, Chen; Rashid, Asim J; Insel, Nathan; Ye, Li; Niibori, Yosuke; Deisseroth, Karl; Frankland, Paul W; Josselyn, Sheena A

    2014-10-15

    Experience with drugs of abuse (such as cocaine) produces powerful, long-lasting memories that may be important in the development and persistence of drug addiction. The neural mechanisms that mediate how and where these cocaine memories are encoded, consolidated and stored are unknown. Here we used conditioned place preference in mice to examine the precise neural circuits that support the memory of a cocaine-cue association (the "cocaine memory trace" or "cocaine engram"). We found that a small population of neurons (∼10%) in the lateral nucleus of amygdala (LA) were recruited at the time of cocaine-conditioning to become part of this cocaine engram. Neurons with increased levels of the transcription factor CREB were preferentially recruited or allocated to the cocaine engram. Ablating or silencing neurons overexpressing CREB (but not a similar number of random LA neurons) before testing disrupted the expression of a previously acquired cocaine memory, suggesting that neurons overexpressing CREB become a critical hub in what is likely a larger cocaine memory engram. Consistent with theories that coordinated postencoding reactivation of neurons within an engram or cell assembly is crucial for memory consolidation (Marr, 1971; Buzsáki, 1989; Wilson and McNaughton, 1994; McClelland et al., 1995; Girardeau et al., 2009; Dupret et al., 2010; Carr et al., 2011), we also found that post-training suppression, or nondiscriminate activation, of CREB overexpressing neurons impaired consolidation of the cocaine memory. These findings reveal mechanisms underlying how and where drug memories are encoded and stored in the brain and may also inform the development of treatments for drug addiction.

  7. Activation of exchange protein activated by cAMP in the rat basolateral amygdala impairs reconsolidation of a memory associated with self-administered cocaine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Wan

    Full Text Available The intracellular mechanisms underlying memory reconsolidation critically involve cAMP signaling. These events were originally attributed to PKA activation by cAMP, but the identification of Exchange Protein Activated by cAMP (Epac, as a distinct mediator of cAMP signaling, suggests that cAMP-regulated processes that subserve memory reconsolidation are more complex. Here we investigated how activation of Epac with 8-pCPT-cAMP (8-CPT impacts reconsolidation of a memory that had been associated with cocaine self-administration. Rats were trained to lever press for cocaine on an FR-1 schedule, in which each cocaine delivery was paired with a tone+light cue. Lever pressing was then extinguished in the absence of cue presentations and cocaine delivery. Following the last day of extinction, rats were put in a novel context, in which the conditioned cue was presented to reactivate the cocaine-associated memory. Immediate bilateral infusions of 8-CPT into the basolateral amygdala (BLA following reactivation disrupted subsequent cue-induced reinstatement in a dose-dependent manner, and modestly reduced responding for conditioned reinforcement. When 8-CPT infusions were delayed for 3 hours after the cue reactivation session or were given after a cue extinction session, no effect on cue-induced reinstatement was observed. Co-administration of 8-CPT and the PKA activator 6-Bnz-cAMP (10 nmol/side rescued memory reconsolidation while 6-Bnz alone had no effect, suggesting an antagonizing interaction between the two cAMP signaling substrates. Taken together, these studies suggest that activation of Epac represents a parallel cAMP-dependent pathway that can inhibit reconsolidation of cocaine-cue memories and reduce the ability of the cue to produce reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior.

  8. Prolonged fever after Infliximab infusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer; Katz; Michael; Frank

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacologic management for ulcerative colitis (UC) has recently been expanded to include antitumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for severe disease. Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed again TNF α was first tested in patients with Crohn’s disease. In addition to serious infections, malignancy, drug induced lupus and other autoimmune diseases, serum sickness-like reactions, neurological disease, and infusion reactions further complicate the use of Infliximab. We report a case of prolonged fever after Infliximab infusion to treat steroid refractory UC.

  9. Familiar companions diminish cocaine conditioning and attenuate cocaine-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Wen-Yu; Cherng, Chian-Fang G; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Yu, Lung

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of companions on the rewarding effects of cocaine. Three cage mates, serving as companions, were housed with each experimental mouse throughout cocaine-place conditioning in a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm using conditioning doses of 10 and 20mg/kg. The presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP. At 20mg/kg, cocaine stimulated dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens as evidenced by a significant decrease in total (spontaneous and electrical stimulation-provoked) DA release in accumbal superfusate samples. The presence of companions prevented this cocaine-stimulated DA release; such a reduction in cocaine-induced DA release may account for the reduction in the magnitude of the CPP in the presence of the companions. Furthermore, cocaine pretreatment (2.5mg/kg) was found to prevent the companion-produced decreases in cocaine (10mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP as well as the cocaine (10mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Moreover, the presence of methamphetamine (MA) (1mg/kg)-treated companions decreased cocaine (20mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP and prevented the cocaine (20mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Finally, the presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP could not seem to be accounted for by cocaine-stimulated corticosterone (CORT) release. Taken together, these results indicate that familiar companions, regardless of their pharmacological status, may exert dampening effects on CPP induced by moderate to high conditioning doses of cocaine, at least in part, by preventing cocaine-stimulated DA release in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:27001454

  10. Cilioretinal artery occlusion following intranasal cocaine insufflations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Kannan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine is used to produce a euphoric effect by abusers, who may be unaware of the devastating systemic and ocular side effects of this drug. We describe the first known case of cilioretinal artery occlusion after intranasal cocaine abuse.

  11. Opiate and Cocaine Exposed Newborns: Growth Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Arlene M.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Royall, Richard; Kolodner, Ken; Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Lears, Mary Kathleen; Henderson, Robin; Belcher, Harolyn; Sellers, Sherri; Wilson, Modena

    1999-01-01

    Examines growth parameters at birth in 204 infants born to mothers who used cocaine and/or opiates during pregnancy. Outcome measures included birth weight, length, and head circumference. Study provides support that in utero cocaine exposure may confer more risk for somatic growth retardation at birth than opiate exposure. (Author/GCP)

  12. Osteonecrosis following alcohol, cocaine, and steroid use.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ziraldo, Laura

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol, steroids and cocaine have all been shown to be independent risk factors for osteonecrosis when taken in excess. Here we present a case of a young girl who developed debilitating osteonecrosis secondary to low doses of alcohol, steroids and cocaine. We feel it is important to highlight to those caring for such patients of the potential devastating complication of these three agents.

  13. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow response to a 5HT3 antagonist in early- and late-onset cocaine-dependent subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinoff, Bryon; Devous, Michael D; Williams, Mark J; Harris, Thomas S; Best, Susan E; Dong, Hongyun; Zielinski, Tanya

    2014-03-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5HT3) receptors are important modulators of mesostriatal dopaminergic transmission and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of cocaine reward, withdrawal and self-administration. In addition, the 5HT3 antagonist ondansetron is effective in treating early-onset, but not late-onset, alcohol-dependent subjects. To explore the role of 5HT3 receptor systems in cocaine addiction using functioning imaging, we administered ondansetron to 23 abstinent, treatment-seeking cocaine-addicted and 22 sex-, age- and race-matched healthy control participants. Differences between early- (first use before 20 years, n = 10) and late-onset (first use after 20 years, n = 10) cocaine-addicted subjects were also assessed. On two separate days, subjects were administered ondansetron (0.15 mg/kg intravenously over 15 minutes) or saline. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured following each infusion with single photon emission computed tomography. No significant rCBF differences between the cocaine-addicted and control participants were observed following ondansetron relative to saline. Early-onset subjects, however, showed increased (P cocaine-addicted subjects. Further clarification of these alterations may guide targeted treatment with serotonergic medications similar to those successfully used in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:22458709

  14. Repeated cocaine enhances ventral hippocampal-stimulated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens and alters ventral hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeffrey L.; Forster, Gina L.; Unterwald, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is important for various reward-related cognitive processes including reinforcement learning. Repeated cocaine enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and phasic elevations of accumbal dopamine evoked by unconditioned stimuli are dependent on impulse flow from the ventral hippocampus. Therefore, sensitized hippocampal activity may be one mechanism by which drugs of abuse enhance limbic dopaminergic activity. In the present study, in vivo microdialysis in freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to investigate the effect of repeated cocaine on ventral hippocampus-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens. Following seven daily injections of saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip), unilateral infusion of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA, 0.5 μg) into the ventral hippocampus transiently increased both motoric activity and ipsilateral dopamine efflux in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, and this effect was greater in rats that received repeated cocaine compared to controls that received repeated saline. In addition, repeated cocaine altered NMDA receptor subunit expression in the ventral hippocampus, reducing the NR2A:NR2B subunit ratio. Together, these results suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine produces maladaptive ventral hippocampal-nucleus accumbens communication, in part through changes in glutamate receptor composition. PMID:24832868

  15. Cues paired with either rapid or slower self-administered cocaine injections acquire similar conditioned rewarding properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Noël Samaha

    Full Text Available The faster drugs of abuse reach the brain, the more addictive they can be. It is not known why this is. Environmental stimuli associated with drugs can promote the development and persistence of addiction by invigorating and precipitating drug-seeking behaviour. We determined, therefore, whether cues associated with the self-administration of rapidly delivered cocaine (injected intravenously over 5 versus 90 seconds would acquire greater conditioned rewarding properties, as assessed by the performance of an operant response reinforced solely by the cues. Rats nose-poked for intravenous cocaine infusions delivered either over 5 or 90 seconds. Discrete visual cues accompanied each infusion. The rats could then press a lever to obtain the cues--now a conditioned reward--or an inactive lever. Rats in both the 5- and 90-second groups pressed more on the active versus inactive lever following extensive (24 sessions but not following limited (3 sessions self-administration training. There were no group differences in this behaviour. Following withdrawal from cocaine self-administration, lever discrimination progressively abated in both groups and was lost by withdrawal day 30. However, the rewarding properties of the cues were not "forgotten" because on withdrawal days 32-33, amphetamine selectively enhanced active-lever pressing, and did so to a similar extent in both groups. Thus, cues paired with rapid or slower cocaine delivery acquire similar conditioned rewarding properties. We conclude, therefore, that the rapid delivery of cocaine to the brain promotes addiction by mechanisms that might not involve a greater ability of drug cues to control behaviour.

  16. Increased Sensitivity to Cocaine Self-Administration in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats is Associated with Changes in Striatal Dopamine Transporter Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Pattison, Lindsey P; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2015-09-01

    Cocaine abuse in HIV patients accelerates the progression and severity of neuropathology, motor impairment and cognitive dysfunction compared to non-drug using HIV patients. Cocaine and HIV interact with the dopamine transporter (DAT); however, the effect of their interaction on DAT binding remains understudied. The present study compared the dose-response functions for intravenous self-administration of cocaine and heroin between male HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1 Tg) and Fischer 344 rats. The cocaine and heroin dose-response functions exhibit an inverted U-shape for both HIV-1 Tg and F344 rats. For cocaine, the number of infusions for each dose on the ascending limb was greater for HIV-1 Tg versus F344 rats. No significant changes in the heroin dose-response function were observed in HIV-1 Tg animals. Following the conclusion of self-administration experiments, DAT binding was assessed in striatal membranes. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125)I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) in rat striatal membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to a two-site binding model, allowing for calculation of dissociation constant (Kd) and binding density (Bmax) values that correspond to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Control HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a significantly greater affinity (i.e., decrease in Kd value) in the low-affinity DAT binding site compared to control F344 rats. Furthermore, cocaine self-administration in HIV-1 Tg rats increased low-affinity Kd (i.e., decreased affinity) compared to levels observed in control F344 rats. Cocaine also increased low-affinity Bmax in HIV-1 Tg rats as compared to controls, indicating an increase in the number of low-affinity DAT binding sites. F344 rats did not exhibit any change in high- or low-affinity Kd or Bmax values following cocaine or heroin self-administration. The increase in DAT affinity in cocaine HIV-1 Tg rats is consistent with the leftward shift of the

  17. Dopamine transporter inhibition is required for cocaine-induced stereotypy

    OpenAIRE

    Tilley, Michael R.; Gu, Howard H.

    2008-01-01

    The primary mechanism by which cocaine induces stereotypy has been difficult to discern because cocaine has three high affinity targets, the reuptake transporters for dopamine (DAT), norepinephrine, and serotonin. To dissect out the role of DAT in cocaine effects, we generated a knock-in mouse line with a cocaine insensitive DAT (DAT-CI mice). DAT-CI mice provide a powerful tool that can directly test whether DAT inhibition is important for cocaine-induced stereotypy. We found that acute coca...

  18. [Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and delayed puberty: differential diagnosis using the LH-RH-infusion test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierhapper, H

    1983-08-26

    Serum concentrations of LH and FSH were determined during an intravenous infusion of LH-RH (200 micrograms, t = 4 hours) in 8 patients (age: 15 to 20 years) with delayed sexual maturation and retarded bone age. Four patients who by clinical criteria were later recognized as suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) presented during the infusion of LH-RH with only a small response of LH (and, in three cases, of FSH). In 3 patients with HH a deficiency of endogenous LH-RH due to a hypothalamic defect was suggested by an enhanced secretion of LH and FSH during a second LH-RH infusion test performed after priming of the pituitary by pulsatile, subcutaneous infusions of LH-RH (50 micrograms/night for 9 consecutive nights). The fourth patient with HH, who suffered from a pituitary adenoma, failed to display this enhanced secretion of gonadotropins following pituitary priming by intermittent administration of LH-RH. As compared with the patients with HH, 4 patients in whom puberty, although delayed, later occurred spontaneously (pubertas tarda, PT), presented with a considerably more pronounced secretion of LH and FSH during the infusion of LH-RH, and priming by intermittent subcutaneous LH-RH failed to achieve further enhancement of the secretion of LH and FSH during a second infusion test in these patients. The intravenous infusion of LH-RH in combination with a protocol of pituitary priming offers a possibility of distinguishing patients with delayed puberty from those with various forms of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:6417915

  19. Dopamine D1/D5 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus are required for the acquisition and expression of a single trial cocaine-associated memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramar, Cecilia P; Barbano, M Flavia; Medina, Jorge H

    2014-12-01

    The role of the hippocampus in memory supporting associative learning between contexts and unconditioned stimuli is well documented. Hippocampal dopamine neurotransmission modulates synaptic plasticity and memory processing of fear-motivated and spatial learning tasks. Much less is known about the involvement of the hippocampus and its D1/D5 dopamine receptors in the acquisition, consolidation and expression of memories for drug-associated experiences, more particularly, in the processing of single pairing cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) training. To determine the temporal dynamics of cocaine CPP memory formation, we trained rats in a one-pairing CPP paradigm and tested them at different time intervals after conditioning. The cocaine-associated memory lasted 24 h but not 72 h. Then, we bilaterally infused the dorsal hippocampus with the GABA A receptor agonist muscimol or the D1/D5 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390 at different stages to evaluate the mechanisms involved in the acquisition, consolidation or expression of cocaine CPP memory. Blockade of D1/D5 dopamine receptors at the moment of training impaired the acquisition of cocaine CPP memories, without having any effect when administered immediately or 12 h after training. The expression of cocaine CPP memory was also affected by the administration of SCH 23390 at the moment of the test. Conversely, muscimol impaired the consolidation of cocaine CPP memory only when administered 12 h post conditioning. These findings suggests that dopaminergic inputs to the dorsal hippocampus are required for the acquisition and expression of one trial cocaine-associated memory while neural activity of this structure is required for the late consolidation of these types of memories. PMID:25452086

  20. Effects of imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands on the immobility, swimming and climbing in the forced swim test in rats following discontinuation of cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowska, Małgorzata; Gołda, Anna; Wydra, Karolina; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-02-10

    We tested if discontinuation of cocaine self-administration can lead to the development of depressive-like symptoms in the forced swim test expressed as changes in immobility, swimming and climbing behaviors in rats. A "yoked" procedure in which rats were run simultaneously in groups of three, with two rats received the passive injection of cocaine or saline, was employed. Later, we examined whether acute treatment with the classical antidepressant imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands could alter the increases in immobility recorded after discontinuation of self-administered cocaine. We found a significant increase (44%) in the immobility time 3 days following discontinuation of cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion/2h daily) self-administration for 14 days; such enhancement resembled that observed in rats following the chronic mild stress. Acute administration with imipramine (15 or 30 mg/kg), the GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen (0.125 mg/kg) and SKF 97541 (0.005 mg/kg), the positive allosteric modulator CGP 7930 (0.3mg/kg) or the antagonist SCH 50911 (0.3mg/kg) counteracted the cocaine discontinuation-induced enhancement in the immobility time. The enhanced immobility time in rats that self-administered cocaine (but not given cocaine passively) may reflect the motivated or cognitive processes of reinforced responding of cocaine and could be a potential driver of the addiction process per se. Moreover, either blockade or stimulation of GABA(B) receptors by their ligands in very low doses attenuated the enhanced immobility time in rats after discontinuation of cocaine self-administration and these findings extend preclinical studies demonstrating the potential involvement of GABA(B) receptor ligands to reduce cocaine craving.

  1. Inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 suppresses cocaine seeking by generating THP, a cocaine use–dependent inhibitor of dopamine synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Lina; Fan, Peidong; Arolfo, Maria; Jiang, Zhang; Olive, M. Foster; Zablocki, Jeff; Sun, Hai-Ling; Chu, Nancy; Lee, Jeongrim; Kim, Hee-Yong; Leung, Kwan; Shryock, John; Blackburn, Brent; Diamond, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    There is no effective treatment for cocaine addiction despite extensive knowledge of the neurobiology of drug addiction1–4. Here we show that a selective aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH-2) inhibitor, ALDH2i, suppresses cocaine self-administration in rats and prevents cocaine- or cue-induced reinstatement in a rat model of cocaine relapse-like behavior. We also identify a molecular mechanism by which ALDH-2 inhibition reduces cocaine-seeking behavior: increases in tetrahydropapaveroline (THP) f...

  2. [{sup 11}]Cocaine: PET studies of cocaine pharmacokinetics, dopamine transporter availability and dopamine transporter occupancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Joanna S. E-mail: fowler@bnl.gov; Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Gatley, S. John; Logan, Jean

    2001-07-01

    Cocaine was initially labeled with carbon-11 in order to track the distribution and pharmacokinetics of this powerful stimulant and drug of abuse in the human brain and body. It was soon discovered that [{sup 11}C]cocaine was not only useful for measuring cocaine pharmacokinetics and its relationship to behavior but that it is also a sensitive radiotracer for dopamine transporter (DAT) availability. Measures of DAT availability were facilitated by the development of a graphical analysis method (Logan Plot) for reversible systems which streamlined kinetic analysis. This expanded the applications of [{sup 11}C]cocaine to studies of DAT availability in the human brain and allowed the first comparative measures of the degree of DAT occupancy by cocaine and another stimulant drug methylphenidate. This article will summarize preclinical and clinical research with [{sup 11}C]cocaine.

  3. Cocaine, Marijuana, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Ghadiani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine is used by more than 14 million people worldwide, about 0.3 percent of the global population age is 15 to 64 years. After alcohol, cocaine is the most common cause of acute drug-related emergency department visits in the United States. Cocaine consumption is more frequently associated with acute cardiovascular illness.  Cocaine stimulates α1, α2, β1 and β2 adrenergic receptors through increased levels of norepinephrine and a lesser extent epinephrine. The cardiovascular effects of cocaine are thought to be similar and regardless to the route of consumption. An acute coronary syndrome is the most common cardiac problem including myocardial ischemia and infarction even in young persons without atherosclerosis, aortic dissection and rupture, arrhythmias, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, asystole and finally sudden death. Other cardiovascular effects that caused by cocaine include coronary artery aneurysm, palpitation, sinus tachycardia, increased systemic vascular resistance and hypertension crisis, left ventricular hypertrophy, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, myocardial fibrosis, bundle branch block, heart block, supraventricular arrhythmia, accelerated atherosclerosis, hypotension, bradycardia and infective endocarditis  among intravenous users.Cocaine by three mechanisms cause ischemia: 1. increased myocardial oxygen demand, 2. decreased coronary blood flow due to coronary artery vasoconstriction and spasm and 3. Coronary artery thrombosis via activation of platelets, stimulation of platelet aggregation and potentiation of thromboxane production.

  4. Oral fluid cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations following controlled intravenous cocaine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; Concheiro, Marta; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    Limited oral fluid (OF) pharmacokinetic data collected with commercially available collection devices after controlled cocaine administration hinder OF result interpretations. Ten cocaine-using adults provided OF, collected with Oral-Eze(®) (OE) and StatSure Saliva Sampler™ (SS) devices, an hour prior to and up to 69 h after 25mg intravenous (IV) cocaine administration. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BE) were quantified by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Large inter-subject variability was observed. Cocaine was detected in OF in the first 0.17 h sample after IV administration, with much more rapid elimination than BE. OE observed Cmax median (range) concentrations were 932 (394-1574)μg/L for cocaine and 248 (96.9-953)μg/L for BE. SS observed cocaine and BE Cmax median (range) concentrations trended lower at 732 (83.3-1892)μg/L and 360 (77.2-836)μg/L, respectively. OE and SS cocaine OF detection times were 12.5 and 6.5h and for BE 30.5 and 28.0 h, respectively at 1 μg/L. There were no significant pharmacokinetic differences between OE and SS OF collection devices, except cocaine half-life was significantly shorter in SS OF specimens. This difference could be attributed to differences in stabilizing buffers present in OF collection devices, which may affect cocaine stability in OF specimens, or decreased recovery from collection pads. Both OE and SS OF collection devices were effective in monitoring cocaine and metabolite concentrations with similar detection windows. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different confirmatory OF cutoffs can be selected to produce shorter or longer cocaine and metabolite detection windows to address specific needs of clinical and forensic drug testing programs. PMID:26851651

  5. Functional Consequences of Cocaine Re-exposure after Discontinuation of Cocaine Availability

    OpenAIRE

    Beveridge, Thomas J.R.; Smith, Hilary R.; Nader, Susan H.; Nader, Michael A.; Porrino, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine users exhibit a wide range of behavioral impairments accompanied by brain structural, neurochemical and functional abnormalities. Metabolic mapping studies in cocaine users and animal models have shown extensive functional alterations throughout the striatum, limbic system, and cortex. Few studies, however, have evaluated the persistence of these effects following cessation of cocaine availability. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to assess the functional effects of re-exposu...

  6. Methylphenidate Attenuates Limbic Brain Inhibition after Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Cocaine Abusers

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, Nora D.; Gene-Jack Wang; Dardo Tomasi; Frank Telang; Fowler, Joanna S.; Kith Pradhan; Millard Jayne; Jean Logan; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Nelly Alia-Klein; Christopher Wong

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine (phasic release) is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate) on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function) was measured with PET and...

  7. Abolished cocaine reward in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Rong; Tilley, Michael R.; Wei, Hua; Zhou, Fuwen; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Ching, San; Quan, Ning; Stephens, Robert L.; Hill, Erik R.; Nottoli, Timothy; Han, Dawn D; Gu, Howard H.

    2006-01-01

    There are three known high-affinity targets for cocaine: the dopamine transporter (DAT), the serotonin transporter (SERT), and the norepinephrine transporter (NET). Decades of studies support the dopamine (DA) hypothesis that the blockade of DAT and the subsequent increase in extracellular DA primarily mediate cocaine reward and reinforcement. Contrary to expectations, DAT knockout (DAT-KO) mice and SERT or NET knockout mice still self-administer cocaine and/or display conditioned place prefe...

  8. Daily Stressor Sensitivity, Abuse Effects, And Cocaine Use In Cocaine Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Waldrop, Angela E.; Back, Sudie E.; Brady, Kathleen T.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.; McRae, Aimee L.; Saladin, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    This study highlights respondent sensitivity to daily hassles as it relates to situational cocaine use and perceived long-term effects of adverse events in childhood. Data were drawn from a larger study on stress reactivity in cocaine dependent individuals. Participants (n=104) were cocaine dependent men and women without comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They completed the Early Trauma Inventory (ETI), the Daily Hassles Scale (DHS), the Inventory of Drug-Taking Situations (IDTS)...

  9. Cocaine-associated lower limb ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Chris G

    2011-07-25

    Cocaine-associated thrombosis has been reported in the literature with reports of vascular injuries to cardiac, pulmonary, intestinal, placental, and musculoskeletal vessels; however, injury of the pedal vessels is rare. We report on a 31-year-old man who presented 2 months following a cocaine binge with limb-threatening ischemia without an otherwise identifiable embolic source. Angiography confirmed extensive occlusive disease of the tibioperoneal vessels. The patient improved following therapy with heparin and a prostacyclin analogue. Cocaine-induced thrombosis should be considered in patients presenting with acute arterial insufficiency in the lower limb without any other identifiable cause.

  10. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction induced by cocaine and cocaine plus morphine in brain and liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Silva, Lisbeth; Silva, Ana Maria; Moreno, António J; Oliveira, Catarina R; Santos, Maria S

    2013-06-01

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are affected in brains of human cocaine abusers. Cocaine is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac and hepatic tissues, but its effects on brain bioenergetics are less documented. Furthermore, the combination of cocaine and opioids (speedball) was also shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work, we compared the effects of cocaine and/or morphine on the bioenergetics of isolated brain and liver mitochondria, to understand their specific effects in each tissue. Upon energization with complex I substrates, cocaine decreased state-3 respiration in brain (but not in liver) mitochondria and decreased uncoupled respiration and mitochondrial potential in both tissues, through a direct effect on complex I. Morphine presented only slight effects on brain and liver mitochondria, and the combination cocaine+morphine had similar effects to cocaine alone, except for a greater decrease in state-3 respiration. Brain and liver mitochondrial respirations were differentially affected, and liver mitochondria were more prone to proton leak caused by the drugs or their combination. This was possibly related with a different dependence on complex I in mitochondrial populations from these tissues. In summary, cocaine and cocaine+morphine induce mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in isolated brain and liver mitochondria, with specific effects in each tissue. PMID:23542814

  11. Novelty seeking, incentive salience and acquisition of cocaine self-administration in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Joshua S; Marusich, Julie A; Gipson, Cassandra D; Bardo, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that incentive salience plays a major role in drug abuse and the development of addiction. Additionally, novelty seeking has been identified as a significant risk factor for drug abuse. However, how differences in the readiness to attribute incentive salience relate to novelty seeking and drug abuse vulnerability has not been explored. The present experiments examined how individual differences in incentive salience attribution relate to novelty seeking and acquisition of cocaine self-administration in a preclinical model. Rats were first assessed in an inescapable novelty task and a novelty place preference task (measures of novelty seeking), followed by a Pavlovian conditioned approach task for food (a measure of incentive salience attribution). Rats then were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg/infusion) using an autoshaping procedure. The results demonstrate that animals that attributed incentive salience to a food-associated cue were higher novelty seekers and acquired cocaine self-administration more quickly at the lower dose. The results suggest that novelty-seeking behavior may be a mediator of incentive salience attribution and that incentive salience magnitude may be an indicator of drug reward.

  12. Infusion of radionuclides throughout pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of a long-term study to examine the cancer incidence in the offspring of mice exposed to 239Pu or 147Pm throughout pregnancy. The need to model the human intake scenario and the possibility of a critical period during uterine development necessitates constant availability of radionuclides throughout pregnancy. Various methods (multiple daily injections, infusion by external cannula and infusion by indwelling osmotic pump) have been examined and osmotic infusion pumps chosen. These pumps result in a near-constant blood concentration for up to 21 days. Part of the study is the estimation of dose to the critical haemopoietic tissues of the pup from a knowledge of the radionuclide distribution and kinetics. At present the distribution has been followed from birth to 180 days. Activity in the suckling pups at 7 days old is around 1 percent of the infused activity, though most of this is accounted for by the contents of the stomach and gastrointestinal tract. The liver and femur account for around 0.025 percent and 0.012 percent respectively per pup. Activity increases in both liver and femur during lactation after which both concentration and activity fall with time. Long-term studies with the pups of dams exposed to a range of 239Pu concentrations between 0-70 kBq/kg are underway. Correlation of average organ dose with tumour incidence will be determined at completion of the life-span study. (Author) 39 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  13. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infantile Psychomotor Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on child development outcomes were studied prospectively in an obstetric unit of a large US urban teaching hospital at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.

  14. Recurrent encephalic hemorrhage associated with cocaine abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage secondary to cocaine abuse in a patient with no other predisposing factors. The hemorrhages were located both supra- and infratentorially. (orig.)

  15. Impaired inhibitory control in recreational cocaine users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza S Colzato

    Full Text Available Chronic use of cocaine is associated with impairment in response inhibition but it is an open question whether and to which degree findings from chronic users generalize to the upcoming type of recreational users. This study compared the ability to inhibit and execute behavioral responses in adult recreational users and in a cocaine-free-matched sample controlled for age, race, gender distribution, level of intelligence, and alcohol consumption. Response inhibition and response execution were measured by a stop-signal paradigm. Results show that users and non users are comparable in terms of response execution but users need significantly more time to inhibit responses to stop-signals than non users. Interestingly, the magnitude of the inhibitory deficit was positively correlated with the individuals lifetime cocaine exposure suggesting that the magnitude of the impairment is proportional to the degree of cocaine consumed.

  16. Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopamine (phasic release) is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate) on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function) was measured with PET and 18FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes) and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg). The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68%) and with methylphenidate (64%). In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005) in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens) and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005), amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05). This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes), which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes) that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue-induced limbic inhibition

  17. Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.; Fowler, J.S.; Pradhan, K.; Jayne, M.; Logan, J.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2010-07-01

    Dopamine (phasic release) is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate) on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function) was measured with PET and {sup 18}FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes) and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg). The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68%) and with methylphenidate (64%). In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005) in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens) and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005), amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05). This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes), which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes) that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue

  18. Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora D Volkow

    Full Text Available Dopamine (phasic release is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function was measured with PET and (18FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg. The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68% and with methylphenidate (64%. In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005 in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005, amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05. This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes, which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue-induced limbic

  19. Positron emitting tracers for studies of cocaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of PET to study the behavior and mechanism of action of therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse can be approached from a number of perspectives. The most common approach is to measure the effect of a drug on some aspect of metabolism and requires well characterized radiotracers whose behavior in vivo can be related to a discrete biochemical transformation. A second approach is to study the labeled drug itself. This provides information on the drug's regional distribution and kinetics as well as its pharmacological profile and metabolism. Cocaine has been labeled in different positions with carbon-11 and with fluorine-18 and the stereoisomers of cocaine have also been labeled to characterize its binding and metabolism in human and baboon brain. Regional cocaine binding as measured by PET is consistent with reversible binding to striatal dopamine reuptake sites and its time course parallels the behavioral activation of cocaine. The behaviorally inactive enantiomer (+)-cocaine is rapidly metabolized in serum preventing its entry into the brain. These PET tracers are useful in understanding the neurochemical basis of cocaine's action

  20. Adenovirus Capsid-Based Anti-Cocaine Vaccine Prevents Cocaine from Binding to the Nonhuman Primate CNS Dopamine Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Maoz, Anat; Hicks, Martin J.; Vallabhjosula, Shankar; Synan, Michael; Kothari, Paresh J; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Ballon, Douglas J.; KaMinSky, Stephen M.; De, Bishnu P.; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Martinez, Diana; Koob, George F.; Kim D. Janda; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major problem for which there is no approved pharmacotherapy. We have developed a vaccine to cocaine (dAd5GNE), based on the cocaine analog GNE linked to the capsid proteins of a serotype 5 adenovirus, designed to evoke anti-cocaine antibodies that sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to the CNS. To assess the efficacy of dAd5GNE in a large animal model, positron emission tomography (PET) and the radiotracer [11C]PE2I were used to measure cocaine occupancy ...

  1. Cardiovascular effects of cocaine: cellular, ionic and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, E; Bello, S; Neri, M; Pomara, C; Riezzo, I; Fineschi, V

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused drug responsible for the majority of deaths ascribed to drug overdose. Many mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain the various cocaine associated cardiovascular complications. Conventionally, cocaine cardiotoxicity has been thought to be mediated indirectly through its sympathomimetic effect, i.e., by inhibiting the reuptake and thus increasing the levels of neuronal catecholamines at work on adrenoceptors. Increased oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, and cocaine-induced apoptosis in the heart muscle have suggested a new way to understand the cardiotoxic effects of cocaine. More recent studies have led the attention to the interaction of cocaine and some metabolites with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The current paper is aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of cocaine cardiotoxicity which have a specific clinical and forensic interest. From a clinical point of view the full knowledge of the exact mechanisms by which cocaine exerts cardio - vascular damage is essential to identify potential therapeutic targets and improve novel strategies for cocaine related cardiovascular diseases. From a forensic point of view, it is to be underlined that cocaine use is often associated to sudden death in young, otherwise healthy individuals. While such events are widely reported, the relationship between cardiac morphological alterations and molecular/cellular mechanisms is still controversial. In conclusion, the study of cocaine cardiovascular toxicity needs a strict collaboration between clinicians and pathologists which may be very effective in further dissecting the mechanisms underlying cocaine cardiotoxicity and understanding the cardiac cocaine connection. PMID:22856657

  2. Prolonged withdrawal following cocaine self-administration increases resistance to punishment in a cocaine binge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancarz-Kausch, Amy M.; Adank, Danielle N.; Dietz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by compulsive drug-taking behaviors and a high propensity to relapse following drug cessation. Drug craving and seeking can increase during a period of abstinence, but this phenomenon is not observed in drug-induced reinstatement models. To investigate the effect of withdrawal on cocaine relapse, rats were exposed to extended-access cocaine self-administration and subjected to either 1 or 30 d of withdrawal. When tested during 12 h unlimited access to cocaine (binge), the duration of the withdrawal did not influence cocaine intake. However, using a histamine punishment procedure that greatly suppresses drug-taking behavior, we demonstrate that longer periods of abstinence from cocaine induce a greater persistence in responding for drug in the face of negative consequences. PMID:25363133

  3. Changes in endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain structures following cocaine self-administration and extinction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrowska, Beata; Smaga, Irena; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-04-01

    Preclinical investigations have demonstrated that drugs of abuse alter the levels of lipid-based signalling molecules, including endocannabinoids (eCBs) and N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), in the rodent brain. In addition, several drugs targeting eCBs and/or NAEs are implicated in reward and/or seeking behaviours related to the stimulation of dopamine systems in the brain. In our study, the brain levels of eCBs (anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)) and NAEs (oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA)) were analyzed via an LC-MS/MS method in selected brain structures of rats during cocaine self-administration and after extinction training according to the "yoked" control procedure. Repeated (14days) cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion) self-administration and yoked drug delivery resulted in a significant decrease (ca. 52%) in AEA levels in the cerebellum, whereas levels of 2-AG increased in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the cerebellum and decreased in the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. In addition, we detected increases (>150%) in the levels of OEA and PEA in the limbic areas in both cocaine treated groups, as well as an increase in the tissue levels of OEA in the dorsal striatum in only the yoked cocaine group and increases in the tissue levels of PEA in the dorsal striatum (both cocaine groups) and the nucleus accumbens (yoked cocaine group only). Compared to the yoked saline control group, extinction training (10days) resulted in a potent reduction in AEA levels in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the nucleus accumbens and in 2-AG levels in the hippocampus, the dorsal striatum and the cerebellum. The decreases in the limbic and subcortical areas were more apparent for rats that self-administered cocaine. Following extinction, there was a region-specific change in the levels of NAEs in rats previously injected with cocaine; a potent increase (ca. 100%) in the levels of OEA and PEA was detected in the prefrontal cortex and the

  4. Pharmacological modulation of lateral habenular dopamine D2 receptors alters the anxiogenic response to cocaine in a runway model of drug self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Kerisa; Bogyo, Kelsie; Schick, Tinisha; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine has long been known to produce an initial "high" followed by an aversive/anxiogenic "crash". While much is known about the neurobiology of cocaine's positive/rewarding effects, the mechanisms that give rise to the drug's negative/anxiogenic actions remain unclear. Recent research has implicated the lateral habenula (LHb) in the encoding of aversive events including the anxiogenic response to cocaine. Of particular interest in this regard are the reciprocal connections between the LHb and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA-DA neurons innervate different subsets of LHb cells that in turn feedback upon and modulate VTA neuronal activity. Here we examined the impact of D2 receptor activation and inhibition on the anxiogenic response to cocaine using a runway model of self-administration that is sensitive to the dual and opposing effects of the drug. Male rats ran a straight alley for IV cocaine (1.0mg/kg) following bilateral intra-LHb infusions of the D2 receptor antagonist, cis-flupenthixol (0, 7.5 or 15μg/side) or the D2 agonist, sumanirole (0, 5 or 10μg/side). Vehicle-pretreated controls developed approach-avoidance conflict behaviors about goal-box entry reflective of the dual positive and negative effects of cocaine. These behaviors were significantly diminished during LHb-D2 receptor antagonism and increased by the LHb D2 receptor agonist. These results demonstrate that activity at the D2 receptor in the lateral habenula serves to modulate the anxiogenic response to cocaine. PMID:27155504

  5. Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the ... Health Effects Statistics and Trends Swipe left or right to scroll. Monitoring the Future Study: Trends in ...

  6. Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Substances Act DEA Museum and Visitors Center Doing Business with DEA Drug Disposal Employee Assistance Program Extortion Scam Alert For Victims of Crime How do I...? National Clandestine Laboratory Register Registration ...

  7. Temporal Pattern of Cocaine Intake Determines Tolerance vs Sensitization of Cocaine Effects at the Dopamine Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Roberts, David CS; Jones, Sara R

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is responsible for terminating dopamine (DA) signaling and is the primary site of cocaine's reinforcing actions. Cocaine self-administration has been shown previously to result in changes in cocaine potency at the DAT. To determine whether the DAT changes associated with self-administration are due to differences in intake levels or temporal patterns of cocaine-induced DAT inhibition, we manipulated cocaine access to produce either continuous or intermittent elevations in cocaine brain levels. Long-access (LgA, 6 h) and short-access (ShA, 2 h) continuous self-administration produced similar temporal profiles of cocaine intake that were sustained throughout the session; however, LgA had greater intake. ShA and intermittent-access (IntA, 6 h) produced the same intake, but different temporal profiles, with ‘spiking' brain levels in IntA compared with constant levels in ShA. IntA consisted of 5-min access periods alternating with 25-min timeouts, which resulted in bursts of high responding followed by periods of no responding. DA release and uptake, as well as the potency of cocaine for DAT inhibition, were assessed by voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens slices following control, IntA, ShA, and LgA self-administration. Continuous-access protocols (LgA and ShA) did not change DA parameters, but the ‘spiking' protocol (IntA) increased both release and uptake of DA. In addition, high continuous intake (LgA) produced tolerance to cocaine, while ‘spiking' (IntA) produced sensitization, relative to ShA and naive controls. Thus, intake and pattern can both influence cocaine potency, and tolerance seems to be produced by high intake, while sensitization is produced by intermittent temporal patterns of intake. PMID:23719505

  8. A randomised controlled trial of two infusion rates to decrease reactions to antivenom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Isbister

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Snake envenoming is a major clinical problem in Sri Lanka, with an estimated 40,000 bites annually. Antivenom is only available from India and there is a high rate of systemic hypersensitivity reactions. This study aimed to investigate whether the rate of infusion of antivenom reduced the frequency of severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This was a randomized comparison trial of two infusion rates of antivenom for treatment of non-pregnant adult patients (>14 y with snake envenoming in Sri Lanka. Snake identification was by patient or hospital examination of dead snakes when available and confirmed by enzyme-immunoassay for Russell's viper envenoming. Patients were blindly allocated in a 11 randomisation schedule to receive antivenom either as a 20 minute infusion (rapid or a two hour infusion (slow. The primary outcome was the proportion with severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions (grade 3 by Brown grading system within 4 hours of commencement of antivenom. Secondary outcomes included the proportion with mild/moderate hypersensitivity reactions and repeat antivenom doses. Of 1004 patients with suspected snakebites, 247 patients received antivenom. 49 patients were excluded or not recruited leaving 104 patients allocated to the rapid antivenom infusion and 94 to the slow antivenom infusion. The median actual duration of antivenom infusion in the rapid group was 20 min (Interquartile range[IQR]:20-25 min versus 120 min (IQR:75-120 min in the slow group. There was no difference in severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions between those given rapid and slow infusions (32% vs. 35%; difference 3%; 95%CI:-10% to +17%;p = 0.65. The frequency of mild/moderate reactions was also similar. Similar numbers of patients in each arm received further doses of antivenom (30/104 vs. 23/94. CONCLUSIONS: A slower infusion rate would not reduce the rate of severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions from current high

  9. Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopamine system and cocaine addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, M J; Kalivas, P.W.; Shaham, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The main characteristics of cocaine addiction are compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences and high rates of relapse during periods of abstinence. A current popular hypothesis is that compulsive cocaine use and cocaine relapse is due to drug-induced neuroadaptations in reward-related learning and memory processes, which cause hypersensitivity to cocaine-associated cues, impulsive decision making and abnormal habit-like learned behaviours that are insensitive to adverse consequences. H...

