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Sample records for 3d rayleigh-taylor instability

  1. Understanding the Rayleigh-Taylor instability through 1D and 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaeil, Mark; Denissen, Nicholas; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    A series of Rayleigh-Taylor instability numerical simulations were completed using the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode FLAG developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One-dimensional simulations employed a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach with turbulence closure models selected from the Besnard-Harlow-Rauenzahn family of models. Growth rate parameters and turbulence statistics are derived from these simulations and compared between closure models. Variations from experimental results are explored and used to validate the models. The effect of density ratio on the bubble-spike growth rate asymmetry is also investigated. High resolution three-dimensional large eddy simulations (LES) are also completed and presented. LES were initialized using a multi-modal perturbation prescribed from experimental data collected at the Georgia Institute of Technology multi-layer Gas Tunnel facility. Turbulence statistics are gathered by averaging many simulations started with different initial conditions. Late time development is compared to Gas Tunnel experimental results and previous LES.

  2. Simulation of the growth of the 3D Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Supernova Remnants using an expanding reference frame

    CERN Document Server

    Fraschetti, Federico; Ballet, Jean; Decourchelle, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Context: The Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities generated by the deceleration of a supernova remnant during the ejecta-dominated phase are known to produce finger-like structures in the matter distribution which modify the geometry of the remnant. The morphology of supernova remnants is also expected to be modified when efficient particle acceleration occurs at their shocks. Aims: The impact of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities from the ejecta-dominated to the Sedov-Taylor phase is investigated over one octant of the supernova remnant. We also study the effect of efficient particle acceleration at the forward shock on the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Methods: We modified the Adaptive Mesh Refinement code RAMSES to study with hydrodynamic numerical simulations the evolution of supernova remnants in the framework of an expanding reference frame. The adiabatic index of a relativistic gas between the forward shock and the contact discontinuity mimics the presence of accelerated particles. Results: The ...

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Viscoelastic Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Amey

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I analyze the onset of Rayleigh-Taylor instability between two linear viscoelastic fluids assuming that the perturbations at the interface are small. In the first half, the paper analyzes a stratified viscoelastic fluid in which I prove that the perturbations rise or fall exponentially without oscillating. The second half of the paper examines the effect of electric and magnetic fields on viscoelastic fluids. I show that it is possible to choose electric or magnetic field gradie...

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturtevant, B. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA). Graduate Aeronautical Labs.)

    1990-11-05

    This is a report of the progress during the past year of the shock-tube study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, initiated under the sponsorship of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in September, 1982. The purpose of this research program, as stated in the original proposal, is: to investigate the nonlinear processes initiated by shock wave interaction with gas-gas interfaces. In particular, the nonlinear stage of shock-initiated Rayleigh-Taylor instability, the secondary instabilities (e.g., Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) arising therefrom and the concomitant mixing of the two fluids are of interest.''

  5. Curvature suppresses the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Philippe H; Hammoud, Naima; Howell, Peter D; Chapman, S Jonathan; Stone, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of a thin liquid film on the underside of a curved cylindrical substrate is studied. The evolution of the liquid layer is investigated as the film thickness and the radius of curvature of the substrate are varied. A dimensionless parameter (a modified Bond number) that incorporates both geometric parameters, gravity, and surface tension is identified, and allows the observations to be classified according to three different flow regimes: stable films, films with transient growth of perturbations followed by decay, and unstable films. Experiments and theory confirm that, below a critical value of the Bond number, curvature of the substrate suppresses the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, A R; Cela, J J López; Cortázar, O D; Tahir, N A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2005-11-01

    We present an analytical model for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that allows for an approximate but still very accurate and appealing description of the instability physics in the linear regime. The model is based on the second law of Newton and it has been developed with the aim of dealing with the instability of accelerated elastic solids. It yields the asymptotic instability growth rate but also describes the initial transient phase determined by the initial conditions. We have applied the model to solid/solid and solid/fluid interfaces with arbitrary Atwood numbers. The results are in excellent agreement with previous models that yield exact solutions but which are of more limited validity. Our model allows for including more complex physics. In particular, the present approach is expected to lead to a more general theory of the instability that would allow for describing the transition to the plastic regime. PMID:16383751

  7. A 3D cell-centered Lagrangian scheme applied to the simulation of 3D non-stationary Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, G.; Breil, J.; Ribeyre, X.; Le Bel, E.

    2015-12-01

    Several astronomical flows can be studied thanks to the gas dynamics equations under the Lagrangian formalism. Here we propose to study the plerion dynamic, i.e. supernova remnants blown-up by a central pulsar as well as the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) development at the inner interface of this gas shell. The scheme used is a multi-dimensional second order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme. It satisfies the Geometric Conservation Law (GCL), a semi-discrete entropy inequality and it conserves globally the momentum and the total energy. The convergence of the scheme towards the analytical solution is tested for the plerion test case and in the case of an axi-symmetric perturbation. Finally, the scheme is used to study the perturbation growth on the shell inner face perturbed with spherical harmonics.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Viscoelastic Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Amey

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I analyze the onset of Rayleigh-Taylor instability between two linear viscoelastic fluids assuming that the perturbations at the interface are small. In the first half, the paper analyzes a stratified viscoelastic fluid in which I prove that the perturbations rise or fall exponentially without oscillating. The second half of the paper examines the effect of electric and magnetic fields on viscoelastic fluids. I show that it is possible to choose electric or magnetic field gradient such that the effective acceleration due to gravity is zero. If a heavy Newtonian fluid rests on top of a lighter Newtonian fluid such a choice of field gradient would have rendered the arrangement stable. If the fluids are viscoelastic, I show that a similar arrangement is unstable.

  9. The Rotating Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Scase, Matthew M; Hill, Richard J A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of rotation upon the classical two-layer Rayleigh-Taylor instability is considered theoretically and compared with previous experimental results. In particular we consider a two-layer system with an axis of rotation that is perpendicular to the interface between the layers. In general we find that a wave mode's growth rate may be reduced by rotation. We further show that in some cases, unstable axisymmetric wave modes may be stabilized by rotating the system above a critical rotation rate associated with the mode's wavelength, the Atwood number and the flow's aspect ratio. We compare our theory with experiments conducted in a magnetic field using 'heavy' diamagnetic and 'light' paramagnetic fluids and present comparisons between the theoretical predictions and experimental observations.

  10. Kinetic Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagert, Irina; Bauer, Wolfgang; Colbry, Dirk; Howell, Jim; Staber, Alec; Strother, Terrance

    2014-09-01

    We report on an ongoing project to develop a large scale Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The code is primarily aimed towards applications in astrophysics such as simulations of core-collapse supernovae. It has been tested on shock wave phenomena in the continuum limit and for matter out of equilibrium. In the current work we focus on the study of fluid instabilities. Like shock waves these are routinely used as test-cases for hydrodynamic codes and are discussed to play an important role in the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae. As a first test we study the evolution of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface of a light and a heavy fluid in the presence of a gravitational acceleration. To suppress small-wavelength instabilities caused by the irregularity in the separation layer we use a large particle mean free path. The latter leads to the development of a diffusion layer as particles propagate from one fluid into the other. For small amplitudes, when the instability is in the linear regime, we compare its position and shape to the analytic prediction. Despite the broadening of the fluid interface we see a good agreement with the analytic solution. At later times we observe the development of a mushroom like shape caused by secondary Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities as seen in hydrodynamic simulations and consistent with experimental observations.

  11. Kinetic Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Sagert, Irina; Colbry, Dirk; Howell, Jim; Staber, Alec; Strother, Terrance

    2014-01-01

    We report on an ongoing project to develop a large scale Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The code is primarily aimed towards applications in astrophysics such as simulations of core-collapse supernovae. It has been tested on shock wave phenomena in the continuum limit and for matter out of equilibrium. In the current work we focus on the study of fluid instabilities. Like shock waves these are routinely used as test-cases for hydrodynamic codes and are discussed to play an important role in the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae. As a first test we study the evolution of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface of a light and a heavy fluid in the presence of a gravitational acceleration. To suppress small-wavelength instabilities caused by the irregularity in the separation layer we use a large particle mean free path. The latter leads to the development of a diffusion layer as particles propagate from one fluid into the other. For small amplitudes, when the instability is i...

  12. Experimental Investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeremy

    2011-12-01

    A series of experiments have been carried out to study the behavior of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The experiments cover a wide range of Atwood (A = (rho2-rho1)/(rho 2-rho1)) numbers, 0.28 ≤ A ≤ 1 using immiscible fluids, with Reynolds numbers spanning four orders of magnitude, ˜ 10 ≤ Re ≤ 10000. Multiple 2D interface shapes have been studied along with a single 3D configuration. The unique properties of magnetorheological fluids are exploited to generate well defined, static initial conditions for both single and multi-mode sinusoidal perturbations as well as isolated wavelengths of single-mode perturbations protruding from flat interfaces. The magnetic properties of the fluid are used to hold these shapes static prior to running, as well as to suspend them above a lighter fluid to allow gravity to provide acceleration to drive the mixing. The 2D experimental results corroborate some of the limitations of the non-linear analytical models, which have been recently investigated numerically, as well as observed in 3D experiments, but not reported in 2D experiments before. The unbounded growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes at late times has been experimentally confirmed for both the 3D condition, where this is predicted to occur for all Atwood numbers, and for the A = 1 limit in the 2D configuration. Preliminary testing with multi-mode interface shapes with high viscosity, high surface tension MR fluids demonstrate the feasibility of extending this unique experimental technique to the more complicated multi-mode/broadband initial conditions more commonly present in applications. Further extension to lower viscosity and surface tension MR fluids for higher Reynolds number flows has proven difficult with the experimental design, yet has revealed the future changes that will be needed to apply this unique experimental idea to the study of the turbulent mix regime. Finally, 3D simulations using the 2D experimental conditions have demonstrated the importance

  13. Synchrotron Magnetic Fields from Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Duffell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron emission from a supernova necessitates a magnetic field, but it is unknown how strong the relevant magnetic fields are, and what mechanism generates them. In this study, we perform high-resolution numerical gas dynamics calculations to determine the growth of turbulence due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and the resulting kinetic energy in turbulent fluctuations, to infer the strength of magnetic fields amplified by this turbulence. We find that Rayleigh-Taylor instability can produce turbulent fluctuations strong enough to amplify magnetic fields to a few percent of equipartition with the thermal energy. This turbulence stays concentrated near the reverse shock, but averaging this magnetic energy throughout the shocked region (weighting by emissivity) sets the magnetic fields at a minimum of 0.3 percent of equipartition. This suggests a minimum effective magnetic field strength ($\\epsilon_B > 0.003$) which should be present in all interacting supernovae.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor instability between two stable stratifications

    CERN Document Server

    Wykes, Megan S Davies

    2012-01-01

    These fluid dynamics video sequences show two Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments. The first video sequence shows an experiment where two layers of uniform density are arranged such that the density of the upper layer is greater than the density of the lower. The unstable interface between the two layers is initially supported by a stainless steel barrier. With the removal of the barrier, Rayleigh-Taylor instability results in the creation of a mixing region, which grows with time. This growth accelerates until the mixing region fills the entire tank. The second sequence shows Rayleigh-Taylor instability when it is confined between two stable stratifications. Although initially the growth of the mixing region accelerates, the stable stratification slows the growth of the instability and brings it to a halt before it can fill the tank. The stratifications are constructed of fresh and salt water and both experiments have the same Atwood number. Visualisation of the upper surface of the mixing layer was achi...

  15. Effects of interfacial curvature on Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    OpenAIRE

    Krechetnikov, Rouslan

    2008-01-01

    In this work a non-trivial effect of the interfacial curvature on the stability of accelerated interfaces, such as liquid rims, is uncovered. The new stability analysis, based on operator and boundary perturbation theories, reveals and quantifies influence of the interfacial curvature on the growth rate and on the wavenumber selection of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The systematic approach developed here also provides a rigorous generalization of the widely used \\textit{ad hoc} idea, due ...

  16. Viscous Potential Flow Analysis of Electrohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Awasthi Mukesh Kumar; Yadav Dhananjay; G.S. Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    A linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of tangential electric field has been carried out using viscous potential flow theory. In viscous potential flow theory, viscosity is not zero but viscous term in the Navier- Stokes equation is zero as vorticity is zero. Viscosity enters through normal stress balance and tangential stresses are not considered in viscous flow theory. A dispersion relation has been obtained and stability criterion has been given in the terms of cr...

  17. Kinetic Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Sagert, Irina; Bauer, Wolfgang; Colbry, Dirk; Howell, Jim; Staber, Alec; Strother, Terrance

    2014-01-01

    We report on an ongoing project to develop a large scale Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The code is primarily aimed towards applications in astrophysics such as simulations of core-collapse supernovae. It has been tested on shock wave phenomena in the continuum limit and for matter out of equilibrium. In the current work we focus on the study of fluid instabilities. Like shock waves these are routinely used as test-cases for hydrodynamic codes and are discussed to play an important role ...

  18. Three-dimensional single-mode nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, R. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Sanz, J. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Aluie, H. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Liu, B. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Frank, A. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2016-02-02

    The nonlinear evolution of the single-mode ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in three dimensions. As the mode wavelength approaches the cutoff of the linear spectrum (short-wavelength modes), it is found that the three-dimensional (3D) terminal bubble velocity greatly exceeds both the two-dimensional (2D) value and the classical 3D bubble velocity. Unlike in 2D, the 3D short-wavelength bubble velocity does not saturate. The growing 3D bubble acceleration is driven by the unbounded accumulation of vorticity inside the bubble. As a result, the vorticity is transferred by mass ablation from the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes to the ablated plasma filling the bubble volume.

  19. Three-dimensional single-mode nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, R.; Aluie, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Betti, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Sanz, J. [E.T.S.I. Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Liu, B.; Frank, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The nonlinear evolution of the single-mode ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in three dimensions. As the mode wavelength approaches the cutoff of the linear spectrum (short-wavelength modes), it is found that the three-dimensional (3D) terminal bubble velocity greatly exceeds both the two-dimensional (2D) value and the classical 3D bubble velocity. Unlike in 2D, the 3D short-wavelength bubble velocity does not saturate. The growing 3D bubble acceleration is driven by the unbounded accumulation of vorticity inside the bubble. The vorticity is transferred by mass ablation from the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes to the ablated plasma filling the bubble volume.

  20. Effects of interfacial curvature on Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    CERN Document Server

    Krechetnikov, Rouslan

    2008-01-01

    In this work a non-trivial effect of the interfacial curvature on the stability of accelerated interfaces, such as liquid rims, is uncovered. The new stability analysis, based on operator and boundary perturbation theories, reveals and quantifies influence of the interfacial curvature on the growth rate and on the wavenumber selection of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The systematic approach developed here also provides a rigorous generalization of the widely used \\textit{ad hoc} idea, due to Layzer [Astrophys. J. \\textbf{122}, 1-12 (1955)], of approximating the potential velocity field near the interface.

  1. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed

  2. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Yue Ying [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gilgenbach, Ronald [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-07-07

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed.

  3. The Inhibition of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability by Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kyle A; Scase, Matthew M; Hill, Richard J A

    2015-01-01

    It is well-established that the Coriolis force that acts on fluid in a rotating system can act to stabilise otherwise unstable flows. Chandrasekhar considered theoretically the effect of the Coriolis force on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which occurs at the interface between a dense fluid lying on top of a lighter fluid under gravity, concluding that rotation alone could not stabilise this system indefinitely. Recent numerical work suggests that rotation may, nevertheless, slow the growth of the instability. Experimental verification of these results using standard techniques is problematic, owing to the practical difficulty in establishing the initial conditions. Here, we present a new experimental technique for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor instability under rotation that side-steps the problems encountered with standard techniques by using a strong magnetic field to destabilize an otherwise stable system. We find that rotation about an axis normal to the interface acts to retard the growth rate of the instability and stabilise long wavelength modes; the scale of the observed structures decreases with increasing rotation rate, asymptoting to a minimum wavelength controlled by viscosity. We present a critical rotation rate, dependent on Atwood number and the aspect ratio of the system, for stabilising the most unstable mode. PMID:26130005

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor instability with finite current relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, F. E. M.; Orlandi, H. I.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we explore the influence of perturbative wavelengths, shorter than those usually considered, on the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor modes. Therefore, we adopt an extended form of Ohm's law which includes a finite relaxation time of the current density due to inertial effects of charged species in the plasma. The restoring force density that acts upon charged species close to the mode rational surface takes into account a new term which is usually neglected with respect to the motional electromotive force. We find that the width of the resistive layer can be interpreted in terms of the "height" of free fall in a constant gravitational field, in the Alfvén time interval. We also show that the charged species must fall "down" in the constant gravitational field in order that the static state of equilibrium of the system becomes unstable to the linear perturbation. Through the principle of conservation of energy, we find a general formula which gives the growth rate γ of the Rayleigh-Taylor modes. When the new term becomes negligible with respect to the motional electromotive force, we recover the standard result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which establishes that γ scales with the plasma resistivity η as γ ˜ η 1 / 3 . However, in the opposite limiting situation, we find that γ does not depend any longer on the plasma resistivity and scales now with the electron number density n e as γ ˜ ne - 1 / 2 . Further developments of our theory may contribute to improve our understanding on the excitation mechanisms of resistive plasma instabilities by transient phenomena such as shock waves.

  5. Linear analysis of incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, A R; Cela, J J López; Tahir, N A

    2009-10-01

    The study of the linear stage of the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic-plastic solids is performed by considering thick plates under a constant acceleration that is also uniform except for a small sinusoidal ripple in the horizontal plane. The analysis is carried out by using an analytical model based on the Newton second law and it is complemented with extensive two-dimensional numerical simulations. The conditions for marginal stability that determine the instability threshold are derived. Besides, the boundary for the transition from the elastic to the plastic regime is obtained and it is demonstrated that such a transition is not a sufficient condition for instability. The model yields complete analytical solutions for the perturbation amplitude evolution and reveals the main physical process that governs the instability. The theory is in general agreement with the numerical simulations and provides useful quantitative results. Implications for high-energy-density-physics experiments are also discussed. PMID:19905434

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of viscous fluids with phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2016-04-01

    Film boiling on a horizontal surface is a typical example of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. During the film boiling, phase changes take place at the interface, and thus heat and mass transfer must be taken into consideration in the stability analysis. Moreover, since the vapor layer is not quite thick, a viscous flow must be analyzed. Existing studies assumed equal kinematic viscosities of two fluids, and/or considered thin viscous fluids. The purpose of this study is to derive the analytical dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for more general conditions. The two fluids have different properties. The thickness of the vapor layer is finite, but the liquid layer is thick enough to be nearly semi-infinite in view of perturbation. Initially, the vapor is in equilibrium with the liquid at the interface, and the direction of heat transfer is from the vapor side to the liquid side. In this case, the phase change has a stabilizing effect on the growth rate of the interface. When the vapor layer is thin, there is a coupled effect of the vapor viscosity, phase change, and vapor thickness on the critical wave number. For the other limit of a thick vapor, both the liquid and vapor viscosities influence the critical wave number. Finally, the most unstable wavelength is investigated. When the vapor layer is thin, the most unstable wavelength is not affected by phase change. When the vapor layer is thick, however, it increases with the increasing rate of phase change.

  7. The Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Astrophysical Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This is our first study of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the inner edge of an astrophysical disk around a central back hole. We derive the equations governing small-amplitude oscillations in general relativistic ideal magnetodydrodynamics and obtain a criterion for the onset of the instability. We suggest that static disk configurations where magnetic field is held by the disk material are unstable around a Schwarzschild black hole. On the other hand, we find that such configurations are stabilized by the spacetime rotation around a Kerr black hole. We obtain a crude estimate of the maximum amount of poloidal magnetic flux that can be accumulated around the center, and suggest that it is proportional to the black hole spin. Finally, we discuss the astrophysical implications of our result for the theoretical and observational estimations of the black hole jet power.

  8. Viscous Potential Flow Analysis of Electrohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awasthi Mukesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of tangential electric field has been carried out using viscous potential flow theory. In viscous potential flow theory, viscosity is not zero but viscous term in the Navier- Stokes equation is zero as vorticity is zero. Viscosity enters through normal stress balance and tangential stresses are not considered in viscous flow theory. A dispersion relation has been obtained and stability criterion has been given in the terms of critical value of electric field. It has been observed that tangential electric field influences stability of the system. A comparison between the results obtained by viscous potential analysis and inviscid potential flow has been made and found that viscosity reduces the growth of instability.

  9. Experimental investigation of turbulent mixing by Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key feature of compressible turbulent mixing is the generation of vorticity via the ∇px ∇(1/ρ) term. This source of vorticity is also present in incompressible flows involving the mixing of fluids of different density, for example Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flows. This paper gives a summary of an experimental investigation of turbulent mixing at a plane boundary between two fluids, of densities ρ1, and ρ2. (ρ1 > ρ2) due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The two fluids are near incompressible and mixing occurs when an approximately constant acceleration, g, is applied normal to the interface with direction from fluid 2 to fluid 1. Full details of the experimental programme are given in a set of three reports. Some of the earlier experiments are also described by Read. Previous experimental work and much of the theoretical research has concentrated on studying the growth of the instability from a single wavelength perturbation rather than turbulent mixing. Notable exceptions are published in the Russian literature. A related process, turbulent mixing induced by the passage of shock waves though an interface between fluids of different density is described by Andronov et al. The major purpose of the experiments described here was to study the evolution of the instability from small random perturbations where it is found that large and larger structures appear as time proceeds. A novel technique was used to provide the desired acceleration. The two fluids were enclosed in a rectangular tank, the lighter fluid 2 initially resting on top of the denser fluid 1. One or more rocket motors were then used to drive the tank vertically downwards. The aim of the experimental programme is to provide data for the calibration of a turbulence model used to predict mixing in real situations

  10. Magnetic curvature driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Pokhotelov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of incomplete finite ion Larmor radius (FLR stabilization of the magnetic curvature driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI in low beta plasma with homogeneous ion temperature is investigated. For this purpose a model hydrodynamic description of nonlinear flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales compared to the ion Larmor radius is developed. It is shown that the RTI is not stabilized by FLR effects in a plasma with cold electrons when the ratio of characteristic spatial scale of the plasma inhomogeneity to local effective radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines is larger than 1/4. The crucial role in the absence of the complete FLR stabilization plays the contribution of the compressibility of the polarization part of the ion velocity.

  11. Experimental investigation of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K.S.; Remington, B.A.; Peyser, T.A.; Mikaelian, K.O.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Berning, M.; Wood-Vasey, M.W.

    1996-05-21

    The evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in a compressible medium has been investigated at an accelerating embedded interface and at the ablation front in a series of experiments on the Nova laser. The x-ray drive generated in a gold hohlraum ablatively accelerated a planar target consisting of a doped plastic pusher backed by a higher density titanium payload with perturbations placed at the plastic-Ti interface. The targets were diagnosed by face-on and side-on radiography. In previous work focusing on single mode perturbations, wavelengths as short as 10 m have been observed to grow strongly at the embedded interface. Here multimode perturbations consisting of either 2, 10 or 20 modes superposed in phase have been investigated.

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments in cryogenic deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2005-10-01

    We report on experiments under way at the Omega laser, using cryogenic deuterium to study Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in laser targets. These instabilities are important in astrophysical situations (e.g., mixing of the different shells during a supernova explosion) and in inertial fusion (during the compression stage of a fusion target). They can be studied in small (˜1 mm) shock tubes filled with one heavy and one light material, with an interface between the two materials that is machined to seed the instability. A high-energy laser (˜5 kJ) drives a shock from the heavy to the light material. The evolution of the interface is studied using gated x-ray cameras, where x-ray illumination is obtained from additional laser beams focused on metal backlighter foils. Traditionally the heavy material is CH (1 g/cm^3) doped with I or Br for improved contrast, while the light material is a low-density (˜0.1 g/cm^3) C foam. The goal of the current experiments is to determine if contrast can be improved even further by replacing the foam with cryogenic deuterium, which has a density similar to the foam, but a lower x-ray opacity allowing clearer images, including images taken at late times in the evolution. Work performed under the auspices of the Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48.

  13. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-04-01

    Here, the fundamental problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS), where the two air masses at different temperatures, kept apart initially by a non-conducting horizontal interface in a 2D box, are allowed to mix. Upon removal of the partition, mixing is controlled by RTI, apart from mutual mass, momentum, and energy transfer. To accentuate the instability, the top chamber is filled with the heavier (lower temperature) air, which rests atop the chamber containing lighter air. The partition is positioned initially at mid-height of the box. As the fluid dynamical system considered is completely isolated from outside, the DNS results obtained without using Boussinesq approximation will enable one to study non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a finite reservoir undergoing strong irreversible processes. The barrier is removed impulsively, triggering baroclinic instability by non-alignment of density, and pressure gradient by ambient disturbances via the sharp discontinuity at the interface. Adopted DNS method has dispersion relation preservation properties with neutral stability and does not require any external initial perturbations. The complete inhomogeneous problem with non-periodic, no-slip boundary conditions is studied by solving compressible Navier-Stokes equation, without the Boussinesq approximation. This is important as the temperature difference between the two air masses considered is high enough (Δ T = 70 K) to invalidate Boussinesq approximation. We discuss non-equilibrium thermodynamical aspects of RTI with the help of numerical results for density, vorticity, entropy, energy, and enstrophy.

  14. Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids in un-magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P. K.; Tiwari, A.; Argal, S.; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    The linear Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed compressible Newtonian fluids is discussed with the effect of surface tension which can play important roles in space plasma. As in both the superposed Newtonian fluids, the system is stable for potentially stable case and unstable for potentially unstable case in the present problem also. The equations of the problem are solved by normal mode method and a dispersion relation is obtained for such a system. The behaviour of growth rate is examined in the presence of surface tension and it is found that the surface tension has stabilizing influence on the Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids. Numerical analysis is performed to show the effect of sound velocity and surface tension on the growth rate of Rayleigh Taylor instability. It is found that both parameters have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Rayleigh Taylor instability.

  15. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y. B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 73000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Piriz, A. R., E-mail: roberto.piriz@uclm.es [E.T.S.I. Industriales (Spain); CYTEMA (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    A linear analysis of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between a Newtonian fluid and an elastic-plastic solid is performed by considering a uniform magnetic B{sup →}, parallel to the interface, which has diffused into the fluid but not into the solid. It is found that the magnetic field attributes elastic properties to the viscous fluid which enhance the stability region by stabilizing all the perturbation wavelengths shorter than λ{sub 0}∝B{sup 2} for any initial perturbation amplitude. Longer wavelengths are stabilized by the mechanical properties of the solid provided that the initial perturbation wavelength is smaller than a threshold value determined by the yield strength and the shear modulus of the solid. Beyond this threshold, the amplitude grows initially with a growth rate reduced by the solid strength properties. However, such properties do not affect the asymptotic growth rate which is only determined by the magnetic field and the fluid viscosity. The described physical situation intends to resemble some of the features present in recent experiments involving the magnetic shockless acceleration of flyers plates.

  16. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y. B.; Piriz, A. R.

    2014-07-01

    A linear analysis of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between a Newtonian fluid and an elastic-plastic solid is performed by considering a uniform magnetic B →, parallel to the interface, which has diffused into the fluid but not into the solid. It is found that the magnetic field attributes elastic properties to the viscous fluid which enhance the stability region by stabilizing all the perturbation wavelengths shorter than λ 0 ∝ B 2 for any initial perturbation amplitude. Longer wavelengths are stabilized by the mechanical properties of the solid provided that the initial perturbation wavelength is smaller than a threshold value determined by the yield strength and the shear modulus of the solid. Beyond this threshold, the amplitude grows initially with a growth rate reduced by the solid strength properties. However, such properties do not affect the asymptotic growth rate which is only determined by the magnetic field and the fluid viscosity. The described physical situation intends to resemble some of the features present in recent experiments involving the magnetic shockless acceleration of flyers plates.

  17. The role of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in filament threads

    CERN Document Server

    Terradas, J; Ballester, J L

    2012-01-01

    Many solar filaments and prominences show short-lived horizontal threads lying parallel to the photosphere. In this work the possible link between Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and thread lifetimes is investigated. This is done by calculating the eigenmodes of a thread modelled as a Cartesian slab under the presence of gravity. An analytical dispersion relation is derived using the incompressible assumption for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) perturbations. The system allows a mode that is always stable, independently of the value of the Alfv\\'en speed in the thread. The character of this mode varies from being localised at the upper interface of the slab when the magnetic field is weak, to having a global nature and resembling the transverse kink mode when the magnetic field is strong. On the contrary, the slab model permits another mode that is unstable and localised at the lower interface when the magnetic field is weak. The growth rates of this mode can be very short, of the order of minutes for typical thr...

  18. Three-Dimensional Single-Mode Nonlinear Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, R.; Betti, R.; Sanz, J.; Liu, B.; Frank, A.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (ART) instability is studied in three dimensions for conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion targets. The simulations are performed using our newly developed code ART3D and an astrophysical code AstroBEAR. The laser ablation can suppress the growth of the short-wavelength modes in the linear phase but may enhance their growth in the nonlinear phase because of the vortex-acceleration mechanism. As the mode wavelength approaches the cutoff of the linear spectrum (short-wavelength modes), it is found that the bubble velocity grows faster than predicted in the classical 3-D theory. When compared to 2-D results, 3-D short-wavelength bubbles grow faster and do not reach saturation. The unbounded 3-D bubble acceleration is driven by the unbounded accumulation of vorticity inside the bubble. The vorticity is transferred by mass ablation from the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes into the ablated plasma filling the bubble volume. A density plateau is observed inside a nonlinear ART bubble and the plateau density is higher for shorter-wavelength modes. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  19. Large-eddy-simulation of 3-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability in incompressible fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Lili

    2002-01-01

    [1]Sharp, D. H., An overview of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, Physica D, 1984, 12: 3-18.[2]Baker, G. R., Meiron, D. I., Orszag, S. A., Vortex simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, Phys. Fluids, 1980, 23: 1485-1490.[3]Tryggvason, G., Numerical simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, J. Comput. Phys., 1988, 75: 253-282.[4]Mulder, W., Osher, S., Sethian, J., Computing interface motion in compressible gas dynamics, J. Comput. Phys., 1992, 100: 209-228.[5]Osher, S., Sethian, J., Fronts propagating with curvature-dependent speed: algorithms based on Hamilton-Jacobi formulations, J. Compput. Phys., 1988, 79(1): 12-49.[6]Li, X. L., Study of three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible fluids through level set method and parallel computation, Phys. Fluids, 1993, A(5): 1904-1913.[7]Holmes, R. L, Grove, J. W., Sharp, D. H., Numerical investigation of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using front tracking, J. Fluid Mech., 1995, 301: 51-64.[8]Gardner, C., Glimm, J., McBryan, O. et al., The dynamics of bubble growth for Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interfaces, Phys. Fluids, 1988, 31: 447-465.[9]He Xiaoyi, Chen Shiyi, Zhang Raoyang, A lattice Boltzmann scheme for incompressible multiphase flow and its application in simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, J. Comput Phys., 1999, 152: 642-663.[10]Li, X. L., Jin, B. X., Glimm, J., Numerical study for the three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability through the TVD/AC scheme and parallel computation, J. Comput. Phys., 1996, 126: 343-355.[11]Taylor, G. I., The stability of liquid surface when accelerated in a direction perpendicular to their planes, I, Proc. Roy. Soc., London, 1950, A201: 192-196.[12]Abarzhi, S. I., Stable steady flow in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, Phs. Rev. Lett., 1998, 81: 337-340.[13]Zhang, Q., The motion of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interfaces, IMPACT Comput. Sci. Eng., 1991, 3: 277-389.[14]Deardorff. J. W

  20. Suppressing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with a rotating magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Rannacher, D

    2006-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a magnetic fluid superimposed on a non-magnetic liquid of lower density may be suppressed with the help of a spatially homogeneous magnetic field rotating in the plane of the undisturbed interface. Starting from the complete set of Navier-Stokes equations for both liquids a Floquet analysis is performed which consistently takes into account the viscosities of the fluids. Using experimentally relevant values of the parameters we suggest to use this stabilization mechanism to provide controlled initial conditions for an experimental investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  1. Developpement of a numerical method for Navier-Stokes equations in anelastic approximation: application to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'anelastic' approximation allows us to filter the acoustic waves thanks to an asymptotic development of the Navier-Stokes equations, so increasing the averaged time step, during the numerical simulation of hydrodynamic instabilities development. So, the anelastic equations for a two fluid mixture in case of Rayleigh-Taylor instability are established.The linear stability of Rayleigh-Taylor flow is studied, for the first time, for perfect fluids in the anelastic approximation. We define the Stokes problem resulting from Navier-Stokes equations without the non linear terms (a part of the buoyancy is considered); the ellipticity is demonstrated, the Eigenmodes and the invariance related to the pressure are detailed. The Uzawa's method is extended to the anelastic approximation and shows the decoupling speeds in 3D, the particular case k = 0 and the spurious modes of pressure. Passing to multi-domain allowed to establish the transmission conditions.The algorithms and the implementation in the existing program are validated by comparing the Uzawa's operator in Fortran and Mathematica languages, to an experiment with incompressible fluids and results from anelastic and compressible numerical simulations. The study of the influence of the initial stratification of both fluids on the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is initiated. (author)

  2. Unstable normal mode for Rayleigh--Taylor instability in viscous fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The character of the growth rates of the normal modes for Rayleigh--Taylor instability of superposed incompressible, viscous fluids is analyzed in terms of appropriately scaled dimensionless parameters and a particularly simple representation of the Rayleigh--Taylor dispersion relation. The chief feature that emerges is that the scaled growth rate is remarkably insensitive to the values of fluid densities and viscosities. To within a few percent, the physical growth rate depends only on the surface tension, the density-weighted average viscosity, and the effective acceleration. Approximate formulae for the most unstable wavenumber and the corresponding maximum growth rate are given

  3. A numerical and analytical investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a solid tungsten plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability response of an elastic-plastic tungsten plate is investigated by numerical experiments and an approximate modal analysis. The so-called ''minimum amplitude'' instability criteria derived from plasticity analyses is shown to be incomplete as a general indicator of instability or stability at very large driving pressures. Model equations are derived which are able to reproduce the basic qualitative features of the observed instability response given by the numerical calculations. 11 refs., 29 figs

  4. Intuitive calculation of the relativistic Rayleigh-Taylor instability linear growth rate

    OpenAIRE

    Bret, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is a key process in many fields of Physics ranging from astrophysics to inertial confinement fusion. It is usually analyzed deriving the linearized fluid equations, but the physics behind the instability is not always clear. Recent works on this instability allow for an very intuitive understanding of the phenomenon and for a straightforward calculation of the linear growth rate. In this Letter, it is shown that the same reasoning allows for a direct derivation...

  5. Nonlinear mixing behavior of the three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a decelerating interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported from the first experiments to explore the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from intentionally three-dimensional (3D) initial conditions at an embedded, decelerating interface in a high-Reynolds-number flow. The experiments used ∼5 kJ of laser energy to produce a blast wave in polyimide and/or brominated plastic having an initial pressure of ∼50 Mbars. This blast wave shocked and then decelerated the perturbed interface between the first material and lower-density C foam. This caused the formation of a decelerating interface with an Atwood number ∼2/3, producing a long-term positive growth rate for the RT instability. The initial perturbations were a 3D perturbation in an 'egg-crate' pattern with feature spacings of 71 μm in two orthogonal directions and peak-to-valley amplitudes of 5 μm. The resulting RT spikes appear to overtake the shock waves, moving at a large fraction of the predeceleration, 'free-fall' velocity. This result was unanticipated by prior simulations and models

  6. Investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccardo Bonazza, Mark Anderson, Jason Oakley

    2006-11-03

    The present research program is centered on the experimental and numerical study of two instabilities that develop at the interface between two different fluids when the interface experiences an impulsive or a constant acceleration. The instabilities, called the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability, respectively, adversely affect target implosion in experiments aimed at the achievement of nuclear fusion by inertial confinement by causing the nuclear fuel contained in a target and the shell material to mix, leading to contamination of the fuel, yield reduction or no ignition at all. The laboratory experiments summarized in this report include shock tube experiments to study a shock-accelerated bubble and a shock-accelerated 2-D sinusoidal interface; and experiments based on the use of magnetorheological fluids for the study of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Computational experiments based on the shock tube experimental conditions are also reported.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in Colliding-Plasma-Jet Experiments with Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  8. Simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate of laser accelerated plant target. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel`kov, S.A.; Bondarenko, S.V.; Vinokurov, O.A.; Kochemasov, G.G.; Mkhitarian, L.S.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the research results for the time point when the Rayleigh-Taylor instability converts to the nonlinear stage as well as the computational results for the interaction of two modes of Rayleigh-Taylor instability when initial perturbations are concentrated at the ablation front (problem (a)) and on the rear side (problem (b)) of the plane target. As was shown in the report for the first phase, for a target of 3 {mu}m thick the existence time of the nonlinear stage is extremely low and does not allow to track the evolution pattern. In it was shown that the plane target with {Delta}{sub 0}=5 {mu}m is more preferable for this goal. Therefore all the computations presented here relate to the target with the indicated thickness. The laser pulse parameters are remained unchanged J{sub L}=10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, {lambda}=0.35 {mu}m.

  9. Study on Electrohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Heat and Mass Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Awasthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the interface between two viscous and dielectric fluids in the presence of a tangential electric field has been carried out when there is heat and mass transfer across the interface. In our earlier work, the viscous potential flow analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in presence of tangential electric field was studied. Here, we use another irrotational theory in which the discontinuities in the irrotational tangential velocity and shear stress are eliminated in the global energy balance. Stability criterion is given by critical value of applied electric field as well as critical wave number. Various graphs have been drawn to show the effect of various physical parameters such as electric field, heat transfer coefficient, and vapour fraction on the stability of the system. It has been observed that heat transfer and electric field both have stabilizing effect on the stability of the system.

  10. Mitigation Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Z-Pinch Implosions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孝明; 黄林; 简广德

    2002-01-01

    Based on the framework of magnetohydrodynamic theory, a simple model is proposed to study the mitigation effect of finite Larmor radius on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions. In this model, taking account of Ti ≥ Te in Z-pinch implosions we believe that the magnetohydrodynamic plasma responds to a perturbation (~ exp [i (k. x - ωt)]) at frequency (ω + ik2⊥ρ2iΩi) instead of frequency ω, where k2⊥ρ2i is due to the finite Larmor radius effects expressed from the generalkinetic theory of magnetized plasma. Therefore the linearized continuity and momentum equations for the perturbed mass-density and velocity include the finite Larmor radius effects. The calculations indicate that, in the wavenumber region of interest, the finite Larmor radius effects can mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions.

  11. Influence of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on Liquid Propellant Reorientation in a Low-Gravity Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhang-Guo; LIU Qiu-Sheng; LIU Rong; HU Wei; DENG Xin-Yu

    2009-01-01

    A computational simulation is conducted to investigate the influence of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on liquid propellant reorientation flow dynamics for the tank of CZ-3A launch vehicle series fuel tanks in a low-gravity environment. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) method is used to simulate the free surface flow of gas-liquid. The process of the liquid propellant reorientation started from initially fiat and curved interfaces are numerically studied. These two different initial conditions of the gas-liquid interface result in two modes of liquid flow. It is found that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can be reduced evidently at the initial gas-liquid interface with a high curve during the process of liquid reorientation in a low-gravity environment.

  12. Suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch loads with tailored density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A load structure with a tailored density profile which delays the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability development in imploding Z-pinches by inverting acceleration of the magnetic field/plasma interface was proposed and studied numerically. This approach makes it possible to start gas-puff implosions from large radii (like 8 cm) and produce a significant K-shell yield with current pulse duration of 250 ns and longer. (author). 3 figs., 7 refs

  13. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of ablation fronts in inertial confinement fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lucchio, Laura

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important problems in inertial confinement fusion is how to find a way to mitigate the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability which arises in the ablation front during the compression. In this thesis it is studied in detail the possibility of using for such a purpose the well-known mechanism of dynamic stabilization, already applied to other dynamical systems such as the inverted pendulum. In this context, a periodic acceleration superposed to the background gravity generat...

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor finger instability mixing in hydrodynamic shell convection models

    OpenAIRE

    Mocak, Miroslav; Mueller, Ewald

    2010-01-01

    Mixing processes in stars driven by composition gradients as a result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are not anticipated. They are supported only by hydrodynamic studies of stellar convection. We find that such mixing occurs below the bottom edge of convection zones in our multidimensional hydrodynamic shell convection models. It operates at interfaces created by off-center nuclear burning, where less dense gas with higher mean molecular weight is located above denser gas with a lower mea...

  15. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames II: The Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Type Ia supernova explosion likely begins as a nuclear runaway near the center of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The outward propagating flame is unstable to the Landau-Darrieus, Rayleigh-Taylor, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which serve to accelerate it to a large fraction of the speed of sound. We investigate the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flame at the transition from the flamelet regime to the distributed-burning regime, around densities of 10e7 gm/cc, through detailed, fully resolved simulations. A low Mach number, adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code is used to achieve the necessary resolution and long time scales. As the density is varied, we see a fundamental change in the character of the burning--at the low end of the density range the Rayleigh-Taylor instability dominates the burning, whereas at the high end the burning suppresses the instability. In all cases, significant acceleration of the flame is observed, limited only by the size of the domain we are able to study. We discuss the implications of these results on the potential for a deflagration to detonation transition

  16. Three-dimensional blast-wave-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the effects of long-wavelength modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes experiments exploring the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a blast-wave-driven interface. This experiment is well scaled to the He/H interface during the explosion phase of SN1987A. In the experiments, ∼5 kJ of energy from the Omega laser was used to create a planar blast wave in a plastic disk, which is accelerated into a lower-density foam. These circumstances induce the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and, after the shock passes the interface, the system quickly becomes dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plastic disk has an intentional pattern machined at the plastic/foam interface. This perturbation is 3D with a basic structure of two orthogonal sine waves with a wavelength of 71 μm and an amplitude of 2.5 μm. Additional long-wavelength modes with a wavelength of either 212 or 424 μm are added onto the single-mode pattern. The addition of the long-wavelength modes was motivated by the results of previous experiments where material penetrated unexpectedly to the shock front, perhaps due to an unintended structure. The current experiments and simulations were performed to explore the effects of this unintended structure; however, we were unable to reproduce the previous results.

