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Sample records for 3d in-vitro assay

  1. A high-throughput in vitro ring assay for vasoactivity using magnetic 3D bioprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Shen, Tsaiwei; Hebel, Chris; Barthlow, Herbert G.; Wagoner, Matthew; Souza, Glauco R.

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive liabilities are typically assayed using wire myography, which is limited by its high cost and low throughput. To meet the demand for higher throughput in vitro alternatives, this study introduces a magnetic 3D bioprinting-based vasoactivity assay. The principle behind this assay is the magnetic printing of vascular smooth muscle cells into 3D rings that functionally represent blood vessel segments, whose contraction can be altered by vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. A cost-effective imaging modality employing a mobile device is used to capture contraction with high throughput. The goal of this study was to validate ring contraction as a measure of vasoactivity, using a small panel of known vasoactive drugs. In vitro responses of the rings matched outcomes predicted by in vivo pharmacology, and were supported by immunohistochemistry. Altogether, this ring assay robustly models vasoactivity, which could meet the need for higher throughput in vitro alternatives. PMID:27477945

  2. Exploring Drug Dosing Regimens In Vitro Using Real-Time 3D Spheroid Tumor Growth Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Titus, Steven A; Brimacombe, Kyle; Michael, Sam; Sittampalam, Gurusingham; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer cell proliferation assays for cancer drug discovery have made the implementation of large-scale screens feasible but only seem to reflect a simplified view that oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes are the genetic drivers of cancer cell proliferation. However, there is now increased evidence that the cellular and physiological context in which these oncogenic events occur play a key role in how they drive tumor growth in vivo and, therefore, in how tumors respond to drug treatments. In vitro 3D spheroid tumor models are being developed to better mimic the physiology of tumors in vivo, in an attempt to improve the predictability and efficiency of drug discovery for the treatment of cancer. Here we describe the establishment of a real-time 3D spheroid growth, 384-well screening assay. The cells used in this study constitutively expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled the real-time monitoring of spheroid formation and the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on spheroid size at different time points of sphere growth and drug treatment. This real-time 3D spheroid assay platform represents a first step toward the replication in vitro of drug dosing regimens being investigated in vivo. We hope that further development of this assay platform will allow the investigation of drug dosing regimens, efficacy, and resistance before preclinical and clinical studies.

  3. A novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro assay for the study of tumor cell invasion

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    Neufeld Gera

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The induction of tumor cell invasion is an important step in tumor progression. Due to the cost and slowness of in-vivo invasion assays, there is need for quantitative in-vitro invasion assays that mimic as closely as possible the tumor environment and in which conditions can be rigorously controlled. Methods We have established a novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro invasion assay by embedding a monolayer of tumor cells between two layers of collagen. The cells were then allowed to invade the upper and lower layers of collagen. To visualize invading cells the gels were sectioned perpendicular to the monolayer so that after seeding the monolayer appears as a thin line precisely defining the origin of invasion. The number of invading tumor cells, their proliferation rate, the distance they traverse and the direction of invasion could then be determined quantitatively. Results The assay was used to compare the invasive properties of several tumor cell types and the results compare well with those obtained by previously described assays. Lysyl-oxidase like protein-2 (Loxl2 is a potent inducer of invasiveness. Using our assay we show for the first time that inhibition of endogenous Loxl2 expression in several types of tumor cells strongly inhibits their invasiveness. We also took advantage of the asymmetric nature of the assay in order to show that fibronectin enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells more potently than laminin. The asymmetric properties of the assay were also used to demonstrate that soluble factors derived from fibroblasts can preferentially attract invading breast cancer cells. Conclusion Our assay displays several advantages over previous invasion assays as it is allows the quantitative analysis of directional invasive behavior of tumor cells in a 3D environment mimicking the tumor microenvironment. It should be particularly useful for the study of the effects of components of the tumor microenvironment on

  4. 3D in vitro technology for drug discovery.

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    Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro systems that can mimic organ and tissue structure and function in vivo, will be of great benefit for a variety of biological applications from basic biology to toxicity testing and drug discovery. There have been several attempts to generate 3D tissue models but most of these models require costly equipment, and the most serious disadvantage in them is that they are too far from the mature human organs in vivo. Because of these problems, research and development in drug discovery, toxicity testing and biotech industries are highly expensive, and involve sacrifice of countless animals and it takes several years to bring a single drug/product to the market or to find the toxicity or otherwise of chemical entities. Our group has been actively working on several alternative models by merging biomaterials science, nanotechnology and biological principles to generate 3D in vitro living organs, to be called "Human Organs-on-Chip", to mimic natural organ/tissues, in order to reduce animal testing and clinical trials. We have fabricated a novel type of mechanically and biologically bio-mimicking collagen-based hydrogel that would provide for interconnected mini-wells in which 3D cell/organ culture of human samples in a manner similar to human organs with extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules would be possible. These products mimic the physical, chemical, and biological properties of natural organs and tissues at different scales. This paper will review the outcome of our several experiments so far in this direction and the future perspectives.