  10. Cocaine facilitates glutamatergic transmission and activates lateral habenular neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Wanhong; Chen, Lixin; WANG, Liwei; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine administration can be both rewarding and aversive. While much effort has gone to investigating the rewarding effect, the mechanisms underlying cocaine-induced aversion remain murky. There is increasing evidence that the lateral habenula (LHb), a small epithalamic structure, plays a critical role in the aversive responses of many addictive drugs including cocaine. However, the effects of cocaine on LHb neurons are not well explored. Here we show that, in acute brain slices from rats, c...

  11. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez; Lifen eZhang; Fuwen eZhou; Suzhen eGong; Howard eGu; Mariella eDe Biasi; Fu-Ming eZhou; Dani, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit...

  12. Mice lacking neuropeptide Y show increased sensitivity to cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing data implicating neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the neurobiology of addiction. This study explored the possible role of NPY in cocaine-induced behavior using NPY knockout mice. The transgenic mice showed a hypersensitive response to cocaine in three animal models of cocaine addiction...

  13. Neural circuit competition in cocaine-seeking: Roles of the infralimbic cortex and nucleus accumbens shell

    OpenAIRE

    LaLumiere, Ryan T.; Smith, Kyle C.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Following cocaine self-administration and extinction training, activity in the infralimbic cortex (IL) suppresses cocaine-seeking behavior. IL inactivation induces cocaine-seeking, whereas activation suppresses cocaine-reinstated drug-seeking. We asked how the suppression of cocaine-seeking induced by IL activation integrates with the circuitry promoting reinstated cocaine-seeking. Following cocaine self-administration and extinction training, rats underwent cue-induced reinstatement. In orde...

  14. AAVrh.10-Mediated Expression of an Anti-Cocaine Antibody Mediates Persistent Passive Immunization That Suppresses Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Hicks, Martin J.; De, Bishnu P.; Pagovich, Odelya; Frenk, Esther; Kim D. Janda; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F.; Hackett, Neil R.; KaMinSky, Stephen M.; Worgall, Stefan; Tignor, Nicole; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major problem affecting all societal and economic classes for which there is no effective therapy. We hypothesized an effective anti-cocaine vaccine could be developed by using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector as the delivery vehicle to persistently express an anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody in vivo, which would sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to cognate receptors in the brain. To accomplish this, we constructed AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab...

  15. Modification of pharmacokinetic and abuse-related effects of cocaine by human-derived cocaine hydrolase in monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Schindler, Charles W.; Justinova, Zuzana; LaFleur, David; Woods, Doug; Roschke, Viktor; Hallak, Hussein; Sklair-Tavron, Liora; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Yasar, Sevil; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Although substantial research effort has focused on developing pharmacological treatments for cocaine abuse, no effective medications have been developed. Recent studies show that enzymes that metabolize cocaine in the periphery, forestalling its entry into the brain, can prevent cocaine toxicity and its behavioral effects in rodents. Here we report on effects of one such enzyme (Albu-CocH) on the pharmacokinetic and behavioral effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. Albu-CocH was developed f...

  16. A Cocaine Hydrolase Engineered from Human Butyrylcholinesterase Selectively Blocks Cocaine Toxicity and Reinstatement of Drug Seeking in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Anker, Justin J.; Gliddon, Luke A.; LaFleur, David; Shah, R.; Zhao, Qinghai; Singh, M; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2008-01-01

    Successive rational mutations of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) followed by fusion to human serum albumin have yielded an efficient hydrolase that offers realistic options for therapy of cocaine overdose and abuse. This albumin-BChE prevented seizures in rats given a normally lethal cocaine injection (100 mg/kg, i.p.), lowered brain cocaine levels even when administered after the drug, and provided rescue after convulsions commenced. Moreover, it selectively blocked cocaine-induced reinst...

  17. Ventral tegmental glutamate: A role in stress-, cue-, and cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Roy A.

    2008-01-01

    Ventral tegmental dopamine neurons are activated by primary rewards and, when such rewards are predictabale, by reward-predicting stimuli. Glutamatergic input to the ventral tegmental area contributes to this activation: in animals trained to self-administer cocaine, cocaine predictive cues trigger ventral tegmental glutamate release and dopaminergic activation. Mild footshock stress similarly causes glutamate release and dopaminergic activation in cocaine-trained but not cocaine-naïve animal...

  18. The Inhibition Of Cocaine-Induced Locomotor Activity By CART 55-102 Is Lost After Repeated Cocaine Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Job, Martin O.; Shen, Li L; Kuhar, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    CART peptide is known for having an inhibitory effect on cocaine- and dopamine-mediated actions after acute administration of cocaine and dopamine. In this regard, it is postulated to be a homeostatic, regulatory factor on dopaminergic activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, there is no data on the effect of CART peptide after chronic administration of cocaine, and this study addresses this. It was found that CART peptide blunted cocaine-induced locomotion (LMA) after acute administ...

  19. Low and High Locomotor Responsiveness to Cocaine Predicts Intravenous Cocaine Conditioned Place Preference in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Richard M.; Everett, Carson V.; Nelson, Anna M.; Gulley, Joshua M.; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2006-01-01

    Outbred, male Sprague-Dawley rats can be classified as either low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively) based on cocaine-induced locomotor activity in an open-field arena. This difference reflects cocaine’s ability to inhibit the striatal dopamine transporter and predicts development of sensitization. To investigate the relationship between initial cocaine locomotor responsiveness and cocaine reward, here we first classified rats as either LCRs or HCRs in a conditioned place...

  20. Pharmacokinetics of continuous-infusion meropenem for the treatment of Serratia marcescens ventriculitis in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cies, Jeffrey J; Moore, Wayne S; Calaman, Sharon; Brown, Melandee; Narayan, Prithvi; Parker, Jason; Chopra, Arun

    2015-04-01

    Neither guidelines nor best practices for the treatment of external ventricular drain (EVD) and ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections exist. An antimicrobial regimen with a broad spectrum of activity and adequate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration is vital in the management of both EVD and ventriculoperitoneal infections. In this case report, we describe the pharmacokinetics of continuous-infusion meropenem for a 2-year-old girl with Serratia marcescens ventriculitis. A right frontal EVD was placed for the management of a posterior fossa mass with hydrocephalus and intraventricular hemorrhage. On hospital day 6, CSF specimens were cultured, which identified a pan-sensitive Serratia marcescens with an initial cefotaxime minimum inhibitory concentration of 1 μg/ml or less. The patient was treated with cefotaxime monotherapy from hospital days 6 to 17, during which her CSF cultures and Gram's stain remained positive. On hospital day 26, Serratia marcescens was noted to be resistant to cefotaxime (minimum inhibitory concentration > 16 μg/ml), and the antimicrobial regimen was ultimately changed to meropenem and amikacin. Meropenem was dosed at 40 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 6 hours, infused over 30 minutes, during which, simultaneous serum and CSF meropenem levels were measured. Meropenem serum and CSF levels were measured at 2 and 4 hours from the end of the infusion with the intent to perform a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis. The resulting serum meropenem levels were 12 μg/ml at 2 hours and "undetectable" at 4 hours, with CSF levels of 1 and 0.5 μg/ml at 2 and 4 hours, respectively. On hospital day 27, the meropenem regimen was changed to a continuous infusion of 200 mg/kg/day, with repeat serum and CSF meropenem levels measured on hospital day 33. The serum and CSF levels were noted to be 13 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The serum level of 13 μg/ml corresponds to an estimated meropenem clearance from the serum of 10.2 ml/kg/minute. Repeat

  1. Gambling Problems Among Community Cocaine Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Magali; Nguyen, Noël; Bertrand, Karine; Perreault, Michel; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Morvannou, Adèle; Bruneau, Julie; Berbiche, Djamal; Roy, Élise

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine use is highly prevalent and a major public health problem. While some studies have reported frequent comorbidity problems among cocaine users, few studies have included evaluation of gambling problems. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of gambling problems and compare those who were at-risk gamblers with non-problem gamblers in terms of mental health problems, substance use problems, and some risk factors (i.e. family antecedents, erroneous perceptions and coping strategies) among individuals who smoke or inject cocaine. A total of 424 smoked or injected cocaine users recruited through community-based programs in Montreal (Quebec) completed the questionnaire, including the Canadian Pathological Gambling Index, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, the CAGE, and the Severity Dependence Scale. Of the sample, 18.4 % were considered at-risk gamblers, of whom 7.8 % had problems gambling and 10.6 % were moderate-risk gamblers. The at-risk group was more likely to have experienced a recent phobic disorder and alcohol problems than the non-problem group. A multivariate analysis showed that, compared to those who were non-problem gamblers, the at-risk ones were more likely to have lost a large sum of money when they first started gambling, believed that their luck would turn, and gambled in reaction to painful life events. These results indicate the need to include routines for screening to identify gambling problem among cocaine users. PMID:26983825

  2. Reduced metabolism in brain "control networks" following cocaine-cues exposure in female cocaine abusers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora D Volkow

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. METHOD: To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and ¹⁸FDG between female (n = 10 and male (n = 16 active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes versus a cocaine-cues video. RESULTS: Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05; females significantly decreased metabolism (-8.6%±10 whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5%±18. SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001 whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45 (only at p<0.005. The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001 in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10, anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32, posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31, inferior parietal (BA 40 and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus. CONCLUSIONS: Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from "control networks" (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition. This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction.

  3. Reduced Metabolism in Brain 'Control Networks' Following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and 18FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05); females significantly decreased metabolism (-8.6% ± 10) whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5% ± 18). SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral) in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001) whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45) (only at p<0.005). The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001) in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10), anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32), posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31), inferior parietal (BA 40) and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus). Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from 'control networks' (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus) in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition). This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction.

  4. Elevated expression of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in the rat ventral tegmental area enhances vulnerability to the behavioral effects of cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Herin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine mesocorticoaccumbens pathway which originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and projects to the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex is a circuit important in mediating the actions of psychostimulants. The function of this circuit is modulated by the actions of serotonin (5-HT at 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR localized to the VTA. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that virally-mediated overexpression of 5-HT2AR in the VTA would increase cocaine-evoked locomotor activity in the absence of alterations in basal locomotor activity. A plasmid containing the gene for the 5-HT2AR linked to a synthetic marker peptide (Flag was created and the construct was packaged in an adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV-5-HT2AR-Flag. This viral vector (2 µl; 109-10 transducing units/ml was unilaterally infused into the VTA of male rats, while control animals received an intra-VTA infusion of Ringer’s solution. Virus-pretreated rats exhibited normal spontaneous locomotor activity measured in a modified open-field apparatus at 7, 14, and 21 days following infusion. After an injection of cocaine (15 mg/kg, ip, both horizontal hyperactivity and rearing were significantly enhanced in virus-treated rats (p<0.05. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed expression of Flag and overexpression of the 5-HT2AR protein. These data indicate that the vulnerability of adult male rats to hyperactivity induced by cocaine is enhanced following increased levels of expression of the 5-HT2AR in the VTA and suggest that the 5-HT2AR receptor in the VTA plays a role in regulation of responsiveness to cocaine.

  5. Effects of chronic cocaine abuse on postsynaptic dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effects of chronic cocaine intoxication on dopamine receptors in human subjects, the authors evaluated [18F]N-methylspiroperidol binding using positron emission tomography in 10 cocaine abusers and 10 normal control subjects. Cocaine abusers who had been detoxified for 1 week or less showed significantly lower values for uptake of [18F]N-methylspiroperidol in striatum than the normal subjects, whereas the cocaine abusers who had been detoxified for 1 month showed values comparable to those obtained from normal subjects. The authors conclude that postsynaptic dopamine receptor availability decreases with chronic cocaine abuse but may recover after a drug-free interval

  6. Vaccines against stimulants: cocaine and MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Thomas; Domingo, Coreen; Orson, Frank; Kinsey, Berma

    2014-01-01

    While the worldwide prevalence of cocaine use remains significant, medications, or small molecule approaches, to treat drug addictions have met with limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines, on the other hand, have demonstrated great potential for treating drug abuse using a distinctly different mechanism of eliciting an antibody response that blocks the pharmacological effects of drugs. We provide a review of vaccine-based approaches to treating stimulant addictions; specifically and cocaine addictions. This selective review article focuses on the one cocaine vaccine that has been into clinical trials and presents new data related to pre-clinical development of a methamphetamine (MA) vaccine. We also review the mechanism of action for vaccine induced antibodies to abused drugs, which involves kinetic slowing of brain entry as well as simple blocking properties. We present pre-clinical innovations for MA vaccines including hapten design, linkage to carrier proteins and new adjuvants beyond alum. We provide some new information on hapten structures and linkers and variations in protein carriers. We consider a carrier, outer membrance polysaccharide coat protein (OMPC), that provides some self-adjuvant through lipopolysaccharide components and provide new results with a monophosopholipid adjuvant for the more standard carrier proteins with cocaine and MA. The review then covers the clinical trials with the cocaine vaccine TA-CD. The clinical prospects for advances in this field over the next few years include a multi-site cocaine vaccine clinical trial to be reported in 2013 and phase 1 clinical trials of a MA vaccine in 2014. PMID:23509915

  7. Can ropinirole modulate reinforcing subjective effects of cocaine in humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Giovanni Icro eMaremmani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated, by means of the Cocaine Rush Visual Analogue Scale (CRVAS, the impact of ropinirole on the expected rush induced by cocaine in a group of heroin addicts abusing cocaine; the self-reported reaction to the rush blockade (if any on cocaine consumption, and the correlations between this self-reported reaction and individual, clinical and therapeutic parameters. Nineteen cocaine abuser heroin-dependent patients entered the study. Their experienced cocaine rush was 61.31±32.1% of the maximum effect previously experienced. Compared with their previous rush intensity 16 patients experienced significantly lower intensity, three the same intensity and none a higher intensity. In particular, two patients experienced a complete blockade of rush and reported a reduced use of cocaine. Fourteen patients experienced a partial blockade of cocaine rush; of these, nine reported they had reduced their use of cocaine. Ropinirole does diminish the subjective intensity of an expected cocaine rush, so interfering with the dynamics of reward, while supporting its possible use in the treatment of cocaine dependence.

  8. A cocaine consumption study in Madrid from Social Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Saiz Galdós

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine use in Spain is understood to be a serious problem, and this article reports two methodologically contrasting studies of the phenomenon. The first measures differences in eight variables (personality traits, personal values, attitudes towards cocaine consumption, subjective norms, behavioral perceived control, behavioral intention and socio-demographic and substance consumption among three groups of respondents, totaling 660 people. The groups are: cocaine users, people in treatment for cocaine dependence, and people who have never used cocaine. The results identify, as significant risk factors: perceived behavioral control, the values of Hedonism and Stimulation, and the personality trait of Impulsivity. In the second study, life stories are collected form 32 people with significant experience of cocaine use. These life stories reveal the sociocultural, leisure, competitive and consumerist factors that promote or facilitate cocaine and other substance use. Finally, the article considers theoretical and methodological issues, and makes a number of recommendations for drugs prevention policy.

  9. Polysomnographic Sleep Dysregulation in Cocaine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin M. Valladares

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia and sleep disturbance are associated with declines in health functioning, alongwith increases in mortality risk. Given the prominence of reported sleep disturbance incocaine-dependent subjects and persistence into recovery, understanding the natureand severity of these disturbances in this population may help to identify relevantpathways that contribute to the increased mortality in cocaine dependence. Polysomnography provides a means of objectively characterizing sleep and, in turn, sleep disturbances. Few studies have used polysomnography to evaluate sleep incocaine-dependent persons, yet these studies have the potential to advance treatmentsthat will ultimately reduce morbidity in cocaine-dependent subjects.

  10. Dopamine D1 receptors in cocaine dependence measured with PET and the choice to self-administer cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Diana; Slifstein, Mark; Narendran, Rajesh; Foltin, Richard W.; Broft, Allegra; Hwang, Dah-Ren; Perez, Audrey; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Fischman, Marian W.; Kleber, Herbert D.; Laruelle, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to determine D1 receptor availability in human cocaine dependent (CD) subjects and matched healthy controls (HC). In addition, the cocaine dependent subjects performed cocaine self-administration sessions in order to explore the association between D1 receptor availability and cocaine seeking behavior. Methods 25 cocaine dependent subjects (40 ±4 yrs, 19M/6 F) and 23 matched healthy controls (38 ±4 yrs, 19M/4F) were scanned with PET and the radiotracer [11...

  11. Perioperative Continuous Ropivacaine Wound Infusion in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized Controlled Double-blind Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassoulaki, Argyro; Vassi, Emilia; Korkolis, Dimitrios; Zotou, Marianna

    2016-02-01

    Wound infusion with local anesthetics has been used for postoperative pain relief with variable results. This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial examines the effect of ropivacaine infusion on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A total of 110 patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups. After induction of anesthesia a 75-mm catheter was inserted subcutaneously and connected to an elastomeric pump containing either 0.75% ropivacaine (ropivacaine group) or normal saline (control group) for 24 hours postoperatively. Before skin closure, each hole was infiltrated with 2 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine or normal saline according to randomization. Pain at rest, pain during cough, and analgesic consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit and at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Analgesic requirements and pain scores were recorded 1 and 3 months after surgery. The ropivacaine group reported less pain during cough (P=0.044) in the postanesthesia care unit (P=0.017) and 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.038). Ropivacaine wound infusion had no effect on late and chronic pain. PMID:26679680

  12. Comparative behavioral pharmacology and toxicology of cocaine and its ethanol-derived metabolite, cocaine ethyl-ester (cocaethylene)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, J.L.; Terry, P.; Witkin, J.M. (NIDA Addiction Research Center, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The present study compared the behavioral and toxic effects of cocaine and its ethanol derived metabolite, cocaine ethyl-ester (cocaethylene). Both drugs produced qualitatively similar psychomoter stimulant effects. Cocaine and cocaethylene increased locomotor activity in mice, with cocaine approximately four times more potent than cocaethylene. The durations of action of ED{sub 75} doses of each of the drugs were comparable. Each of the drugs also produced stimulation of operant responding in rats. In rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine injections from saline, cocaine was approximately three to five times more potent than cocaethylene in producing these cocaine-like interoceptive effects. In contrast to the behavioral effects, cocaine and cocaethylene were equipotent in producing convulsions, and cocaethylene was more potent than cocaine in producing lethality. These results suggest that the conversion of cocaine to cocaethylene with simultaneous cocaine and alcohol use may produce an increased risk of toxicity due to a decrease in the potency of cocaethylene in producing psychomotor stimulant effects, and its increased potency in producing toxicity.

  13. Daily stressor sensitivity, abuse effects, and cocaine use in cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Angela E; Back, Sudie E; Brady, Kathleen T; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P; McRae, Aimee L; Saladin, Michael E

    2007-12-01

    This study highlights respondent sensitivity to daily hassles as it relates to situational cocaine use and perceived long-term effects of adverse events in childhood. Data were drawn from a larger study on stress reactivity in cocaine dependent individuals. Participants (n=104) were cocaine dependent men and women without comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They completed the Early Trauma Inventory (ETI), the Daily Hassles Scale (DHS), the Inventory of Drug-Taking Situations (IDTS), and the Time-Line Follow-Back (TLFB; for 90 days prior to interview). There were no gender differences in the amount or frequency of cocaine use, although the patterns of use differed between male and female users. Overall, there were some associations in the patterns of cocaine use and sensitivity to daily hassles, particularly the use in response to conflict with others. Early negative life events were positively related to response to daily hassles, but current triggers were more relevant. Reactivity to cocaine cues was related to daily hassle sensitivity among women only. Limitations and implications of the findings are discussed.

  14. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody inhibits the distribution of cocaine to the brain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Andrew B; Gooden, Felicia C T; Tabet, Michael R; Ball, William J

    2014-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb), h2E2, is a humanized version of the chimeric human/murine anti-cocaine mAb 2E2. The recombinant h2E2 protein was produced in vitro from a transfected mammalian cell line and retained high affinity (4 nM Kd) and specificity for cocaine over its inactive metabolites benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester. In rats, pharmacokinetic studies of h2E2 (120 mg/kg i.v.) showed a long terminal elimination half-life of 9.0 days and a low volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss) of 0.3 l/kg. Pretreatment with h2E2 produced a dramatic 8.8-fold increase in the area under the plasma cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) and in brain a concomitant decrease of 68% of cocaine's AUC following an i.v. injection of an equimolar cocaine dose. Sequestration of cocaine in plasma by h2E2, shown via reduction of cocaine's Vdss, indicates potential clinical efficacy. Although the binding of cocaine to h2E2 in plasma should inhibit distribution and metabolism, the elimination of cocaine remained multicompartmental and was still rapidly eliminated from plasma despite the presence of h2E2. BE was the major cocaine metabolite, and brain BE concentrations were sixfold higher than in plasma, indicating that cocaine is normally metabolized in the brain. In the presence of h2E2, brain BE concentrations were decreased and plasma BE was increased, consistent with the observed h2E2-induced changes in cocaine disposition. The inhibition of cocaine distribution to the brain confirms the humanized mAb, h2E2, as a lead candidate for development as an immunotherapy for cocaine abuse. PMID:24733787

  15. The brain-specific neural zinc finger transcription factor 2b (NZF-2b/7ZFMyt1 suppresses cocaine self-administration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Chandrasekar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain-specific neural-zinc-finger transcription factor-2b (NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 is induced in the mesolimbic dopaminergic region after chronic cocaine exposure and lentiviral-mediated expression of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in the nucleus accumbens results in decreased locomotor activity (Chandrasekar and Dreyer, 2009. In this study the role of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in active cocaine seeking and of its interaction with histone deacetylase on the altered behavior has been observed. Localized expression of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in the nucleus accumbens resulted in attenuated cocaine self-administration, whereas silencing this transcription factor with lentiviruses expressing siRNAs increased the animal′s motivation to self-infuse cocaine. Low doses of sodium butyrate, a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylase, were sufficient to reverse the NZF2b/7ZFMyt1-mediated decrease in cocaine self-administration. NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 expression resulted in strong induction of transcription factors REST1 and NAC1 and of the dopamine D2 receptor, with concomitant inhibition of BDNF and its receptor TrkB. We show that NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 colocalizes with histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2, probably overcoming the suppression of transcriptional activity caused by Lingo1. These findings show that molecular adaptations mediated by NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 expression possibly lead to decreased responsiveness to the reinforcing properties of cocaine and play a prominent role in affecting the behavioral changes induced by the drug.

  16. Vulnerability to cocaine : role of stress hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Inge Elisabeth Maria de

    2007-01-01

    Not everyone who experiments with cocaine acquires compulsive drug use. The mechanism underlying this individual difference in susceptibility to addiction is poorly understood. Recent studies have identified genes and adverse life events (stress) as risk factors. The objective of this thesis is to i

  17. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rocha de Almeida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease.Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors.Results:In 8 patients (36.4%, the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with "crack lung", those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%, barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each.Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings.

  18. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Renata Rocha de; Zanetti, Glaucia; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Radiologia; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de Petropolis, Petropolis, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Luciana Soares de [Ultra-X, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador (Brazil). Dep. de Medicina e Apoio Diagnostico; Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Irion, Klaus Loureiro [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mancano, Alexandre Dias [Hospital Anchieta, Taguatinga, DF (Brazil); Nobre, Luiz Felipe [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease. Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors. Results: In 8 patients (36.4%), the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with 'crack lung', those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%), barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each. Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings. (author)

  19. Cocaine-Associated Seizures and Incidence of Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlesi, Nima DO

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Acute complications from cocaine abuse are commonly treated in the emergency department (ED; one of the most consequential is status epilepticus. The incidence of this complication is not clearly defined in the prior literature on cocaine-associated sequelae. We evaluated the incidence of status epilepticus in patients with seizures secondary to suspected cocaine use.Methods: We performed a retrospective multi-center study of patients with seizures resulting from cocaine use. We identified study subjects at 15 hospitals by record review and conducted a computer-assisted records search to identify patients with seizures for each institution over a four-year period. We selected subjects from this group on the basis of cocaine use and determined the occurrence of status epilepticus among them. Data were collected on each subject using a standardized data collection form.Results: We evaluated 43 patients in the ED for cocaine-associated seizures. Their age range was 17 to 54, with a mean age was 31 years; 53% were male. Of 43 patients, 42 experienced a single tonic-clonic seizure and one developed status epilepticus. All patients had either a history of cocaine use or positive urine drug screen for cocaine.Conclusion: Despite reported cases of status epilepticus with cocaine-induced seizures, the incidence of this complication was unclear based on prior literature. This study shows that most cocaine-associated seizures are self-limited. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:157-160.

  20. Adolescent cocaine abuse. Addictive potential, behavioral and psychiatric effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estroff, T W; Schwartz, R H; Hoffmann, N G

    1989-12-01

    Four hundred seventy-nine drug abusing adolescent patients enrolled in seven Straight, Inc. Adolescent Drug-Abuse Treatment Programs in five geographic regions across the United States were studied to determine the severity and patterns of cocaine abuse. Of these, 341 admitted to cocaine use and became part of this survey. Cocaine use was categorized as heavy, intermediate, or light. Areas examined were the addictive spectrum, psychosocial dysfunction, and psychiatric symptoms. Intermediate and heavy users of cocaine abused significantly less marijuana and inhalants than light cocaine abusers. Heavy and intermediate users were more likely to use cocaine intravenously and to use crack. They developed tachyphylaxis more frequently, progressed to weekly use in less than 3 months more frequently, and became preoccupied with obtaining and using cocaine significantly more frequently. They used more sedative hypnotics to calm themselves and engaged in more criminal behavior, such as stealing from parents and stores and passing bad checks. They had more arrests for possession of drugs, stole more cars, sold more drugs, and were more likely to trade sexual favors to obtain the drug. Heavy and intermediate users were significantly more psychiatrically disturbed than light users, becoming more suspicious, nervous, aggressive, and demonstrating increased symptoms of fatigue, sleeplessness, decreased appetite, and increasing cocaine dysphoria. All of these symptoms could be mistaken for psychiatric disorders. This study suggests that cocaine is as addictive in adolescents as in adults; possibly more so. It also causes psychosocial dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms. Further research into cocaine addiction among adolescents is indicated. PMID:2582695

  1. Cocaine disposition in discrete regions of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, J I; Davis, J M

    1993-05-01

    It has been proposed that various effects of psychoactive drugs on the central nervous system may be related to the capacity of the drug to selectively concentrate in specific regions of the brain. In rat brain, cocaine effects on striatal and nucleus accumbens dopaminergic systems show quantitative differences. However, the disposition of cocaine in various brain regions has not been reported. In the present studies we examined the cocaine concentrations over time in serum and discrete brain regions of the rat after single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. At different time points (5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min) after i.p. injection of cocaine hydrochloride (10 mg kg-1, free base) the rats were decapitated and cocaine in serum and various brain regions was quantitated by a specific gas liquid chromatographic method. There was large inter-individual variability in different rats at each time-point. The disposition pattern of cocaine in rats after i.p. administration was similar to that observed in humans after intranasal administration. Initial absorption rate was rapid and, on average, the peak levels of cocaine were achieved in 10 min. The cocaine levels remained relatively high over the next 50 min indicating continual absorption, and then declined with a rate such that the levels 4 h after cocaine administration were undetectable in most of the animals. The overall changes in cocaine levels in various brain regions paralleled the serum concentrations. The area under the cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) revealed more than three-fold differences in cocaine accumulation in various brain regions. This unequal disposition of cocaine may be responsible in part for differential biochemical effects in different brain regions. PMID:8499585

  2. Disrupting astrocyte–neuron lactate transfer persistently reduces conditioned responses to cocaine

    KAUST Repository

    Boury-Jamot, B

    2015-10-27

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is the high risk of relapse often precipitated by drug-associated cues. The transfer of glycogen-derived lactate from astrocytes to neurons is required for long-term memory. Whereas blockade of drug memory reconsolidation represents a potential therapeutic strategy, the role of astrocyte–neuron lactate transport in long-term conditioning has received little attention. By infusing an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase into the basolateral amygdala of rats, we report that disruption of astrocyte-derived lactate not only transiently impaired the acquisition of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but also persistently disrupted an established conditioning. The drug memory was rescued by L-Lactate co-administration through a mechanism requiring the synaptic plasticity-related transcription factor Zif268 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway but not the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). The long-term amnesia induced by glycogenolysis inhibition and the concomitant decreased expression of phospho-ERK were both restored with L-Lactate co-administration. These findings reveal a critical role for astrocyte-derived lactate in positive memory formation and highlight a novel amygdala-dependent reconsolidation process, whose disruption may offer a novel therapeutic target to reduce the long-lasting conditioned responses to cocaine.

  3. Disrupting astrocyte-neuron lactate transfer persistently reduces conditioned responses to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boury-Jamot, B; Carrard, A; Martin, J L; Halfon, O; Magistretti, P J; Boutrel, B

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is the high risk of relapse often precipitated by drug-associated cues. The transfer of glycogen-derived lactate from astrocytes to neurons is required for long-term memory. Whereas blockade of drug memory reconsolidation represents a potential therapeutic strategy, the role of astrocyte-neuron lactate transport in long-term conditioning has received little attention. By infusing an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase into the basolateral amygdala of rats, we report that disruption of astrocyte-derived lactate not only transiently impaired the acquisition of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but also persistently disrupted an established conditioning. The drug memory was rescued by L-Lactate co-administration through a mechanism requiring the synaptic plasticity-related transcription factor Zif268 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway but not the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). The long-term amnesia induced by glycogenolysis inhibition and the concomitant decreased expression of phospho-ERK were both restored with L-Lactate co-administration. These findings reveal a critical role for astrocyte-derived lactate in positive memory formation and highlight a novel amygdala-dependent reconsolidation process, whose disruption may offer a novel therapeutic target to reduce the long-lasting conditioned responses to cocaine. PMID:26503760

  4. The Concept of Pharmacologic Cocaine Interception as a Treatment for Drug Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yang; Orson, Frank M; Kinsey, Berma; Kosten, Tom; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine access to brain tissue and associated cocaine-induced behaviors are substantially reduced in rats and mice by significant plasma levels of an enzyme that rapidly metabolizes the drug. Similar results have been obtained in rodents and humans with therapeutic anti-cocaine antibodies, which sequester the drug and prevent its entry into the brain. We show that an efficient cocaine hydrolase can lead to rapid unloading of anti-cocaine antibodies saturated with cocaine, and we provide a the...

  5. Intermittent Cocaine Self-Administration Produces Sensitization of Stimulant Effects at the Dopamine Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Calipari, Erin S.; Ferris, Mark J.; Siciliano, Cody A.; Zimmer, Benjamin A.; JONES, SARA R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous literature investigating neurobiological adaptations following cocaine self-administration has shown that high, continuous levels of cocaine intake (long access; LgA) results in reduced potency of cocaine at the dopamine transporter (DAT), whereas an intermittent pattern of cocaine administration (intermittent access; IntA) results in sensitization of cocaine potency at the DAT. Here, we aimed to determine whether these changes are specific to cocaine or translate to other psychostim...

  6. Low or High Cocaine Responding Rats Differ in Striatal Extracellular Dopamine Levels and Dopamine Transporter Number

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Anna M.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2009-01-01

    Both humans and animals exhibit marked individual differences in cocaine responsiveness. By using the median split of cocaine-induced locomotor activity, we have classified outbred male Sprague-Dawley rats as either low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively). LCR/HCR classification predicts differences in cocaine inhibition of striatal dopamine (DA) transporters (DATs), cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, cocaine-conditioned place preference, and motivation to self-admin...

  7. Myocardial uptake of cocaine and effects of cocaine on myocardial substrate utilization and perfusion in hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Som, P.; Wang, G.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Oster, Z.H. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Knapp, F.F. Jr. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Yonekura, Y. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Fujibayashi, Y. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital); Yamamoto, K. (Fukui Univ. (Japan). Medical School); Kubota, K. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai

    1992-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is a problem causing world-wide concern and the number of deaths following cocaine use is increasing. Cardiovascular complications following cocaine include severe tachyarrythmias, pulmonary edema, myocardial infarction, and acute renal failure, which are major problems confronting emergency facilities. While the studies of cocaine effects on the brain have been given the most attention, it is clear that the effects of cocaine on the cardiovascular system are of great importance, given the increasing number of reports on sudden death and myocardial infarctions in young adults related to cocaine use. The precise mechanisms of cardiotoxic actions of cocaine are unclear. We investigated the whole-body distribution of C-14-labeled cocaine to determine the cocaine-binding sites, including blocking experiments to determine the nature of regional binding sites, and differential response of the normal vs. diseased heart (hypertensive cardiomyopathy) in an animal model to mimic a potentially high risk population. We investigated the acute effects of cocaine on myocardial metabolism using two myocardial energy substrate analogs, fatty acid and glucose with comparison with regional perfusion.

  8. Myocardial uptake of cocaine and effects of cocaine on myocardial substrate utilization and perfusion in hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Som, P.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Oster, Z.H. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yonekura, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Fujibayashi, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital; Yamamoto, K. [Fukui Univ. (Japan). Medical School; Kubota, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1992-12-31

    Cocaine abuse is a problem causing world-wide concern and the number of deaths following cocaine use is increasing. Cardiovascular complications following cocaine include severe tachyarrythmias, pulmonary edema, myocardial infarction, and acute renal failure, which are major problems confronting emergency facilities. While the studies of cocaine effects on the brain have been given the most attention, it is clear that the effects of cocaine on the cardiovascular system are of great importance, given the increasing number of reports on sudden death and myocardial infarctions in young adults related to cocaine use. The precise mechanisms of cardiotoxic actions of cocaine are unclear. We investigated the whole-body distribution of C-14-labeled cocaine to determine the cocaine-binding sites, including blocking experiments to determine the nature of regional binding sites, and differential response of the normal vs. diseased heart (hypertensive cardiomyopathy) in an animal model to mimic a potentially high risk population. We investigated the acute effects of cocaine on myocardial metabolism using two myocardial energy substrate analogs, fatty acid and glucose with comparison with regional perfusion.

  9. Cocaine self-administration in rats lacking a functional trpc4 gene [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/w9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin C Rasmus

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC family of Ca2+ permeable, non-selective cation channels is abundantly expressed throughout the brain, and plays a pivotal role in modulating cellular excitability. Unlike other TRPC channels, TRPC4 subtype expression in the adult rodent brain is restricted to a network of structures that receive dopaminergic innervation, suggesting an association with motivation- and reward-related behaviors. We hypothesized that these channels may play a critical role in dopamine-dependent drug-seeking behaviors. Here, we gathered data testing trpc4 knockout (KO rats and wild-type (WT littermates in the acquisition of a natural sucrose reward (10 days, and cocaine self-administration (13 days at 0.5 mg/kg/infusion. Rats lacking the trpc4 gene (trpc4-KO learned to lever press for sucrose to a similar degree as their WT controls. However, when they were switched to cocaine, the trpc4-KO rats had substantially reduced cocaine-paired lever pressing compared to WT controls. No obvious group differences in inactive lever pressing were observed, for any time, during cocaine self-administration.

  10. Chronic Cocaine Dampens Dopamine Signaling during Cocaine Intoxication and Unbalances D1 over D2 Receptor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kicheon; Pan, Yingtian

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine increases triggered by cocaine and consequent stimulation of dopamine receptors (including D1 and D2) are associated with its rewarding effects. However, while facilitation of D1 receptor (D1R) signaling enhances the rewarding effects of cocaine, facilitation of D2R signaling decreases it, which indicates that for cocaine to be rewarding it must result in a predominance of D1R over D2R signaling. Moreover, the transition to compulsive cocaine intake might result from an imbalance between D1R and D2R signaling. To test the hypothesis that chronic cocaine use unbalances D1R over D2R signaling during cocaine intoxication, we used microprobe optical imaging to compare dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i, marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in striatal D1R-EGFP and D2R-EGFP-expressing neurons between control and chronically treated mice. Chronic cocaine attenuated responses to acute cocaine in D1R (blunting Ca2+ increases by 67 ± 16%) and D2R (blunting Ca2+ decrease by 72 ± 17%) neurons in most D1R and D2R neurons (∼75%). However, the dynamics of this attenuation during cocaine intoxication was longer lasting for D2R than for D1R. Thus, whereas control mice showed a fast but short-lasting predominance of D1R over D2R signaling (peaking at ∼8 min) during acute cocaine intoxication, in chronically treated mice D1R predominance was sustained for >30 min (throughout the measurement period). Thus, chronic cocaine use dramatically reduced cocaine-induced DA signaling, shifting the balance between D1R and D2R signaling during intoxication to a predominance of D1R (stimulatory) over D2R (inhibitory) signaling, which might facilitate compulsive intake in addiction. PMID:24089490

  11. Cocaine is pharmacologically active in the nonhuman primate fetal brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benveniste, Helene; Fowler, Joanna S; Rooney, William D;

    2010-01-01

    -trimester pregnant nonhuman primates, cocaine at doses typically used by drug abusers significantly increased brain glucose metabolism to the same extent in the mother as in the fetus (approximately 100%). Inasmuch as brain glucose metabolism is a sensitive marker of brain function, the current findings provide......Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third...... evidence that cocaine use by a pregnant mother will also affect the function of the fetal brain. We are also unique in showing that cocaine's effects in brain glucose metabolism differed in pregnant (increased) and nonpregnant (decreased) animals, which suggests that the psychoactive effects of cocaine...

  12. Determination of 24-hour insulin infusion pattern by an artificial endocrine pancreas for intravenous insulin infusion with a miniature pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kølendorf, K; Christiansen, J S; Bojsen, J;

    1981-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Intravenous insulin infusion with a glucose controlled insulin infusion system (GCIIS) is known to restore glucose homeostasis. A simpler approach to improve blood glucose regulation is preprogrammed intravenous insulin infusion with portable pumps without sensor-mediated feedback. We...

  13. Continued Effects of Prenatal Cocaine Use: Preschool Development

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Gale A.; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Willford, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between prenatal cocaine use and preschooler’s physical and cognitive development and behavioral characteristics was examined, controlling for other influences on child development. On average, children were 38.5 months old, women were 29.4 years old, had 12.3 years of education, and 47% were African American. During the first trimester, 18% of the women were frequent cocaine users (≥ 1 line/day). First trimester cocaine exposure predicted decreased head circumference at 3 ye...

  14. Individual predictors of the subjective effects of intravenous cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Grasing, Kenneth; Mathur, Deepan; Newton, Thomas F.; DeSouza, Cherilyn

    2013-01-01

    The subjective and reinforcing effects of addictive substances can vary greatly between individuals. This study compared the relative contributions of baseline drug use, craving, stressful life events, and social factors in determining the subjective effects of cocaine in individual participants. Twelve veterans meeting criteria for cocaine dependence were evaluated in a laboratory setting. Self-report of the subjective effects of intravenous cocaine was recorded following single- and double-...