  17. Theoretical and numerical study of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas; Etude theorique et numerique des instabilites rayleigh-taylor en plasmas magnetises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, A. Ivanov

    2001-06-15

    In this thesis we're studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words - two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external 'pumping' on the instability. These results can be applied to a wide range of systems, starting from classic hydrodynamics and up to astrophysical plasmas. The scheme of wire arrays has become recently a very popular method to obtain a high power X-radiation or for a high quality implosion in Z-pinches. The experimental studies have demonstrated that the results of implosion are much better for the case of multiple thin wires situated cylindrically than in a usual liner scheme. We have examined the problem modeling the stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a wire array system. The reason for instability suppression is the regular spatial modulation of

  18. Two- and three-dimensional behavior of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two- and three-dimensional behavior of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) and Kelvin-Helmholts (K-H) instabilities is examined with a newly developed hydrodynamic code CIP (Cubic Interpolated Pseudoparticle). The mushroom structure owing to the K-H instability is quite different in two and three dimensions. The simulation without gravity show a similar behavior and hence this difference between two and three dimensions does not originate from the R-T instability. This difference cannot be explained by a linear analysis on the K-H instability also. (author)

  19. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of two-dimensional (2D) pre-imposed modulations, and 2D and three-dimensional (3D) modulations imprinted on targets by the nonuniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model (Haan 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812). In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions (Oron et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8 2883). The 3D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate nonlocal thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  20. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of 2-D pre-imposed modulations, and 2-D and 3-D modulations imprinted on targets by the non-uniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3-D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model (Haan S W 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812). In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions (Oron D et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883). The 3-D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2-D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate non-local thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  1. Analytical and numerical analysis of finite amplitude Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiron, D.I.; Saffman, P.G.

    1987-09-18

    We summarize the results obtained in the last year. These include a simple model of bubble competition in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flows which gives results which are in good agreement with experiment. In addition the model has been compared with two dimensional numerical simulations of inviscid Rayleigh-Taylor instability using the cloud-in-cell method. These simulations can now be run into the late time regime and can track the competition of as many as ten bubbles. The improvement in performance over previous applications of the cloud-in-cell approach is due to the application of finite difference techniques designed to handle shock-like structures in the vorticity of the interface which occur at late times. We propose to extend the research carried thus far to Rayleigh-Taylor problems in three dimensional and convergent geometries as well as to two-fluid instabilities in which interface roll-up is observed. Finally we present a budget for the fiscal year 1987-1988. 6 refs.

  2. Analytical and numerical analysis of finite amplitude Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We summarize the results obtained in the last year. These include a simple model of bubble competition in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flows which gives results which are in good agreement with experiment. In addition the model has been compared with two dimensional numerical simulations of inviscid Rayleigh-Taylor instability using the cloud-in-cell method. These simulations can now be run into the late time regime and can track the competition of as many as ten bubbles. The improvement in performance over previous applications of the cloud-in-cell approach is due to the application of finite difference techniques designed to handle shock-like structures in the vorticity of the interface which occur at late times. We propose to extend the research carried thus far to Rayleigh-Taylor problems in three dimensional and convergent geometries as well as to two-fluid instabilities in which interface roll-up is observed. Finally we present a budget for the fiscal year 1987-1988. 6 refs

  3. Granular Rayleigh-Taylor Instability: Experiments and Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Johnsen, Oistein; Flekkoy, Eirik G.; Toussaint, Renaud; Maloy, Knut Jorgen

    2007-01-01

    A granular instability driven by gravity is studied experimentally and numerically. The instability arises as grains fall in a closed Hele-Shaw cell where a layer of dense granular material is positioned above a layer of air. The initially flat front defined by the grains subsequently develops into a pattern of falling granular fingers separated by rising bubbles of air. A transient coarsening of the front is observed right from the start by a finger merging process. The coarsening is later s...

  4. Intuitive calculation of the relativistic Rayleigh-Taylor instability linear growth rate

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, A

    2011-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is a key process in many fields of Physics ranging from astrophysics to inertial confinement fusion. It is usually analyzed deriving the linearized fluid equations, but the physics behind the instability is not always clear. Recent works on this instability allow for an very intuitive understanding of the phenomenon and for a straightforward calculation of the linear growth rate. In this Letter, it is shown that the same reasoning allows for a direct derivation of the relativistic expression of the linear growth rate for an incompressible fluid.

  5. Stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a non-Newtonian incompressible complex plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata - 700 064 (India); Banerjee, D. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2015-03-15

    The stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is investigated in a non-Newtonian unmagnetized dusty plasma with an experimentally verified model of shear flow rate dependent viscosity. It has been found that non-Newtonian property has also a significant role in stabilization of RT instability along with velocity shear stabilization in the short wavelength regime. The effect of the non-Newtonian parameters is more profound in the higher velocity shear rate regime. A detailed study is reported on the role of non-Newtonian effect on RT instability with conventional dust fluid equations using standard numerical eigenvalue analysis.

  6. Theoretical and numerical studies of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type are considered in the thesis. The topic of the thesis was inspired by recent advances in the physics of plasma compression, especially with the aid of systems like Z-pinch. Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) plays an important role in the evolution of magnetized plasmas in these experiments, as well as in stellar plasmas and classic fluids. For the phenomena concerning the nuclear fusion the RTI is very often the factor limiting the possibility of compression. In the current work we try to examine in detail the characteristic features of the instabilities of this type in order to eliminate their detrimental influence. In this thesis we are studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words, two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external 'pumping' on the instability

  7. Theoretical and numerical study of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis we're studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words - two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external 'pumping' on the instability. These results can be applied to a wide range of systems, starting from classic hydrodynamics and up to astrophysical plasmas. The scheme of wire arrays has become recently a very popular method to obtain a high power X-radiation or for a high quality implosion in Z-pinches. The experimental studies have demonstrated that the results of implosion are much better for the case of multiple thin wires situated cylindrically than in a usual liner scheme. We have examined the problem modeling the stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a wire array system. The reason for instability suppression is the regular spatial modulation of the surface plasma

  8. A visualization study of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of flames generated by sudden acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.; Yao, X.; Chomiak, J. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Thermo- and Fluid Dynamics

    1996-07-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomenon occurs in flames when the pressure in the products is higher than in the mixture. The development of this phenomenon in premixed flames was investigated experimentally. A square glass tube for standard flammability limit studies and a methane air mixture were used in the experiment. The flame was accelerated by a falling piston and flame shapes and positions were recorded. Results showed that sudden acceleration does not induce small scale instabilities of flame, contrary to predictions of existing linear theories. The accelerated flames form large scale bubbles which propagate with constant speed relative to the gas. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Elastoplastic Solids: A Local Catastrophic Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimouni, I.; Goyon, J.; Lac, E.; Pringuey, T.; Boujlel, J.; Chateau, X.; Coussot, P.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastoplastic solids takes the form of local perturbations penetrating the material independently of the interface size, in contrast with the theory for simple elastic materials. Then, even just beyond the stable domain, the instability abruptly develops as bursts rapidly moving through the other medium. We show that this is due to the resistance to penetration of a finger which is minimal for a specific finger size and drops to a much lower value beyond a small depth (a few millimeters).

  10. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H; Li, Q X; Shi, B C; Chai, Z H

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) with low Atwood number (A(t)=0.15) in a long square duct (12W × W × W) is studied by using a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) multiphase model. The effect of the Reynolds number on the interfacial dynamics and bubble and spike amplitudes at late time is investigated in detail. The numerical results show that at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, a sequence of stages in the 3D immiscible RTI can be observed, which includes the linear growth, terminal velocity growth, reacceleration, and chaotic development stages. At late stage, the RTI induces a very complicated topology structure of the interface, and an abundance of dissociative drops are also observed in the system. The bubble and spike velocities at late stage are unstable and their values have exceeded the predictions of the potential flow theory [V. N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 134502 (2002)]. The acceleration of the bubble front is also measured and it is found that the normalized acceleration at late time fluctuates around a constant value of 0.16. When the Reynolds number is reduced to small values, some later stages cannot be reached sequentially. The interface becomes relatively smoothed and the bubble velocity at late time is approximate to a constant value, which coincides with the results of the extended Layzer model [S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Rev. E 80, 055302(R) (2009)] and the modified potential theory [R. Banerjee, L. Mandal, S. Roy, M. Khan, and M. R. Guptae, Phys. Plasmas 18, 022109 (2011)]. In our simulations, the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) parallel computing is also used to relieve the massive computational cost. PMID:27078453

  11. Proton Beam Fast Ignition Fusion: Synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The proton beam generation and focusing in fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is studied. The spatial and energy spread of the proton beam generated in a laser-solid interaction is increased due to the synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The focal spot radius can reach 100 μm, which is nearly an order of magnitude larger than the optimal value. The energy spread decreases the beam deposition energy in the focal spot. Under these conditions, ignition of a precompressed DT fuel is achieved with the beam powers much higher than the values presently in consideration. Work supported in part by NIKOLA TESLA Laboratories (Stefan University), La Jolla, CA.

  12. Comprehensive numerical methodology for direct numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckinger, Scott James [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Livescu, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vasilyev, Oleg V. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-09-02

    A comprehensive numerical methodology has been developed that handles the challenges introduced by considering the compressive nature of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) systems, which include sharp interfacial density gradients on strongly stratified background states, acoustic wave generation and removal at computational boundaries, and stratification dependent vorticity production [1]. The computational framework is used to simulate two-dimensional single-mode RTI to extreme late-times for a wide range of flow compressibility and variable density effects. The results show that flow compressibility acts to reduce the growth of RTI for low Atwood numbers, as predicted from linear stability analysis.

  13. Combined effect of horizontal magnetic field and vorticity on Rayleigh Taylor instability

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the height, curvature and velocity of the bubble tip in Rayleigh-Taylor instability at arbitrary Atwood number with horizontal magnetic field are investigated. To support the earlier simulation and experimental results, the vorticity generation inside the bubble is introduced. It is found that, in early nonlinear stage, the temporal evolution of the bubble tip parameters depend essentially on the strength and initial perturbation of the magnetic field, although the asymptotic nature coincides with the non magnetic case. The model proposed here agrees with the previous linear, nonlinear and simulation observations.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in indirect laser drive with rugby-shaped hohlraums; Experiences d'instabilites Rayleigh-Taylor en attaque indirecte avec des cavites rugby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.P.; Richard, A.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2009-07-01

    The mastering of the development of hydrodynamic instabilities like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities is an important milestone on the way to perform efficient laser implosions. The complexity of these instabilities implies an experimental validation of the theoretical models and their computer simulations. An experimental platform involving the Omega laser has allowed us to perform indirect drive with rugby-shaped hohlraums. The experiments have validated the growth of 2- and 3-dimensional initial defects as predicted by theory. We have shown that the 3-dimensional defect saturates for an higher amplitude than the 2-dimensional one does. The experiments have been made by using a plastic shell doped with Germanium (CH:Ge). (A.C.)

  15. Ablative stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in regimes relevant to inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As shown elsewhere an ablatively imploded shell is hydrodynamically unstable, the dominant instability being the well known Rayleigh-Taylor instability with growth rate γ = √Akg where k = 2π/λ is the wave number, g is the acceleration and A the Attwood number (ρhi - ρlo)/(ρhi + ρlo) where ρhi is the density of the heavier fluid and ρlo is the density of the lighter fluid. A theoretical understanding of ablative stabilization has gradually evolved, confirmed over the last five years by experiments. The linear growth is very well understood with excellent agreement between experiment and simulation for planar geometry with wavelengths in the region of 30--100μm. There is an accurate, albeit phenomenological dispersion relation. The non-linear growth has been measured and agrees with calculations. In this lecture, the authors go into the fundamentals of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the experimental measurements that show it is stabilized sufficiently by ablation in regimes relevant to ICF

  16. TWO-DIMENSIONAL BLAST-WAVE-DRIVEN RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY: EXPERIMENT AND SIMULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows results from experiments diagnosing the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with two-dimensional initial conditions at an embedded, decelerating interface. Experiments are performed at the Omega Laser and use ∼5 kJ of energy to create a planar blast wave in a dense, plastic layer that is followed by a lower density foam layer. The single-mode interface has a wavelength of 50 μm and amplitude of 2.5 μm. Some targets are supplemented with additional modes. The interface is shocked then decelerated by the foam layer. This initially produces the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability followed and then dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor growth that quickly evolves into the nonlinear regime. The experimental conditions are scaled to be hydrodynamically similar to SN1987A in order to study the instabilities that are believed to occur at the He/H interface during the blast-wave-driven explosion phase of the star. Simulations of the experiment were performed using the FLASH hydrodynamics code.

  17. Effect of magnetic field on Rayleigh-Taylor instability of quantum and stratified plasma in porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is devoted to an investigation of Quantum effects and magnetic field effects on the Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed incompressible fluids in bounded porous medium. The Quantum magneto hydrodynamic equations are solved by using normal mode method and a dispersion relation is obtained. The dispersion relation is derived for the case where plasma is bounded by two rigid planes z = 0 and z = h. The Rayleigh Taylor instability growth rate and stability condition of the medium is discussed in the presence of quantum effect, magnetic field, porosity and permeability. It is found that the magnetic field and medium porosity have stabilizing influence while permeability has destabilizing influence on the Rayleigh Taylor instability. (author)

  18. Assembling Stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability by the Effects of Finite Larmor Radius and Sheared Axial Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Guangde; Huang Lin; Qiu Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    The assembling stabilizing effect of the finite Larmor radius (FLR) and the sheared axial flow (SAF) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions is studied by means of the incompressible finite Larmor radius magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The finite Larmor radius effects are introduced in the momentum equation with the sheared axial flow through an anisotropic ion stress tensor. In this paper a linear mode equation is derived that is valid for arbitrary kL, where k is the wave number and L is the plasma shell thickness. Numerical solutions are presented. The results indicate that the short-wavelength modes of the RayleighTaylor instability are easily stabilized by the individual effect of the finite Larmor radius or the sheared axial flow. The assembling effects of the finite Larmor radius and sheared axial flow can heavily mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and the unstable region can be compressed considerably.

  19. Nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimonte, G

    1998-11-01

    Scaled experiments on the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh- Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities are described under a variety, of conditions that occur in nature. At high Reynolds number, the mixing layer grows self-similarly - {alpha}{sub i}Agt{sup 2} for a constant acceleration (g), and as a power law t{sup {theta}{sub i}} for impulsive accelerations U{delta}(t) at low and high Mach numbers. The growth coefficients {alpha}{sub i} and {theta}{sub i} exponents are measured over a comprehensive range of Atwood numbers A. The RT instability is also investigated with Non- Newtonian materials which are independently characterized. A critical wavelength and amplitude for instability is observed associated with the shear modulus and tensile yield of the material. The results are applicable from supernova explosions to geophysical flows subject to these hydrodynamic instabilities.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2013-03-21

    In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

  1. Development of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in presence of magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Manoranjan; Banerjee, Rahul; Roy, Sourav; Gupta, M R

    2011-01-01

    Fluid instabilities like Rayleigh-Taylor,Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can occur in a wide range of physical phenomenon from astrophysical context to Inertial Confinement Fusion(ICF).Using Layzer's potential flow model, we derive the analytical expressions of growth rate of bubble and spike for ideal magnetized fluid in R-T and R-M cases. In presence of transverse magnetic field the R-M and R-T instability are suppressed or enhanced depending on the direction of magnetic pressure and hydrodynamic pressure. Again the interface of two fluid may oscillate if both the fluids are conducting. However the magnetic field has no effect in linear case.

  2. Experiments on the rarefaction wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability initiated with a random initial perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    Experiments are presented in which a diffuse interface between two gases is accelerated to become Rayleigh-Taylor unstable. The initially flat interface is generated by the opposing flow of two test gases at matched volumetric flow rates exiting through small holes in the test section. A random, three-dimensional interface perturbation is forced using a loudspeaker. The interface is then accelerated by an expansion wave which is generated by the rupturing of a diaphragm separating the heavy gas from a vacuum tank evacuated to ~0.01 atm. The expansion wave generates a large (of order 1000 g), non-constant acceleration acting on the interface causing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Planar Mie scattering is employed to visualize the flow using a planar laser sheet generated at the top of the apparatus, which illuminates smoke particles seeded in the heavy gas. The scattered light is then recorded using a CMOS camera operating at 12 kHz. The mixing layer width is obtained from an ensemble of experiments and the turbulent growth parameter α is extracted and compared with previous experiments and simulations.

  3. Stabilization of Viscosity on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Z Pinches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孝明; 黄林; 简广德

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of incompressible viscid magnetohydrodynamic equations, a formula is developed to study the mitigation of viscosity on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z pinches. The results indicate that in the whole wavenumber region, the viscosity effect can mitigate the instability. In addition, we compare the viscosity effect with the finite Larmor radius effect [Chin. Phys. Lett. 19 (2002) 217], and the calculation results show that in the temperature region of interest, the former is stronger than the latter. Moreover, for heavy wire-array implosion the viscosity effect is stronger than the finite Larmor radius one, because the former is proportional to m1/2i and the latter is independent of mi.

  4. The effect of normal electric field on the evolution of immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Nima; Ozbulut, Murat; Feng, James J.; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    Manipulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using an external electric field has been the subject of many studies. However, most of these studies are focused on early stages of the evolution. In this work, the long-term evolution of the instability is investigated, focusing on the forces acting on the interface between the two fluids. To this end, numerical simulations are carried out at various electric permittivity and conductivity ratios as well as electric field intensities using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. The electric field is applied in parallel to gravity to maintain unstable evolution. The results show that increasing top-to-bottom permittivity ratio increases the rising velocity of the bubble while hindering the spike descent. The opposite trend is observed for increasing top-to-bottom conductivity ratio. These effects are amplified at larger electric field intensities, resulting in narrower structures as the response to the excitation is non-uniform along the interface.

  5. Two-dimensional simulation of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an imploding foil plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional (r-z) magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the electromagnetic implosion of metallic foil plasmas show, for certain initial configurations, a tendency to develop large-amplitude perturbations characteristic of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. These perturbations develop at the plasma magnetic field interface for plasma configurations where the density gradient scale length, the characteristic dimension for the instability, is short. The effects on the plasma dynamics of the implosion will be discussed for several initial foil configurations. In general, the growth rates and linear mode structure are found to be influenced by the plasma shell thickness and density gradient scale length, in agreement with theory. The most destructive modes are found to be those with wavelengths of the order of the plasma shell thickness

  6. On the analogy between nonlinear stage of modulational instability in a nonuniform plasma and Rayleigh-Taylor instability of rotating shallow water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-similar solutions describing the evolution of rounding nonlinear waves in a nonuniform plasma and the dynamics of final amplitude drops under Rayleigh-Taylor instability of rotating shallow water are constructed. 4 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Self-consistent cutoff wave number of the ablative Rayleigh--Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cutoff wave number of the ablative Rayleigh--Taylor instability is calculated self-consistently by including the effects of finite thermal conduction. The derived cutoff wave number is quite different from the one obtained with the incompressible fluid (∇·v=0) or sharp boundary models, and it is strongly dependent on thermal conductivity (K∼Tν) and the Froude number (Fr). The derivation is carried out for values of ν>1, Fr>1, and it is valid for some regimes of interest to direct and indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The analytic formula for the cutoff wave number is in excellent agreement with the numerical results of Kull [Phys. Fluids B 1, 170 (1989)]. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. Non-linear Evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in a Radiation Supported Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James

    2012-01-01

    The non-linear regime of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a radiation supported atmosphere, consisting of two uniform fluids with different densities, is studied numerically. We perform simulations using our recently developed numerical algorithm for multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics based on a variable Eddington tensor as implemented in Athena, focusing on the regime where scattering opacity greatly exceeds absorption opacity. We find that the radiation field can reduce the growth and mixing rate of RTI, but this reduction is only significant when radiation pressure significantly exceeds gas pressure. Small scale structures are also suppressed in this case. In the non-linear regime, dense fingers sink faster than rarefied bubbles can rise, leading to asymmetric structures about the interface. By comparing the calculations that use a variable Eddington tensor (VET) versus the Eddington approximation, we demonstrate that anisotropy in the radiation field can affect the non-linear development of RTI...

  9. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability for inviscid and viscous fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, K.; Forbes, L. K.

    2011-05-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability arises whenever two fluids with different densities are arranged such that the heavier fluid sits above the lighter fluid, with a sharp interface in between. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability has the further complication due to the presence of a magnetic field throughout both media. The two fluids in question may also have differing magnetic properties, such as the magnetic permeability. When the fluids in consideration are in fact plasmas comprised of charged particles, induced currents, magnetic fields, and Lorentz forces can all act in ways that will affect the stability of the system. Stable base flows exist for the 2D case, and small sinusoidal disturbances to the base flow will grow in the unstable scenario. The numerical method described in this paper calculates the growth of the interface in the nonlinear regime, since closed form solutions are obtained only in the linear approximation. Through the analysis of both the fluid and magnetic vorticities and streamfunctions, the simulated results can be explained from the principles of magnetohydrodynamics. A range of simulations is presented, looking at cases with different initial conditions, cases with strong and weak magnetic fields, and cases with magnetic fields oriented at different angles relative to the interface of the two fluids. It is shown in particular how different initial conditions give rise to outcomes that are very different in terms of the geometry of the interface between the two fluids, primarily the differences between a single mode disturbance and a multimode disturbance to the interface at time t = 0.

  10. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability for inviscid and viscous fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability arises whenever two fluids with different densities are arranged such that the heavier fluid sits above the lighter fluid, with a sharp interface in between. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability has the further complication due to the presence of a magnetic field throughout both media. The two fluids in question may also have differing magnetic properties, such as the magnetic permeability. When the fluids in consideration are in fact plasmas comprised of charged particles, induced currents, magnetic fields, and Lorentz forces can all act in ways that will affect the stability of the system. Stable base flows exist for the 2D case, and small sinusoidal disturbances to the base flow will grow in the unstable scenario. The numerical method described in this paper calculates the growth of the interface in the nonlinear regime, since closed form solutions are obtained only in the linear approximation. Through the analysis of both the fluid and magnetic vorticities and streamfunctions, the simulated results can be explained from the principles of magnetohydrodynamics. A range of simulations is presented, looking at cases with different initial conditions, cases with strong and weak magnetic fields, and cases with magnetic fields oriented at different angles relative to the interface of the two fluids. It is shown in particular how different initial conditions give rise to outcomes that are very different in terms of the geometry of the interface between the two fluids, primarily the differences between a single mode disturbance and a multimode disturbance to the interface at time t = 0.

  11. Numerical study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the lightning return stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bin; Shi, Lihua; Yi, Yun; Wang, Yangyang

    2015-09-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities are important hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena that are found in systems in high energy density physics and normal fluids. The formation and evolution of the R-T instability at channel boundary during back-flow of the lightning return stroke are analyzed using the linear perturbation theory and normal mode analysis methods, and the linear growth rate of the R-T instability in typical condition for lightning return stroke channel is obtained. Then, the R-T instability phenomena of lightning return stroke are simulated using a two-dimensional Eulerian finite volumes resistive radiation MHD code. The numerical results show that the evolution characteristics of the R-T instability in the early stage of back-flow are consistent with theoretical predictions obtained by linear analysis. The simulation also yields more evolution characteristics for the R-T instability beyond the linear theory. The results of this work apply to some observed features of the return stroke channel and further advance previous theoretical and experimental work.

  12. Numerical study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the lightning return stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiang, E-mail: cq0405@126.com [National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment and Electro-optical Engineering, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Luoyang Electronic Equipment Testing Center, Luoyang 471000 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: emcchen@163.com; Shi, Lihua; Yi, Yun [National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment and Electro-optical Engineering, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Wang, Yangyang [Department of Electro-optical Engineering, Electronic Engineering Institute of PLA, Hefei 230037 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities are important hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena that are found in systems in high energy density physics and normal fluids. The formation and evolution of the R-T instability at channel boundary during back-flow of the lightning return stroke are analyzed using the linear perturbation theory and normal mode analysis methods, and the linear growth rate of the R-T instability in typical condition for lightning return stroke channel is obtained. Then, the R-T instability phenomena of lightning return stroke are simulated using a two-dimensional Eulerian finite volumes resistive radiation MHD code. The numerical results show that the evolution characteristics of the R-T instability in the early stage of back-flow are consistent with theoretical predictions obtained by linear analysis. The simulation also yields more evolution characteristics for the R-T instability beyond the linear theory. The results of this work apply to some observed features of the return stroke channel and further advance previous theoretical and experimental work.

  13. Numerical study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the lightning return stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities are important hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena that are found in systems in high energy density physics and normal fluids. The formation and evolution of the R-T instability at channel boundary during back-flow of the lightning return stroke are analyzed using the linear perturbation theory and normal mode analysis methods, and the linear growth rate of the R-T instability in typical condition for lightning return stroke channel is obtained. Then, the R-T instability phenomena of lightning return stroke are simulated using a two-dimensional Eulerian finite volumes resistive radiation MHD code. The numerical results show that the evolution characteristics of the R-T instability in the early stage of back-flow are consistent with theoretical predictions obtained by linear analysis. The simulation also yields more evolution characteristics for the R-T instability beyond the linear theory. The results of this work apply to some observed features of the return stroke channel and further advance previous theoretical and experimental work

  14. Numerical study of particle-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Effects of particle settling and entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Ju; Shao, Yun-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which the density stratification is caused by the suspension of particles in liquid flows using the conventional single-phase model and Euler-Lagrange (EL) two-phase model. The single-phase model is valid only when the particles are small and number densities are large, such that the continuum approximation applies. The present single-phase results show that the constant settling of the particle concentration restricts the lateral development of the vortex ring, which results in a decrease of the rising speed of the Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles. The EL model enables the investigation of particle-flow interaction and the influence of particle entrainment, resulting from local non-uniformity in the particle distribution. We compare bubble dynamics in the single-phase and EL cases, and our results show that the deviation between the two cases becomes more pronounced when the particle size increases. The main mechanism responsible for the deviation is particle entrainment, which can only be resolved in the EL model. We provide a theoretical argument for the small-scale local entrainment resulting from the local velocity shear and non-uniformity of the particle concentration. The theoretical argument is supported by numerical evidence. Energy budget analysis is also performed and shows that potential energy is released due to the interphase drag and buoyant effect. The buoyant effect, which results in the transformation of potential energy into kinetic energy and shear dissipation, plays a key role in settling enhancement. We also find that particle entrainment increases the shear dissipation, which in turn enhances the release of potential energy.

  15. Simulating the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in polymer fluids with dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanggui; Geng, Xingguo; Zhuang, Xin; Wang, Lihua; Ouyang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability that occurs in the flow of polymer fluids is numerically investigated with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method at the mesoscale particle level. For modeling two-phase flow, the Flory-Huggins parameter is introduced to model binary fluids. And the polymer chains in fluids are described by the modified FENE model that depicts both the elastic tension and the elastic repulsion between the adjacent beads with bond length as the equilibrium length of one segment. Besides, a bead repulsive potential is employed to capture entanglements between polymer chains. Through our model and numerical simulation, we research the dynamics behaviors of the RT instability in polymer fluid medium. Furthermore, we also explore the effects of polymer volume concentration, chain length, and extensibility on the evolution of RT instability. These simulation results show that increasing any of the parameters, concentration, chain length, and extensibility, the saturation length of spikes becomes longer, and the two polymer fluids have less mixture. On the contrary, for the case of low concentration, or short chain, or small extensibility, the spikes easily split and break up, and the RT instability pattern evolves into chaotic structure. These observations indicate that the polymer and its properties drastically modify the RT instability pattern.

  16. Observation of Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in a Plasma Regime Expected to Provide Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Colin S; Hsu, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    We present time-resolved observations of Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth at the interface between an unmagnetized plasma jet colliding with a stagnated, magnetized plasma. The observed instability growth time ($\\sim 10$ $\\mu$s) is consistent with the estimated linear Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate calculated using experimentally inferred values of density ($\\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$) and acceleration ($10^9$ m/s$^2$). The observed instability wavelengths ($\\gtrsim 1$ cm) are consistent with stabilization of short wavelengths by a magnetic field of the experimentally measured magnitude ($\\sim 15$ G) and direction. Comparisons of data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization.

  17. Experimental Studies of the Electrothermal and Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities on Thin Metal Foil Ablations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Adam; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Patel, Sonal; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) and magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability (MRT) are important in the implosion of metallic liners, such as magnetized liner implosion fusion (MagLIF). The MAIZE linear transformer driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan generates 200 ns risetime-current pulses of 500 to 600 kA into Al foil liners to study plasma instabilities and implosion dynamics, most recently MRT growth on imploding cylindrical liners. A full circuit model of MAIZE, along with I-V measurements, yields time-resolved load inductance. This has enabled measurements of an effective current-carrying radius to determine implosion velocity and plasma-vacuum interface acceleration. Measurements are also compared to implosion data from 4-time-frame laser shadowgraphy. Improved resolution measurements on the laser shadowgraph system have been used to examine the liner interface early in the shot to examine surface perturbations resulting from ETI for various seeding conditions. Fourier analysis examines the growth rates of wavelength bands of these structures to examine the transition from ETI to MRT. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE through award DE-SC0012328. S.G. Patel is supported by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager is supported by NSF fellowship grant DGE 1256260.

  18. Effect of FLR and rotation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of two component plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability of superposed magnetized fluids is investigated in a partially ionized medium. The fluid has ionized and neutralized particles components interacting with each other by collisions. The effect of rotation in the horizontal directions also included in this R-T problem. The usual magnetohydrodynamic equations are modified for finite Larmor radius corrections which is in the form of tensor. The permeability of medium is also included in the equation. The relevant linearized perturbation equation are taken and using normal mode analysis the general relation is obtained. The dispersion relation for two superimposed fluids of different densities is derived. The dispersion relation shows that the growth rate of unstable system is reduced due to FLR corrections, rotation and collisional frequency of the neutrals. The dispersions relation gives no effect of magnetic field because horizontal magnetic field has no role in the R-T instability. The condition of instability remains unaffected by the permeability of porous medium, pressure of neutral particles in the fluids and rotation. (author)

  19. Investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccardo Bonazza

    2006-03-09

    The present research program is centered on the experimental and numerical study of two instabilities that develop at the interface between two different fluids when the interface experiences an impulsive or a constant acceleration. The instabilities, called the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability, respectively (RMI and RTI), adversely affect target implosion in experiments aimed at the achievement of nuclear fusion by inertial confinement by causing the nuclear fuel contained in a target and the ablated shell material to mix, leading to contamination of the fuel, yield reduction or no ignition at all. Specifically, our work is articulated in three main directions: study of impulsively accelerated spherical gas inhomogeneities; study of impulsively accelerated 2-D interfaces; study of a liquid interface under the action of gravity. The objectives common to all three activities are to learn some physics directly from our experiments and calculations; and to develop a database at previously untested conditions to be used to calibrate and verify some of the computational tools being developed within the RTI/RMI community at the national laboratories and the ASCI centers.

  20. Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability mitigation in large-diameter gas puff Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a new approach for efficiently generating K-shell x-rays in large-diameter, long-implosion time, structured argon gas Z-pinches has been demonstrated based on a 'pusher-stabilizer-radiator' model. In this paper, direct observations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mitigation of a 12-cm diameter, 200-ns implosion time argon Z-pinch using a laser shearing interferometer (LSI) and a laser wavefront analyzer (LWA) are presented. Using a zero-dimensional snowplow model, the imploding plasma trajectories are calculated with the driver current waveforms and the initial mass distributions measured using the planar laser induced fluorescence method. From the LSI and LWA images, the plasma density and trajectory during the implosion are measured. The measured trajectory agrees with the snowplow calculations. The suppression of hydromagnetic instabilities in the ''pusher-stabilizer-radiator'' structured loads, leading to a high-compression ratio, high-yield Z-pinch, is discussed. For comparison, the LSI and LWA images of an alternative load (without stabilizer) show the evolution of a highly unstable Z-pinch

  1. Effect of magnetic field on temporal development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced interfacial nonlinear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, M R; Roy, Sourav; Khan, Manoranjan

    2011-01-01

    The effect of magnetic field on the nonlinear growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced two fluid interfacial structures has been investigated. The magnetic field is assumed to be parallel to the plane of the two fluid interface and acts in a direction perpendicular to the wave vector. If magnetic field is restricted only to either side of the interface the growth rate may be depressed (may almost disappear) or be enhanced depending on whether the magnetic pressure on the interface opposes the instability driving pressure difference g({\\rho}h - {\\rho}l)y or acts in the same direction. If magnetic field is present on both sides of the two fluid interface, stabilization may also take place in the sense that the surface of separation undulates periodically when the force due to magnetic pressure on two sides are such as to act in opposite direction. This result differs from the classical linear theory result which predicts that the magnetic field parallel to the surface has no influence on the growth ra...

  2. Hydrodynamic Scaling of the Deceleration-Phase Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, A.; Nora, R.; Woo, K.; Betti, R.

    2013-10-01

    A 2-D study of the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth is carried out to assess how the yield-over-clean (YOC) varies in hydro-equivalent implosions. Hydro-equivalent implosions exhibit equal implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity. The YOC indicates the effects of hydrodynamic instabilities on inertial fusion capsule implosions. While the classical RT instability follows the laws of hydrodynamic similarity (the same growth factor for hydro-equivalent implosions), the effects of ablation and thermal transport in the hot spot cause a deviation from similarity. We present analytic and numerical calculations of the RT growth factors in hydro-equivalent implosions with target sizes varying from typical OMEGA to NIF-scale targets. Theoretical scaling suggests that the deceleration-phase Atwood number and ablation velocity is different for OMEGA and the NIF, yielding growth factors that are dependent on the target size. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (Fusion Science Center).

  3. Contribution to modelization and simulation of the ablative-like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities for ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the dynamics of accelerated ablative front spreading in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments. ICF is designed for the implosion of a deuterium-tritium spherical target. The outer shell, the ablator, is irradiated providing a high level pressure inside the target. During this first stage, the ablation front propagating inwards is perturbed by hydrodynamics instabilities, which can prevent the fusion reaction in the decelerated stage. We propose here a study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during ablation process, in the two dimensional case. In order to obtain a numerical solution, we perform an asymptotic analysis in the limit of a high temperature ratio, between the remaining cold ablator and the hot ablated plasma. This study is divided in two steps. First, the thermo-diffusive part of the set of equations is approximated by a Hele-Shaw model, which is then perturbed by the hydrodynamics part. Using a vortex method, we have to solve the advection of a vortical sheet moving with the ablation front. We compute the numerical solution on an Eulerian mesh coupled with a marker method. The thermal part is computed by implementing the Fat Boundary Method, recently developed. The hydrodynamic part is obtained from a Finite Volume scheme. (author)

  4. Influence of gradual density transition and nonlinear saturation on Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear theory of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at a density profile which varies exponentially between regions of constant density is discussed in detail. The exact theory provides an approximate but conservative simple formula for the growth constant and it shows that a hitherto widely used theory erroneously underestimates the growth constant. A simple but effective ''synthetical model'' of nonlinear bubble growth is obtained from a synthesis of linear theory and constant terminal bubble speed. It is applied to pusher shell break-up in an inertial confinement fusion pellet to determine the maximum allowable initial perturbations and the most dangerous wavelength. In a situation typical of heavy ion drivers it is found that the allowable initial perturbations are increased by a few orders of magnitude by the gradual density transition and another order of magnitude by nonlinear saturation of the bubble speed. The gradual density transition also shifts the most dangerous wavelength from about once to about four times the minimum pusher shell thickness. The following topics are treated briefly: Reasons conflicting with use of the synthetical model to decide whether the pusher shell in a certain simulation will be broken up; other nonlinear theories available in the literature; further realistic effects that might aggravate instability growth. (orig.)

  5. Evidence for a Bubble-Competition Regime in Indirectly Driven Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Experiments on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Kane, J. O.; Casner, A.; Liberatore, S.; Masse, L. P.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes. A planar plastic package with preimposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130 μ m thick foil. Measurements of the modulation optical density performed by x-ray radiography show that a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at an ablation front is achieved for the first time in indirect drive. The mutimode modulation amplitudes are in the nonlinear regime, grow beyond the Haan multimode saturation level, evolve toward the longer wavelengths, and show insensitivity to the initial conditions.

  6. Crossover between Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and turbulent cascading atomization mechanism in the bag-breakup regime

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbert, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The question whether liquid atomization (or pulverization) resorts to instability dynamics (through refinements of Rayleigh-Plateau, Rayleigh-Taylor or Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism) or to turbulent cascades similar to Richardson and Kolmogorov first ideas seems to be still open. In this paper, we report experimental evidences that both mechanisms are needed to explain the spray drop PDF obtained from an industrial nozzle. Instability of Rayleigh-Taylor kind governs the size of the largest droplets while the smallest ones obey a PDF given by a turbulent cascading mechanism resulting in a log-L\\'evy stable law of stability parameter close to 1.68. This value, very close to the inverse of the Flory exponent, can be related to a recent model for intermittency modeling stemming from self-avoiding random vortex stretching.

  7. Experimental Observation of Nonlinear Mode Coupling In the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, David

    2015-11-01

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the transition from linear to highly nonlinear regimes. This work is part of the Discovery Science Program on NIF and of particular importance to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where careful attention to the form of the rise to final peak drive is calculated to prevent the RT instability from shredding the ablator in-flight and leading to ablator mixing into the cold fuel. The growth of the ablative RT instability was investigated using a planar plastic foil with pre-imposed two-dimensional broadband modulations and diagnosed using x-ray radiography. The foil was accelerated for 12ns by the x-ray drive created in a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. The dependence on initial conditions was investigated by systematically changing the modulation amplitude, ablator material and the modulation pattern. For each of these cases bubble mergers were observed and the nonlinear evolution of the RT instability showed insensitivity to the initial conditions. This experiment provides critical data needed to validate current theories on the ablative RT instability for indirect drive that relies on the ablative stabilization of short-scale modulations for ICF ignition. This paper will compare the experimental data to the current nonlinear theories. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  8. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Gerashchenko, S

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in the presence of a background temperature gradient, $\\Theta$, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of $\\Theta$ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, $At$, and, when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of a large $\\Theta$. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and $\\Theta=0$. Compared to $\\Theta=0$ case, the role of $\\Theta0$ (col...

  9. Evolution of mixing width induced by general Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, You-sheng; He, Zhi-wei; Gao, Fu-jie; Li, Xin-liang; Tian, Bao-lin

    2016-06-01

    Turbulent mixing induced by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs ubiquitously in many natural phenomena and engineering applications. As the simplest and primary descriptor of the mixing process, the evolution of mixing width of the mixing zone plays a notable role in the flows. The flows generally involve complex varying acceleration histories and widely varying density ratios, two dominant factors affecting the evolution of mixing width. However, no satisfactory theory for predicting the evolution has yet been established. Here a theory determining the evolution of mixing width in general RT flows is established to reproduce, first, all of the documented experiments conducted for diverse (i.e., constant, impulsive, oscillating, decreasing, increasing, and complex) acceleration histories and all density ratios. The theory is established in terms of the conservation principle, with special consideration given to the asymmetry of the volume-averaged density fields occurring in actual flows. The results reveal the sensitivity or insensitivity of the evolution of a mixing front of a neighboring light or heavy fluid to the degree of asymmetry and thus explain the distinct evolutions in two experiments with the same configurations.

  10. Numerical Experiments with a Turbulent Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation is a powerful tool for studying turbulent flows. Unfortunately, it is also computationally expensive and often beyond the reach of the largest, fastest computers. Consequently, a variety of turbulence models have been devised to allow tractable and affordable simulations of averaged flow fields. Unfortunately, these present a variety of practical difficulties, including the incorporation of varying degrees of empiricism and phenomenology, which leads to a lack of universality. This unsatisfactory state of affairs has led to the speculation that one can avoid the expense and bother of using a turbulence model by relying on the grid and numerical diffusion of the computational fluid dynamics algorithm to introduce a spectral cutoff on the flow field and to provide dissipation at the grid scale, thereby mimicking two main effects of a large eddy simulation model. This paper shows numerical examples of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which this procedure produces questionable results. We then show a dramatic improvement when two simple subgrid-scale models are employed. This study also illustrates the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions that is a common feature of turbulent flows.

  11. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in non-uniform magnetized rotating strongly coupled viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, R. P.

    2016-02-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in an incompressible strongly coupled viscoelastic fluid is investigated considering the effects of inhomogeneous magnetic field, density gradient, and uniform rotation. The generalized hydrodynamic equations have been formulated, and linear dispersion relation is derived taking appropriate density and magnetic field profiles for the considered system. The gravity induced stable and unstable configurations of RTI are analyzed in hydrodynamic and kinetic limits. In the kinetic limit, shear wave modified dispersion relation and the condition of RTI are derived in terms of magnetic-viscoelastic Mach number and viscoelastic Froude number. The criteria of RTI and critical wavenumber for the growth of RTI to be unstable are estimated numerically for white dwarf and inertial confinement fusion target. It is observed that magnetic field, rotation, and viscoelastic effects play a significant role in the suppression of RTI in these systems. The stabilizing influence of magnetic field, rotation, and magnetic-viscoelastic Mach number while the destabilizing influence of viscoelastic Froude on the growth rate of RTI number is observed graphically. The growth rate of RTI decreases faster in kinetic limit as compared to the hydrodynamic limit.

  12. A numerical study of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in aluminum and steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SCRAM code is applied to the study of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in metal plates, and comparisons of these computer results are made with experimental data for 1100-O aluminum, 6061-T6 aluminum and 304 stainless steel. Various models for the pressure, temperature, and strain-rate dependencies of the flow stress are compared in the computer calculations. The coefficients that are required in these models to give good agreement with the experimental results are generally close to values that were determined from previous experimental comparisons. The sensitivity of the computed results to modeling parameters, to variations in the hardening modulus, and to the amplitude and wavelength of the perturbations in the plate surface is examined. Very little growth in amplitude occurs if either the initial amplitude or the wavelength is sufficiently small. The growth rate increases monotonically with increasing initial amplitude. There appears to exist a wavelength of maximum growth, such that the growth rate increases rapidly with wavelength up to this wavelength, but then decreases slowly as the wavelength is further increased

  13. Comprehensive numerical methodology for direct numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckinger, Scott J.; Livescu, Daniel; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2016-05-01

    An investigation of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) requires efficient numerical methods, advanced boundary conditions, and consistent initialization in order to capture the wide range of scales and vortex dynamics present in the system, while reducing the computational impact associated with acoustic wave generation and the subsequent interaction with the flow. An advanced computational framework is presented that handles the challenges introduced by considering the compressive nature of RTI systems, which include sharp interfacial density gradients on strongly stratified background states, acoustic wave generation and removal at computational boundaries, and stratification dependent vorticity production. The foundation of the numerical methodology described here is the wavelet-based grid adaptivity of the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM) that maintains symmetry in single-mode RTI systems to extreme late-times. PAWCM is combined with a consistent initialization, which reduces the generation of acoustic disturbances, and effective boundary treatments, which prevent acoustic reflections. A dynamic time integration scheme that can handle highly nonlinear and potentially stiff systems, such as compressible RTI, completes the computational framework. The numerical methodology is used to simulate two-dimensional single-mode RTI to extreme late-times for a wide range of flow compressibility and variable density effects. The results show that flow compressibility acts to reduce the growth of RTI for low Atwood numbers, as predicted from linear stability analysis.