  5. 3D microtumors in vitro supported by perfused vascular networks

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    Sobrino, Agua; Phan, Duc T. T.; Datta, Rupsa; Wang, Xiaolin; Hachey, Stephanie J.; Romero-López, Mónica; Gratton, Enrico; Lee, Abraham P.; George, Steven C.; Hughes, Christopher C. W.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in developing microphysiological systems that can be used to model both normal and pathological human organs in vitro. This “organs-on-chips” approach aims to capture key structural and physiological characteristics of the target tissue. Here we describe in vitro vascularized microtumors (VMTs). This “tumor-on-a-chip” platform incorporates human tumor and stromal cells that grow in a 3D extracellular matrix and that depend for survival on nutrient delivery through living, perfused microvessels. Both colorectal and breast cancer cells grow vigorously in the platform and respond to standard-of-care therapies, showing reduced growth and/or regression. Vascular-targeting agents with different mechanisms of action can also be distinguished, and we find that drugs targeting only VEGFRs (Apatinib and Vandetanib) are not effective, whereas drugs that target VEGFRs, PDGFR and Tie2 (Linifanib and Cabozantinib) do regress the vasculature. Tumors in the VMT show strong metabolic heterogeneity when imaged using NADH Fluorescent Lifetime Imaging Microscopy and, compared to their surrounding stroma, many show a higher free/bound NADH ratio consistent with their known preference for aerobic glycolysis. The VMT platform provides a unique model for studying vascularized solid tumors in vitro. PMID:27549930

  6. Using a 3D Culture System to Differentiate Visceral Adipocytes In Vitro.

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    Emont, Margo P; Yu, Hui; Jun, Heejin; Hong, Xiaowei; Maganti, Nenita; Stegemann, Jan P; Wu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    It has long been recognized that body fat distribution and regional adiposity play a major role in the control of metabolic homeostasis. However, the ability to study and compare the cell autonomous regulation and response of adipocytes from different fat depots has been hampered by the difficulty of inducing preadipocytes isolated from the visceral depot to differentiate into mature adipocytes in culture. Here, we present an easily created 3-dimensional (3D) culture system that can be used to differentiate preadipocytes from the visceral depot as robustly as those from the sc depot. The cells differentiated in these 3D collagen gels are mature adipocytes that retain depot-specific characteristics, as determined by imaging, gene expression, and functional assays. This 3D culture system therefore allows for study of the development and function of adipocytes from both depots in vitro and may ultimately lead to a greater understanding of site-specific functional differences of adipose tissues to metabolic dysregulation.

  7. In vitro biological characterization of macroporous 3D Bonelike structures prepared through a 3D machining technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laranjeira, M.S.; Dias, A.G. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Santos, J.D. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto - Portugal (Portugal); Fernandes, M.H., E-mail: mhrf@portugalmail.pt [Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Medicina Dentaria, Laboratorio de Farmacologia e Biocompatibilidade Celular, Rua Dr. Manuel Pereira da Silva, 4200-392 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-04-30

    3D bioactive macroporous structures were prepared using a 3D machining technique. A virtual 3D structure model was created and a computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling device machined Bonelike samples. The resulting structures showed a reproducible macroporosity and interconnective structure. Macropores size after sintering was approximately 2000 {mu}m. In vitro testing using human bone marrow stroma showed that cells were able to adhere and proliferate on 3D structures surface and migrate into all macropore channels. In addition, these cells were able to differentiate, since mineralized globular structures associated with cell layer were identified. Results obtained showed that 3D structures of Bonelike successfully allow cell migration into all macropores, and allow human bone marrow stromal cells to proliferate and differentiate. This innovative technique may be considered as a step-forward preparation for 3D interconnective macroporous structures that allow bone ingrowth while maintaining mechanical integrity.

  8. Seeding Osteoblasts onto Osteocytes: An In Vitro 3D Study

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    Judith Green

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms by which bone cells communicate is vital in exploring diseases characterized by bone degeneration, namely, osteoporosis. Cell seeding has been used in two dimensional (2D cell cultures to study how bone cells interact with one another, specifically, to prove the existence of gap junctions between osteocytes and osteoblasts. However, the natural three dimensional (3D state of bone tissue requires examining it in 3D. Accordingly, the cell seeding procedure was tested on trabecular bone core explants to ascertain whether it is useful in 3D studies as well. When the dye concentrations taken from past 2D experiments were used, Day 1 showed many osteoblasts, but by Day 2 the cells were not visible. The dye concentrations were then doubled to determine if the osteoblasts were still seeded onto the bone cores and viable but not visible, or if they had actually died. With these dye concentrations, the stained osteoblasts were still visible on the second day after seeding, indicating that the cells were seeded and living. According to these results, it is evident that with minor modifications of the 2D procedure, it is possible to seed osteoblasts onto osteocytes in 3D, making this a credible test for the presence of gap junctions in 3D bone tissue.

  9. Chemotherapeutic efficiency of drugs in vitro: Comparison of doxorubicin exposure in 3D and 2D culture matrices.

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    Casey, A; Gargotti, M; Bonnier, F; Byrne, H J

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the use of 3D matrices for in vitro analysis, with a view to increasing the relevance of in vitro studies and reducing the dependence on in vivo studies, has been growing in recent years. Cells grown in a 3D in vitro matrix environment have been reported to exhibit significantly different properties to those in a conventional 2D culture environment. However, comparison of 2D and 3D cell culture models have recently been noted to result in differing responses of cytotoxic assays, without any associated change in viability. The effect was attributed to differing conversion rates and effective concentrations of the resazurin assay in 2D and 3D environments, rather than differences in cellular metabolism. In this study, the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, is monitored and compared in conventional 2D and 3D collagen gel exposures of immortalized human cervical cells. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay and drug internalisation was verified using confocal microscopy. Drug uptake and retention within the collagen matrix was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to a 3D environment causing alterations to dye resazurin uptake and conversion rates. The use of 3D culture matrices has widely been interpreted to result in "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" to the chemotherapeutic agent. The results of this study show that the reduced efficiency of the drug to cells grown in the 3D environment can be accounted for by a sequential reduction of the effective concentration of the test compound and assay. This is due to absorption within the collagen gel inducing a higher uptake of both drug and assay thereby influencing the toxic impact of the drug and conversion rate of resazurin, and. The increased effective surface area of the cell exposed to the drug

  10. Critical analysis of 3-D organoid in vitro cell culture models for high-throughput drug candidate toxicity assessments.