  15. Synergistic effects of ethanol and cocaine on brain stimulation reward.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, M. J.; June, H L

    1994-01-01

    The effects of two widely abused drugs, ethanol and cocaine, were examined alone and in combination on intracranial reward processes. In agreement with previous research, higher doses of both cocaine and ethanol alone produced facilitation of behavior maintained by brain stimulation reward. Low intraperitoneal doses of ethanol and cocaine, which alone did not affect performance, were found to reduce stimulation reward threshold and modestly increase response rate. The enhancement of brain sti...

  16. Dopamine-beta hydroxylase polymorphism and cocaine addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Collier David; Laranjeira Ronaldo; Guindalini Camila; Messas Guilherme; Vallada Homero; Breen Gerome

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Cocaine addiction involves a number of medical, psychological and social problems. Understanding the genetic aetiology of this disorder will be essential for design of effective treatments. Dopamine-beta hydroxylase (DbH) catalyzes the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine and could, therefore, have an influence on both cocaine action and the basal sensitivity of neurotransmitter systems to cocaine. Recently, the -1021C>T polymorphism have been found to strongly correlated with in...

  17. Effects of cocaine on honey bee dance behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Barron, Andrew B.; Maleszka, Ryszard; Helliwell, Paul G.; Robinson, Gene E

    2008-01-01

    The role of cocaine as an addictive drug of abuse in human society is hard to reconcile with its ecological role as a natural insecticide and plant-protective compound, preventing herbivory of coca plants (Erythroxylum spp.). This paradox is often explained by proposing a fundamental difference in mammalian and invertebrate responses to cocaine, but here we show effects of cocaine on honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) that parallel human responses. Forager honey bees perfo...

  18. Applying Behavioral Economics to the Challenge of Reducing Cocaine Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, Stephen T.

    1998-01-01

    This paper focuses on potential contributions of behavioral economics to reducing cocaine abuse. More specifically, this paper underscores the fundamental role of reinforcement in the genesis and maintenance of cocaine use and explores how reinforcement and consumer-demand theory might be translated into effective strategies for reducing cocaine use. A broad range of relevant research findings are discussed, including preclinical studies conducted with laboratory animals, laboratory and treat...

  19. Long-Term Reduction of Cocaine Self-Administration in Rats Treated with Adenoviral Vector-Delivered Cocaine Hydrolase: Evidence for Enzymatic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Saykao, Amy T.; Parks, Robin J.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    A new pharmacokinetic approach treating cocaine addiction involves rapidly metabolizing cocaine before it reaches brain reward centers using mutated human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) or cocaine hydrolase (CocH). Recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated plasma CocH reduced the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and prevented reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior up to 6 months in rats. The present study investigated whether hdAD-CocH could decreas...

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antagonists attenuate cocaine priming- and cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaresan, Vidhya; Yuan, Menglu; Yee, Judy; Famous, Katie R.; Anderson, Sharon M.; Schmidt, Heath D.; Pierce, R Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are involved in both cocaine reinforcement and the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. In the present experiments, rats were trained to self-administer cocaine under fixed ratio (for cocaine priming-induced reinstatement) or second order (for cocaine cue-induced reinstatement) schedules of reinforcement. Lever pressing was then extinguished followed by a reinstatement phase where operant responding was promot...

  1. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  2. Daily treadmill exercise attenuates cocaine cue-induced reinstatement and cocaine induced locomotor response but increases cocaine-primed reinstatement

    OpenAIRE

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Stamos, Joshua; Robison, Lisa S.; Heyman, Gary; Tucci, Andrew; Wang, Gene-Jack; Robinson, John K.; Anderson, Brenda J.; Volkow, Nora D

    2012-01-01

    Exercise affects neuroplasticity and neurotransmission including dopamine (DA), which modulates drug-taking behavior. Previous research in rodents has shown that exercise may attenuate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. The present study examined the effects of high and low exercise on cocaine responses in male Wistar rats that had been trained to self-administer and were compared to a group of sedentary rats. High exercise rats (HE) ran daily on a treadmill for 2 h and low exercise (LE...

  3. Thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic cerebral stroke: intraarterial urokinase infusion vs. intravenous heparin and urokinase infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the efficacy and limitation of intra-arterial urokinase (IAUK) infusion for treatment of acute cerebral stroke. Twenty-seven acute cerebral stroke patients treated with IAUK infusion within six hours of stroke onset were reviewed. All patients showed normal initial brain findings on CT. In 21 patients, urokinase(5-15 x 105IU) was administered through a microcatheter placed into or proximal to occluded segment. Mechanical disruption of thrombus by guidewire was performed in 17 patients. Angiographic and clinical responses and complications after IAUK infusion, were evaluated and the results were compared with those of intravenous heparin(N=19) and urokinase infusion(N=19). Complete or partial angiographic recanalization of occluded segment was found in 18 patients (67%), and neurologic improvement was followed in 14 patients(52%). The degree of improvement on the stroke scale score after IAUK infusion was statistically more significant(p<0.05) than that shown after intravenous heparin and urokinase infusion. Complications after IAUK infusion were large(15%) and small amount intracerebral hemorrhage(15%), contrast leakage into brain parenchyma(11%), and gastrointestinal bleeding(4%). Between the IAVK and the intravenous urokinase infusion group, differences in extent and types of complications were statistically insignificant, but were significantly higher in those two groups than in the intravenous heparin infusion group. IAUK infusion may be effective for the treatment of acute cerebral stroke

  4. Neurotensin Agonist Attenuates Nicotine Potentiation to Cocaine Sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Fredrickson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco usage typically precedes illicit drug use in adolescent and young adult populations. Several animal studies suggest nicotine increases the risk for subsequent cocaine abuse, and may be a negative prognostic factor for treatment of cocaine addiction; i.e., a “gateway drug”. Neurotensin (NT is a 13-amino acid neuropeptide that modulates dopamine, acetylcholine, glutamate, and GABA neurotransmission in brain reward pathways. NT69L, a NT(8-13 analog, blocks behavioral sensitization (an animal model for psychostimulant addiction to nicotine, and nicotine self-administration in rats. The present study tested the effect of NT69L on the potentiating effects of nicotine on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Male Wistar rats were injected daily for seven days with nicotine or saline (control followed by four daily injections of cocaine. NT69L was administered 30 min prior to the last cocaine injection. Behavior was recorded with the use of activity chambers. Subchronic administration of nicotine enhanced cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in Wistar rats, consistent with an hypothesized gateway effect. These behavioral effects of cocaine were attenuated by pretreatment with NT69L. The effect of the neurotensin agonist on cocaine sensitization in the nicotine treated group indicated a possible therapeutic effect for cocaine addiction, even in the presence of enhanced behavioral sensitization induced by nicotine.

  5. Effects of cocaine on maternal behavior and neurochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nephew, Benjamin C; Febo, Marcelo

    2012-03-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves drug seeking and abuse despite the negative social and health consequences. While the potential effects of cocaine on child development have been extensively studied over the last 30 years, few researchers have focused on the effects of cocaine on maternal behavior, which includes offspring care and maternal aggression towards an unfamiliar individual. In humans, maternal cocaine use can lead to child neglect, abuse, and disrupt the mother-child bond. While it has been argued the developmental effects of maternal cocaine use on children were initially overstated, it is clear that disruptions of typical maternal behavior (i.e. postpartum depression, anxiety disorders) are detrimental to the physical and emotional health of offspring. Cocaine use in mothers is commonly associated with psychological disorders, including depression and anxiety, and it is postulated that many of the negative effects of maternal cocaine use on offspring are mediated through changes in maternal behavior. This review will summarize research on cocaine and maternal behavior in animal and human studies, discuss potential mechanisms, and suggest therapeutic strategies for treating cocaine-affected maternal behavior which may improve the physical and behavioral health of both mother and child. The primary objective is to stimulate future communication, cooperation, and collaboration between researchers who use animals and humans to study cocaine and maternal behavior. PMID:22942878

  6. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Rezende Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD, protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0 mg/kg abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30 mg/kg reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse.

  7. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Zhang, Lifen; Zhou, Fuwen; Gong, Suzhen; Gu, Howard; De Biasi, Mariella; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Dani, John A

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine's ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic) stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors. PMID:25237305

  8. Dynorphin/KOP and nociceptin/NOP gene expression and epigenetic changes by cocaine in rat striatum and nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Francesca Felicia; Di Benedetto, Manuela; Carretta, Donatella; Bastias del Carmen Candia, Sussy; D'Addario, Claudio; Cavina, Chiara; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2014-03-01

    Cocaine induces neurochemical changes of endogenous prodynorphin-kappa opioid receptor (pDYN-KOP) and pronociceptin/orphaninFQ-nociceptin receptor (pN/OFQ-NOP) systems. Both systems play an important role in rewarding mechanisms and addictive stimulus processing by modulating drug-induced dopaminergic activation in the mesocortico-limbic brain areas. They are also involved in regulating stress mechanisms related to addiction. The aim of this study was to investigate possible changes of gene expression of the dynorphinergic and nociceptinergic system components in the nucleus accumbens (NA) and in medial and lateral caudate putamen (mCPu and lCPu, respectively) of rats, following chronic subcutaneous infusion of cocaine. In addition, the epigenetic histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 (an activating and a repressive marker, respectively) at the promoter level of the pDYN, KOP, pN/OFQ and NOP genes were investigated. Results showed that cocaine induced pDYN gene expression up-regulation in the NA and lCPu, and its down-regulation in the mCPu, whereas KOP mRNA levels were unchanged. Moreover, cocaine exposure decreased pN/OFQ gene expression in the NA and lCPu, while NOP mRNA levels appeared significantly increased in the NA and decreased in the lCPu. Specific changes of the H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 levels were found at pDYN, pN/OFQ, and NOP gene promoter, consistent with the observed gene expression alterations. The present findings contribute to better define the role of endogenous pDYN-KOP and pN/OFQ-NOP systems in neuroplasticity mechanisms following chronic cocaine treatment. The epigenetic histone modifications underlying the gene expression changes likely mediate the effects of cocaine on transcriptional regulation of specific gene promoters that result in long-lasting drug-induced plasticity. PMID:24184686

  9. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  10. Extended Access Cocaine Self-Administration Results in Tolerance to the Dopamine-Elevating and Locomotor-Stimulating Effects of Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calipari, Erin S.; Ferris, Mark J.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance to the neurochemical and psychoactive effects of cocaine after repeated use is a hallmark of cocaine addiction in humans. However, comprehensive studies on tolerance to the behavioral, psychoactive, and neurochemical effects of cocaine following contingent administration in rodents are lacking. We outlined the consequences of extended access cocaine self-administration as it related to tolerance to the psychomotor activating, dopamine (DA) elevating, and DA transporter (DAT) inhibiting effects of cocaine. Cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/inj; 40 inj; 5 days), which resulted in escalation of first hour intake, caused reductions in evoked DA release and reduced maximal rates of uptake through the DAT as measured by slice voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens core. Further, we report reductions in cocaine-induced uptake inhibition as measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry, and a corresponding increase in the dose of cocaine required for 50% inhibition of DA uptake (Ki) at the DAT. Cocaine tolerance at the DAT translated to reductions in cocaine-induced DA overflow as measured by microdialysis. Additionally, cocaine-induced elevations in locomotor activity and stereotypy were reduced, while rearing behavior was enhanced in animals with a history of cocaine self-administration. Here we demonstrate both neurochemical and behavioral cocaine tolerance in an extended-access rodent model of cocaine abuse, which allows for a better understanding of the neurochemical and psychomotor tolerance that develops to cocaine in human addicts. PMID:24102293

  11. Dopamine Increases in Striatum do not Elicit Craving in Cocaine Abusers Unless they are Coupled with Cocaine Cues

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Childress, Anna-Rose; Jayne, Millard; Ma, Yeming; Wong, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Imaging studies have shown an association between dopamine increases in striatum and cue induced craving in cocaine abusers. However, the extent to which dopamine increases reflect a primary rather than a secondary response to the cues remains unclear. Here we evaluated the extent to which dopamine increases by themselves can induce craving in cocaine abusers. Using PET and [11C]raclopride (D2 receptor radioligand sensitive to competition with endogenous dopamine) we show that in cocaine abus...

  12. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration.

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Stanley J.; Kearns, David N.; Cohn, Scott I.; Schindler, Charles W.; Panlilio, Leigh V.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental stimuli that set the occasion wherein drugs are acquired can "trigger" drug-related behavior. Investigating the stimulus control of drug self-administration in laboratory animals should help us better understand this aspect of human drug abuse. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration was generated here for the first time using multiple and chained schedules with short, frequently-alternating components--like those typically used to study food-maintained responding. The p...

  13. Minocycline affects cocaine sensitization in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hu; Uz, Tolga; Manev, Hari

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence has pointed to an interaction between the tetracycline antibiotic minocycline and drugs with abuse liability such as opioids and amphetamines. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that similar to its effects on methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization, minocycline may influence the behavioral effects of cocaine. Experiments were performed in male C57BL/6J mice using an automated system to measure locomotor activity. We found that 80 mg/kg minocycline significantly re...

  14. CIA and the Contras' cocaine connection

    OpenAIRE

    Kain, Victor

    2006-01-01

    The evidence shows that the government knew that the Contras’ decided to traffic cocaine to finance themselves. The government participated in the drug trafficking by not interrupting it. CIA ordered the Contras to traffic drugs. Traffickers were protected from prosecution and received government contract. The government knew and sanctioned the drug trafficking into the US to support the Contras. The White House urged lenience for at least one convicted trafficker and terrorist.

  15. Particulate contaminants of intravenous medications and infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhouse, C M; Ball, P R; Booth, S; Kelshaw, M A; Potter, S R; McCollum, C N

    1987-04-01

    Particulate contamination in small volume parenteral medications has been studied and compared with that found in a selection of large volume infusions. Particle counts in 39 commonly used small volume medications and 7 large volume infusions were performed by an automated light blockage method (HIAC) or by optical microscopy. Based on these results and a random survey of drug therapy of intensive care patients, it is concluded that the contribution of intravenous medications to the total particle load received by such patients is likely to be many times greater than from infusion fluids. Until firm evidence regarding the harmful systemic effects of drug particles is available and the manufacturing regulations adjusted appropriately, final in-line filtration of infusions immediately proximal to the intravenous cannula should be considered when drugs are being given intravenously. PMID:2884285

  16. Cocaine Induced Pleural and Pericardial Effusion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehabaldin Alqalyoobi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old African American female with chronic cocaine use for 20 years, presented with two-day history of exertional shortness of breath and pleuritic chest pain. She was admitted three years back with acute kidney injury and skin rashes. At that time, skin biopsy was consistent with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and renal biopsy revealed proliferative glomerulonephritis. She responded to oral prednisone and mycophenolate with complete recovery of her kidney functions. Skin rash was waxing and waning over the last two years. On the second admission, patient was found to have large pleural effusion on computerized tomography scan and pericardial effusion on echocardiogram as shown in the figures. Pleural fluid analysis was exudative. Her serology was negative for ANA (antineutrophilic antibody and anti-dsDNA (double stranded DNA. Complements levels were normal. She had positive low titers of ANCA levels. The patient was started on a course of prednisone for 6 months. Her pleural and pericardial effusion resolved completely on follow-up imaging with computerized tomography scan and echocardiogram. This case is unique since the pericardial and pleural effusions developed without any other etiology in the setting of cocaine; hence, we describe this clinical syndrome as cocaine induced pleural and pericardial effusions syndrome (CIPP.

  17. Multicriteria wavenumber selection in cocaine classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzanello, M J; Kahmann, A; Marcelo, M C A; Mariotti, K C; Ferrão, M F; Ortiz, R S

    2015-11-10

    Cocaine ATR-FTIR spectra consist of a large number of wavenumbers that typically decreases the performance of exploratory and predictive multivariate techniques. This paper proposes a framework for selecting the most relevant wavenumbers to classify cocaine samples into two categories regarding chemical composition, i.e. salt and base. The proposed framework builds a wavenumber importance index based on the Bhattacharyya distance (BD) followed by a procedure that removes wavenumbers from the spectra according to the order suggested by the BD index. The recommended wavenumber subset is chosen based on multiple criteria assessing classification performance, which are recalculated after each wavenumber is eliminated. The method was applied to ATR-FTIR spectra from 513 samples of cocaine, remarkably reducing the percent of retained wavenumbers and yielding near to perfect classifications in the testing set. In addition, we compared our propositions with other methods tailored to wavenumber selection; we found that the proposed framework, which relies on simple mathematical fundamentals, yielded competitive results. PMID:26319749

  18. The History of Target-Controlled Infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struys, Michel M R F; De Smet, Tom; Glen, John Iain B; Vereecke, Hugo E M; Absalom, Anthony R; Schnider, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) is a technique of infusing IV drugs to achieve a user-defined predicted ("target") drug concentration in a specific body compartment or tissue of interest. In this review, we describe the pharmacokinetic principles of TCI, the development of TCI systems, and technical and regulatory issues addressed in prototype development. We also describe the launch of the current clinically available systems.

  19. Sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and plasma biomarkers for cocaine addiction in abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects in outpatient settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA ePEDRAZ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine.Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview ‘Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders’. Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex.The results showed that the chemokine concentrations of CCL2/MCP-1 and CXCL12/SDF-1 were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TNFα were higher in control women relative to men, but these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women. Cytokine concentrations were unaltered in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative; whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, POEA was only increased in cocaine-addicted women.Regarding psychiatric comorbidity in the cocaine group, women had lower incidence rates of comorbid substance use disorders than did men. For example, alcohol use disorders were found in 80% of men and 40% of women. In contrast, the addicted women had increased prevalences of comorbid psychiatric disorders (mood, anxiety and psychosis disorders.These results demonstrate the existence of a sex influence on plasma biomarkers for cocaine addiction and on the presence of

  20. Functional consequences of cocaine expectation: findings in a non-human primate model of cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrino, Linda J; Beveridge, Thomas J R; Smith, Hilary R; Nader, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to stimuli and environments associated with drug use is considered one of the most important contributors to relapse among substance abusers. Neuroimaging studies have identified neural circuits underlying these responses in cocaine-dependent subjects. But these studies are often difficult to interpret because of the heterogeneity of the participants, substances abused, and differences in drug histories and social variables. Therefore, the goal of this study was to assess the functional effects of exposure to cocaine-associated stimuli in a non-human primate model of cocaine self-administration, providing precise control over these variables, with the 2-[(14) C]deoxyglucose method. Rhesus monkeys self-administered 0.3 mg/kg/injection cocaine (n = 4) under a fixed-interval 3-minute (FI 3-min) schedule of reinforcement (30 injections/session) for 100 sessions. Control animals (n = 4) underwent identical schedules of food reinforcement. Sessions were then discontinued for 30 days, after which time, monkeys were exposed to cocaine- or food-paired cues, and the 2-[(14) C]deoxyglucose experiment was conducted. The presentation of the cocaine-paired cues resulted in significant increases in functional activity within highly restricted circuits that included portions of the pre-commissural striatum, medial prefrontal cortex, rostral temporal cortex and limbic thalamus when compared with control animals presented with the food-paired cues. The presentation of cocaine-associated cues increased brain functional activity in contrast to the decreases observed after cocaine consumption. Furthermore, the topography of brain circuits engaged by the expectation of cocaine is similar to the distribution of effects during the earliest phases of cocaine self-administration, prior to the onset of neuroadaptations that accompany chronic cocaine exposure. PMID:25684556

  1. Dopamine-induced plasticity, phospholipase D (PLD activity and cocaine-cue behavior depend on PLD-linked metabotropic glutamate receptors in amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Krishnan

    Full Text Available Cocaine-cue associations induce synaptic plasticity with long lasting molecular and cellular changes in the amygdala, a site crucial for cue-associated memory mechanisms. The underlying neuroadaptations can include marked alterations in signaling via dopamine (DA receptors (DRs and metabotropic glutamate (Glu receptors (mGluRs. Previously, we reported that DR antagonists blocked forms of synaptic plasticity in amygdala slices of Sprague-Dawley rats withdrawn from repeated cocaine administration. In the present study, we investigated synaptic plasticity induced by exogenous DA and its dependence on mGluR signaling and a potential role for phospholipase D (PLD as a downstream element linked to mGluR and DR signaling. Utilizing a modified conditioned place preference (CPP paradigm as a functional behavioral measure, we studied the neurophysiological effects after two-weeks to the last cocaine conditioning. We recorded, electrophysiologically, a DR-induced synaptic potentiation in the basolateral to lateral capsula central amygdala (BLA-lcCeA synaptic pathway that was blocked by antagonists of group I mGluRs, particularly, the PLD-linked mGluR. In addition, we observed 2-2.5 fold increase in PLD expression and 3.7-fold increase in basal PLD enzyme activity. The enhanced PLD activity could be further stimulated (9.3 fold by a DA D1-like (D1/5R receptor agonist, and decreased to control levels by mGluR1 and PLD-linked mGluR antagonists. Diminished CPP was observed by infusion of a PLD-linked mGluR antagonist, PCCG-13, in the amygdala 15 minutes prior to testing, two weeks after the last cocaine injection. These results imply a functional interaction between D1/5Rs, group I mGluRs via PLD in the amygdala synaptic plasticity associated with cocaine-cues.

  2. The fast and furious : Cocaine, amphetamines and harm reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-P.C. Grund (Jean-Paul); P. Coffin (Philip); M. Jauffret-Roustide (Marie); M. Dijkstra (Minke); D. de Bruin (Dick); P. Blanken (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCocaine and amphetamines (‘stimulants’) are distinct central nervous system stimulants with similar effects (Pleuvry, 2009; Holman, 1994). Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid extracted from coca leaves. Amphetamines are a subclass of phenylethylamines with primarily stimulant effec

  3. Carrots and sticks fail to change behavior in cocaine addiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersche, K.D.; Gillan, C.M.; Jones, P.S.; Williams, G.B.; Ward, L.H.E.; Luijten, M.; Wit, S. de; Sahakian, B.J.; Bullmore, E.T.; Robbins, T.W.

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major public health problem that is particularly difficult to treat. Without medically proven pharmacological treatments, interventions to change the maladaptive behavior of addicted individuals mainly rely on psychosocial approaches. Here we report on impairments in cocaine-a

  4. Cannabis, Cocaine and the Wages of Prime Age Males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper uses a dataset collected among inhabitants of Amsterdam, to study whether wages of prime age male workers are affected by the use of cannabis and cocaine.The analysis shows that cocaine use and infrequent cannabis use do not affect wages.Frequent cannabis use has a negative wage effect.Th

  5. Cocaine is pharmacologically active in the nonhuman primate fetal brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benveniste, Helene; Fowler, Joanna S; Rooney, William D;

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third-trimester ......Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third......-trimester pregnant nonhuman primates, cocaine at doses typically used by drug abusers significantly increased brain glucose metabolism to the same extent in the mother as in the fetus (approximately 100%). Inasmuch as brain glucose metabolism is a sensitive marker of brain function, the current findings provide...... are influenced by the state of pregnancy. Our findings have clinical implications because they imply that the adverse effects of prenatal cocaine exposure to the newborn child include not only cocaine's deleterious effects to the placental circulation, but also cocaine's direct pharmacological effect...

  6. Adolescent cocaine exposure simplifies orbitofrontal cortical dendritic arbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M DePoy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine and amphetamine remodel dendritic spines within discrete cortico-limbic brain structures including the orbitofrontal cortex (oPFC. Whether dendrite structure is similarly affected, and whether pre-existing cellular characteristics influence behavioral vulnerabilities to drugs of abuse, remain unclear. Animal models provide an ideal venue to address these issues because neurobehavioral phenotypes can be defined both before, and following, drug exposure. We exposed mice to cocaine from postnatal days 31-35, corresponding to early adolescence, using a dosing protocol that causes impairments in an instrumental reversal task in adulthood. We then imaged and reconstructed excitatory neurons in deep-layer oPFC. Prior cocaine exposure shortened and simplified arbors, particularly in the basal region. Next, we imaged and reconstructed orbital neurons in a developmental-genetic model of cocaine vulnerability – the p190rhogap+/- mouse. p190RhoGAP is an actin cytoskeleton regulatory protein that stabilizes dendrites and dendritic spines, and p190rhogap+/- mice develop rapid and robust locomotor activation in response to cocaine. Despite this, oPFC dendritic arbors were intact in drug-naïve p190rhogap+/- mice. Together, these findings provide evidence that adolescent cocaine exposure has long-term effects on dendrite structure in the oPFC, and they suggest that cocaine-induced modifications in dendrite structure may contribute to the behavioral effects of cocaine more so than pre-existing structural abnormalities in this cell population.

  7. A role for BDNF in cocaine reward and relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenbaum, Geoffrey; Stalnaker, Thomas A; Shaham, Yavin

    2007-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important in regulating synaptic plasticity in the brain areas that process reward information. A new study reports that BDNF in the nucleus accumbens, a brain area critical for the rewarding effects of cocaine, promotes persistent cocaine-seeking behaviors and heightens relapse vulnerability.

  8. Perceived risk and sources of information regarding cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, J E; Brown, B S; Chung, A S; Kolar, A F; Michaelson, B S

    1991-07-01

    A study was made of the perceptions of risk and of the sources of information about risk regarding cocaine. Subjects were adult (N = 90) and juvenile (N = 20) cocaine abusers in seven Baltimore area treatment programs. Using structured interview, it was found that 87.8% of adults and 80.0% of youth had experienced at least one negative consequence of their cocaine use, other than addiction, prior to entry into treatment. The most common negative experience reported by both groups was the loss of reality testing. Moreover, 86.6% of adults and 65.0% of youth reported becoming addicted to cocaine before entering treatment. While juveniles sampled had entered treatment within a year of first cocaine use, adults entered treatment 7.9 years after first use and reported an average of 6.6 years of cocaine use before experiencing the first negative consequences. Television received consistently high ratings as an accessible and credible source of information about cocaine. Adolescents rated schools relatively high on the amount and accuracy of cocaine-related information provided. PMID:1959999

  9. The interplay between brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels and cocaine addiction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonkes, L.J.P.; Bussel, I.P. van; Verheij, M.M.M.; Homberg, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major health problem that affects millions of people. Cocaine acts by inhibiting dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine(5-HT)] reuptake. The dopaminergic system is generally assumed to be involved in the reinforcing aspects of the drug, but the role of 5-HT

  10. Sonographic and Endoscopic Findings in Cocaine-Induced Ischemic Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Thomas; Wilkens, Rune; Bonderup, Ole Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-induced ischemic colitis is a recognized entity. The diagnosis is based on clinical and endoscopic findings. However, diagnostic imaging is helpful in the evaluation of abdominal symptoms and prior studies have suggested specific sonographic findings in ischemic colitis. We report...... sonographic and endoscopic images along with abdominal computed tomography in a case of cocaine-induced ischemic colitis....

  11. Cocaine Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine ReceptorsInfluences Dopamine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs potently regulate dopamine (DA release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors.

  12. Children with Prenatal Cocaine Exposure: Resilient or Handicapped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, LeAdelle; Cox, Deborah

    1993-01-01

    Notes that prenatal exposure to cocaine may result in broad range of deficits. Reviews pharmacological properties of cocaine critical to neurological and behavioral outcomes. Delineates specific multilevel and multidisciplinary interventions with family unit. Advocates that services for each child be based on individual strengths and weaknesses…

  13. [Rhabdomyolysis in acute cocaine poisoning. Presentation of 2 cases].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bernad, M

    1990-12-01

    Because the important increase of cocaine abuse and the frequent pathology associated, we present two cases of males who had a multiorganic failure cause by severe rabdomyolysis, renal failure with myoglobinuria and disseminated intravascular coagulation, after the cocaine consumption. In one case a pancreatitis associated was observed, this not being described before. Both cases are recovered.

  14. A neurotensin analog blocks cocaine-conditioned place preference and reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boules, Mona; Netz, Rebecca; Fredrickson, Paul A; Richelson, Elliott

    2016-04-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a neuropeptide that acts as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system. Several studies suggest a therapeutic role for NT analogs in nicotine and other psychostimulant addictions. We studied the effects of the nonselective NT receptor agonist NT69L, which has equal affinity for the two major NT receptors, NTS1 and NTS2, on the expression of cocaine-conditioned place preference (cocaine-CPP) and reinstatement after extinction. Robust cocaine-CPP was obtained after 5 days of conditioning. Extinction was induced using eight repeated daily injections of saline. Reinstatement was prompted by priming with one injection of cocaine (12 mg/kg intraperitoneally). On the test day, NT69L (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally) was administered 30 min before assessing cocaine-CPP. Extinction led to the loss of cocaine-CPP. One injection of cocaine (12 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for cocaine priming reinstated cocaine-CPP. NT69L blocked cocaine-CPP reinstatement in cocaine-primed animals. In addition, NT69L blocked cocaine-CPP reinstatement when administered before priming with cocaine. Thus, the NT agonist NT69L blocked both cocaine-CPP and reinstatement to cocaine preference. NT69L may exert this action by modulating the mesocorticolimbic dopamine and glutamatergic pathways involved in addiction and relapse processes. Therefore, NT agonists may represent a novel therapy for the treatment of addiction to cocaine and possibly to other psychostimulants. PMID:26901162

  15. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Abed Abdin, Asma; Hamza, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Awab

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as "euglycemic DKA." This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA.

  16. A comparison of male and female cocaine abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M L; Weiss, R D; Mirin, S M; Lange, U

    1989-02-01

    Little has been written about the differences between male and female cocaine abusers. We therefore compared sociodemographic characteristics, reasons for cocaine use, drug effects, depressive symptoms, and psychiatric diagnoses in 95 men and 34 women hospitalized for cocaine abuse. Men were more likely to be employed, to hold higher status jobs, and to be self-supporting. Women were more likely to cite specific reasons for drug use, while men tended to use cocaine as part of a larger pattern of antisocial behavior. Women were diagnosed more often as having major depression, and their depressive symptoms improved much more slowly than men's when drug free. These findings suggest that women cocaine abusers may initially experience more residual problems, eg, depression and job dissatisfaction, than men after becoming drug free. Drug treatment centers should be alert to possible differences based on gender. PMID:2913971

  17. Examining possible gender differences among cocaine-dependent outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Conrad J; Badger, Gary J; Sigmon, Stacey C; Higgins, Stephen T

    2002-08-01

    Potential differences in sociodemographics, drug use, and measures of treatment outcome were examined among 137 male and 51 female cocaine-dependent outpatients. More women than men were unemployed, received public assistance, and were living with their children. Women reported fewer years of regular cocaine use, spending less money per week on cocaine, less prior treatment for cocaine abuse, and were more likely than men to test positive for cocaine at intake. With respect to other drug use, fewer women than men reported using sedatives and tested positive for sedatives at intake. Women reported a lower frequency of alcohol use before intake, and fewer women than men met criteria for cannabis dependence. Men and women experienced comparable improvement during the course of treatment and follow-up. PMID:12233993

  18. Disrupted Functional Connectivity with Dopaminergic Midbrain in Cocaine Abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasi, D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.; Carrillo, J.; Maloney, T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-06-01

    Chronic cocaine use is associated with disrupted dopaminergic neurotransmission but how this disruption affects overall brain function (other than reward/motivation) is yet to be fully investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that cocaine addicted subjects will have disrupted functional connectivity between the midbrain (where dopamine neurons are located) and cortical and subcortical brain regions during the performance of a sustained attention task. We measured brain activation and functional connectivity with fMRI in 20 cocaine abusers and 20 matched controls. When compared to controls, cocaine abusers had lower positive functional connectivity of midbrain with thalamus, cerebellum, and rostral cingulate, and this was associated with decreased activation in thalamus and cerebellum and enhanced deactivation in rostral cingulate. These findings suggest that decreased functional connectivity of the midbrain interferes with the activation and deactivation signals associated with sustained attention in cocaine addicts.

  19. Disrupted functional connectivity with dopaminergic midbrain in cocaine abusers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dardo Tomasi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic cocaine use is associated with disrupted dopaminergic neurotransmission but how this disruption affects overall brain function (other than reward/motivation is yet to be fully investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that cocaine addicted subjects will have disrupted functional connectivity between the midbrain (where dopamine neurons are located and cortical and subcortical brain regions during the performance of a sustained attention task. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured brain activation and functional connectivity with fMRI in 20 cocaine abusers and 20 matched controls. When compared to controls, cocaine abusers had lower positive functional connectivity of midbrain with thalamus, cerebellum, and rostral cingulate, and this was associated with decreased activation in thalamus and cerebellum and enhanced deactivation in rostral cingulate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that decreased functional connectivity of the midbrain interferes with the activation and deactivation signals associated with sustained attention in cocaine addicts.

  20. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Abed Abdin, Asma; Hamza, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Awab

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as "euglycemic DKA." This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA. PMID:27579186

  1. Cocaine use and withdrawal: the effect on sleep and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, R; Bakos, L; Compton, P; Gawin, F

    1992-01-01

    Three recreational cocaine users (age, 26.7 years), after one adaptation night, spent 5 days and nights in the laboratory where their EEG, EOG, and submental EMG were recorded during all of their sleep. On the second afternoon and evening of the study, subjects used an estimated 1 to 2 g cocaine intranasally. They all slept between 2:00 A.M. and 9:00 A.M. that night. Blood samples were drawn each evening and morning. Absolute plasma cocaine levels and patterns of elimination were consistent with subjects report of dose and time of administration. Mood ratings were made repeatedly throughout the study. There was suppression of REM sleep during the use of cocaine followed by a rebound which is specific to REM sleep and is not seen in other stages of sleep. REM variables subsided to normal levels on the third recovery night following cocaine use. PMID:1562006

  2. Opponent process properties of self-administered cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenberg, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, data collected in our laboratory have demonstrated that self-administered cocaine produces Opponent-Process-like behavioral effects. Animals running a straight alley once each day for IV cocaine develop over trials an approach-avoidance conflict about re-entering the goal box. This conflict behavior is characterized by a stop in forward locomotion (usually at the very mouth of the goal box) followed by a turn and 'retreat' back toward the goal box. The results of a series of studies conducted over the past decade collectively suggest that the behavioral ambivalence exemplified by rats running the alley for IV cocaine stems from concurrent and opponent positive (rewarding) and negative (anxiogenic) properties of the drug--both of which are associated with the goal box. These opponent properties of cocaine have been shown to result from temporally distinct affective states. Using a conditioned place preference test, we have been able to demonstrate that while the initial immediate effects of IV cocaine are reinforcing, the state present 15 min post-injection is aversive. In our most recent work, the co-administration of IV cocaine with either oral ethanol or IV heroin was found to greatly diminish the development and occurrence of retreat behaviors in the runway. It may therefore be that the high incidence of co-abuse of cocaine with either ethanol or heroin, stems from the users' motivation to alleviate some of the negative side effects of cocaine. It would seem then that the Opponent Process Theory has provided a useful conceptual framework for the study of the behavioral consequences of self-administered cocaine including the notion that both positive and negative reinforcement mechanisms are involved in the development and maintenance of cocaine abuse. PMID:15019422

  3. Opponent process properties of self-administered cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenberg, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, data collected in our laboratory have demonstrated that self-administered cocaine produces Opponent-Process-like behavioral effects. Animals running a straight alley once each day for IV cocaine develop over trials an approach-avoidance conflict about re-entering the goal box. This conflict behavior is characterized by a stop in forward locomotion (usually at the very mouth of the goal box) followed by a turn and 'retreat' back toward the goal box. The results of a series of studies conducted over the past decade collectively suggest that the behavioral ambivalence exemplified by rats running the alley for IV cocaine stems from concurrent and opponent positive (rewarding) and negative (anxiogenic) properties of the drug--both of which are associated with the goal box. These opponent properties of cocaine have been shown to result from temporally distinct affective states. Using a conditioned place preference test, we have been able to demonstrate that while the initial immediate effects of IV cocaine are reinforcing, the state present 15 min post-injection is aversive. In our most recent work, the co-administration of IV cocaine with either oral ethanol or IV heroin was found to greatly diminish the development and occurrence of retreat behaviors in the runway. It may therefore be that the high incidence of co-abuse of cocaine with either ethanol or heroin, stems from the users' motivation to alleviate some of the negative side effects of cocaine. It would seem then that the Opponent Process Theory has provided a useful conceptual framework for the study of the behavioral consequences of self-administered cocaine including the notion that both positive and negative reinforcement mechanisms are involved in the development and maintenance of cocaine abuse.

  4. Genome-Environmental Risk Assessment of Cocaine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changshuai eWei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine-associated biomedical and psychosocial problems are substantial 21st century global burdens of disease. This burden is largely driven by a cocaine dependence process that becomes engaged with increasing occasions of cocaine product use. For this reason, the development of a risk prediction model for cocaine dependence may be of special value. Ultimately, success in building such a risk prediction model may help promote personalized cocaine dependence prediction, prevention, and treatment approaches not presently available. As an initial step toward this goal, we conducted a genome-environmental risk prediction study for cocaine dependence, simultaneously considering 948,658 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, six potentially cocaine-related facets of environment, and three personal characteristics. In this study, a novel statistical approach was applied to 1045 case-control samples from the Family Study of Cocaine Dependence. The results identify 330 low- to medium-effect size SNPs (i.e., those with a single locus p-value of less than 10-4 that made a substantial contribution to cocaine dependence risk prediction (AUC=0.718. Inclusion of six facets of environment and three personal characteristics yielded greater accuracy (AUC=0.809. Of special importance was childhood abuse (CA among trauma experiences, with a potentially important interaction of CA and the GBE1 gene in cocaine dependence risk prediction. Genome-environmental risk prediction models may become more promising in future risk prediction research, once a more substantial array of environmental facets are taken into account, sometimes with model improvement when gene-by-environment product terms are included as part of these risk predication models.

  5. PET Studies in Nonhuman Primate Models of Cocaine Abuse: Translational Research Related to Vulnerability and Neuroadaptations

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, Robert W.; Duke, Angela N.; Nader, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The current review highlights the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to study the neurobiological substrates underlying vulnerability to cocaine addiction and subsequent adaptations following chronic cocaine self-administration in nonhuman primate models of cocaine abuse. Environmental (e.g., social rank) and sex-specific influences on dopaminergic function and sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine are discussed. Cocaine-related cognitive defic...

  6. Modeling the Catalysis of Anti-Cocaine Catalytic Antibody: Competing Reaction Pathways and Free Energy Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yongmei; Gao, Daquan; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2008-01-01

    The competing reaction pathways and the corresponding free energy barriers for cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by an anti-cocaine catalytic antibody, mAb 15A10, were studied by using a novel computational strategy based on the binding free energy calculations on the antibody binding with cocaine and transition states. The calculated binding free energies were used to evaluate the free energy barrier shift from the cocaine hydrolysis in water to the antibody-catalyzed cocaine hydrolysis for each ...

  7. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Uncouples mGluR1 from Homer1 and Gq Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Kalindi Bakshi; Raminder Parihar; Goswami, Satindra K.; Melissa Walsh; Eitan Friedman; Hoau-Yan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine exposure during gestation causes protracted neurobehavioral changes consistent with a compromised glutamatergic system. Although cocaine profoundly disrupts glutamatergic neurotransmission and in utero cocaine exposure negatively affects metabotropic glutamate receptor-type 1 (mGluR1) activity, the effect of prenatal cocaine exposure on mGluR1 signaling and the underlying mechanism responsible for the prenatal cocaine effect remain elusive. Using brains of the 21-day-old (P21) prenata...

  8. Effects of low dose cocaine on REM sleep in the freely moving rat

    OpenAIRE

    Knapp, Clifford M.; Datta, Subimal; Ciraulo, Domenic A; Kornetsky, Conan

    2007-01-01

    Cocaine administration can be disruptive to sleep. In compulsive cocaine users, sleep disruption may be a factor contributing to relapse. The effects of cocaine on sleep, particularly those produced by low doses, have not been extensively studied. Low dose cocaine may stimulate brain reward systems that are linked to the liability of abusing of this drug. This study was designed to assess the effects of the acute administration of low to moderate cocaine doses on sleep in the rat. Polygraphic...