  14. Bubble merger model for the nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven by a strong blast wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bubble merger model is presented for the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven by a strong blast wave. Single bubble motion is determined by an extension of previous buoyancy-drag models extended to the blast-wave-driven case, and a simple bubble merger law in the spirit of the Sharp-Wheeler model allows for the generation of larger scales. The blast-wave-driven case differs in several respects from the classical case of incompressible fluids in a uniform gravitational field. Because of material decompression in the rarefaction behind the blast front, the asymptotic bubble velocity and the merger time depend on time as well as the transverse scale and the drive. For planar blast waves, this precludes the emergence of a self-similar regime independent of the initial conditions. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for the establishment of the self-similar state, but its establishment requires a very high initial characteristic mode number and a high Mach number for the incident blast wave

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible fluids: Final report for the period 1 October 1985-30 September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research program is to investigate fluid dynamic instabilities and mixing initiated by the interaction of shock waves with interfaces between light and heavy gases. In particular, the nonlinear stage of shock-initiated Rayleigh-Taylor instability (also known as the Richtmeyer-Meshkov instability), the secondary instabilities (e.g., the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) arising therefrom and the resulting mixing of the two gases are of interest. This report describes activities during the performance period 1 October 1985 to 30 September 1986

  16. The Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Karkhanis, Varad; Banerjee, Rahul; Varshochi, Hilda; Khan, Manoranjan; Lawrie, Andrew; Variable g RT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    From detailed numerical simulations of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories, we report on several findings of relevance to the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules. The incompressible, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) were performed in two- and three-dimensions, and over a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We have investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles g(t) of the general form tn, with n > -2. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations are compared with a potential flow model developed and reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with an extension to the drag buoyancy model with modifications for time-dependent acceleration histories. We have come up with simple analytic solutions to the Drag Buoyancy model for variable g flows, and compared the solution with the 2D and 3D DNS results. This work was supported in part by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA2-5396.

  17. The feed-out process: Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in thin, laser-driven foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smitherman, D.P.

    1998-04-01

    Eight beams carrying a shaped pulse from the NOVA laser were focused into a hohlraum with a total energy of about 25 kJ. A planar foil was placed on the side of the hohlraum with perturbations facing away from the hohlraum. All perturbations were 4 {micro}m in amplitude and 50 {micro}m in wavelength. Three foils of pure aluminum were shot with thicknesses and pulse lengths respectively of 86 {micro}m and 2. 2 ns, 50 {micro}m and 4.5 ns, and 35 {micro}m with both 2.2 ns and 4. 5 ns pulses. Two composite foils constructed respectively of 32 and 84 {micro}m aluminum on the ablative side and 10 {micro}m beryllium on the cold surface were also shot using the 2.2 ns pulse. X-ray framing cameras recorded perturbation growth using both face- and side-on radiography. The LASNEX code was used to model the experiments. A shock wave interacted with the perturbation on the cold surface generating growth from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and a strong acoustic mode. The cold surface perturbation fed-out to the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable ablation surface, both by differential acceleration and interface coupling, where it grew. A density jump did not appear to have a large effect on feed-out from interface coupling. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability`s vortex pairs overtook and reversed the direction of flow of the Richtmyer-Meshkov vortices, resulting in the foil moving from a sinuous to a bubble and spike configuration. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability may have acted as an ablative instability on the hot surface, and as a classical instability on the cold surface, on which grew second and third order harmonics.

  18. Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprabhu, P; Karkhanis, V; Banerjee, R; Varshochi, H; Khan, M; Lawrie, A G W

    2016-01-01

    From nonlinear models and direct numerical simulations we report on several findings of relevance to the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories. The incompressible, direct numerical simulations (DNSs) were performed in two (2D) and three dimensions (3D), and at a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles of the general form g(t)∼t^{n}, with n≥0 and acceleration histories reminiscent of the linear electric motor experiments. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations compare well with a 2D potential flow model and solutions to a drag-buoyancy model reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with the so-called level 2 and level 3 models of Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 79, 065303(R) (2009)10.1103/PhysRevE.79.065303], and with corresponding 3D drag-buoyancy model solutions derived in this article. Our generalization of the RT problem to study variable g(t) affords us the opportunity to investigate the appropriate scaling for bubble and spike amplitudes under these conditions. We consider two candidates, the displacement Z and width s^{2}, but find the appropriate scaling is dependent on the density ratios between the fluids-at low density ratios, bubble and spike amplitudes are explained by both s^{2} and Z, while at large density differences the displacement collapses the spike data. Finally, for all the acceleration profiles studied here, spikes enter a free-fall regime at lower Atwood numbers than predicted by all the models. PMID:26871165

  19. Nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor instability of the cylindrical fluid flow with mass and heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ALY R SEADAWY; K EL-RASHIDY

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor stability of the cylindrical interface between the vapour and liquid phases of a fluid is studied. The phases enclosed between two cylindrical surfaces coaxial with mass and heat transfer is derived from nonlinear Ginzburg--Landau equation. The F-expansion method is used to get exactsolutions for a nonlinear Ginzburg--Landau equation. The region of solutions is displayed graphically.

  20. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Wavelength under Pressure Effect using High Speed Video and Particle Image Velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Han; Moon, Sung Bo; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In the present study, the observation of RT instability wavelength with one-dimensional horizontal wire surface is studied in the pressurized wire pool boiling facility to show the relation between RT instability wavelength and CHF or MHF. The pressure effect is considered instead of using different working fluids. The observation of RT instability wavelength at different system pressure with bare Ni-Cr wire (0.5 mm dia) was studied. The CHF using R-123 refrigerant was enhanced according with higher system pressure. There was a tendency that RT instability wavelength was decreased when CHF and MHF is increased. The measurement value of wavelength in the experiment is less than the predicted wavelength equation. Different wire radius and system pressures should be conducted with bare wire surface to establish the fundamental data for the experiment of nano-coated wire. The analysis of minimum heat flux based on unstable wavelength (RT instability wavelength) has been studied to quantify the available experimental data. The experiments were studied using different inorganic fluids. To quantify the data, the dimensionless terms such as radius and minimum heat flux were considered. Nowadays, nanofluids and depositions of nano-particle on heater surface have been used to enhance of thermal margin in terms of critical heat flux (CHF) and boiling heat transfer. The enhancement of thermal margin is described as surface wettability, thermal activity (effusivity), and the change Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability wavelength due to deposition of nanoparticles which could make the surface as porous structure. In our research group, the change of RT instability wavelength using a simple condensation method was studied because the graphene-oxide deposition layer did not show the surface wettability improvement. Based on the enhancement of CHF studies, Lee et al. proposed the change of Rayleigh-Taylor instability wavelength could explain all the methods of CHF enhancement on pool

  1. Immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using simultaneous particle image velocimetry and planar laser induced fluorescence concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear induction motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Forced and unforced experiments are conducted using an immiscible liquid combination. Forced initial perturbations are produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445 nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids and aluminum oxide particles dispersed in both fluids. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface. The resulting images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. Time dependent velocity and density fields are obtained from the recorded images allowing for 2D full field measurements of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent mass transport.

  2. Initial value problem for Rayleigh--Taylor instability of viscous fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial value problem associated with the development of small amplitude disturbances in Rayleigh--Taylor unstable, viscous, incompressible fluids is studied. Solutions to the linearized equations of motion which satisfy general initial conditions are obtained in terms of Fourier--Laplace transforms of the hydrodynamic variables, without restriction on the density or viscosity of either fluid. When the two fluids have equal kinematic viscosities, these transforms can be inverted explicitly to express the fluid variables as integrals of Green's functions multiplied by initial data. In addition to normal modes, a set of continuum modes, not treated explicitly in the literature, makes an important contribution to the development of the fluid motion

  3. Stable radiation pressure acceleration of ions by suppressing transverse Rayleigh-Taylor instability with multiple Gaussian pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M. L.; Liu, B.; Hu, R. H.; Shou, Y. R.; Lin, C.; Lu, H. Y.; Lu, Y. R.; Gu, Y. Q.; Ma, W. J.; Yan, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    In the case of a thin plasma slab accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra-intense laser pulse, the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) will destroy the acceleration structure and terminate the acceleration process much sooner than theoretical limit. In this paper, a new scheme using multiple Gaussian pulses for ion acceleration in a radiation pressure acceleration regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulation. We found that with multiple Gaussian pulses, the instability could be efficiently suppressed and the divergence of the ion bunch is greatly reduced, resulting in a longer acceleration time and much more collimated ion bunch with higher energy than using a single Gaussian pulse. An analytical model is developed to describe the suppression of RTI at the laser-plasma interface. The model shows that the suppression of RTI is due to the introduction of the long wavelength mode RTI by the multiple Gaussian pulses.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigations of beryllium strength models using the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry de Frahan, M. T. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA; Belof, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Cavallo, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Raevsky, V. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Ignatova, O. N. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Lebedev, A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Ancheta, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; El-dasher, B. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Florando, J. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Gallegos, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Johnsen, E. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA; LeBlanc, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA

    2015-06-14

    A recent collaboration between LLNL and VNIIEF has produced a set of high explosive driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength data for beryllium. Design simulations using legacy strength models from Steinberg-Lund and Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) suggested an optimal design that would delineate between not just different strength models, but different parameters sets of the PTW model. Application of the models to the post-shot results, however, shows close to classical growth. We characterize the material properties of the beryllium tested in the experiments. We also discuss recent efforts to simulate the data using the legacy strength models as well as the more recent RING relaxation model developed at VNIIEF. Finally, we present shock and ramp-loading recovery experiments conducted as part of the collaboration.

  5. Coupling of sausage, kink, and magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in a cylindrical liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyzes the coupling of magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT), sausage, and kink modes in an imploding cylindrical liner, using ideal MHD. A uniform axial magnetic field of arbitrary value is included in each region: liner, its interior, and its exterior. The dispersion relation is solved exactly, for arbitrary radial acceleration (-g), axial wavenumber (k), azimuthal mode number (m), liner aspect ratio, and equilibrium quantities in each region. For small k, a positive g (inward radial acceleration in the lab frame) tends to stabilize the sausage mode, but destabilize the kink mode. For large k, a positive g destabilizes both the kink and sausage mode. Using the 1D-HYDRA simulation results for an equilibrium model that includes a pre-existing axial magnetic field and a preheated fuel, we identify several stages of MRT-sausage-kink mode evolution. We find that the m = 1 kink-MRT mode has a higher growth rate at the initial stage and stagnation stage of the implosion, and that the m = 0 sausage-MRT mode dominates at the main part of implosion. This analysis also sheds light on a puzzling feature in Harris' classic paper of MRT [E. G. Harris, Phys. Fluids 5, 1057 (1962)]. An attempt is made to interpret the persistence of the observed helical structures [Awe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235005 (2013)] in terms of non-axisymmetric eigenmode

  6. Measurements of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in solid liners on the 20 MA Z facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability is the most important instability for determining whether a cylindrical liner can be compressed to its axis in a relatively intact form, a requirement for achieving the high pressures needed for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other high energy-density physics applications. While there are many published RT studies, there are a handful of well-characterized MRT experiments at time scales >1 (micro)s and none for 100 ns z-pinch implosions. Experiments used solid Al liners with outer radii of 3.16 mm and thicknesses of 292 (micro)m, dimensions similar to magnetically-driven ICF target designs (1). In most tests the MRT instability was seeded with sinusoidal perturbations (λ = 200, 400 (micro)m, peak-to-valley amplitudes of 10, 20 (micro)m, respectively), wavelengths similar to those predicted to dominate near stagnation. Radiographs show the evolution of the MRT instability and the effects of current-induced ablation of mass from the liner surface. Additional Al liner tests used 25-200 (micro)m wavelengths and flat surfaces. Codes being used to design magnetized liner ICF loads (1) match the features seen except at the smallest scales (<50 (micro)m). Recent experiments used Be liners to enable penetrating radiography using the same 6.151 keV diagnostics and provide an in-flight measurement of the liner density profile.

  7. Measurements of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in solid liners on the 20 MA Z facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigman, Verle; Vesey, Roger Alan; Shores, Jonathon; Herrmann, Mark C.; Stamm, Robert (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Killebrew, Korbie (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Holt, Randy (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Blue, Brent (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Nakhleh, Charlie; McBride, Ryan D.; Leifeste, Gordon T.; Smith, Ian Craig; Stygar, William A.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Bennett, Guy R.; Schroen, Diana Grace (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Sinars, Daniel Brian; Lopez, Mike R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Tomlinson, Kurt; Edens, Aaron D.; Savage, Mark Edward; Peterson, Kyle J.

    2010-07-01

    The magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability is the most important instability for determining whether a cylindrical liner can be compressed to its axis in a relatively intact form, a requirement for achieving the high pressures needed for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other high energy-density physics applications. While there are many published RT studies, there are a handful of well-characterized MRT experiments at time scales >1 {micro}s and none for 100 ns z-pinch implosions. Experiments used solid Al liners with outer radii of 3.16 mm and thicknesses of 292 {micro}m, dimensions similar to magnetically-driven ICF target designs [1]. In most tests the MRT instability was seeded with sinusoidal perturbations ({lambda} = 200, 400 {micro}m, peak-to-valley amplitudes of 10, 20 {micro}m, respectively), wavelengths similar to those predicted to dominate near stagnation. Radiographs show the evolution of the MRT instability and the effects of current-induced ablation of mass from the liner surface. Additional Al liner tests used 25-200 {micro}m wavelengths and flat surfaces. Codes being used to design magnetized liner ICF loads [1] match the features seen except at the smallest scales (<50 {micro}m). Recent experiments used Be liners to enable penetrating radiography using the same 6.151 keV diagnostics and provide an in-flight measurement of the liner density profile.

  8. A review of the ablative stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in regimes relevant to ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been recognized for many years that the most significant limitation of ICF is the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability. It limits the distance an ablatively driven shell can be moved to several times its initial thickness. Fortunately material flow through the unstable region at velocity vA reduces the growth rate to √1+kL/kg -βkvA with β from 2-3. In recent years experiments using both x-ray drive and smoothed laser drive to accelerate foils have confirmed our understanding of the R-T instability. The growth of small initial modulations on the foils is measured for growth factors up to 60 for direct drive and 80 for indirect drive. For x-ray drive large stabilization is evident After some growth, the instability enters the non-linear phase when mode coupling and saturation are also seen and compare well with modeling. Normalized growth rates for direct drive are measured to be higher, but strategies for reduction by raising the isentrope are being investigated. For direct drive, high spatial frequencies are imprinted from the laser beam and amplified by the R-T instability. Modeling shows an understanding of this ''laser imprinting.''

  9. A review of the ablative stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in regimes relevant to Inertial Confinement Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been recognized for many year's that the most significant limitation of ICF is the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability. It limits the distance an ablatively driven shell can be moved to several times its initial thickness. Fortunately material flow through the unstable region at velocity vA reduces the growth rate to √1+kL/kg -βkvA with β from 2-3. In recent years experiments using both x-ray drive and smoothed laser drive to accelerate foils have confirmed our understanding of the ablative R-T instability in planar geometry. The growth of small initial modulations on the foils is measured for growth factors up to 60 for direct drive and 80 for indirect drive. For x-ray drive large stabilization is evident. After some growth, the instability enters the non-linear phase when mode coupling and saturation are also seen and compare well with modeling. Normalized growth rates for direct drive are measured to be higher, but strategies for reduction by raising the isentrope are being investigated. For direct drive, high spatial frequencies are imprinted from the laser beam and amplified by the R-T instability. Modeling shows an understanding of this ''laser imprinting.''

  10. RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR TYPE INSTABILITIES IN THE RECONNECTION EXHAUST JET AS A MECHANISM FOR SUPRA-ARCADE DOWNFLOWS IN THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, L.-J.; Huang, Y.-M.; Bhattacharjee, A. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Innes, D. E., E-mail: yiminh@princeton.edu, E-mail: amitava@princeton.edu, E-mail: guol@mps.mpg.de, E-mail: innes@mps.mpg.de [Max Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Supra-arcade downflows (hereafter referred to as SADs) are low-emission, elongated, finger-like features observed in active region coronae above post-eruption flare arcades. Observations exhibit downward moving SADs intertwined with bright upward growing spikes. Whereas SADs are dark voids, spikes are brighter, denser structures. Although SADs have been observed for more than a decade, the mechanism of the formation of SADs remains an open issue. Using three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we demonstrate that Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities develop in the downstream region of a reconnecting current sheet. The instabilities result in the formation of low-density coherent structures that resemble SADs, and high-density structures that appear to be spike-like. Comparison between the simulation results and observations suggests that Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities in the exhaust of reconnecting current sheets provide a plausible mechanism for observed SADs.

  11. Analytic theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a uniform density plasma-filled ion diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The J-vector x B-vector forces associated with the surface current of a plasma-filled ion diode will accelerate this plasma fill toward the anode surface. It is well known that such a configuration with a high I is susceptible to the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in certain geometries. A number of ion diode plasma sources have been proposed, most of which have a falling density going away from the wall. A somewhat more unstable case, however, is that of uniform density. In this report we attempt to establish an upper limit on this effect with a simple analytic model in which a uniform-density plasma is accelerated by the magnetic field anticipated in a PBFA-II diode. We estimate the number of linear e-foldings experienced by an unstable surface as well as the most damaging wavelength initial perturbation. This model, which accounts approximately for stabilization due to field diffusion, suggests that even with a uniform fill, densities in excess of a few 1015 are probably not damaged by the instability. In addition, even lower densities might be tolerated if perturbations near the most damaging wavelength can be kept very small

  12. Hall and gyro-viscosity effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a 2D rectangular slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of the Hall term and the gyro-viscosity on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a 2D rectangular slab are studied numerically. Nonlinear magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with these effects reveal that the combination of the Hall term and the gyro-viscosity causes the lower growth rates and the lower saturation level of unstable modes relative those in the single-fluid MHD case, while neither the gyro-viscosity nor the Hall term shows a strong stabilization effect only by itself. It is also shown that the mixing width of the density field can grow as large as that in the single-fluid MHD case, even though the saturation level of the kinetic energy is lowered and the detailed density profile becomes sharper. These numerical results suggest that the extension of the MHD equations can bring about a growth of unstable modes in a lower level, although it does not necessarily mean a weaker impact of the instability to the equilibrium. (author)

  13. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability at the Interface of Superposed Couple-Stress Casson Fluids Flow in Porous Medium under the Effect of a Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Agoor. Bothaina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RIT at the interface of two superposed Couple-stress Casson fluids flowing in porous medium and in the presence of a uniform normal magnetic field is studied. The fluids have different densities. For mathematical simplicity, the stability analysis based on fully developed approximations is used. The maximum wave numbers and the corresponding maximum frequency are obtained. The Growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the case of non-Newtonian Casson fluid with couple-stress through porous medium is discussed. The effects of physical parameters of the problem such as the permeability parameter, magnetic parameter, non-Newtonian Parameter and couple-stress parameter on the regions of stability are discussed numerically and illustrated graphically through a set of figures.

  14. Stabilizing transverse ablative Rayleigh Taylor like instability by using elliptically polarized laser pulses in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Dong; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh Taylor like instability can be well stabilized by using elliptically polarized laser in the hole boring radiation pressure acceleration regime. The $\\bm{J}\\times\\bm{B}$ effect of the laser will thermalize the local electrons and support a transverse diffusion mechanism of the ions, resulting in the stabilization of the short wavelength perturbations, which is quite similar to the ablative Rayleigh Taylor instability in the initial confinement fusion research. The proper range of polarization ratio is obtained from a theoretical model for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The stabilization mechanism is well confirmed by two dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, and the ion beam driven by the elliptically polarized laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability for viscous thin gas films: Application to Critical Heat Flux and Minimum Film Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four types of Rayleigh-Taylor instability analyses have been applied to thin gas films. In particular, the Dispersion relation including phase change was derived based on the lubrication approximation. The evaporation effect was shown to be negligible to find the most dangerous wavelength and the most rapid growth rate. As a result, it was shown that λd = 2π√2σ/Δρg should be used for the most dangerous wavelength for thin vapor films. This value was used to modify the existing critical heat flux for saturated pool boiling on horizontal surfaces. The modified correlations showed good predictions in the wide rate of pressure. Moreover, the thin vapor film analysis correctly led to the expression for the vapor film thickness at minimum film boiling, which is consistent with the well-known existing correlation. The question raised in introduction is now answered. If the viscosity effect is neglected for thin gas films, the most dangerous wavelength and the most rapid growth rate are incorrectly predicted. Therefore, the viscous flow analysis must be performed than the inviscid flow analysis

  16. Bell-Plesset effects in Rayleigh-Taylor instability of finite-thickness spherical and cylindrical shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Schmit, P. F.

    2015-11-01

    Bell-Plesset effects accounting for the time dependence of the radius, velocity and acceleration of the Rayleigh-Taylor-unstable surface are ubiquitous in the instability of spherical laser targets and magnetically driven cylindrical liners. We present an analytical model that, for an ideal incompressible fluid and small perturbation amplitudes, exactly accounts for the Bell-Plesset effects in finite-thickness targets and liners through acceleration and deceleration phases. We derive the time-dependent dispersion equations determining the ``instantaneous growth rate'' and demonstrate that by integrating this growth rate over time (the WKB approximation) we accurately evaluate the number of perturbation e-foldings during the acceleration phase. In the limit of the small target/liner thickness, we obtain the exact thin-shell perturbation equations and approximate thin-shell dispersion relations, generalizing the earlier results of Harris (1962), Ott (1972) and Bud'ko et al. (1989). This research was supported by the US DOE/NNSA (A.L.V.), and in part by appointment to the Sandia National Laboratories Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering (P.F.S.), which is part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, Project No. 165746, and sponsored by Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation) as Operator of Sandia National Laboratories under its U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, Sausage, and Kink Instability Experiments on a MegaAmpere Linear Transformer Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Weis, M. R.; Zhang, P.

    2015-11-01

    At the Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-Pinch Experiments (MAIZE) facility, a 1-MA Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) is being used to deliver 500-600 kA to cylindrical liners in order to study the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT), sausage, and kink instabilities in imploding and exploding Al plasmas. The liners studied in this experiment had thicknesses of 400 nm to 30 μm, heights of 1-2 cm, and diameters of 1-6 mm. The plasmas were imaged using 4-time-frame, laser shadowgraphy and shearing-interferometry at 532 nm. For imploding liners, the measured acceleration was found to be less than predicted from the current pulse, indicating significant diffusion of the azimuthal magnetic field. A simple experimental configuration is presented for ``end-on'' laser probing in the r- θ plane in order to study the interior of the liner. Finally, the effects of axial magnetic fields are determined by modifying the return current posts and incorporating external coils. Experimental growth rates are determined and discussed. This work was supported by DOE award DE-SC0012328. S.G. Patel supported by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager was supported by NSF fellowship grant DGE 1256260.

  18. Numerical simulations of two-fluid turbulent mixing at large density ratios and applications to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livescu, D

    2013-11-28

    A tentative review is presented of various approaches for numerical simulations of two-fluid gaseous mixtures at high density ratios, as they have been applied to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI). Systems exhibiting such RTI behaviour extend from atomistic sizes to scales where the continuum approximation becomes valid. Each level of description can fit into a hierarchy of theoretical models and the governing equations appropriate for each model, with their assumptions, are presented. In particular, because the compressible to incompressible limit of the Navier-Stokes equations is not unique and understanding compressibility effects in the RTI critically depends on having the appropriate basis for comparison, two relevant incompressible limits are presented. One of these limits has not been considered before. Recent results from RTI simulations, spanning the levels of description presented, are reviewed in connection to the material mixing problem. Owing to the computational limitations, most in-depth RTI results have been obtained for the incompressible case. Two such results, concerning the asymmetry of the mixing and small-scale anisotropy anomaly, as well as the possibility of a mixing transition in the RTI, are surveyed. New lines for further investigation are suggested and it is hoped that bringing together such diverse levels of description may provide new ideas and increased motivation for studying such flows. PMID:24146007

  19. Competitions between Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with continuous density and velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, competitions between Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) in two-dimensional incompressible fluids within a linear growth regime are investigated analytically. Normalized linear growth rate formulas for both the RTI, suitable for arbitrary density ratio with continuous density profile, and the KHI, suitable for arbitrary density ratio with continuous density and velocity profiles, are obtained. The linear growth rates of pure RTI (γRT), pure KHI (γKH), and combined RTI and KHI (γtotal) are investigated, respectively. In the pure RTI, it is found that the effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer (Lρ) reduces the linear growth of the RTI (stabilizes the RTI). In the pure KHI, it is found that conversely, the effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer increases the linear growth of the KHI (destabilizes the KHI). It is found that the effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer decreases the ''effective'' or ''local'' Atwood number (A) for both the RTI and the KHI. However, based on the properties of γRT∝√(A) and γKH∝√(1-A2), the effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer therefore has a completely opposite role on the RTI and the KHI noted above. In addition, it is found that the effect of the finite thickness of the velocity shear layer (Lu) stabilizes the KHI, and for the most cases, the combined effects of the finite thickness of the density transition layer and the velocity shear layer (Lρ=Lu) also stabilize the KHI. Regarding the combined RTI and KHI, it is found that there is a competition between the RTI and the KHI because of the completely opposite effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer on these two kinds of instability. It is found that the competitions between the RTI and the KHI depend, respectively, on the Froude number, the density ratio of the light fluid to the heavy one, and the

  20. Effects of magnetic field, sheared flow and ablative velocity on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is found that magnetic field has a stabilization effect whereas the sheared flow has a destabilization effect on the RT instability in the presence of sharp interface. RT instability only occurs in the long wave region and can be completely suppressed if the stabilizing effect of magnetic field dominates. The RT instability increases with wave number and flow shear, and acts much like a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability when destabilizing effect of sheared flow dominates. It is shown that both of ablation velocity and magnetic filed have stabilization effect on RT instability in the presence of continued interface. The stabilization effect of magnetic field takes place for whole waveband and becomes more significant for the short wavelength. The RT instability can be completely suppressed by the cooperated effect of magnetic field and ablation velocity so that the ICF target shell may be unnecessary to be accelerated to very high speed. The growth rate decreases as the density scale length increases. The stabilization effect of magnetic field is more significant for the short density scale length. (author)

  1. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisher, N. C.; Abarzhi, S. I., E-mail: snezhana.abarzhi@gmail.com [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Kuranz, C. C. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Arnett, D. [University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order.

  2. Contribution to modelization and simulation of the ablative-like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities for ICF; Contribution a la modelisation et a la simulation des instabilites de type Rayleigh-Taylor ablatif pour la FCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egly, H

    2007-10-15

    This thesis deals with the dynamics of accelerated ablative front spreading in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments. ICF is designed for the implosion of a deuterium-tritium spherical target. The outer shell, the ablator, is irradiated providing a high level pressure inside the target. During this first stage, the ablation front propagating inwards is perturbed by hydrodynamics instabilities, which can prevent the fusion reaction in the decelerated stage. We propose here a study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during ablation process, in the two dimensional case. In order to obtain a numerical solution, we perform an asymptotic analysis in the limit of a high temperature ratio, between the remaining cold ablator and the hot ablated plasma. This study is divided in two steps. First, the thermo-diffusive part of the set of equations is approximated by a Hele-Shaw model, which is then perturbed by the hydrodynamics part. Using a vortex method, we have to solve the advection of a vortical sheet moving with the ablation front. We compute the numerical solution on an Eulerian mesh coupled with a marker method. The thermal part is computed by implementing the Fat Boundary Method, recently developed. The hydrodynamic part is obtained from a Finite Volume scheme. (author)

  3. Nonlinear theory of laser imprint, Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implosion process in laser fusion can be divided into three phases: start-up, acceleration and stagnation phases and various hydrodynamic instabilities appear in each phase. Analytical models are developed to study nonlinear evolutions of the hydrodynamic instabilities in these phases, and compared with multi-dimensional simulations. We mainly discuss the formation of double spiral structures caused by the singularity of vorticity in the RM spikes, the effect of the ablative stabilization in nonlinear growth of the RT instability with a finite bandwidth and the effect of the radiation cooling on the stability in the stagnation phase. Various smoothing effect, such as radiation smoothing and hydrodynamic smoothing, are also studied in the start-up phase. (author)

  4. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Paul R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockefeller, Gabriel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kares, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-05

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  5. Suppression of transverse ablative Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using elliptically polarized laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Dong; Qiao, B; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability in the hole boring radiation pressure acceleration can be suppressed by using elliptically polarized (EP) laser. A moderate ${J}\\times{B}$ heating of the EP laser will thermalize the local electrons, which leads to the transverse diffusion of ions, suppressing the short wavelength perturbations of RT instability. A proper condition of polarization ratio is obtained analytically for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The idea is confirmed by two dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, showing that the ion beam driven by the EP laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  6. Development of nonlinear two fluid interfacial structures by combined action of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities:Oblique shock

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, M R; Roy, Sourav; Banerjee, Rahul; Khan, Manoranjan

    2010-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of two fluid interfacial structures like bubbles and spikes arising due to the combined action of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or due to that of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability resulting from oblique shock is investigated. Using Layzer's model analytic expressions for the asymptotic value of the combined growth rate are obtained in both cases for spikes and bubbles. However, if the overlying fluid is of lower density the interface perturbation behaves in different ways. Depending on the magnitude of the velocity shear associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz instability both the bubble and spike amplitude may simultaneously grow monotonically (instability) or oscillate with time or it may so happen that while this spike steepens the bubble tends to undulate. In case of an oblique shock which causes combined action of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability arising due to the normal component of the shock and Kelvin Helmholtz instability through creation of velocity...

  7. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the externally cooled liquid lying over a thin vapor film coating the wall of a horizontal plane heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, V. V.; Lyubimov, D. V.; Lyubimova, T. P.

    2016-06-01

    The linear instability of a vapor film formed at the surface of a flat horizontal heater surrounded by an externally cooled liquid is investigated in the presence of a gravitational field. Consideration is given to the case when the stationary base state is characterized by the heat fluxes balanced at the interface between the two media. The critical value of the heat flux required for the complete suppression of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability by the phase transition has been evaluated mainly in the absence of the natural convection in the liquid layer and is found to be different from the known data obtained by approximate approaches. The case of the instability suppression in the system when long-wave disturbances have the longest lifetime is described. It has been shown that the media pressure influence on the phase transition, revealed in thin vapor films, can markedly increase the growth rate of long-wave disturbances and prevent their suppression.

  8. Reactive Rayleigh-Taylor Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, M; Vladimirova, N

    2008-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability develops and leads to turbulence when a heavy fluid falls under the action of gravity through a light one. We consider this phenomenon accompanied by a reactive transformation between the fluids, and study with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) how the reaction (flame) affects the turbulent mixing in the Boussinesq approximation. We discuss "slow" reactions where the characteristic reaction time exceeds the temporal scale of the RT instability. In the early turbulent stage, effects of the flame are distributed over a maturing mixing zone, whose development is weakly influenced by the reaction. At later times, the fully mixed zone transforms into a conglomerate of pure-fluid patches of sizes proportional to the mixing zone width. In this "stirred flame'' regime, temperature fluctuations are consumed by reactions in the regions separating the pure-fluid patches. This DNS-based qualitative description is followed by a phenomenology suggesting that thin turbulent flame is of ...

  9. The Braginskii model of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. I. Effects of self-generated magnetic fields and thermal conduction in two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Modica, Frank; Zhiglo, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) There exists a substantial disagreement between computer simulation results and high-energy density laboratory experiments of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability Kuranz et al. (2010). We adopt the Braginskii formulation for transport in hot, dense plasma, implement and verify the additional physics modules, and conduct a computational study of a single-mode RTI in two dimensions with various combinations of the newly implemented modules. We find that magnetic fields reach levels on the order of 11 MG in the absence of thermal conduction. We observe denting of the RT spike tip and generation of additional higher order modes as a result of these fields. Contrary to interpretation presented in earlier work Nishiguchi (2002), the additional mode is not generated due to modified anisotropic heat transport effects but due to dynamical effect of self-generated magnetic fields. The main effects of thermal conduction are a reduction of the RT instability growth rate (by about 20% for conditions considered here)...

  10. Simultaneous measurements of dark band structures in the OI 630 nm emission all-sky images associated with Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Perkins instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Using ground-based measurements we investigate the simultaneous occurrence of dark band structures in the OI 630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and Perkins instability. This is the first reported observation related to the quasi north-south aligned intensity depletion bands (plasma bubble) simultaneously with the presence of medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) in the tropical region using OI 630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images. On February 27-28, 2006, the OI 630 nm emission all-sky images obtained at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7 deg S, 45.0 deg W), Brazil, were used to map the spatial and temporal locations of plasma bubble and MSTIDs in the bottomside of the F-region. The ionospheric plasma bubble zonal drift measured by the all-sky imaging showed that it moved to eastward with average speed of 50 m/s, whereas MSTIDs moved from southeast to northwest with average speed of about 40 m/s. Also, digisonde observations registered abrupt increases in both the F-layer peak height (hmF2) and base height (h'F) when the MSTIDs passed over Cachoeira Paulista. It should be pointed out that these thermospheric/ionospheric events are not related to geomagnetic disturbed conditions. In this work, we present and discuss the dynamics of these kind airglow structures and their effects in the thermosphere/ionosphere dynamics.

  11. Two-dimensional modeling of the dynamics and radiation output from magnetically driven Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in hollow z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional computational methodology has been developed which uses a phenomenological representation of initial perturbations to model the evolution of magnetically driven Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in a hollow z-pinch. The drive current waveform and x-ray output obtained from the perturbed two-dimensional models differ qualitatively from the results of one-dimensional (unperturbed) models. The results form the perturbed model reproduce the principle features of z-inch experiments conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus 2 facility. The authors discuss the computational approach used in this study and present comparisons between simulations and experimental measurements of current waveforms, visible framing camera pictures, spectra, XRD and bolometry data

  12. Nonideal Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, David Howland [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lin, Hyun K [STONY BROOK UNIV.; Iwerks, Justin G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gliman, James G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic Instability, which occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical) which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale Invariant formulation, and non Ideal (i.e. experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We Interpret mathematical theories of existence and non-uniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations, in other words indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as non unique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, In the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and PrandtJ numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength Initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to playa role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing In different proportions In these two different contexts.

  13. Comparison Between Mitigation Effects of the Finite Larmor Radius and Sheared Axial Flow on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Z-Pinch implosions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孝明; 黄林; 简广德

    2002-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) formulation is derived to investigate and compare the mitigation effects of both the sheared axial flow and finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in Z-pinch implosions. The sheared axial flow is introduced into MHD equations in a conventional way and the FLR effect into the equations via а/аt → -i(ω + ik2⊥ρi2Ωi), as proposed in our previous paper [Chin. Phys. Lett. 2002, 19:217] , where k2⊥ρ2i is referred to FLR effect from the general kinetic theory of magnetized plasma. Therefore the linearized continuity and momentum equations for the perturbed massdensity and velocity include both the sheared axial flow and the FLR effect. It is found that the effect of sheared axial flow with a lower peak velocity can mitigate RT instability in the whole wavenumber region and the effect of sheared axial flow with a higher one can mitigate RT instability only in the large wavenumber region (for normalized wavenumber κ> 2.4); The effect of FLR can mitigate RT instability in the whole wavenumber region and the mitigation effect is stronger than that of the sheared axial flow with a lower peak velocity in the almost whole wavenumber region.

  14. Probing the deep nonlinear stage of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in indirect drive experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Jacquet, L.; Martinez, D.; Moore, A. S.; Seugling, R.; Felker, S.; Haan, S. W.; Remington, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-05-01

    Academic tests in physical regimes not encountered in Inertial Confinement Fusion will help to build a better understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities and constitute the scientifically grounded validation complementary to fully integrated experiments. Under the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Discovery Science program, recent indirect drive experiments have been carried out to study the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regime [A. Casner et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082708 (2012)]. In these experiments, a modulated package is accelerated by a 175 eV radiative temperature plateau created by a room temperature gas-filled platform irradiated by 60 NIF laser beams. The unique capabilities of the NIF are harnessed to accelerate this planar sample over much larger distances ( ≃1.4 mm) and longer time periods ( ≃12 ns) than previously achieved. This extended acceleration could eventually allow entering into a turbulent-like regime not precluded by the theory for the RTI at the ablation front. Simultaneous measurements of the foil trajectory and the subsequent RTI growth are performed and compared with radiative hydrodynamics simulations. We present RTI growth measurements for two-dimensional single-mode and broadband multimode modulations. The dependence of RTI growth on initial conditions and ablative stabilization is emphasized, and we demonstrate for the first time in indirect-drive a bubble-competition, bubble-merger regime for the RTI at ablation front.

  15. Effect of initial conditions on two-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability and transition to turbulence in planar blast-wave-driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, the results from a computational study of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multiphysics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J. A. Greenough, J. Comput. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution for multiple amplitude and phase realizations of a variety of multimode spectral types is considered. Compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. The loss of transverse spectral information is demonstrated, however, along with the existence of a quasi-self-similar regime over short time intervals. Certain aspects of the initial conditions, including the rms amplitude, are shown to have a strong effect on the time to transition to the quasi-self-similar regime

  16. On the Bell-Plesset effects: The effects of uniform compression and geometrical convergence on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability of an accelerating fluid interface is examined considering the effects of compression and geometrical convergence on incompressible perturbations of an interface separating two homogeneous compressible fluid layers of different mass densities. These effects occur in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion capsules. A complete description of Bell-Plesset effects is presented in terms of a simple model formulated in terms of the mass amplitude of perturbations of planar, cylindrical, and spherical interfaces. This formulation makes a clear distinction between perturbation growth driven by buoyant force - the RT instability - and modifications of perturbation behavior by compression and geometrical convergence - the Bell-Plesset (BP) effects [G. I. Bell, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Report LA-1321 (1951); M. S. Plesset, J. Appl. Phys. 25, 96 (1954)]. BP effects modify RT growth rates and may affect RT stability criteria, but they are not a distinct instability. These effects vary widely in their nature and importance from application to application, depending on the relative rates of RT growth, radial convergence, and uniform compression. Limiting cases are compared and contrasted. BP effects are generally different for each component of the perturbation solution pair. BP effects on perturbation growth in cylindrical implosion experiments have been analyzed successfully [e.g., W. W. Hsing et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1832 (1997)], in terms of an incomplete single-component solution that is indistinguishable from unperturbed flow, indicating that the component exhibiting true ongoing perturbed motion is largely absent. This static mass perturbation solution is often treated as the one and only BP effect, even though it occurs as one of a pair of solutions and only in the limit of a vanishing RT effect

  17. Role of source-layer tilts in the axi-asymmetric growth of diapirs triggered by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Urmi; Baruah, Amiya; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-07-01

    In many geological systems inversion of density stratification sets in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities, leading to an ascent of relatively low-density materials through the high-density overburden in the form of diapirs. These diapirs often originate from dipping low-density layers. This study aims to show how the initial tilt of such source layers can control the ascent behavior of diapirs initiated by RT instabilities. Using two-layer viscous models we produced RT instabilities in physical experiments, and investigated the effects of source-layer tilts (β). Our experiments suggest that these diapirs ascend with contrasting lateral spreading rates in the up and down slope directions, resulting in their axi-asymmetric geometry. However, their heads retain a circular outline on the horizontal top surface, where the upwelling axis is located away from their geometric centre in the up-slope direction. In this paper we present a series of experimental models to demonstrate the spectrum of axi-symmetric to -asymmetric geometrical transitions with increasing β. Our experiments also reveal that, when β is large (> 4o) the diapirs become unstable, resulting in a continuous migration of their stems in the upslope direction. Using the volume of fluid (VOF) method we ran computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations to study the underlying hydrodynamics of axi-asymmetric diapiric growth. The CFD simulations show that β > 0o conditions develop stronger flow vortices on the down-slope side of an ascending diapir, leading to a pressure difference between the up- and down-slope flanks. Such a differential pressure causes the diapir head to spread at a faster rate in the tilt direction. An estimate of the asymmetric spreading rates is given as a function of β. Our present study provides a fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamic flow structure responsible for the asymmetric growth of RT instabilities on tilted source layers, as applicable to a wide range of large

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames -- Fast or Faster?

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, E P

    2015-01-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of Type Ia supernovae. However, the dynamics of these flames is still not well-understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from tr...

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames -- Fast or Faster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, E. P.

    2015-04-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of supernovae Ia. However, the dynamics of these flames are still not well understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from traditional turbulent flames: they are thinner rather than thicker when turbulence is stronger. We also show that none of the several different types of turbulent flame speed models accurately predicts measured flame speeds. In addition, we find that the RT flame speed model only correctly predicts the measured flame speed in a certain parameter regime. Finally, we propose that the formation of cusps may be the factor causing the flame to propagate more quickly than predicted by the RT model.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability of Feedthrough Growth In an Incompressible Convergent Geometry%不可压结构聚合运动耦合增长的瑞利-泰勒不稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林其文

    2001-01-01

    推导并计算了不可压圆筒结构的扰动增长方程及具有弹性的运动方程,讨论了氧气-乙炔混合气体聚爆明胶圆筒的耦合扰动增长规律,研究结果为会聚结构的瑞利-泰勒不稳定性实验提供了很好的理论依据。%Feedthrough perturbation growth equations in an incompressiblecylinder geometry and motion equations in elastic cylinder were derived.Feedthrough perturbation growth in cylindrical gelatine driven by explosions in oxygen-acetylene gas mixture are discussed and analysed.Calculatal results are in good agreement with S. T.Weir et al′s reports.The results are useful for studying Rayleigh-Taylor instability experimentally.

  1. Radiatively driven Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities around a forming massive star system ? NACO adaptive optics and VISIR study of G333.6-0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, M S N

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the highest mass stars are thought to be dominated by instabilities resulting from gravitation and radiation. Instabilities due to gravitation are commonly demonstrated by observations of fragmentation, but those due to effects of radiation are thus far not found. Here I report on the NACO adaptive optics and mid-infrared diffraction limited VISIR imaging data of an extemely luminous ultra-compact HII region G333.6-0.2. Two infrared sources, one bright in the near-infrared (appearing point-like) and another in the mid-infrared (resolved with an elliptical shape) are uncovered through this data, located at the heart of this region. These infrared sources appear to be embedded in the waist of a bipolar shaped nebula and UCHII region, the lobes of which are separated by a dark patch. It represents an outflow bubble originating from a large toroid viewed in its edge-on configuration. Filamentary features with finger/hook morphology are found connected to the two bright infrared sources which are ...