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    Astashkina, Anna; Grainger, David W

    2014-04-01

    Drug failure due to toxicity indicators remains among the primary reasons for staggering drug attrition rates during clinical studies and post-marketing surveillance. Broader validation and use of next-generation 3-D improved cell culture models are expected to improve predictive power and effectiveness of drug toxicological predictions. However, after decades of promising research significant gaps remain in our collective ability to extract quality human toxicity information from in vitro data using 3-D cell and tissue models. Issues, challenges and future directions for the field to improve drug assay predictive power and reliability of 3-D models are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro evaluation of curcumin effects on breast adenocarcinoma 2D and 3D cell cultures.

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    Abuelba, Hussam; Cotrutz, Carmen Elena; Stoica, Bogdan Alexandru; Stoica, Laura; Olinici, DoiniŢa; Petreuş, Tudor

    2015-01-01

    Breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231, even if it expresses low levels of E-cadherin, still readily form multicellular aggregates of cells, namely spheroids. Curcumin is a diarylheptanoid antitumoral drug while it significantly inhibits cell migration, invasion, and colony formation in vitro and reduces tumor growth and liver metastasis in vivo. Curcumin photoactivation may enhance antiapoptotic role against cancer cells. To evaluate the effect of low curcumin concentrations, ranged from 1.9 to 15 μM, with and without photoactivation, using a manufactured 670 nm LED-matrix. A secondary aim was to evaluate the ideal method to produce easy-to-use tumor cell spheroids, comparing two low adherence plate supports. Breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 were cultured according to 2D monolayer and 3D spheroid models then submitted to normal and photoactivated curcumin in micromolar concentrations. MTT assay was used to evaluate cell viability following curcumin application on cells. On 2D cell cultures, curcumin inhibits cell tumor development and proliferation at concentrations of 15 μM, with a viability of 65.7% at 48 hours incubation time. A decreased viability up to 25% for a concentration of 15 μM was recorded following photoactivation and cytotoxic action on breast cancer tumor cell line continued at concentrations of 7.5 and 3.75 μM. Curcumin photoactivation increases pro-apoptotic effects in both 2D and 3D tumor cell culture models and also responsiveness to curcumin is slightly reduced in spheroid-like structures. Thus, 3D tumor cell culture systems appear to be the ideal environment for in vitro assays regarding anticancer drug effects on cell viability.

  12. Pharmaceutical Metabolism in Fish: Using a 3-D Hepatic In Vitro Model to Assess Clearance

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    Baron, Matthew G.; Mintram, Kate S.; Owen, Stewart F.; Hetheridge, Malcolm J.; Moody, A. John; Purcell, Wendy M.; Jackson, Simon K.; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2017-01-01

    At high internal doses, pharmaceuticals have the potential for inducing biological/pharmacological effects in fish. One particular concern for the environment is their potential to bioaccumulate and reach pharmacological levels; the study of these implications for environmental risk assessment has therefore gained increasing attention. To avoid unnecessary testing on animals, in vitro methods for assessment of xenobiotic metabolism could aid in the ecotoxicological evaluation. Here we report the use of a 3-D in vitro liver organoid culture system (spheroids) derived from rainbow trout to measure the metabolism of seven pharmaceuticals using a substrate depletion assay. Of the pharmaceuticals tested, propranolol, diclofenac and phenylbutazone were metabolised by trout liver spheroids; atenolol, metoprolol, diazepam and carbamazepine were not. Substrate depletion kinetics data was used to estimate intrinsic hepatic clearance by this spheroid model, which was similar for diclofenac and approximately 5 fold higher for propranolol when compared to trout liver microsomal fraction (S9) data. These results suggest that liver spheroids could be used as a relevant and metabolically competent in vitro model with which to measure the biotransformation of pharmaceuticals in fish; and propranolol acts as a reproducible positive control. PMID:28045944

  13. Engineering an in vitro air-blood barrier by 3D bioprinting

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Intensive efforts in recent years to develop and commercialize in vitro alternatives in the field of risk assessment have yielded new promising two- and three dimensional (3D) cell culture models. Nevertheless, a realistic 3D in vitro alveolar model is not available yet. Here we report on the biofabrication of the human air-blood tissue barrier analogue composed of an endothelial cell, basement membrane and epithelial cell layer by using a bioprinting technology. In contrary to the manual met...

  14. Assessing Drug Efficacy in a Miniaturized Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro 3D Cell Culture Model.

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    Shelper, Todd B; Lovitt, Carrie J; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers. The drug discovery efforts for this disease have largely failed, with no significant improvement in survival outcomes for advanced pancreatic cancer patients over the past 20 years. Traditional in vitro cell culture techniques have been used extensively in both basic and early drug discovery; however, these systems offer poor models to assess emerging therapeutics. More predictive cell-based models, which better capture the cellular heterogeneity and complexities of solid pancreatic tumors, are urgently needed not only to improve drug discovery success but also to provide insight into the tumor biology. Pancreatic tumors are characterized by a unique micro-environment that is surrounded by a dense stroma. A complex network of interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and the effects of cell-to-cell contacts may enhance survival pathways within in vivo tumors. This biological and physical complexity is lost in traditional cell monolayer models. To explore the predictive potential of a more complex cellular system, a three-dimensional (3D) micro-tumor assay was evaluated. Efficacy of six current chemotherapeutics was determined against a panel of primary and metastatic pancreatic tumor cell lines in a miniaturized ECM-based 3D cell culture system. Suitability for potential use in high-throughput screening applications was assessed, including ascertaining the effects that miniaturization and automation had on assay robustness. Cellular health was determined by utilizing an indirect population-based metabolic activity assay and a direct imaging-based cell viability assay.