  9. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in cocaine-taking behaviors in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Bong Hyo; Chang, Su-Chan; Yeo, Mi Jin; Kim, Sang Hyun; Folsom, Ryan J.; Schilaty, Nathan D.; Kim, Kwang Joong; Yang, Chae Ha; Steffensen, Scott C.; Kim, Hee Young

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the development of behavioral sensitization following repeated cocaine exposure. We hypothesized that increased ROS following cocaine exposure would act as signaling molecules in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, which might play an important role in mediating the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The aim of this study was to evaluate cocaine enhancement of brain metabolic activity and the effects of ROS scavengers on cocaine self-adminis...

  10. Altered social and non-social decision-making in recreational and dependent cocaine users

    OpenAIRE

    Hulka, L M; Eisenegger, C.; Preller, K. H.; Vonmoos, M; Jenni, D; Bendrick, K; Baumgartner, M.R.; Seifritz, E.; Quednow, B B

    2014-01-01

    Background Maladaptive decision-making is assumed to be a core feature of cocaine addiction. Indeed, numerous studies have reported deficits in non-social decision-making tasks and reward-related impulsivity in dependent cocaine users. However, social decision-making has not been examined in cocaine users yet. Moreover, it is unknown if even recreational and non-dependent cocaine use is linked to decision-making deficits. Therefore, we investigated whether recreational and dependent cocaine u...

  11. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    OpenAIRE

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L; Shi, Lei; Gracia, Luis; Raniszewska, Klaudia; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog LeuT. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopami...

  12. Brief intermittent cocaine self-administration and abstinence sensitizes cocaine effects on the dopamine transporter and increases drug seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calipari, Erin S; Siciliano, Cody A; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-02-01

    Although traditional sensitization paradigms, which result in an augmentation of cocaine-induced locomotor behavior and dopamine (DA) overflow following repeated experimenter-delivered cocaine injections, are often used as a model to study drug addiction, similar effects have been difficult to demonstrate following cocaine self-administration. We have recently shown that intermittent access (IntA) to cocaine can result in increased cocaine potency at the DA transporter (DAT); however, traditional sensitization paradigms often show enhanced effects following withdrawal/abstinence periods. Therefore, we determined a time course of IntA-induced sensitization by examining the effects of 1 or 3 days of IntA, as well as a 7-day abstinence period on DA function, cocaine potency, and reinforcement. Here we show that cocaine potency is increased following as little as 3 days of IntA and further augmented following an abstinence period. In addition, IntA plus abstinence produced greater evoked DA release in the presence of cocaine as compared with all other groups, demonstrating that following abstinence, both cocaine's ability to increase DA release and inhibit uptake at the DAT, two separate mechanisms for increasing DA levels, are enhanced. Finally, we found that IntA-induced sensitization of the DA system resulted in an increased reinforcing efficacy of cocaine, an effect that was augmented after the 7-day abstinence period. These results suggest that sensitization of the DA system may have an important role in the early stages of drug abuse and may drive the increased drug seeking and taking that characterize the transition to uncontrolled drug use. Human data suggest that intermittency, sensitization, and periods of abstinence have an integral role in the process of addiction, highlighting the importance of utilizing pre-clinical models that integrate these phenomena, and suggesting that IntA paradigms may serve as novel models of human addiction. PMID:25212486

  13. Psychopathology among cocaine abusers entering treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, P H; Miller, A B; Millman, R B; Woody, G E; Todd, T; Kemp, J; Lipton, D S

    1990-07-01

    A number of different indicators of psychopathology were assessed in this study of 76 cocaine and crack abusers who entered outpatient treatment in New York City between June and December 1987. The majority (75%) had used cocaine for 4 years or more, and the majority (62%) spent over one thousand dollars a month on cocaine in the 6 months before entry into treatment. Forty-seven percent of the sample were found to be clinically depressed. Phobic disorders were the only other axis I diagnoses found in addition to depression, and all persons who were found to have phobic disorders also were diagnosed as having some form of depressive disorder. The four most common axis II diagnoses were antisocial personality (21%), passive-aggressive (21%), borderline (18%) and self-defeating (18%). Subjects were classified as falling into one of the following three categories of a newly developed "psychopathology classification": a) no diagnosed psychopathology except substance abuse or dependency; b) one or more axis II diagnoses, but no axis I diagnoses except for substance abuse or dependency; c) at least one axis I diagnosis in addition to drug disorders whether or not accompanied by an axis II diagnosis. Mean scores on subscales and total score on the SCL-90, as well as total score on the Beck Depression Inventory, were ordered by category of the classification scheme, with those having no diagnosed psychopathology except substance abuse having the lowest score and persons in the third category having the highest score.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2366058

  14. Forearm metabolism during infusion of adrenaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Stefl, B; Bülow, J

    2000-01-01

    Human skeletal muscle metabolism is often investigated by measurements of substrate fluxes across the forearm. To evaluate whether the two forearms give the same metabolic information, nine healthy subjects were studied in the fasted state and during infusion of adrenaline. Both arms were...... catheterized in a cubital vein in the retrograde direction. A femoral artery was catheterized for blood sampling, and a femoral vein for infusion of adrenaline. Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion strain-gauge plethysmography. Forearm subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow was measured...... by the local 133Xe washout method. Metabolic fluxes were calculated as the product of forearm blood flow and a-v differences of metabolite concentrations. After baseline measurements, adrenaline was infused at a rate of 0.3 nmol kg-1 min-1. No difference in the metabolic information obtained in the fasting...

  15. Design of Infusion Schemes for Neuroreceptor Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ling; Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karine;

    2016-01-01

    for bolus infusion (BI) or programmed infusion (PI) experiments. Steady-state quantitative measurements can be made with one short scan and venous blood samples. The GABAA receptor ligand [(11)C]Flumazenil (FMZ) was chosen for this purpose, as it lacks a suitable reference region. Methods. Five bolus [(11)C...... state was attained within 40 min, which was 8 min earlier than the optimal BI (B/I ratio = 55 min). Conclusions. The system can design both BI and PI schemes to attain steady state rapidly. For example, subjects can be [(11)C]FMZ-PET scanned after 40 min of tracer infusion for 40 min with venous...

  16. Quinine enhances the behavioral stimulant effect of cocaine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Adriana; Wessinger, William D; Kucheryavykh, Yuri V; Sanabria, Priscila; Eaton, Misty J; Skatchkov, Serguei N; Rojas, Legier V; Maldonado-Martínez, Gerónimo; Inyushin, Mikhail Y

    2015-02-01

    The Na(+)-dependent dopamine transporter (DAT) is primarily responsible for regulating free dopamine (DA) concentrations in the brain by participating in the majority of DA uptake; however, other DA transporters may also participate, especially if cocaine or other drugs of abuse compromise DAT. Recently, such cocaine-insensitive low-affinity mono- and poly-amine OCT transporters were described in astrocytes which use DA as a substrate. These transporters are from a different transporter family and while insensitive to cocaine, they are specifically blocked by quinine and some steroids. Quinine is inexpensive and is often found in injected street drugs as an "adulterant". The present study was designed to determine the participation of OCTs in cocaine dependent behavioral and physiological changes in mice. Using FVB mice we showed, that daily single injections of quinine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) co-administered with cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) for 10 days significantly enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor behavioral sensitization. Quinine had no significant effect on the time course of behavioral activation. In astrocytes from the ventral tegmental area of mice, transporter currents of quinine-sensitive monoamine transporters were also augmented after two weeks of cocaine administration. The importance of low-affinity high-capacity transporters for DA clearance is discussed, explaining the known ability of systemically administered DAT inhibitors to anomalously increase DA clearance.

  17. Cocaine during pregnancy: a critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offidani, C; Pomini, F; Caruso, A; Ferrazzani, S; Chiarotti, M; Fiori, A

    1995-09-01

    A number of epidemiological indices suggest that the use of cocaine in Italy is increasing, thus explaining the importance of scientific interest in this field. There is considerable disparity between the scientific papers published in the literature concerning the damaging effects on fetus and mother linked to the use of cocaine during pregnancy. The main problem consists of the method used to identify those patients using cocaine. These methods are burdened by a high level of false negatives: subjects who often use a variety of active pharmacological substances are identified and the methods are not always suitable for classifying subjects according to useful clinical parameters. This is reflected in the poor quality of data concerning the epidemiology and clinical aspects of cocaine abuse during pregnancy. A careful selection of the best scientific papers published in the literature shows that the effects on the maternal organism are slight, whereas those on the fetus are more severe. Compared to controls, the use of cocaine is associated with a high percentage of cardiac malformations, preterm delivery, low birth weight and minor anomalies of the nervous system. Results relating to sudden neonatal death are discordant. This paper shows that the use of cocaine is often underestimated both in epidemiological terms and from the fetal point of view. This behaviour is linked to the belief that the effects of cocaine are benign. PMID:8545039

  18. Cocaine-induced psychotic symptoms in clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Moragues, Esperanza; Araos Gómez, Pedro; González-Saiz, Francisco; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-06-30

    Cocaine use is significantly associated with psychiatric co-morbidities of which psychotic symptoms are the most typical. The primary goal of this study is to estimate the life-time prevalence of cocaine-induced psychotic symptoms (CIPS) in a sample of patients without a history of primary psychosis, who attended specific out-patient drug-dependence treatment centres (ODDTCs). This is an observational, cross-sectional design and a consecutive sampling technique. The Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms-Cocaine Induced Psychosis (SAPS-CIP) was used to interview 114 patients who request treatment at specific ODDTCs for problems related to cocaine use. Most patients, 89.5% (95% CIs: 83.8-95.2%) had dependence of cocaine and 84.2% (95% CIs: 77.5-90.9%) showed at least one CIPS. Patients with CIPS had used cocaine more times throughout their lives and had a more frequency of use during the period of higher abuse severity in the last year, had higher severity of dependence score and had fewer abstinence periods greater than 30 days compared with those without CIPS. Cocaine dependency severity scale scores were significantly greater in patients with CIPS compared with those without CIPS. PMID:24679995

  19. Role for M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Fedorova, Irina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P D; Rasmussen, Thøger; Thomsen, Morgane; Bolwig, Tom G; Knitowski, Karen M; McKinzie, David L; Yamada, Masahisa; Wess, Jürgen; Basile, Anthony

    2003-10-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors of the M5 subtype are expressed by dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmentum. These M5 receptors modulate the activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, which play an important role in mediating reinforcing properties of abused psychostimulants like cocaine. The potential role of M5 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine was investigated using M5 receptor-deficient mice in a model of acute cocaine self-administration. The M5-deficient mice self-administered cocaine at a significantly lower rate than wild-type controls. In the conditioned place preference procedure, a classic test for evaluating the rewarding properties of drugs, M5-deficient mice spent significantly less time in the cocaine-paired compartment than control mice. Moreover, the severity of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome (withdrawal-associated anxiety measured in the elevated plus-maze) was significantly attenuated in mice lacking the M5 receptor. These results demonstrate that M5 receptors play an important role in mediating both cocaine-associated reinforcement and withdrawal.

  20. Diet influences cocaine withdrawal behaviors in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebens, M; Barros, H M T

    2003-01-01

    The effects of drugs of abuse might depend on several environmental factors, among them the individual's feeding habits. It was our objective to study the influence of the diet on cocaine acute behavioral effects and during the first 5 days of withdrawal after prolonged treatment. Rats were fed a balanced diet, high-protein diet, high-carbohydrate diet or high-fat diet from weaning to adulthood. Adult rats were injected with 15 mg/kg cocaine 24, 5 and 1 h before the forced swimming retest or the drug was administered daily during 15 days and the animals were evaluated in the forced swimming test on five daily occasions after drug withdrawal. Diets alone did not induce significant behavioral differences in locomotion, immobility, swimming, climbing or head shakes. Acute cocaine reduced immobility during the forced swimming test and increased locomotion demonstrating a nonspecific antiimmobility effect related to hyperactivity. Acute cocaine reduced head shakes of rats fed high-protein and high-carbohydrate diets. After cocaine withdrawal, head shakes were decreased for rats fed any of the diets and rats were more immobile if fed a high-fat diet and were less immobile if fed a high-protein or high-carbohydrate diet. In conclusion, differences in the amounts of macronutrients in the diet may cause different behavioral outcomes after acute cocaine and during cocaine withdrawal.

  1. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nance, Mark R.; Gao, Daquan; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Macdonald, Joanne; Tamburi, Patricia; Yoon, Dan; Landry, Donald M.; Woods, James H.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K. (Michigan); (Columbia); (Kentucky)

    2010-09-03

    Cocaine is considered to be the most addictive of all substances of abuse and mediates its effects by inhibiting monoamine transporters, primarily the dopamine transporters. There are currently no small molecules that can be used to combat its toxic and addictive properties, in part because of the difficulty of developing compounds that inhibit cocaine binding without having intrinsic effects on dopamine transport. Most of the effective cocaine inhibitors also display addictive properties. We have recently reported the use of cocaine esterase (CocE) to accelerate the removal of systemic cocaine and to prevent cocaine-induced lethality. However, wild-type CocE is relatively unstable at physiological temperatures ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 13 min at 37 C), presenting challenges for its development as a viable therapeutic agent. We applied computational approaches to predict mutations to stabilize CocE and showed that several of these have increased stability both in vitro and in vivo, with the most efficacious mutant (T172R/G173Q) extending half-life up to 370 min. Here we present novel X-ray crystallographic data on these mutants that provide a plausible model for the observed enhanced stability. We also more extensively characterize the previously reported variants and report on a new stabilizing mutant, L169K. The improved stability of these engineered CocE enzymes will have a profound influence on the use of this protein to combat cocaine-induced toxicity and addiction in humans.

  2. Dopamine-beta hydroxylase polymorphism and cocaine addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cocaine addiction involves a number of medical, psychological and social problems. Understanding the genetic aetiology of this disorder will be essential for design of effective treatments. Dopamine-beta hydroxylase (DbH catalyzes the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine and could, therefore, have an influence on both cocaine action and the basal sensitivity of neurotransmitter systems to cocaine. Recently, the -1021C>T polymorphism have been found to strongly correlated with individual variation in plasma DbH activity. To test the influence of this polymorphism on the susceptibility of cocaine addiction, we decided to genotype it in a sample of 689 cocaine addicts and 832 healthy individuals. Genotypic and allelic analyses did not show any evidence of association with cocaine addiction, even after correcting for the effect of population stratification and other possible confounders. Our results do not support a major role of the -1021C>T polymorphism or the gene itself in the development of cocaine addiction but further examination of other variants within this gene will be necessary to completely rule out an effect.

  3. PET physiological measurements using constant infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide range of study designs can be used with positron emission tomography methods to provide quantitative measurements of physiological parameters. While bolus injection of tracer is the conventional approach, use of combined bolus plus constant infusion provides a number of advantages for receptor-binding tracers. Of recent interest is the use of this approach to dynamically follow the displacement of tracer during in vivo changes in neurotransmitter concentrations. This paper provides an overview of the tradeoffs in using bolus/infusion methods versus conventional bolus injection for receptor binding studies

  4. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence. PMID:26934161

  5. Covalent thiol adducts arising from reactive intermediates of cocaine biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kevin J; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2013-11-18

    Exposure to cocaine results in the depletion of hepatocellular glutathione and macromolecular protein binding in humans. Such cocaine-induced responses have generally been attributed to oxidative stress and reactive metabolites resulting from oxidative activation of the cocaine tropane nitrogen. However, little conclusive data exists on the mechanistic pathways leading to protein modification or the structure and specificity of cocaine-derived adduction products. We now report a previously uncharacterized route of cocaine bioactivation leading to the covalent adduction of biological thiols, including cysteine and glutathione. Incubation of cocaine with biological nucleophiles in an in vitro biotransformation system containing human liver microsomes identified a monooxygenase-mediated event leading to the oxidation of, and subsequent sulfhydryl addition to, the cocaine aryl moiety. Adduct structures were confirmed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution, high mass accuracy mass spectrometry. Examination of assays containing transgenic bactosomes expressing single human cytochrome P450 isoforms determined the role of P450s 1A2, 2C19, and 2D6 in the oxidation process resulting in adduct formation. P450-catalyzed aryl epoxide formation and subsequent attack by free nucleophilic moieties is consistent with the resulting adduct structures, mechanisms of formation, and the empirical observation of multiple structural and stereo isomers. Analogous adduction mechanisms were maintained across all sulfhydryl-containing nucleophile models examined; N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, and a synthetic cysteine-containing hexapeptide. Predictive in silico calculations of molecular reactivity and electrophilicity/nucleophilicity were compared to the results of in vitro assay incubations in order to better understand the adduction process using the principles of hard and soft acid and base (HSAB) theory. This study elucidated a novel metabolic

  6. Neonatal fibroblast growth factor treatment enhances cocaine sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Sarah M; Turner, Cortney A; Flagel, Shelly B; Simpson, Danielle N; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda

    2012-11-01

    Growth factors are critical in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity, and recent studies point to their involvement in addiction. We previously reported increased levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) in high novelty/drug-seeking rats (bred high responders, bHR) compared to low novelty/drug-seeking rats(bred low responders, bLRs). The present study asked whether an early life manipulation of the FGF system(a single FGF2 injection on postnatal day 2) can impact cocaine sensitization and associated neurobiological markers in adult bHR/bLR animals. Neonatal FGF2- and vehicle-treated bHR/bLR rats were sensitized to cocaine(7 daily injections, 15 mg/kg/day, i.p.) in adulthood. Neonatal FGF2 markedly increased bLRs' typically low psychomotor sensitization to cocaine (day 7 locomotor response to cocaine), but had little effect on bHRs' cocaine sensitization. Gene expression studies examined dopaminergic molecules as well as FGF2 and the FGFR1 receptor in cocaine naïve animals, to investigate possible neurobiological alterations induced by neonatal FGF2 exposure that may influence behavioral response to cocaine. bLRs showed decreased tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), decreased D1 and increased D2 receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as decreased FGF2 in the VTA, substantia nigra, accumbens core, and caudate putamen compared to bHRs. Neonatal FGF2 selectively increased D1 receptor and FGF2 mRNA in the accumbens core of bLRs, which may contribute to their heightened cocaine sensitization. Our results suggest increased FGF2 in the mesodopaminergic circuit (as in baseline bHRs and neonatal FGF2-exposed bLRs vs. baseline bLRs) enhances an individual's susceptibility to cocaine sensitization and may increase vulnerability to drug seeking and addiction. PMID:22819969

  7. Histone arginine methylation in cocaine action in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damez-Werno, Diane M; Sun, HaoSheng; Scobie, Kimberly N; Shao, Ningyi; Rabkin, Jaclyn; Dias, Caroline; Calipari, Erin S; Maze, Ian; Pena, Catherine J; Walker, Deena M; Cahill, Michael E; Chandra, Ramesh; Gancarz, Amy; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Landry, Joseph A; Cates, Hannah; Lobo, Mary-Kay; Dietz, David; Allis, C David; Guccione, Ernesto; Turecki, Gustavo; Defilippi, Paola; Neve, Rachael L; Hurd, Yasmin L; Shen, Li; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-08-23

    Repeated cocaine exposure regulates transcriptional regulation within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), and epigenetic mechanisms-such as histone acetylation and methylation on Lys residues-have been linked to these lasting actions of cocaine. In contrast to Lys methylation, the role of histone Arg (R) methylation remains underexplored in addiction models. Here we show that protein-R-methyltransferase-6 (PRMT6) and its associated histone mark, asymmetric dimethylation of R2 on histone H3 (H3R2me2a), are decreased in the NAc of mice and rats after repeated cocaine exposure, including self-administration, and in the NAc of cocaine-addicted humans. Such PRMT6 down-regulation occurs selectively in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) expressing dopamine D2 receptors (D2-MSNs), with opposite regulation occurring in D1-MSNs, and serves to protect against cocaine-induced addictive-like behavioral abnormalities. Using ChIP-seq, we identified Src kinase signaling inhibitor 1 (Srcin1; also referred to as p140Cap) as a key gene target for reduced H3R2me2a binding, and found that consequent Srcin1 induction in the NAc decreases Src signaling, cocaine reward, and the motivation to self-administer cocaine. Taken together, these findings suggest that suppression of Src signaling in NAc D2-MSNs, via PRMT6 and H3R2me2a down-regulation, functions as a homeostatic brake to restrain cocaine action, and provide novel candidates for the development of treatments for cocaine addiction. PMID:27506785

  8. Effect of steel and teflon infusion catheters on subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow and infusion counter pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Lise; Skov-Jensen, Camilla; Kaastrup, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous tissue is an important target for drug deposition or infusion. A local trauma may induce alterations in local microcirculation and diffusion barriers with consequences for drug bioavailability. We examined the influence of infusion catheters' wear time on local...... microcirculation and infusion counter pressure. METHODS: One steel catheter and one Teflon (Dupont, Wilmington, DE) catheter were inserted in subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) in 10 healthy, lean men. The catheters were infused with isotonic saline at a rate of 10 microL/h for 48 h. Another steel...... catheter and a Teflon catheter were inserted contralateral to the previous catheters after 48 h. The infusion counter pressure was measured during a basal infusion rate followed by a bolus infusion. The measurements during a basal rate infusion were repeated after the bolus infusion. Adipose tissue blood...

  9. Effect of PTSD diagnosis and contingency management procedures on cocaine use in dually cocaine and opioid-dependent individuals maintained on LAAM: A retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mancino, M.; McGaugh, J.; Feldman, Z; Poling, J.; Oliveto, A.

    2010-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial retrospectively examined the effect of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and contingency management (CM) on cocaine use in opioid and cocaine dependent individuals maintained on high or low-dose LAAM randomly assigned to CM or a yoked-control condition. Cocaine-positive urines decreased more rapidly over time in those without PTSD versus those with PTSD in the non-contingency condition. In participants with PTSD, CM resulted in fewer cocaine positive urines ...

  10. IMPACT OF GESTATIONAL COCAINE TREATMENT OR PRENATAL COCAINE EXPOSURE ON EARLY POSTPARTUM OXYTOCIN mRNA LEVELS AND RECEPTOR BINDING IN THE RAT

    OpenAIRE

    Mcmurray, M.S.; Cox, E.T.; Jarrett, T.M.; Williams, S.K.; Walker, C H; Johns, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Prior research reported decreased oxytocin levels in specific brain regions correlated with disruptions in maternal care following gestational cocaine treatment in rats. Similarly, prenatal exposure to cocaine impaired subsequent maternal behavior in adulthood, but behavioral alterations were not associated with decreases in oxytocin levels in the same brain regions as were found in their cocaine-treated rat dams. To determine if other aspects of the oxytocin system are disrupted by cocaine t...

  11. Rats classified as low or high cocaine locomotor responders: A unique model involving striatal dopamine transporters that predicts cocaine addiction-like behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Dorothy J.; Nelson, Anna M.; Mandt, Bruce H.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Rorabaugh, Jacki M.; Ng, Christopher M.C.; Barcomb, Kelsey M.; Richards, Toni L.; Allen, Richard M.; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences are a hallmark of drug addiction. Here, we describe a rat model based on differential initial responsiveness to low dose cocaine. Despite similar brain cocaine levels, individual outbred Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit markedly different magnitudes of acute cocaine-induced locomotor activity and, thereby, can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs). LCRs and HCRs differ in drug-induced, but not novelty-associated, hyperactivity. LCRs have higher basal...

  12. Overlapping patterns of brain activation to food and cocaine cues in cocaine abusers: association to striatal D2/D3 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Caparelli, Elisabeth C.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine, through its activation of dopamine (DA) signaling, usurps pathways that process natural rewards. However, the extent to which there is overlap between the networks that process natural and drug rewards and whether DA signaling associated with cocaine abuse influences these networks have not been investigated in humans. We measured brain activation responses to food and cocaine cues with fMRI, and D2/D3 receptors in the striatum with [11C]raclopride and PET in 20 active cocaine abuser...

  13. Extended Access Cocaine Self-Administration Results in Tolerance to the Dopamine-Elevating and Locomotor-Stimulating Effects of Cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Calipari, Erin S.; Ferris, Mark J.; JONES, SARA R.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance to the neurochemical and psychoactive effects of cocaine after repeated use is a hallmark of cocaine addiction in humans. However, comprehensive studies on tolerance to the behavioral, psychoactive, and neurochemical effects of cocaine following contingent administration in rodents are lacking. We outlined the consequences of extended access cocaine self-administration as it related to tolerance to the psychomotor activating, dopamine (DA) elevating, and DA transporter (DAT) inhibit...

  14. Cocaine is pharmacologically active in the nonhuman primate fetal brain

    OpenAIRE

    Benveniste, Helene; Fowler, Joanna S.; Rooney, William D; Scharf, Bruce A.; Backus, W. Walter; Izrailtyan, Igor; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Volkow, Nora D.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third-trimester pregnant nonhuman primates, cocaine at doses typically used by drug abusers significantly increased brain glucose metabolism to the same extent in the mother as in the fetus (∼100%). Inasmuch as brain...

  15. Cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects: lack of evidence for a central nervous system site of action based on hemodynamic studies with cocaine methiodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, L W; Rodak, D J; Kuhn, F E; Wahlstrom, S K; Tessel, R E; Visner, M S; Schaer, G L; Gillis, R A

    1999-01-01

    It has been suggested that cocaine acts directly in the brain to enhance central sympathetic outflow. However, some studies suggested that the cardiovascular effects of cocaine are related to a peripheral action. To characterize further the site of cocaine's cardiovascular effect, we compared the hemodynamic effects of cocaine (2 mg/kg, i.v. bolus) with those observed after administration of an equimolar dose (2.62 mg/kg, i.v. bolus) of cocaine methiodide, a quaternary derivative of cocaine that does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier, by using sufentanil-sedated dogs. Cocaine produced significant (p < 0.05) increases in heart rate (+37+/-11 beats/min), mean arterial pressure (+55+/-11 mm Hg), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (+5.3+/-1.0 mm Hg), and cardiac output (+2.4+/-0.9 L/min). Cocaine methiodide produced increases in heart rate (+57+/-11 beats/min), mean arterial pressure (+45+/-11 mm Hg), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (+3.4+/-1.0 mm Hg), and cardiac output (1.1+/-0.9 L/min), which were not significantly different from those observed with cocaine. Because opiate sedation potentially might have attenuated central sympathetic outflow, we further confirmed the qualitative similarity of the actions of cocaine and cocaine methiodide on heart rate and blood pressure in unsedated, conscious dogs. Our data suggest that the cardiovascular effects of cocaine result primarily from a peripheral site of action.

  16. Reduced Metabolsim in Brain 'Control Networks' Following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2011-03-01

    Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and {sup 18}FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05); females significantly decreased metabolism (-8.6% {+-} 10) whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5% {+-} 18). SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral) in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001) whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45) (only at p<0.005). The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001) in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10), anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32), posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31), inferior parietal (BA 40) and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus). Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from 'control networks' (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus) in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition). This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction.

  17. Reduced Metabolism in Brain “Control Networks” following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wong, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Objective Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. Method To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and 18FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. Results Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05); females significantly decreased metabolism (−8.6%±10) whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5%±18). SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral) in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001) whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45) (only at p<0.005). The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001) in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10), anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32), posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31), inferior parietal (BA 40) and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus). Conclusions Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from “control networks” (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus) in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition). This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction. PMID:21373180

  18. Infusing interprofessional education into the nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Joan Sistrunk; Bates, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Education for interprofessional collaboration should begin early in the nursing program with a gradual infusion of interprofessional competencies into the curriculum. The faculty developed an interprofessional education program for students in nursing, physical therapy, nutrition, and respiratory care, which focused on sharing knowledge about each discipline, developing respect and value for each other's disciplines, and emphasizing techniques to improve communication and teamwork.

  19. Liquid infused surfaces in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Matthew; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang; Wang, Karen; Lee, Kevin; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    A turbulent channel flow facility is used to measure the drag reduction capabilities and dynamic behavior of liquid-infused micro-patterned surfaces. Liquid infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust alternative to traditional air-cushion-based superhydrophobic surfaces. The mobile liquid lubricant creates a surface slip with the outer turbulent shear flow as well as an energetic sink to dampen turbulent fluctuations. Micro-manufactured surfaces can be mounted flush in the channel and exposed to turbulent flows. Two configurations are possible, both capable of producing laminar and turbulent flows. The first configuration allows detailed investigation of the infused liquid layer and the other allows well resolved pressure gradient measurements. Both of the configurations have high aspect ratios 15-45:1. Drag reduction for a variety of liquid-infused surface architectures is quantified by measuring pressure drop in the channel. Flow in the oil film is simultaneously visualized using fluorescent dye. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  20. Propofol Infusion Syndrome Heralded by ECG Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijzen, Elsbeth J.; Jacobs, Bram; Aslan, Adnan; Rodgers, Michael G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS) is well known, often associated with, lethal complication of sedation with propofol. PRIS seems to be associated with young age, traumatic brain injury (TBI), higher cumulative doses of propofol, and the concomitant use of catecholamines. Known manifestations of PRI

  1. Novel Cocaine Vaccine Linked to a Disrupted Adenovirus Gene Transfer Vector Blocks Cocaine Psychostimulant and Reinforcing Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Wee, Sunmee; Hicks, Martin J.; De, Bishnu P.; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Moreno, Amira Y.; KaMinSky, Stephen M.; Kim D. Janda; Crystal, Ronald G.; Koob, George F.

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising treatment for drug addiction. However, insufficient immune responses to vaccines in most subjects pose a challenge. In this study, we tested the efficacy of a new cocaine vaccine (dAd5GNE) in antagonizing cocaine addiction-related behaviors in rats. This vaccine used a disrupted serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vector coupled to a third-generation cocaine hapten, termed GNE (6-(2R,3S)-3-(benzoyloxy)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo [3.2.1] octane-2-carboxamido-hexano...

  2. Reduced Metabolism in Brain “Control Networks” following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, Nora D.; Dardo Tomasi; Gene-Jack Wang; Fowler, Joanna S.; Frank Telang; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Nelly Alia-Klein; Christopher Wong

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. METHOD: To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and ¹⁸FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. RESULTS: Self-reports of cr...

  3. Chronic inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase facilitates behavioral responses to cocaine in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Gaval-Cruz

    Full Text Available The anti-alcoholism medication, disulfiram (Antabuse, decreases cocaine use in humans regardless of concurrent alcohol consumption and facilitates cocaine sensitization in rats, but the functional targets are unknown. Disulfiram inhibits dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH, the enzyme that converts dopamine (DA to norepinephrine (NE in noradrenergic neurons. The goal of this study was to test the effects of chronic genetic or pharmacological DBH inhibition on behavioral responses to cocaine using DBH knockout (Dbh -/- mice, disulfiram, and the selective DBH inhibitor, nepicastat. Locomotor activity was measured in control (Dbh +/- and Dbh -/- mice during a 5 day regimen of saline+saline, disulfiram+saline, nepicastat+saline, saline+cocaine, disulfiram+cocaine, or nepicastat+cocaine. After a 10 day withdrawal period, all groups were administered cocaine, and locomotor activity and stereotypy were measured. Drug-naïve Dbh -/- mice were hypersensitive to cocaine-induced locomotion and resembled cocaine-sensitized Dbh +/- mice. Chronic disulfiram administration facilitated cocaine-induced locomotion in some mice and induced stereotypy in others during the development of sensitization, while cocaine-induced stereotypy was evident in all nepicastat-treated mice. Cocaine-induced stereotypy was profoundly increased in the disulfiram+cocaine, nepicastat+cocaine, and nepicastat+saline groups upon cocaine challenge after withdrawal in Dbh +/- mice. Disulfiram or nepicastat treatment had no effect on behavioral responses to cocaine in Dbh -/- mice. These results demonstrate that chronic DBH inhibition facilitates behavioral responses to cocaine, although different methods of inhibition (genetic vs. non-selective inhibitor vs. selective inhibitor enhance qualitatively different cocaine-induced behaviors.

  4. Are cocaine users too sensitive? Functional and structural brain imaging studies in regular cocaine users

    OpenAIRE

    Kaag, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    While previous research primarily focused on the involvement of the frontostriatal network in the etiology of substance use disorder, it has recently been suggested that the amygdala, and its interaction with the frontostriatal circuitry, may play a key role in habitual drug seeking, and therefore in the etiology of substance use disorder The studies described in this dissertation demonstrate that cocaine use disorder is associated with hyper-activity of the amygdala in response to negative e...

  5. Inhibition of protein synthesis but not β-adrenergic receptors blocks reconsolidation of a cocaine-associated cue memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Amber B; Taylor, Jane R

    2016-08-01

    Previously consolidated memories have the potential to enter a state of lability upon memory recall, during which time the memory can be altered before undergoing an additional consolidation-like process and being stored again as a long-term memory. Blocking reconsolidation of aberrant memories has been proposed as a potential treatment for psychiatric disorders including addiction. Here we investigated of the effect of systemically administering the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide or the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol on reconsolidation. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, during which each lever press resulted in the presentation of a cue paired with an intravenous infusion of cocaine. After undergoing lever press extinction to reduce operant responding, the cue memory was reactivated and rats were administered systemic injections of propranolol, cycloheximide, or vehicle. Post-reactivation cycloheximide, but not propranolol, resulted in a reactivation-dependent decrease in cue-induced reinstatement, indicative of reconsolidation blockade by protein synthesis inhibition. The present data indicate that systemically targeting protein synthesis as opposed to the β-adrenergic system may more effectively attenuate the reconsolidation of a drug-related memory and decrease drug-seeking behavior. PMID:27421890

  6. Marrow Stromal Cell Infusion Rescues Hematopoiesis in Lethally Irradiated Mice despite Rapid Clearance after Infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marrow stromal cells (MSCs, also termed mesenchymal stem cells have been proposed as a promising cellular therapy for tissue injury including radiation-induced marrow failure, but evidence for a direct effect is lacking. To assess the effects of MSCs on survival after lethal irradiation, we infused syngeneic MSCs (either as immortalized MSCs clones or primary MSCs intravenously into wild-type C57/Bl6 mice within 24 hours of lethal total body irradiation (TBI. Mice receiving either of the MSC preparations had significantly improved survival when compared to controls. In vivo imaging, immune histochemistry, and RT-PCR employed to detect MSCs indicated that the infused MSCs were predominantly localized to the lungs and rapidly cleared following infusion. Our results suggest that a single infusion of MSCs can improve survival after otherwise lethal TBI but the effect is not due to a direct interaction with, or contribution to, the damaged marrow by MSCs.

  7. Cocaine Self-Administration Produces Pharmacodynamic Tolerance: Differential Effects on the Potency of Dopamine Transporter Blockers, Releasers, and Methylphenidate

    OpenAIRE

    Ferris, Mark J.; Calipari, Erin S.; Mateo, Yolanda; Melchior, James R.; Roberts, David CS; JONES, SARA R.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is the primary site of action for psychostimulant drugs such as cocaine, methylphenidate, and amphetamine. Our previous work demonstrated a reduced ability of cocaine to inhibit the DAT following high-dose cocaine self-administration (SA), corresponding to a reduced ability of cocaine to increase extracellular dopamine. However, this effect had only been demonstrated for cocaine. Thus, the current investigations sought to understand the extent to which cocaine S...

  8. Hippocampal infusions of pyruvate reverse the memory-impairing effects of septal muscimol infusions

    OpenAIRE

    Krebs, Desiree L.; Parent, Marise B.

    2005-01-01

    Hippocampal infusions of glucose reverse memory deficits in spontaneous alternation and in a continuous multiple trial inhibitory avoidance task. The current experiments tested whether glucose metabolism may participate in these effects of glucose. Specifically, these experiments determined whether the glycolytic metabolite pyruvate would mimic these effects of glucose. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were given septal infusions of vehicle or the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonist musci...

  9. Effect of caffeine on cocaine locomotor stimulant activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A L; Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B

    1986-03-01

    The effect of caffeine on the locomotor stimulant activity induced by intravenous cocaine in rats was investigated. Low doses of caffeine (20 mg/kg IP) potentiated the locomotor activity induced by 1, 2.5 mg/kg intravenous doses of cocaine and higher doses of caffeine (50, 100 mg/kg IP) had no significant effect. The locomotor stimulant effect of 20 mg/kg IP dose of caffeine per se in vehicle was significantly higher and that with 100 mg/kg dose significantly lower than that of the vehicle control. Thus caffeine produced dose-dependent effects on cocaine-induced locomotor stimulant activity, with low dose potentiating and higher doses having no significant effect on such activity. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors did not appear to play a role in potentiation of cocaine locomotor stimulant activity by caffeine. PMID:3703910

  10. Cocaine-Induced Delayed Myocardial Infarction Complicated by Apical Thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rafay; Arshed, Sabrina; Jehangir, Waqas; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    It is well demonstrated in the literature that cocaine use has been well linked to the formation of various forms of acute and chronic cardiovascular problems including but not limited to acute coronary syndromes. However, cocaine has been commonly associated with coronary vasospasms and less commonly with myocardial infarction and the formation of atrial thrombus. Through this case presentation, we illustrate the findings of a 35-year-old gentleman with history of cocaine use presenting with acute coronary syndrome and complicated by thrombus formation. Furthermore, through this report, we illustrate in a patient with no other risk factors and at a young age, how chronic cocaine use or even a history of usage may result in complications even weeks after its consumption. PMID:26668686

  11. Effect of cocaine dependence on brain connections: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liangsuo; Steinberg, Joel L; Moeller, F Gerard; Johns, Sade E; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine dependence (CD) is associated with several cognitive deficits. Accumulating evidence, based on human and animal studies, has led to models for interpreting the neural basis of cognitive functions as interactions between functionally related brain regions. In this review, we focus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies using brain connectivity techniques as related to CD. The majority of these brain connectivity studies indicated that cocaine use is associated with altered brain connectivity between different structures, including cortical-striatal regions and default mode network. In cocaine users some of the altered brain connectivity measures are associated with behavioral performance, history of drug use, and treatment outcome. The implications of these brain connectivity findings to the treatment of CD and the pros and cons of the major brain connectivity techniques are discussed. Finally potential future directions in cocaine use disorder research using brain connectivity techniques are briefly described. PMID:26512421

  12. Norepinephrine infusion increases urine output in children under sedative and analgesic infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Piva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the effects of early norepinephrine (NE infusion in children submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV requiring continuous sedative and analgesic infusion. Methods: double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial enrolling children (1 month to 12 years of age admitted to a Brazilian PICU and expected to require MV and continuous sedative and analgesic drug infusions for at least five days. Children were randomized to receive either norepinephrine (NE (0.15 mcg/kg/min or normal saline infusion, started in the first 24 hours of MV, and maintained for 72 hours. We compared hemodynamic variables, fluid intake, renal function and urine output between groups. Results: forty children were equally allocated to the NE or placebo groups, with no differences in baseline characteristics, laboratorial findings, PRISM II score, length of MV, or mortality between groups. The average norepinephrine infusion was 0.143 mcg/kg/min. The NE group showed higher urine output (p = 0.016 and continuous increment in the mean arterial pressure compared to the baseline (p = 0.043. There were no differences in the remaining hemodynamic variables, fluid requirements, or furosemide administration. Conclusion: early norepinephrine infusion in children submitted to MV improves mean arterial pressure and increases urine output. These effects were attributed to reversion of vasoplegia induced by the sedative and analgesic drugs.