  2. Multimode Rayleigh-Taylor growth at strongly convergent spherical interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, attention has focused on the effects of spherical convergence on the nonlinear phase of Rayleigh-Taylor growth. In particular, for instability growth on spherically converging interfaces, modifications to the predictions of the Layzer model for the secular growth of a single, nonlinear mode have been reported. On the other hand, applications of interest involve surface perturbations which include the superposition of many unstable modes growing simultaneously. Such weakly nonlinear, multimode growth has previously been studied in the context of the well-known Haan model. Here, we combine the most recent results for enhanced nonlinear single mode growth on spherical interfaces with the Haan model formulation for multimode growth. Remarkably, the multimode results are found not to be substantially modified by including the effects of convergence

  3. Modeling Solid Rayleigh-Taylor Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, Ann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-20

    Intense impulses applied to solid materials result in high strain rates, strong plastic strains and significant temperature increments. Data in such regimes would allow confidence in extending material strength models to strain rates of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} s{sup -1}. High explosives can be used to accelerate a plate with a perturbation on the side facing the HE, resulting in a Rayleigh-Taylor-like perturbation growth that depends on amplitude and wavelength of the initial surface perturbation, strength of the material, time dependence of the driving pressure force, and temperature of the material. Such experiments have been conducted on perturbed copper plates at LANL, using the LANSCE proton radiography beam to obtain multiple frames of data for each experiment. The results of numerical simulations of these experiments using a 2-D ALE code are presented.

  4. Slab model for Rayleigh--Taylor stabilization by vortex shedding, compressibility, thermal conduction, and ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical models are derived for stabilization of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability of an ablatively accelerated slab. The procedure is to conserve mass, momentum, and energy flux across a perturbed interface through which plasma flows. In various regimes, the stabilization mechanism can be described as vortex shedding, compressibility, thermal conduction, and ablation. Comparisons are made with recent fluid simulations, and simple laws relevant to laser-driven ablative acceleration are derived

  5. Stability of Rayleigh-Taylor Vortices in Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun; CHEN Yin-Hua; GAN Bao-Xia; WANG Fei-Hu; WANG Dong

    2006-01-01

    @@ The evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor mode in dusty plasma with vortex-flow is investigated. Based on fluid theory and Bayly's method, we derive the coupling equations describing the Rayleigh-Taylor mode in the core of vortex,and research the evolution characteristics of the perturbation amplitude with time numerically. It is shown that the eccentric of vortex and the content of dust have considerable effects on the amplitude evolutions.

  6. Limits of the potential flow approach to the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprabhu, P; Dimonte, Guy; Young, Yuan-Nan; Calder, A C; Fryxell, B

    2006-12-01

    We report on the behavior of a single-wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor flow at late times. The calculations were performed in a long square duct (lambda x lambda x 8lambda), using four different numerical simulations. In contradiction with potential flow theories that predict a constant terminal velocity, the single-wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor problem exhibits late-time acceleration. The onset of acceleration occurs as the bubble penetration depth exceeds the diameter of bubbles, and is observed for low and moderate density differences. Based on our simulations, we provide a phenomenological description of the observed acceleration, and ascribe this behavior to the formation of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices on the bubble-spike interface that diminish the friction drag, while the associated induced flow propels the bubbles forward. For large density ratios, the formation of secondary instabilities is suppressed, and the bubbles remain terminal consistent with potential flow models. PMID:17280149

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, premixed flames: the transition to turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Elizabeth; Rosner, Robert

    2010-11-01

    A premixed flame moving against a sufficiently strong gravitational field becomes deformed and creates vorticity. If gravity is strong enough, this vorticity is shed and deposited behind the flame front. We present two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of this vortex shedding process and its effect on the flame front for various values of the gravitational force. The flame and its shed vortices go through the following stages as gravity is increased: no vorticity and a flat flame front; long vortices attached to a cusped flame front; instability of the attached vortices and vortex shedding (Hopf bifurcation); disruption of the flame front by the shed vortices, causing the flame to pulsate; loss of left/right symmetry (period doubling); dominance of Rayleigh-Taylor instability over burning (torus bifurcation); and, finally, complex interactions between the flame front and the vortices. We measure the subsequent wrinkling of the flame front by computing its fractal dimension and also measure mixing behind the flame front by computing the finite-time Lyapunov exponents.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flames: The competition between burning, gravity and self-generated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Elizabeth Peele

    A Type Ia supernova explosion may occur if a subsonic nuclear flame in a white dwarf star is wrinkled by turbulence produced by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes supersonic. Our research investigates the plausibility of this theory by simulating a very simple case- a model flame in 2D. We performed a parameter study in which we changed only the non-dimensional gravitational force, G. The overarching goal of the thesis was to figure out how changing the strength of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability affects the flame surface and therefore the flame speed. At low values of G, this is a transition-to-turbulence type problem and we approached it from the dynamical systems point of view. Specifically, we measured various observables in our simulations and used them to search for simple bifurcation models of the flame behavior. For instance, the initial vortex shedding instability in the wake behind the flame front can be described by a Hopf bifurcation. Overall, simple temporal bifurcations are sufficient to describe the flame for low G. For high values of G, the simple dynamical systems approach breaks down. The area just behind the flame becomes fully turbulent and this turbulence wrinkles the flame front. Because the wrinkling takes place on all scales between the integral scale and the viscous scale, the flame assumes a fractal shape. We measured the fractal dimension of the flame front to assess the importance of this effect. For very high G, it turns out that large-scale Rayleigh-Taylor stretching is responsible for creating a larger part of flame surface than the turbulent wrinkling. This suggests that the flame speed is mostly determined by large-scale stretching driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, not by the secondary interaction of turbulence with the flame front. The flame speed predicted for this situation is much too small for the flame to become supersonic, casting some doubt on the Rayleigh-Taylor wrinkling mechanism for Type Ia explosions.

  9. Gravitationally Unstable Flames: Rayleigh-Taylor Stretching versus Turbulent Wrinkling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, E. P.; Rosner, R.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we provide support for the Rayleigh-Taylor-(RT)-based subgrid model used in full-star simulations of deflagrations in Type Ia supernovae explosions. We use the results of a parameter study of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an RT unstable model flame to distinguish between the two main types of subgrid models (RT or turbulence dominated) in the flamelet regime. First, we give scalings for the turbulent flame speed, the Reynolds number, the viscous scale, and the size of the burning region as the non-dimensional gravity (G) is varied. The flame speed is well predicted by an RT-based flame speed model. Next, the above scalings are used to calculate the Karlovitz number (Ka) and to discuss appropriate combustion regimes. No transition to thin reaction zones is seen at Ka = 1, although such a transition is expected by turbulence-dominated subgrid models. Finally, we confirm a basic physical premise of the RT subgrid model, namely, that the flame is fractal, and thus self-similar. By modeling the turbulent flame speed, we demonstrate that it is affected more by large-scale RT stretching than by small-scale turbulent wrinkling. In this way, the RT instability controls the flame directly from the large scales. Overall, these results support the RT subgrid model.

  10. GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE FLAMES: RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRETCHING VERSUS TURBULENT WRINKLING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we provide support for the Rayleigh-Taylor-(RT)-based subgrid model used in full-star simulations of deflagrations in Type Ia supernovae explosions. We use the results of a parameter study of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an RT unstable model flame to distinguish between the two main types of subgrid models (RT or turbulence dominated) in the flamelet regime. First, we give scalings for the turbulent flame speed, the Reynolds number, the viscous scale, and the size of the burning region as the non-dimensional gravity (G) is varied. The flame speed is well predicted by an RT-based flame speed model. Next, the above scalings are used to calculate the Karlovitz number (Ka) and to discuss appropriate combustion regimes. No transition to thin reaction zones is seen at Ka = 1, although such a transition is expected by turbulence-dominated subgrid models. Finally, we confirm a basic physical premise of the RT subgrid model, namely, that the flame is fractal, and thus self-similar. By modeling the turbulent flame speed, we demonstrate that it is affected more by large-scale RT stretching than by small-scale turbulent wrinkling. In this way, the RT instability controls the flame directly from the large scales. Overall, these results support the RT subgrid model.

  11. GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE FLAMES: RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRETCHING VERSUS TURBULENT WRINKLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, E. P. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Rosner, R., E-mail: eph2001@columbia.edu [Computation Institute, University of Chicago, 5735 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-10

    In this paper, we provide support for the Rayleigh-Taylor-(RT)-based subgrid model used in full-star simulations of deflagrations in Type Ia supernovae explosions. We use the results of a parameter study of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an RT unstable model flame to distinguish between the two main types of subgrid models (RT or turbulence dominated) in the flamelet regime. First, we give scalings for the turbulent flame speed, the Reynolds number, the viscous scale, and the size of the burning region as the non-dimensional gravity (G) is varied. The flame speed is well predicted by an RT-based flame speed model. Next, the above scalings are used to calculate the Karlovitz number (Ka) and to discuss appropriate combustion regimes. No transition to thin reaction zones is seen at Ka = 1, although such a transition is expected by turbulence-dominated subgrid models. Finally, we confirm a basic physical premise of the RT subgrid model, namely, that the flame is fractal, and thus self-similar. By modeling the turbulent flame speed, we demonstrate that it is affected more by large-scale RT stretching than by small-scale turbulent wrinkling. In this way, the RT instability controls the flame directly from the large scales. Overall, these results support the RT subgrid model.

  12. Multimode Rayleigh-Taylor growth at strongly convergent spherical interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, attention has focused on the effects of spherical convergence on the nonlinear phase of Rayleigh-Taylor growth. In particular, for instability growth on spherically converging interfaces, modifications to the predictions of the Layzer model for the secular growth of a single, nonlinear mode have been reported. On the other hand, applications of interest involve surface perturbations which include the superposition of many unstable modes growing simultaneously. Such weakly nonlinear, multimode growth has previously been studied in the context of the well-known Haan model. Here, we combine the most recent results for enhanced nonlinear single mode growth on spherical interfaces with the Haan model formulation for multimode growth. Remarkably, the multimode results are found not to be substantially modified by including the effects of convergence. This is due to the particular form chosen by Haan in constructing his multimode model. Indeed, in the limit of large mode numbers, explicitly including convergence for the nonlinear regime leads only to logarithmic corrections to Haan's original result

  13. The Transition to Turbulence of Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Elizabeth P.; Rosner, R.

    2011-01-01

    Part of the uncertainty surrounding the explosion mechanism of Type 1A supernovae is the extent to which the turbulence created by the flame front can speed the flame up. A premixed flame moving against a sufficiently strong gravitational field becomes deformed and creates vorticity. If gravity is strong enough, this vorticity is shed and deposited behind the flame front. We have completed some two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of this shedding process for various values of the gravitational force. If gravity is weak enough, the flame front remains flat and no vorticity is created. If gravity is slightly stronger, the flame front becomes cusped and creates vorticity; long vortices attach to the flame front and extend behind it. For even larger values of gravity, the far end of these vortices becomes unstable and sheds more vortices. For simulations with increased gravity, the position of the shedding instability moves closer to the flame front. Next, the vortex shedding disturbs the flame front, causing the flame to pulsate. These pulsations lose their left/right symmetry and the period of oscillation doubles. For even higher values of gravity, an additional frequency is introduced into the system as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability begins to dominate over burning. Eventually, the pulsations of the flame become quite complex and the interaction between the flame front and the vortices can't be simply described. We have measured the subsequent wrinkling of the flame front by computing its fractal dimension and the energy spectra behind the flame front. Measurements of the fractal dimension suggest that it saturates, implying that any additional speed up of the flame must be due to large-scale stretching or disruption of the flame front. Our simulations were performed at NERSC which is supported by the Department of Energy.

  14. Using the self-learning intellectual models for predicting the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of target compression in the laser thermonuclear synthesis is discussed. The process is determined by developing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RNI). A program unit for description of the RNI evolution by its initial distributions is developed. The results of statistical analysis of the RT mixing calculations are given. The analysis is carried out by means of learning base system and is substantiated on the generalization of great number of data, fulfilled by means of the neural network methods

  15. Reactive Rayleigh-Taylor systems: flame propagation and non-stationarity

    CERN Document Server

    Scagliarini, A; Mantovani, F; Sbragaglia, M; Toschi, F; Tripiccione, R

    2011-01-01

    Reactive Rayleigh-Taylor systems are characterized by the competition between the growth of the instability and the rate of reaction between cold (heavy) and hot (light) phases. We present results from state-of-the-art numerical simulations performed at high resolution in 2d by means of a self-consistent lattice Boltzmann method which evolves the coupled momentum and thermal equations and includes a reactive term. We tune the parameters affecting flame properties, in order to address the competition between turbulent mixing and reaction, ranging from slow to fast-reaction rates. We also study the mutual feedback between turbulence evolution driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and front propagation against gravitational acceleration. We quantify both the enhancement of flame propagation due to turbulent mixing for the case of slow reaction-rate as well as the slowing down of turbulence growth for the fast reaction case, when the flame quickly burns the gravitationally unstable phase. An increase of inter...

  16. Dynamics of bubble growth for Rayleigh--Taylor unstable interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statistical model is analyzed for the growth of bubbles in a Rayleigh--Taylor unstable interface. The model is compared to solutions of the full Euler equations for compressible two phase flow, using numerical solutions based on the method of front tracking. The front tracking method has the distinguishing feature of being a predominantly Eulerian method in which sharp interfaces are preserved with zero numerical diffusion. Various regimes in the statistical model exhibiting qualitatively distinct behavior are explored

  17. Direct numerical simulation of single mode three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, Maxwell

    2015-01-01

    The single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability (smRTI) is This study reproduces three low-Atwood single mode Rayleigh-Taylor experimental runs [1] in a specialized version of the Nek5000 [2] spectral element code. The simulations use the initial amplitude, wavelength, acceleration, Atwood number, and viscosity from the three specific experiments and impose no-slip and no-flux boundaries on the velocity and scalar, respectively. The simulations are shown to reproduce the linear, saturation, stagnation, and re-acceleration phases of the smRTI seen in the experiments. Additionally, access to the full velocity and scalar fields demonstrates three different finite size effects: wall drag, wall lift, and a long wavelength mode along the diagonal. One of the simulations is extended by a factor of two in the vertical direction and the resulting late-time dynamics reach Froude numbers around 1.8, higher than previously reported. Finally, inspection of the span-wise flow reveals secondary flows of the first kind that tran...

  18. 2D HYDRA Calculations of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Growth and Feedthrough in Cylindrical Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Matthew; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Cylindrical liner implosions are susceptible to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT), along with the azimuthal current-carrying modes (sausage, kink, etc). ``Feedthrough'' of these instabilities has a strong influence on the integrity of the liner/fuel interface in the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept (MagLIF). The linearized ideal MHD equations can be solved to quantify these effects, including the presence of an effective gravity and an axial magnetic field. We investigate the potential of this field to mitigate feedthrough, due to MRT growth from various initial surface finishes (seeded, rough), throughout the implosion using our analytic results and the LLNL code, HYDRA. We will present both low and high convergence cases. Lastly, we illustrate the effect shock compression can have on feedthrough in seeded liners for various fill gases (cold and pre-heated) and magnetic field configurations. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories.

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing with time-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We extend the momentum model to describe Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing driven by a time-dependent acceleration. The acceleration is a power-law function of time, similarly to astrophysical and plasma fusion applications. In RT flow the dynamics of a fluid parcel is driven by a balance per unit mass of the rates of momentum gain and loss. We find analytical solutions in the cases of balanced and imbalanced gains and losses, and identify their dependence on the acceleration exponent. The existence is shown of two typical regimes of self-similar RT mixing -acceleration-driven Rayleigh-Taylor-type and dissipation-driven Richtymer-Meshkov-type with the latter being in general non-universal. Possible scenarios are proposed for transitions from the balanced dynamics to the imbalanced self-similar dynamics. Scaling and correlations properties of RT mixing are studied on the basis of dimensional analysis. Departures are outlined of RT dynamics with time-dependent acceleration from canonical cases of homogeneous turbulence as well as blast waves with first and second kind self-similarity. Support of National Science Foundation is warmy appreciated.

  20. Acceleration- and deceleration-phase nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor growth at spherical interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Layzer model for the nonlinear evolution of bubbles in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability has recently been generalized to the case of spherically imploding interfaces [D. S. Clark and M. Tabak, Phys. Rev. E 71, 055302(R) (2005)]. The spherical case is more relevant to, e.g., inertial confinement fusion or various astrophysical phenomena when the convergence is strong or the perturbation wavelength is comparable to the interface curvature. Here, the model is further extended to the case of bubble growth during the deceleration (stagnation) phase of a spherical implosion and to the growth of spikes during both the acceleration and deceleration phases. Differences in the nonlinear growth rates for both bubbles and spikes are found when compared with planar results. The model predictions are verified by comparison with numerical hydrodynamics simulations

  1. Acceleration and deceleration phase nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor growth at spherical interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Layzer model for the nonlinear evolution of bubbles in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability has recently been generalized to the case of spherically imploding interfaces [D. S. Clark and M. Tabak, to appear, PRE (2005).]. The spherical case is more relevant to, e.g., inertial confinement fusion or various astrophysical phenomena when the convergence is strong or the perturbation wavelength is comparable to the interface curvature. Here, the model is further extended to the case of bubble growth during the deceleration (stagnation) phase of a spherical implosion and to the growth of spikes during both the acceleration and deceleration phases. Differences in the nonlinear growth rates for both bubbles and spikes are found when compared with planar results. The model predictions are verified by comparison with numerical hydrodynamics simulations

  2. Validation of Nek5000 against low-Atwood, single-mode Rayleigh Taylor experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Maxwell

    2015-11-01

    Experiments by Wilkinson and Jacobs demonstrate the stagnation and reacceleration phases of the low-Atwood, single-mode Rayleigh Taylor instability between two water mixtures. We reproduce the experimental conditions of three runs in direct numerical simulations using the spectral element code Nek5000. The simulations required 17 billion grid points on 512 thousand cores of the Mira supercomputer to reach Rayleigh numbers up to 90 million. We extend the vertical dimension to reach higher bubble aspect ratios and demonstrate the limits of wall-bounded single-mode studies. Finally, exploration of the full-field results reveals spanwise secondary flows that enhance mixing at low to moderate Reynolds number. This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Self-generated magnetic fields in blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaig, Markus; Plewa, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    We study the effect of self-generated magnetic fields in two-dimensional computer models of blast-wave driven high-energy density Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) experiments. Previous works [1,2] suggested that such fields have the potential to influence the RTI morphology and mixing. When neglecting the friction force between electrons and ions, we do indeed find that dynamically important (β≲103) magnetic fields are generated. However, in the more realistic case where the friction force is accounted for, the resulting fields are much weaker, β≳105 , and can no longer influence the dynamics of the system. Although we find no evidence for dynamically important magnetic fields being created in the two-dimensional case studied here, the situation might be different in a three-dimensional setup, which will be addressed in a future study.

  4. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Rayleigh?Taylor instability-induced mixing are discussed.

  5. Qualitative and quantitative features of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Karkhanis, Varad; Lawrie, Andrew; Bhowmick, Aklant; Abarzhi, Snezhana; RTI Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We consider dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) flow in a large aspect ratio three-dimensional domain with square symmetry in the plane for fluids with contrasting densities. In order to quantify the interface evolution from a small amplitude single-mode initial perturbation to advanced stage of RT mixing, we apply numerical simulations using the MOBILE code, theoretical analyses, including group theory and momentum model, as well as parameters describing the interplay between acceleration and turbulence. We find: In RT flow, the fluid motion is intense near the interface and is negligible far from the interface. At late times the growth rates of RT bubbles and spikes may increase without a corresponding increase of length-scales in the direction normal to acceleration. The parameters describing the interplay between acceleration and turbulence in RT mixing are shown to scale well with the flow Reynolds number and Froude number.

  6. Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor growth in convergine geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early nonlinear phase of Rayleigh-Taylor growth is typically described in terms of the classic Layzer model in which bubbles of light fluid rise into the heavy fluid at a constant rate determined by the bubble radius and the gravitational acceleration. However, this model is strictly valid only for planar interfaces and hence ignores any effects which might be introduced by the spherically converging interfaces of interest in inertial confinement fusion. Here a generalization of the Layzer nonlinear bubble rise rate is given for a self-similar spherically converging flow of the type studied by Kidder. A simple formula for the bubble amplitude is found showing that, while the bubble initially rises with a constant velocity similar to the Layzer result, during the late phase of the implosion, an acceleration of the bubble rise rate occurs. The bubble rise rate is verified by comparison with numerical hydrodynamics simulations

  7. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  8. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2006-03-24

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  9. Experimental tests of Rayleigh-Taylor stabilization mechanisms with long pulse gas-filled halfraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Huser, G.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Liberatore, S.; Masse, L.; Galmiche, D.

    2008-11-01

    Mitigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities growth is a key issue on the road toward ignition. The graded doped ablator is a common concept for NIF [1] and LMJ [2] point designs. A complementary stabilization mechanism based on anisotropic thermal diffusion was theoretically underlined [3] for the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We will present the first ever experimental tests of these mechanisms. Indirect drive experiments were performed on the OMEGA laser facility with a long-pulse platform. We used in fact gas-filled halfraums and stack 15 drive beams along 2 cones to create a 7 ns long radiation drive. Halfraum energetics with E-IDI-300 phase plates was validated by dedicated shots along P5/P8 and is fairly reproduced by the simulations. These drive measurements allowed also to determine the graded doped planar emulator whose layers thicknesses and composition should be carefully optimized . Side-on and face-on data acquired with germanium-doped plastic samples (modulations wavelength 35 and 50 microns) will be presented and compared with FCI2 hydrocodes simulations. [1] S.W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056316 (2005). [2] C C-Cl'erouin et al 2008 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112 022023 [3] L. Masse., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 245001 (2007).

  10. Rayleigh-Taylor breakdown for the Muskat problem with applications to water waves

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Ángel; Córdoba, Diego; Fefferman, Charles; Gancedo, Francisco; López-Fernández, Mar\\'ia

    2012-01-01

    The Muskat problem models the evolution of the interface given by two different fluids in porous media. The Rayleigh-Taylor condition is natural to reach the linear stability of the Muskat problem. We show that the Rayleigh-Taylor condition may hold initially but break down in finite time. As a consequence of the method used, we prove the existence of water waves turning.

  11. Evolution of a double-front Rayleigh-Taylor system using a GPU-based high resolution thermal Lattice-Boltzmann model

    CERN Document Server

    Ripesi, P; Schifano, S F; Tripiccione, R

    2014-01-01

    We study the turbulent evolution originated from a system subjected to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability with a double density at high resolution in a 2 dimensional geometry using a highly optimized thermal Lattice Boltzmann code for GPUs. The novelty of our investigation stems from the initial condition, given by the superposition of three layers with three different densities, leading to the development of two Rayleigh-Taylor fronts that expand upward and downward and collide in the middle of the cell. By using high resolution numerical data we highlight the effects induced by the collision of the two turbulent fronts in the long time asymptotic regime. We also provide details on the optimized Lattice-Boltzmann code that we have run on a cluster of GPUs

  12. Planar and cylindrical Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on Nova (HEP2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Marinak, M.M. [and others

    1996-06-01

    A high-density fluid on top of a low-density fluid is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable. Driven by gravity, random perturbations at the interface between the two fluids will grow: fingers ({open_quotes}spikes{close_quotes}) of the heavier fluid will poke through the lighter fluid, and bubbles of the lighter fluid will rise into the heavier fluid. The RT instability and its shock-driven analog, the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, have been a focus of research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for some time. In ICF, the driver - laser light, x rays, or ions - heats the outer layer of the capsule wall, causing it to ionize and expand rapidly. The result is a low-density ablated plasma accelerating the high-density capsule wall ({open_quotes}Pusher{close_quotes}). The ablation front is RT unstable, and outer-surface imperfections grow. This growth can seed perturbations at the pusher inner wall, which in turn become RT unstable during deceleration and stagnation. Ultimately, pusher material can mix into the fuel, degrading performance.

  13. Rayleigh Taylor turbulence: self-similar analysis and direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.; Clark, T. T.

    2004-05-01

    Direct numerical simulations and a self-similar analysis of the single-fluid Boussinesq Rayleigh Taylor instability and transition to turbulence are used to investigate Rayleigh Taylor turbulence. The Schmidt, Atwood and bulk Reynolds numbers are Sc {=} 1, A {=} 0.01, Re {≤} 3000. High-Reynolds-number moment self-similarity, consistent with the the energy cascade interpretation of dissipation, is used to analyse the DNS results. The mixing layer width obeys a differential equation with solution h(t;C_o,h_0) {=} fourth C_o Agt(2+) sqrt{AgC_o}h(1/2) _0 t+h_0; the result for h(t;C_o,h_0) is a rigorous consequence of only one ansatz, self-similarity. It indicates an intermediate time regime in which the growth is linear and the importance of a virtual origin. At long time the well-known h ˜ fourth C_o Agt(2) scaling dominates. The self-similar analysis indicates that the asymptotic growth rate is not universal. The scalings of the second-order moments, their dissipations, and production dissipation ratios, are obtained and compared to the DNS. The flow is not self-similar in a conventional sense there is no single length scale that scales the flow. The moment similarity method produces three different scalings for the turbulence energy-containing length scale, ℓ, the Taylor microscale, la, and the Kolmogorov dissipation scale, eta. The DNS and the self-similar analysis are in accord showing ℓ {˜} Agt(2) , ⪉ {˜} t(1/2) and eta {˜} (({A(2g^2}/{nu^3})t)(-1/4)) achieving self-similar behaviour within three initial eddy turnovers of the inception of the turbulence growth phase at bulk Reynolds numbers in the range of Re = 800 1000 depending on initial conditions. A picture of a turbulence in which the largest scales grow, asymptotically, as t(2) and the smallest scales decrease as t(-1/4) , emerges. As a consequence the bandwidth of the turbulence spectrum grows as t(9/4) and is consistent with the R_t(3/4) Kolmogorov scaling law of fully developed stationary

  14. Three-dimensional Numerical Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Zingale, M A; Rendleman, C A; Day, M S; Bell, J B

    2005-01-01

    Flame instabilities play a dominant role in accelerating the burning front to a large fraction of the speed of sound in a Type Ia supernova. We present a three-dimensional numerical simulation of a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable carbon flame, following its evolution through the transition to turbulence. A low Mach number hydrodynamics method is used, freeing us from the harsh timestep restrictions imposed by sound waves. We fully resolve the thermal structure of the flame and its reaction zone, eliminating the need for a flame model. A single density is considered, $1.5\\times 10^7 \\gcc$, and half carbon\\slash half oxygen fuel--conditions under which the flame propagated in the flamelet regime in our related two-dimensional study. We compare to a corresponding two-dimensional simulation, and show that while fire-polishing keeps the small features suppressed in two dimensions, turbulence wrinkles the flame on far smaller scales in the three-dimensional case, suggesting that the transition to the distributed burning r...

  15. Investigating iron material strength during phase transitions using Rayleigh-Taylor growth measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, C. M.; Belof, J. L.; Blobaum, K. J. M.; Cavallo, R. M.; Kostinski, N.; Maddox, B. R.; May, M. J.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.; Swift, D. W.; Wallace, R. J.; Wilson, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    A solid-solid phase transition between the bcc (α) and hcp (ɛ) lattice structures in iron is known to occur as the material is compressed. When kept below its melting point, an effective increase in the macroscopic strength of the material accompanies this phase transition. Understanding the strength of iron throughout the deformation process is important for improving models of planetary structure, including interpretation of seismic measurements on Earth. To explore iron strength at high pressures and strain rates, we have performed experiments at the OMEGA laser. The laser drive produces a pressure near 1 Mbar on a thin Fe disk with a sinusoidal ripple pattern imposed on its face. The ripples seed the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, the growth of which is suppressed by the material strength of the sample. The ripple amplitude is diagnosed with x-ray radiography, and their growth is compared to values from simulations using different material strength models. This work will be compared to previous, similar experiments at 0.1 - 0.3 Mbar pressures. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore Na- tional Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on a MegaAmpere linear transformer driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, J. C.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Chalenski, D. A.; Lau, Y. Y.; French, D. M.; Gomez, M. R.; Patel, S. G.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Steiner, A. M.; Weis, M.; Zhang, P.; Mazarakis, M.; Cuneo, M. E.; Lopez, M.

    2012-03-01

    Experiments have been performed on a nominal 100 ns rise time, MegaAmpere (MA)-class linear transformer driver to explore the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability in planar geometry. Plasma loads consisted of ablated 400 nm-thick, 1 cm-wide aluminum foils located between two parallel-plate return-current electrodes. Plasma acceleration was adjusted by offsetting the position of the foil (cathode) between the anode plates. Diagnostics included double-pulse, sub-ns laser shadowgraphy, and machine current B-dot loops. Experimental growth rates for MRT on both sides of the ablated aluminum plasma slab were comparable for centered-foils. The MRT growth rate was fastest (98 ns e-folding time) for the foil-offset case where there was a larger magnetic field to accelerate the plasma. Other cases showed slower growth rates with e-folding times of about ˜106 ns. An interpretation of the experimental data in terms of an analytic MRT model is attempted.

  17. Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the ∇ne×∇Te term in the generalized Ohm’s law. Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

  18. Linear and nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor growth at strongly convergent spherical interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent attention has focused on the effect of spherical convergence on the nonlinear phase of Rayleigh-Taylor growth. For instability growth on spherically converging interfaces, modifications to the predictions of the Layzer model for the secular growth of a single, nonlinear mode have been reported [D. S. Clark and M. Tabak, Phys. Rev. E 72, 0056308 (2005).]. However, this model is limited in assuming a self-similar background implosion history as well as only addressing growth from a perturbation of already nonlinearly large amplitude. Additionally, only the case of single-mode growth was considered and not the multimode growth of interest in applications. Here, these deficiencies are remedied. First, the connection of the recent nonlinear results including convergence to the well-known results for the linear regime of growth is demonstrated. Second, the applicability of the model to more general implosion histories (i.e., not self-similar) is shown. Finally, to address the case of multimode growth with convergence, the recent nonlinear single mode results are combined with the Haan model formulation for weakly nonlinear multimode growth. Remarkably, convergence in the nonlinear regime is found not to modify substantially the multimode predictions of Haan's original model

  19. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x1014W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%endash 7% over a 600-μm-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-μm and 60-μm wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-μm-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-μm perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-μm case when compared to targets without foam. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2−10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6–1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06–10 T) could result in a factor of 2–500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix

  1. Three-dimensional Numerical Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingale, M.; Woosley, S. E.; Rendleman, C. A.; Day, M. S.; Bell, J. B.

    2005-10-01

    Flame instabilities play a dominant role in accelerating the burning front to a large fraction of the speed of sound in a Type Ia supernova. We present a three-dimensional numerical simulation of a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable carbon flame, following its evolution through the transition to turbulence. A low-Mach number hydrodynamics method is used, freeing us from the harsh time step restrictions imposed by sound waves. We fully resolve the thermal structure of the flame and its reaction zone, eliminating the need for a flame model. A single density is considered, 1.5×107 g cm-3, and half-carbon, half-oxygen fuel: conditions under which the flame propagated in the flamelet regime in our related two-dimensional study. We compare to a corresponding two-dimensional simulation and show that while fire polishing keeps the small features suppressed in two dimensions, turbulence wrinkles the flame on far smaller scales in the three-dimensional case, suggesting that the transition to the distributed burning regime occurs at higher densities in three dimensions. Detailed turbulence diagnostics are provided. We show that the turbulence follows a Kolmogorov spectrum and is highly anisotropic on the large scales, with a much larger integral scale in the direction of gravity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that it becomes more isotropic as it cascades down to small scales. On the basis of the turbulent statistics and the flame properties of our simulation, we compute the Gibson scale. We show the progress of the turbulent flame through a classic combustion regime diagram, indicating that the flame just enters the distributed burning regime near the end of our simulation.

  2. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x1014 W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 μm diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 μm wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  3. Simulating coronal condensation dynamics in 3D

    CERN Document Server

    Moschou, S P; Xia, C; Fang, X

    2015-01-01

    We present numerical simulations in 3D settings where coronal rain phenomena take place in a magnetic configuration of a quadrupolar arcade system. Our simulation is a magnetohydrodynamic simulation including anisotropic thermal conduction, optically thin radiative losses, and parametrised heating as main thermodynamical features to construct a realistic arcade configuration from chromospheric to coronal heights. The plasma evaporation from chromospheric and transition region heights eventually causes localised runaway condensation events and we witness the formation of plasma blobs due to thermal instability, that evolve dynamically in the heated arcade part and move gradually downwards due to interchange type dynamics. Unlike earlier 2.5D simulations, in this case there is no large scale prominence formation observed, but a continuous coronal rain develops which shows clear indications of Rayleigh-Taylor or interchange instability, that causes the denser plasma located above the transition region to fall do...

  4. 3D dynamics of hydrous thermal-chemical plumes in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, G.; Gerya, T.; Yuen, D.; Connolly, J. A. D.

    2009-04-01

    Mantle wedges are identified as sites of intense thermal convection and thermal-chemical Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities ("cold plumes") controlling distribution and intensity of magmatic activity in subduction zones. To investigate 3D hydrous partially molten cold plumes forming in the mantle wedge in response to slab dehydration, we perform 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of the intraoceanic one-sided subduction with spontaneously bending retreating slab characterized by weak hydrated upper interface. I3ELVIS code is used which is developed based on multigrid approach combined with marker-in-cell method with conservative finite-difference schemes. We investigated regional 800 km wide and 200 km deep 3D subduction models with variable 200 to 800 km lateral dimension along the trench using uniform numerical staggered grid with 405x101x101 nodal points and up to 50 million markers. Our results show three patterns (roll(sheet)-, zig-zag- and finger-like) of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities can develop above the subducting slab, which are controlled by effective viscosity of partially molten rocks. Spatial and temporal periodicity of plumes correlate well with that of volcanic activity in natural intraoceanic arcs such as Japan. High laterally variable surface heat flow predicted in the arc region in response to thermal-chemical plumes activity is also consistent with natural observations.

  5. One-dimensional-turbulence simulations of reactive Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Esteban; Kerstein, Alan; Lignell, David

    2011-11-01

    We consider the problem of reactive Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence in the Boussinesq framework, and model combustion with a reaction-progress-variable method, and a KPP reaction. The interesting feature of this problem is that the interface (flame) between heavy/cold reactants and light/hot products moves against gravity. Such problem is challenging because of the delicate interplay between turbulence, buoyancy, and reactions, and the wide separation between large and small scales. One model that has the capabilities to deal with these challenges is the one-dimensional-turbulence (ODT) model. In this talk, we discuss ODT results for non-reactive and reactive Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence, and compare them with those from direct numerical simulations (DNS). Here, the key advantage of ODT over DNS is that it can be used to explore larger parameter spaces. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  6. Turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor flow driven by time-varying accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Lawrie, Andrew; Muthuraman, Karthik; UNC-LMFA Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    We report on numerical simulations of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor flow subject to variable acceleration histories. The acceleration profiles were inspired by experiments and theoretical studies, and include an impulsive acceleration, accel-decel profiles, as well as a constant drive as the baseline case. The simulations were performed using the MOBILE software, a variable-density, incompressible fluid flow code. The advection algorithm employs a 3rd-order, monotonicity-preserving upwind scheme, allowing the definition of sharp interfaces in the flow, while pressure convergence is accelerated by the use of a multi-grid scheme. The simulations are initialized with two classes of perturbations: narrow-band, short-wavelength modes and broadband with long-wavelength modes. The effect of initial amplitudes on the perturbations is investigated under the variable drive conditions. The acceleration profiles are capable of producing stages of ``demixing,'' useful in validating turbulence models of RTI.

  7. Formation of large-scale structures with sharp density gradient through Rayleigh-Taylor growth in a two-dimensional slab under the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-fluid and the finite Larmor effects on linear and nonlinear growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a two-dimensional slab are studied numerically with special attention to high-wave-number dynamics and nonlinear structure formation at a low β-value. The two effects stabilize the unstable high wave number modes for a certain range of the β-value. In nonlinear simulations, the absence of the high wave number modes in the linear stage leads to the formation of the density field structure much larger than that in the single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation, together with a sharp density gradient as well as a large velocity difference. The formation of the sharp velocity difference leads to a subsequent Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability only when both the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius terms are incorporated, whereas it is not observed otherwise. It is shown that the emergence of the secondary instability can modify the outline of the turbulent structures associated with the primary Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  8. Test Problem: Tilted Rayleigh-Taylor for 2-D Mixing Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Malcolm J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Youngs, David L. [AWE

    2012-08-14

    The 'tilted-rig' test problem originates from a series of experiments (Smeeton & Youngs, 1987, Youngs, 1989) performed at AWE in the late 1980's, that followed from the 'rocket-rig' experiments (Burrows et al., 1984; Read & Youngs, 1983), and exploratory experiments performed at Imperial College (Andrews, 1986; Andrews and Spalding, 1990). A schematic of the experiment is shown in Figure 1, and comprises a tank filled with light fluid above heavy, and then 'tilted' on one side of the apparatus, thus causing an 'angled interface' to the acceleration history due to rockets. Details of the configuration given in the next chapter include: fluids, dimensions, and other necessary details to simulate the experiment. Figure 2 shows results from two experiments, Case 110 (which is the source for this test problem) that has an Atwood number of 0.5, and Case 115 (a secondary source described in Appendix B), with Atwood of 0.9 Inspection of the photograph in Figure 2 (the main experimental diagnostic) for Case 110. reveals two main areas for mix development; 1) a large-scale overturning motion that produces a rising plume (spike) on the left, and falling plume (bubble) on the right, that are almost symmetric; and 2) a Rayleigh-Taylor driven mixing central mixing region that has a large-scale rotation associated with the rising and falling plumes, and also experiences lateral strain due to stretching of the interface by the plumes, and shear across the interface due to upper fluid moving downward and to the right, and lower fluid moving upward and to the left. Case 115 is similar but differs by a much larger Atwood of 0.9 that drives a strong asymmetry between a left side heavy spike penetration and a right side light bubble penetration. Case 110 is chosen as the source for the present test problem as the fluids have low surface tension (unlike Case 115) due the addition of a surfactant, the asymmetry small (no need to have fine

  9. Hydrodynamic instability of compressible fluid in porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrodynamic Rayleigh -Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids in porous medium has been studied. The dispersion relation is derived for such a medium by using normal mode analysis. The RT instability is discussed for various simplified configuration. The effect of porosity and dynamic viscosity has been analyzed and it is observed that porosity and dynamic viscosity have stabilizing effect on the Rayleigh- Taylor instability of compressible fluids.

  10. RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRENGTH EXPERIMENTS OF THE PRESSURE-INDUCED alpha->epsilon->alpha' PHASE TRANSITION IN IRON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belof, J L; Cavallo, R M; Olson, R T; King, R S; Gray, G T; Holtkamp, D B; Chen, S R; Rudd, R E; Barton, N R; Arsenlis, A; Remington, B A; Park, H; Prisbrey, S T; Vitello, P A; Bazan, G; Mikaelian, K O; Comley, A J; Maddox, B R; May, M J

    2011-08-10

    We present here the first dynamic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) strength measurement of a material undergoing solid-solid phase transition. Iron is quasi-isentropically driven across the pressure-induced bcc ({alpha}-Fe) {yields} hcp ({var_epsilon}-Fe) phase transition and the dynamic strength of the {alpha}, {var_epsilon} and reverted {alpha}{prime} phases have been determined via proton radiography of the resulting Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface between the iron target and high-explosive products. Simultaneous velocimetry measurements of the iron free surface yield the phase transition dynamics and, in conjunction with detailed hydrodynamic simulations, allow for determination of the strength of the distinct phases of iron. Forward analysis of the experiment via hydrodynamic simulations reveals significant strength enhancement of the dynamically-generated {var_epsilon}-Fe and reverted {alpha}{prime}-Fe, comparable in magnitude to the strength of austenitic stainless steels.

  11. Rayleigh Taylor Growth At An Embedded Interface Driven By A Radiative Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Raman, K. S.; Miles, A. R.; MacLaren, S. A.; Kalantar, D. H.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Doss, F. W.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Wan, W.; Drake, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    Radiative shocks are those where the radiation generated by the shock influences the hydrodynamics of the matter in the system. Radiative shocks occur during supernovae, as well as during the rebound phase of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. In the presence of a radiative shock, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth at an unstable interface may be reduced relative to the growth from a purely hydrodynamic system. Using a 325 eV hohlraum on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), we are able to, for the first time, generate a radiative shock that traverses an RT-unstable interface. Because the generation of radiation at the shock front is a strong function of shock velocity (~v8), the RT growth in the presence of fast and slow shocks were directly compared. We observe reduced RT spike development when the driving shock is expected to be radiative. The amplitude of the unstable embedded feature was in good agreement with 2D models for both the low-drive (225 eV) and high drive (325 eV) cases. This result has important implications for our understanding of astrophysical radiative shocks, as well as the dynamics of ICF capsules. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor growth and imprint reduction using foam buffer layers on the Omega Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, R. G.; Duke, J. R.; Elliot, N. E.; Gobby, P. L.; Hollis, R. V.; Kopp, R. A.; Mason, R. J.; Pollak, G.; Wilson, D. C.; Willi, O.; Kalantar, D. H.; Boehly, T. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.

    1997-11-01

    A serious concern for directly driven ICF implosions is the asymmetry imparted to the capsule by laser drive nonuniformities. A distributed phase plate (DPP) with speckle pattern averaged over several coherence times by smoothing with spectral dispersion (SSD) still retains an ``early time imprint''. A supersonically preheated foam, with Au preheat layer, may reduce this imprint, by creating a low density, high temperature thermal plasma between the absorption and ablation surfaces. We report on experiments using machined polystyrene (PS) foams at 30 mg/cc on the Omega laser at 351 nm. The Rayleigh-Taylor growth of intentional solid substrate mass modulations was measured. Similar observed growth with and without foam suggests at most minor isentrope changes in the solid due to the presence of the foam. Significant reduction in the imprint from the OMEGA beams with DPP and distributed polarization rotators (DPR) but without smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) is observed when a foam buffer is employed. Recent experimental results will be shown and compared to simulations.

  13. An Investigation of the Influence of Initial Conditions on Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O

    2004-10-04

    Experiments and direct numerical simulations (DNS) have been performed to examine the effects of initial conditions on the dynamics of a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable mixing layer. Experiments were performed on a water channel facility to measure the interfacial and velocity perturbations initially present at the two-fluid interface in a small Atwood number mixing layer. The experimental measurements have been parameterized for use in numerical simulations of the experiment. Two- and three-dimensional DNS of the experiment have been performed using the parameterized initial conditions. It is shown that simulations implemented with initial velocity and density perturbations, rather than density perturbations alone, are required to match experimentally-measured statistics and spectra. Data acquired from both the experiment and numerical simulations are used to examine the role of initial conditions on the evolution of integral-scale, turbulence, and mixing statistics. Early-time turbulence and mixing statistics are shown to be strongly-dependent upon the early-time transition of the initial perturbation from a weakly-nonlinear to a strongly-nonlinear flow.

  14. The Nonlinear Asymptotic Stage of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Wide Bubbles and Narrowing Spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Cherniavski, V. M.; Shtemler, Yu. M.