  15. AlgiMatrix™ based 3D cell culture system as an in-vitro tumor model for anticancer studies.

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    Chandraiah Godugu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional (3D in-vitro cultures are recognized for recapitulating the physiological microenvironment and exhibiting high concordance with in-vivo conditions. Taking the advantages of 3D culture, we have developed the in-vitro tumor model for anticancer drug screening. METHODS: Cancer cells grown in 6 and 96 well AlgiMatrix™ scaffolds resulted in the formation of multicellular spheroids in the size range of 100-300 µm. Spheroids were grown in two weeks in cultures without compromising the growth characteristics. Different marketed anticancer drugs were screened by incubating them for 24 h at 7, 9 and 11 days in 3D cultures and cytotoxicity was measured by AlamarBlue® assay. Effectiveness of anticancer drug treatments were measured based on spheroid number and size distribution. Evaluation of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic markers was done by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The 3D results were compared with the conventional 2D monolayer cultures. Cellular uptake studies for drug (Doxorubicin and nanoparticle (NLC were done using spheroids. RESULTS: IC(50 values for anticancer drugs were significantly higher in AlgiMatrix™ systems compared to 2D culture models. The cleaved caspase-3 expression was significantly decreased (2.09 and 2.47 folds respectively for 5-Fluorouracil and Camptothecin in H460 spheroid cultures compared to 2D culture system. The cytotoxicity, spheroid size distribution, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and nanoparticle penetration data suggested that in vitro tumor models show higher resistance to anticancer drugs and supporting the fact that 3D culture is a better model for the cytotoxic evaluation of anticancer drugs in vitro. CONCLUSION: The results from our studies are useful to develop a high throughput in vitro tumor model to study the effect of various anticancer agents and various molecular pathways affected by the anticancer drugs and formulations.

  16. Nanoparticle toxicity assessment using an in vitro 3-D kidney organoid culture model.

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    Astashkina, Anna I; Jones, Clint F; Thiagarajan, Giridhar; Kurtzeborn, Kristen; Ghandehari, Hamid; Brooks, Benjamin D; Grainger, David W

    2014-08-01

    Nanocarriers and nanoparticles remain an intense pharmaceutical and medical imaging technology interest. Their entry into clinical use is hampered by the lack of reliable in vitro models that accurately predict in vivo toxicity. This study evaluates a 3-D kidney organoid proximal tubule culture to assess in vitro toxicity of the hydroxylated generation-5 PAMAM dendrimer (G5-OH) compared to previously published preclinical in vivo rodent nephrotoxicity data. 3-D kidney proximal tubule cultures were created using isolated murine proximal tubule fractions suspended in a biomedical grade hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel. Toxicity in these cultures to neutral G5-OH dendrimer nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles in vitro was assessed using clinical biomarker generation. Neutral PAMAM nanoparticle dendrimers elicit in vivo-relevant kidney biomarkers and cell viability in a 3-D kidney organoid culture that closely reflect toxicity markers reported in vivo in rodent nephrotoxicity models exposed to this same nanoparticle.

  17. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

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    Albritton, Jacob L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies. PMID:28067628

  18. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

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    Jacob L. Albritton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies.

  19. Validation of the 3D Skin Comet assay using full thickness skin models: transferability and reproducibility

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    Kerstin Reisinger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The 3D Skin Comet assay was developed to improve the in vitro prediction of the genotoxic potential of dermally applied chemicals. For this purpose, a classical read-out for genotoxicity (i.e. comet formation was combined with reconstructed 3D skin models as well-established test systems. Five laboratories (BASF, BfR (Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Henkel, Procter & Gamble and TNO Triskilion started to validate this assay using the Phenion® Full- Thickness (FT Skin Model and 8 coded chemicals with financial support by Cosmetics Europe and the German Ministry of Education & Research. There was an excellent overall predictivity of the expected genotoxicity (>90%. Four labs correctly identified all chemicals and the fifth correctly identified 80% of the chemicals. Background DNA damage was low and values for solvent (acetone and positive (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS controls were comparable among labs. Inclusion of the DNA-polymerase inhibitor, aphidicolin (APC, in the protocol improved the predictivity of the assay since it enabled robust detection of pro-mutagens e.g., 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene. Therefore, all negative findings are now confirmed by additional APC experiments to come to a final conclusion. Furthermore, MMC, which intercalates between DNA strands causing covalent binding, was detected with the standard protocol, in which it gave weak but statistically significant responses. Stronger responses, however, were obtained using a cross-linker specific protocol in which MMC reduced the migration of MMS-induced DNA damage. These data support the use of the Phenion® FT in the Comet assay: no false-positives and only one false-negative finding in a single lab. Testing will continue to obtain data for 30 chemicals. Once validated, the 3D Skin Comet assay is foreseen to be used as a follow-up test for positive results from the current in vitro genotoxicity test battery.

  20. Engineering an in vitro air-blood barrier by 3D bioprinting.

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    Horváth, Lenke; Umehara, Yuki; Jud, Corinne; Blank, Fabian; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2015-01-22

    Intensive efforts in recent years to develop and commercialize in vitro alternatives in the field of risk assessment have yielded new promising two- and three dimensional (3D) cell culture models. Nevertheless, a realistic 3D in vitro alveolar model is not available yet. Here we report on the biofabrication of the human air-blood tissue barrier analogue composed of an endothelial cell, basement membrane and epithelial cell layer by using a bioprinting technology. In contrary to the manual method, we demonstrate that this technique enables automatized and reproducible creation of thinner and more homogeneous cell layers, which is required for an optimal air-blood tissue barrier. This bioprinting platform will offer an excellent tool to engineer an advanced 3D lung model for high-throughput screening for safety assessment and drug efficacy testing.