  13. Cocaine-Associated Myocardial Infarction: Should They All Be Stented?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazzli Kasim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine use is a known cause of chest pain and acute myocardial infarction and frequently leads to cardiac catheterization procedure. The treatment of cocaine-related acute coronary syndromes presents unique challenges because a variety of mechanisms including atherosclerotic plaque rupture, platelet activation, and coronary vasospasm may contribute to the pathogenesis. Our case highlights important considerations taken in dealing with this acute scenario

  14. Miracle or Menace?: The Arrival of Cocaine 1860-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of cocaine was the formative episode in the modern understanding of the benefits and dangers of neurostimulants. European culture and medicine had historically been poor in stimulant plants and drugs. When coca and cocaine appeared in nineteenth-century Europe, doctors, pharmacists, and the public struggled to understand their benefits and risks, and to formulate a distinction between use and abuse. PMID:26070752

  15. Cocaine contamination in pubic hair: Analysis of the decontamination method

    OpenAIRE

    Guido Romano; Francesca Indorato; Giorgio Spadaro; Salvatore Barbera; Nunziata Barbera

    2014-01-01

    Even if pubic hair represents a reliable and widely accepted alternative hair matrix to identify drug abusers, it might produce false positive results due to external contamination. The aim of this study was to verify whether the external contamination of pubic hair with cocaine could influence the discrimination between active users and false positive subjects. The analysis was performed on in vivo and in vitro samples; the contamination was carried out by rubbing pubic hair with cocaine ...

  16. Narco-scapes: Cocaine Trafficking and Deforestation in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrathall, D.; McSweeney, K.; Nielsen, E.; Pearson, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Narcotics trafficking and drug interdiction efforts have resulted in a well-documented social crisis in Central America, but more recently, has been tightly linked to environmental catastrophe and accelerated deforestation in transit zones. This talk will outline synthesis findings from multi-country, interdisciplinary research on cocaine trafficking as an engine of forest loss in Central America. During the "narco-boom" of the mid-2000s, we observed a geographical evolution of cocaine flows into Central America, and the transit of cocaine through new spaces, accompanied by specific patterns of social and environmental change in new nodes of transit. We coarsely estimated that the total amount of cocaine flowing through Central America increased from 70 metric tons in 2000 to 350 mt in 2012, implying that total cocaine trafficking revenue in the region increased from roughly 600 million dollars to 3.5 billion in that time. We describe the mechanism by which these locally captured cocaine rents resulted in a rapid conversion of forest into cattle pasture. Narco-traffickers are drawn to invest in the cattle economy, as a direct means of laundering and formalizing proceeds. Ranching is a land intensive activity, and new narco-enriched cattle pastures can be isolated from other forms forest loss solely by their spatial and temporal change characteristics. A preliminary forest change study in Honduras, for example, indicated that areas of accelerated deforestation were in close proximity to known narcotics trafficking routes and were thirteen times more extensive on average than other forest clearings. Deforested areas commonly appeared in isolated and biodiverse lowland tropical rainforest regions that often intersected with protected areas and indigenous reserves. We find that narco-deforestation is a readily identifiable signal of the extent and health of the cocaine economy. This talk will feature summaries of both ethnographic and land cover change we have observed

  17. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, Luciano R. [Graduate Program in Neuroscience, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Medeiros, Daniel C.; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H. [Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Doria, Juliana G. [Graduate Program in Neuroscience, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, Flávia [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Aguiar, Daniele C. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Pereira, Grace S.; Massessini, André R. [Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ribeiro, Fabíola M. [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P. de [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Moraes, Marcio F.D., E-mail: mfdm@icb.ufmg.br [Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Moreira, Fabricio A., E-mail: fabriciomoreira@icb.ufmg.br [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB{sub 1} receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis

  18. Cocaine-induced changes in NMDA receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ortinski, Pavel I.

    2014-01-01

    Addictive states are often thought to rely on lasting modification of signaling at relevant synapses. A long-standing theory posits that activity at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is a critical component of long-term synaptic plasticity in many brain areas. Indeed, NMDAR signaling has been found to play a role in the etiology of addictive states, in particular following cocaine exposure. However, no consensus is apparent with respect to the specific effects of cocaine exposure on NMD...

  19. Selective neuronal toxicity of cocaine in embryonic mouse brain cocultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Evrard, Philippe

    1995-01-01

    Cocaine exposure in utero causes severe alterations in the development of the central nervous system. To study the basis of these teratogenic effects in vitro, we have used cocultures of neurons and glial cells from mouse embryonic brain. Cocaine selectively affected embryonic neuronal cells, causing first a dramatic reduction of both number and length of neurites and then extensive neuronal death. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated a shift from a multipolar neuronal pattern towards bi...

  20. Cocaine induced cortical microischemia in the rodent brain: Clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hugang; Du, Congwu; Yuan, Zhijia; Park, Ki; Volkow, Nora D.; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine-induced stroke is among the most serious medical complications associated with its abuse. However the extent to which acute cocaine may induce silent microischemia predisposing the cerebral tissue to neurotoxicity has not been investigated; in part, because of limitations of current neuroimaging tools, i.e., lack of high spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity to simultaneously measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) in vessels of different calibers (including capillaries) quantitatively and over a large field of view. Here we combine ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography to enable tracker-free 3D microvascular angiography (μOCA) and a new phase-intensity-mapping algorithm to enhance the sensitivity of 3D optical Doppler tomography (μODT) for simultaneous capillary CBF quantization. We apply the technique to study the responses of cerebral microvascular networks to single and repeated cocaine administration in the mouse somatosensory cortex. We show that within 2–3 minutes after cocaine administration CBF markedly decreased (e.g., ~70%) but the magnitude and recovery differed for the various types of vessels; arterioles had the fastest recovery (~5min), capillaries varied drastically (from 4–20min) and venules showed relatively slower recovery (~12min). More importantly, we showed that cocaine interrupted CBF in some arteriolar branches for over 45min and this effect was exacerbated with repeated cocaine administration. These results provide evidence that cocaine doses within the range administered by drug abusers induces cerebral microischemia and that these effects are exacerbated with repeated use. Thus cocaine-induced microischemia is likely to be a contributor to its neurotoxic effects. PMID:22124273

  1. Cocaine induced cortical microischemia in the rodent brain: Clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Hugang; Du, Congwu; Yuan, Zhijia; Park, Ki; Volkow, Nora D.; Pan, Yingtian

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine-induced stroke is among the most serious medical complications associated with its abuse. However the extent to which acute cocaine may induce silent microischemia predisposing the cerebral tissue to neurotoxicity has not been investigated; in part, because of limitations of current neuroimaging tools, i.e., lack of high spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity to simultaneously measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) in vessels of different calibers (including capillaries) quantitatively ...

  2. [Portable elastomeric infusion system applied to patients with knee prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Gemma; Quiles, Olga; Nicolau, Agnes; Faura, Teresa; Moreno, Cristina

    2007-03-01

    An LV infuser consists of an infusion pump which can administer medicines via various methods: intravenous, epidural, subdural, o subcutaneous. Its usefulness is based on the administration of medicines such as oncological drugs and/or analgesic by means of a continuous infusion. PMID:17474369

  3. Restoration of Cocaine Stimulation and Reward by Reintroducing Wild Type Dopamine Transporter in Adult Knock-in Mice with a Cocaine-Insensitive Dopamine Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Haiyin; O’Neill, Brian; Han, Dawn D; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi; Wang, Yanlin; Gu, Howard H.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we generated knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter (DAT-CI mice) and found cocaine does not stimulate locomotion or produce reward in these mice, indicating DAT inhibition is necessary for cocaine stimulation and reward. However, DAT uptake is reduced in DAT-CI mice and thus the lack of cocaine responses could be due to adaptive changes. To test this, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to reintroduce the cocaine-sensitive wild type DAT (AAV-DATwt...

  4. An audit of hospital based outpatient infusions and a pilot program of community-based monoclonal antibody infusions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doran, J-P

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumour necrosis factor alpha, is administered as an intravenous infusion requiring a costly hospital day case or inpatient admission. METHODS: An audit of all current therapies given by intravenous infusions in an outpatient setting in St Vincent\\'s University Hospital (SVUH) was undertaken. Furthermore, in conjunction with TCP homecare, we established in a general practise health clinic, the first Irish community infusion centre for the administration of infliximab in August 2006. RESULTS: All outpatient departments indicated that they would favour a centralized hospital infusion unit. There were no adverse events and the mean global satisfaction improved in the community infliximab infusion pilot programme of seven patients. CONCLUSION: This study suggests efficiencies in providing centralized infusion facilities, while the community based infusion of infliximab is feasible and safe in this small cohort and identifies the community infusion unit as a viable and cost efficient alternative for administration of infliximab.

  5. Brain activation to cocaine cues and motivation/treatment status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, James J.; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Myrick, Hugh; Henderson, Scott; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation to change is believed to be a key factor in therapeutic success in substance use disorders; however, the neurobiological mechanisms through which motivation to change impacts decreased substance use remain unclear. Existing research is conflicting, with some investigations supporting decreased and others reporting increased frontal activation to drug cues in individuals seeking treatment for substance use disorders. The present study investigated the relationship between motivation to change cocaine use and cue-elicited brain activity in cocaine-dependent individuals using two conceptualizations of “motivation to change:” 1) current treatment status (i.e., currently receiving vs. not receiving outpatient treatment for cocaine dependence) and 2) self-reported motivation to change substance use, using the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES; Miller and Tonigan, 1996). Thirty-eight cocaine-dependent individuals (14 currently in treatment) completed a diagnostic assessment and an fMRI cocaine cue-reactivity task. Whole-brain analyses demonstrated that both treatment-seeking and motivated participants had lower activation to cocaine cues in a wide variety of brain regions in the frontal, occipital, temporal, and cingulate cortices relative to non-treatment-seeking and less motivated participants. Future research is needed to explain the mechanism by which treatment and/or motivation impacts neural cue-reactivity, as such work could potentially aid in the development of more effective therapeutic techniques for substance-dependent patients. PMID:22458561

  6. Cocaine: A Catalyst for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet K Dhillon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug use has been recognized as a major risk factor for AIDS from the outset of the epidemic. Cocaine, one of the most widely abused drugs in the United States can both impair the functions of macrophages & CD4+ lymphocytes and also activate HIV-1 expression in these cells. Cocaine is a multifactorial agent that acts globally to impair the functioning of brain resident cells through multiple pathways. The drug not only promotes virus replication in macrophages, microglia and astrocytes, but can also upregulate CCR5 coreceptor, and reciprocally inhibit its ligands, thereby increasing virus infectivity. Cocaine is known to modulate astroglial function and activation. Cocaine causes a myriad of toxic responses in the neurons: a it synergizes with viral proteins, Tat and gp120 resulting in exacerbated neuronal apoptosis, b it causes calcium mobilization and, c generation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, cocaine also exerts potent effects on microvascular permeability, thereby impacting the influx of virus-infected inflammatory cells in brain parenchyma. By amplifying the various arms of the toxic responses that characterize HIV-associated dementia (HAD, cocaine skews the balance in favor of the virus leading to accelerated progression and severity of dementia.

  7. Brain activation to cocaine cues and motivation/treatment status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, James J; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Myrick, Hugh; Henderson, Scott; Brady, Kathleen T

    2014-03-01

    Motivation to change is believed to be a key factor in therapeutic success in substance use disorders; however, the neurobiological mechanisms through which motivation to change impacts decreased substance use remain unclear. Existing research is conflicting, with some investigations supporting decreased and others reporting increased frontal activation to drug cues in individuals seeking treatment for substance use disorders. The present study investigated the relationship between motivation to change cocaine use and cue-elicited brain activity in cocaine-dependent individuals using two conceptualizations of 'motivation to change': (1) current treatment status (i.e. currently receiving versus not receiving outpatient treatment for cocaine dependence) and (2) self-reported motivation to change substance use, using the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale. Thirty-eight cocaine-dependent individuals (14 currently in treatment) completed a diagnostic assessment and an fMRI cocaine cue-reactivity task. Whole-brain analyses demonstrated that both treatment-seeking and motivated participants had lower activation to cocaine cues in a wide variety of brain regions in the frontal, occipital, temporal and cingulate cortices relative to non-treatment-seeking and less motivated participants. Future research is needed to explain the mechanism by which treatment and/or motivation impacts neural cue reactivity, as such work could potentially aid in the development of more effective therapeutic techniques for substance-dependent patients.

  8. Optogenetically evoked gamma oscillations are disturbed by cocaine administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Dilgen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drugs of abuse have enormous societal impact by degrading the cognitive abilities, emotional state and social behavior of addicted individuals. Among other events involved in the addiction cycle, the study of a single exposure to cocaine, and the contribution of the effects of that event to the continuous and further use of drugs of abuse are fundamental. Gamma oscillations are thought to be important neural correlates of cognitive processing in the prefrontal cortex (PFC which include decision making, set shifting and working memory. It follows that cocaine exposure might modulate gamma oscillations, which could result in reduced cognitive ability. Parvalbumin-positive fast-spiking interneurons play an orchestrating role in gamma oscillation induction and it has been shown recently that gamma oscillations can be induced in an anesthetized animal using optogenetic techniques. We use a knock-in mouse model together with optogenetics and in vivo electrophysiology to study the effects of acute cocaine on PFC gamma oscillation as a step toward understanding the cortical changes that may underlie continuous use of stimulants. Our results show that acute cocaine administration increases entrainment of the gamma oscillation to the optogentically induced driving frequency. Our results also suggest that this modulation of gamma oscillations is driven trough activation of DAD1 receptors. The acute cocaine-mediated changes in mPFC may underlie the enhancement of attention and awareness commonly reported by cocaine users and may contribute to the further use and abuse of psychostimulants.

  9. Cocaine-induced Psychosis and Brain-derived Neurothrophic Factor in Patients with Cocaine Dependence: Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncero, Carlos; Palma-Álvarez, Raul Felipe; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Barral, Carmen; Gonzalvo, Begoña; Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Casas, Miguel; Grau-López, Lara

    2016-02-29

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is linked to numerous brain functions. In addition, BDNF alterations contribute to neurological, mental, and addictive disorders. Cocaine dependence has received much attention recently due to its prevalence and psychological effects. Symptoms of psychosis are one of the most serious adverse events precipitated by cocaine use. It is particularly important to identify patients at risk of developing cocaine-induced psychosis (CIP). We described two cases of patients with cocaine dependence who presented with CIP and had changes in their BDNF levels during the psychotic episode. BDNF levels were initially low in both patients, and then decreased by more than 50% in association with CIP. The relationship between BDNF and psychosis is described in the literature. These cases revealed that BDNF levels decreased during a CIP episode and, thus, it is necessary to investigate BDNF and its relationship with CIP further. PMID:26792050

  10. Cocaine-induced Psychosis and Brain-derived Neurothrophic Factor in Patients with Cocaine Dependence: Report of Two Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncero, Carlos; Palma-Álvarez, Raul Felipe; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Barral, Carmen; Gonzalvo, Begoña; Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Casas, Miguel; Grau-López, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is linked to numerous brain functions. In addition, BDNF alterations contribute to neurological, mental, and addictive disorders. Cocaine dependence has received much attention recently due to its prevalence and psychological effects. Symptoms of psychosis are one of the most serious adverse events precipitated by cocaine use. It is particularly important to identify patients at risk of developing cocaine-induced psychosis (CIP). We described two cases of patients with cocaine dependence who presented with CIP and had changes in their BDNF levels during the psychotic episode. BDNF levels were initially low in both patients, and then decreased by more than 50% in association with CIP. The relationship between BDNF and psychosis is described in the literature. These cases revealed that BDNF levels decreased during a CIP episode and, thus, it is necessary to investigate BDNF and its relationship with CIP further. PMID:26792050

  11. Regulation of BDNF expression by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Deirdre M; Brown, Amber N; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2012-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors. It is expressed throughout the nervous system. A unique feature of the BDNF gene is the existence of multiple mRNA transcripts, all of which are translated into BDNF protein, suggesting a multilevel regulation of expression. In particular, the BDNF exon IV promoter region is a preferential target for epigenetic alterations, as it contains binding sites for CREB and MeCP2, two transcriptional regulators known to mediate epigenetic changes. Exposure to drugs of abuse is known to modulate epigenetic regulation of BDNF gene expression. This review will discuss how exposure to cocaine, one of the most addictive drugs known to mankind, can produce alterations in BDNF gene expression, especially in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, which lead to alterations in the reward-mediated behaviors involved in addiction. PMID:23239946

  12. Orexin-1 receptor signaling increases motivation for cocaine-associated cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzley, Brandon S; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2015-05-01

    The orexin/hypocretin system is involved in multiple cocaine addiction processes that involve drug-associated environmental cues, including cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking and expression of conditioned place preference. However, the orexin system does not play a role in several behaviors that are less cue-dependent, such as cocaine-primed reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking and low-effort cocaine self-administration. We hypothesized that cocaine-associated cues, but not cocaine alone, engage signaling at orexin-1 receptors (OX1Rs), and this cue-engaged OX1R signaling increases motivation for cocaine. Motivation for cocaine was measured in Sprague-Dawley rats with behavioral-economic demand curve analysis after pretreatment with the OX1R antagonist SB-334867 (SB) or vehicle with and without light + tone cues. Demand for cocaine was higher when cocaine-associated cues were present, and SB only reduced cocaine demand in the presence of these cues. We then investigated whether cocaine demand was linked to the cued reinstatement of cocaine seeking, as both procedures are partially driven by cocaine-associated cues in an orexin-dependent manner. SB blocked cue-induced reinstatement behavior, and baseline demand predicted SB efficacy with the largest effect in high-demand animals, i.e. animals with the greatest cue-dependent behavior. We conclude that OX1R signaling increases the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine-associated cues but not that of cocaine alone. This supports our view that orexin plays a prominent role in the ability of conditioned cues to activate motivational responses.

  13. The Extracellular Matrix Protein Brevican Limits Time-Dependent Enhancement of Cocaine Conditioned Place Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Bart R; Matos, Mariana R; Horn, Annemarie; Visser, Esther; Van der Loo, Rolinka C; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; Meerhoff, Gideon F; Frischknecht, Renato; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Smit, August B; Spijker, Sabine; van den Oever, Michel C

    2016-06-01

    Cocaine-associated environmental cues sustain relapse vulnerability by reactivating long-lasting memories of cocaine reward. During periods of abstinence, responding to cocaine cues can time-dependently intensify a phenomenon referred to as 'incubation of cocaine craving'. Here, we investigated the role of the extracellular matrix protein brevican in recent (1 day after training) and remote (3 weeks after training) expression of cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP). Wild-type and Brevican heterozygous knock-out mice, which express brevican at ~50% of wild-type levels, received three cocaine-context pairings using a relatively low dose of cocaine (5 mg/kg). In a drug-free CPP test, heterozygous mice showed enhanced preference for the cocaine-associated context at the remote time point compared with the recent time point. This progressive increase was not observed in wild-type mice and it did not generalize to contextual-fear memory. Virally mediated overexpression of brevican levels in the hippocampus, but not medial prefrontal cortex, of heterozygous mice prevented the progressive increase in cocaine CPP, but only when overexpression was induced before conditioning. Post-conditioning overexpression of brevican did not affect remote cocaine CPP, suggesting that brevican limited the increase in remote CPP by altering neuro-adaptive mechanisms during cocaine conditioning. We provide causal evidence that hippocampal brevican levels control time-dependent enhancement of cocaine CPP during abstinence, pointing to a novel substrate that regulates incubation of responding to cocaine-associated cues. PMID:26711251

  14. Intermittent Cocaine Self-Administration Produces Sensitization of Stimulant Effects at the Dopamine Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calipari, Erin S.; Ferris, Mark J.; Siciliano, Cody A.; Zimmer, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous literature investigating neurobiological adaptations following cocaine self-administration has shown that high, continuous levels of cocaine intake (long access; LgA) results in reduced potency of cocaine at the dopamine transporter (DAT), whereas an intermittent pattern of cocaine administration (intermittent access; IntA) results in sensitization of cocaine potency at the DAT. Here, we aimed to determine whether these changes are specific to cocaine or translate to other psychostimulants. Psychostimulant potency was assessed by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens following IntA, short access, and LgA cocaine self-administration, as well as in brain slices from naive animals. We assessed the potency of amphetamine (a releaser), and methylphenidate (a DAT blocker, MPH). MPH was selected because it is functionally similar to cocaine and structurally related to amphetamine. We found that MPH and amphetamine potencies were increased following IntA, whereas neither was changed following LgA or short access cocaine self-administration. Therefore, whereas LgA-induced tolerance at the DAT is specific to cocaine as shown in previous work, the sensitizing effects of IntA apply to cocaine, MPH, and amphetamine. This demonstrates that the pattern with which cocaine is administered is important in determining the neurochemical consequences of not only cocaine effects but potential cross-sensitization/cross-tolerance effects of other psychostimulants as well. PMID:24566123

  15. Behavior of knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter after virogenetic restoration of cocaine sensitivity in the striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Brian; Tilley, Michael R.; Han, Dawn D.; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi; Hill, Erik R.; Bishop, Georgia A.; Zhou, Fu-Ming; During, Matthew J.; Gu, Howard H.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine's main pharmacological actions are the inhibition of the dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporters. Its main behavioral effects are reward and locomotor stimulation, potentially leading to addiction. Using knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter (DAT-CI mice) we have shown previously that inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT) is necessary for both of these behaviors. In this study, we sought to determine brain regions in which DAT inhibition by cocaine stimulates locomotor activity and/or produces reward. We used adeno-associated viral vectors to reintroduce the cocaine-sensitive wild-type DAT in specific brain regions of DAT-CI mice, which otherwise only express a cocaine-insensitive DAT globally. Viral-mediated expression of wild-type DAT in the rostrolateral striatum restored cocaine-induced locomotor stimulation and sensitization in DAT-CI mice. In contrast, the expression of wild-type DAT in the dorsal striatum, or in the medial nucleus accumbens, did not restore cocaine-induced locomotor stimulation. These data help to determine cocaine's molecular actions and anatomical loci that cause hyperlocomotion. Interestingly, cocaine did not produce significant reward – as measured by conditioned place-preference – in any of the three cohorts of DAT-CI mice with the virus injections. Therefore, the locus or loci underlying cocaine-induced reward remain underdetermined. It is possible that multiple dopamine-related brain regions are involved in producing the robust rewarding effect of cocaine. PMID:24412674

  16. Increased intra-individual reaction time variability in cocaine-dependent subjects: role of cocaine-related cues

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shijing; Lane, Scott D.; Schmitz, Joy M.; Green, Charles E.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging data suggest that impaired performance on response inhibition and information processing tests in cocaine-dependent subjects is related to prefrontal and frontal cortical dysfunction and that dysfunction in these brain areas may underlie some aspects of cocaine addiction. In subjects with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and other psychiatric disorders, the Intra-Individual Reaction Time Variability (IIRTV) has been associated with frontal cortical dysfunction. In the pre...

  17. Cortical metabolite alterations in abstinent cocaine and cocaine/alcohol-dependent subjects: proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Meyerhoff, D. J.; BLOOMER, C.; Schuff, N.; Ezekiel, F.; Norman, D.; Clark, W; Weiner, M W; Fein, G.

    1999-01-01

    Chronic abuse of cocaine or alcohol is associated with structural, neuropathological and cognitive impairments that have been documented extensively. Little is known, however, about neurobiochemical changes in chronic substance abusers. We performed MRI and multi-slice brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to assess neuronal viability (via N-acetylaspartate (NAA)) and white matter metabolite status in 22 4-months-abstinent individuals dependent on crack cocaine only and...

  18. Certain or uncertain cocaine expectations influence accumbens dopamine responses to self-administered cocaine and non-rewarded operant behavior

    OpenAIRE

    D’Souza, Manoranjan S.; Duvauchelle, Christine L.

    2008-01-01

    Uncertainty and errors in predicting natural rewards influence associative learning and dopamine activity. The present study was conducted to determine the influence of cue-induced cocaine uncertainty, certainty and prediction error on nucleus accumbens dopamine (NAcc DA) in rats. For Certainty training, distinctive sensory cues were present during cocaine availability and alternate cues were paired with non-reinforced (saline) operant sessions. For Uncertainty training, all cues were equally...

  19. Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART) peptide attenuates dopamine- and cocaine-mediated locomotor activity in both male and female rats: lack of sex differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Martin O.; Perry, JoAnna; Shen, Li L.; Kuhar, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine-and-Amphetamine Regulated Transcript peptide (CART peptide) is known for having an inhibitory effect on dopamine (DA)- and cocaine-mediated actions and is postulated to be a homeostatic, regulatory factor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Some sex differences in cocaine-mediated LMA and in the expression and function of CART peptide have been reported. However, it is not known if the inhibitory effect of CART peptide on cocaine-mediated locomotor activity (LMA) is sexually dimorphic. In this study, the effect of CART 55-102 on LMA due to intra-NAc DA and i.p. cocaine were determined in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. The results show that CART 55-102 blunted or reduced both the DA- and cocaine-induced LMA in both males and females. In conclusion, CART peptide is effective in blunting DA- and cocaine-mediated LMA in both males and females. PMID:24630272

  20. Dopamine increases in striatum do not elicit craving in cocaine abusers unless they are coupled with cocaine cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S; Logan, Jean; Childress, Anna-Rose; Jayne, Millard; Ma, Yeming; Wong, Christopher

    2008-02-01

    Imaging studies have shown an association between dopamine increases in striatum and cue induced craving in cocaine abusers. However, the extent to which dopamine increases reflect a primary rather than a secondary response to the cues remains unclear. Here we evaluated the extent to which dopamine increases by themselves can induce craving in cocaine abusers. Using PET and [(11)C]raclopride (D2 receptor radioligand sensitive to competition with endogenous dopamine) we show that in cocaine abusers (n=20) oral methylphenidate (20 mg), which significantly increased dopamine in striatum, did not induce craving unless subjects were concomitantly exposed to cocaine cues (video scenes of subjects self-administering cocaine). This suggests that dopamine increases associated with conditioned cues are not primary responses but reflect downstream stimulation of dopamine cells (presumably glutamatergic afferents from prefrontal cortex and/or amygdala). Inasmuch as afferent stimulation of dopamine neurons results in phasic cell firing these findings suggest that "fast" dopamine increases, in contrast to the "slow" dopamine increases as achieved when using oral methylphenidate (mimicking tonic dopamine cell firing), are required for cues to trigger craving. The fact that methylphenidate induced craving only when given with the cocaine cues highlights the context dependency of methylphenidate's effects and suggests that its use for the treatment of ADHD subjects with co-morbid drug abuse should not increase craving. PMID:18024160

  1. Software Engineering Technology Infusion Within NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this paper, several software engineering technologies used within NASA are studied, and the mechanisms, schedules, and efforts at transferring these technologies are investigated. The goals of this study are: 1) to understand the difference between technology transfer (the adoption of a new method by large segments of an industry) as an industry-wide phenomenon and the adoption of a new technology by an individual organization (called technology infusion); and 2) to see if software engineering technology transfer differs from other engineering disciplines. While there is great interest today in developing technology transfer models for industry, it is the technology infusion process that actually causes changes in the current state of the practice.

  2. Pre-rigor infusion with kiwifruit juice improves lamb tenderness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J; Morton, J D; Bekhit, A E D; Sedcole, J R

    2009-07-01

    The ability of pre-rigor infusion of kiwifruit juice to improve the tenderness of lamb was investigated. Lamb carcasses were infused (10% body weight) with fresh kiwifruit juice (Ac), water (W) and a non-infusion control (C) treatment. Infusion treatment had no effect on lamb hot carcass weight, cold carcass weight and chilling evaporative losses. The infused treatment carcasses of Ac and W had lower (Ptender with significantly lower shear force (Pmeat tenderizer, which could contribute efficiently and effectively to the meat tenderization process. PMID:20416722

  3. Could the inter-individual variability in cocaine-induced psychotic effects influence the development of cocaine addiction? Towards a new pharmacogenetic approach to addictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousse, G; Vorspan, F; Ksouda, K; Bloch, V; Peoc'h, K; Laplanche, J L; Mouly, S; Schmidt, J; Llorca, P M; Lepine, J P

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronic disease marked by relapses, co-morbidities and the importance of psychosocial consequences. The etiology of cocaine addiction is complex and involves three types of factors: environmental factors, factors linked to the specific effects of cocaine and genetic factors. The latter could explain 40-60% of the risk for developing an addiction. Several studies have looked for a link between cocaine addiction and the genes of the dopaminergic system: the genes DRD2, COMT, SLC6A3 (coding for the dopamine transporter DAT) and DBH (coding for the dopamine beta hydroxylase) but unfortunately very few well established results. Pharmacogenetic approach could be an interesting opportunity for the future. The gene DBH has particularly been linked with the psychotic effects caused by cocaine. This so-called cocaine-induced psychosis (CIP) or cocaine-induced paranoia may influence the development of cocaine addiction. Indeed, these psychotic symptoms during cocaine exposure could cause an aversive effect limiting the development of an addiction. Several functional alterations caused by different mutations of the genes involved in dopaminergic transmission (principally-1021C>T of the gene DBH, but also Val158Met of the gene COMT, TaqI A of the gene DRD2 and VNTR 9 repeat of the DAT) could result in a cocaine-induced psychosis prone phenotype. We are hypothesising that the appearance of CIP during the first contact with cocaine is associated with a lower risk of developing cocaine addiction. This protective effect could be associated with the presence of one or more polymorphisms associated with CIP. A pharmacogenetic approach studying combination of polymorphism could isolate a sub-group of patients at risk for CIPs but more favorably protected from developing an addiction. This theory could enable a better understanding of the protective factors against cocaine addiction and offer new therapeutic or preventive targets in vulnerable sub-groups exposed

  4. Cerebral Critical Closing Pressure During Infusion Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsos, Georgios V; Czosnyka, Marek; Smielewski, Peter; Garnett, Matthew R; Liu, Xiuyun; Adams, Hadie; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    We studied possible correlations between cerebral hemodynamic indices based on critical closing pressure (CrCP) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compensatory dynamics, as assessed during lumbar infusion tests. Our data consisted of 34 patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus who undertook an infusion test, in conjunction with simultaneous transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) monitoring of blood flow velocity (FV). CrCP was calculated from the monitored signals of ICP, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and FV, whereas vascular wall tension (WT) was estimated as CrCP - ICP. The closing margin (CM) expresses the difference between ABP and CrCP. ICP increased during infusion from 6.67 ± 4.61 to 24.98 ± 10.49 mmHg (mean ± SD; p < 0.001), resulting in CrCP rising by 22.93 % (p < 0.001), with WT decreasing by 11.33 % (p = 0.005) owing to vasodilatation. CM showed a tendency to decrease, albeit not significantly (p = 0.070), because of rising ABP (9.12 %; p = 0.005), and was significantly different from zero for the whole duration of the tests (52.78 ± 22.82 mmHg; p < 0.001). CM at baseline correlated inversely with brain elasticity (R = -0.358; p = 0.038). Neither CrCP nor WT correlated with CSF compensatory parameters. Overall, CrCP increases and WT decreases during infusion tests, whereas CM at baseline pressure may act as a characterizing indicator of the cerebrospinal compensatory reserve. PMID:27165909

  5. Superselective arterial infusion and concomitant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superselective arterial infusion for patients with advanced head and neck cancer has been increasingly applied in Japan. We analyzed our experiences and evaluated the efficacy and safety of this treatment. Through October 1999 to March 2002, 29 patients, ranging in age between 33 and 71 years (median 52 years), received superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy of cisplatin (100-120 mg/m2/week) with simultaneous intravenous infusion of thiosulfate for neutralizing cisplatin toxicity, and conventional concomitant extrabeam radiotherapy (65 Gy/26 f/6.5 weeks). Four patients were diagnosed with stage III and 25 with stage IV. Thirteen patients were considered contraindicated for surgery, and the other 16 patients rejected radical surgery. Primary tumor sites included paranasal sinus (11 patients), hypopharynx (7), oropharynx (6), oral cavity (4), and parotid gland (1). During the median follow-up period of 20 months, there was no apparent recurrence in 14 (48.3%) of 29 patients. Eleven (37.9%) patients died of disease, and three (10.3%) were alive with disease. In twenty-one patients (72.4%) the primary lesions were well-controlled. Acute toxic effects were moderate, and severe toxic events occurred in four cases, namely, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia, sepsis, tetraplasia, and osteoradionecrosis. We confirmed the effectiveness and safety of superselective arterial infusion and concomitant radiotherapy. Furthermore, we must establish the optimal procedures and schedule, as well as the indications for this treatment. This treatment protocol may improve the prognosis of patients with unresectable disease and patients rejecting surgical treatment. Further study in this particular area is needed. (author)

  6. Infusing Engineering Concepts: Teaching Engineering Design

    OpenAIRE

    Daugherty, Jenny L.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering has gained considerable traction in many K-12 schools. However, there are several obstacles or challenges to an effective approach that leads to student learning. Questions such as where engineering best fits in the curriculum; how to include it authentically and appropriately; toward what educational end; and how best to prepare teachers need to be answered. Integration or infusion appears to be the most viable approach; instead of stand-alone engineering courses squeezing into t...

  7. Superselective arterial infusion and concomitant radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Akihiro; Suzuki, Fumiyuki; Inuyama, Yukio; Fukuda, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-05-01

    Superselective arterial infusion for patients with advanced head and neck cancer has been increasingly applied in Japan. We analyzed our experiences and evaluated the efficacy and safety of this treatment. Through October 1999 to March 2002, 29 patients, ranging in age between 33 and 71 years (median 52 years), received superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy of cisplatin (100-120 mg/m{sup 2}/week) with simultaneous intravenous infusion of thiosulfate for neutralizing cisplatin toxicity, and conventional concomitant extrabeam radiotherapy (65 Gy/26 f/6.5 weeks). Four patients were diagnosed with stage III and 25 with stage IV. Thirteen patients were considered contraindicated for surgery, and the other 16 patients rejected radical surgery. Primary tumor sites included paranasal sinus (11 patients), hypopharynx (7), oropharynx (6), oral cavity (4), and parotid gland (1). During the median follow-up period of 20 months, there was no apparent recurrence in 14 (48.3%) of 29 patients. Eleven (37.9%) patients died of disease, and three (10.3%) were alive with disease. In twenty-one patients (72.4%) the primary lesions were well-controlled. Acute toxic effects were moderate, and severe toxic events occurred in four cases, namely, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia, sepsis, tetraplasia, and osteoradionecrosis. We confirmed the effectiveness and safety of superselective arterial infusion and concomitant radiotherapy. Furthermore, we must establish the optimal procedures and schedule, as well as the indications for this treatment. This treatment protocol may improve the prognosis of patients with unresectable disease and patients rejecting surgical treatment. Further study in this particular area is needed. (author)

  8. Scavenged body heat powered infusion pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An infusion pump powered by body heat is investigated in this paper, with the goal of addressing the needs of dermal wound healing. The infusion pump incorporates a Knudsen gas pump, a type of thermally driven pump, to pneumatic push the pharmaceutical agent from a reservoir. Two designs are considered: an integrated pump and reservoir, and a design with cascaded pump and reservoir. Thermal models are developed for both pumps, and the simulations agree well with the experimental results. The integrated pump and reservoir design uses hydrophobic materials to prevent a flow from occurring unless the infusion pump is placed on a human body. Flow rates in the µL min−1 range for the integrated pump and reservoir, and approximately 70 µL min−1 for the cascaded pump were obtained. The dynamic behavior of the cascaded pump is described based on the thermal models. Multiple copies of the cascaded pump are easily made in series or parallel, to increase either the pressure or the flow rate. The flow rate of multiple pumps in series does not change, and the pressure of multiple pumps in parallel does not change. (paper)

  9. Improved cognitive flexibility in serotonin transporter knockout rats is unchanged following chronic cocaine self-administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonkes, L.J.; Maes, J.H.R.; Homberg, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is associated with orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)-dependent cognitive inflexibility in both humans and laboratory animals. A critical question is whether cocaine self-administration affects pre-existing individual differences in cognitive flexibility. Serotonin transporter knockout (5

  10. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig;

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus...

  11. Power spectrum scale invariance as a neural marker of cocaine misuse and altered cognitive control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime S. Ide

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest disrupted connectivity dynamics in the fronto-parietal areas in association with post-signal behavioral adjustment in cocaine addicts. These new findings support PSSI as a neural marker of impaired cognitive control in cocaine addiction.

  12. Effect of Insulin Infusion on Liver Protein Synthesis during Hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Mark; Frystyk, Jan; Jespersen, Bente;

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) is a catabolic procedure that may contribute to the high frequency of protein-energy wasting among patients receiving maintenance HD. The present study investigated the additional effect of glucose and glucose-insulin infusion on liver protein synthesis during HD...... compared with a meal alone. Methods In a randomized cross-over study with three arms, 11 non-diabetic HD patients were assigned to receive a conventional HD session with either: • no treatment (NT) • IV infusion of glucose (G) • IV infusion of glucose-insulin (GI) During infusions blood glucose levels were...... maintained at 8.0-10.0 mmol/L by additional glucose infusion. Glucose and glucose-insulin infusions were commenced 2 h prior to HD and continued throughout the HD session. Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline before infusion and followed by the only meal allowed during the study. Results Blood...

  13. Severity of Childhood Trauma is Predictive of Cocaine Relapse Outcomes in Women but not Men

    OpenAIRE

    Hyman, Scott M.; Paliwal, Prashni; Chaplin, Tara M.; Mazure, Carolyn M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.; Sinha, Rajita

    2007-01-01

    We prospectively examined the gender-specific effects of childhood trauma on cocaine relapse outcomes in an inpatient sample of treatment engaged cocaine dependent adults. Cocaine dependent men (n = 70) and women (n = 54) participating in inpatient treatment for cocaine dependence were assessed on severity of childhood trauma and followed for 90 days after discharge from treatment. Greater severity of childhood emotional abuse was associated with an increased risk of relapse in women. Severit...

  14. Characteristics of Rural Crack and Powder Cocaine Users: Gender and Other Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Sandra K.; Falck, Russel S.; Carlson, Robert G.; Leukefeld, Carl; Booth, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the relationship of gender with cocaine use in rural areas. This study describes these relationships among stimulant users residing in rural areas of Arkansas, Kentucky and Ohio. Objectives Understanding characteristics of crack and powder cocaine users in rural areas may help inform prevention, education and treatment efforts to address rural stimulant use. Methods Participants were 690 stimulant users, including 274 (38.6%) females, residing in 9 rural counties. Cocaine use was measured by self-report of cocaine use, frequency of use, age of first use, and cocaine abuse/dependence. Powder cocaine use was reported by 49% of this sample of stimulant users and 59% reported using crack cocaine. Findings Differing use patterns emerged for female and male cocaine users in this rural sample; females began using alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine at later ages than males but there were no gender differences in current powder cocaine use. Females reported more frequent use of crack cocaine and more cocaine abuse/dependence than males, and in regression analyses, female crack cocaine users had 1.8 times greater odds of reporting frequent crack use than male crack users. Conclusions and Scientific Significance These findings suggest differing profiles and patterns of cocaine use for male and female users in rural areas, supporting previous findings in urban areas of gender-based vulnerability to negative consequences of cocaine use. Further research on cocain use in rural areas can provide insights into gender differences that can inform development and refinement of effective interventions in rural communities. PMID:21851207

  15. Reduced Forebrain Serotonin Transmission is Causally Involved in the Development of Compulsive Cocaine Seeking in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Pelloux, Yann; Dilleen, Ruth; Economidou, Daina; Theobald, David; Everitt, Barry J.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the majority of cocaine users quit as they experience the negative consequences of drug use, some lose control over their drug taking and compulsively seek drugs. We report that 20% of rats compulsively seek cocaine despite intermittent negative outcomes after escalating their cocaine self-administration. This compulsive subgroup showed marked reductions in forebrain serotonin utilization; increasing serotonin transmission reduced their compulsive cocaine seeking. Depleting forebrain ...

  16. Orexin-1 Receptor Mediation of Cocaine Seeking in Male and Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Luyi; Ghee, Shannon M.; Chan, Clifford; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D.; Kenny, Paul J.; See, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that female rats exhibit enhanced cocaine seeking during multiple phases of cocaine addiction compared with males. The orexin/hypocretin system recently has been implicated in drug addiction in male rats. Based on the known sex differences in cocaine addiction, in the current study we examined orexin-mediated cocaine seeking during self-administration, extinction, and reinstatement in age-matched male (initial weight 250–300 g) and female (initial weight 175–225 g)...