    2013-01-01

    The potential flow of an incompressible inviscid heavy fluid over a light one is considered. The integral version of the method of matched asymptotic expansion is applied to the construction of the solution over long intervals of time. The asymptotic solution describes the flow in which a bubble rises with constant speed and the "tongue" is in free fall. The outer expansion is stationary, but the inner one depends on time. It is shown that the solution exists within the same range of Froude n...

  15. The Nonlinear Asymptotic Stage of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Wide Bubbles and Narrowing Spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Cherniavski, V M

    2013-01-01

    The potential flow of an incompressible inviscid heavy fluid over a light one is considered. The integral version of the method of matched asymptotic expansion is applied to the construction of the solution over long intervals of time. The asymptotic solution describes the flow in which a bubble rises with constant speed and the "tongue" is in free fall. The outer expansion is stationary, but the inner one depends on time. It is shown that the solution exists within the same range of Froude number obtained previously by Vanden-Broeck (1984a,b). The Froude number and the solution depend on the initial energy of the disturbance. At the top of the bubble, the derivative of the free-surface curvature has a discontinuity when the Froude number is not equal to 0.23. This makes it possible to identify the choice of the solution obtained in a number of studies with the presence of an artificial numerical surface tension. The first correction term in the neighborhood of the tongue is obtained when large surface tensio...

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities and Mixing in Stratified Cylindrical Shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikaelian, K O

    2004-04-15

    We study the linear stability of an arbitrary number N of cylindrical concentric shells undergoing a radial implosion or explosion.We derive the evolution equation for the perturbation {eta}{sub i} at interface i; it is coupled to the two adjacent interfaces via {eta}{sub i{+-}1}. For N=2, where there is only one interface, we verify Bell's conjecture as to the form of the evolution equation for arbitrary {rho}{sub 1} and {rho}{sub 2}, the fluid densities on either side of the interface. We obtain several analytic solutions for the N=2 and 3 cases. We discuss freeze-out, a phenomenon that can occur in all three geometries (planar, cylindrical, or spherical), and ''critical modes'' that are stable for any implosion or explosion history and occur only in cylindrical or spherical geometries. We present numerical simulations of possible gelatin-ring experiments illustrating perturbation feedthrough from one interface to another. We also develop a simple model for the evolution of turbulent mix in cylindrical geometry and define a geometrical factor G as the ratio h{sub cylindrical}/h{sub planar} between cylindrical and planar mixing layers. We find that G is a decreasing function of R/R{sub o}, implying that in our model h{sub cylindrical} evolves faster (slower) than h{sub planar} during an implosion (explosion).

  17. Analytical model of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the deceleration phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sharp boundary model for the deceleration phase of imploding capsules in inertial confinement fusion, in both direct and indirect drive, has been developed. The model includes heat conduction, local α-particle energy deposition, and shell compressibility effects. A differential equation for the temporal evolution of the modal amplitude interface is obtained. It is found that the α-particle energy has a strong influence on the evolution of the low l modes, via the compressibility of the shell. The modes are damped by vorticity convection, fire polishing, and α-particle energy deposition. The existence of a cutoff l number arises from the high blow of velocity into the hot region (rocket effect) if density gradient scale length effects are taken into account at the interface. The differential equation for the modal amplitude is used as a postprocessor to the results of 1D-SARA code [J. J. Honrubia, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer. 49, 491 (1993)] in a typical capsule for indirect-drive ignition designed on the National Ignition Facility. It is found that modes with l>180 are completely stabilized. The results are in agreement with two-dimensional simulations

  18. Analytical model of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the deceleration phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, J.; Betti, R.

    2005-04-01

    A sharp boundary model for the deceleration phase of imploding capsules in inertial confinement fusion, in both direct and indirect drive, has been developed. The model includes heat conduction, local α-particle energy deposition, and shell compressibility effects. A differential equation for the temporal evolution of the modal amplitude interface is obtained. It is found that the α-particle energy has a strong influence on the evolution of the low l modes, via the compressibility of the shell. The modes are damped by vorticity convection, fire polishing, and α-particle energy deposition. The existence of a cutoff l number arises from the high blow of velocity into the hot region (rocket effect) if density gradient scale length effects are taken into account at the interface. The differential equation for the modal amplitude is used as a postprocessor to the results of 1D-SARA code [J. J. Honrubia, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer. 49, 491 (1993)] in a typical capsule for indirect-drive ignition designed on the National Ignition Facility. It is found that modes with l >180 are completely stabilized. The results are in agreement with two-dimensional simulations.

  19. Spike morphology in blast-wave-driven instability experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laboratory experiments described in the present paper observe the blast-wave-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability with three-dimensional (3D) initial conditions. About 5 kJ of energy from the Omega laser creates conditions similar to those of the He-H interface during the explosion phase of a supernova. The experimental target is a 150 μm thick plastic disk followed by a low-density foam. The plastic piece has an embedded, 3D perturbation. The basic structure of the pattern is two orthogonal sine waves where each sine wave has an amplitude of 2.5 μm and a wavelength of 71 μm. In some experiments, an additional wavelength is added to explore the interaction of modes. In experiments with 3D initial conditions the spike morphology differs from what has been observed in other Rayleigh-Taylor experiments and simulations. Under certain conditions, experimental radiographs show some mass extending from the interface to the shock front. Current simulations show neither the spike morphology nor the spike penetration observed in the experiments. The amount of mass reaching the shock front is analyzed and potential causes for the spike morphology and the spikes reaching the shock are discussed. One such hypothesis is that these phenomena may be caused by magnetic pressure, generated by an azimuthal magnetic field produced by the plasma dynamics.

  20. 3D Printing Variable Stiffness Foams Using Viscous Thread Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Jeffrey I; Lipson, Hod

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of cellular structures has numerous applications ranging from fabrication of biological scaffolds and medical implants, to mechanical weight reduction and control over mechanical properties. Various additive manufacturing processes have been used to produce open regular cellular structures limited only by the resolution of the printer. These efforts have focused on printing explicitly designed cells or explicitly planning offsets between strands. Here we describe a technique for producing cellular structures implicitly by inducing viscous thread instability when extruding material. This process allows us to produce complex cellular structures at a scale that is finer than the native resolution of the printer. We demonstrate tunable effective elastic modulus and density that span two orders of magnitude. Fine grained cellular structures allow for fabrication of foams for use in a wide range of fields ranging from bioengineering, to robotics to food printing. PMID:27503148

  1. 3D Printing Variable Stiffness Foams Using Viscous Thread Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Jeffrey I.; Lipson, Hod

    2016-08-01

    Additive manufacturing of cellular structures has numerous applications ranging from fabrication of biological scaffolds and medical implants, to mechanical weight reduction and control over mechanical properties. Various additive manufacturing processes have been used to produce open regular cellular structures limited only by the resolution of the printer. These efforts have focused on printing explicitly designed cells or explicitly planning offsets between strands. Here we describe a technique for producing cellular structures implicitly by inducing viscous thread instability when extruding material. This process allows us to produce complex cellular structures at a scale that is finer than the native resolution of the printer. We demonstrate tunable effective elastic modulus and density that span two orders of magnitude. Fine grained cellular structures allow for fabrication of foams for use in a wide range of fields ranging from bioengineering, to robotics to food printing.

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor Gravity Waves and Quasiperiodic Oscillation Phenomenon in X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-01-01

    Accretion onto compact objects in X-ray binaries (black hole, neutron star (NS), white dwarf) is characterized by non-uniform flow density profiles. Such an effect of heterogeneity in presence of gravitational forces and pressure gradients exhibits Rayleigh-Taylor gravity waves (RTGW). They should be seen as quasiperiodic wave oscillations (QPO) of the accretion flow in the transition (boundary) layer between the Keplerian disk and the central object. In this paper the author shows that the main QPO frequency, which is very close to the Keplerian frequency, is split into separate frequencies (hybrid and low branch) under the influence of the gravitational forces in the rotational frame of reference. The RTGWs must be present and the related QPOs should be detected in any system where the gravity, buoyancy and Coriolis force effects cannot be excluded (even in the Earth and solar environments). The observed low and high QPO frequencies are an intrinsic signature of the RTGW. The author elaborates the conditions for the density profile when the RTGW oscillations are stable. A comparison of the inferred QPO frequencies with QPO observations is presented. The author finds that hectohertz frequencies detected from NS binaries can be identified as the RTGW low branch frequencies. The author also predicts that an observer can see the double NS spin frequency during the NS long (super) burst events when the pressure gradients and buoyant forces are suppressed. The Coriolis force is the only force which acts in the rotational frame of reference and its presence causes perfect coherent pulsations with a frequency twice of the NS spin. The QPO observations of neutron binaries have established that the high QPO frequencies do not go beyond of the certain upper limit. The author explains this observational effect as a result of the density profile inversions. Also the author demonstrates that a particular problem of the gravity waves in the rotational frame of reference in the

  3. How Do Hydrodynamic Instabilities Affect 3D Transport in Geophysical Vortices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding three-dimensional (3D) transport in ocean eddies is important for processes at a variety of scales, ranging from plankton production to climate variability. It is well known that geophysical vortices are subject to various hydrodynamic instabilities. Yet the influence of these instabilities on 3D material transport in vortex systems is not well investigated. Focusing on barotropic, inertial and 3D instabilities, we analyze these instabilities with normal-mode method, and reproduce their characteristics via highly-resolved numerical simulations using a spectral element Navier-Stokes solver. By comparing the simulation results of stable and unstable vortices, we investigate the joint impacts of instabilities on 3D transport through three major aspects: (i) energy transfer, (ii) overturning transport of the secondary circulation, and (iii) rates of vertical exchange and mixing. It is found that instabilities can enhance local nonlinear interactions and cause the kinetic energy wavenumber spectrum to have slopes between the conventional -5/3 and -3 at inertial ranges. The cascade of a new quantity is proposed to explain these non-conventional slopes. One of our main results is the discovery of material exchange between the central vortex and satellite vortices through 3D pathways, called funnels. These funnels modify the concept of elliptic regions that can trap material when confined to 2D dynamics. Thus, we show that a family of vortices, created by the hydrodynamic instabilities of the initially unstable vortex, can still continue to operate in unity in order to complete the 3D transport in these systems. We also show that flow instabilities can double the magnitude of vertical velocity, increase the rate of vertical exchange by an order of magnitude and enhance mixing rate more than 100%.

  4. 3D printing meets computational astrophysics: deciphering the structure of η Carinae's inner colliding winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (≳120 M⊙), highly eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary star system η Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF (Portable Document Format) journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyse data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of η Carinae's inner (r ˜ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown `finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ˜ 1.045) that protrude radially outwards from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the fast (3000 km s-1), adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unrecognized physical features highlight the important role 3D printing and interactive graphics can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  5. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  6. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae's Inner Colliding Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Madura, Thomas I; Gull, Theodore R; Kruip, Chael J H; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 M_Sun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary star system Eta Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyze data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (phi ~ 1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise a...

  7. Global gyrokinetic models for energetic particle driven Alfvén instabilities in 3D equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Don; Holod, Ihor

    2015-11-01

    The GTC global gyrokinetic PIC model has been adapted to 3D VMEC equilibria and provides a new method for the analysis of Alfvénic instabilities in stellarators, 3D tokamaks, and helical RFP states. The gyrokinetic orderings (k||/k⊥ applicable to a range of energetic particle driven instabilities that have been observed in 3D configurations. Applications of this model to stellarators have indicated that a variety of different Alfvén instabilities can be excited, depending on the toroidal mode number, fast ion average energy and fast ion density profile. Both an LHD discharge where bursting n = 1 Alfvén activity in the TAE gap was observed and a W7-X case have been examined. TAE,/EAE/GAE modes have been found in the simulations, depending on the mode family and fast ion profiles used. The dynamical evolution of the instabilities shows the field period coupling between n and n + Nfp expected for a stellarator. The development of gyrofluid reduced models that can capture relevant physics aspects of the gyrokinetic models will also be discussed. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC and the GSEP SciDAC Center.

  8. 3D Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Current-Driven Instability. I. Instability of a static column

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability through three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations. A static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study the influence of the initial configuration on the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability. We found that the initial configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the kink instability. The instability develops as predicted by linear theory. In the non-linear regime the kink amplitude continues to increase up to the terminal simulation time, albeit at different rates, for all but one simulation. The growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the CD kink instability depends moderately on the density profile and strongly on the magnetic pitch profile. The growth rate of the kink mode is reduced in the linear regime by an increase in the magnetic pitch with radius and the non-linear regime is reached at a later time than for constant helical pitch. On the other hand, the g...

  9. 3D Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Current-Driven Instability. 1; Instability of a Static Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability through three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations. A static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study the influence of the initial configuration on the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability. We found that the initial configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the kink instability. The instability develops as predicted by linear theory. In the non-linear regime the kink amplitude continues to increase up to the terminal simulation time, albeit at different rates, for all but one simulation. The growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the CD kink instability depends moderately on the density profile and strongly on the magnetic pitch profile. The growth rate of the kink mode is reduced in the linear regime by an increase in the magnetic pitch with radius and the non-linear regime is reached at a later time than for constant helical pitch. On the other hand, the growth rate of the kink mode is increased in the linear regime by a decrease in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the non-linear regime sooner than the case with constant magnetic pitch. Kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime for decreasing magnetic pitch leads to a slender helically twisted column wrapped by magnetic field. On the other hand, kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime nearly ceases for increasing magnetic pitch.

  10. Relativistic MHD simulations of core-collapse GRB jets: 3D instabilities and magnetic dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberg, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Relativistic jets naturally occur in astrophysical systems that involve accretion onto compact objects, such as core collapse of massive stars in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and accretion onto supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN). It is generally accepted that these jets are powered electromagnetically, by the magnetised rotation of a central compact object. However, how they produce the observed emission and survive the propagation for many orders of magnitude in distance without being disrupted by current-driven non-axisymmetric instabilities is the subject of active debate. We carry out time-dependent 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic, Poynting flux dominated jets. The jets are launched self-consistently by the rotation of a strongly magnetised central compact object. This determines the natural degree of azimuthal magnetic field winding, a crucial factor that controls jet stability. We find that the jets are susceptible to two types of instability: (i) a globa...

  11. A 3D GCL compatible cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving gas dynamics equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Gabriel; Breil, Jérôme; Maire, Pierre-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Solving the gas dynamics equations under the Lagrangian formalism enables to simulate complex flows with strong shock waves. This formulation is well suited to the simulation of multi-material compressible fluid flows such as those encountered in the domain of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These types of flows are characterized by complex 3D structures such as hydrodynamic instabilities (Richtmyer-Meshkov, Rayleigh-Taylor, etc.). Recently, the 3D extension of different Lagrangian schemes has been proposed and appears to be challenging. More precisely, the definition of the cell geometry in the 3D space through the treatment of its non-planar faces and the limiting of a reconstructed field in 3D in the case of a second-order extension are of great interest. This paper proposes two new methods to solve these problems. A systematic and symmetric geometrical decomposition of polyhedral cells is presented. This method enables to define a discrete divergence operator leading to the respect of the Geometric Conservation Law (GCL). Moreover, a multi-dimensional minmod limiter is proposed. This new limiter constructs, from nodal gradients, a cell gradient which enables to ensure the monotonicity of the numerical solution even in presence of strong discontinuity. These new ingredients are employed into a cell-centered Lagrangian scheme. Robustness and accuracy are assessed against various representative test cases.

  12. Coupling frontal photopolymerization and surface instabilities for a novel 3D patterning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Alessandra; Hennessy, Matthew; Matar, Omar; Douglas, Jack; Cabral, João

    2015-03-01

    Patterning of soft matter provides an exceptional route for the generation of micro/nanostructured and functional surfaces. We describe a new 3D fabrication process based on coupling frontal photopolymerization (FPP) with precisely controlled, yet spontaneous, interfacial wrinkling. FPP is a complex spatio-temporal process that can lead to well-defined propagating fronts of network formation, both stable and unstable. We investigate this process focusing on the interfacial monomer-to-polymer conversion profile and its wave propagation. A simple coarse-grained model is found to describe remarkably well the planar frontal logarithmic kinetics, capturing the effects of UV light exposure time (or dose) and temperature, as well as the front position. In defined conditions, surface instabilities are introduced and interfere with wave planarity, resulting in the formation of ``minimal'' surfaces with complex 3D geometries. Building on this understanding on the propagation of wavefronts of network formation during photopolymerization, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of 3D patterned polymer materials with tunable shapes with optical and surface functionality.

  13. Dynamical Instability and Soliton Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of dynamical instability and clustering (stable fragments formation) in a breakup of excited nuclear systems are considered from the points of view of the soliton concept. It is noted that the volume (spinodal) instability can be associated with nonlinear terms, and the surface (Rayleigh-Taylor type) instability, with the dispersion terms in the evolution equations. The spinodal instability and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability may compensate each other and lead to stable quasi-soliton type objects. The simple analytical model is presented to illustrate this physical picture. The time evolution of an initially compressed cold nuclear system is analysed in the framework of the inverse mean-field method. It is demonstrated that the nonlinearity and dispersion terms of the evolution equations can lead to clusterization in the final channel. 8 p

  14. Instabilities at planetary gap edges in 3D self-gravitating disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Min-Kai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations are presented to study the stability of gaps opened by giant planets in 3D self-gravitating disks. In weakly self-gravitating disks, a few vortices develop at the gap edge and merge on orbital time-scales. The result is one large but weak vortex with Rossby number -0.01. In moderately self-gravitating disks, more vortices develop and their merging is resisted on dynamical time-scales. Self-gravity can sustain multi-vortex configurations, with Rossby number -0.2 to -0.1, over a time-scale of order 100 orbits. Self-gravity also enhances the vortex vertical density stratification, even in disks with initial Toomre parameter of order 10. However, vortex formation is suppressed in strongly self-gravitating disks and replaced by a global spiral instability associated with the gap edge which develops during gap formation.

  15. Quasi 3D ECE imaging system for study of MHD instabilities in KSTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, G S; Lee, W; Choi, M J; Lee, J; Kim, M; Leem, J; Nam, Y; Choe, G H; Park, H K; Park, H; Woo, D S; Kim, K W; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Ito, N; Mase, A; Lee, S G

    2014-11-01

    A second electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system has been installed on the KSTAR tokamak, toroidally separated by 1/16th of the torus from the first ECEI system. For the first time, the dynamical evolutions of MHD instabilities from the plasma core to the edge have been visualized in quasi-3D for a wide range of the KSTAR operation (B0 = 1.7∼3.5 T). This flexible diagnostic capability has been realized by substantial improvements in large-aperture quasi-optical microwave components including the development of broad-band polarization rotators for imaging of the fundamental ordinary ECE as well as the usual 2nd harmonic extraordinary ECE. PMID:25430233

  16. Quasi 3D ECE imaging system for study of MHD instabilities in KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, G. S., E-mail: gunsu@postech.ac.kr; Choi, M. J.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Leem, J.; Nam, Y.; Choe, G. H. [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W.; Park, H. K. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H.; Woo, D. S.; Kim, K. W. [School of Electrical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Ito, N. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Mase, A. [Ube National College of Technology, Ube-shi, Yamaguchi 755-8555 (Japan); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    A second electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system has been installed on the KSTAR tokamak, toroidally separated by 1/16th of the torus from the first ECEI system. For the first time, the dynamical evolutions of MHD instabilities from the plasma core to the edge have been visualized in quasi-3D for a wide range of the KSTAR operation (B{sub 0} = 1.7∼3.5 T). This flexible diagnostic capability has been realized by substantial improvements in large-aperture quasi-optical microwave components including the development of broad-band polarization rotators for imaging of the fundamental ordinary ECE as well as the usual 2nd harmonic extraordinary ECE.

  17. Etude expérimentale des conditions initiales de l'instabilité de Rayleigh-Taylor au front d'ablation en fusion par confinement inertiel

    OpenAIRE

    Delorme, Barthélémy

    2015-01-01

    Les différents dimensionnements et expériences de Fusion par Confinement Inertiel (FCI) en attaque directe comme indirecte montrent qu'une des principales limites à l'atteinte de l'ignition est l'instabilité de Rayleigh-Taylor (IRT) qui cause la rupture de la coquille de la cible en vol et potentiellement le mélange du combustible chaud du coeur avec celui, froid, de la coquille. La connaissance, la compréhension et la maîtrise des conditions initiales de ce mécanisme sont donc d'un grand int...

  18. Thermo/Soluto-capillary instabilities in 3D bi-component liquid pools using DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Adam; Saenz, Pedro; Valluri, Prashant; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-11-01

    The behaviour of surface tension dominated flows in the presence of a temperature gradient and phase change is of great importance in designing micro-cooling devices. While evaporating pools and droplets have been investigated numerically and experimentally, these studies have dealt only with pure fluids. For bicomponent liquid mixtures, limited experimental studies have been conducted but a rigorous numerical model is absent. We present a two-phase multicomponent DNS model to simulate thermo/soluto-capillary instabilities in bicomponent liquid layers subject to a horizontal temperature gradient. The strategy fully accounts for a deformable interface using a variant of volume-of-fluid method. The presence of a second component introduces thermophoresis in the liquid phase which then gives rise to solutal Marangoni effects. By combining mixture thermodynamics with multiphase DNS, we investigate thermo/soluto-capillary and interfacial instabilities of a 3D bicomponent liquid pool. An important aspect we quantify is the strength of solutal over thermal Marangoni convection and its effect on stability of resultant interfacial waves and phase-separation in the liquid. The model is robust enough to include phase-change and the advection-diffusion of volatile species in the gas phase. Funded by EPSRC, Grant No. EP/K00963X/1.

  19. Understanding the structure of the turbulent mixing layer in hydrodynamic instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a heavy fluid is placed above a light fluid, tiny vertical perturbations in the interface create a characteristic structure of rising bubbles and falling spikes known as Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have received much attention over the past half-century because of their importance in understanding many natural and man-made phenomena, ranging from the rate of formation of heavy elements in supernovae to the design of capsules for Inertial Confinement Fusion. We present a new approach to analyze Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which we extract a hierarchical segmentation of the mixing envelope surface to identify bubbles and analyze analogous segmentations of fields on the original interface plane. We compute meaningful statistical information that reveals the evolution of topological features and corroborates the observations made by scientists

  20. MARCHING CUBES BASED FRONT TRACKING METHOD AND ITS APPLICATION TO SOME INTERFACE INSTABILITY PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing-yi; ZOU Jian-feng; ZHENG Yao; REN An-lu

    2011-01-01

    A front tracking method based on a marching cubes isosurface extractor,which is related filter generating isosurfaces from a structured point set,is provided to achieve sharp resolution for the simulation of non-diffusive interfacial flow.Compared with the traditional topology processing procedure,the current front tracking method is easier to be implemented and presents high performance in terms of computational resources.The numerical tests for 2-D highly-shearing flows and 3-D bubbles merging process are conducted to numerically examine the performance of the current methodology for tracking interfaces between two immiscible fluids.The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability problems are successfully investigated with the present marching cubes based front tracking method.

  1. Computational and experimental studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing: Review of VNIIEF efforts. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronov, V.A.; Zhidov, I.G.; Meskov, E.E.; Nevmerzhitskii, N.V.; Nikiforov, V.V.; Razin, A.N.; Rogatchev, V.G.; Tolshmyakov, A.I.; Yanilkin, Y.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The report presents the basic results of some calculations, theoretical and experimental efforts in the study of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities and the turbulent mixing which is caused by their evolution. Since the late forties the VNIIEF has been conducting these investigations. This report is based on the data which were published in different times in Russian and foreign journals. The first part of the report deals with calculations an theoretical techniques for the description of hydrodynamic instabilities applied currently, as well as with the results of several individual problems and their comparison with the experiment. These methods can be divided into two types: direct numerical simulation methods and phenomenological methods. The first type includes the regular 2D and 3D gasdynamical techniques as well as the techniques based on small perturbation approximation and on incompressible liquid approximation. The second type comprises the techniques based on various phenomenological turbulence models. The second part of the report describes the experimental methods and cites the experimental results of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meskov instability studies as well as of turbulent mixing. The applied methods were based on thin-film gaseous models, on jelly models and liquid layer models. The research was done for plane and cylindrical geometries. As drivers, the shock tubes of different designs were used as well as gaseous explosive mixtures, compressed air and electric wire explosions. The experimental results were applied in calculational-theoretical technique calibrations. The authors did not aim at covering all VNIIEF research done in this field of science. To a great extent the choice of the material depended on the personal contribution of the author in these studies.

  2. Simulation of the Initial 3-D Instability of an Impacting Drop Vortex Ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdson, Lorenz; Wiwchar, Justin; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    Computational vortex particle method simulations of a perturbed vortex ring are performed to recreate and understand the instability seen in impacting water drop experiments. Three fundamentally different initial vorticity distributions are used to attempt to trigger a Widnall instability, a...... Rayleigh centrifugal instability, or a vortex breakdown-type instability. Simulations which simply have a perturbed solitary ring result in an instability similar to that seen experimentally. Waviness of the core which would be expected from a Widnall instability is not visible. Adding an opposite......, though tests are not conclusive. Perhaps the opposite-signed secondary vortex was not strong enough or placed appropriately. Elliptical streamlines , as expected, are visible in the core of the solitary ring at early times. Support from the Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council grant...

  3. The effect of small 3D magnetic perturbations on linear micro-instability properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2014-10-01

    Small externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations can significantly alter the edge properties of tokamaks. In this work, we model the effect of the applied 3D fields on the flux surface deformation and show that these can alter key geometric properties of interest to microinstabilities. Shielding physics is assumed to be operative so that flux surface integrity is retained. Local 3D equilibrium theory is employed using a perturbative approach to calculate flux surface deformations consistent with magnetostatic force balance. Prior work has shown applied 3D fields can significantly alter ideal ballooning stability boundaries due to order unity 3D field induced changes to the local shear. The impact of 3D fields on ion temperature gradient and trapped electron mode growth rates are quantified using analytically derived proxy functions. Research supported by U.S. DoE Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53218.

  4. The quantification of glenoid bone loss in anterior shoulder instability; MR-arthro compared to 3D-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate if magnetic resonance imaging with intra-articular contrast (MR-arthro) is as reliable as three-dimensionally reconstructed computed tomography imaging (3D-CT) in quantifying the glenoid bone loss in patients with anterior shoulder instability. Thirty-five patients were included. Sagittal MR-arthro and 3D-CT images of the glenoid surface were obtained pre-operatively. Two observers measured these images twice with OsiriX software in a randomized and blinded way. The intraclass correlations (ICC) of the intra- and inter-observer reliability within one method and an additional Bland-Altman plot for calculating agreement between the two methods were obtained. The joint estimates of the intra-observer reliability, taking into account the data from both observer A and B, for 3D-CT and MR-arthro were good to excellent. The intra-observer reliability was 0.938 (95 % CI: 0.879, 0.968) for 3D-CT and 0.799 (95 % CI: 0.639, 0.837) for MR-arthro. The inter-observer reliability between the two observers within one method (3D-CT or MR-arthro) was moderate to good. 3D-CT: 0.724 (95 % CI: 0.236, 0.886) and MR-arthro: 0.534 (95 % CI: 0.128, 0.762). Comparing both the 3D-CT and MR-arthro method, a Bland-Altman plot showed satisfying differences with the majority of outcomes (89 %) within 1 SD. Good to excellent intra- and moderate to good inter-observer correlations and a satisfying Bland-Altman plot when compared to 3D-CT show tendencies that MR-arthro is reliable and valid for measuring bony defects of the glenoid. (orig.)

  5. 3D simulations of supernova remnants evolution including non-linear particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrand, Gilles; Ballet, Jean; Teyssier, Romain; Fraschetti, Federico

    2009-01-01

    If a sizeable fraction of the energy of supernova remnant shocks is channeled into energetic particles (commonly identified with Galactic cosmic rays), then the morphological evolution of the remnants must be distinctly modified. Evidence of such modifications has been recently obtained with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray satellites. To investigate these effects, we coupled a semi-analytical kinetic model of shock acceleration with a 3D hydrodynamic code (by means of an effective adiabatic index). This enables us to study the time-dependent compression of the region between the forward and reverse shocks due to the back reaction of accelerated particles, concomitantly with the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability at the contact discontinuity. Density profiles depend critically on the injection level eta of particles: for eta up to about 10^-4 modifications are weak and progressive, for eta of the order of 10^-3 modifications are strong and immediate. Nevertheless, the extension of the...

  6. Modeling hydrodynamic instabilities of double ablation fronts in inertial confinement fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Yanez C.; Sanz J; Olazabal-Loumé M.; Ibanez L.F.

    2013-01-01

    A linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability theory of double ablation (DA) fronts is developed for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Two approaches are discussed: an analytical discontinuity model for the radiation dominated regime of very steep DA front structure, and a numerical self-consistent model that covers more general hydrodynamic profiles behaviours. Dispersion relation results are compared to 2D simulations.

  7. Modeling hydrodynamic instabilities of double ablation fronts in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability theory of double ablation (DA) fronts is developed for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Two approaches are discussed: an analytical discontinuity model for the radiation dominated regime of very steep DA front structure, and a numerical self-consistent model that covers more general hydrodynamic profiles behaviours. Dispersion relation results are compared to 2D simulations. (authors)

  8. Self-organization of a plasma due to 3D evolution of the Weibel instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear evolution of the thermal Weibel instability is studied by using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. After a fast saturation due to a reduction in the temperature anisotropy, the instability evolves to a quasistationary state which includes a single mode long wavelength helical magnetic field and a finite degree of temperature anisotropy. The nonlinear stability of this state is explained by periodic variations of the temperature anisotropy axis. At long time scales the magnetic field, wave number, and temperature anisotropy slowly evolve to the decreasing magnitudes

  9. Effects of a weakly 3-D equilibrium on ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, C. C. [Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The effect of a small three-dimensional equilibrium distortion on an otherwise axisymmetric configuration is shown to be destabilizing to ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes. The calculations assume that the 3-D fields are weak and that shielding physics is present so that no islands appear in the resulting equilibrium. An eigenfunction that has coupled harmonics of different toroidal mode number is constructed using a perturbation approach. The theory is applied to the case of tokamak H-modes with shielded resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) present indicating RMPs can be destabilizing to intermediate-n peeling-ballooning modes.

  10. Physics and control of external kink instabilities with realistic 3D boundaries. A challenge for modern experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In present day devices, the external kink ideal MHD instability establishes hard operational boundaries for both the tokamak and the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) configurations. An interesting feature of it is that its growth rate critically depends on the device passive boundary characteristics and this can slow it down to time scales accessible to modern real time feedback control systems, normally using external active coils as actuators. 3D passive structures and external fields play a key role in determining physics and control of this instability. This is in particular true for equilibria with multimodal unstable RWM spectra where modes can couple to specific 3D features of passive and active magnetic boundary. In the paper we will present recent data and simulations from RFX-mod, a medium size (R = 2 m, a = 0.459 m) device able to confine RFP and tokamak plasmas with currents up to 2 MA and 120 kA, respectively. Successful quantitative modeling of multimodal RWM control experiments performed using different actuator configurations will be presented and commented. (author)

  11. 3D dislocation dynamics study of plastic instability in irradiated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset of plastic instability in neutron irradiated copper is investigated by computer simulation of the dynamics of the elastic interaction between dislocation loops emitted from Frank-Read (F-R) sources and irradiation-induced defect clusters. We show that small prismatic defect clusters produced directly from collision cascades are trapped in the stress field of slip dislocations, and that mobile clusters are absorbed in the dislocation core, when they approach within ∼6 nm. Sessile vacancy clusters are also absorbed within this 'stand-off' distance because of an induced surface tension on their stacking fault. The interaction between prismatic defect clusters in 'decorations' and dislocations is shown to provide significant resistance to the initiation of plastic deformation in irradiated copper (source hardening). Sessile stacking fault tetrahedra are also shown to resist dislocation motion by localized forces before they are absorbed and removed by activated dislocation sources. The significance of these mechanisms to initiation of localized deformation and plastic instability are discussed

  12. Statistical hydrodynamic models for mixing instability flows in turbulent regime: theoretical 0D evaluation criteria and comparison of one and two-fluid approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical criteria are defined to perform quick analytical evaluations of statistical hydro models for turbulent mixing flows induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. They are based on a global energy balance analysis of the mixing zone ('0D' projection) in the limit of zero Atwood number, for incompressible fluids, and in self-similar regime. It is then shown that single-fluid descriptions must be replaced by two-fluid descriptions, particularly for the Rayleigh-Taylor case with variable acceleration. The interaction between a shock and heterogeneities is also considered. Various approaches for the development of new models are finally given. (author)

  13. Instability of a Thin Conducting Foil Accelerated by a Finite Wavelength Intense Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Eliasson, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    We derive a theoretical model for the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT)-like instability for a thin foil accelerated by an intense laser, taking into account finite wavelength effects in the laser wave field. The latter leads to the diffraction of the electromagnetic wave off the periodic structures arising from the instability of the foil, which significantly modifies the growth rate of the RT-like instability when the perturbations on the foil have wavenumbers comparable to or larger than the laser wave...

  14. A high-order Godunov scheme for global 3D MHD accretion disks simulations. I. The linear growth regime of the magneto-rotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Flock, M; Klahr, H; Mignone, A

    2009-01-01

    We employ the PLUTO code for computational astrophysics to assess and compare the validity of different numerical algorithms on simulations of the magneto-rotational instability in 3D accretion disks. In particular we stress on the importance of using a consistent upwind reconstruction of the electro-motive force (EMF) when using the constrained transport (CT) method to avoid the onset of numerical instabilities. We show that the electro-motive force (EMF) reconstruction in the classical constrained transport (CT) method for Godunov schemes drives a numerical instability. The well-studied linear growth of magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is used as a benchmark for an inter-code comparison of PLUTO and ZeusMP. We reproduce the analytical results for linear MRI growth in 3D global MHD simulations and present a robust and accurate Godunov code which can be used for 3D accretion disk simulations in curvilinear coordinate systems.

  15. Hydrodynamic instability experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimonte, G.; Schneider, M.; Frerking, C.E.

    1995-07-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments are conducted on the Nova laser with strong radiatively driven shocks (Mach > 20) in planar, two-fluid targets with Atwood number A < 0. Single mode interfacial perturbations are used to test linear theory and 3D random perturbations are used to study turbulent mix. Rayleigh-Taylor experiments are conducted on a new facility called the Linear Electric Motor (LEM) in which macroscopic fluids are accelerated electromagnetically with arbitrary acceleration profiles. The initial experiments are described. Hydrodynamic simulations in 2D are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, but these studies show that simulations in 3D with good radiation transport and equation of state are needed.

  16. The collapse of protoplanetary clumps formed through disc instability: 3D simulations of the pre-dissociation phase

    CERN Document Server

    Galvagni, M; Boley, A C; Mayer, L; Roskar, R; Saha, P

    2012-01-01

    We present 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the collapse of clumps formed through gravitational instability in the outer part of a protoplanetary disc. The initial conditions are taken directly from a global disc simulation, and a realistic equation of state is used to follow the clumps as they contract over several orders of magnitude in density, approaching the molecular hydrogen dissociation stage. The effects of clump rotation, asymmetries, and radiative cooling are studied. Rotation provides support against fast collapse, but non-axisymmetric modes develop and efficiently transport angular momentum outward, forming a circumplanetary disc. This transport helps the clump reach the dynamical collapse phase, resulting from molecular hydrogen dissociation, on a thousand-year timescale, which is smaller than timescales predicted by some previous spherical 1D collapse models. Extrapolation to the threshold of the runaway hydrogen dissociation indicates that the collapse timescales can be shorte...

  17. Instability growth for magnetized liner inertial fusion seeded by electro-thermal, electro-choric, and material strength effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical limitation of magnetically imploded systems such as magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability which primarily disrupts the outer surface of the liner. MagLIF-relevant experiments have showed large amplitude multi-mode MRT instability growth growing from surface roughness [McBride et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 135004 (2012)], which is only reproduced by 3D simulations using our MHD code Gorgon when an artificially azimuthally correlated initialisation is added. We have shown that the missing azimuthal correlation could be provided by a combination of the electro-thermal instability (ETI) and an “electro-choric” instability (ECI); describing, respectively, the tendency of current to correlate azimuthally early in time due to temperature dependent Ohmic heating; and an amplification of the ETI driven by density dependent resistivity around vapourisation. We developed and implemented a material strength model in Gorgon to improve simulation of the solid phase of liner implosions which, when applied to simulations exhibiting the ETI and ECI, gave a significant increase in wavelength and amplitude. Full circumference simulations of the MRT instability provided a significant improvement on previous randomly initialised results and approached agreement with experiment

  18. Instability growth for magnetized liner inertial fusion seeded by electro-thermal, electro-choric, and material strength effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecover, J. D.; Chittenden, J. P. [The Centre for Inertial Fusion Studies, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    A critical limitation of magnetically imploded systems such as magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability which primarily disrupts the outer surface of the liner. MagLIF-relevant experiments have showed large amplitude multi-mode MRT instability growth growing from surface roughness [McBride et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 135004 (2012)], which is only reproduced by 3D simulations using our MHD code Gorgon when an artificially azimuthally correlated initialisation is added. We have shown that the missing azimuthal correlation could be provided by a combination of the electro-thermal instability (ETI) and an “electro-choric” instability (ECI); describing, respectively, the tendency of current to correlate azimuthally early in time due to temperature dependent Ohmic heating; and an amplification of the ETI driven by density dependent resistivity around vapourisation. We developed and implemented a material strength model in Gorgon to improve simulation of the solid phase of liner implosions which, when applied to simulations exhibiting the ETI and ECI, gave a significant increase in wavelength and amplitude. Full circumference simulations of the MRT instability provided a significant improvement on previous randomly initialised results and approached agreement with experiment.

  19. Plasma mixing and transport caused by the three-dimensional development of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takuma; Daughton, William; karimabadi, Homa; Eriksson, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) is a key process for the transport of solar wind plasma into the Earth's magnetosphere across the magnetopause. When both magnetic and velocity shears coexists within a boundary as commonly seen at the magnetopause, the resulting KHI leads to generation of vortices and subsequent triggering of magnetic reconnection. Our recent 3D fully kinetic simulations of this vortex-induced reconnection (VIR) process for symmetric boundary layers demonstrated the copious formation of oblique magnetic flux ropes, which leads to a rapid mixing of the plasma within the vortex layer. THEMIS observations at the dusk-flank magnetopause indeed show similar features of flux ropes between observed KH vortices. More recently, we performed additional 3D fully kinetic simulations considering the effects of density and temperature asymmetries, which also commonly exist across the magnetopause. Past 2D simulations have shown that such asymmetries can lead to an excitation of secondary KH and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities along the edge of the vortex in the absence of a finite magnetic field component (Bk) parallel to the k-vector of the KHI. Since Bk is expected to be finite at the magnetopause, here we explore the effect of Bk on the secondary KH/RT instabilities in 3D. We find that the suppression of the secondary instabilities due to Bk is an artifact of the 2D simulations, whereas in 3D the instabilities can grow over a range of oblique angles even when there is a finite Bk. These secondary instabilities give rise to turbulence, which gradually transports the solar wind plasma originally stored within the flow vortices deep into the magnetosphere. Simple estimates suggest that the reconnection-induced rapid mixing and the turbulent-induced gradual transport processes may contribute significantly to the formation of the Earth's low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and the cold-dense plasma sheet (CDPS) during prolonged periods of northward

  20. Influence of surface tension on two fluids shearing instability

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Rahul; Kanjilal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Using extended Layzer's potential flow model, we investigate the effects of surface tension on the growth of the bubble and spike in combined Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The nonlinear asymptotic solutions are obtained analytically for the velocity and curvature of the bubble and spike tip. We find that the surface tension decreases the velocity but does not affect the curvature, provided surface tension is greater than a critical value. For a certain condition, we observ...

  1. Self-consistent numerical dispersion relation of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability of double ablation fronts in inertial confinement fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Yáñez Vico, Carlos; Sanz Recio, Javier; Olazabal-Loumé, M.

    2012-01-01

    The linear stability analysis of accelerated double ablation fronts is carried out numerically with a self-consistent approach. Accurate hydrodynamic profiles are taken into account in the theoretical model by means of a fitting parameters method using 1D simulation results. Numerical dispersión relation is compared to an analytical sharp boundary model [Yan˜ez et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 052701 (2011)] showing an excellent agreement for the radiation dominated regime of very steep ablati...

  2. Extreme ultra-violet burst, particle heating, and whistler wave emission in fast magnetic reconnection induced by kink-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    A spatially localized energetic extreme ultra-violet (EUV) burst is imaged at the presumed position of fast magnetic reconnection in a plasma jet produced by a coaxial helicity injection source; this EUV burst indicates strong localized electron heating. A circularly polarized high frequency magnetic field perturbation is simultaneously observed at some distance from the reconnection region indicating that the reconnection emits whistler waves and that Hall dynamics likely governs the reconnection. Spectroscopic measurement shows simultaneous fast ion heating. The electron heating is consistent with Ohmic dissipation, while the ion heating is consistent with ion trajectories becoming stochastic.

  3. The effect of electro-thermal and electro-choric instabilities and material strength on MagLIF liner stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecover, James; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) is a promising route to controlled thermonuclear fusion. The concept involves magnetically imploding a metal liner containing fuel with an azimuthal magnetic field (Bz) ; a key limitation of such systems is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. MagLIF relevant liner implosions with Bz = 0 carried out at SNL showed high amplitude MRT growth; we present a quantitative comparison between experimental results and 3D results from our MHD code Gorgon, demonstrating closer agreement for the MRT properties with the inclusion of electro-thermal and electro-choric instabilities (ETI and ECI) and material strength. The ETI and ECI result in early time azimuthally correlated structures which provide a seed for the MRT. Material strength increases the ETI amplitude due to positive feedback during the solid phase of the liner. Similar liner implosions with Bz exhibited a re-orientation of the MRT into helical structures, which are yet to be reproduced by simulations without an artificial helical initialisation. Our 3D Gorgon results with Bz show helices prior to vapourisation; these occur at initially positive angles before changing sign, tending to zero later in time. This angle does not follow the relative magnitudes of Bz and Bθ as would be expected for the MRT. The angle instead follows the ratio of axial and azimuthal currents (induced by compression or rarefaction of the initial Bz) , indicating an electro-thermal origin.