  1. 3D cell culture to determine in vitro biocompatibility of bioactive glass in association with chitosan.

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    Bédouin, Y; Pellen Mussi, P; Tricot-Doleux, S; Chauvel-Lebret, D; Auroy, P; Ravalec, X; Oudadesse, H; Perez, F

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the in vitro biocompatibility of a composite biomaterial composed of 46S6 bioactive glass in association with chitosan (CH) by using 3D osteoblast culture of SaOS2. The 46S6 and CH composite (46S6-CH) forms small hydroxyapatite crystals on its surface after only three days immersion in the simulated body fluid. For 2D osteoblast culture, a significant increase in cell proliferation was observed after three days of contact with 46S6 or 46S6-CH-immersed media. After six days, 46S6-CH led to a significant increase in cell proliferation (128%) compared with pure 46S6 (113%) and pure CH (122%). For 3D osteoblast culture, after six days of culture, there was an increase in gene expression of markers of the early osteoblastic differentiation (RUNX2, ALP, COL1A1). Geometric structures corresponding to small apatite clusters were observed by SEM on the surface of the spheroids cultivated with 46S6 or 46S6-CH-immersed media. We showed different cellular responses depending on the 2D and 3D cell culture model. The induction of osteoblast differentiation in the 3D cell culture explained the differences of cell proliferation in contact with 46S6, CH or 46S6-CH-immersed media. This study confirmed that the 3D cell culture model is a very promising tool for in vitro biological evaluation of bone substitutes' properties.

  2. 3D In Vitro Model for Breast Cancer Research Using Magnetic Levitation and Bioprinting Method.

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    Leonard, Fransisca; Godin, Biana

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment composition and architecture are known as a major factor in orchestrating the tumor growth and its response to various therapies. In this context, in vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the responses. However, while tumor cells can be of human origin, tumor microenvironment in the in vivo models is host-based. On the other hand, in vitro studies in a flat monoculture of tumor cells (the most frequently used in vitro tumor model) are unable to recapitulate the complexity of tumor microenvironment. Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro cell cultures of tumor cells have been proven to be an important experimental tool in understanding mechanisms of tumor growth, response to therapeutics, and transport of nutrients/drugs. We have recently described a novel tool to create 3D co-cultures of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment. Our method utilizes magnetic manipulation/levitation of the specific ratios of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment (from human or animal origin) aiding in the formation of tumor spheres with defined cellular composition and density, as quickly as within 24 h. This chapter describes the experimental protocols developed to model the 3D structure of the cancer environment using the above method.

  3. 3-D In Vitro Acoustic Super-Resolution and Super-Resolved Velocity Mapping Using Microbubbles.

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    Christensen-Jeffries, Kirsten; Brown, Jemma; Aljabar, Paul; Tang, Mengxing; Dunsby, Christopher; Eckersley, Robert J

    2017-07-31

    Standard clinical ultrasound (US) imaging frequencies are unable to resolve microvascular structures due to the fundamental diffraction limit of US waves. Recent demonstrations of 2D super-resolution both in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated that fine vascular structures can be visualized using acoustic single bubble localization. Visualization of more complex and disordered 3D vasculature, such as that of a tumor, requires an acquisition strategy which can additionally localize bubbles in the elevational plane with high precision in order to generate super-resolution in all three dimensions. Furthermore, a particular challenge lies in the need to provide this level of visualization with minimal acquisition time. In this work, we develop a fast, coherent US imaging tool for microbubble localization in 3D using a pair of US transducers positioned at 90°. This allowed detection of point scatterer signals in 3 dimensions with average precisions equal to 1.9 µm in axial and elevational planes, and 11 µm in the lateral plane, compared to the diffraction limited point spread function full widths at half maximum of 488 µm, 1188 µm and 953 µm of the original imaging system with a single transducer. Visualization and velocity mapping of 3D in vitro structures was demonstrated far beyond the diffraction limit. The capability to measure the complete flow pattern of blood vessels associated with disease at depth would ultimately enable analysis of in vivo microvascular morphology, blood flow dynamics and occlusions resulting from disease states.

  4. Construction of 3D multicellular microfluidic chip for an in vitro skin model.

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    Lee, Sojin; Jin, Seon-Pil; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Sung, Gun Yong; Chung, Jin Ho; Sung, Jong Hwan

    2017-06-01

    Current in vitro skin models do not recapitulate the complex architecture and functions of the skin tissue. In particular, on-chip construction of an in vitro model comprising the epidermis and dermis layer with vascular structure for mass transport has not been reported yet. In this study, we aim to develop a microfluidic, three-dimensional (3D) skin chip with fluidic channels using PDMS and hydrogels. Mass transport within the collagen hydrogel matrix was verified with fluorescent model molecules, and a transport-reaction model of oxygen and glucose inside the skin chip was developed to aid the design of the microfluidic skin chip. Comparison of viabilities of dermal fibroblasts and HaCaT cultured in the chip with various culture conditions revealed that the presence of flow plays a crucial role in maintaining the viability, and both cells were viable after 10 days of air exposure culture. Our 3D skin chip with vascular structures can be a valuable in vitro model for reproducing the interaction between different components of the skin tissue, and thus work as a more physiologically realistic platform for testing skin reaction to cosmetic products and drugs.