  17. Association analysis between polymorphisms in the conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) gene and cocaine dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Bloch, Paul J.; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Berrettini, Wade H.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Dackis, Charles A.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Oslin, David W

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine induced neuroplasticity changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of cocaine dependence. Since neurotrophic factors have been observed to prevent/reverse and mimic cocaine-induced neurobiological changes in the brain, related genes are plausible candidates for susceptibility to cocaine dependence. The novel conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor protein (CDNF) promotes the survival, growth, and function of dopamine-specific neu...

  18. Cocaine exposure modulates dopamine and adenosine signaling in the fetal brain

    OpenAIRE

    Kubrusly, Regina C. C.; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to cocaine during the fetal period can produce significant lasting changes in the structure and function of the brain. Cocaine exerts its effects on the developing brain by blocking monoamine transporters and impairing monoamine receptor signaling. Dopamine is a major central target of cocaine. In a mouse model, we show that cocaine exposure from embryonic day 8 (E8) to E14 produces significant reduction in dopamine transporter activity, attenuation of dopamine D1-receptor function a...

  19. Pharmacokinetic profile of cocaine following intravenous administration in the female rabbit

    OpenAIRE

    Parlaman, Joshua P.; Thompson, Barbara L.; Levitt, Pat; Stanwood, Gregg D.

    2007-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure in a rabbit intravenous model has revealed selective disruption of brain development and pharmacological responsiveness. We therefore examined the pharmacokinetic properties of cocaine in this model. Dutch-belted rabbits were surgically implanted with a catheter in the carotid artery, allowed to recover, and then injected intravenously with a cocaine bolus. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations were measured in arterial blood plasma and analyzed by nonlinear reg...

  20. Modulation Of The Endo-Cannabinoid System: Therapeutic Potential Against Cocaine Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Tanda, Gianluigi

    2007-01-01

    Dependence on cocaine is still a main unresolved medical and social concern, and in spite of research efforts, no pharmacological therapy against cocaine dependence is yet available. Recent studies have shown that the endocannabinoid system participates in specific stages and aspects of drug dependence in general, and some of this evidence suggests an involvement of the cannabinoid system in cocaine effects. For example, cocaine administration has been shown to alter brain endocannabinoid lev...

  1. Pharmacotherapeutics directed at deficiencies associated with cocaine dependence: Focus on dopamine, norepinephrine and glutamate

    OpenAIRE

    Haile, Colin N.; Mahoney, James J.; Newton, Thomas F.; De La Garza, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to research focused on pharmacotherapies for cocaine dependence yet there are no FDA-approved medications for this brain disease. Preclinical models have been essential to defining the central and peripheral effects produced by cocaine. Recent evidence suggests that cocaine exerts its reinforcing effects by acting on multiple neurotransmitter systems within mesocorticolimibic circuitry. Imaging studies in cocaine-dependent individuals have identified deficiencies ...

  2. Upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 following prenatal cocaine exposure induces apoptosis in fetal rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, DaLiao; Zhang, Lubo

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy has been associated with numerous adverse perinatal outcomes. Aims: The present study was to determine whether prenatal cocaine exposure induced apoptosis and the possible role of Bcl-2 family genes in the programming cell death in fetal rat brain. Main methods: Pregnant rats were treated with cocaine subcutaneously (30 & 60 mg/kg/day) from day 15 to 21 of gestation. Then the fetal and maternal brains were isolated. Key findings: Cocaine produced a dose-dependen...

  3. Upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 following prenatal cocaine exposure induces apoptosis in fetal rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    DaLiao Xiao, Lubo Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy has been associated with numerous adverse perinatal outcomes. Aims: The present study was to determine whether prenatal cocaine exposure induced apoptosis and the possible role of Bcl-2 family genes in the programming cell death in fetal rat brain. Main methods: Pregnant rats were treated with cocaine subcutaneously (30 & 60 mg/kg/day) from day 15 to 21 of gestation. Then the fetal and maternal brains were isolated. Key findings: Cocaine produced a dose-depe...

  4. Cocaine enhances HIV-1 gp120-induced lymphatic endothelial dysfunction in the lung

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Jiang, Susan; Yu, Jinlong; Kuzontkoski, Paula M; Groopman, Jerome E

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are common in both AIDS patients and cocaine users. We addressed the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which HIV and cocaine may partner to induce their deleterious effects. Using primary lung lymphatic endothelial cells (L-LECs), we examined how cocaine and HIV-1 gp120, alone and together, modulate signaling and functional properties of L-LECs. We found that brief cocaine exposure activated paxillin and induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, while sustained exposure i...

  5. Experience-Dependent Effects of Cocaine Self-Administration/Conditioning on Prefrontal and Accumbens Dopamine Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Ikegami, Aiko; Olsen, Christopher M; D’Souza, Manoranjan S.; Duvauchelle, Christine L.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the effects of cocaine self-administration and conditioning experience on operant behavior, locomotor activity, and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine (DA) responses. Sensory cues were paired with alternating cocaine and nonreinforcement during 12 (limited training) or 40 (long-term training) daily operant sessions. After limited training, NAcc DA responses to cocaine were significantly enhanced in the presence of cocaine-associ...

  6. Stimulant-induced dopamine increases are markedly blunted in active cocaine abusers

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, ND; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G-J; J. Logan; Alexoff, DL; Jayne, M; Fowler, JS; C Wong; P. Yin; Du, C.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine signaling in nucleus accumbens is essential for cocaine reward. Interestingly, imaging studies have reported blunted dopamine increases in striatum (assessed as reduced binding of [11C]raclopride to D2/D3 receptors) in detoxified cocaine abusers. Here, we evaluate whether the blunted dopamine response reflected the effects of detoxification and the lack of cocaine-cues during stimulant exposure. For this purpose we studied 62 participants (43 non-detoxified cocaine abusers and 19 con...

  7. Adolescents Are More Vulnerable to Cocaine Addiction: Behavioral and Electrophysiological Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Wai Chong; Ford, Kerstin A.; Pagels, Nicole E.; McCutcheon, James E.; Marinelli, Michela

    2013-01-01

    In humans, adolescence is a period of heightened propensity to develop cocaine addiction. It is unknown whether this is attributable to greater access and exposure to cocaine at this age, or whether the adolescent brain is particularly vulnerable to the addictive properties of cocaine. Here, we subjected male adolescent (P42) and adult (~P88) rats to a wide range of cocaine self-administration procedures. In addition, to determine whether behavioral differences are associated with development...

  8. Development of the dopamine transporter selective RTI-336 as a pharmacotherapy for cocaine abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, F. Ivy; Howard, James L.; Howell, Leonard L.; Fox, Barbara S.; Kuhar, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery and preclinical development of selective dopamine reuptake inhibitors as potential pharmacotherapies for treating cocaine addiction are presented. The studies are based on the hypothesis that a dopamine reuptake inhibitor is expected to partially substitute for cocaine, thus decreasing cocaine self-administration and minimizing the craving for cocaine. This type of indirect agonist therapy has been highly effective for treating smoking addiction (nicotine replacement therapy) an...

  9. Elevated dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex suppresses cocaine seeking via D1 receptor overstimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoto, Paola; Fattore, Liana; Antinori, Silvia; Saba, Pierluigi; Frau, Roberto; Fratta, Walter; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that the dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitors disulfiram and nepicastat suppress cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine self-administration behaviour. Moreover, both inhibitors increase dopamine release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and markedly potentiate cocaine-induced dopamine release in this region. This study was aimed to clarify if the suppressant effect of DBH inhibitors on cocaine reinstatement was mediated by the high extracellular dopamine in the rat mPFC leading to a supra-maximal stimulation of D1 receptors in the dorsal division of mPFC, an area critical for reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour. In line with previous microdialysis studies in drug-naïve animals, both DBH inhibitors potentiated cocaine-induced dopamine release in the mPFC, in the same animals in which they also suppressed reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Similar to the DBH inhibitors, L-DOPA potentiated cocaine-induced dopamine release in the mPFC and suppressed cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour. The bilateral microinfusion of the D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 into the dorsal mPFC not only prevented cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking but also reverted both disulfiram- and L-DOPA-induced suppression of reinstatement. Moreover, the bilateral microinfusion of the D1 receptor agonist chloro-APB (SKF 82958) into the dorsal mPFC markedly attenuated cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking. These results suggest that stimulation of D1 receptors in the dorsal mPFC plays a crucial role in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, whereas the suppressant effect of DBH inhibitors and L-DOPA on drug-induced reinstatement is mediated by a supra-maximal stimulation of D1 receptors leading to their inactivation. PMID:25135633

  10. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure, Gender, and Adolescent Stress Response: A Prospective Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Freiburger, Matthew B.; Linda C Mayes; Sinha, Rajita

    2010-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure is associated with alterations in arousal regulation in response to stress in young children. However, relations between cocaine exposure and stress response in adolescence have not been examined. We examined salivary cortisol, self-reported emotion, heart rate, and blood pressure (BP) responses to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in 49 Prenatally Cocaine and other drug Exposed (PCE) and 33 Non Cocaine Exposed (NCE) adolescents. PCE adolescents had higher cortisol...

  11. Effect of cocaine use on outcomes in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky T Yeung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Animal and molecular studies have shown that cocaine exerts a neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemia. Aims: To determine if the presence of cocaine metabolites on admission following traumatic brain injury (TBI is associated with better outcomes. Settings and Design: Level-1 trauma center, retrospective cohort. Materials and Methods: After obtaining Institutional Review Board (IRB approval, the trauma registry was searched from 2006 to 2009 for all patients aged 15-55 years with blunt head trauma and non-head AIS <3. Exclusion criteria were pre-existing brain pathology and death within 30 min of admission. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality; secondary outcomes were hospital length of stay (LOS, and Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS. Statistical Analysis: Logistic regression was used to determine the independent effect of cocaine on mortality. Hospital LOS was compared with multiple linear regression. Results: A total of 741 patients met criteria and had drug screens. The screened versus unscreened groups were similar. Cocaine positive patients were predominantly African-American (46% vs. 21%, P < 0.0001, older (40 years vs. 30 years, P < 0.0001, and had ethanol present more often (50.7% vs. 37.8%, P = 0.01. There were no differences in mortality (cocaine-positive 1.4% vs. cocaine-negative 2.7%, P = 0.6 on both univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Positive cocaine screening was not associated with mortality in TBI. An effect may not have been detected because of the low mortality rate. LOS is affected by many factors unrelated to the injury and may not be a good surrogate for recovery. Similarly, GOS may be too coarse a measure to identify a benefit.

  12. Evaluation of Talbot's Safety Zone of Infusion Volume and Osmolality in Infusion Therapy for Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuasa,Shiro

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available Problems with infusion therapy for correcting fluid and sodium imbalance in decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC were investigated by establishing the safety zone of Talbot et al. for parenteral fluid therapy in 4 DLC patients infused with over 900 ml of fluid each day for at least 9 days. The safety zone was different in each case. The safe infusion volume decreased and the safe electrolyte concentration shifted to a lower osmolality when there was ascites with renal failure than ascites without renal failure. Infusion therapy was performed without deterioration of the water and sodium balance in those patients whose infusion volume and fluid osmolality were in the safety zone. In contrast, ascites retention increased and peripheral edema appeared in patients whose infusion volume and osmolality were out of the safety zone. Therefore, the safety zone should be determined repeatedly during infusion therapy.

  13. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cocaine on the Spontaneous Behavior of Pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Branch, Marc N.

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment examined the effects of acute and daily cocaine on spontaneous behavior patterns of pigeons. After determining the acute effects of a range of doses, 9 pigeons were divided into three groups that received one of three doses of cocaine daily, either 1.0, 3.0, or 10.0 mg/kg cocaine. Measures were taken of spontaneous…

  14. Brain imaging studies of the cocaine addict: Implications for reinforcement and addiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[SUNY, Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry

    1995-07-01

    These studies document dopaminergic abnormalities in cocaine abusers. They also suggest a regulatory role of Dopamine (DA) in frontal metabolism. The correlation of striatal D{sub 2} receptor availability with metabolism was strongest for orbital frontal cortex (OFC) cingulate and prefrontal cortices. In cocaine abusers tested during early withdrawal (<1 week) the OFC was found to be hypermetabolic and metabolism in OFC and prefrontal cortices were found to be significantly associated with cocaine craving . Thus, we postulate that repeated and intermittent DA stimulation, as seen during a cocaine binge, activates the prefrontal and OFC cortices increasing the drive to compulsively self-administer cocaine. During cocaine discontinuation and protracted withdrawal and with decreased DA stimulation, these frontal cortical regions become hyponietabolic. Dopaminergic stimulation by a DA-enhancing drug and/or environmental conditioning will reactivate these frontal regions resetting the compulsion to self-administer cocaine and the inability to terminate this behavior. The pharmacokionetic studies with [11C]cocaine are consistent with behavioral and pharmacological studies in animals as well as in vitro studies which have revealed that while the mechanisms for cocaine`s reinforcing properties are complex, they partly involve the brain`s dopamine system and also highlight the importance of cocaine`s pharmacokinetic on its unique reinforcing properties.

  15. Reserpine differentially affects cocaine-induced behavior in low and high responders to novelty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, M.M.M.; Cools, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals are known to differ in their sensitivity to cocaine. Cocaine is known to inhibit the re-uptake of monoamines. The response to cocaine has also been found to depend on monoamines inside reserpine-sensitive storage vesicles. The present study examined the effects of reserpine (1-2 mg/kg) o

  16. Restoration of Cocaine Stimulation and Reward by Reintroducing Wild Type Dopamine Transporter in Adult Knock-in Mice with a Cocaine-Insensitive Dopamine Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiyin; O’Neill, Brian; Han, Dawn D.; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi; Wang, Yanlin; Gu, Howard H.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we generated knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter (DAT-CI mice) and found cocaine does not stimulate locomotion or produce reward in these mice, indicating DAT inhibition is necessary for cocaine stimulation and reward. However, DAT uptake is reduced in DAT-CI mice and thus the lack of cocaine responses could be due to adaptive changes. To test this, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to reintroduce the cocaine-sensitive wild type DAT (AAV-DATwt) back into adult DAT-CI mice, which restores cocaine inhibition of DAT in affected brain regions but does not reverse the adaptive changes. In an earlier study we showed that AAV-DATwt injections in regions covering the lateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) and lateral caudate-putamen (CPu) restored cocaine stimulation but not cocaine reward. In the current study, we expanded the AAV-DATwt infected areas to cover the olfactory tubercle (Tu) and the ventral midbrain (vMB) containing the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) in addition to CPu and NAc with multiple injections. These mice displayed the restoration of both locomotor stimulation and cocaine reward. We further found that AAV-DATwt injection in the vMB alone was sufficient to restore both cocaine stimulation and reward in DAT-CI mice. AAV injected in the VTA and SN resulted in DATwt expression and distribution to the DA terminal regions. In summary, cocaine induced locomotion and reward can be restored in fully developed DAT-CI mice, and cocaine inhibition of DAT expressed in dopaminergic neurons originated from the ventral midbrain mediates cocaine reward and stimulation. PMID:24835281

  17. Cocaine-associated increase of atrial natriuretic peptides: an early predictor of cardiac complications in cocaine users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casartelli, Alessandro; Dacome, Lisa; Tessari, Michela; Pascali, Jennifer; Bortolotti, Federica; Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Bosco, Oliviero; Cristofori, Patrizia; Tagliaro, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cocaine is known to produce life-threatening cardiovascular complications, and the investigation of the causes of death may be challenging in forensic medicine. The increasing knowledge of the cardiac function biomarkers and the increasing sensitivity of assays provide new tools in monitoring the cardiac life-threatening pathological conditions and in the sudden death investigation in chronic abusers. In this work, cardiac dysfunction was assessed in an animal model by measuring troponin I and natriuretic peptides as biomarkers, and considering other standard endpoints used in preclinical toxicology studies. Methods Lister Hooded rats were treated with cocaine in chronic self-administration studies. Troponin I (cTnI) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were evaluated at different time points and heart weight and histopathology were assessed at the end of the treatment period. Furthermore, cocaine and its main metabolites were measured in the rat fur to assess rats’ cocaine exposure. All the procedures and endpoints considered were designed to allow an easy and complete translation from the laboratory animals to human beings, and the same approach was also adopted with a group of 10 healthy cocaine abuse volunteers with no cardiac pathologies. Results Cardiac troponin I values were unaffected, and ANP showed an increasing trend with time in all cocaine-treated animals considered. Similarly, in the healthy volunteers, no changes were observed in troponin serum levels, whereas the N-terminal brain natriuretic pro-peptide (NT proBNP) showed variations comparable with the changes observed in rats. Conclusions In conclusion, natriuretic peptides could represent an early indicator of heart dysfunction liability in chronic cocaine abusers. PMID:27326180

  18. Loss of the trpc4 gene is associated with a reduction in cocaine self-administration and reduced spontaneous ventral tegmental area dopamine neuronal activity, without deficits in learning for natural rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipec, William D; Burrow, Kristin R; O'Neill, Casey; Cao, Jun-Li; Lawyer, Chloe R; Ostertag, Eric; Fowler, Melissa; Bachtell, Ryan K; Illig, Kurt R; Cooper, Donald C

    2016-06-01

    Among the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels, the TRPC4 non-selective cation channel is one of the most abundantly expressed subtypes within mammalian corticolimbic brain regions, but its functional and behavioral role is unknown. To identify a function for TRPC4 channels we compared the performance of rats with a genetic knockout of the trpc4 gene (trpc4 KO) to wild-type (WT) controls on the acquisition of simple and complex learning for natural rewards, and on cocaine self-administration (SA). Despite the abundant distribution of TRPC4 channels through the corticolimbic brain regions, we found trpc4 KO rats exhibited normal learning in Y-maze and complex reversal shift paradigms. However, a deficit was observed in cocaine SA in the trpc4 KO group, which infused significantly less cocaine than WT controls despite displaying normal sucrose SA. Given the important role of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons in cocaine SA, we hypothesized that TRPC4 channels may regulate basal dopamine neuron excitability. Double-immunolabeling showed a selective expression of TRPC4 channels in a subpopulation of putative dopamine neurons in the VTA. Ex vivo recordings of spontaneous VTA dopamine neuronal activity from acute brain slices revealed fewer cells with high-frequency firing rates in trpc4 KO rats compared to WT controls. Since deletion of the trpc4 gene does not impair learning involving natural rewards, but reduces cocaine SA, these data demonstrate a potentially novel role for TRPC4 channels in dopamine systems and may offer a new pharmacological target for more effective treatment of a variety of dopamine disorders. PMID:26988269

  19. Interactions of cocaine with barbital, pentobarbital and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1989-01-01

    This study deals with the interactions of cocaine with barbital, pentobarbital and ethanol in nontolerant and tolerant male Sprague-Dawley rats. Cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellets implanted s.c. in rats prior to the i.p. injections of sodium barbital (150 mg/kg dose once daily for 4 days) potentiated the hypothermic response 2 hr after the barbital injection, when maximum hypothermia occurred. The s.c. implantation of the same type of pellets prior to the i.p. injections of sodium pentobarbital (75 mg/kg dose once daily for 5 days) potentiated the pentobarbital hypnosis as measured by the duration of loss of the righting reflex in animals. Cocaine pellets (12.5 mg) implanted s.c. in rats potentiated the hypnosis induced by ethanol (3.2 g/kg i.p.) and the implantation of the same type of pellets (12.5, 25 mg) in ethanol-tolerant rats restored the ethanol hypnosis to levels observed in acutely treated animals. The course of tolerance development to barbital-induced hypothermia or pentobarbital hypnosis did not appear to be affected by cocaine. The possible role of central monoamines in the potentiation of barbital hypothermia and pentobarbital and ethanol hypnosis by cocaine is discussed. PMID:2774771

  20. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Abu-Abed Abdin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as “euglycemic DKA.” This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA.

  1. PET imaging predicts future body weight and cocaine preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deficits in dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2R/D3R) binding availability using PET imaging have been reported in obese humans and rodents. Similar deficits have been reported in cocaine-addicts and cocaine-exposed primates. We found that D2R/D3R binding availability negatively correlated with measures of body weight at the time of scan (ventral striatum), at 1 (ventral striatum) and 2 months (dorsal and ventral striatum) post scan in rats. Cocaine preference was negatively correlated with D2R/D3R binding availability 2 months (ventral striatum) post scan. Our findings suggest that inherent deficits in striatal D2R/D3R signaling are related to obesity and drug addiction susceptibility and that ventral and dorsal striatum serve dissociable roles in maintaining weight gain and cocaine preference. Measuring D2R/D3R binding availability provides a way for assessing susceptibility to weight gain and cocaine abuse in rodents and given the translational nature of PET imaging, potentially primates and humans.

  2. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Upregulates BDNF-TrkB Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Andres; Bakshi, Kalindi P.; Friedman, Eitan; Wang, Hoau-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure causes profound changes in neurobehavior as well as synaptic function and structure with compromised glutamatergic transmission. Since synaptic health and glutamatergic activity are tightly regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its cognate tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), we hypothesized that prenatal cocaine exposure alters BDNF-TrkB signaling during brain development. Here we show prenatal cocaine exposure enhances BDNF-TrkB signaling in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFCX) of 21-day-old rats without affecting the expression levels of TrkB, P75NTR, signaling molecules, NMDA receptor—NR1 subunit as well as proBDNF and BDNF. Prenatal cocaine exposure reduces activity-dependent proBDNF and BDNF release and elevates BDNF affinity for TrkB leading to increased tyrosine-phosphorylated TrkB, heightened Phospholipase C-γ1 and N-Shc/Shc recruitment and higher downstream PI3K and ERK activation in response to ex vivo BDNF. The augmented BDNF-TrkB signaling is accompanied by increases in association between activated TrkB and NMDARs. These data suggest that cocaine exposure during gestation upregulates BDNF-TrkB signaling and its interaction with NMDARs by increasing BDNF affinity, perhaps in an attempt to restore the diminished excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:27494324

  3. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Upregulates BDNF-TrkB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Andres; Bakshi, Kalindi P; Friedman, Eitan; Wang, Hoau-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure causes profound changes in neurobehavior as well as synaptic function and structure with compromised glutamatergic transmission. Since synaptic health and glutamatergic activity are tightly regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its cognate tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), we hypothesized that prenatal cocaine exposure alters BDNF-TrkB signaling during brain development. Here we show prenatal cocaine exposure enhances BDNF-TrkB signaling in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFCX) of 21-day-old rats without affecting the expression levels of TrkB, P75NTR, signaling molecules, NMDA receptor-NR1 subunit as well as proBDNF and BDNF. Prenatal cocaine exposure reduces activity-dependent proBDNF and BDNF release and elevates BDNF affinity for TrkB leading to increased tyrosine-phosphorylated TrkB, heightened Phospholipase C-γ1 and N-Shc/Shc recruitment and higher downstream PI3K and ERK activation in response to ex vivo BDNF. The augmented BDNF-TrkB signaling is accompanied by increases in association between activated TrkB and NMDARs. These data suggest that cocaine exposure during gestation upregulates BDNF-TrkB signaling and its interaction with NMDARs by increasing BDNF affinity, perhaps in an attempt to restore the diminished excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:27494324

  4. Cocaine dependence and thalamic functional connectivity: a multivariate pattern analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Sinha, Rajita; Potenza, Marc N; Malison, Robert T; Li, Chiang-Shan R

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is associated with deficits in cognitive control. Previous studies demonstrated that chronic cocaine use affects the activity and functional connectivity of the thalamus, a subcortical structure critical for cognitive functioning. However, the thalamus contains nuclei heterogeneous in functions, and it is not known how thalamic subregions contribute to cognitive dysfunctions in cocaine dependence. To address this issue, we used multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) to examine how functional connectivity of the thalamus distinguishes 100 cocaine-dependent participants (CD) from 100 demographically matched healthy control individuals (HC). We characterized six task-related networks with independent component analysis of fMRI data of a stop signal task and employed MVPA to distinguish CD from HC on the basis of voxel-wise thalamic connectivity to the six independent components. In an unbiased model of distinct training and testing data, the analysis correctly classified 72% of subjects with leave-one-out cross-validation (p brain regions with similar voxel counts (p cocaine dependence. PMID:27556009

  5. PET imaging predicts future body weight and cocaine preference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelides M.; Wang G.; Michaelides M.; Thanos P.K. Kim R.; Cho J.; Ananth M.; Wang G.-J.; Volkow N.D.

    2011-08-28

    Deficits in dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2R/D3R) binding availability using PET imaging have been reported in obese humans and rodents. Similar deficits have been reported in cocaine-addicts and cocaine-exposed primates. We found that D2R/D3R binding availability negatively correlated with measures of body weight at the time of scan (ventral striatum), at 1 (ventral striatum) and 2 months (dorsal and ventral striatum) post scan in rats. Cocaine preference was negatively correlated with D2R/D3R binding availability 2 months (ventral striatum) post scan. Our findings suggest that inherent deficits in striatal D2R/D3R signaling are related to obesity and drug addiction susceptibility and that ventral and dorsal striatum serve dissociable roles in maintaining weight gain and cocaine preference. Measuring D2R/D3R binding availability provides a way for assessing susceptibility to weight gain and cocaine abuse in rodents and given the translational nature of PET imaging, potentially primates and humans.

  6. Striatal microRNA controls cocaine intake through CREB signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Jonathan A; Im, Heh-In; Amelio, Antonio L; Kocerha, Jannet; Bali, Purva; Lu, Qun; Willoughby, David; Wahlestedt, Claes; Conkright, Michael D; Kenny, Paul J

    2010-07-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by a gradual loss of control over drug use, but the molecular mechanisms regulating vulnerability to this process remain unclear. Here we report that microRNA-212 (miR-212) is upregulated in the dorsal striatum of rats with a history of extended access to cocaine. Striatal miR-212 decreases responsiveness to the motivational properties of cocaine by markedly amplifying the stimulatory effects of the drug on cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) signalling. This action occurs through miR-212-enhanced Raf1 activity, resulting in adenylyl cyclase sensitization and increased expression of the essential CREB co-activator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB; also known as CRTC). Our findings indicate that striatal miR-212 signalling has a key role in determining vulnerability to cocaine addiction, reveal new molecular regulators that control the complex actions of cocaine in brain reward circuitries and provide an entirely new direction for the development of anti-addiction therapeutics based on the modulation of noncoding RNAs.

  7. Cocaine-Induced Endocannabinoid Mobilization in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huikun Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine is a highly addictive drug that acts upon the brain’s reward circuitry via the inhibition of monoamine uptake. Endogenous cannabinoids (eCB are lipid molecules released from midbrain dopamine (DA neurons that modulate cocaine’s effects through poorly understood mechanisms. We find that cocaine stimulates release of the eCB, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, in the rat ventral midbrain to suppress GABAergic inhibition of DA neurons, through activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Cocaine mobilizes 2-AG via inhibition of norepinephrine uptake and promotion of a cooperative interaction between Gq/11-coupled type-1 metabotropic glutamate and α1-adrenergic receptors to stimulate internal calcium stores and activate phospholipase C. The disinhibition of DA neurons by cocaine-mobilized 2-AG is also functionally relevant because it augments DA release in the nucleus accumbens in vivo. Our results identify a mechanism through which the eCB system can regulate the rewarding and addictive properties of cocaine.

  8. Possibilities for discrimination between chewing of coca leaves and abuse of cocaine by hair analysis including hygrine, cuscohygrine, cinnamoylcocaine and cocaine metabolite/cocaine ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Nelida Cristina; Hastedt, Martin; Gonzalez, Jorge; Pragst, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the illegal use of any form of manufactured cocaine, chewing of coca leaves and drinking of coca tea are allowed and are very common and socially integrated in several South American countries. Because of this different legal state, an analytical method for discrimination between use of coca leaves and abuse of processed cocaine preparations is required. In this study, the applicability of hair analysis for this purpose was examined. Hair samples from 26 Argentinean coca chewers and 22 German cocaine users were analysed for cocaine (COC), norcocaine (NC), benzoylecgonine (BE), ecgonine methyl ester (EME), cocaethylene (CE), cinnamoylcocaine (CIN), tropacocaine (TRO), cuscohygrine (CUS) and hygrine (HYG) by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) in combination with triplequad mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS). The following concentrations (range, median, ng/mg) were determined in hair of the coca chewers: COC 0.085-75.5, 17.0; NC 0.03-1.15, 0.12; BE 0.046-35.5, 6.1; EME 0.014-6.0, 0.66; CE 0.00-13.8, 0.38; CIN 0.005-16.8, 0.79; TRO 0.02-0.16, 0.023; CUS 0.026-26.7, 0.31. In lack of a reference substance, only qualitative data were obtained for HYG, and two metabolites of CUS were detected which were not found in hair of the cocaine users. For interpretation, the concentrations of the metabolites and of the coca alkaloids in relation to cocaine were statistically compared between coca chewers and cocaine users. By analysis of variance (ANOVA) significant differences were found for all analytes (α = 0.000 to 0.030) with the exception of TRO (α = 0.218). The ratios CUS/COC, CIN/COC and EME/COC appeared to be the most suitable criteria for discrimination between both groups with the means and medians 5-fold to 10-fold higher for coca chewers and a low overlap of the ranges between both groups. The same was qualitatively found for HYG. However, these criteria cannot exclude

  9. Cocaine serves as a peripheral interoceptive conditioned stimulus for central glutamate and dopamine release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy A Wise

    Full Text Available Intravenous injections of cocaine HCl are habit-forming because, among their many actions, they elevate extracellular dopamine levels in the terminal fields of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. This action, thought to be very important for cocaine's strong addiction liability, is believed to have very short latency and is assumed to reflect rapid brain entry and pharmacokinetics of the drug. However, while intravenous cocaine HCl has almost immediate effects on behavior and extracellular dopamine levels, recent evidence suggests that its central pharmacological effects are not evident until 10 or more seconds after IV injection. Thus the immediate effects of a given intravenous cocaine injection on extracellular dopamine concentration and behavior appear to occur before there is sufficient time for cocaine to act centrally as a dopamine uptake inhibitor. To explore the contribution of peripheral effects of cocaine to the early activation of the dopamine system, we used brain microdialysis to measure the effects of cocaine methiodide (MI--a cocaine analogue that does not cross the blood brain barrier--on glutamate (excitatory input to the dopamine cells. IP injections of cocaine MI were ineffective in cocaine-naïve animals but stimulated ventral tegmental glutamate release in rats previously trained to lever-press for cocaine HCl. This peripherally triggered glutamate input was sufficient to reinstate cocaine-seeking in previously trained animals that had undergone extinction of the habit. These findings offer an explanation for short-latency behavioral responses and immediate dopamine elevations seen following cocaine injections in cocaine-experienced but not cocaine-naïve animals.

  10. Selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonism by SB-277011A attenuates cocaine reinforcement as assessed by progressive-ratio and variable-cost–variable-payoff fixed-ratio cocaine self-administration in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Gilbert, Jeremy G.; Pak, Arlene C.; ASHBY, CHARLES R.; Heidbreder, Christian A.; Gardner, Eliot L

    2005-01-01

    In rats, acute administration of SB-277011A, a highly selective dopamine (DA) D3 receptor antagonist, blocks cocaine-enhanced brain stimulation reward, cocaine-seeking behaviour and reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour. Here, we investigated whether SB-277011A attenuates cocaine reinforcement as assessed by cocaine self-administration under variable-cost–variable-payoff fixed-ratio (FR) and progressive-ratio (PR) reinforcement schedules. Acute i.p. administration of SB-277011A (3–24 mg/...

  11. Effect of diamorphine, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and ethanol on intravenous cocaine disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B; Misra, A L

    1984-08-01

    The disposition of cocaine (1 mg kg-1) was altered by diamorphine (0.1 mg kg-1) and that of morphine (1 mg kg-1) was altered after their concurrent administration as a bolus i.v. injection to rats by cocaine, without any changes in the metabolism of the drugs. delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (10 mg kg-1 i.p.) did not affect the cocaine disposition. Chronic ethanol treatment (2.5 g kg-1 orally twice daily for 16 days) produced a significantly higher brain-to-plasma cocaine concentration ratio than did saline as control, without any changes in cocaine metabolism. PMID:6148403

  12. DBH gene as predictor of response in a cocaine vaccine clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kosten, Thomas R.; Domingo, Coreen B.; Hamon, Sara C.; Nielsen, David A

    2013-01-01

    We examined a pharmacogenetic association of the dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) gene with a response to an anti-cocaine vaccine that was tested in a recent clinical trial. This gene is associated with cocaine-induced paranoia, which has a slower onset than the euphoria from cocaine. The vaccine reduced euphoria by slowing the entry of cocaine into the brain, but it may not reduce aversive symptoms like paranoia. A 16-week Phase IIb randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 114 cocaine...

  13. Physical Victimization of Rural Methamphetamine and Cocaine Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Borders, Tyrone F.; Tripathi, Shanti; Lynch, Christian; Leukefeld, Carl; Falck, Russel S.; Carlson, Robert G.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    Substance use and physical violence often co-occur, but little has been published on the correlates associated with receipt of partner versus non-partner physical violence for rural users of methamphetamine and/or cocaine. In this study, participants’ substance use, depression and past-year physical victimization were assessed. In separate logistic regression models, received partner violence in females was associated with age; alcohol, cocaine and methamphetamine abuse/dependence; and number of drugs used in the past six months. In males, received non-partner violence was associated with age, cocaine abuse/dependence and being Caucasian. Findings suggest a relationship between stimulant use and received violence among rural substance users and a need for victimization screenings in settings where such individuals seek health care. PMID:22455188

  14. Cholinergic interneurons control local circuit activity and cocaine conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Ilana B; Lin, Shih-Chun; Brodsky, Matthew; Prakash, Rohit; Diester, Ilka; Anikeeva, Polina; Gradinaru, Viviana; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-12-17

    Cholinergic neurons are widespread, and pharmacological modulation of acetylcholine receptors affects numerous brain processes, but such modulation entails side effects due to limitations in specificity for receptor type and target cell. As a result, causal roles of cholinergic neurons in circuits have been unclear. We integrated optogenetics, freely moving mammalian behavior, in vivo electrophysiology, and slice physiology to probe the cholinergic interneurons of the nucleus accumbens by direct excitation or inhibition. Despite representing less than 1% of local neurons, these cholinergic cells have dominant control roles, exerting powerful modulation of circuit activity. Furthermore, these neurons could be activated by cocaine, and silencing this drug-induced activity during cocaine exposure (despite the fact that the manipulation of the cholinergic interneurons was not aversive by itself) blocked cocaine conditioning in freely moving mammals.

  15. Emotional intelligence, risk perception in abstinent cocaine dependent individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Ayuso, Dulce; Mayoral-Gontán, Yolanda; Triviño-Juárez, José-Matías

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is now responsible for the second-highest number of cessation intervention requests. In this study we analyze the different skills of emotional intelligence in cocaine- dependent patients maintaining abstinence. The Mayer- Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) were administered to 50 subjects (25 individuals with no history of drug use and 25 individuals in treatment at the Addictive Behaviors Unit in a state of withdrawal at the time of evaluation). The results showed differences between these groups in overall emotional intelligence quotient, strategic emotional intelligence, understanding emotions and emotional management. Cocaine-addicted participants showed difficulties in analyzing complex emotions and regulating their emotional response, aspects that can interfere with interactions in daily life. PMID:27099213

  16. Detection of cocaine induced rat brain activation by photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) was used to detect the progressive changes on the cerebral cortex of Sprague Dawley rats after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Different concentrations (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution were injected into Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. Cerebral cortex images of the animals were continuously acquired by PAT. For continuous observation, PAT system used multi-transducers to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The obtained photoacoustic images were compared with each other and confirmed that changes in blood volume were induced by cocaine hydrochloride injection. The results demonstrate that PAT may be used to detect the effects of drug abuse-induced brain activation. PMID:21163301

  17. Developing a System for Integraded Automatic Control of Mutiple Infusion Pumps : The Multiplex infusion system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Most errors in ICUs are related to intravenous (IV) therapy. Previous studies suggested that hard to operate infusion pumps and the high cognitive workload for ICU nurses contribute to these errors. Conventional IV therapy requires separate lumens for incompatible IV drugs. This often requires the p

  18. Tolerance to continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion can be reversed by pulsatile bolus infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heetla, H. W.; Staal, M. J.; van Laar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Study design: Pilot study. Objective: To study the effect of pulsatile bolus infusion of intrathecal baclofen (ITB) on daily ITB dose, in patients showing dose increases, probably due to tolerance. Setting: Department of neurology and neurosurgery, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherland

  19. Blockade of tolerance to morphine analgesia by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1989-07-01

    Tolerance to morphine analgesia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by s.c. implantation of a morphine base pellet (75 mg) on the first and second day and determining the magnitude of tolerance 72 h after the first implant by s.c. injection of a test dose of morphine (5 mg/kg). Implantation of a cocaine hydrochloride pellet (25 mg), concurrently with morphine pellets or of a cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellet after the development of tolerance, blocked both the development and expression of morphine analgesic tolerance. In morphine-pelleted animals pretreatment for 3 days with desipramine or zimelidine or phenoxybenzamine but not haloperidol produced no significant morphine tolerance. Pretreatment with a combination of desipramine and zimelidine, however, was as effective as cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance. Alpha-Methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester counteracted the effect of cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance and potentiated the tolerance development. Blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine was reinforced and facilitated by pretreatment with fenfluramine or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester and to a lesser extent by clonidine and haloperidol. Acute administration of fenfluramine or zimelidine or a combination of desipramine and zimelidine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester did not significantly affect morphine analgesia. The study suggests an important role of the concomitant depletion of both central noradrenaline and serotonin in the blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine and stresses the importance of the counter-balancing functional relationship between these two neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. PMID:2780065

  20. Tibial osteomyelitis following intraosseous infusion: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dogan, Ali; Irmak, Hasan; Harman, Mustafa; Ceylan, Abdullah; Akpinar, Fuat; Tosun, Nihat

    2004-01-01

    Fluids, medications, and blood products can be rapidly administered via intraosseous infusion under emergency conditions, particularly to pediatric patients aged from 0 to 2 years. A five-month-old infant who had been hospitalized with a diagnosis of sepsis developed swelling and hyperemia at the infusion site 10 days after an intraosseous infusion in the right proximal tibia. Physical examination showed a serous discharge from a fistula on the anteromedial side of the right proximal cruris. ...

  1. Supercritical Fluid Infusion of Iron Additives in Polymeric Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazem, Negin; Taylor, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project was the experimentation to measure preparation of iron nanophases within polymeric matrices via supercritical fluid infusion of iron precursors followed by thermal reduction. Another objective was to determine if supercritical CO2 could infuse into the polymer. The experiment is described along with the materials, and the supercritical fluid infusion and cure procedures. X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron micrographs were obtained. The results are summarized in charts, and tables.

  2. Portal 5-hydroxytryptophan infusion enhances glucose disposal in conscious dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Mary Courtney; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Haruki; Honjoh, Tsutomu; Saito, Masayuki; Everett, Carrie A.; Smith, Marta S.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2005-01-01

    Intraportal serotonin infusion enhances net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU) during glucose infusion but blunts nonhepatic glucose uptake and can cause gastrointestinal discomfort and diarrhea at high doses. Whether the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) could enhance NHGU without gastrointestinal side effects during glucose infusion was examined in conscious 42-h-fasted dogs, using arteriovenous difference and tracer ([3-3H]glucose) techniques. Experiments consisted of equilibratio...

  3. Acetylcholine release in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system during cocaine-seeking: Conditioned and unconditioned contributions to reward and motivation

    OpenAIRE

    You, Zhi-Bing; Wang, Bin; Zitzman, Dawnya; Wise, Roy A.

    2008-01-01

    Microdialysis was used to assess the contribution to cocaine-seeking of cholinergic input to the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system in ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA acetylcholine (ACh) was elevated in animals lever-pressing for IV cocaine and in cocaine-experienced and cocaine-naïve animals passively receiving similar “yoked” injections. In cocaine-trained animals, the elevations comprised an initial (first hour) peak to about 160% of baseline and a subsequent plateau of 140% of baseline f...