  4. True 3D kinematic analysis for slope instability assessment in the Siq of Petra (Jordan), from high resolution TLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigli, Giovanni; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Ruther, Heinz; Casagli, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    released, stratigraphic setting and tectonic activity can be recognized. As a consequence, rock-falls have been occurring, even recently, with unstable rock mass volumes ranging from 0.1 m3 up to over some hundreds m3. Slope instability, acceleration of crack deformation and consequent increasing of rock-fall hazard conditions, could threaten the safety of tourist as well as the integrity of the heritage. 3D surface model coming from Terrestrial Laser Scanner acquisitions was developed almost all over the site of Petra, including the Siq. Comprehensively, a point cloud of five billion points was generated making the site of Petra likely the largest scanned archaeological site in the word. As far as the Siq, the scanner was positioned on the path floor at intervals of not more than 10 meters from each station. The total number of scans in the Siq was 220 with an average point cloud interval of approximately 3 cm. Subsequently, for the definition of the main rockfall source areas, a spatial kinematic analysis for the whole Siq has been performed, by using discontinuity orientation data extracted from the point cloud by means of the software Diana. Orientation, number of sets, spacing/frequency, persistence, block size and scale dependent roughness was obtained combining fieldwork and automatic analysis. This kind of analysis is able to establish where a particular instability mechanism is kinematically feasible, given the geometry of the slope, the orientation of discontinuities and shear strength of the rock. The final outcome of this project was a detail landslide kinematic index map, reporting main potential instability mechanisms for a given area. The kinematic index was finally calibrated for each instability mechanism (plane failure; wedge failure; block toppling; flexural toppling) surveyed in the site. The latter is including the collapse occurred in May 2015, likely not producing any victim, in a sector clearly identified by the susceptibility maps produced by the

  5. Development of azimuthally correlated instabilities for MagLIF seeded by electro-thermal and material strength effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecover, James; Weinwurm, Marcus; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) is a promising route to controlled thermonuclear fusion. The concept involves magnetically imploding a metal liner; a key limitation of such systems is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. MagLIF relevant liner implosions carried out at Sandia showed high amplitude MRT growth. 3D simulations with our MHD code Gorgon have shown that azimuthal correlation required to explain this can be contributed to by early time effects the electro-thermal instability (ETI) and an ``electro-choric instability'' (ECI). Shear forces can damp short wavelength perturbations while the liner remains solid, potentially setting axial wavelengths for the ETI and ECI. We can now model shear stresses in solids with Gorgon using a Johnson-Cook strength model and a bulk modulus calculated from the FEOS equation of state. Gorgon results with the strength model are compared to results from the shock hydrodynamics code iSALE. Results for liners show elongation of perturbations at the outer edge relative to the case without strength. We present results showing the model applied to liner implosions with axial magnetic fields of 0 T and 10 T.

  6. Three-dimensional simulations of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities in indirectly driven targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinak, M.M.; Tipton, R.E.; Remington, B.A. [and others

    1996-06-01

    To model ignition in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosion, the authors must understand the behavior of instabilities that can cause breakup of the pellet shell. During a capsule implosion, shocks that transit the shell cause growth of perturbations at the surface or at an interface because of a Richtmyer-Meshkov type of instability. Following shock breakout, or earlier for a shaped pulse, the low-density ablated plasma accelerates the pusher, and the ablation front is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable. Ablation and finite density gradients have the effect of stabilizing the short wavelength modes. Unstable modes present on the outer surface grow and feed through to the inner surface. Once the shell encounters the rebounding shock from the capsule center, it decelerates and the inner surface becomes RT unstable. If perturbations grow large enough, pusher material mixes into the core, degrading implosion performance. Capsule designs for the NIF depend on ablative stabilization and saturation to prevent perturbations initially present on the capsule surface from growing large enough to quench ignition. Here, the authors examine the first simulations and experiments to study the effect of 3-D perturbation shape on instability growth and saturation in indirectly driven targets. The first section discusses HYDRA, the radiation hydrodynamics code developed for these simulations. The subsequent section examines 3-D shape effects in single-mode perturbations in planar foil simulations and experiments. A discussion of the evolution of multimode perturbations on planar foils is followed by a discussion of 3-D simulations of instability growth in Nova capsule implosions.

  7. Modeling hydrodynamic instabilities of double ablation fronts in inertial confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanez C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability theory of double ablation (DA fronts is developed for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Two approaches are discussed: an analytical discontinuity model for the radiation dominated regime of very steep DA front structure, and a numerical self-consistent model that covers more general hydrodynamic profiles behaviours. Dispersion relation results are compared to 2D simulations.

  8. Application of high-speed photography to hydrodynamic instability research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-speed photography is used to study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of air-water interface driven by high- pressure exploding gas. Clear images illustrating the instability are obtained, along with the air bubble peak speed and turbulent mixing speed. The RM (Richtmyer-Meshkov) instability of air/SF6 interface driven by shock wave is also researched by using high-speed Schlieren technique on the horizontal shock tube and primary experimental results are obtained, which show the change of the turbulent mixing region clearly. (authors)

  9. High-order Godunov schemes for global 3D MHD simulations of accretion disks. I. Testing the linear growth of the magneto-rotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flock, M.; Dzyurkevich, N.; Klahr, H.; Mignone, A.

    2010-06-01

    We assess the suitability of various numerical MHD algorithms for astrophysical accretion disk simulations with the PLUTO code. The well-studied linear growth of the magneto-rotational instability is used as the benchmark test for a comparison between the implementations within PLUTO and against the ZeusMP code. The results demonstrate the importance of using an upwind reconstruction of the electro-motive force (EMF) in the context of a constrained transport scheme, which is consistent with plane-parallel, grid-aligned flows. In contrast, constructing the EMF from the simple average of the Godunov fluxes leads to a numerical instability and the unphysical growth of the magnetic energy. We compare the results from 3D global calculations using different MHD methods against the analytical solution for the linear growth of the MRI, and discuss the effect of numerical dissipation. The comparison identifies a robust and accurate code configuration that is vital for realistic modeling of accretion disk processes.

  10. Experimental electronic structure and Fermi-surface instability of the correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 : High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, S.; Fazekas, P.; Søndergaard, C.; Ariosa, D.; Barišić, N.; Berger, H.; Cloëtta, D.; Forró, L.; Höchst, H.; Kupčić, I.; Pavuna, D.; Margaritondo, G.

    2007-04-01

    The correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 exhibits an interesting coexistence of one-dimensional and three-dimensional properties. Our experiments determine the electronic band structure and shed light on this puzzle. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements in a 4-eV -wide range below the Fermi energy level uncover and investigate the coexistence of a1g wide-band and eg narrow-band d electrons, which lead to the complicated electronic properties of this material. We explore the effects of strong correlations and the Fermi surface instability associated with the metal-insulator transition.

  11. Interfacial instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Madison

    2015-11-01

    Determining the critera for onset and amplitude growth of instabilities is one of the central problems of fluid mechanics. We develop a parallel between the Kapitsa effect, in which a pendulum subject to high-frequency low-amplitude vibrations becomes stable in the inverted position, and interfaces separating fluids of different density. It has long been known that such interfaces can be stabilized by vibrations, even when the denser fluid is on top. We demonstrate that the stability diagram for these fluid interfaces is identical to the stability diagram for an appopriate Kapitsa pendulum. We expand the robust, ``dictionary''-type relationship between Kapitsa pendula and interfacial instabilities by considering the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Plateau instabilities, as well as less-canonical examples ranging in scale from the micron to the width of a galaxy.

  12. Hydrodynamick instabilities on ICF capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarizes our current understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities as relevant to ICF. First we discuss classical, single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and nonlinear effects in the evolution of a single mode. Then we discuss multimode systems, considering: (1) the onset of nonlinearity; (2) a second order mode coupling theory for weakly nonlinear effects, and (3) the fully nonlinear regime. Two stabilization mechanisms relevant to ICF are described next: gradient scale length and convective stabilization. Then we describe a model which is meant to estimate the weakly nonlinear evolution of multi-mode systems as relevant to ICF, given the short-wavelength stabilization. Finally, we discuss the relevant code simulation capability, and experiments. At this time we are quite optimistic about our ability to estimate instability growth on ICF capsules, but further experiments and simulations are needed to verify the modeling. 52 refs

  13. Triclade: influence of a sinuous secondary instability on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities; Triclade: influence d'une instabilite sinueuse sur les instabilites de Richtmyer-Meshkov en 2D et 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, M.; Griffond, J. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dept. Sciences de la Simulation et de l' Information, 91 (France)

    2004-07-01

    Occurrence of a secondary instability developing after the Richtmyer-Meshkov (primary) instability is emphasized thanks to numerical simulations with the TRICLADE code. We are mainly considering 2D perturbations describes by trigonometric function cosine or [cosine]. However, the 3D case is also tackled. The sinuous secondary instability is characterized by the loss of the symmetries in the direction normal to the interface at its crests. It reduces the late time growing rate of the 'mushrooms' formed by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. Related simplified problems, like symmetrical Riemann problems or the Mallier-Maslowe array of counter-rotating vortices, allow us to perform 2D linear stability analysis. Thus, we show that the sinuous secondary instability is not a numerical artifact and that is comes from the continuous incompressible velocity field in the interface region. This instability implies temporal limitations for the validity of single mode simulations; therefore multimode simulations are necessary to study the ]ate-time behaviour of interfaces bitted by shocks. (authors)

  14. On the location of microseismic sources in instable rock slope areas: heterogeneous vs. homogenous 3D velocity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Velio; Manconi, Andrea; Occhiena, Cristina; Arattano, Massimo; Scavia, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Rock-falls are one of the most common and hazardous phenomena occurring in mountainous areas. The formation of cracks in rocks is often accompanied by a sudden release of energy, which propagates in form of elastic waves and can be detected by a suitable transducer array. Therefore, geophones are among the most effective monitoring devices to investigate eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. However, the identification of an efficient procedure to forecast rock-fall occurrence in space and time is still an open challenge. In this study, we aim at developing an efficient procedure to locate microseismic sources relevant to cracking mechanisms, and thus gather indications on eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. Common seismic location tools usually implement homogeneous or multilayered velocity models but, in case of high slope gradients and heavily fractured rock masses, these simplifications may lead to errors on the correct estimation of the source location. Thus, we analyzed how the consideration of 3D material properties on the propagation medium may influence the location. In the framework of the Alcotra 2007-2013 Project MASSA (Medium And Small Size rock-fall hazard Assessment), a monitoring system composed by 8 triaxial geophones was installed in 2010 at the J.A. Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Italian Alps) and during the first year of operation the network recorded more than 600 natural events that exceeded a fixed threshold [1]. Despite the harsh environmental conditions of the study area, eighteen points distributed as uniformly as possible in space were selected for hammering. The artificial source dataset of known coordinates was used to constrain a 3D heterogeneous velocity model through a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstructive Technique. In order to mitigate the intrinsic uncertainties of the inversion procedure, bootstrapping was performed to extend the dataset and a statistical analysis was issued to improve the model

  15. Analyses of Instability Events in the Peach Bottom-2 BWR Using Thermal-Hydraulic and 3D Neutron Kinetic Coupled Codes Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Lombardi Costa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Boiling water reactor (BWR instabilities may occur when, starting from a stable operating condition, changes in system parameters bring the reactor towards an unstable region. In order to design more stable and safer core configurations, experimental and theoretical studies about BWR stability have been performed to characterise the phenomenon and to predict the conditions for its occurrence. In this work, contributions to the study of BWR instability phenomena are presented. The RELAP5/MOD3.3 thermal-hydraulic (TH system code and the PARCS-2.4 3D neutron kinetic (NK code were coupled to simulate BWR transients. Different algorithms were used to calculate the decay ratio (DR and the natural frequency (NF from the power oscillation predicted by the transient calculations as two typical parameters used to provide a quantitative description of instabilities. The validation of the code model set up for the Peach Bottom Unit 2 BWR plant is performed against low-flow stability tests (LFSTs. The four series of LFST have been performed during the first quarter of 1977 at the end of cycle 2 in Pennsylvania. The tests were intended to measure the reactor core stability margins at the limiting conditions used in design and safety analyses.

  16. 3D electrostatic gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion simulation of lower-hybrid drift instability of Harris current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2016-07-01

    The eigenmode stability properties of three-dimensional lower-hybrid-drift-instabilities (LHDI) in a Harris current sheet with a small but finite guide magnetic field have been systematically studied by employing the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model with a realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me . In contrast to the fully kinetic PIC simulation scheme, the fast electron cyclotron motion and plasma oscillations are systematically removed in the GeFi model, and hence one can employ the realistic mi/me . The GeFi simulations are benchmarked against and show excellent agreement with both the fully kinetic PIC simulation and the analytical eigenmode theory. Our studies indicate that, for small wavenumbers, ky, along the current direction, the most unstable eigenmodes are peaked at the location where k →.B → =0 , consistent with previous analytical and simulation studies. Here, B → is the equilibrium magnetic field and k → is the wavevector perpendicular to the nonuniformity direction. As ky increases, however, the most unstable eigenmodes are found to be peaked at k →.B → ≠0 . In addition, the simulation results indicate that varying mi/me , the current sheet width, and the guide magnetic field can affect the stability of LHDI. Simulations with the varying mass ratio confirm the lower hybrid frequency and wave number scalings.

  17. Instability of the Heliopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heliopause (HP) separates the tenuous hot heliosheath plasma from the relatively dense cool magnetized plasma of the local interstellar medium (LISM). Fluid acceleration in the HP region can therefore drive Rayleigh-Taylor-like and Kelvin-Helmholtz- like instabilities. Charge exchange coupling of plasma ions and primary interstellar neutral atoms provides an effective gravity, suggesting the possibility of Rayleigh Taylor-like (RT-like) instabilities. Shear flow due to the velocity difference between the heliosheath and the interstellar flows drives Kelvin Helmholtz-like (KH-like) modes on the heliopause. Magnetic fields damp the classical KH instability. However, we show that energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) destabilize KH-modes,even in the presence of interplanetary and interstellar magnetic fields. We consider a model that includes a number of effects that are important in the heliosphere such as resonant change exchange between the primary neutrals and the solar wind plasma, ENAs from the inner heliosheath, plasma flows along the heliopause and magnetic fields in the inner and outer heliosheath. We find that the nose region is unstable to RT-like modes for HP parameters, while the shoulder region is unstable to a new instability that has the characteristics of a mixed RT-KH-like mode. These instabilities are not stabilized by typical values of the magnetic fields in the inner and outer heliosheath close to the nose and shoulder regions. Whereas ENAs have a stabilizing influence on the RT instability in the vicinity of the nose region (due to counter streaming), they have a destabilizing influence on the KH instability in the vicinity of the flanks. We find that even in the presence of interplanetary and interstellar magnetic fields, ENAs can drive a new form of KH-like instability on the flanks. An analysis of the collisional and anomalous magnetic field diffusion time scales shows that ideal MHD is an appropriate model at the HP. The interstellar magnetic

  18. Study of hydrodynamic instabilities with a multiphase lattice Boltzmann model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Ali Mauricio; Muñoz, José Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz hydrodynamic instabilities are frequent in many natural and industrial processes, but their numerical simulation is not an easy challenge. This work simulates both instabilities by using a lattice Boltzmann model on multiphase fluids at a liquid-vapour interface, instead of multicomponent systems like the oil-water one. The model, proposed by He, Chen and Zhang (1999) [1] was modified to increase the precision by computing the pressure gradients with a higher order, as proposed by McCracken and Abraham (2005) [2]. The resulting model correctly simulates both instabilities by using almost the same parameter set. It also reproduces the relation γ ∝√{ A} between the growing rate γ of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the relative density difference between the fluids (known as the Atwood number A), but including also deviations observed in experiments at low density differences. The results show that the implemented model is a useful tool for the study of hydrodynamic instabilities, drawing a sharp interface and exhibiting numerical stability for moderately high Reynolds numbers.

  19. Experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by a Mach 3 shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK-B135 An experimental investigation of a shock-induced interfacial instability (Richtmyer-Meshkov instability) is undertaken in an effort to study temporal evolution of interfacial perturbations in the late stages of development. The experiments are performed in a vertical shock tube with a square cross-section. A membraneless interface is prepared by retracting a sinusoidally shaped metal plate initially separating carbon dioxide from air, with both gases initially at atmospheric pressure. With carbon dioxide above the plate, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability commences as the plate is retracted and the amplitude of the initial sinusoidal perturbation imposed on the interface begins to grow. The interface is accelerated by a strong shock wave (M=3.08) while its shape is still sinusoidal and before the Kelvin-Helmhotz instability distorts it into the well known mushroom-like structures; its initial amplitude to wavelength ratio is large enough that the interface evolution enters its nonlinear stage very shortly after shock acceleration. The pre-shock evolution of the interface due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the post-shock evolution of the interface due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are visualized using planar Mie scattering. The pre-shock evolution of the interface is carried out in an independent set of experiments. The initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment are determined from the pre-shock Rayleigh-Taylor growth. One image of the post-shock interface is obtained per experiment and image sequences, showing the post-shock evolution of the interface, are constructed from several experiments. The growth rate of the perturbation amplitude is measured and compared with two recent analytical models of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

  20. Interfacial fluid instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Madison Ski

    2015-01-01

    The onset and development of instabilities is one of the central problems in fluid mechanics. Here we develop a connection between instabilities of free fluid interfaces and inverted pendula. When acted upon solely by the gravitational force, the inverted pendulum is unstable. This position can be stabilised by the Kapitsa phenomenon, in which high-frequency low-amplitude vertical vibrations of the base creates a fictitious force which opposes the gravitational force. By transforming the dynamical equations governing a fluid interface into an appropriate pendulum, we demonstrate how stability can be induced in fluid systems by properly tuned vibrations. We construct a "dictionary"-type relationship between various pendula and the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Plateau and the self-gravitational instabilities. This makes several results in control theory and dynamical systems directly applicable to the study of "tunable" fluid instabilities, where the critical wavelength depends on the e...

  1. Influence of surface tension on two fluids shearing instability

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Using extended Layzer's potential flow model, we investigate the effects of surface tension on the growth of the bubble and spike in combined Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The nonlinear asymptotic solutions are obtained analytically for the velocity and curvature of the bubble and spike tip. We find that the surface tension decreases the velocity but does not affect the curvature, provided surface tension is greater than a critical value. For a certain condition, we observe that surface tension stabilizes the motion. Any perturbation, whatever its magnitude, results stable with nonlinear oscillations. The nonlinear oscillations depend on surface tension and relative velocity shear of the two fluids.

  2. Fingering Instability in a Water-Sand Mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, A; Scherer, M A; Engel, A; Rehberg, I

    1997-01-01

    The temporal evolution of a water-sand interface driven by gravity is experimentally investigated. By means of a Fourier analysis of the evolving interface the growth rates are determined for the different modes appearing in the developing front. To model the observed behavior we apply the idea of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for two stratified fluids. Carrying out a linear stability analysis we calculate the growth rates from the corresponding dispersion relations for finite and infinite cell sizes. Taking into account the uncertainty in the viscosity measurements for sand dispersed in water, the theoretical results catch the essence of the experiment but also demonstrate the limitations of this approach.

  3. 3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also complete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.'s and three (3) MS's, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow)

  4. Numerical study and modeling of hydrodynamic instabilities in the context of inertial confinement fusion in the presence of self-generated magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of inertial confinement fusion we investigate effects of magnetic fields on the development in the linear regime of two hydrodynamic instabilities: Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using ideal magnetohydrodynamics and ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in both acceleration and deceleration stages. Direct numerical simulations with a linear perturbation code enable us to confirm the stabilizing effect of the component of the magnetic field along the perturbations wave vector. The amplitude doesn't grow linearly in time but experiences oscillations instead. The compressibility taken into account in the code does not affect predictions given by an already existing impulsive and incompressible model. As far as Rayleigh-Taylor instability is concerned we study the effects of self-generated magnetic fields that arise from the development of the instability itself. In the acceleration stage we perform two dimensional simulations in planar geometry. We show that magnetic fields of about 1 T can be generated and that the instability growth transits more rapidly into nonlinear growth with the enhancement of the development of the third harmonic. We also propose an adaptation of an existing model that aims at studying thermal conductivity anisotropy effects, to take into account the effects of the self-generated magnetic fields on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate. Finally, in the deceleration stage, we perform two dimensional simulations in cylindrical geometry that take into account self-generation of magnetic fields due to the instability development. It reveals magnetic fields of about several thousands of Teslas that are not strong enough though to affect the instability behavior. (author)

  5. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  6. Nonlinear evolution of the sausage instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sausage instabilities of an incompressible, uniform, perfectly conducting Z pinch are studied in the nonlinear regime. In the long wavelength limit (analogous to the ''shallow water theory'' of hydrodynamics), a simplified set of universal fluid equations is derived, with no radial dependence, and with all parameters scaled out. Analytic and numerical solutions of these one-dimensional equations show that an initially sinusoidal perturbation grows into a ''spindle'' or cylindrical ''spike and bubble'' shape, with sharp radial maxima. In the short wavelength limit, the problem is shown to be mathematically equivalent to the planar semi-infinite Rayleigh--Taylor instability, which also grows into a spike-and-bubble shape. Since the spindle shape is common to both limits, it is concluded that it probably obtains in all cases. The results are in agreement with dense plasma focus experiments

  7. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-01-01

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a shear flow in an initially unmagnetized plasma, unlike in the (magneto)hydrodynamics case. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroom-like electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. Macroscopic ($\\gg c/\\omega_{pe}$) fields are shown to be generated by these microscopic shear instabilities, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission and to seed MHD processes at long time-scales.

  8. Dependence of Ablative Rayleigh—Taylor Instability on High-Z Dopant Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroto, Takashi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sunahara, Atsushi; Fujioka, Shinsuke

    2016-03-01

    We conducted two-dimensional simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets to evaluate effects of high-Z doping on implosion hydrodynamics. It was found that an ablation structure drastically changes with concentration of dopant material. We also confirmed that even a lightly-doped target can suppress Rayleigh-Taylor instability on short wavelength, while a long-wavelength perturbation is difficult to be suppressed with any dopant concentration. The high-Z doping is thus only effective for a spherical implosion with high-mode perturbations.

  9. Hydrodynamic instability experiments on the HIPER laser facility at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present recent results on the hydrodynamic instability experiments on the HIPER (High Intensity Plasma Experimental Research) laser facility at ILE, Osaka University. We measured the Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate on the HIPER laser. Also measured were all parameters that determine the RT growth rate. We focused on the measurements of the ablation density of laser-irradiated targets, which had not been experimentally measured. The experimental results were compared with calculations with one dimensional simulation coupled with Fokker-Planck equation for electron transport. (author)

  10. Statistical hydrodynamic models for mixing instability flows in turbulent regime: theoretical 0D evaluation criteria and comparison of one and two-fluid approaches; Modeles hydrodynamiques statistiques pour les ecoulements d'instabilites de melange en regime developpe: criteres theoriques d'evaluation ''0D'' et comparaison des approches mono et bifluides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llor, A

    2001-07-01

    Theoretical criteria are defined to perform quick analytical evaluations of statistical hydro models for turbulent mixing flows induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. They are based on a global energy balance analysis of the mixing zone ('0D' projection) in the limit of zero Atwood number, for incompressible fluids, and in self-similar regime. It is then shown that single-fluid descriptions must be replaced by two-fluid descriptions, particularly for the Rayleigh-Taylor case with variable acceleration. The interaction between a shock and heterogeneities is also considered. Various approaches for the development of new models are finally given. (author)

  11. A 3D Bubble Merger Model for RTI Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Baolian

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present a model for the merger processes of bubbles at the edge of an unstable acceleration driven mixing layer. Steady acceleration defines a self-similar mixing process, with a time-dependent inverse cascade of structures of increasing size. The time evolution is itself a renormalization group evolution. The model predicts the growth rate of a Rayleigh-Taylor chaotic fluid-mixing layer. The 3-D model differs from the 2-D merger model in several important ways. Beyond the extension of the model to three dimensions, the model contains one phenomenological parameter, the variance of the bubble radii at fixed time. The model also predicts several experimental numbers: the bubble mixing rate, the mean bubble radius, and the bubble height separation at the time of merger. From these we also obtain the bubble height to the radius aspect ratio, which is in good agreement with experiments. Applications to recent NIF and Omega experiments will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  12. Ab initio determination of the instability growth rate of warm dense beryllium-deuterium interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Zi; Li, DaFang [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Accurate knowledge about the interfacial unstable growth is of great importance in inertial confinement fusion. During implosions, the deuterium-tritium capsule is driven by laser beams or X-rays to access the strongly coupled and partially degenerated warm dense matter regime. At this stage, the effects of dissipative processes, such as diffusion and viscosity, have significant impact on the instability growth rates. Here, we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to determine the equations of state and the transport coefficients. Several models are used to estimate the reduction in the growth rate dispersion curves of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities with considering the presence of these dissipative effects. We show that these instability growth rates are effectively reduced when considering diffusion. The findings provide significant insights into the microscopic mechanism of the instability growth at the ablator-fuel interface and will refine the models used in the laser-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments.

  13. Ab initio determination of the instability growth rate of warm dense beryllium-deuterium interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Li, Zi; Li, DaFang; Zhang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Accurate knowledge about the interfacial unstable growth is of great importance in inertial confinement fusion. During implosions, the deuterium-tritium capsule is driven by laser beams or X-rays to access the strongly coupled and partially degenerated warm dense matter regime. At this stage, the effects of dissipative processes, such as diffusion and viscosity, have significant impact on the instability growth rates. Here, we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to determine the equations of state and the transport coefficients. Several models are used to estimate the reduction in the growth rate dispersion curves of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities with considering the presence of these dissipative effects. We show that these instability growth rates are effectively reduced when considering diffusion. The findings provide significant insights into the microscopic mechanism of the instability growth at the ablator-fuel interface and will refine the models used in the laser-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments.

  14. Ab initio determination of the instability growth rate of warm dense beryllium-deuterium interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate knowledge about the interfacial unstable growth is of great importance in inertial confinement fusion. During implosions, the deuterium-tritium capsule is driven by laser beams or X-rays to access the strongly coupled and partially degenerated warm dense matter regime. At this stage, the effects of dissipative processes, such as diffusion and viscosity, have significant impact on the instability growth rates. Here, we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to determine the equations of state and the transport coefficients. Several models are used to estimate the reduction in the growth rate dispersion curves of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities with considering the presence of these dissipative effects. We show that these instability growth rates are effectively reduced when considering diffusion. The findings provide significant insights into the microscopic mechanism of the instability growth at the ablator-fuel interface and will refine the models used in the laser-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments

  15. Analyses of Instability Events in the Peach Bottom-2 BWR Using Thermal-Hydraulic and 3D Neutron Kinetic Coupled Codes Technique

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) instabilities may occur when, starting from a stable operating condition, changes in system parameters bring the reactor towards an unstable region. In order to design more stable and safer core configurations, experimental and theoretical studies about BWR stability have been performed to characterise the phenomenon and to predict the conditions for its occurrence. In this work, contributions to the study of BWR instability phenomena are presen...

  16. Progress toward Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a High-Energy-Density Plasma on the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Huntington, C. M.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Plewa, T.; Dwarkadas, V. V.

    2008-04-01

    In the realm of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, there exist three primary hydrodynamic instabilities of concern: Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH). Although the RT and the RM instabilities have been readily observed and diagnosed in the laboratory, the KH instability remains relatively unexplored in HED plasmas. Unlike the RT and RM instabilities, the KH instability is driven by a lifting force generated by a strong velocity gradient in a stratified fluid. Understanding the KH instability mechanism in HED plasmas will provide essential insight into oblique shock systems, jets, mass stripping, and detailed RT-spike development. In addition, our KH experiment will help provide the groundwork for future transition to turbulence experiments. We present 2D FLASH simulations and experimental data from our initial attempts to create a pure KH system using the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  17. Numerical analysis of anisotropic diffusion effect on ICF hydrodynamic instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olazabal-Loumé M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of anisotropic diffusion on hydrodynamic instabilities in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF flows is numerically assessed. This anisotropy occurs in indirect-drive when laminated ablators are used to modify the lateral transport [1,2]. In direct-drive, non-local transport mechanisms and magnetic fields may modify the lateral conduction [3]. In this work, numerical simulations obtained with the code PERLE [4], dedicated to linear stability analysis, are compared with previous theoretical results [5]. In these approaches, the diffusion anisotropy can be controlled by a characteristic coefficient which enables a comprehensive study. This work provides new results on the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT, ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM and Darrieus-Landau (DL instabilities.

  18. Instability of a Thin Conducting Foil Accelerated by a Finite Wavelength Intense Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Eliasson, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    We derive a theoretical model for the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT)-like instability for a thin foil accelerated by an intense laser, taking into account finite wavelength effects in the laser wave field. The latter leads to the diffraction of the electromagnetic wave off the periodic structures arising from the instability of the foil, which significantly modifies the growth rate of the RT-like instability when the perturbations on the foil have wavenumbers comparable to or larger than the laser wavenumber. In particular, the growth rate has a local maximum at a perturbation wavenumber approximately equal to the laser wavenumber. The standard RT instability, arising from a pressure difference between the two sides of a foil, is approximately recovered for perturbation wavenumbers smaller than the laser wavenumber. Differences in the results for circular and linear polarization of the laser light are pointed out. The model has significance to radiation pressure acceleration of thin foils and to laser-driven inertial c...

  19. Observations of supra-arcade fans: instabilities at the head of reconnection jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.-J.; Schmit, D. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.-M., E-mail: innes@mps.mpg.de [Max Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Supra-arcade fans are bright, irregular regions of emission that develop during eruptive flares above flare arcades. The underlying flare arcades are thought to be a consequence of magnetic reconnection along a current sheet in the corona. At the same time, theory predicts plasma jets from the reconnection sites which are extremely difficult to observe directly because of their low densities. It has been suggested that the dark supra-arcade downflows (SADs) seen falling through supra-arcade fans may be low-density jet plasma. The head of a low-density jet directed toward higher-density plasma would be Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, and lead to the development of rapidly growing low- and high-density fingers along the interface. Using Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131 Å images, we show details of SADs seen from three different orientations with respect to the flare arcade and current sheet, and highlight features that have been previously unexplained, such as the splitting of SADs at their heads, but are a natural consequence of instabilities above the arcade. Comparison with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations suggests that SADs are the result of secondary instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type in the exhaust of reconnection jets.

  20. Numerical study of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of laser-irradiated deuterium and deuterium-tritium targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocchino, Alberto; Atzeni, Stefano; Schiavi, Angelo

    2010-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at the ablation front of laser-irradiated planar targets is investigated by two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. The linear evolution of perturbations seeded either by surface roughness or target inhomogeneity is studied for perturbation wavelengths in the range 10≤λ≤400 μm and laser intensity 4×1012≤I≤4×1014 W/cm2 (with laser wavelength λlaser=0.35 μm). Thin and thick cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium (DT) planar targets are considered. For targets irradiated at constant intensity, it is found that perturbations with wavelength below a given threshold perform damped oscillations, while perturbations above such a threshold are unstable and oscillate with growing amplitude. This is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions by Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)], according to which ablation related processes stabilize perturbations with kDc≫1, where Dc is the distance between the ablation front and critical density for laser propagation. For kDcdamped after an initial growth. In a thin target, initial perturbations, either damped or amplified by RMI and LDI, seed the subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, it is shown that RMI growth of fusion targets can be reduced by using laser pulses including an initial adiabat-shaping picket (originally proposed to reduce the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instability).

  1. Linear analysis and 3D hybrid simulation study of Z-pinch instabilities in the presence of non - ideal MHD effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Wanex, L.; Bauer, B. S.; Paraschiv, I.; LeBoeuf, J. N.; Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel; Fiala, Vladimír

    New Jersey : Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc, 2003 - (Giesselmann, M.; Neuber, A.), s. 66-69 ISBN 0-7803-7915-2. [IEEE international pulsed power conference /14./. Dallas (US), 15.06.2003-18.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB3042106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : Z-pinch plasmas * instabilities Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  2. Linear Simulations of the Cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Hydrodynamics and MHD

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Song

    2013-05-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs when density-stratified interfaces are impulsively accelerated, typically by a shock wave. We present a numerical method to simulate the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cylindrical geometry. The ideal MHD equations are linearized about a time-dependent base state to yield linear partial differential equations governing the perturbed quantities. Convergence tests demonstrate that second order accuracy is achieved for smooth flows, and the order of accuracy is between first and second order for flows with discontinuities. Numerical results are presented for cases of interfaces with positive Atwood number and purely azimuthal perturbations. In hydrodynamics, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth of perturbations is followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor growth phase. In MHD, numerical results indicate that the perturbations can be suppressed for sufficiently large perturbation wavenumbers and magnetic fields.

  3. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  4. Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities with Godunov SPH

    CERN Document Server

    Cha, Seung-Hoon; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations for the non-linear development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in two different density layers have been performed with the particle-based method (Godunov SPH) developed by Inutsuka (2002). The Godunov SPH can describe the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability even with a high density contrast, while the standard SPH shows the absence of the instability across a density gradient (Agertz et al. 2007). The interaction of a dense blob with a hot ambient medium has been performed also. The Godunov SPH describes the formation and evolution of the fingers due to the combinations of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The blob test result coincides well with the results of the grid-based codes. An inaccurate handling of a density gradient in the standard SPH has been pointed out as the direct reason of the absence of the instabilities. An unphysical force happens at the density gradient even in a pressure equilibrium, and repulses particles from the initial density di...

  5. Sedimentation instabilities: impact of the fluid compressibility and viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebling, Michael J; Flekkøy, Eirik G; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Toussaint, Renaud

    2010-11-01

    The effect of an interstitial fluid on the mixing of sedimenting grains is studied numerically in a closed rectangular Hele-Shaw cell. We investigate the impact of the fluid compressibility and fluid viscosity on the dynamics and structures of the granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability. First we discuss the effect of the fluid compressibility on the initial fluid pressure evolution and on the dynamics of the particles. Here, the emerging patterns do not seem highly affected by the compressibility change studied. To characterize the patterns and motion the combined length of the particle trajectories in relation to the movement of the center of mass is analyzed, and the separation of particle pairs is measured as a function of the fluid viscosity. PMID:21230468

  6. Convective instability of hollow Sedov-Taylor blast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-similar solutions by Sedov (1946) and Taylor (1950) for a strong spherical shock in an ideal gas are evacuated at their centers if the preshock density falls as a high power of radius. These solutions could represent an idealized form of a supernova blast wave in the early phase when the shock moves through the stellar envelope. For astrophysically relevant values of the adiabatic index, the hollow solutions are unstable to global convective modes; that is, the compressible generalization of Rayleigh-Taylor modes. For very large spherical harmonic degrees l, the growth rate scales as l exp 1/2 and the eigenfunction is concentrated within a distance proportional to 1/l of the inner edge of the fluid. A condition is also given for local convective instability, which may exist even when unstable global modes to not. 36 refs

  7. Large-eddy simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in a converging geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardini, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) refers to the baroclinic generation of vorticity at a perturbed density interface when impacted by a shock wave. It is often thought of as the impulsive limit of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI). The fluid dynamics video "large-eddy simulations (LES) of RMI in a converging geometry" shows the mixing of materials resulting from the interaction of an imploding cylindrical shock wave with a concentric perturbed interface that separates outside light gas from heavy gas (initially 5 times denser) inside a wedge. At the initial impact, the incident shock Mach number is either 1.3 or 2.0. The present canonical simulations support recent interests on compressible turbulent mixing in converging geometries relevant to both inertial confinement fusion and core-collapse supernovae dynamics.

  8. On physical and numerical instabilities arising in simulations of non-stationary radiatively cooling shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Badjin, D A; Manukovskiy, K V; Blinnikov, S I

    2015-01-01

    We describe our experience of modelling of the radiatively cooling shocks and their thin shells with various numerical tools in different physical and calculational setups. We have found that under certain physical conditions, the circular shaped shells show a strong bending instability and successive fragmentation on Cartesian grids soon after their formation, while remain almost unperturbed when simulated on polar meshes. We explain these results as an interplay of numerical perturbations superimposed by grids not aligned to the flow lines, and a physical Rayleigh--Taylor like instability of the thin shell inner boundary being accelerated during re-estabilshing of pressure balance within and behind the shell after preceding sudden temperature loss. This phenomenon also sets new requirements on further radiatively cooling shocks simulations in order to be physically correct and free of numerical artefacts.

  9. 3D video

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  10. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  11. EUROPEANA AND 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pletinckx

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  12. Solid works 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book explains modeling of solid works 3D and application of 3D CAD/CAM. The contents of this book are outline of modeling such as CAD and 2D and 3D, solid works composition, method of sketch, writing measurement fixing, selecting projection, choosing condition of restriction, practice of sketch, making parts, reforming parts, modeling 3D, revising 3D modeling, using pattern function, modeling necessaries, assembling, floor plan, 3D modeling method, practice floor plans for industrial engineer data aided manufacturing, processing of CAD/CAM interface.

  13. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J. [Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RY), Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Paraschiv, I. [University of Nevada at Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Mehlhorn, T. A. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  14. Open 3D Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many professionals and 3D artists consider Blender as being the best open source solution for 3D computer graphics. The main features are related to modeling, rendering, shading, imaging, compositing, animation, physics and particles and realtime 3D/game creation.

  15. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  16. IZDELAVA TISKALNIKA 3D

    OpenAIRE

    Brdnik, Lovro

    2015-01-01

    Diplomsko delo analizira trenutno stanje 3D tiskalnikov na trgu. Prikazan je razvoj in principi delovanja 3D tiskalnikov. Predstavljeni so tipi 3D tiskalnikov, njihove prednosti in slabosti. Podrobneje je predstavljena zgradba in delovanje koračnih motorjev. Opravljene so meritve koračnih motorjev. Opisana je programska oprema za rokovanje s 3D tiskalniki in komponente, ki jih potrebujemo za izdelavo. Diploma se oklepa vprašanja, ali je izdelava 3D tiskalnika bolj ekonomična kot pa naložba v ...

  17. Sudden contact of a hot liquid with a volatile coolant: instability of the created vapour film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the sudden contact of a hot body with a coolant which may evaporate, results, after some delay, in an explosive evaporation, this research thesis proposes an interpretation based on the study of the destabilization of the vapour film which forms at the surface of the hot body. The author reports the modelling of the evolution of the average thickness of the film before the explosion. The possible chemical reactions at the surface of the hot body are taken into account. A base flow is obtained which allows the calculation of the evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities which may occur at the gas-coolant interface. This study is applied to the interaction between liquid sodium and water

  18. 3D and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  19. Numerical study of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of laser-irradiated deuterium and deuterium-tritium targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at the ablation front of laser-irradiated planar targets is investigated by two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. The linear evolution of perturbations seeded either by surface roughness or target inhomogeneity is studied for perturbation wavelengths in the range 10≤λ≤400 μm and laser intensity 4x1012≤I≤4x1014 W/cm2 (with laser wavelength λlaser=0.35 μm). Thin and thick cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium (DT) planar targets are considered. For targets irradiated at constant intensity, it is found that perturbations with wavelength below a given threshold perform damped oscillations, while perturbations above such a threshold are unstable and oscillate with growing amplitude. This is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions by Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)], according to which ablation related processes stabilize perturbations with kDc>>1, where Dc is the distance between the ablation front and critical density for laser propagation. For kDcc on laser intensity I (roughly Dc∝I, according to the present simulations). Direct-drive laser fusion targets are irradiated by time-shaped pulses, with a low intensity initial foot. In this case, perturbations with wavelengths below some threshold (about 10 μm, for typical ignition-class all-DT targets) are damped after an initial growth. In a thin target, initial perturbations, either damped or amplified by RMI and LDI, seed the subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, it is shown that RMI growth of fusion targets can be reduced by using laser pulses including an initial adiabat-shaping picket (originally proposed to reduce the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instability).

  20. 3D virtuel udstilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tournay, Bruno; Rüdiger, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s.......3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s....

  1. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  2. CHF Enhancement by Surface Patterning based on Hydrodynamic Instability Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the power density of a device exceeds the CHF point, bubbles and vapor films will be covered on the whole heater surface. Because vapor films have much lower heat transfer capabilities compared to the liquid layer, the temperature of the heater surface will increase rapidly, and the device could be damaged due to the heater burnout. Therefore, the prediction and the enhancement of the CHF are essential to maximizing the efficient heat removal region. Numerous studies have been conducted to describe the CHF phenomenon, such as hydrodynamic instability theory, macrolayer dryout theory, hot/dry spot theory, and bubble interaction theory. The hydrodynamic instability model, proposed by Zuber, is the predominant CHF model that Helmholtz instability attributed to the CHF. Zuber assumed that the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability wavelength is related to the Helmholtz wavelength. Lienhard and Dhir proposed a CHF model that Helmholtz instability wavelength is equal to the most dangerous RT wavelength. In addition, they showed the heater size effect using various heater surfaces. Lu et al. proposed a modified hydrodynamic theory that the Helmholtz instability was assumed to be the heater size and the area of the vapor column was used as a fitting factor. The modified hydrodynamic theories were based on the change of Helmholtz wavelength related to the RT instability wavelength. In the present study, the change of the RT instability wavelength, based on the heater surface modification, was conducted to show the CHF enhancement based on the heater surface patterning in a plate pool boiling. Sapphire glass was used as a base heater substrate, and the Pt film was used as a heating source. The patterning surface was based on the change of RT instability wavelength. In the present work the study of the CHF was conducted using bare Pt and patterned heating surfaces

  3. CHF Enhancement by Surface Patterning based on Hydrodynamic Instability Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    If the power density of a device exceeds the CHF point, bubbles and vapor films will be covered on the whole heater surface. Because vapor films have much lower heat transfer capabilities compared to the liquid layer, the temperature of the heater surface will increase rapidly, and the device could be damaged due to the heater burnout. Therefore, the prediction and the enhancement of the CHF are essential to maximizing the efficient heat removal region. Numerous studies have been conducted to describe the CHF phenomenon, such as hydrodynamic instability theory, macrolayer dryout theory, hot/dry spot theory, and bubble interaction theory. The hydrodynamic instability model, proposed by Zuber, is the predominant CHF model that Helmholtz instability attributed to the CHF. Zuber assumed that the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability wavelength is related to the Helmholtz wavelength. Lienhard and Dhir proposed a CHF model that Helmholtz instability wavelength is equal to the most dangerous RT wavelength. In addition, they showed the heater size effect using various heater surfaces. Lu et al. proposed a modified hydrodynamic theory that the Helmholtz instability was assumed to be the heater size and the area of the vapor column was used as a fitting factor. The modified hydrodynamic theories were based on the change of Helmholtz wavelength related to the RT instability wavelength. In the present study, the change of the RT instability wavelength, based on the heater surface modification, was conducted to show the CHF enhancement based on the heater surface patterning in a plate pool boiling. Sapphire glass was used as a base heater substrate, and the Pt film was used as a heating source. The patterning surface was based on the change of RT instability wavelength. In the present work the study of the CHF was conducted using bare Pt and patterned heating surfaces.