  5. Scaffolds for 3D in vitro culture of neural lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ashley R; Laslett, Andrew; O'Brien, Carmel M; Cameron, Neil R

    2017-03-01

    Understanding how neurodegenerative disorders develop is not only a key challenge for researchers but also for the wider society, given the rapidly aging populations in developed countries. Advances in this field require new tools with which to recreate neural tissue in vitro and produce realistic disease models. This in turn requires robust and reliable systems for performing 3D in vitro culture of neural lineage cells. This review provides a state of the art update on three-dimensional culture systems for in vitro development of neural tissue, employing a wide range of scaffold types including hydrogels, solid porous polymers, fibrous materials and decellularised tissues as well as microfluidic devices and lab-on-a-chip systems. To provide some context with in vivo development of the central nervous system (CNS), we also provide a brief overview of the neural stem cell niche, neural development and neural differentiation in vitro. We conclude with a discussion of future directions for this exciting and important field of biomaterials research.

  6. Nuclear Factor-kappaB controls the reaggregation of 3D neurosphere cultures in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Widera

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The approach of reaggregation involves the regeneration and self-renewal of histotypical 3D spheres from isolated tissue kept in suspension culture. Reaggregated spheres can be used as tumour, genetic, biohybrid and neurosphere models. In addition the functional superiority of 3D aggregates over conventional 2D cultures developed the use of neurospheres for brain engineering of CNS diseases. Thus 3D aggregate cultures created enormous interest in mechanisms that regulate the formation of multicellular aggregates in vitro. Here we analyzed mechanisms guiding the development of 3D neurosphere cultures. Adult neural stem cells can be cultured as self-adherent clusters, called neurospheres. Neurospheres are characterised as heterogeneous clusters containing unequal stem cell sub-types. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- alpha is one of the crucial inflammatory cytokines with multiple actions on several cell types. TNF- alpha strongly activates the canonical Nuclear Factor Kappa-B (NF-kappaB pathway. In order to investigate further functions of TNF in neural stem cells (NSCs we tested the hypothesis that TNF is able to modulate the motility and/or migratory behaviour of SVZ derived adult neural stem cells. We observed a significantly faster sphere formation in TNF treated cultures than in untreated controls. The very fast aggregation of isolated NSCs (<2h is a commonly observed phenomenon, though the mechanisms of 3D neurosphere formation remain largely unclear. Here we demonstrate for the first time, increased aggregation and enhanced motility of isolated NSCs in response to the TNF-stimulus. Moreover, this phenomenon is largely dependent on activated transcription factor NF-kappaB. Both, the pharmacological blockade of NF-kappaB pathway by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC or Bay11-7082 and genetic blockade by expression of a transdominant-negative super-repressor IkappaB-AA1 led to decreased aggregation.

  7. In vitro vascularization of a combined system based on a 3D printing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinru; Liu, Libiao; Wang, Jiayin; Xu, Yufan; Zhang, Weiming; Khang, Gilson; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    A vital challenge in complex organ manufacturing is to vascularize large combined tissues. The aim of this study is to vascularize in vitro an adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)/fibrin/collagen incorporated three-dimensional (3D) poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (10 × 10 × 10 mm(3) ) with interconnected channels. A low-temperature 3D printing technique was employed to build the PLGA scaffold. A step-by-step cocktail procedure was designed to engage or steer the ADSCs in the PLGA channels towards both endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages. The combined system had sufficient mechanical properties to support the cell/fibrin/collagen hydrogel inside the predefined PLGA channels. The ADSCs encapsulated in the fibrin/collagen hydrogel differentiated to endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineage, respectively, corresponding to their respective locations in the construct and formed vascular-like structures. This technique allows in vitro vascularization of the predefined PLGA channels and provides a choice for complex organ manufacture. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Quantification of blood perfusion using 3D power Doppler: an in-vitro flow phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine-Fenning, N. J.; Ramnarine, K. V.; Nordin, N. M.; Campbell, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) power Doppler data is increasingly used to assess and quantify blood flow and tissue perfusion. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of common 3D power Doppler ‘vascularity’ indices by quantification in well characterised in-vitro flow models. A computer driven gear pump was used to circulate a steady flow of a blood mimicking fluid through various well characterised flow phantoms to investigate the effect of the number of flow channels, flow rate, depth dependent tissue attenuation, blood mimic scatter particle concentration and ultrasound settings. 3D Power Doppler data were acquired with a Voluson 530D scanner and 7.5 MHz transvaginal transducer (GE Kretz). Virtual Organ Computer-aided Analysis software (VOCAL) was used to quantify the vascularisation index (VI), flow index (FI) and vascularisation-flow index (VFI). The vascular indices were affected by many factors, some intuitive and some with more complex or unexpected relationships (e.g. VI increased linearly with an increase in flow rate, blood mimic scatter particle concentration and number of flow channels, and had a complex dependence on pulse repetition frequency). Use of standardised settings and appropriate calibration are required in any attempt at relating ‘vascularity indices’ with flow.