  4. Electrophysiological evaluation of the time-course of dopamine uptake inhibition induced by intravenous cocaine at a reinforcing dose

    OpenAIRE

    Wakazono, Yoshihiko; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2007-01-01

    Cocaine is an effective dopamine (DA) uptake inhibitor and this action appears to be the primary cause for increased DA transmission following systemic cocaine administration. Although this action had been reliably demonstrated in vivo with cocaine at high doses, data on the extent and the time-course of DA uptake inhibition induced by intravenous (iv) cocaine at low, reinforcing doses remain controversial. To clarify this issue, we examined how cocaine affects striatal neuronal responses to ...

  5. Reinstatement in a Cocaine vs. Food Choice Situation: Reversal of Preference between Drug and Non-Drug Rewards

    OpenAIRE

    Tunstall, Brendan J.; Kearns, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies (for review see Ahmed, 2010; 2012) show that when given a mutually exclusive choice between cocaine and food, rats almost exclusively choose food. The present experiment investigated potential shifts in preference between levers associated with either food or cocaine which might occur during extinction (food and cocaine no longer available) and during footshock-induced, cocaine-primed, and food-primed reinstatement. During self-administration sessions where food and cocaine wer...

  6. Adolescent cocaine self-administration induces habit behavior in adulthood: sex differences and structural consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePoy, L M; Allen, A G; Gourley, S L

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent cocaine use increases the likelihood of drug abuse and addiction in adulthood, and etiological factors may include a cocaine-induced bias towards so-called ‘reward-seeking' habits. To determine whether adolescent cocaine exposure indeed impacts decision-making strategies in adulthood, we trained adolescent mice to orally self-administer cocaine. In adulthood, males with a history of escalating self-administration developed a bias towards habit-based behaviors. In contrast, escalating females did not develop habit biases; rather, low response rates were associated with later behavioral inflexibility, independent of cocaine dose. We focused the rest of our report on understanding how individual differences in young-adolescent females predicted long-term behavioral outcomes. Low, ‘stable' cocaine-reinforced response rates during adolescence were associated with cocaine-conditioned object preference and enlarged dendritic spine head size in the medial (prelimbic) prefrontal cortex in adulthood. Meanwhile, cocaine resilience was associated with enlarged spine heads in deep-layer orbitofrontal cortex. Re-exposure to the cocaine-associated context in adulthood energized responding in ‘stable responders', which could then be reduced by the GABAB agonist baclofen and the putative tyrosine receptor kinase B (trkB) agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone. Together, our findings highlight resilience to cocaine-induced habits in females relative to males when intake escalates. However, failures in instrumental conditioning in adolescent females may precipitate reward-seeking behaviors in adulthood, particularly in the context of cocaine exposure. PMID:27576164

  7. Chronic cocaine disrupts neurovascular networks and cerebral function: optical imaging studies in rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiujia; You, Jiang; Volkow, Nora D.; Choi, Jeonghun; Yin, Wei; Wang, Wei; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2016-02-01

    Cocaine abuse can lead to cerebral strokes and hemorrhages secondary to cocaine's cerebrovascular effects, which are poorly understood. We assessed cocaine's effects on cerebrovascular anatomy and function in the somatosensory cortex of the rat's brain. Optical coherence tomography was used for in vivo imaging of three-dimensional cerebral blood flow (CBF) networks and to quantify CBF velocities (CBFv), and multiwavelength laser-speckle-imaging was used to simultaneously measure changes in CBFv, oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Δ[HbR]) concentrations prior to and after an acute cocaine challenge in chronically cocaine exposed rats. Immunofluorescence techniques on brain slices were used to quantify microvasculature density and levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). After chronic cocaine (2 and 4 weeks), CBFv in small vessels decreased, whereas vasculature density and VEGF levels increased. Acute cocaine further reduced CBFv and decreased Δ[HbO2] and this decline was larger and longer lasting in 4 weeks than 2 weeks cocaine-exposed rats, which indicates that risk for ischemia is heightened during intoxication and that it increases with chronic exposures. These results provide evidence of cocaine-induced angiogenesis in cortex. The CBF reduction after chronic cocaine exposure, despite the increases in vessel density, indicate that angiogenesis was insufficient to compensate for cocaine-induced disruption of cerebrovascular function.

  8. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist enhances the subjective effects of cocaine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Thomas F; Haile, Colin N; Mahoney, James J; Shah, Ravi; Verrico, Christopher D; De La Garza, Richard; Kosten, Thomas R

    2015-11-30

    Pramipexole is a D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonist indicated for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Studies associate pramipexole with pathological gambling and impulse control disorders suggesting a role for D3 receptors in reinforcement processes. Clinical studies showed pramipexole decreased cocaine craving and reversed central deficits in individuals with cocaine use disorder. Preclinical studies have shown acute administration of pramipexole increases cocaine's reinforcing effects whereas other reports suggest chronic pramipexole produces tolerance to cocaine. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we examined the impact of pramipexole treatment on the subjective effects produced by cocaine in volunteers with cocaine use disorder. Volunteers received pramipexole titrated up to 3.0mg/d or placebo over 15 days. Participants then received intravenous cocaine (0, 20 and 40mg) on day 15. Cardiovascular and subjective effects were obtained with visual analog scales at time points across the session. Pramipexole alone increased peak heart rate following saline and diastolic blood pressure following cocaine. Pramipexole produced upwards of two-fold increases in positive subjective effects ratings following cocaine. These results indicate that chronic D3 receptor activation increases the subjective effects of cocaine in humans. Caution should be used when prescribing pramipexole to patients that may also use cocaine. PMID:26239766

  9. Serotonin 5-HT2 receptor interactions with dopamine function: implications for therapeutics in cocaine use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Leonard L; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine exhibits prominent abuse liability, and chronic abuse can result in cocaine use disorder with significant morbidity. Major advances have been made in delineating neurobiological mechanisms of cocaine abuse; however, effective medications to treat cocaine use disorder remain to be discovered. The present review will focus on the role of serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine) neurotransmission in the neuropharmacology of cocaine and related abused stimulants. Extensive research suggests that the primary contribution of 5-HT to cocaine addiction is a consequence of interactions with dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. The literature on the neurobiological and behavioral effects of cocaine is well developed, so the focus of the review will be on cocaine with inferences made about other monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers based on mechanistic considerations. 5-HT receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain, and several different 5-HT receptor subtypes have been implicated in mediating the effects of endogenous 5-HT on DA. However, the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in particular have been implicated as likely candidates for mediating the influence of 5-HT in cocaine abuse as well as to traits (e.g., impulsivity) that contribute to the development of cocaine use disorder and relapse in humans. Lastly, new approaches are proposed to guide targeted development of serotonergic ligands for the treatment of cocaine use disorder. PMID:25505168

  10. Comparison of Extra-Amniotic Normal Saline Infusion plus Hydrocortisone versus Prostaglandin E2 Suppository for Pregnancy Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Keshavarzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Pregnancy termination before onset of labor is one of the midwifery problems. The aim of the present study was to compare extra-amniotic normal saline infusion plus hydrocortisone effect versus prostaglandin E2 suppository for cervical ripening and second- trimester pregnancy termination.   Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical-trial study was performed on 50 pregnant women with gestation age of 14 to 28 weeks and Bishops Score ≤ 2 who required pregnancy termination for fetal indications. Half of the cases received extra-amniotic normal saline infusion plus 100 mg hydrocortisone (EASI+ H and the other half received two doses of 3mg prostaglandin E2 suppository every 4 hours. Six hours later, induction of labor was started by means of a high dose of Oxytocin according to of Alabama University Protocol for Mid-trimester Abortion. The obtained data was analyzed by using statistical softwares Chi-square, Fisher and T-test.   Results: There were no differences between the two groups regarding maternal age, parity, gestational age, Primary Bishops Score and indication of pregnancy termination. In the EASI+H group, the mean interval between initiation of labor induction and fetal expulsion was 23.04 ± 4.47 hours and in PGE2 group was 28.65 ± 2.87 hours (P=0.001. The success rate in the EASI+H group was 100% and in PGE2 group 80 % (P =0.04. Complications such as fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, increase of blood pressure and need to curettage in PGE2 group were statistically and significantly more abundant.   Conclusion: Extra-amniotic normal saline infusion plus hydrocortisone is an effective and safe method that is suggested for cervical ripening and second- trimester pregnancy termination.

  11. Theophylline: constant-rate infusion predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, C A; Sahebjami, H; Imhoff, T; Thomas, J P; Myre, S A

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate a method of prospectively estimating appropriate aminophylline infusion rates in acutely ill, hospitalized patients with bronchospasm. Steady-state serum theophylline concentrations (Css), clearances (Cl), and half-lives (t1/2) were estimated by the Chiou method using serum concetrantions obtained 1 and 6 h after the start of a constant-rate intravenous aminophylline infusion in 10 male patients averaging 57 years of age. Using an enzyme-multiplied immunoassay (EMIT) system for theophylline analysis, pharmacokinetic estimations were excellent for Css (r = 0.9103, p less than 0.01) and Cl (r = 0.9750, p less than 0.01). The mean estimation errors were 9.4% (range 0.8-21.5) for Css and 12.3% (range 1.3-28.0) for Cl. There was no correlation between patient age and Cl. This method is useful for rapidly individualizing aminophylline therapy in patients with acute bronchospasm. PMID:6740734

  12. Prenatal IV Cocaine: Alterations in Auditory Information Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F. Mactutus

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available One clue regarding the basis of cocaine-induced deficits in attentional processing is provided by the clinical findings of changes in the infants’ startle response; observations buttressed by neurophysiological evidence of alterations in brainstem transmission time. Using the IV route of administration and doses that mimic the peak arterial levels of cocaine use in humans, the present study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine on auditory information processing via tests of the acoustic startle response (ASR, habituation, and prepulse inhibition (PPI in the offspring. Nulliparous Long-Evans female rats, implanted with an IV access port prior to breeding, were administered saline, 0.5, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg/injection of cocaine HCL (COC from gestation day (GD8-20 (1x/day-GD8-14, 2x/day-GD15-20. COC had no significant effects on maternal/litter parameters or growth of the offspring. At 18-20 days of age, one male and one female, randomly selected from each litter displayed an increased ASR (>30% for males at 1.0 mg/kg and >30% for females at 3.0 mg/kg. When reassessed in adulthood (D90-100, a linear dose-response increase was noted on response amplitude. At both test ages, within-session habituation was retarded by prenatal cocaine treatment. Testing the females in diestrus vs. estrus did not alter the results. Prenatal cocaine altered the PPI response function across interstimulus interval (ISI and induced significant sex-dependent changes in response latency. Idazoxan, an alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, significantly enhanced the ASR, but less enhancement was noted with increasing doses of prenatal cocaine. Thus, in utero exposure to cocaine, when delivered via a protocol designed to capture prominent features of recreational usage, causes persistent, if not permanent, alterations in auditory information processing, and suggests dysfunction of the central noradrenergic circuitry modulating, if not mediating, these responses.

  13. Cocaine use among American adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, P M; Johnston, L D; Bachman, J G

    1985-01-01

    In this chapter, we have tried to provide some objective information about the levels of and recent trends in cocaine use among America's adolescents and young adults, as well as some of their attitudes and beliefs about the drug and their reasons for using it. We have also examined cross-time patterns of use, certain predictors of use, and some of the conditions of the social and physical environments which are associated with use. Overall, we have found levels of use to be relatively stable for the past several years after a period of rapid increase between 1976 and 1979. We also found a strong age effect, with cocaine use increasing in the first few years after high school. The levels of use, though stable recently, are disturbingly high, particularly among young adults in their early to mid twenties. Self reported use has followed patterns that parallel exposure to use and use by friend, as would be expected, assuming valid measures. Perceived availability also has moved in tandem with these other measures. The great majority of today's seniors believe regular use to be dangerous, and 77% disapprove of even experimenting with cocaine. Use is found most frequently in the western and northeastern regions of the country, in more urban areas, among males, and among those who are not college-bound. Neither socioeconomic status nor personal income are very strongly associated with use; but a history of truancy, going out frequently in the evenings, and having relatively low religious involvement are. Cocaine users tend to use other illicit drugs (particularly marijuana) and to be cigarette smokers and heavy drinkers much more frequently than nonusers. Thus, there is little evidence that cocaine involves a separate drug-using syndrome. In fact, it is not uncommon for cocaine users to use marijuana or alcohol concurrently. When taking cocaine, high school students most often snort it, though some (24% of recent users) smoke it while only 4% of the users inject it. It

  14. Cocaine-induced neurodevelopmental deficits and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Melissa M; Graham, Devon L; McCarthy, Deirdre M; Bhide, Pradeep G; Stanwood, Gregg D

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to drugs early in life has complex and long-lasting implications for brain structure and function. This review summarizes work to date on the immediate and long-term effects of prenatal exposure to cocaine. In utero cocaine exposure produces disruptions in brain monoamines, particularly dopamine, during sensitive periods of brain development, and leads to permanent changes in specific brain circuits, molecules, and behavior. Here, we integrate clinical studies and significance with mechanistic preclinical studies, to define our current knowledge base and identify gaps for future investigation. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 108:147-173, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27345015

  15. Rats classified as low or high cocaine locomotor responders: A unique model involving striatal dopamine transporters that predicts cocaine addiction-like behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Dorothy J.; Nelson, Anna M.; Mandt, Bruce H.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Rorabaugh, Jacki M.; Ng, Christopher M.C.; Barcomb, Kelsey M.; Richards, Toni L.; Allen, Richard M.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences are a hallmark of drug addiction. Here, we describe a rat model based on differential initial responsiveness to low dose cocaine. Despite similar brain cocaine levels, individual outbred Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit markedly different magnitudes of acute cocaine-induced locomotor activity and, thereby, can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs). LCRs and HCRs differ in drug-induced, but not novelty-associated, hyperactivity. LCRs have higher basal numbers of striatal dopamine transporters (DATs) than HCRs and exhibit marginal cocaine inhibition of in vivo DAT activity and cocaine-induced increases in extracellular DA. Importantly, lower initial cocaine response predicts greater locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference and greater motivation to self-administer cocaine following low dose acquisition. Further, outbred Long-Evans rats classified as LCRs, versus HCRs, are more sensitive to cocaine’s discriminative stimulus effects. Overall, results to date with the LCR/HCR model underscore the contribution of striatal DATs to individual differences in initial cocaine responsiveness and the value of assessing the influence of initial drug response on subsequent expression of addiction-like behaviors. PMID:23850581

  16. Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Binary Drug Mixtures: Studies with Cocaine, MDPV, and Caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gregory T; Abbott, Megan; Galindo, Kayla; Rush, Elise L; Rice, Kenner C; France, Charles P

    2016-10-01

    Illicit drug preparations often include more than one pharmacologically active compound. For example, cocaine and synthetic cathinones [e.g., 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV)] are often mixed with caffeine before sale. Caffeine is likely added to these preparations because it is inexpensive and legal; however, caffeine might also mimic or enhance some of the effects of cocaine or MDPV. In these studies, male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline, and the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, caffeine, and MDPV were evaluated alone and as binary mixtures (cocaine and caffeine, MDPV and caffeine, and cocaine and MDPV) at fixed-dose ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 relative to the dose of each drug that produced 50% cocaine-appropriate responding. Dose-addition analyses were used to determine the nature of the drug-drug interactions for each mixture (e.g., additive, supra-additive, or subadditive). Although additive interactions were observed for most mixtures, supra-additive interactions were observed at the 50% effect level for the 1:1 mixture of cocaine and caffeine and at the 80% effect level for all three mixtures of cocaine and caffeine, as well as for the 3:1 and 1:3 mixtures of cocaine and MDPV. These results demonstrate that with respect to cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, caffeine can function as a substitute in drug preparations containing either cocaine or MDPV, with enhancements of cocaine-like effects possible under certain conditions. Further research is needed to determine whether similar interactions exist for other abuse-related or toxic effects of drug preparations, including cocaine, synthetic cathinones, and caffeine. PMID:27493274

  17. Cocaine is low on the value ladder of rats: possible evidence for resilience to addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauriane Cantin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assessing the relative value of cocaine and how it changes with chronic drug use represents a long-standing goal in addiction research. Surprisingly, recent experiments in rats--by far the most frequently used animal model in this field--suggest that the value of cocaine is lower than previously thought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a series of choice experiments that better define the relative position of cocaine on the value ladder of rats (i.e., preference rank-ordering of different rewards. Rats were allowed to choose either taking cocaine or drinking water sweetened with saccharin--a nondrug alternative that is not biologically essential. By systematically varying the cost and concentration of sweet water, we found that cocaine is low on the value ladder of the large majority of rats, near the lowest concentrations of sweet water. In addition, a retrospective analysis of all experiments over the past 5 years revealed that no matter how heavy was past cocaine use most rats readily give up cocaine use in favor of the nondrug alternative. Only a minority, fewer than 15% at the heaviest level of past cocaine use, continued to take cocaine, even when hungry and offered a natural sugar that could relieve their need of calories. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This pattern of results (cocaine abstinence in most rats; cocaine preference in few rats maps well onto the epidemiology of human cocaine addiction and suggests that only a minority of rats would be vulnerable to cocaine addiction while the large majority would be resilient despite extensive drug use. Resilience to drug addiction has long been suspected in humans but could not be firmly established, mostly because it is difficult to control retrospectively for differences in drug self-exposure and/or availability in human drug users. This conclusion has important implications for preclinical research on the neurobiology of cocaine addiction and for future medication

  18. Absence of age-related dopamine transporter loss in current cocaine abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fischman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    The brain dopamine (DA) system appears to play a crucial role in the reinforcing properties of cocaine. Using PET we had previously shown significant decreases in DA D2 receptors but no changes in DA transporters (DAT) in detoxified cocaine abusers (>1 month after last cocaine use). This study evaluates DAT availability in current cocaine abusers (15 male and 5 female; age = 36.2{+-}5.3 years old) using PET and [C-11]cocaine, as a DAT ligand, and compares it to that in 18 male and 2 female age matched normal controls. Cocaine abusers had a history of abusing 4.2{+-}2.8 gm /week of cocaine for an average of 11.0{+-}4.9 years and their last use of cocaine was 5.4{+-}8 days prior to PET study. DAT availability was obtained using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest (caudate, pulamen) to that in cerebellum which is a function of Bmax./Kd.+1. DAT availability in cocaine abusers did not differ to that in normals (N) (C= 1.78{+-}0.14, N= 1.77{+-}0.13). In addition, there were no differences between the groups in the distribution volume or the Kl (plasma to brain transfer constant) measures for [C-11]cocaine. However, in the normals but not in the abusers striatal DAT availability decreased with age (C: r = -0.07, p = 0.76; N: r = -0.55, p < 0.01). Though this study fails to show group differences in DAT availability between normals and current cocaine abusers it indicates a blunting of the age-related decline in DAT availability in the cocaine abusers. Future studies in older cocaine abusers at different time after detoxification arc required in order to assess if cocaine slows the loss of DAT with age or whether these changes reflect compensation to increased DAT blockade and recover with detoxification.

  19. Cocaine-induced oxidative stress precedes cell death in human neuronal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, H Fai; Abdullah, Laila; Mullan, Myles A; Mullan, Michael J; Crawford, Fiona C

    2007-01-01

    By 2003, an estimated 34 million Americans had used cocaine according to the National Survey on Drug Use & Health. About 5.9 million of those had used in the past 12 months. Chronic cocaine users often develop addiction, dependency and tolerance to the drug. The psychological and physical effects of cocaine are due to the disruption of the limbic system in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased oxidative stress reported in the frontal cortex and the striatum of rats exposed to cocaine suggests that oxidative damage plays a significant role in cocaine-induced disruption of the CNS. Although it is evident that cocaine induces oxidative stress in the CNS, little has been learned about whether such increased oxidative stress is also relevant to apoptosis in cocaine-exposed models. To gain insight into the role of cocaine-induced oxidative stress in apoptosis, we hypothesized that oxidative stress precedes cell death when cocaine is administrated. To test this hypothesis, we have monitored the oxidative stress and apoptotic effects of acute cocaine exposure in human neuronal progenitor cells (HNPC). We found that oxidative stress was significantly increased at 48h after a 30min cocaine exposure compared to control cells, and that this was followed by cell death at 72h. Using the same experimental paradigm we have previously shown that pro-inflammatory genes are up-regulated in cocaine-exposed HNPC at 24h. Therefore, we suggest that the increased oxidative stress (possibly mediated by inflammatory responses) precedes cell death in cocaine-exposed HNPC. This may have implications for the consequences of cocaine abuse in situations where antioxidant capacity is compromised, as in the aging brain. PMID:16956698

  20. Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Binary Drug Mixtures: Studies with Cocaine, MDPV, and Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Megan; Galindo, Kayla; Rush, Elise L.; Rice, Kenner C.; France, Charles P.

    2016-01-01

    Illicit drug preparations often include more than one pharmacologically active compound. For example, cocaine and synthetic cathinones [e.g., 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV)] are often mixed with caffeine before sale. Caffeine is likely added to these preparations because it is inexpensive and legal; however, caffeine might also mimic or enhance some of the effects of cocaine or MDPV. In these studies, male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline, and the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, caffeine, and MDPV were evaluated alone and as binary mixtures (cocaine and caffeine, MDPV and caffeine, and cocaine and MDPV) at fixed-dose ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 relative to the dose of each drug that produced 50% cocaine-appropriate responding. Dose-addition analyses were used to determine the nature of the drug-drug interactions for each mixture (e.g., additive, supra-additive, or subadditive). Although additive interactions were observed for most mixtures, supra-additive interactions were observed at the 50% effect level for the 1:1 mixture of cocaine and caffeine and at the 80% effect level for all three mixtures of cocaine and caffeine, as well as for the 3:1 and 1:3 mixtures of cocaine and MDPV. These results demonstrate that with respect to cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, caffeine can function as a substitute in drug preparations containing either cocaine or MDPV, with enhancements of cocaine-like effects possible under certain conditions. Further research is needed to determine whether similar interactions exist for other abuse-related or toxic effects of drug preparations, including cocaine, synthetic cathinones, and caffeine. PMID:27493274

  1. Initial d2 dopamine receptor sensitivity predicts cocaine sensitivity and reward in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E Merritt

    Full Text Available The activation of dopamine receptors within the mesolimbic dopamine system is known to be involved in the initiation and maintenance of cocaine use. Expression of the D2 dopamine receptor subtype has been implicated as both a predisposing factor and consequence of chronic cocaine use. It is unclear whether there is a predictive relationship between D2 dopamine receptor function and cocaine sensitivity that would enable cocaine abuse. Therefore, we exploited individual differences in behavioral responses to D2 dopamine receptor stimulation to test its relationship with cocaine-mediated behaviors. Outbred, male Sprague-Dawley rats were initially characterized by their locomotor responsiveness to the D2 dopamine receptor agonist, quinpirole, in a within-session ascending dose-response regimen (0, 0.1, 0.3 & 1.0 mg/kg, sc. Rats were classified as high or low quinpirole responders (HD2 and LD2, respectively by a median split of their quinpirole-induced locomotor activity. Rats were subsequently tested for differences in the psychostimulant effects of cocaine by measuring changes in cocaine-induced locomotor activity (5 and 15 mg/kg, ip. Rats were also tested for differences in the development of conditioned place preference to a low dose of cocaine (7.5 mg/kg, ip that does not reliably produce a cocaine conditioned place preference. Finally, rats were tested for acquisition of cocaine self-administration and maintenance responding on fixed ratio 1 and 5 schedules of reinforcement, respectively. Results demonstrate that HD2 rats have enhanced sensitivity to the locomotor stimulating properties of cocaine, display greater cocaine conditioned place preference, and self-administer more cocaine compared to LD2 animals. These findings suggest that individual differences in D2 dopamine receptor sensitivity may be predictive of cocaine sensitivity and reward.

  2. Initial D2 Dopamine Receptor Sensitivity Predicts Cocaine Sensitivity and Reward in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Kathryn E.; Bachtell, Ryan K.

    2013-01-01

    The activation of dopamine receptors within the mesolimbic dopamine system is known to be involved in the initiation and maintenance of cocaine use. Expression of the D2 dopamine receptor subtype has been implicated as both a predisposing factor and consequence of chronic cocaine use. It is unclear whether there is a predictive relationship between D2 dopamine receptor function and cocaine sensitivity that would enable cocaine abuse. Therefore, we exploited individual differences in behavioral responses to D2 dopamine receptor stimulation to test its relationship with cocaine-mediated behaviors. Outbred, male Sprague-Dawley rats were initially characterized by their locomotor responsiveness to the D2 dopamine receptor agonist, quinpirole, in a within-session ascending dose-response regimen (0, 0.1, 0.3 & 1.0 mg/kg, sc). Rats were classified as high or low quinpirole responders (HD2 and LD2, respectively) by a median split of their quinpirole-induced locomotor activity. Rats were subsequently tested for differences in the psychostimulant effects of cocaine by measuring changes in cocaine-induced locomotor activity (5 and 15 mg/kg, ip). Rats were also tested for differences in the development of conditioned place preference to a low dose of cocaine (7.5 mg/kg, ip) that does not reliably produce a cocaine conditioned place preference. Finally, rats were tested for acquisition of cocaine self-administration and maintenance responding on fixed ratio 1 and 5 schedules of reinforcement, respectively. Results demonstrate that HD2 rats have enhanced sensitivity to the locomotor stimulating properties of cocaine, display greater cocaine conditioned place preference, and self-administer more cocaine compared to LD2 animals. These findings suggest that individual differences in D2 dopamine receptor sensitivity may be predictive of cocaine sensitivity and reward. PMID:24223783

  3. NMDA and dopamine D1 receptors within NAc-shell regulate IEG proteins expression in reward circuit during cocaine memory reconsolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Ge, S; Li, N; Chen, L; Zhang, S; Wang, J; Wu, H; Wang, X; Wang, X

    2016-02-19

    Reactivation of consolidated memory initiates a memory reconsolidation process, during which the reactivated memory is susceptible to strengthening, weakening or updating. Therefore, effective interference with the memory reconsolidation process is expected to be an important treatment for drug addiction. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) has been well recognized as a pathway component that can prevent drug relapse, although the mechanism underlying this function is poorly understood. We aimed to clarify the regulatory role of the NAc in the cocaine memory reconsolidation process, by examining the effect of applying different pharmacological interventions to the NAc on Zif 268 and Fos B expression in the entire reward circuit after cocaine memory reactivation. Through the cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) model, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence staining for Zif 268 and Fos B were used to explore the functional activated brain nuclei after cocaine memory reactivation. Our results showed that the expression of Zif 268 and Fos B was commonly increased in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the infralimbic cortex (IL), the NAc-core, the NAc-shell, the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, and CA3 subregions), the amygdala, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the supramammillary nucleus (SuM) following memory reconsolidation, and Zif 268/Fos B co-expression was commonly observed (for Zif 268: 51-68%; for Fos B: 52-66%). Further, bilateral NAc-shell infusion of MK 801 and SCH 23390, but not raclopride or propranolol, prior to addictive memory reconsolidation, decreased Zif 268 and Fos B expression in the entire reward circuit, except for the amygdala, and effectively disturbed subsequent CPP-related behavior. In summary, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and dopamine D1 receptors, but not dopamine D2 or β adrenergic receptors, within the NAc-shell, may regulate Zif 268 and Fos B expression in most brain nuclei of the reward circuit after cocaine memory reactivation

  4. A Recombinant Humanized Anti-Cocaine Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits the Distribution of Cocaine to the Brain in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Andrew B.; Gooden, Felicia C. T.; Tabet, Michael R.; Ball, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb), h2E2, is a humanized version of the chimeric human/murine anti-cocaine mAb 2E2. The recombinant h2E2 protein was produced in vitro from a transfected mammalian cell line and retained high affinity (4 nM Kd) and specificity for cocaine over its inactive metabolites benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester. In rats, pharmacokinetic studies of h2E2 (120 mg/kg i.v.) showed a long terminal elimination half-life of 9.0 days and a low volume of distribution at st...

  5. Strain and cocaine-induced differential opioid gene expression may predispose Lewis but not Fischer rats to escalate cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Marta; Picetti, Roberto; Yuferov, Vadim; Butelman, Eduardo R; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in gene expression of opioid system components induced by extended access (18 h) cocaine self-administration and to determine the impact of genetic background in the vulnerability to escalate cocaine intake. Comparing two inbred rat strains, we previously reported that Lewis rats progressively escalated cocaine consumption compared to Fischer rats, in a new translational model of intravenous cocaine self-administration, which included 14 sessions of 18-h operant sessions in which rats were allowed to select the cocaine unit dose to self-administer. We compare here Fischer and Lewis rats in the gene expression of endogenous opioid peptides (Pomc, Penk, Pdyn) and cognate receptors (Oprm, Oprk and Oprd) in reward-related brain regions, after exposure to either cocaine self-administration or yoked-saline, in the aforementioned translational paradigm. We performed a correlation analysis between the mRNA level, found in the Dorsal Striatum (DS), Nucleus accumbens (NAcc) shell and core respectively, and individual cocaine intake. Our findings show that the gene expression of all the aforementioned opioid genes exhibit strain-dependent differences in the DS, in absence of cocaine exposure. Also, different strain-specific cocaine-induced mRNA expression of Oprm and Oprk was found in DS. Only few differences were found in the ventral parts of the striatum. Moreover, gene expression level of Pdyn, Penk, Oprk, and Oprm in the DS was significantly correlated with cocaine intake only in Fischer rats. Overall, these data shed light on potential genetic differences which may predispose of subjects to initiate and escalate cocaine consumption. PMID:26777278

  6. Infused polymers for cell sheet release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering.

  7. Use of NMR in profiling of cocaine seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagano, Bruno; Lauri, Ilaria; De Tito, Stefano;

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine is the most widely used illicit drug, and its origin is always the focus of intense investigation aimed at identifying the trafficking routes. Since NMR represents a unique methodology for performing chemical identification and quantification, here it is proposed a strategy based on (1)H...... adding significant information in the process toward identification of the trafficking routes for this drug....

  8. Stability of cocaine impurity profiles during 12 months of storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise Stride; Villesen, Palle; Lindholst, Christian

    2016-01-01

    During the lifetime of a cocaine batch from production end to consumption, several alterations may occur, leading to possible changes in the original impurity profile. Such profile changes may eventually result in erroneous forensic evaluations. In the present study, the stability of both...

  9. Alterations of the Host Microbiome Affect Behavioral Responses to Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Drew D.; Walker, Deena M.; Calipari, Erin S.; Labonte, Benoit; Issler, Orna; Pena, Catherine J.; Ribeiro, Efrain A.; Russo, Scott J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to cocaine and other psychostimulants represents a major public health crisis. The development and persistence of addictive behaviors comes from a complex interaction of genes and environment - the precise mechanisms of which remain elusive. In recent years a surge of evidence has suggested that the gut microbiome can have tremendous impact on behavioral via the microbiota-gut-brain axis. In this study we characterized the influence of the gut microbiota on cocaine-mediated behaviors. Groups of mice were treated with a prolonged course of non-absorbable antibiotics via the drinking water, which resulted in a substantial reduction of gut bacteria. Animals with reduced gut bacteria showed an enhanced sensitivity to cocaine reward and enhanced sensitivity to the locomotor-sensitizing effects of repeated cocaine administration. These behavioral changes were correlated with adaptations in multiple transcripts encoding important synaptic proteins in the brain’s reward circuitry. This study represents the first evidence that alterations in the gut microbiota affect behavioral response to drugs of abuse. PMID:27752130

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging and decision making in cocaine dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D Lane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic stimulant abuse is associated with both impairment in decision making and structural abnormalities in brain gray and white matter. Recent data suggest these structural abnormalities may be related to functional impairment in important behavioral processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 15 cocaine-dependent and 18 control subjects, we examined relationships between decision-making performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT and white matter integrity as measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Whole brain voxelwise analyses showed that, relative to controls, the cocaine group had lower fractional anisotropy (FA and higher mean of the second and third eigenvalues (lambda perpendicular in frontal and parietal white matter regions and the corpus callosum. Cocaine subjects showed worse performance on the IGT, notably over the last 40 trials. Importantly, FA and lambda perpendicular values in these regions showed a significant relationship with IGT performance on the last 40 trials. CONCLUSIONS: Compromised white matter integrity in cocaine dependence may be related to functional impairments in decision making.

  11. Vulnerability for cocaine dependence / Involvement of µ-opioid receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesscher, Heidi Maria Bonifacio

    2004-01-01

    Drug dependence is a major health issue worldwide, which is characterised by its persistence and high rates of relapse. Individual differences exist in the vulnerability for drug dependence after first exposure to drugs of abuse like cocaine. A likely risk factor for drug dependence is the sensitivi

  12. What You Need to Know about Drugs: Cocaine and Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Butterflies? Read This Chloe & Nurb Meet The Brain (Movie) Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What You Need to Know About Drugs: Cocaine and Crack KidsHealth > For Kids > What You Need ...

  13. Spontaneous pneumothorax associated with talc pulmonary granulomatosis after cocaine inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Accardo, Marina; Rossi, Francesco; Santini, Mario

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with cocaine abuse through inhalation alone. He underwent thoracoscopic apical lung resection with mechanical pleurodesis. Despite the lack of significant radiological features of talc induced pulmonary granulomatosis, pathological findings showed granulomas with foreign materials suggestive of being talc. Electronic microscopy showed that the size of talc particles were alveoli. PMID:24942102

  14. Adolescent Initiation of Drug Use: Effects of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Gale A.; Larkby, Cynthia; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Day, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the direct effects of prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) on adolescent drug use, while controlling for other predictors of adolescent use. Method: Data are from a longitudinal study of PCE in which women and their offspring were assessed throughout childhood. Adolescents were interviewed at 15 years about their age at…

  15. Polypeptide Functional Surface for the Aptamer Immobilization: Electrochemical Cocaine Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozokalfa, Guliz; Akbulut, Huseyin; Demir, Bilal; Guler, Emine; Gumus, Z Pınar; Odaci Demirkol, Dilek; Aldemir, Ebru; Yamada, Shuhei; Endo, Takeshi; Coskunol, Hakan; Timur, Suna; Yagci, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    Electroanalytical technologies as a beneficial subject of modern analytical chemistry can play an important role for abused drug analysis which is crucial for both legal and social respects. This article reports a novel aptamer-based biosensing procedure for cocaine analysis by combining the advantages of aptamers as selective recognition elements with the well-known advantages of biosensor systems such as the possibility of miniaturization and automation, easy fabrication and modification, low cost, and sensitivity. In order to construct the aptasensor platform, first, polythiophene bearing polyalanine homopeptide side chains (PT-Pala) was electrochemically coated onto the surface of an electrode and then cocaine aptamer was attached to the polymer via covalent conjugation chemistry. The stepwise modification of the surface was confirmed by electrochemical characterization. The designed biosensing system was applied for the detection of cocaine and its metabolite, benzoylecgonine (BE), which exhibited a linear correlation in the range from 2.5 up to 10 nM and 0.5 up to 50 μM for cocaine and BE, respectively. In order to expand its practical application, the proposed method was successfully tested for the analysis of synthetic biological fluids. PMID:26928030

  16. Perisciatic infusion of ropivacaine and analgesia after hallux valgus repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaric, D; Jørgensen, B G; Laigaard, F;

    2010-01-01

    Moderate to severe pain after hallux valgus repair can be successfully treated with a continuous popliteal sciatic nerve block in ambulatory patients. Different anesthesiologists use various infusion rates for this purpose. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of two infusion...

  17. Effect of perioperative insulin infusion on surgical morbidity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandhi, Gunjan Y; Murad, M Hassan; Flynn, Errol David;

    2008-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of perioperative insulin infusion on outcomes important to patients.......To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of perioperative insulin infusion on outcomes important to patients....

  18. Current and future applications of target-controlled infusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Absalom, A; Kenny, GNC

    1999-01-01

    Target-controlled infusions (TCI) aim to provide constant, user-defined blood concentrations of a drug. The infusion device of such a system is controlled by a microprocessor that uses population pharmacokinetic data and the individual patient's weight and age to continuously calculate required drug

  19. ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Lynn C.; Pinciotti, Patricia; Gorton, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of twenty-first century, global learners can be challenging, yet a growing body of research points to the proved successes of arts-infused and integrated curricula, especially for building capacity for learning and motivation. This article presents the ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion framework, a…

  20. Brain imaging studies of the cocaine addict: Implications for reinforcement and addiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These studies document dopaminergic abnormalities in cocaine abusers. They also suggest a regulatory role of Dopamine (DA) in frontal metabolism. The correlation of striatal D2 receptor availability with metabolism was strongest for orbital frontal cortex (OFC) cingulate and prefrontal cortices. In cocaine abusers tested during early withdrawal (<1 week) the OFC was found to be hypermetabolic and metabolism in OFC and prefrontal cortices were found to be significantly associated with cocaine craving . Thus, we postulate that repeated and intermittent DA stimulation, as seen during a cocaine binge, activates the prefrontal and OFC cortices increasing the drive to compulsively self-administer cocaine. During cocaine discontinuation and protracted withdrawal and with decreased DA stimulation, these frontal cortical regions become hyponietabolic. Dopaminergic stimulation by a DA-enhancing drug and/or environmental conditioning will reactivate these frontal regions resetting the compulsion to self-administer cocaine and the inability to terminate this behavior. The pharmacokionetic studies with [11C]cocaine are consistent with behavioral and pharmacological studies in animals as well as in vitro studies which have revealed that while the mechanisms for cocaine's reinforcing properties are complex, they partly involve the brain's dopamine system and also highlight the importance of cocaine's pharmacokinetic on its unique reinforcing properties

  1. Cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion and neuronal apoptosis from HIV-infected macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenón, Frances; Segarra, Annabell C; Gonzalez, Mariangeline; Meléndez, Loyda M

    2014-12-01

    Substance abuse is a risk factor for HIV infection and progression to AIDS. Recent evidence establishes that cocaine use promotes brain perivascular macrophage infiltration and microglia activation. The lysosomal protease cathepsin B is increased in monocytes from patients with HIV dementia and its secretion induces 10-15% of neurotoxicity. Here we asked if cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion from HIV-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and its effect in neuronal apoptosis. Samples of plasma, CSF, and post-mortem brain tissue from HIV positive patients that used cocaine were tested for cathepsin B and its inhibitors to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings. MDM were inoculated with HIV-1ADA, exposed to cocaine, and the levels of secreted and bioactive cathepsin B and its inhibitors were measured at different time-points. Cathepsin B expression (p cocaine treated MDM compared with HIV-infected cocaine negative controls. Increased levels of cystatin B expression was also found in supernatants from HIV-cocaine treated MDM (p cocaine users over non-drug users. Our results demonstrated that cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion in HIV-infected MDM and increase neuronal apoptosis. These findings provide new evidence that cocaine synergize with HIV-1 infection in increasing cathepsin B secretion and neurotoxicity. PMID:25209871

  2. Cocaine enhances HIV-1 gp120-induced lymphatic endothelial dysfunction in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Jiang, Susan; Yu, Jinlong; Kuzontkoski, Paula M; Groopman, Jerome E

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary complications are common in both AIDS patients and cocaine users. We addressed the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which HIV and cocaine may partner to induce their deleterious effects. Using primary lung lymphatic endothelial cells (L-LECs), we examined how cocaine and HIV-1 gp120, alone and together, modulate signaling and functional properties of L-LECs. We found that brief cocaine exposure activated paxillin and induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, while sustained exposure increased fibronectin (FN) expression, decreased Robo4 expression, and enhanced the permeability of L-LEC monolayers. Moreover, incubating L-LECs with both cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 exacerbated hyperpermeability, significantly enhanced apoptosis, and further impaired in vitro wound healing as compared with cocaine alone. Our studies also suggested that the sigma-1 receptor (Sigma-1R) and the dopamine-4 receptor (D4R) are involved in cocaine-induced pathology in L-LECs. Seeking clinical correlation, we found that FN levels in sera and lung tissue of HIV(+) donors were significantly elevated as compared to HIV(-) donors. Our in vitro data demonstrate that cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 induce dysfunction and damage of lung lymphatics, and suggest that cocaine use may exacerbate pulmonary edema and fibrosis associated with HIV infection. Continued exploration of the interplay between cocaine and HIV should assist the design of therapeutics to ameliorate HIV-induced pulmonary disorders within the drug using population. PMID:26311830

  3. Risky decisions in a lottery task are associated with an increase of cocaine use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrei eWittwer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine use disorder is associated with maladaptive decision-making behaviour, which strongly contributes to the harmful consequences of chronic drug use. Prior research has shown that cocaine users exhibit impaired neuropsychological test performances, particularly with regard to attention, learning, and memory but also in executive functions such as decision-making and impulse control. However, to what extent cocaine users show impaired decision-making under risk without feedback has not yet been investigated systematically. Therefore, to examine risk-taking behaviour, 31 chronic cocaine users and 26 stimulant-naïve healthy controls, who were part of the Zurich Cocaine Cognition Study, performed the Randomized Lottery Task (RALT with winning lotteries consisting of an uncertain and a certain prospect. Results revealed that risky decisions were associated with male sex, increased cocaine use in the past year, higher cocaine concentrations in the hair, and younger age. In addition, higher levels of cocaine in the hair and cumulative lifetime consumption were associated with risky decisions, whereas potentially confounding factors including cognition and psychiatric symptoms had no significant effect. Taken together, our results indicate that cocaine users who increased their consumption over a period of one year show deficits in the processing of risky information accompanied with increased risk-taking. Future research should analyse whether risky decisions could potentially serve as a prognostic marker for cocaine use disorder.