  4. Blender 3D cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Valenza, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed at the professionals that already have good 3D CGI experience with commercial packages and have now decided to try the open source Blender and want to experiment with something more complex than the average tutorials on the web. However, it's also aimed at the intermediate Blender users who simply want to go some steps further.It's taken for granted that you already know how to move inside the Blender interface, that you already have 3D modeling knowledge, and also that of basic 3D modeling and rendering concepts, for example, edge-loops, n-gons, or samples. In any case, it'

  5. Role of hydrodynamic instability growth in hot-spot mass gain and fusion performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an inertial confinement fusion target, energy loss due to thermal conduction from the hot-spot will inevitably ablate fuel ice into the hot-spot, resulting in a more massive but cooler hot-spot, which negatively impacts fusion yield. Hydrodynamic mix due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the gas-ice interface can aggravate the problem via an increased gas-ice interfacial area across which energy transfer from the hot-spot and ice can be enhanced. Here, this mix-enhanced transport effect on hot-spot fusion-performance degradation is quantified using contrasting 1D and 2D hydrodynamic simulations, and its dependence on effective acceleration, Atwood number, and ablation speed is identified

  6. 3D Digital Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper

    wave of new building information modelling tools demands further investigation, not least because of industry representatives' somewhat coarse parlance: Now the word is spreading -3D digital modelling is nothing less than a revolution, a shift of paradigm, a new alphabet... Research qeustions. Based...... on empirical probes (interviews, observations, written inscriptions) within the Danish construction industry this paper explores the organizational and managerial dynamics of 3D Digital Modelling. The paper intends to - Illustrate how the network of (non-)human actors engaged in the promotion (and arrest) of 3......D Modelling (in Denmark) stabilizes - Examine how 3D Modelling manifests itself in the early design phases of a construction project with a view to discuss the effects hereof for i.a. the management of the building process. Structure. The paper introduces a few, basic methodological concepts...

  7. Professional Papervision3D

    CERN Document Server

    Lively, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Professional Papervision3D describes how Papervision3D works and how real world applications are built, with a clear look at essential topics such as building websites and games, creating virtual tours, and Adobe's Flash 10. Readers learn important techniques through hands-on applications, and build on those skills as the book progresses. The companion website contains all code examples, video step-by-step explanations, and a collada repository.

  8. 3D Spectroscopic Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Bershady, Matthew A

    2009-01-01

    In this Chapter we review the challenges of, and opportunities for, 3D spectroscopy, and how these have lead to new and different approaches to sampling astronomical information. We describe and categorize existing instruments on 4m and 10m telescopes. Our primary focus is on grating-dispersed spectrographs. We discuss how to optimize dispersive elements, such as VPH gratings, to achieve adequate spectral resolution, high throughput, and efficient data packing to maximize spatial sampling for 3D spectroscopy. We review and compare the various coupling methods that make these spectrographs ``3D,'' including fibers, lenslets, slicers, and filtered multi-slits. We also describe Fabry-Perot and spatial-heterodyne interferometers, pointing out their advantages as field-widened systems relative to conventional, grating-dispersed spectrographs. We explore the parameter space all these instruments sample, highlighting regimes open for exploitation. Present instruments provide a foil for future development. We give an...

  9. 3D Projection Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halskov, Kim; Johansen, Stine Liv; Bach Mikkelsen, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional projection installations are particular kinds of augmented spaces in which a digital 3-D model is projected onto a physical three-dimensional object, thereby fusing the digital content and the physical object. Based on interaction design research and media studies, this article...... contributes to the understanding of the distinctive characteristics of such a new medium, and identifies three strategies for designing 3-D projection installations: establishing space; interplay between the digital and the physical; and transformation of materiality. The principal empirical case, From...... Fingerplan to Loop City, is a 3-D projection installation presenting the history and future of city planning for the Copenhagen area in Denmark. The installation was presented as part of the 12th Architecture Biennale in Venice in 2010....

  10. Herramientas SIG 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Feito Higueruela

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Geographical Information Systems on several Archeology fields have been increasing during the last years. Recent avances in these technologies make possible to work with more realistic 3D models. In this paper we introduce a new paradigm for this system, the GIS Thetrahedron, in which we define the fundamental elements of GIS, in order to provide a better understanding of their capabilities. At the same time the basic 3D characteristics of some comercial and open source software are described, as well as the application to some samples on archeological researchs

  11. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  12. Interaktiv 3D design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villaume, René Domine; Ørstrup, Finn Rude

    2002-01-01

    Projektet undersøger potentialet for interaktiv 3D design via Internettet. Arkitekt Jørn Utzons projekt til Espansiva blev udviklet som et byggesystem med det mål, at kunne skabe mangfoldige planmuligheder og mangfoldige facade- og rumudformninger. Systemets bygningskomponenter er digitaliseret som...... 3D elementer og gjort tilgængelige. Via Internettet er det nu muligt at sammenstille og afprøve en uendelig  række bygningstyper som  systemet blev tænkt og udviklet til....

  13. 3D Dental Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Kotek, L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is about 3D scan of plaster dental casts. The main aim of the work is a hardware and software proposition of 3D scan system for scanning of dental casts. There were used camera, projector and rotate table for this scanning system. Surface triangulation was used, taking benefits of projections of structured light on object, which is being scanned. The rotate table is controlled by PC. The camera, projector and rotate table are synchronized by PC. Controlling of stepper motor is prov...

  14. TOWARDS: 3D INTERNET

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Swapnali R. Ghadge

    2013-01-01

    In today’s ever-shifting media landscape, it can be a complex task to find effective ways to reach your desired audience. As traditional media such as television continue to lose audience share, one venue in particular stands out for its ability to attract highly motivated audiences and for its tremendous growth potential the 3D Internet. The concept of '3D Internet' has recently come into the spotlight in the R&D arena, catching the attention of many people, and leading to a lot o...

  15. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI),a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly,the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases:The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube; the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability,which is conducted on the AWE’s shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data,good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models acceler-ated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM),which are adopted in our experi-ments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces,and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer ex-periment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface,and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer,bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images,and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely,especially at late times.

  16. Tangible 3D Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlesen, Aske K.; Ovesen, Nis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental approach to teaching 3D modelling techniques in an Industrial Design programme. The approach includes the use of tangible free form models as tools for improving the overall learning. The paper is based on lecturer and student experiences obtained through...

  17. Shaping 3-D boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data...

  18. 3D Harmonic Echocardiography:

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Voormolen

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThree dimensional (3D) echocardiography has recently developed from an experimental technique in the ’90 towards an imaging modality for the daily clinical practice. This dissertation describes the considerations, implementation, validation and clinical application of a unique

  19. Progress in indirect and direct-drive planar experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Delorme, B.; Martinez, D.; Huser, G.; Galmiche, D.; Liberatore, S.; Igumenshchev, I.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Michel, D. T.; Froula, D.; Seka, W.; Riazuelo, G.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Grech, M.; Chicanne, C.; Theobald, M.; Borisenko, N.; Orekhov, A.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Remington, B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experiments performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. The foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.

  20. Linear simulations of the cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsh, A.; Gao, S.; Samtaney, R.; Wheatley, V.

    2016-03-01

    Numerical simulations and analysis indicate that the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is suppressed in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in Cartesian slab geometry. Motivated by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion and suppression by means of a magnetic field, we investigate the RMI via linear MHD simulations in cylindrical geometry. The physical setup is that of a Chisnell-type converging shock interacting with a density interface with either axial or azimuthal (2D) perturbations. The linear stability is examined in the context of an initial value problem (with a time-varying base state) wherein the linearized ideal MHD equations are solved with an upwind numerical method. Linear simulations in the absence of a magnetic field indicate that RMI growth rate during the early time period is similar to that observed in Cartesian geometry. However, this RMI phase is short-lived and followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability phase with an accompanied exponential increase in the perturbation amplitude. We examine several strengths of the magnetic field (characterized by β = /2 p Br 2 ) and observe a significant suppression of the instability for β ≤ 4. The suppression of the instability is attributed to the transport of vorticity away from the interface by Alfvén fronts.

  1. Linear simulations of the cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in magnetohydrodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bakhsh, A.

    2016-03-09

    Numerical simulations and analysis indicate that the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability(RMI) is suppressed in ideal magnetohydrodynamics(MHD) in Cartesian slab geometry. Motivated by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion and suppression by means of a magnetic field, we investigate the RMI via linear MHD simulations in cylindrical geometry. The physical setup is that of a Chisnell-type converging shock interacting with a density interface with either axial or azimuthal (2D) perturbations. The linear stability is examined in the context of an initial value problem (with a time-varying base state) wherein the linearized ideal MHD equations are solved with an upwind numerical method. Linear simulations in the absence of a magnetic field indicate that RMI growth rate during the early time period is similar to that observed in Cartesian geometry. However, this RMI phase is short-lived and followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability phase with an accompanied exponential increase in the perturbation amplitude. We examine several strengths of the magnetic field (characterized by β=2p/B^2_r) and observe a significant suppression of the instability for β ≤ 4. The suppression of the instability is attributed to the transport of vorticity away from the interface by Alfvén fronts.

  2. On physical and numerical instabilities arising in simulations of non-stationary radiatively cooling shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjin, D. A.; Glazyrin, S. I.; Manukovskiy, K. V.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    2016-06-01

    We describe our modelling of the radiatively cooling shocks and their thin shells with various numerical tools in different physical and calculational setups. We inspect structure of the dense shell, its formation and evolution, pointing out physical and numerical factors that sustain its shape and also may lead to instabilities. We have found that under certain physical conditions, the circular shaped shells show a strong bending instability and successive fragmentation on Cartesian grids soon after their formation, while remain almost unperturbed when simulated on polar meshes. We explain this by physical Rayleigh-Taylor-like instabilities triggered by corrugation of the dense shell surfaces by numerical noise. Conditions for these instabilities follow from both the shell structure itself and from episodes of transient acceleration during re-establishing of dynamical pressure balance after sudden radiative cooling onset. They are also easily excited by physical perturbations of the ambient medium. The widely mentioned non-linear thin shell instability, in contrast, in tests with physical perturbations is shown to have only limited chances to develop in real radiative shocks, as it seems to require a special spatial arrangement of fluctuations to be excited efficiently. The described phenomena also set new requirements on further simulations of the radiatively cooling shocks in order to be physically correct and free of numerical artefacts.

  3. 3D animace

    OpenAIRE

    Klusoň, Jindřich

    2010-01-01

    Computer animation has a growing importance and application in the world. With expansion of technologies increases quality of the final animation as well as number of 3D animation software. This thesis is currently mapped animation software for creating animation in film, television industry and video games which are advisable users requirements. Of them were selected according to criteria the best - Autodesk Maya 2011. This animation software is unique with tools for creating special effects...

  4. Massive 3D Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Andringa, Roel; de Roo, Mees; Hohm, Olaf; Sezgin, Ergin; Townsend, Paul K

    2009-01-01

    We construct the N=1 three-dimensional supergravity theory with cosmological, Einstein-Hilbert, Lorentz Chern-Simons, and general curvature squared terms. We determine the general supersymmetric configuration, and find a family of supersymmetric adS vacua with the supersymmetric Minkowski vacuum as a limiting case. Linearizing about the Minkowski vacuum, we find three classes of unitary theories; one is the supersymmetric extension of the recently discovered `massive 3D gravity'. Another is a `new topologically massive supergravity' (with no Einstein-Hilbert term) that propagates a single (2,3/2) helicity supermultiplet.

  5. Massive 3D supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andringa, Roel; Bergshoeff, Eric A; De Roo, Mees; Hohm, Olaf [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Sezgin, Ergin [George and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Townsend, Paul K, E-mail: E.A.Bergshoeff@rug.n, E-mail: O.Hohm@rug.n, E-mail: sezgin@tamu.ed, E-mail: P.K.Townsend@damtp.cam.ac.u [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-21

    We construct the N=1 three-dimensional supergravity theory with cosmological, Einstein-Hilbert, Lorentz Chern-Simons, and general curvature squared terms. We determine the general supersymmetric configuration, and find a family of supersymmetric adS vacua with the supersymmetric Minkowski vacuum as a limiting case. Linearizing about the Minkowski vacuum, we find three classes of unitary theories; one is the supersymmetric extension of the recently discovered 'massive 3D gravity'. Another is a 'new topologically massive supergravity' (with no Einstein-Hilbert term) that propagates a single (2,3/2) helicity supermultiplet.

  6. TOWARDS: 3D INTERNET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Swapnali R. Ghadge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In today’s ever-shifting media landscape, it can be a complex task to find effective ways to reach your desired audience. As traditional media such as television continue to lose audience share, one venue in particular stands out for its ability to attract highly motivated audiences and for its tremendous growth potential the 3D Internet. The concept of '3D Internet' has recently come into the spotlight in the R&D arena, catching the attention of many people, and leading to a lot of discussions. Basically, one can look into this matter from a few different perspectives: visualization and representation of information, and creation and transportation of information, among others. All of them still constitute research challenges, as no products or services are yet available or foreseen for the near future. Nevertheless, one can try to envisage the directions that can be taken towards achieving this goal. People who take part in virtual worlds stay online longer with a heightened level of interest. To take advantage of that interest, diverse businesses and organizations have claimed an early stake in this fast-growing market. They include technology leaders such as IBM, Microsoft, and Cisco, companies such as BMW, Toyota, Circuit City, Coca Cola, and Calvin Klein, and scores of universities, including Harvard, Stanford and Penn State.

  7. Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities with Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seung-Hoon; Inutsuka, Shu-Ichiro; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2010-04-01

    Numerical simulations for the non-linear development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in two different density layers have been performed with the particle-based method (Godunov SPH) developed by Inutsuka. The Godunov SPH can describe the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability even with a high-density contrast, while the standard SPH shows the absence of the instability across a density gradient. The interaction of a dense blob with a hot ambient medium has been performed also. The Godunov SPH describes the formation and evolution of the fingers due to the combinations of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The blob test result coincides well with the results of the grid-based codes. An inaccurate handling of a density gradient in the standard SPH has been pointed out as the direct reason of the absence of the instabilities. An unphysical force happens at the density gradient even in a pressure equilibrium, and repulses particles from the initial density discontinuity. Therefore, the initial perturbation damps, and a gap form at the discontinuity. The unphysical force has been studied in terms of the consistency of a numerical scheme. Contrary to the standard SPH, the momentum equation of the Godunov SPH does not use the particle approximation, and has been derived from the kernel convolution or a new Lagrangian function. The new Lagrangian function used in the Godunov SPH is more analogous to the real Lagrangian function for continuum. The momentum equation of the Godunov SPH has much better linear consistency, so the unphysical force is greatly reduced compared to the standard SPH in a high density contrast.

  8. Experience of percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system Arcadis Orbic 3D+Stealth Station Navigation System for vertebral fractures expressing instability. From April 2007 to December 2007, we performed percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system on 31 unstable fractures. Progress was good in all cases, indicating that percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system is effective for vertebral fractures expressing instability. (author)

  9. Spike Penetration in Blast-Wave-Driven Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2010-05-01

    Recent experiments by C. Kuranz and collaborators, motivated by structure in supernovae, have studied systems in which planar blast waves encounter interfaces where the density decreases. During the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) phase of such experiments, they observed greater penetration of the RT spikes than tends to be seen in simulations. Here we seek to employ semi-analytic theory to understand the general nature and regimes of spike penetration for blast-wave-driven instabilities. This problem is not trivial as one must account for the initial vorticity deposition at the interface, for its time-dependent deceleration, for the expansion of the shocked material in time and space, and for the drag on the broadened tips of the spikes. We offer here an improved evaluation of the material expansion in comparison to past work. The goal is to use such models to increase our ability to interpret the behavior of simulations of such systems, in both the laboratory and astrophysics. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  10. Reshocks, rarefactions, and the generalized Layzer model for hydrodynamic instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikaelian, K O

    2008-06-10

    We report numerical simulations and analytic modeling of shock tube experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. We examine single interfaces of the type A/B where the incident shock is initiated in A and the transmitted shock proceeds into B. Examples are He/air and air/He. In addition, we study finite-thickness or double-interface A/B/A configurations like air/SF{sub 6}/air gas-curtain experiments. We first consider conventional shock tubes that have a 'fixed' boundary: A solid endwall which reflects the transmitted shock and reshocks the interface(s). Then we focus on new experiments with a 'free' boundary--a membrane disrupted mechanically or by the transmitted shock, sending back a rarefaction towards the interface(s). Complex acceleration histories are achieved, relevant for Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. We compare our simulation results with a generalized Layzer model for two fluids with time-dependent densities, and derive a new freeze-out condition whereby accelerating and compressive forces cancel each other out. Except for the recently reported failures of the Layzer model, the generalized Layzer model and hydrocode simulations for reshocks and rarefactions agree well with each other, and remain to be verified experimentally.

  11. 3D printing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  12. Thermal Marangoni instability and magnetic pressure for a thin ferrofluid layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennenberg, Marcel; Slavtchev, Slavtcho; Weyssow, Boris

    2009-04-01

    We study the linear coupling between the Marangoni and Cowley-Rosensweig instabilities for a thin layer of ferrofluid subjected to a temperature gradient and a magnetic field. Both are perpendicular to the reference horizontal boundaries, one of which is a rigid plate, while the other is a free surface remaining flat as long as the magnetic field is smaller than the critical value of the onset of the static isothermal Cowley-Rosensweig instability. Our study considers at first a ferrofluid layer resting on the rigid border. In the stationary case, when heating is directed from the rigid side, a magnetic field, smaller than the Cowley-Rosensweig critical one, can induce a new pattern: the critical Marangoni number is much lower than in the nonmagnetic undeformable case, for a dimensionless wavenumber of O(square root Bo) less than 1.992, its Newtonian classical value. When heating from the gaseous phase, an oscillatory marginal case exists theoretically, but for unphysical conditions. We consider also the case when the ferrofluid is hanging down from the rigid side. Only the wavelength critical value of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that separates a stable region from an unstable one changes. PMID:19426330

  13. A Study of Interfacial-Instability-Induced Mixing in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Annamalai, Subramanian; Ouellet, Frederick

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments have shown that when a bed of particles is explosively dispersed, a multiphase instability front may occur, and lead to the formation of aerodynamically stable jet-particle structures. It is believed that these coherent structures originates from the early phase of explosive dispersal, in particular, in the manner in which the initial layer of particles undergoes instability, as it rapidly expands in the radial direction. In this work we want to isolate and study the effect of gas-particle two-way interaction on the nature of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities of an explosively driven particle layer. As a result we perform numerical experiments, where we limit the initial volume fraction of the particle layer. The focus of this investigation is on the RT and RM growth mechanisms in the linear and non-linear stages under the complexity of the cylindrical geometry, very high pressures and densities associated with the detonation process. Thus, in addition to the initial disturbance created by the random distribution of particles, we explicitly vary the initial density of the particle and gas distribution. Detailed analyses of single mode and two-mode RT/RM-induced mixing are presented. This work was supported (in part) by the U.S. DoE, NNSA, ASC Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  14. 3D monitor

    OpenAIRE

    Szkandera, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Tato bakalářská práce se zabývá návrhem a realizací systému, který umožní obraz scény zobrazovaný na ploše vnímat prostorově. Prostorové vnímání 2D obrazové informace je umožněno jednak stereopromítáním a jednak tím, že se obraz mění v závislosti na poloze pozorovatele. Tato práce se zabývá hlavně druhým z těchto problémů. This Bachelor's thesis goal is to design and realize system, which allows user to perceive 2D visual information as three-dimensional. 3D visual preception of 2D image i...

  15. Mobile 3D tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobile tomographs often have the problem that high spatial resolution is impossible owing to the position or setup of the tomograph. While the tree tomograph developed by Messrs. Isotopenforschung Dr. Sauerwein GmbH worked well in practice, it is no longer used as the spatial resolution and measuring time are insufficient for many modern applications. The paper shows that the mechanical base of the method is sufficient for 3D CT measurements with modern detectors and X-ray tubes. CT measurements with very good statistics take less than 10 min. This means that mobile systems can be used, e.g. in examinations of non-transportable cultural objects or monuments. Enhancement of the spatial resolution of mobile tomographs capable of measuring in any position is made difficult by the fact that the tomograph has moving parts and will therefore have weight shifts. With the aid of tomographies whose spatial resolution is far higher than the mechanical accuracy, a correction method is presented for direct integration of the Feldkamp algorithm

  16. The linear electric motor: Instability at 1,000 g's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When fluid of high density is supported against gravity by a less dense liquid, the system is unstable, and microscopic perturbations grow at the interface between the fluids. This phenomenon, called the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, also occurs when a bottle of oil-and-vinegar salad dressing is turned upside down. The instability causes spikes of the dense fluid to penetrate the light fluid, while bubbles of the lighter fluid rise into the dense fluid. The same phenomenon occurs when a light fluid is used to accelerate a dense fluid, causing the two fluids to mix at a very high rate. For example, during the implosion of an ICF capsule, this instability can cause enough mixing to contaminate, cool, and degrade the yield of the thermonuclear fuel. The LEM is an excellent tool for studying this instability, but what is it? Think of a miniature high-speed electric train (the container) hurtling down a track (the electrodes) while diagnostic equipment (optical and laser) photographs it. The LEM, consists of four linear electrodes, or rails, that carry an electrical current to a pair of sliding armatures on the container. A magnetic field is produced that works in concert with the rail-armature current to accelerate the container--just as in an electric motor, but in a linear fashion rather than in rotation. The magnetic field is augmented with elongated coils just as in a conventional electric motor. This configuration also helps hold the armatures against the electrodes to prevent arcing. The electrical energy (0.6 megajoules) is provided by 16 capacitor banks that can be triggered independently to produce different acceleration profiles (i.e., how the acceleration varies with time)

  17. X3D: Extensible 3D Graphics Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Leonard; Brutzman, Don

    2007-01-01

    The article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MSP.2007.905889 Extensible 3D (X3D) is the open standard for Web-delivered three-dimensional (3D) graphics. It specifies a declarative geometry definition language, a run-time engine, and an application program interface (API) that provide an interactive, animated, real-time environment for 3D graphics. The X3D specification documents are freely available, the standard can be used without paying any royalties,...

  18. 3D game environments create professional 3D game worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Ahearn, Luke

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate resource to help you create triple-A quality art for a variety of game worlds; 3D Game Environments offers detailed tutorials on creating 3D models, applying 2D art to 3D models, and clear concise advice on issues of efficiency and optimization for a 3D game engine. Using Photoshop and 3ds Max as his primary tools, Luke Ahearn explains how to create realistic textures from photo source and uses a variety of techniques to portray dynamic and believable game worlds.From a modern city to a steamy jungle, learn about the planning and technological considerations for 3D modelin

  19. 3D Printing an Octohedron

    OpenAIRE

    Aboufadel, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this short paper is to describe a project to manufacture a regular octohedron on a 3D printer. We assume that the reader is familiar with the basics of 3D printing. In the project, we use fundamental ideas to calculate the vertices and faces of an octohedron. Then, we utilize the OPENSCAD program to create a virtual 3D model and an STereoLithography (.stl) file that can be used by a 3D printer.

  20. 3D modelling and recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Marcos; Robinson, Alan; Alboul, Lyuba; Brink, Willie

    2006-01-01

    3D face recognition is an open field. In this paper we present a method for 3D facial recognition based on Principal Components Analysis. The method uses a relatively large number of facial measurements and ratios and yields reliable recognition. We also highlight our approach to sensor development for fast 3D model acquisition and automatic facial feature extraction.

  1. Can the magnetic field in the Orion arm inhibit the growth of instabilities in the bow shock of Betelgeuse?

    CERN Document Server

    van Marle, Allard Jan; Meliani, Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    Many evolved stars travel through space at supersonic velocities, which leads to the formation of bow shocks ahead of the star where the stellar wind collides with the interstellar medium (ISM). Herschel observations of the bow shock of $\\alpha$-Orionis show that the shock is almost free of instabilities, despite being, at least in theory, subject to both Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. A possible explanation for the lack of instabilities lies in the presence of an interstellar magnetic field. We wish to investigate whether the magnetic field of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the Orion arm can inhibit the growth of instabilities in the bow shock of $\\alpha$-Orionis. We used the code MPI-AMRVAC to make magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of a circumstellar bow shock, using the wind parameters derived for $\\alpha$-Orionis and interstellar magnetic field strengths of $B\\,=\\,1.4,\\, 3.0$, and $5.0\\, \\mu$G, which fall within the boundaries of the observed magnetic field strength in the Orion arm ...

  2. 3-D contextual Bayesian classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    distribution for the pixel values as well as a prior distribution for the configuration of class variables within the cross that is made of a pixel and its four nearest neighbours. We will extend these algorithms to 3-D, i.e. we will specify a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for a pixel and its 6 nearest 3......-D neighbours, and generalise the class variable configuration distributions within the 3-D cross given in 2-D algorithms. The new 3-D algorithms are tested on a synthetic 3-D multivariate dataset....

  3. Taming Supersymmetric Defects in 3d-3d Correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Gang, Dongmin; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group $SL(N,\\mathbb{C})$, in the context of its relation with 3d $\\mathcal{N}=2$ theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d $(2,0)$ theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold $\\hat{M}$. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d $SL(N,\\mathbb{C})$ Chern-Simons theory, in 3d $\\mathcal{N}=2$ theory, in 5d $\\mathcal{N}=2$ super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper, which contains more details and more results.

  4. 3D Printing Functional Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Leong, Yew Juan

    2016-01-01

    3D printing presents the ability of rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing. Techniques such as stereolithography (SLA) and fused deposition molding (FDM) have been developed and utilized since the inception of 3D printing. In such techniques, polymers represent the most commonly used material for 3D printing due to material properties such as thermo plasticity as well as its ability to be polymerized from monomers. Polymer nanocomposites are polymers with nanomaterials composited into the ...

  5. R-T instability model of magnetic fluid and its numerical simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑秋云; 李明军; 舒适

    2008-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor(R-T) instability of ferrofluid has been the subject of recent research,because of its implications on the stability of stellar.By neglecting the viscosity and rotation of magnetic fluid,and assuming that the magnetic particles are irrotational and temperature insensitive,we obtain a simplified R-T instability model of magnetic fluid.For the interface tracing,we use five-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory(WENO) scheme to spatial direction and three-order TVD R-K method to time direction on the uniform mesh,respectively.If the direction of the external magnetic field is the same as that of gravity,the velocities of the interface will be increased.But if the direction of the external magnetic field is in opposition to the direction of gravity,the velocities of the interface will be decreased.When the direction of the external magnetic field is perpendicular to the direction of gravity,the symmetry of the interface will be destroyed.Because of the action which is produced by perpendicular external magnetic field,there are other bubbles at the boudaries which parallel the direction of gravity.When we increase the magnetic susceptibility of the magnetic fluids,the effects of external magnetic fields will be more distinct for the interface tracing.

  6. Faraday instability of a two-layer liquid film with a free upper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototsky, Andrey; Bestehorn, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We study the linear stability of a laterally extended flat two-layer liquid film under the influence of external vertical vibration. The first liquid layer rests on a vibrating solid plate and is overlaid by a second layer of immiscible fluid with deformable upper surface. Surface waves, excited as the result of the Faraday instability, can be characterized by a time-dependent relative amplitude of the displacements of the liquid-liquid and the liquid-gas interfaces. The in-phase displacements are associated with a zigzag (barotropic) mode and the antiphase displacement corresponds to the varicose thinning mode. We numerically determine the stability threshold in the vibrated two-layer film and compute the dispersion relation together with the decay rates of the surface waves in the absence of vibration. The in-phase and the antiphase displacements are strongly coupled in the vibrated system. The interplay between the Faraday and the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the system with heavier fluid on top of a lighter fluid is analyzed.

  7. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  8. 3D IBFV : Hardware-Accelerated 3D Flow Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D flow visualization problem in a

  9. 3D for Graphic Designers

    CERN Document Server

    Connell, Ellery

    2011-01-01

    Helping graphic designers expand their 2D skills into the 3D space The trend in graphic design is towards 3D, with the demand for motion graphics, animation, photorealism, and interactivity rapidly increasing. And with the meteoric rise of iPads, smartphones, and other interactive devices, the design landscape is changing faster than ever.2D digital artists who need a quick and efficient way to join this brave new world will want 3D for Graphic Designers. Readers get hands-on basic training in working in the 3D space, including product design, industrial design and visualization, modeling, ani

  10. A 3-D Contextual Classifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1997-01-01

    . This includes the specification of a Gaussian distribution for the pixel values as well as a prior distribution for the configuration of class variables within the cross that is m ade of a pixel and its four nearest neighbours. We will extend this algorithm to 3-D, i.e. we will specify a simultaneous Gaussian...... distr ibution for a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours, and generalise the class variable configuration distribution within the 3-D cross. The algorithm is tested on a synthetic 3-D multivariate dataset....

  11. 3D Bayesian contextual classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours.......We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours....

  12. Interactive 3D multimedia content

    CERN Document Server

    Cellary, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    The book describes recent research results in the areas of modelling, creation, management and presentation of interactive 3D multimedia content. The book describes the current state of the art in the field and identifies the most important research and design issues. Consecutive chapters address these issues. These are: database modelling of 3D content, security in 3D environments, describing interactivity of content, searching content, visualization of search results, modelling mixed reality content, and efficient creation of interactive 3D content. Each chapter is illustrated with example a

  13. 3-D printers for libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Griffey, Jason

    2014-01-01

    As the maker movement continues to grow and 3-D printers become more affordable, an expanding group of hobbyists is keen to explore this new technology. In the time-honored tradition of introducing new technologies, many libraries are considering purchasing a 3-D printer. Jason Griffey, an early enthusiast of 3-D printing, has researched the marketplace and seen several systems first hand at the Consumer Electronics Show. In this report he introduces readers to the 3-D printing marketplace, covering such topics asHow fused deposition modeling (FDM) printing workBasic terminology such as build

  14. Improvement of 3D Scanner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The disadvantage remaining in 3D scanning system and its reasons are discussed. A new host-and-slave structure with high speed image acquisition and processing system is proposed to quicken the image processing and improve the performance of 3D scanning system.

  15. 3D Printing for Bricks

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2015-01-01

    Building Bytes, by Brian Peters, is a project that uses desktop 3D printers to print bricks for architecture. Instead of using an expensive custom-made printer, it uses a normal standard 3D printer which is available for everyone and makes it more accessible and also easier for fabrication.

  16. Modular 3-D Transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  17. Nonlinear evolution of MHD instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3-D nonlinear MHD computer code was used to study the time evolution of internal instabilities. Velocity vortex cells are observed to persist into the nonlinear evolution. Pressure and density profiles convect around these cells for a weak localized instability, or convect into the wall for a strong instability. (U.S.)

  18. Using 3D in Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Jo; Kirschenbauer, Sabine; Döllner, Jürgen;

    2005-01-01

    The notion of three-dimensionality is applied to five stages of the visualization pipeline. While 3D visulization is most often associated with the visual mapping and representation of data, this chapter also identifies its role in the management and assembly of data, and in the media used...... to display 3D imagery. The extra cartographic degree of freedom offered by using 3D is explored and offered as a motivation for employing 3D in visualization. The use of VR and the construction of virtual environments exploit navigational and behavioral realism, but become most usefil when combined...... with abstracted representations embedded in a 3D space. The interactions between development of geovisualization, the technology used to implement it and the theory surrounding cartographic representation are explored. The dominance of computing technologies, driven particularly by the gaming industry...

  19. Simulations of 3D LPI's relevant to IFE using the PIC code OSIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Winjum, B. J.

    2014-10-01

    We will study three dimensional effects of laser plasma instabilities, including backward raman scattering, the high frequency hybrid instability, and the two plasmon instability using OSIRIS in 3D Cartesian geometry and cylindrical 2D OSIRIS with azimuthal mode decompositions. With our new capabilities we hope to demonstrate that we are capable of studying single speckle physics relevant to IFE in an efficent manner.

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  1. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  2. ADT-3D Tumor Detection Assistant in 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Lazcano Bello

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The present document describes ADT-3D (Three-Dimensional Tumor Detector Assistant, a prototype application developed to assist doctors diagnose, detect and locate tumors in the brain by using CT scan. The reader may find on this document an introduction to tumor detection; ADT-3D main goals; development details; description of the product; motivation for its development; result’s study; and areas of applicability.

  3. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  4. 5-axis 3D Printer

    OpenAIRE

    Grutle, Øyvind Kallevik

    2015-01-01

    3D printers have in recent years become extremely popular. Even though 3D printing technology have existed since the late 1980's, it is now considered one of the most significant technological breakthroughs of the twenty-first century. Several different 3D printing processes have been invented during the years. But it is the fused deposition modeling (FDM) which was one of the first invented that is considered the most popular today. Even though the FDM process is the most popular, it still s...

  5. Handbook of 3D integration

    CERN Document Server

    Garrou , Philip; Ramm , Peter

    2014-01-01

    Edited by key figures in 3D integration and written by top authors from high-tech companies and renowned research institutions, this book covers the intricate details of 3D process technology.As such, the main focus is on silicon via formation, bonding and debonding, thinning, via reveal and backside processing, both from a technological and a materials science perspective. The last part of the book is concerned with assessing and enhancing the reliability of the 3D integrated devices, which is a prerequisite for the large-scale implementation of this emerging technology. Invaluable reading fo

  6. Exploration of 3D Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Zeyu

    2014-01-01

    3D printing technology is introduced and defined in this Thesis. Some methods of 3D printing are illustrated and their principles are explained with pictures. Most of the essential parts are presented with pictures and their effects are explained within the whole system. Problems on Up! Plus 3D printer are solved and a DIY product is made with this machine. The processes of making product are recorded and the items which need to be noticed during the process are the highlight in this th...

  7. Tuotekehitysprojekti: 3D-tulostin

    OpenAIRE

    Pihlajamäki, Janne

    2011-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tutustuttiin 3D-tulostamisen teknologiaan. Työssä käytiin läpi 3D-tulostimesta tehty tuotekehitysprojekti. Sen lisäksi esiteltiin yleisellä tasolla tuotekehitysprosessi ja syntyneiden tulosten mahdollisia suojausmenetelmiä. Tavoitteena tässä työssä oli kehittää markkinoilta jo löytyvää kotitulostin-tasoista 3D-laiteteknologiaa lähemmäksi ammattilaistason ratkaisua. Tavoitteeseen pyrittiin keskittymällä parantamaan laitteella saavutettavaa tulostustarkkuutta ja -nopeutt...

  8. Color 3D Reverse Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a principle and a method of col or 3D laser scanning measurement. Based on the fundamental monochrome 3D measureme nt study, color information capture, color texture mapping, coordinate computati on and other techniques are performed to achieve color 3D measurement. The syste m is designed and composed of a line laser light emitter, one color CCD camera, a motor-driven rotary filter, a circuit card and a computer. Two steps in captu ring object's images in the measurement process: Firs...

  9. 3-D neutron transport benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of 3-D neutron transport benchmark problems proposed by the Osaka University to NEACRP in 1988 has been calculated by many participants and the corresponding results are summarized in this report. The results of Keff, control rod worth and region-averaged fluxes for the four proposed core models, calculated by using various 3-D transport codes are compared and discussed. The calculational methods used were: Monte Carlo, Discrete Ordinates (Sn), Spherical Harmonics (Pn), Nodal Transport and others. The solutions of the four core models are quite useful as benchmarks for checking the validity of 3-D neutron transport codes

  10. 3D on the internet

    OpenAIRE

    Puntar, Matej

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is the presentation of already established and new technologies of displaying 3D content in a web browser. The thesis begins with a short presentation of the history of 3D content available on the internet and its development together with advantages and disadvantages of individual technologies. The latter two are described in detail as well is their use and the differences among them. Special emphasis has been given to WebGL, the newest technology of 3D conte...

  11. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial instabilities: A consistent, conservative, all-speed, sharp-interface method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Deng, Xiaolong; Theofanous, Theo G.

    2013-06-01

    We present a conservative and consistent numerical method for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in flow domains that may be separated by any number of material interfaces, at arbitrarily-high density/viscosity ratios and acoustic-impedance mismatches, subjected to strong shock waves and flow speeds that can range from highly supersonic to near-zero Mach numbers. A principal aim is prediction of interfacial instabilities under superposition of multiple potentially-active modes (Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov) as found for example with shock-driven, immersed fluid bodies (locally oblique shocks)—accordingly we emphasize fidelity supported by physics-based validation, including experiments. Consistency is achieved by satisfying the jump discontinuities at the interface within a conservative 2nd-order scheme that is coupled, in a conservative manner, to the bulk-fluid motions. The jump conditions are embedded into a Riemann problem, solved exactly to provide the pressures and velocities along the interface, which is tracked by a level set function to accuracy of O(Δx5, Δt4). Subgrid representation of the interface is achieved by allowing curvature of its constituent interfacial elements to obtain O(Δx3) accuracy in cut-cell volume, with attendant benefits in calculating cell- geometric features and interface curvature (O(Δx3)). Overall the computation converges at near-theoretical O(Δx2). Spurious-currents are down to machine error and there is no time-step restriction due to surface tension. Our method is built upon a quadtree-like adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure. When necessary, this is supplemented by body-fitted grids to enhance resolution of the gas dynamics, including flow separation, shear layers, slip lines, and critical layers. Comprehensive comparisons with exact solutions for the linearized Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz problems demonstrate excellent performance. Sample simulations of liquid drops subjected to

  12. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  13. Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi;

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained...

  14. Main: TATCCAYMOTIFOSRAMY3D [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TATCCAYMOTIFOSRAMY3D S000256 01-August-2006 (last modified) kehi TATCCAY motif found in rice (O. ... otif and G motif (see S000130) are responsible for sugar ... repression (Toyofuku et al. 1998); GATA; amylase; ...

  15. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  16. 3D Face Appearance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Åström, Kalle

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}......We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}...

  17. 3D Face Apperance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Astrom, K

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations......We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations...

  18. AI 3D Cybug Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In this short paper I briefly discuss 3D war Game based on artificial intelligence concepts called AI WAR. Going in to the details, I present the importance of CAICL language and how this language is used in AI WAR. Moreover I also present a designed and implemented 3D War Cybug for AI WAR using CAICL and discus the implemented strategy to defeat its enemies during the game life.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann Method for 3-D Flows with Curved Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Renwei; Shyy, Wei; Yu, Dazhi; Luo, Li-Shi

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we investigate two issues that are important to computational efficiency and reliability in fluid dynamics applications of the lattice, Boltzmann equation (LBE): (1) Computational stability and accuracy of different lattice Boltzmann models and (2) the treatment of the boundary conditions on curved solid boundaries and their 3-D implementations. Three athermal 3-D LBE models (D3QI5, D3Ql9, and D3Q27) are studied and compared in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and robustness. The boundary treatment recently developed by Filippova and Hanel and Met et al. in 2-D is extended to and implemented for 3-D. The convergence, stability, and computational efficiency of the 3-D LBE models with the boundary treatment for curved boundaries were tested in simulations of four 3-D flows: (1) Fully developed flows in a square duct, (2) flow in a 3-D lid-driven cavity, (3) fully developed flows in a circular pipe, and (4) a uniform flow over a sphere. We found that while the fifteen-velocity 3-D (D3Ql5) model is more prone to numerical instability and the D3Q27 is more computationally intensive, the 63Q19 model provides a balance between computational reliability and efficiency. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrated that the boundary treatment for 3-D arbitrary curved geometry has second-order accuracy and possesses satisfactory stability characteristics.

  20. From 3D view to 3D print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  1. MC3D modelling of stratified explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that a steam explosion can occur in a stratified geometry and that the observed yields are lower than in the case of explosion in a premixture configuration. However, very few models are available to quantify the amount of melt which can be involved and the pressure peak that can be developed. In the stratified application of the MC3D code, mixing and fragmentation of the melt are explained by the growth of Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities due to the shear flow of the two phase coolant above the melt. Such a model is then used to recalculate the Frost-Ciccarelli tin-water experiment. Pressure peak, speed of propagation, bubble shape and erosion height are well reproduced as well as the influence of the inertial constraint (height of the water pool). (author)

  2. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  3. 3D analyses of cavitation instabilities accounting for plastic anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    main focus is on the effect of different degrees of plastic anisotropy. Loading cases are considered, where all the macroscopic principal stresses differ. The numerical quasi‐static solutions are obtained by a full transient analysis of the equations of motion, in which the loading is applied so slowly...

  4. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  5. Materialedreven 3d digital formgivning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med forskningsprojektet er for det første at understøtte keramikeren i at arbejde eksperimenterende med digital formgivning, og for det andet at bidrage til en tværfaglig diskurs om brugen af digital formgivning. Forskningsprojektet fokuserer på 3d formgivning og derved på 3d digital...... formgivning og Rapid Prototyping (RP). RP er en fællesbetegnelse for en række af de teknikker, der muliggør at overføre den digitale form til 3d fysisk form. Forskningsprojektet koncentrerer sig om to overordnede forskningsspørgsmål. Det første handler om, hvordan viden og erfaring indenfor det keramiske...... fagområde kan blive udnyttet i forhold til 3d digital formgivning. Det andet handler om, hvad en sådan tilgang kan bidrage med, og hvordan den kan blive udnyttet i et dynamisk samspil med det keramiske materiale i formgivningen af 3d keramiske artefakter. Materialedreven formgivning er karakteriseret af en...

  6. Novel 3D media technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2015-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Project ROMEO, which focuses on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the future Internet. The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of consistent video quality to fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will present hybrid networking solutions that combine the DVB-T2 and DVB-NGH broadcas...

  7. 3D future internet media

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2014-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The main contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Projects ROMEO, which focus on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the Future Internet (www.ict-romeo.eu). The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of constant video quality to both fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will design and develop hybrid-networking solutions that co...

  8. Hydrodynamic Instability Growth in Polar-Direct-Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, M.; Shvydky, A.; Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Nikroo, A.; Wallace, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) is an alternative, direct-drive inertial confinement fusion platform being developed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Shell stability of the target is of key importance for an optimized performance. We have begun an experimental campaign to characterize Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth and laser imprint in spherical PDD implosions on the NIF. Plastic, cone-in-shell targets with an outer diameter of ~ 2 . 2 mm were imploded, and the RT-amplified shell mass modulations were tracked via measurements of the 2-D optical depth variations using soft x-ray radiography. The RT growth of discrete modes was investigated by machining single-mode, sinusoidal corrugations onto the target surface, which acted as well-characterized seeds. We will present platform characterization and backlighter optimization data as well as experimental results of instability growth in spherical PDD experiments on the NIF. The experimental data will be compared to 2-D DRACO simulations and strategies for measuring high l-mode perturbations > 300 and for mitigating imprint in future PDD experiments will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  9. Nova Experiments Examining Raleigh-Taylor Instability in Materials with Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S.V.; Kalantar, D.H.; Colvin, J.D.; Gold, D.M.; Mikaelian, K.O.; Remington, B.A.; Wiley, L.G.

    1999-10-06

    Material strength can affect the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid materials, where growth occurs through plastic flow. In order to study this effect at megabar pressures, we have shocked metal foils using hohlraum x-ray drive on Nova, and observed the growth of pre-imposed modulations with x-ray radiography. Previous experiments employing Cu foils did not conclusively show strength effects for resolvable wavelengths. Therefore, we have redesigned the experiment to use aluminum foils. As aluminum has higher specific strength at pressures {approx}1 Mbar, the new design is predicted to show growth reduction due to strength of at least a factor of two for some wavelengths in the observable range of 10 - 50 {micro}m. We have also modified the drive history to extend the interval of uniform acceleration and to reduce the risk of melting the foils with coalesced shocks. The design changes, as well as Nova operational constraints, limit peak pressures to 1-1.5 Mbar. Foil surface motion has been measured with high sensitivity by laser interferometry to look for thermal expansion due to preheat. We have continued to pursue dynamic x-ray diffraction as the most definitive measurement of crystal state.