  9. A 3D in vitro bone organ model using human progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Papadimitropoulos

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D organotypic culture models based on human cells may reduce the use of complex and costly animal models, while gaining clinical relevance. This study aimed at developing a 3D osteoblastic-osteoclastic-endothelial cell co-culture system, as an in vitro model to mimic the process of bone turnover. Osteoprogenitor and endothelial lineage cells were isolated from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF of human adipose tissue, whereas CD14+ osteoclast progenitors were derived from human peripheral blood. Cells were co-cultured within 3D porous ceramic scaffolds using a perfusion-based bioreactor device, in the presence of typical osteoclastogenic factors. After 3 weeks, the scaffolds contained cells with endothelial (2.0 ±0.3%, pre/osteoclastic (14.0 ±1.4% and mesenchymal/osteoblastic (44.0 ±8.4% phenotypes, along with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+ osteoclastic cells in contact with deposited bone-like matrix. Supernatant analysis demonstrated sustained matrix deposition (by C-terminus procollagen-I propeptides, resorption (by N-terminus collagen-I telopeptides and phosphate levels and osteoclastic activity (by TRAP-5b only when SVF and CD14+ cells were co-cultured. Scanning electron microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the pattern of matrix deposition and resorption. The effectiveness of Vitamin D in replacing osteoclastogenic factors indicated a functional osteoblast-osteoclast coupling in the system. The formation of human-origin bone-like tissue, blood vessels and osteoclasts upon ectopic implantation validated the functionality of the developed cell types. The 3D co-culture system and the associated non-invasive analytical tools can be used as an advanced model to capture some aspects of the functional coupling of bone-like matrix deposition and resorption and could be exploited toward the engineering of multi-functional bone substitute implants.

  10. In Vitro Biological Evaluation of 3-D Hydroxyapatite/Collagen (50/50 wt. (% Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Moura Campos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite-collagen (HA/Col composites are potential scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this work, three-dimensional (3-D HA/Col (50/50 wt. (% scaffolds were synthesized using a self-assembly method and cross-linked with a 0.125% glutaraldehyde solution. Scaffolds were evaluated in vitro by cytotoxicity testing using MC3T3 cells; proliferation and differentiation were studied using STRO-1A human stromal cells for up to 21 days. Morphological and histological examinations showed a fibrous structure with a good distribution and homogeneous HA particles distribution. By thermogravimetric analysis, a ratio of 1.2 between inorganic and organic phase was found. The scaffolds presented no cytotoxicity when evaluated using three different parameters of cell survival and integrity: 2,3-bis[2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl] -2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT, Neutral Red (NR and Crystal Violet Dye Elution (CVDE. STRO-1A cells were found to adhere, proliferate and differentiate on the 3-D scaffold, but limited cell penetration was observed.

  11. Surface functionalization of 3D glass-ceramic porous scaffolds for enhanced mineralization in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Sara; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Bretcanu, Oana; Cassinelli, Clara; Vernè, Enrica

    2013-04-01

    Bone reconstruction after tissue loosening due to traumatic, pathological or surgical causes is in increasing demand. 3D scaffolds are a widely studied solution for supporting new bone growth. Bioactive glass-ceramic porous materials can offer a three-dimensional structure that is able to chemically bond to bone. The ability to surface modify these devices by grafting biologically active molecules represents a challenge, with the aim of stimulating physiological bone regeneration with both inorganic and organic signals. In this research work glass ceramic scaffolds with very high mechanical properties and moderate bioactivity have been functionalized with the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The material surface was activated in order to expose hydroxyl groups. The activated surface was further grafted with ALP both via silanization and also via direct grafting to the surface active hydroxyl groups. Enzymatic activity of grafted samples were measured by means of UV-vis spectroscopy before and after ultrasonic washing in TRIS-HCl buffer solution. In vitro inorganic bioactivity was investigated by soaking the scaffolds after the different steps of functionalization in a simulated body fluid (SBF). SEM observations allowed the monitoring of the scaffold morphology and surface chemical composition after soaking in SBF. The presence of ALP enhanced the in vitro inorganic bioactivity of the tested material.

  12. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Z.; Liao, Q.; Hu, Y.; You, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhao, Y. [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-08-10

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  13. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  14. Biocompatible 3D printed polymers via fused deposition modelling direct C2C12 cellular phenotype in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimington, Rowan P; Capel, Andrew J; Christie, Steven D R; Lewis, Mark P

    2017-08-22

    The capability to 3D print bespoke biologically receptive parts within short time periods has driven the growing prevalence of additive manufacture (AM) technology within biological settings, however limited research concerning cellular interaction with 3D printed polymers has been undertaken. In this work, we used skeletal muscle C2C12 cell line in order to ascertain critical evidence of cellular behaviour in response to multiple bio-receptive candidate polymers; polylactic acid (PLA), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) 3D printed via fused deposition modelling (FDM). The extrusion based nature of FDM elicited polymer specific topographies, within which C2C12 cells exhibited reduced metabolic activity when compared to optimised surfaces of tissue culture plastic, however assay viability readings remained high across polymers outlining viable phenotypes. C2C12 cells exhibited consistently high levels of morphological alignment across polymers, however differential myotube widths and levels of transcriptional myogenin expression appeared to demonstrate response specific thresholds at which varying polymer selection potentiates cellular differentiation, elicits pre-mature early myotube formation and directs subsequent morphological phenotype. Here we observed biocompatible AM polymers manufactured via FDM, which also appear to hold the potential to simultaneously manipulate the desired biological phenotype and enhance the biomimicry of skeletal muscle cells in vitro via AM polymer choice and careful selection of machine processing parameters. When considered in combination with the associated design freedom of AM, this may provide the opportunity to not only enhance the efficiency of creating biomimetic models, but also to precisely control the biological output within such scaffolds.