  4. Risky Decisions in a Lottery Task Are Associated with an Increase of Cocaine Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Amrei; Hulka, Lea M; Heinimann, Hans R; Vonmoos, Matthias; Quednow, Boris B

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine use disorder is associated with maladaptive decision-making behavior, which strongly contributes to the harmful consequences of chronic drug use. Prior research has shown that cocaine users exhibit impaired neuropsychological test performances, particularly with regard to attention, learning, and memory but also in executive functions such as decision-making and impulse control. However, to what extent cocaine users show impaired decision-making under risk without feedback has not yet been investigated systematically. Therefore, to examine risk-taking behavior, 31 chronic cocaine users and 26 stimulant-naïve healthy controls who were part of the Zurich Cocaine Cognition Study, performed the Randomized Lottery Task (RALT) with winning lotteries consisting of an uncertain and a certain prospect. Results revealed that risky decisions were associated with male sex, increased cocaine use in the past year, higher cocaine concentrations in the hair, and younger age. In addition, higher levels of cocaine in the hair and cumulative lifetime consumption were associated with risky decisions, whereas potentially confounding factors including cognition and psychiatric symptoms had no significant effect. Taken together, our results indicate that cocaine users who increased their consumption over a period of 1 year show deficits in the processing of risky information accompanied with increased risk-taking. Future research should analyse whether risky decisions could potentially serve as a prognostic marker for cocaine use disorder. PMID:27242574

  5. Intergenerational effects of cocaine on maternal aggressive behavior and brain oxytocin in rat dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurray, M.S.; Joyner, P.W.; Middleton, C.W.; Jarrett, T.M.; Elliott, D.L.; Black, M.A.; Hofler, V.E.; Walker, C.H.; Johns, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Gestational cocaine treatment results in significantly increased maternal aggression towards an intruder by postpartum day six, while acute postpartum treatment dose dependently decreases maternal aggressive (MA) behavior. Both increased and decreased aggression in the cocaine-treated dams are correlated with either decreased or increased levels of oxytocin in the amygdala, respectively. The current study was an effort to determine whether the effect of gestational cocaine on maternal aggression is transient or would continue into the postpartum period; whether an intermittent cocaine treatment regimen, which incorporates gestational and postpartum intermittent cocaine treatment, would differ from chronic daily gestational treatment; and finally, whether next generation female offspring of cocaine-treated or control dams would have altered MA behavior and oxytocin system changes attributable to either prenatal drug exposure, rearing condition or both. We now report no increase in maternal aggression following chronic gestational treatment and significantly lower levels of aggression in intermittently treated dams on postpartum day eight, with no significant effects in either group on postpartum day 12. Young adult female offspring of the cocaine-treated and control dams, who reared their own natural litters and were tested on postpartum day eight for maternal aggression, had higher levels of maternal aggression towards an intruder attributable to both prenatal cocaine exposure and rearing condition. Higher aggression in cocaine-reared next generation dams was associated with lower levels of oxytocin in the amygdala. Intergenerational effects of cocaine were apparent with respect to aggression and oxytocin system changes. PMID:18609307

  6. Cocaine affects foraging behaviour and biogenic amine modulated behavioural reflexes in honey bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Søvik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In humans and other mammals, drugs of abuse alter the function of biogenic amine pathways in the brain leading to the subjective experience of reward and euphoria. Biogenic amine pathways are involved in reward processing across diverse animal phyla, however whether cocaine acts on these neurochemical pathways to cause similar rewarding behavioural effects in animal phyla other than mammals is unclear. Previously, it has been shown that bees are more likely to dance (a signal of perceived reward when returning from a sucrose feeder after cocaine treatment. Here we examined more broadly whether cocaine altered reward-related behaviour, and biogenic amine modulated behavioural responses in bees. Bees developed a preference for locations at which they received cocaine, and when foraging at low quality sucrose feeders increase their foraging rate in response to cocaine treatment. Cocaine also increased reflexive proboscis extension to sucrose, and sting extension to electric shock. Both of these simple reflexes are modulated by biogenic amines. This shows that systemic cocaine treatment alters behavioural responses that are modulated by biogenic amines in insects. Since insect reward responses involve both octopamine and dopamine signalling, we conclude that cocaine treatment altered diverse reward-related aspects of behaviour in bees. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the ecology of cocaine as a plant defence compound. Our findings further validate the honey bee as a model system for understanding the behavioural impacts of cocaine, and potentially other drugs of abuse.

  7. A subpopulation of neurochemically-identified ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons is excited by intravenous cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias-Aponte, Carlos A; Ye, Changquan; Bonci, Antonello; Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Morales, Marisela

    2015-02-01

    Systemic administration of cocaine is thought to decrease the firing rates of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. However, this view is based on categorizations of recorded neurons as DA neurons using preselected electrophysiological characteristics lacking neurochemical confirmation. Without applying cellular preselection, we recorded the impulse activity of VTA neurons in response to cocaine administration in anesthetized adult rats. The phenotype of recorded neurons was determined by their juxtacellular labeling and immunohistochemical detection of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a DA marker. We found that intravenous cocaine altered firing rates in the majority of recorded VTA neurons. Within the cocaine-responsive neurons, half of the population was excited and the other half was inhibited. Both populations had similar discharge rates and firing regularities, and most neurons did not exhibit changes in burst firing. Inhibited neurons were more abundant in the posterior VTA, whereas excited neurons were distributed evenly throughout the VTA. Cocaine-excited neurons were more likely to be excited by footshock. Within the subpopulation of TH-positive neurons, 36% were excited by cocaine and 64% were inhibited. Within the subpopulation of TH-negative neurons, 44% were excited and 28% were inhibited. Contrary to the prevailing view that all DA neurons are inhibited by cocaine, we found a subset of confirmed VTA DA neurons that is excited by systemic administration of cocaine. We provide evidence indicating that DA neurons are heterogeneous in their response to cocaine and that VTA non-DA neurons play an active role in processing systemic cocaine. PMID:25653355

  8. Stimulant-induced dopamine increases are markedly blunted in active cocaine abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, N D; Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D L; Jayne, M; Fowler, J S; Wong, C; Yin, P; Du, C

    2014-09-01

    Dopamine signaling in nucleus accumbens is essential for cocaine reward. Interestingly, imaging studies have reported blunted dopamine increases in striatum (assessed as reduced binding of [(11)C]raclopride to D2/D3 receptors) in detoxified cocaine abusers. Here, we evaluate whether the blunted dopamine response reflected the effects of detoxification and the lack of cocaine-cues during stimulant exposure. For this purpose we studied 62 participants (43 non-detoxified cocaine abusers and 19 controls) using positron emission tomography and [(11)C]raclopride (radioligand sensitive to endogenous dopamine) to measure dopamine increases induced by intravenous methylphenidate and in 24 of the cocaine abusers, we also compared dopamine increases when methylphenidate was administered concomitantly with a cocaine cue-video versus a neutral-video. In controls, methylphenidate increased dopamine in dorsal (effect size 1.4; P<0.001) and ventral striatum (location of accumbens) (effect size 0.89; P<0.001), but in cocaine abusers methylphenidate's effects did not differ from placebo and were similar whether cocaine-cues were present or not. In cocaine abusers despite the markedly attenuated dopaminergic effects, the methylphenidate-induced changes in ventral striatum were associated with intense drug craving. Our findings are consistent with markedly reduced signaling through D2 receptors during intoxication in active cocaine abusers regardless of cues exposure, which might contribute to compulsive drug use. PMID:24912491

  9. The effects of social contact on cocaine intake under extended-access conditions in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Andrea M; Lacy, Ryan T; Strickland, Justin C; Magee, Charlotte P; Smith, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    Social learning theories of drug use propose that drug use is influenced by the behavior of peers. We previously reported that cocaine self-administration under limited-access conditions can be either facilitated or inhibited by social contact, depending on the behavior of a peer. The purpose of this study was to determine whether social contact influences cocaine self-administration under conditions that are more representative of problematic patterns of drug use. Male rats were assigned to either isolated or pair-housed conditions in which a social partner either had access to cocaine or did not have access to cocaine. Pair-housed rats were tested in custom-built operant conditioning chambers that allowed both rats to be tested simultaneously in the same chamber. In Experiment 1, rats were tested for 14 consecutive days during daily 6-hr test sessions. In Experiment 2, different doses of cocaine were tested in 23-hr test sessions conducted every 3 days. All groups of rats escalated their cocaine intake in Experiment 1; however, pair-housed rats with a partner without access to cocaine had lower levels of intake throughout the 14 days of testing. In Experiment 2, pair-housed rats with a partner without access to cocaine had lower levels of cocaine intake than did rats with a partner with access to cocaine, and this effect was observed at all doses of cocaine tested. These data indicate that the behavior of a social partner (i.e., whether or not that partner is also self-administering cocaine) influences cocaine self-administration under conditions that model problematic patterns of drug use. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27454676

  10. Inhibitory effects of ginseng total saponins on behavioral sensitization and dopamine release induced by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, BomBi; Yang, Chae Ha; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Hye-Jung; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Insop

    2008-03-01

    Many studies have suggested that the behavioral and reinforcing effects of cocaine can be mediated by the central dopaminergic systems. It has been shown that repeated injections of cocaine produce an increase in locomotor activity, the expression of the immediate-early gene, c-fos, and the release of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which is one of the main dopaminergic terminal areas. Several studies have shown that behavioral activation and changes in extracellular dopamine levels in the central nervous system induced by psychomotor stimulants are prevented by ginseng total saponins (GTS). In order to investigate the effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations, we examined the influence of GTS on the cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and on c-Fos expression in the brain using immunohistochemistry in rats repeatedly treated with cocaine. We also examined the effect of GTS on cocaine-induced dopamine release in the NAc of freely moving rats repeatedly treated with cocaine using an in vivo microdialysis technique. Pretreatment with GTS (100, 200, 400 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before the daily injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited the repeated cocaine-induced increase in locomotor activity as well as the c-Fos expression in the core and shell in a dose-dependent manner. Also, pretreatment with GTS significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine release in the NAc. Our data demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization were closely associated with the reduction of dopamine release and the postsynaptic neuronal activity. The results of the present study suggest that GTS may be effective for inhibiting the behavioral effects of cocaine by possibly modulating the central dopaminergic system. These results also suggest that GTS may prove to be a useful therapeutic agent for cocaine addiction. PMID:18310906

  11. Cocaine elicits autophagic cytotoxicity via a nitric oxide-GAPDH signaling cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Prasun; Harraz, Maged M; Snyder, Solomon H

    2016-02-01

    Cocaine exerts its behavioral stimulant effects by facilitating synaptic actions of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. It is also neurotoxic and broadly cytotoxic, leading to overdose deaths. We demonstrate that the cytotoxic actions of cocaine reflect selective enhancement of autophagy, a process that physiologically degrades metabolites and cellular organelles, and that uncontrolled autophagy can also lead to cell death. In brain cultures, cocaine markedly increases levels of LC3-II and depletes p62, both actions characteristic of autophagy. By contrast, cocaine fails to stimulate cell death processes reflecting parthanatos, monitored by cleavage of poly(ADP ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), or necroptosis, assessed by levels of phosphorylated mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein. Pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy protects neurons against cocaine-induced cell death. On the other hand, inhibition of parthanatos, necroptosis, or apoptosis did not change cocaine cytotoxicity. Depletion of ATG5 or beclin-1, major mediators of autophagy, prevents cocaine-induced cell death. By contrast, depleting caspase-3, whose cleavage reflects apoptosis, fails to alter cocaine cytotoxicity, and cocaine does not alter caspase-3 cleavage. Moreover, depleting PARP-1 or RIPK1, key mediators of parthanatos and necroptosis, respectively, did not prevent cocaine-induced cell death. Autophagic actions of cocaine are mediated by the nitric oxide-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase signaling pathway. Thus, cocaine-associated autophagy is abolished by depleting GAPDH via shRNA; by the drug CGP3466B, which prevents GAPDH nitrosylation; and by mutating cysteine-150 of GAPDH, its site of nitrosylation. Treatments that selectively influence cocaine-associated autophagy may afford therapeutic benefit. PMID:26787898

  12. Postmortem stability of cocaine and cocaethylene in blood and tissues of humans and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, F; Hashimoto, Y

    1996-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine the postmortem stability of cocaine and cocaethylene in rabbit blood and tissues, and to determine whether cocaethylene is produced in decomposed human specimens containing cocaine and endogenous ethanol. Heart blood, liver, brain and femoral muscle taken from rabbits 20 min after oral administration of 20 mg/kg cocaine together with 2 g/kg ethanol were kept at 20-25 degrees C for 5 days. Cocaine and cocaethylene concentrations were in the order brain > liver > muscle > blood, and showed very large intersubject variations at the time of death. Cocaine was degraded rapidly in the blood and liver. However, 12.0 +/- 8.5% and 26.2% +/- 19.4% of the original cocaine was still detectable in the brain and muscle, respectively. Cocaethylene was degraded more slowly than cocaine in all of the specimens. The pH of the blood remained around 7.4 during a 5-day period; all the other specimens showed pH values of 6.2-6.7 on and after the first day postmortem. When 10,000 ng/g cocaine was incubated with decomposed human blood, liver, brain and muscle homogenates containing 0.29-0.60 mg/g endogenous ethanol at 20-25 degrees C and 37 degrees C, no change in cocaine concentration was observed during the study period of 24 h, and no cocaethylene was detected. The pH values of the homogenates were within the range 4.2 to 5.2 at the beginning of the experiment. It was found that: 1) cocaethylene was more stable in postmortem specimens than cocaine; 2) muscle as well as brain was specimen of choice for detecting cocaine and cocaethylene postmortem; 3) cocaine was resistant to decomposition under acidic conditions; and 4) putrefactive bacteria had no ability to produce cocaethylene even in the presence of cocaine and endogenous ethanol.

  13. Accelerated infliximab infusions for inflammatory bowel disease improve effectiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; McConnell; Simona; Parvulescu-Codrea; Brian; Behm; Beth; Hill; Elizabeth; Dunkle; Karen; Finke; Kathryn; Snyder; Anne; Tuskey; Debbie; Cox; Beth; Woodward

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the safety and effectiveness associated with accelerated infliximab infusion protocols in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD).METHODS:Original protocols and infusion rates were developed for the administration of infliximab over 90-min and 60-min.Then the IBD patients on stable maintenance infliximab therapy were offered accelerated infusions.To be eligible for the study,patients needed a minimum of four prior infusions.An initial infusion of 90-min was given to each patient;those tolerating the accelerated infusion were transitioned to a 60-min infusion protocol at their next and all subsequent visits.Any patient having significant infusion reactions would be reverted to the standard 120-min protocol.A change in a patient’s dose mandated a single 120-min infusion before accelerated infusions could be administered again.RESULTS:The University of Virginia Medical Center’s Institutional Review Board approved this study.Fifty IBD patients treated with infliximab 5mg/kg,7.5mg/kg and 10mg/kg were offered accelerated infusions.Forty-six patients consented to participate in the study.Nineteen(41.3%) were female,five(10.9%) were African American and nine(19.6%) had ulcerative colitis.The mean age was 42.6 years old.Patients under age 18 were excluded.Ten patients used immunosuppressive drugs concurrently out of which six were taking azathioprine,three were taking 6-mercaptopurine and one was taking methotrexate.One of the 46 study patients used corticosteroid therapy for his IBD.Seventeen of the patients used prophylactic medications prior to receiving infusions;six patients received corticosteroids as pre-medication.Four patients had a history of distant transfusion reactions to infliximab.These reactions included shortness of breath,chest tightness,flushing,pruritus and urticaria.These patients all took prophylactic medications before receiving infusions.46 patients(27 males and 19 females) received a total of fifty 90-min infusions and ninety

  14. Dyadic social interaction as an alternative reward to cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald eZernig

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals suffering from substance use disorders often show severely impaired social interaction, preferring drugs of abuse to the contact with others. Their impaired social interaction is doubly harmful for them as (1 therapy itself is based and dependent on social interaction and as (2 social interaction is not available to them as an "alternative", i.e., non-drug reward, decreasing their motivation to stop drug use. We therefore developed an animal experimental model to investigate the neurobiology of dyadic social interaction- vs cocaine reward. We took care to avoid (a engaging sexual attraction-related aspects of such a social interaction and (b hierarchical difference as confounding stimuli. The cocaine- or social interaction stimulus was offered - in a mutually exclusive setting - within the confines of a conditioned place preference (CPP apparatus. In our paradigm, only four 15-min episodes of social interaction proved sufficient to (i switch the rats' preference from cocaine-associated contextual stimuli to social interaction CPP and (ii inhibit the subsequent reacquisition/reexpression of cocaine CPP. The behavioral effect was paralleled by a reversal of brain activation (i.e., EGR1 expression in the nucleus accumbens, the central and basolateral amygdala, and the ventral tegmental area. Of relevance for the psychotherapy of addictive disorders, the most rewarding sensory component of the composite stimulus 'social interaction' was touch. To test our hypothesis that motivation is encoded in neuron ensembles dedicated to specific reward scenarios, we are currently (1 mapping the neural circuits involved in cocaine- vs social interaction reward and (2 adapting our paradigm for C57BL/6 mice to make use of the plethora of transgenic models available in this species.

  15. Functions of microRNA in response to cocaine stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L-F; Wang, J; Lv, F B; Song, Q

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a type of non-protein-coding single-stranded RNA, which are typically 20-25 nt in length. miRNAs play important roles in various biological processes, including development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. We aimed to detect the miRNA response to cocaine stimulations and their target genes. Using the miRNA expression data GSE21901 downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, we screened out the differentially expressed miRNA after short-term (1 h) and longer-term (6 h) cocaine stimulations based on the fold change >1.2. Target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs were retrieved from TargetScan database with the context score -0.3. Functional annotation enrichment analysis was performed for all the target genes with DAVID. A total of 121 differentially expressed miRNAs between the 1-h treatment and the control samples, 58 between the 6-h treatment and the control samples, and 69 between the 1-h and the 6-h treatment samples. Among them, miR-212 results of particular interest, since its expression level was constantly elevated responding to cocaine treatment. After functional and pathway annotations of target genes, we proved that miR-212 was a critical element in cocaine-addiction, because of its involvement in regulating several important cell cycle events. The results may pave the way for further understanding the regulatory mechanisms of cocaine-response in human bodies. PMID:24338410

  16. Cocaine enhances HIV-1-induced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis: implications in disease progression in cocaine-abusing HIV-1 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B; Mantri, Chinmay K; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-04-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1-associated CD4(+) T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4(+) T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4(+) T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1-infected drug abusers. PMID:24486327

  17. Investigating the Potential Influence of Cause of Death and Cocaine Levels on the Differential Expression of Genes Associated with Cocaine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Michael J.; Savonen, Candace L.; Hartley, Zachary J.; Johnson, Magen M.; Schmidt, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of complex brain disorders such as drug addiction is likely to be advanced by a more complete understanding of the underlying molecular pathophysiology. Although the study of postmortem human brain represents a unique resource in this regard, it can be challenging to disentangle the relative contribution of chronic pathological processes versus perimortem events to the observed changes in gene expression. To begin to unravel this issue, we analyzed by quantitative PCR the midbrain expression of numerous candidate genes previously associated with cocaine abuse. Data obtained from chronic cocaine abusers (and matched control subjects) dying of gunshot wounds were compared with a prior study of subjects with deaths directly attributable to cocaine abuse. Most of the genes studied (i.e., tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, forkhead box A2, histone variant H3 family 3B, nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor alpha, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible beta) were found to be differentially expressed in chronic cocaine abusers irrespective of immediate cause of death or perimortem levels of cocaine, suggesting that these may represent core pathophysiological changes arising with chronic drug abuse. On the other hand, chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 and jun proto-oncogene expression were unaffected in cocaine-abusing subjects dying of gunshot wounds, in contrast to the differential expression previously reported in cocaine-related fatalities. The possible influence of cause of death and other factors on the cocaine-responsiveness of these genes is discussed. PMID:25658879

  18. A mechanism for the inhibition of neural progenitor cell proliferation by cocaine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ting Lee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to cocaine causes morphological and behavioral abnormalities. Recent studies indicate that cocaine-induced proliferation inhibition and/or apoptosis in neural progenitor cells may play a pivotal role in causing these abnormalities. To understand the molecular mechanism through which cocaine inhibits cell proliferation in neural progenitors, we sought to identify the molecules that are responsible for mediating the effect of cocaine on cell cycle regulation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Microarray analysis followed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR was used to screen cocaine-responsive and cell cycle-related genes in a neural progenitor cell line where cocaine exposure caused a robust anti-proliferative effect by interfering with the G1-to-S transition. Cyclin A2, among genes related to the G1-to-S cell cycle transition, was most strongly down-regulated by cocaine. Down-regulation of cyclin A was also found in cocaine-treated human primary neural and A2B5+ progenitor cells, as well as in rat fetal brains exposed to cocaine in utero. Reversing cyclin A down-regulation by gene transfer counteracted the proliferation inhibition caused by cocaine. Further, we found that cocaine-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which involves N-oxidation of cocaine via cytochrome P450, promotes cyclin A down-regulation by causing an endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response, as indicated by increased phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and expression of ATF4. In the developing rat brain, the P450 inhibitor cimetidine counteracted cocaine-induced inhibition of neural progenitor cell proliferation as well as down-regulation of cyclin A. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that down-regulation of cyclin A underlies cocaine-induced proliferation inhibition in neural progenitors. The down-regulation of cyclin A is initiated by N-oxidative metabolism of cocaine and consequent ER stress. Inhibition of

  19. Stereospecific potentiation of opiate analgesia by cocaine: predominant role of noradrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1987-01-01

    Cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellets implanted subcutaneously in male Wistar rats potentiated the analgesia of morphine, levorphanol, methadone and buprenorphine as measured by the tail-withdrawal test. Potentiated opiate analgesia was abolished by naloxone and further enhanced by desipramine and phenoxybenzamine. Yohimbine, alpha-methyl p-tyrosine, haloperidol, zimelidine, methysergide, p-chlorophenylalanine produced no significant effect on potentiated opiate analgesia. Pseudo-cocaine (dextro-cocaine), which is several-fold less potent than cocaine as an inhibitor of noradrenaline and dopamine reuptake in the CNS, had no significant effect on opiate analgesia. Analgesia produced by low doses of baclofen, a GABA agonist, was also not potentiated by cocaine. This study suggests a predominant role for noradrenaline in the stereospecific potentiation of opiate analgesia by cocaine. PMID:3822492

  20. The last step in cocaine biosynthesis is catalyzed by a BAHD acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gregor Wolfgang; Jirschitzka, Jan; Porta, Tiffany; Reichelt, Michael; Luck, Katrin; Torre, José Carlos Pardo; Dolke, Franziska; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Gershenzon, Jonathan; D'Auria, John Charles

    2015-01-01

    The esterification of methylecgonine (2-carbomethoxy-3β-tropine) with benzoic acid is the final step in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the production of cocaine in Erythoxylum coca. Here we report the identification of a member of the BAHD family of plant acyltransferases as cocaine synthase. The enzyme is capable of producing both cocaine and cinnamoylcocaine via the activated benzoyl- or cinnamoyl-Coenzyme A thioesters, respectively. Cocaine synthase activity is highest in young developing leaves, especially in the palisade parenchyma and spongy mesophyll. These data correlate well with the tissue distribution pattern of cocaine as visualized with antibodies. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization mass spectral imaging revealed that cocaine and cinnamoylcocaine are differently distributed on the upper versus lower leaf surfaces. Our findings provide further evidence that tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in the Erythroxylaceae occurs in the above-ground portions of the plant in contrast with the Solanaceae, in which tropane alkaloid biosynthesis occurs in the roots.

  1. Some potential contributions of reinforcement and consumer-demand theory to reducing cocaine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, S T

    1996-01-01

    Cocaine abuse remains a daunting United States public health problem. Recreational cocaine use is decreasing, but regular use indicative of dependence is stable or increasing. Treatment interventions are often characterized by high rates of early attrition and continued drug use and involve only a small proportion of cocaine users. Hence, more effective and expanded strategies for motivating individuals to forgo or reduce cocaine use are needed. This commentary has a two-part purpose: (a) to underscore the fundamental role of reinforcement in the genesis and maintenance of cocaine use and (b) to illustrate how that knowledge in combination with consumer-demand theory might be translated into effective strategies for reducing cocaine use.

  2. [Renal and spleen infarction after massive consumption of cannabis and cocaine in a young man].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, P-Y; Gestin, S; Plat, E; Quéhé, P; Bressollette, L

    2011-02-01

    Cannabis is the most widely consumed drug in the world, particularly among young subjects. Cocaine is the third leading illicit drug. Cases of renal infarction associated with combined consumption of cannabis and cocaine have been reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 24-year-old man who presented renal and spleen infarction after massive consumption of cannabis and cocaine. Both vascular events arose on healthy arteries. Etiological tests were negative leading to the conclusion that the events resulted from a toxic cause related to cannabis and cocaine consumption. Different mechanisms, potentially including thrombosis, might explain the association of cannabis and cocaine with vascular events. We suggest that a systematic search for cannabis and cocaine consumption among young victims of vascular disease might be useful.

  3. Cocaine and mitochondria-related signaling in the brain: A mechanistic view and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Jardim, Fernanda Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is extensively used as a psychostimulant among subjects at different ages worldwide. Cocaine causes neuronal dysfunction and, consequently, negatively affects human behavior and decreases life quality severely. Cocaine acts through diverse mechanisms, including mitochondrial impairment and activation of cell signaling pathways associated to stress response. There is some controversy regarding the effect of cocaine in inducing cell death through apoptosis in different experimental models. The aim of the present work is to discuss data associated to the mitochondrial consequences of cocaine exposure of mammalian cells in several experimental models from in vitro to in vivo, including postmortem human tissue analyses. Furthermore, future directions are proposed in order to serve as a suggestive guide in relation to the next steps towards the complete elucidation of the mechanisms of toxicity elicited by cocaine upon mitochondria of neuronal cells. PMID:26707813

  4. Overlapping patterns of brain activation to food and cocaine cues in cocaine abusers: association to striatal D2/D3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Caparelli, Elisabeth C; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine, through its activation of dopamine (DA) signaling, usurps pathways that process natural rewards. However, the extent to which there is overlap between the networks that process natural and drug rewards and whether DA signaling associated with cocaine abuse influences these networks have not been investigated in humans. We measured brain activation responses to food and cocaine cues with fMRI, and D2/D3 receptors in the striatum with [11C]raclopride and Positron emission tomography in 20 active cocaine abusers. Compared to neutral cues, food and cocaine cues increasingly engaged cerebellum, orbitofrontal, inferior frontal, and premotor cortices and insula and disengaged cuneus and default mode network (DMN). These fMRI signals were proportional to striatal D2/D3 receptors. Surprisingly cocaine and food cues also deactivated ventral striatum and hypothalamus. Compared to food cues, cocaine cues produced lower activation in insula and postcentral gyrus, and less deactivation in hypothalamus and DMN regions. Activation in cortical regions and cerebellum increased in proportion to the valence of the cues, and activation to food cues in somatosensory and orbitofrontal cortices also increased in proportion to body mass. Longer exposure to cocaine was associated with lower activation to both cues in occipital cortex and cerebellum, which could reflect the decreases in D2/D3 receptors associated with chronicity. These findings show that cocaine cues activate similar, though not identical, pathways to those activated by food cues and that striatal D2/D3 receptors modulate these responses, suggesting that chronic cocaine exposure might influence brain sensitivity not just to drugs but also to food cues. PMID:25142207

  5. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy for the treatment of metastatic liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Yasuaki; Kido, Choichiro

    1987-12-01

    Some techniques of the most recent interventional radiology are very useful for the treatment of metastatic liver cancer and changing the style of hepatic infusion chemotherapy. This report shows our latest results and methods of hepatic infusion chemotherapy for metastatic liver cancer. 1. For the catheter placement, a new catheterization route via the left subclavian artery into the hepatic artery was developed and performed in 132 cases. Superselective catheterization succeeded in 123 cases (93.2%). This procedure is less invasive than laparotomy and less troublesome than other percutaneous routes. 2. For useful infusion system, an implantable injection port ''Reservoir'' was developed and it was used in 87 cases. This method makes arterial infusion chemotherapy easy, and imploves their quality of life. 3. To acquire adequate drug delivery, arterial redistribution by steel coils was done, and 109 arteries in 80 cases were occluded. This method is very useful to make multiple hepatic artery single and it is important to avoid gasroduodenal complications. 4. Now, using these techniques, the phase II study of 5FU, ADM, MMC combined hepatic infusion in patients with non-resectable metastatic liver cancer is done. Up to this time, such a phase study on arterial infusion chemotherapy was difficult because of technical problems, but these new techniques make it possible. In conclusion, these new methods change the style and conception of hepatic infusion, and these make much progress on the treatment of patients with metastatic liver cancer.

  6. The Neural Consequences of Repeated Cocaine Exposure Revealed by Functional MRI in Awake Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Febo, Marcelo; Segarra, Annabell C.; Nair, Govind; Schmidt, Karl; Duong, Timothy Q.; Ferris, Craig F.

    2005-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in animal models of cocaine addiction is an invaluable tool for investigating the neuroadaptations that lead to this psychiatric disorder. We used blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI in awake rats to identify the neuronal circuits affected by repeated cocaine administration. Rats were given an injection of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle for 7 days, abstained from injections for 1 week, and challenged with an intracerebrovent...

  7. Choosing Money over Drugs: The Neural Underpinnings of Difficult Choice in Chronic Cocaine Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Wesley

    2014-01-01

    CCUs devalued future commodities more than Controls. Choices for money as opposed to cocaine correlated with greater activity in dorsal striatum of CCUs, compared to Controls. In addition, choices for future money as opposed to immediate cocaine engaged the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC of CCUs more than Controls. These data suggest that the ability of CCUs to execute choices away from cocaine relies on activity in the dorsal striatum and left DLPFC.

  8. Sex Differences in Guanfacine Effects on Drug Craving and Stress Arousal in Cocaine-Dependent Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Helen C.; Morgan, Peter T.; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no FDA-approved medication exists for the treatment of cocaine use disorder. Furthermore, as women become increasingly more at risk for the consequences of cocaine addiction, the need to establish better-tailored treatment medications is paramount. We examine the effects of the alpha2 adrenergic agonist, guanfacine HCl, on responses to stress and drug cue in a group of cocaine-dependent men and women who also abuse alcohol and nicotine. Forty early abstinent treatment-seeking cocai...

  9. Serotonin at the Nexus of Impulsivity and Cue Reactivity in Cocaine Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Kathryn A; Anastasio, Noelle C

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and addiction remain great challenges on the public health agendas in the U.S. and the world. Increasingly sophisticated perspectives on addiction to cocaine and other drugs of abuse have evolved with concerted research efforts over the last 30 years. Relapse remains a particularly powerful clinical problem as, even upon termination of drug use and initiation of abstinence, the recidivism rates can be very high. The cycling course of cocaine intake, abstinence and relapse is tie...

  10. Enhanced anxiety in the male offspring of sires that self-administered cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Samantha L; Vassoler, Fair M; Schmidt, Heath D; Pierce, R Christopher; Wimmer, Mathieu E

    2016-07-01

    We previously showed that paternal cocaine exposure reduced the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine in male offspring. Here, we sought to determine whether paternal cocaine experience could also influence anxiety levels in offspring. Male rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (controls received saline passively) for 60 days and then were bred with naïve females. Measures of anxiety and cocaine-induced anxiogenic effects were assessed in the adult offspring. Cocaine-sired male offspring exhibited increased anxiety-like behaviors, as measured using the novelty-induced hypophagia and defensive burying tasks, relative to saline-sired males. In contrast, sire cocaine experience had no effect on anxiety-like behaviors in female offspring. When challenged with an anxiogenic (but not anorectic) dose of cocaine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), anxiety-like behavior was enhanced in all animals to an equal degree regardless of sire drug experience. Since anxiety and depression are often co-morbid, we also assessed measures of depressive-like behavior. Sire cocaine experience had no effect on depression-like behaviors, as measured by the forced swim task, among male offspring. In a separate group of naïve littermates, select neuronal correlates of anxiety were measured. Male offspring of cocaine-experienced sires showed increased mRNA and protein expression of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 in the hippocampus. Together, these results indicate that cocaine-experienced sires produce male progeny that have increased baseline anxiety, which is unaltered by subsequent cocaine exposure. PMID:25923597

  11. Chronic Exercise Increases Sensitivity to the Conditioned Rewarding Effects of Cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Mark A.; Gergans, Samantha R.; Iordanou, Jordan C.; Lyle, Megan A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether chronic exercise alters sensitivity to the conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine. Female rats were obtained at weaning and randomly assigned to either sedentary or exercise conditions. After 6 weeks under these conditions, the effects of cocaine were examined in the conditioned place preference procedure. Cocaine produced a dose-dependent conditioned place preference in both groups of rats. Exercising rats were more sensitive than sedentar...

  12. Neonatal Neurobehavioral and Neuroanatomic Correlates of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure: Problems of Dose and Confounding

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Deborah A.; Augustyn, Marilyn; ZUCKERMAN, BARRY S.

    1998-01-01

    Complex methodologic challenges face researchers studying the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant outcome. These include unavoidable imprecision in ascertaining the gestational timing and dose of cocaine to which the fetus was exposed and difficulties in identifying and quantifying the confounding, mediating, and moderating variables. Review of research on neonatal behavioral and cranial ultrasound findings following in utero cocaine exposure is used to illustrate these issues. We ...

  13. Interaction Between Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatment Strategies to Decrease Cocaine Choice in Rhesus Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, Matthew L.; Blough, Bruce E.; S. Stevens Negus

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral and pharmacotherapeutic approaches constitute two prominent strategies for treating cocaine dependence. This study investigated interactions between behavioral and pharmacological strategies in a preclinical model of cocaine vs food choice. Six rhesus monkeys, implanted with a chronic indwelling double-lumen venous catheter, initially responded under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio (FR) 100 schedule) and cocaine injections (0–0.1 mg/kg/injection, FR...

  14. Effects of disulfiram and dopamine beta-hydroxylase knockout on cocaine-induced seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Schroeder, Jason P; Liles, L. Cameron; Javors, Martin A.; Weinshenker, David

    2008-01-01

    The antialcoholism drug disulfiram has shown recent promise as a pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine dependence, probably via inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE). We previously showed that DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice, which lack NE, are susceptible to seizures and are hypersensitive to the psychomotor, rewarding, and aversive effects of cocaine, suggesting that disulfiram might exacerbate cocaine-induced...

  15. The Effects of Cocaine on Regional Brain Glucose Metabolism Is Attenuated in Dopamine Transporter Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; MICHAELIDES, MICHAEL; Benveniste, Helene; WANG, GENE JACK; Volkow, Nora D.

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine’s ability to block the dopamine transporter (DAT) is crucial for its reinforcing effects. However the brain functional consequences of DAT blockade by cocaine are less clear since they are confounded by its concomitant blockade of norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. To separate the dopaminergic from the non-dopaminergic effects of cocaine on brain function we compared the regional brain metabolic responses to cocaine between dopamine transporter deficient (DAT−/−) mice with tha...

  16. Widespread disruption in brain activation patterns to a working memory task during cocaine abstinence

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasi, D.; Goldstein, R Z; Telang, F; Maloney, T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Caparelli, E.C.; Volkow, N D

    2007-01-01

    Cocaine abstinence is associated with impaired performance in cognitive functions including attention, vigilance and executive function. Here we test the hypothesis that cognitive dysfunction during cocaine abstinence reflects in part impairment of cortical and subcortical regions modulated by dopamine. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain activation to a verbal working memory task in cocaine abusers (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 16). Compared to controls, ...

  17. Cocaine Causes Apoptotic Death in Rat Mesencephalon and Striatum Primary Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Planeta, Cleopatra S.; Critoforo Scavone

    2015-01-01

    To study cocaine’s toxic effects in vitro, we have used primary mesencephalic and striatal cultures from rat embryonic brain. Treatment with cocaine causes a dramatic increase in DNA fragmentation in both primary cultures. The toxicity induced by cocaine was paralleled with a concomitant decrease in the microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) and/or neuronal nucleus protein (NeuN) staining. We also observed in both cultures that the cell death caused by cocaine was induced by an apoptotic mec...

  18. Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Some Rat Brain Structures and Peripheral Organs Underwent Cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Moniczewski, Andrzej; Wydra, Karolina; Suder, Agata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) generates or intensifies cocaine-evoked toxicity in the brain and peripheral organs. The aim of this study was to examine superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and lipid peroxidation [measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) levels] in rats during maintenance of cocaine self-administration and after withdrawal by a yoked-triad procedure. Our results indicate that repeated cocaine self-administration provoked an elevation of SOD activity in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, dorsal ...

  19. COCAINE REWARD AND HYPERACTIVITY IN THE RAT: SITES OF MU OPIOID RECEPTOR MODULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Soderman, Avery R.; Unterwald, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Opioid receptor agonists and antagonists have profound effects on cocaine-induced hyperactivity and conditioned reward. Recently, the role specifically of the mu opioid receptor has been demonstrated based on the finding that intracerebroventricular administration of the selective mu opioid receptor antagonist, CTAP, can attenuate cocaine-induced behaviors. The purpose of the present study was to determine the location of mu opioid receptors that are critical for cocaine-induced reward and hy...

  20. Activin-receptor signaling regulates cocaine-primed behavioral and morphological plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Gancarz, Amy M.; Wang, Zi-Jun; Schroeder, Gabrielle L.; Damez-Werno, Diane; Braunscheidel, Kevin; Mueller, Lauren E.; Monica S Humby; Caccamise, Aaron; Martin, Jennifer A.; Dietz, Karen C.; Neve, Rachael L; Dietz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a life-long relapsing disorder that results from long-term adaptations within the brain. We find that Activin-receptor signaling, including the transcription factor Smad3, is upregulated in the rat nucleus accumbens shell following withdrawal from cocaine. Direct genetic and pharmacological manipulations of this pathway bidirectionally alter cocaine seeking, while governing morphological plasticity in nucleus accumbens neurons. These findings reveal that Activin/Smad3 sig...