  10. Modification of 3D milling machine to 3D printer

    OpenAIRE

    Halamíček, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Tato práce se zabývá přestavbou gravírovací frézky na 3D tiskárnu. V první části se práce zabývá možnými technologiemi 3D tisku a možností jejich využití u přestavby. Dále jsou popsány a vybrány vhodné součásti pro přestavbu. V další části je realizováno řízení ohřevu podložky, trysky a řízení posuvu drátu pomocí softwaru TwinCat od společnosti Beckhoff na průmyslovém počítači. Výsledkem práce by měla být oživená 3D tiskárna. This thesis deals with rebuilding of engraving machine to 3D pri...

  11. 3D Imager and Method for 3D imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, P.; Staszewski, R.; Charbon, E.

    2013-01-01

    3D imager comprising at least one pixel, each pixel comprising a photodetectorfor detecting photon incidence and a time-to-digital converter system configured for referencing said photon incidence to a reference clock, and further comprising a reference clock generator provided for generating the re

  12. Validation of TRAB-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRAB-3D is a reactor dynamics code with three-dimensional neutronics coupled to core and circuit thermal-hydraulics. The code, entirely developed at VTT, can be used in transient and accident analyses of boiling (BWR) and pressurized water (PWR) reactors with rectangular fuel bundle geometry. The validation history of TRAB-3D includes calculation of international benchmark exercises, as well as comparisons with measured data from real plant transients. The most recent validation case is a load rejection test performed at the Olkiluoto 1 nuclear power plant in 1998 in connection with the power uprating project. The fact that there is local power measurement data available from this test makes it a suitable case for three-dimensional core model validation. The agreement between the results of the TRAB-3D calculation and the measurements is very good. (orig.)

  13. Crowded Field 3D Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, T; Roth, M M; Becker, Thomas; Fabrika, Sergei; Roth, Martin M.

    2003-01-01

    The quantitative spectroscopy of stellar objects in complex environments is mainly limited by the ability of separating the object from the background. Standard slit spectroscopy, restricting the field of view to one dimension, is obviously not the proper technique in general. The emerging Integral Field (3D) technique with spatially resolved spectra of a two-dimensional field of view provides a great potential for applying advanced subtraction methods. In this paper an image reconstruction algorithm to separate point sources and a smooth background is applied to 3D data. Several performance tests demonstrate the photometric quality of the method. The algorithm is applied to real 3D observations of a sample Planetary Nebula in M31, whose spectrum is contaminated by the bright and complex galaxy background. The ability of separating sources is also studied in a crowded stellar field in M33.

  14. Markerless 3D Face Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walder, Christian; Breidt, Martin; Bulthoff, Heinrich;

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the markerless tracking of deforming surfaces such as faces. We acquire a sequence of 3D scans along with color images at 40Hz. The data is then represented by implicit surface and color functions, using a novel partition-of-unity type method of efficiently...... combining local regressors using nearest neighbor searches. Both these functions act on the 4D space of 3D plus time, and use temporal information to handle the noise in individual scans. After interactive registration of a template mesh to the first frame, it is then automatically deformed to track...... the scanned surface, using the variation of both shape and color as features in a dynamic energy minimization problem. Our prototype system yields high-quality animated 3D models in correspondence, at a rate of approximately twenty seconds per timestep. Tracking results for faces and other objects...

  15. 3D vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... conventional methods can estimate only the axial component. Several approaches for 3D vector velocity estimation have been suggested, but none of these methods have so far produced convincing in vivo results nor have they been adopted by commercial manufacturers. The basis for this project is the Transverse...... on the TO fields are suggested. They can be used to optimize the TO method. In the third part, a TO method for 3D vector velocity estimation is proposed. It employs a 2D phased array transducer and decouples the velocity estimation into three velocity components, which are estimated simultaneously based on 5...

  16. 3D-grafiikkamoottori mobiililaitteille

    OpenAIRE

    Vahlman, Lauri

    2014-01-01

    Tässä insinöörityössä käydään läpi mobiililaitteille suunnatun yksinkertaisen 3D-grafiikkamoottorin suunnittelu ja toteutus käyttäen OpenGL ES -rajapintaa. Työssä esitellään grafiikkamoottorin toteutuksessa käytettyjä tekniikoita sekä tutustutaan moottorin rakenteeseen ja toteutuksellisiin yksityiskohtiin. Työn alkupuolella tutustutaan myös modernin 3D-grafiikan yleisiin periaatteisiin ja toimintaan sekä käydään läpi 3D-grafiikkaan liittyviä suorituskykyongelmia. Työn loppupuolella esitel...

  17. 3D Computations and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  18. 3D proton beam micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focused high energy ion beam micromachining is the newest of the micromachining techniques. There are about 50 scanning proton microprobe facilities worldwide, but so far only few of them showed activity in this promising field. High energy ion beam micromachining using a direct-write scanning MeV ion beam is capable of producing 3D microstructures and components with well defined lateral and depth geometry. The technique has high potential in the manufacture of 3D molds, stamps, and masks for X-ray lithography (LIGA), and also in the rapid prototyping of microcomponents either for research purposes or for components testing prior to batch production. (R.P.)

  19. The 3-D Structure of Reconnection Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. M.; Cassak, P.; Phan, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    We explore the propagation and structure of 3-D reconnection jets inthe Earth's magnetotail using a kinetic model. The finite cross-tailextent of the flow burst significantly changes the structure andevolution of the jet. Ambient ions reflected from the jet frontproduce a region of enhanced pressure that deflects the jet in thecross-tail direction and dissipates a significant fraction of the bulkflow energy. Thus, even subsonic jet fronts are dissipation sites forbulk flow energy. Jets that are narrow in the cross-tail direction aredeflected dominantly in the direction of the ambient ion drift (duskdirection) while wider jets are deflected in both directions. Massloading of the jet due to ions drifting into the jet from the dawnreduce the peak jet velocity below the Walen prediction. The body ofthe jet does not remain laminar but instead becomes strongly turbulentas a result of instabilities growing on the sharp boundaries thatdevelop on dawn and dusk sides of the jet. Both sheared flow andreconnection are drivers of this turbulence. These instabilities causethe reconnection component of the magnetic field Bz to be highlyvariable on spatial scales of around six ion inertial lengths, whichis consistent with that inferred from the typically bursty behavior ofBz in satellite observations of the jet body. Finally, we discussthe mechanisms that control the finite duration of flow bursts in themagnetotail.

  20. Turbulent Mixing and Transport of the Solar Wind Plasma : Full Particle Simulation Study of the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Hoshino, M.

    2004-12-01

    Recent in-situ observations often show the mixing of the solar wind and magnetospheric plasmas in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL), in which the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is considered to be unstable. Those suggest that LLBL is a candidate for a source of plasmas and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability plays an crucial role in a new transport mechanism. Even though numerous theoretical and computational studies have challenged to explain it so far, no one succeeded in transport of plasmas over a K-H vortex size and diffusive process that explains the observations. Hence, the transport mechanism of the solar wind plasma into the Earth magnetosphere in the situation of northward IMF has been a hot topic in magnetospheric physics. To elucidate the mixing and transport mechanism of the solar wind plasma we carried out two dimensional full particle simulation of the K-H instability. As a result, the strong density stratification triggered the strong turbulence which was also found in the two-dimensional MHD simulation (Matsumoto and Hoshino, GRL, 2004). The secondary Rayleigh-Taylor instability was found out to be unstable inside the stratified vortex structure and transport the dense solar wind plasma deep inside the magnetosphere. The resultant mixing area of the two plasmas increased anomalously fast as compared with the uniform density case. Hence the density stratification is an important factor for the effective mass transport across the velocity shear layer. The density stratification also introduced the ion kinetic effect in the non-linear stage. In a negative shear layer (the dawn side of the magnetopause) the finite Larmor radius (FLR) effect of the ion stabilized the onset of the secondary R-T instability and thus weakened the mass transport. In this presentation, the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the transport mechanism will be presented in detail as well as the onset mechanism of the turbulent mixing and transport by the K-H instability.

  1. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  2. 3D Face Appearance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Åström, Kalle

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}

  3. 3D Face Apperance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Astrom, K

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations

  4. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  5. 3D terahertz beam profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Strikwerda, Andrew; Wang, Tianwu;

    2013-01-01

    We present a characterization of THz beams generated in both a two-color air plasma and in a LiNbO3 crystal. Using a commercial THz camera, we record intensity images as a function of distance through the beam waist, from which we extract 2D beam profiles and visualize our measurements into 3D beam...

  6. Viewing galaxies in 3D

    CERN Document Server

    Krajnović, Davor

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to a technique that reveals galaxies in 3D, astronomers can now show that many galaxies have been wrongly classified. Davor Krajnovi\\'c argues that the classification scheme proposed 85 years ago by Edwin Hubble now needs to be revised.

  7. Priprava 3D modelov za 3D tisk

    OpenAIRE

    Pikovnik, Tomaž

    2015-01-01

    Po mnenju nekaterih strokovnjakov bo aditivna proizvodnja (ali 3D tiskanje) spremenila proizvodnjo industrijo, saj si bo vsak posameznik lahko natisnil svoj objekt po želji. V diplomski nalogi so predstavljene nekatere tehnologije aditivne proizvodnje. V nadaljevanju diplomske naloge je predstavljena izdelava makete hiše v merilu 1:100, vse od modeliranja do tiskanja. Poseben poudarek je posvečen predelavi modela, da je primeren za tiskanje, kjer je razvit pristop za hitrejše i...

  8. Post processing of 3D models for 3D printing

    OpenAIRE

    Pikovnik, Tomaž

    2015-01-01

    According to the opinion of some experts the additive manufacturing or 3D printing will change manufacturing industry, because any individual could print their own model according to his or her wishes. In this graduation thesis some of the additive manufacturing technologies are presented. Furthermore in the production of house scale model in 1:100 is presented, starting from modeling to printing. Special attention is given to postprocessing of the building model elements us...

  9. 3D Cameras: 3D Computer Vision of Wide Scope

    OpenAIRE

    May, Stefan; Pervoelz, Kai; Surmann, Hartmut

    2007-01-01

    First of all, a short comparison of range sensors and their underlying principles was given. The chapter further focused on 3D cameras. The latest innovations have given a significant improvement for the measurement accuracy, wherefore this technology has attracted attention in the robotics community. This was also the motivation for the examination in this chapter. On this account, several applications were presented, which represents common problems in the domain of autonomous robotics. For...

  10. DYNA3D2000*, Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: DYNA3D2000 is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation. 2 - Method of solution: Discretization of a continuous model transforms partial differential equations into algebraic equations. A numerical solution is then obtained by solving these algebraic equations through a direct time marching scheme. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Recent software improvements have eliminated most of the user identified limitations with dynamic memory allocation and a very large format description that has pushed potential problem sizes beyond the reach of most users. The dominant restrictions remain in code execution speed and robustness, which the developers constantly strive to improve

  11. SPIKE PENETRATION IN BLAST-WAVE-DRIVEN INSTABILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of interest is the unstable growth of structure at density transitions affected by blast waves, which arise in natural environments such as core-collapse supernovae and in laboratory experiments. The resulting spikes of dense material, which penetrate the less dense material, develop broadened tips, but the degree of broadening varies substantially across both experiments and simulations. The variable broadening presumably produces variations in the drag experienced by the spike tips as they penetrate the less dense material. The present work has used semianalytic theory to address the question of how the variation in drag might affect the spike penetration, for cases in which the post-shock interface deceleration can be described by a power law in a normalized time variable. It did so by following the evolution of structure on the interface through the initial shock passage, the subsequent small-amplitude phase of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth, and the later phase in which the spike growth involves the competition of buoyancy and drag. In all phases, the expansion of the system during its evolution was accounted for and was important. The calculated spike length is strongly affected by the drag attributed to spike tip broadening. One finds from such a calculation that it is not unreasonable for narrow spikes to keep up with the shock front of the blast wave. The implication is that the accuracy of prediction of spike penetration and consequent structure by simulations very likely depends on how accurately they treat the broadening of the spike tips and the associated drag. Experimental validation of spike morphology in simulations would be useful.

  12. 3D Simulations of line emission from ICF capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Line emission from ICF implosions can be used to diagnose the temperature of the DT fuel and provides an indication of the distortion in the fuel-pusher interface. 2D simulations have provided valuable insights into the usefulness of argon and titanium dopants as diagnostics of instabilities. Characterizing the effects of drive asymmetries requires 3D modeling with large demands for computer time and memory, necessitating the use of parallel computers. We present the results of some 3D simulations achieved with a code utilizing both shared memory and distributed parallelism. We discuss the code structure and related performance issues

  13. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  14. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  15. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene

  16. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  17. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  18. THE BLAST-WAVE-DRIVEN INSTABILITY AS A VEHICLE FOR UNDERSTANDING SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION STRUCTURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role in supernovae (SNe) evolution from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of stellar systems. We consider the simpler idealized problem of an interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a central blast wave. Where valid, the existence of unified solutions suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end, we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models that include effects of divergence and compressibility. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth model. Loss of memory of initial conditions (ICs) can occur in the model, but requires pre-explosion mode numbers higher than predicted for Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low modes dominate, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, the structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes exist in the ICs, the contribution from the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is significant compared to RT. Such RM growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in Tycho. Laser-driven laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making connections to their astrophysical counterparts.

  19. Multimessengers from 3D Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Yakunin, Konstantin N; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, O E Bronson; Lentz, Eric J; Bruenn, Stephen W; Hix, W Rafael; Harris, J Austin

    2015-01-01

    We present gravitational wave and neutrino signatures obtained in our first principle 3D core-collapse supernova simulation of 15M non-rotating progenitor with Chimera code. Observations of neutrinos emitted by the forming neutron star, and gravitational waves, which are produced by hydrodynamic instabilities is the only way to get direct information about the supernova engine. Both GW and neutrino signals show different phases of supernova evolution.

  20. Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FROILAN G. DESTREZA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is for the BSHRM Students of Batangas State University (BatStateU ARASOF for the researchers believe that the Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer would be helpful in their degree program especially on making creative, artistic, personalized and decorative chocolate designs. The researchers used the Prototyping model as procedural method for the successful development and implementation of the hardware and software. This method has five phases which are the following: quick plan, quick design, prototype construction, delivery and feedback and communication. This study was evaluated by the BSHRM Students and the assessment of the respondents regarding the software and hardware application are all excellent in terms of Accuracy, Effecitveness, Efficiency, Maintainability, Reliability and User-friendliness. Also, the overall level of acceptability of the design project as evaluated by the respondents is excellent. With regard to the observation about the best raw material to use in 3D printing, the chocolate is good to use as the printed material is slightly distorted,durable and very easy to prepare; the icing is also good to use as the printed material is not distorted and is very durable but consumes time to prepare; the flour is not good as the printed material is distorted, not durable but it is easy to prepare. The computation of the economic viability level of 3d printer with reference to ROI is 37.14%. The recommendation of the researchers in the design project are as follows: adding a cooling system so that the raw material will be more durable, development of a more simplified version and improving the extrusion process wherein the user do not need to stop the printing process just to replace the empty syringe with a new one.

  1. INGRID, 3-D Mesh Generator for Program DYNA3D and NIKE3D and FACET and TOPAZ3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: INGRID is a general-purpose, three-dimensional mesh generator developed for use with finite element, nonlinear, structural dynamics codes. INGRID generates the large and complex input data files for DYNA3D (NESC 9909), NIKE3D (NESC 9725), FACET, and TOPAZ3D. One of the greatest advantages of INGRID is that virtually any shape can be described without resorting to wedge elements, tetrahedrons, triangular elements or highly distorted quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Other capabilities available are in the areas of geometry and graphics. Exact surface equations and surface intersections considerably improve the ability to deal with accurate models, and a hidden line graphics algorithm is included which is efficient on the most complicated meshes. The most important new capability is associated with the boundary conditions, loads, and material properties required by nonlinear mechanics programs. Commands have been designed for each case to minimize user effort. This is particularly important since special processing is almost always required for each load or boundary condition. 2 - Method of solution: Geometries are described primarily using the index space notation of the INGEN program (NESC 975) with an additional type of notation, index progression. Index progressions provide a concise and simple method for describing complex structures; the concept was developed to facilitate defining multiple regions in index space. Rather than specifying the minimum and maximum indices for a region, one specifies the progression of indices along the I, J and K directions, respectively. The index progression method allows the analyst to describe most geometries including nodes and elements with roughly the same amount of input as a solids modeler

  2. Tehokas 3D-animaatiotuotanto

    OpenAIRE

    Järvinen, Manu

    2009-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tutkittiin tehokasta tapaa toteuttaa minuutin mittainen animaatio Scene.org Awards -tapahtuman avajaisseremoniaan. Kyseinen video toteutettiin osana opinnäytetyötä. Työhön osallistui tekijän lisäksi 3D-mallintaja sekä muusikko. Työkaluina käytettiin pääasiassa Autodesk 3ds Max-, sekä Adobe After Effects- ja Adobe Photoshop -ohjelmia. Opinnäytetyö koostuu animaatioprojektin tuotantoputken ja tiedostonhallintamallin perinpohjaisesta läpikäymisestä sekä sen asian tutkimisesta...

  3. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  4. How 3-D Movies Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕铁雄

    2011-01-01

    难度:★★★★☆词数:450 建议阅读时间:8分钟 Most people see out of two eyes. This is a basic fact of humanity,but it’s what makes possible the illusion of depth(纵深幻觉) that 3-D movies create. Human eyes are spaced about two inches apart, meaning that each eye gives the brain a slightly different perspective(透视感)on the same object. The brain then uses this variance to quickly determine an object’s distance.

  5. Virtual 3-D Facial Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Paul Evison

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial reconstructions in archaeology allow empathy with people who lived in the past and enjoy considerable popularity with the public. It is a common misconception that facial reconstruction will produce an exact likeness; a resemblance is the best that can be hoped for. Research at Sheffield University is aimed at the development of a computer system for facial reconstruction that will be accurate, rapid, repeatable, accessible and flexible. This research is described and prototypical 3-D facial reconstructions are presented. Interpolation models simulating obesity, ageing and ethnic affiliation are also described. Some strengths and weaknesses in the models, and their potential for application in archaeology are discussed.

  6. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  7. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  8. 3D printed bionic ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  9. 3D Ion Temperature Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; You, Setthivoine; Balandin, Alexander; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2009-11-01

    The TS-4 experiment at the University of Tokyo collides two spheromaks to form a single high-beta compact toroid. Magnetic reconnection during the merging process heats and accelerates the plasma in toroidal and poloidal directions. The reconnection region has a complex 3D topology determined by the pitch of the spheromak magnetic fields at the merging plane. A pair of multichord passive spectroscopic diagnostics have been established to measure the ion temperature and velocity in the reconnection volume. One setup measures spectral lines across a poloidal plane, retrieving velocity and temperature from Abel inversion. The other, novel setup records spectral lines across another section of the plasma and reconstructs velocity and temperature from 3D vector and 2D scalar tomography techniques. The magnetic field linking both measurement planes is determined from in situ magnetic probe arrays. The ion temperature is then estimated within the volume between the two measurement planes and at the reconnection region. The measurement is followed over several repeatable discharges to follow the heating and acceleration process during the merging reconnection.

  10. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  11. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  12. 3D biometrics systems and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, David

    2013-01-01

    Includes discussions on popular 3D imaging technologies, combines them with biometric applications, and then presents real 3D biometric systems Introduces many efficient 3D feature extraction, matching, and fusion algorithms Techniques presented have been supported by experimental results using various 3D biometric classifications

  13. Photopolymers in 3D printing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Ramji

    2014-01-01

    3D printing is an emerging technology with applications in several areas. The flexibility of the 3D printing system to use variety of materials and create any object makes it an attractive technology. Photopolymers are one of the materials used in 3D printing with potential to make products with better properties. Due to numerous applications of photopolymers and 3D printing technologies, this thesis is written to provide information about the various 3D printing technologies with particul...

  14. Natural fibre composites for 3D Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing has been common option for prototyping. Not all the materials are suitable for 3D printing. Various studies have been done and still many are ongoing regarding the suitability of the materials for 3D printing. This thesis work discloses the possibility of 3D printing of certain polymer composite materials. The main objective of this thesis work was to study the possibility for 3D printing the polymer composite material composed of natural fibre composite and various different ...

  15. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinics as 2-D imaging. A limiting factor has traditionally been the low image quality achievable using...... and removes the need to integrate custom made electronics into the probe. A downside of row-column addressing 2-D arrays is the creation of secondary temporal lobes, or ghost echoes, in the point spread function. In the second part of the scientific contributions, row-column addressing of 2-D arrays...... was investigated. An analysis of how the ghost echoes can be attenuated was presented.Attenuating the ghost echoes were shown to be achieved by minimizing the first derivative of the apodization function. In the literature, a circular symmetric apodization function was proposed. A new apodization layout...

  16. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Emnéus

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements.

  17. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through. The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave. This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron. High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these structures, but their orientation and

  18. Breaking symmetry in propagation of radially and azimuthally polarized high power laser pulses in underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Naveen; Zhidkov, Alexei; Nakanii, Nobuhiko; Masuda, Shinichi; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2016-03-01

    Propagation of relativistically intense azimuthally or radially polarized laser pulses (RPP) is demonstrated, via 3D particle-in-cell simulations, to be unstable in uniform underdense plasma. Strong breaking of the pulse symmetry occurs for RPP with power exceeding the critical one for self-focusing in transversely uniform plasma with an increment, Γ, close to the well-known Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability depending on the acceleration, α, and the modulated density gradient length, L, as Γ≈(α/L) 1 /2 . In deeper plasma channels, the instability vanishes. Electron self-injection in the pulse wake and resulting acceleration is explored.

  19. 3D toroidal physics: testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Don

    2014-10-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to lead to a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D ELM-suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. There is considerable interest in the development of unified physics models for the full range of 3D effects. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. Fortunately, significant progress is underway in theory, computation and plasma diagnostics on many issues such as magnetic surface quality, plasma screening vs. amplification of 3D perturbations, 3D transport, influence on edge pedestal structures, MHD stability effects, modification of fast ion-driven instabilities, prediction of energetic particle heat loads on plasma-facing materials, effects of 3D fields on turbulence, and magnetic coil design. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with future fusion reactors. The development of models to address 3D physics and progress in these areas will be described. This work is supported both by the US Department of Energy under Contract DE

  20. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  1. Kuvaus 3D-tulostamisesta hammastekniikassa

    OpenAIRE

    Munne, Mauri; Mustonen, Tuomas; Vähäjylkkä, Jaakko

    2013-01-01

    3D-tulostaminen kehittyy nopeasti ja yleistyy koko ajan. Tulostimien tarkkuuksien kehittyessä 3D-tulostus on ottamassa myös jalansijaa hammastekniikan alalta. Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on kuvata 3D-tulostamisen tilaa hammastekniikassa. 3D-tulostaminen on Suomessa vielä melko harvinaista, joten opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on koota yhteen kaikki mahdollinen tieto liittyen 3D-tulostamiseen hammastekniikassa. Tavoitteena on myös 3D-tulostimen testaaminen käytännössä aina suun skannaami...

  2. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  3. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  4. ORMGEN3D, 3-D Crack Geometry FEM Mesh Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: ORMGEN3D is a finite element mesh generator for computational fracture mechanics analysis. The program automatically generates a three-dimensional finite element model for six different crack geometries. These geometries include flat plates with straight or curved surface cracks and cylinders with part-through cracks on the outer or inner surface. Mathematical or user-defined crack shapes may be considered. The curved cracks may be semicircular, semi-elliptical, or user-defined. A cladding option is available that allows for either an embedded or penetrating crack in the clad material. 2 - Method of solution: In general, one eighth or one-quarter of the structure is modelled depending on the configuration or option selected. The program generates a core of special wedge or collapsed prism elements at the crack front to introduce the appropriate stress singularity at the crack tip. The remainder of the structure is modelled with conventional 20-node iso-parametric brick elements. Element group I of the finite element model consists of an inner core of special crack tip elements surrounding the crack front enclosed by a single layer of conventional brick elements. Eight element divisions are used in a plane orthogonal to the crack front, while the number of element divisions along the arc length of the crack front is user-specified. The remaining conventional brick elements of the model constitute element group II. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of 5,500 nodes, 4 layers of clad elements

  5. The Origin and Kinematics of Cold Gas in Galactic Winds: Insight from Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Akimi; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; New, Kimberly C B; Weaver, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We study the origin of Na I absorbing gas in ultraluminous infrared galaxies motivated by the recent observations by Martin of extremely superthermal linewidths in this cool gas. We model the effects of repeated supernova explosions driving supershells in the central regions of molecular disks with M_d=10^{10} M_{\\odot}, using cylindrically symmetric gas dynamical simulations run with ZEUS-3D. The shocked swept-up shells quickly cool and fragment by Rayleigh-Taylor instability as they accelerate out of the dense, stratified disks. The numerical resolution of the cooling and compression at the shock fronts determines the peak shell density, and so the speed of Rayleigh-Taylor fragmentation. We identify cooled shells and shell fragments as Na I absorbing gas and study its kinematics along various sightlines across the grid. We find that simulations with a numerical resolution of \\le 0.2 pc produce multiple Rayleigh-Taylor fragmented shells in a given line of sight that appear to explain the observed kinematics....

  6. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  7. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  8. Will 3D printers manufacture your meals?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bommel, K.J.C. van

    2013-01-01

    These days, 3D printers are laying down plastics, metals, resins, and other materials in whatever configurations creative people can dream up. But when the next 3D printing revolution comes, you'll be able to eat it.

  9. Eesti 3D jaoks kitsas / Virge Haavasalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Haavasalu, Virge

    2009-01-01

    Produktsioonifirma Digitaalne Sputnik: Kaur ja Kaspar Kallas tegelevad filmide produtseerimise ning 3D digitaalkaamerate tootearendusega (Silicon Imaging LLC). Vendade Kallaste 3D-kaamerast. Kommenteerib Eesti Filmi Sihtasutuse direktor Marge Liiske

  10. 3D Printing Making the Digital Real .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miss Prachi More

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is quickly expanding field, with the popularity and uses for 3D printers growing every day. 3D printing can be used to prototype, create replacement parts, and is even versatile enough to print prostheses and medical implants. It will have a growing impact on our world, as more and more people gain access to these amazing machines.[1] In this article, we would like to attempt to give an introduction of the technology. 3Dimensions printing is a method of converting a virtual 3D model into a physical object. 3D printing is a category of rapid prototyping technology. 3D printers typically work by printing successive layers on top of the previous to build up a three dimensional object. 3D printing is a revolutionary method for creating 3D models with the use of inkjet technology.[7

  11. Sliding Adjustment for 3D Video Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galpin Franck

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with video coding of static scenes viewed by a moving camera. We propose an automatic way to encode such video sequences using several 3D models. Contrary to prior art in model-based coding where 3D models have to be known, the 3D models are automatically computed from the original video sequence. We show that several independent 3D models provide the same functionalities as one single 3D model, and avoid some drawbacks of the previous approaches. To achieve this goal we propose a novel algorithm of sliding adjustment, which ensures consistency of successive 3D models. The paper presents a method to automatically extract the set of 3D models and associate camera positions. The obtained representation can be used for reconstructing the original sequence, or virtual ones. It also enables 3D functionalities such as synthetic object insertion, lightning modification, or stereoscopic visualization. Results on real video sequences are presented.

  12. 3D Flash LIDAR Space Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc. (ASC) is a small business that has developed 3D Flash LIDAR systems for space and terrestrial applications. 3D Flash LIDAR is...

  13. 3D Additive Manufacturing Symposium & Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Unver, Ertu; Taylor, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The IMI /3M BIC 3D Additive Manufacturing Symposium and Workshop was hosted by 3M Buckley Innovation Centre on March 17th 2015. The event was attended by the major players in precision engineering, 3D additive design and manufacturing: Representatives from EOS, Renishaw, HK 3D Printing IMI Plc Senior Management team, design engineers, programmers and academics from the University of Huddersfield School of Art Design & Architecture, 3M Buckley centre 3D printing management and designers shared...

  14. Face Detection with a 3D Model

    OpenAIRE

    Barbu, Adrian; Lay, Nathan; Gramajo, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a part-based face detection approach where the spatial relationship between the face parts is represented by a hidden 3D model with six parameters. The computational complexity of the search in the six dimensional pose space is addressed by proposing meaningful 3D pose candidates by image-based regression from detected face keypoint locations. The 3D pose candidates are evaluated using a parameter sensitive classifier based on difference features relative to the 3D pose. A...

  15. 3D PHOTOGRAPHS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Schuhr, W.; J. D. Lee; Kiel, St.

    2013-01-01

    This paper on providing "oo-information" (= objective object-information) on cultural monuments and sites, based on 3D photographs is also a contribution of CIPA task group 3 to the 2013 CIPA Symposium in Strasbourg. To stimulate the interest in 3D photography for scientists as well as for amateurs, 3D-Masterpieces are presented. Exemplary it is shown, due to their high documentary value ("near reality"), 3D photography support, e.g. the recording, the visualization, the interpret...

  16. 3D textiles for composite reinforcements

    OpenAIRE

    Fangueiro, Raúl; Mingxing, Z.; Hong, H; Soutinho, Hélder Filipe Cunha; Gonçalves, P.; Araújo, Mário Duarte de

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview on the last developments on 3D textile structures for composite reinforcements. The application of innovative 3D shaped weft-knitted preforms in GFRP tube joints is presented and discussed. Moreover, the mechanical behaviour of 3D hybrid basalt fiber reinforced composite material sis also presented and discussed.

  17. 3D modelling for multipurpose cadastre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abduhl Rahman, A.; Van Oosterom, P.J.M.; Hua, T.C.; Sharkawi, K.H.; Duncan, E.E.; Azri, N.; Hassan, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling of cadastral objects (such as legal spaces around buildings, around utility networks and other spaces) is one of the important aspects for a multipurpose cadastre (MPC). This paper describes the 3D modelling of the objects for MPC and its usage to the knowledge of 3D

  18. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  19. Esiselvitys elintarvikkeiden 3D-tulostamisesta

    OpenAIRE

    Teva, Arno

    2015-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli laatia esiselvitys 3D-tulostamisesta elintarvikealalla. 3D-tulostaminen on uusi ja jatkuvasti kehittyvä ala, joka tulee vaikuttamaan myös elintarvikealan kehittymiseen. Työn tarkoituksena oli selvittää elintarvikenäkökulmasta 3D-tulostamiseen liittyviä tekijöitä. Aiheen toimeksiantajana oli Hämeen ammattikorkeakoulu ja kohderyhmänä elintarvikealan Pk-yritykset. Opinnäytetyössä esitellään yleisimpiä 3D-tulostusmenetelmiä ja selvitetään 3D-tulostamista tietokone...

  20. PRIPRAVA MODELOV ZA 3D - TISK

    OpenAIRE

    Črešnik, Igor

    2015-01-01

    V diplomskem delu predstavljamo pripravo modela na 3D-tisk. V prvem delu smo preleteli zgodovino tiska. Predstavili smo tehnologijo 3D-tiska ter različne tehnike tiskanja, ki jih uporabljajo določeni tiskalniki. V nadaljevanju smo pregledali različne tipe 3D-tiskalnikov, ki se uporabljajo za domačo ali komercialno uporabo ter izpostavili njihove prednosti in slabosti. V zadnjem delu diplomskega dela smo na praktičnem primeru 3D-modela hiše prikazali proces priprave modela za 3D-tisk. Pri delu...

  1. 3D-tulostimien tutkiminen painotalolle

    OpenAIRE

    Toivonen, Aleksi

    2014-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli perehtyä 3D-tulostamiseen ja tutkia painotaloon sopivia 3D-tulostimia ja 3D-tulostamiseen liittyviä tekniikoita. Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli myös pohtia painotalolle mahdollisia 3D-tulostamiseen liittyviä tuotekonsepteja yrityksille ja yksityisille kuluttajille. Painoalan yrityksen tarkoituksena on sijoittaa lähitulevaisuudessa 3D-tulostimeen, joten opinnäytetyö oli ajankohtainen tutkimustyö yritykselle. Opinnäytetyön toimeksiantajana toimi painoalan yritys. ...

  2. BUILDING A HOMEMADE 3D PRINTER

    OpenAIRE

    Tunc, Baran

    2015-01-01

    3D printing has been attracted much attention around the world due to its high potential of new application fields. In this respect, developing and inventing new filament materials for 3D printers or new techniques of 3D printing are the main interest of the many materials scientists. This paper reports a comprehensive overview of 3D printing followed by a summary of my ongoing study of building a composite homemade 3D printer. At this stage of this study, a CNC router was successfully conver...

  3. 3D Printing our future: Now

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Andrew; Unver, Ertu

    2015-01-01

    This 3D Printing our Future:Now talk and visual presentation was given to delegates at the IMI 3D Workshop held at 3M Buckley Innovation Centre on 17th March 2015. The event was hosted by 3Mbuckley Innovation Centre for IMI plc a global engineering company, 3M, and leading 3D additive manufacturing technology providers: EOS, Renishaw and HK 3D printing to disseminate and share their experience on the latest 3D additive design and manufacturing technologies available to the engineering an...

  4. Investigating Mobile Stereoscopic 3D Touchscreen Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Colley, Ashley; Hakkila, Jonna; SCHOENING, Johannes; Posti, Maaret

    2013-01-01

    3D output is no longer limited to large screens in cinemas or living rooms. Nowadays more and more mobile devices are equipped with autostereoscopic 3D (S3D) touchscreens. As a consequence interaction with 3D content now also happens whilst users are on the move. In this paper we carried out a user study with 27 participants to assess how mobile interaction, i.e. whilst walking, with mobile S3D devices, differs from interaction with 2D mobile touchscreens. We investigate the difference in tou...

  5. ViHAP3D - Final report

    OpenAIRE

    Scopigno, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Nearly all of our cultural heritage is inherently three-dimensional. Recent hard- and software developments enabled 3D computer graphics to be one of the most powerful means to represent complex data sets. The ViHAP3D project (ViHAP3D is an acronym for Virtual Heritage - High Quality 3D Acquisition and Presentation) aimed therefore at preserving, presenting, accessing, and promoting cultural heritage using interactive, high-quality 3D graphics. The vision of the project was to create an exact...

  6. Wafer level 3-D ICs process technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Chuan Seng; Reif, L Rafael

    2009-01-01

    This book focuses on foundry-based process technology that enables the fabrication of 3-D ICs. The core of the book discusses the technology platform for pre-packaging wafer lever 3-D ICs. However, this book does not include a detailed discussion of 3-D ICs design and 3-D packaging. This is an edited book based on chapters contributed by various experts in the field of wafer-level 3-D ICs process technology. They are from academia, research labs and industry.

  7. View-based 3-D object retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Content-based 3-D object retrieval has attracted extensive attention recently and has applications in a variety of fields, such as, computer-aided design, tele-medicine,mobile multimedia, virtual reality, and entertainment. The development of efficient and effective content-based 3-D object retrieval techniques has enabled the use of fast 3-D reconstruction and model design. Recent technical progress, such as the development of camera technologies, has made it possible to capture the views of 3-D objects. As a result, view-based 3-D object retrieval has become an essential but challenging res

  8. Web-based interactive visualization of 3D video mosaics using X3D standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHON Jaechoon; LEE Yang-Won; SHIBASAKI Ryosuke

    2006-01-01

    We present a method of 3D image mosaicing for real 3D representation of roadside buildings, and implement a Web-based interactive visualization environment for the 3D video mosaics created by 3D image mosaicing. The 3D image mosaicing technique developed in our previous work is a very powerful method for creating textured 3D-GIS data without excessive data processing like the laser or stereo system. For the Web-based open access to the 3D video mosaics, we build an interactive visualization environment using X3D, the emerging standard of Web 3D. We conduct the data preprocessing for 3D video mosaics and the X3D modeling for textured 3D data. The data preprocessing includes the conversion of each frame of 3D video mosaics into concatenated image files that can be hyperlinked on the Web. The X3D modeling handles the representation of concatenated images using necessary X3D nodes. By employing X3D as the data format for 3D image mosaics, the real 3D representation of roadside buildings is extended to the Web and mobile service systems.

  9. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  10. 3D laptop for defense applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  11. User-centered 3D geovisualisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anette Hougaard

    2004-01-01

    3D Geovisualisation is a multidisciplinary science mainly utilizing geographically related data, developing software systems for 3D visualisation and producing relevant models. In this paper the connection between geoinformation stored as 3D objects and the end user is of special interest....... In a broader perspective, the overall aim is to develop a language in 3D Geovisualisation gained through usability projects and the development of a theoretical background. A conceptual level of user-centered 3D Geovisualisation is introduced by applying a categorisation originating from Virtual Reality....... The conceptual level is used to structure and organise user-centered 3D Geovisualisation into four categories: representation, rendering, interface and interaction. The categories reflect a process of development of 3D Geovisualisation where objects can be represented verisimilar to the real world...

  12. 3D Chaotic Functions for Image Encryption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan N. Khade

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the chaotic encryption algorithm based on 3D logistic map, 3D Chebyshev map, and 3D, 2D Arnolds cat map for color image encryption. Here the 2D Arnolds cat map is used for image pixel scrambling and 3D Arnolds cat map is used for R, G, and B component substitution. 3D Chebyshev map is used for key generation and 3D logistic map is used for image scrambling. The use of 3D chaotic functions in the encryption algorithm provide more security by using the, shuffling and substitution to the encrypted image. The Chebyshev map is used for public key encryption and distribution of generated private keys.

  13. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  14. FROM 3D MODEL DATA TO SEMANTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    My Abdellah Kassimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The semantic-based 3D models retrieval systems have become necessary since the increase of 3D modelsdatabases. In this paper, we propose a new method for the mapping problem between 3D model data andsemantic data involved in semantic based retrieval for 3D models given by polygonal meshes. First, wefocused on extracting invariant descriptors from the 3D models and analyzing them to efficient semanticannotation and to improve the retrieval accuracy. Selected shape descriptors provide a set of termscommonly used to describe visually a set of objects using linguistic terms and are used as semanticconcept to label 3D model. Second, spatial relationship representing directional, topological anddistance relationships are used to derive other high-level semantic features and to avoid the problem ofautomatic 3D model annotation. Based on the resulting semantic annotation and spatial concepts, anontology for 3D model retrieval is constructed and other concepts can be inferred. This ontology is usedto find similar 3D models for a given query model. We adopted the query by semantic example approach,in which the annotation is performed mostly automatically. The proposed method is implemented in our3D search engine (SB3DMR, tested using the Princeton Shape Benchmark Database.

  15. 3D Systems” ‘Stuck in the Middle’ of the 3D Printer Boom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hoffmann (Alan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstract3D Systems, the pioneer of 3D printing, predicted a future where "kids from 8 to 80" could design and print their ideas at home. By 2013, 9 years after the creation of the first working 3D printer, there were more than 30 major 3D printing companies competing for market share. 3DS and it

  16. 3D-tulostus : case Printrbot

    OpenAIRE

    Arvekari, Lassi

    2013-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on selvittää 3D-tulostustekniikan perusteita ja 3D-tulostuksen nykytilannetta. 3D-tulostukseen sopivien mallien luomista tutkitaan ja mallin tekemiseen on etsitty toimivia ohjesääntöjä. Tärkeä osa työtä on tutkia mitä vaiheita 3D-tulostimen hankinnassa kotikäyttöön tulee vastaan. Käytännön kokeita varten opinnäytetyössä on case Printrbot, jossa on tutustuttu edulliseen 3D-tulostuslaitteeseen kokoonpanosta lähtien. Työn kuluessa selvisi että edulliset 3D-tulos...

  17. Identification of the transition arrays 3d74s-3d74p in Br X and 3d64s-3d64p in Br XI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a beam-foil study of multiply ionized bromine in the region 400-1300A, performed with 6 and 8 MeV Br ions from a tandem accelerator. At these energies transitions belonging to Fe-like Br X and Mn-like Br XI are expected to be prominent. We have identified 31 lines as 3d74s-3d74p transitions in Br X, from which 16 levels of the previously unknown 3d74s configuration could be established. We have also added 6 new 3d74p levels to the 99 previously known. For Br XI we have classified 9 lines as 3d64s-3d64p combinations. The line identifications have been corroborated by isoelectronic comparisons and theoretical calculations using the superposition-of-configurations technique. (orig.)

  18. 3D Dynamic Echocardiography with a Digitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Matani, Ayumu; Chihara, Kunihiro

    1998-05-01

    In this paper,a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging system,where a US brightness-mode (B-mode) imagetriggered with an R-wave of electrocardiogram (ECG)was obtained with an ultrasound diagnostic deviceand the location and orientation of the US probewere simultaneously measured with a 3D digitizer, is described.The obtained B-mode imagewas then projected onto a virtual 3D spacewith the proposed interpolation algorithm using a Gaussian operator.Furthermore, a 3D image was presented on a cathode ray tube (CRT)and stored in virtual reality modeling language (VRML).We performed an experimentto reconstruct a 3D heart image in systole using this system.The experimental results indicatethat the system enables the visualization ofthe 3D and internal structure of a heart viewed from any angleand has potential for use in dynamic imaging,intraoperative ultrasonography and tele-medicine.

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor stability for a shock wave-density discontinuity interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shells in inertial fusion targets are typically accelerated and decelerated by two or three shocks followed by continuous acceleration. The analytic solution for perturbation growth of a shock wave striking a density discontinuity in an inviscid fluid is investigated. The Laplace transform of the solution results in a functional equation, which has a simple solution for weak shock waves. The solution for strong shock waves may be given by a power series. It is assumed that the equation of state is given by a gamma law. The four independent parameters of the solution are the gamma values on each side of the material interface, the density ratio at the interface, and the shock strength. The asymptotic behavior (for large distances and times) of the perturbation velocity is given. For strong shocks the decay of the perturbation away from the interface is much weaker than the exponential decay of an incompressible fluid. The asymptotic value is given by a constant term and a number of slowly decaying discreet frequencies. The number of frequencies is roughly proportional to the logarithm of the density discontinuity divided by that of the shock strength. The asymptotic velocity at the interface is tabulated for representative values of the independent parameters. For weak shocks the solution is compared with results for an incompressible fluid. The range of density ratios with possible zero asymptotic velocities is given

  20. Duchon-Robert solutions for the Rayleigh-Taylor and Muskat problems

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Thomas; Sosoe, Philippe; Wong, Percy

    2012-01-01

    We construct analytic solutions to the Euler equations with an interface between two fluids, extending work of Duchon and Robert. We also show that the estimates of Duchon and Robert yield global analytic solutions to the Muskat problem with small initial data.