  15. 3D bioprinting matrices with controlled pore structure and release function guide in vitro self-organization of sweat gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nanbo; Huang, Sha; Yao, Bin; Xie, Jiangfan; Wu, Xu; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    3D bioprinting matrices are novel platforms for tissue regeneration. Tissue self-organization is a critical process during regeneration that implies the features of organogenesis. However, it is not clear from the current evidences whether 3D printed construct plays a role in guiding tissue self-organization in vitro. Based on our previous study, we bioprinted a 3D matrix as the restrictive niche for direct sweat gland differentiation of epidermal progenitors by different pore structure (300-μm or 400-μm nozzle diameters printed) and reported a long-term gradual transition of differentiated cells into glandular morphogenesis occurs within the 3D construct in vitro. At the initial 14-day culture, an accelerated cell differentiation was achieved with inductive cues released along with gelatin reduction. After protein release completed, the 3D construct guide the self-organized formation of sweat gland tissues, which is similar to that of the natural developmental process. However, glandular morphogenesis was only observed in 300-μm–printed constructs. In the absence of 3D architectural support, glandular morphogenesis was not occurred. This striking finding made us to identify a previously unknown role of the 3D-printed structure in glandular tissue regeneration, and this self-organizing strategy can be applied to forming other tissues in vitro. PMID:27694985

  16. 3D bioprinting matrices with controlled pore structure and release function guide in vitro self-organization of sweat gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nanbo; Huang, Sha; Yao, Bin; Xie, Jiangfan; Wu, Xu; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-10-03

    3D bioprinting matrices are novel platforms for tissue regeneration. Tissue self-organization is a critical process during regeneration that implies the features of organogenesis. However, it is not clear from the current evidences whether 3D printed construct plays a role in guiding tissue self-organization in vitro. Based on our previous study, we bioprinted a 3D matrix as the restrictive niche for direct sweat gland differentiation of epidermal progenitors by different pore structure (300-μm or 400-μm nozzle diameters printed) and reported a long-term gradual transition of differentiated cells into glandular morphogenesis occurs within the 3D construct in vitro. At the initial 14-day culture, an accelerated cell differentiation was achieved with inductive cues released along with gelatin reduction. After protein release completed, the 3D construct guide the self-organized formation of sweat gland tissues, which is similar to that of the natural developmental process. However, glandular morphogenesis was only observed in 300-μm-printed constructs. In the absence of 3D architectural support, glandular morphogenesis was not occurred. This striking finding made us to identify a previously unknown role of the 3D-printed structure in glandular tissue regeneration, and this self-organizing strategy can be applied to forming other tissues in vitro.

  17. Development of a 3D matrix for modeling mammalian spinal cord injury in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Felipe Diaz Quiroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury affects millions of people around the world, however, limited therapies are available to improve the quality of life of these patients. Spinal cord injury is usually modeled in rats and mice using contusion or complete transection models and this has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular complexities of the injury. However, it has not to date led to development of successful novel therapies, this is in part due to the complexity of the injury and the difficulty of deciphering the exact roles and interactions of different cells within this complex environment. Here we developed a collagen matrix that can be molded into the 3D tubular shape with a lumen and can hence support cell interactions in a similar architecture to a spinal cord. We show that astrocytes can be successfully grown on this matrix in vitro and when injured, the cells respond as they do in vivo and undergo reactive gliosis, one of the steps that lead to formation of a glial scar, the main barrier to spinal cord regeneration. In the future, this system can be used to quickly assess the effect of drugs on glial scar protein activity or to perform live imaging of labeled cells after exposure to drugs.

  18. Development of a 3D matrix for modeling mammalian spinal cord injury in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Quiroz, Juan Felipe; Li, Yuping; Aparicio, Conrado; Echeverri, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury affects millions of people around the world, however, limited therapies are available to improve the quality of life of these patients. Spinal cord injury is usually modeled in rats and mice using contusion or complete transection models and this has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular complexities of the injury. However, it has not to date led to development of successful novel therapies, this is in part due to the complexity of the injury and the difficulty of deciphering the exact roles and interactions of different cells within this complex environment. Here we developed a collagen matrix that can be molded into the 3D tubular shape with a lumen and can hence support cell interactions in a similar architecture to a spinal cord. We show that astrocytes can be successfully grown on this matrix in vitro and when injured, the cells respond as they do in vivo and undergo reactive gliosis, one of the steps that lead to formation of a glial scar, the main barrier to spinal cord regeneration. In the future, this system can be used to quickly assess the effect of drugs on glial scar protein activity or to perform live imaging of labeled cells after exposure to drugs. PMID:28123426

  19. Comparative endpoint sensitivity of in vitro estrogen agonist assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, David A; Connors, Kristin A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2015-07-01

    Environmental and human health implications of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), particularly xenoestrogens, have received extensive study. In vitro assays are increasingly employed as diagnostic tools to comparatively evaluate chemicals, whole effluent toxicity and surface water quality, and to identify causative EDCs during toxicity identification evaluations. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated ToxCast under the Tox21 program to generate novel bioactivity data through high throughput screening. This information is useful for prioritizing chemicals requiring additional hazard information, including endocrine active chemicals. Though multiple in vitro and in vivo techniques have been developed to assess estrogen agonist activity, the relative endpoint sensitivity of these approaches and agreement of their conclusions remain unclear during environmental diagnostic applications. Probabilistic hazard assessment (PHA) approaches, including chemical toxicity distributions (CTD), are useful for understanding the relative sensitivity of endpoints associated with in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays by predicting the likelihood of chemicals eliciting undesirable outcomes at or above environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, PHAs were employed to examine the comparative endpoint sensitivity of 16 in vitro assays for estrogen agonist activity using a diverse group of compounds from the USEPA ToxCast dataset. Reporter gene assays were generally observed to possess greater endpoint sensitivity than other assay types, and the Tox21 ERa LUC BG1 Agonist assay was identified as the most sensitive in vitro endpoint for detecting an estrogenic response. When the sensitivity of this most sensitive ToxCast in vitro endpoint was compared to the human MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, a common in vitro model for biomedical and environmental monitoring applications, the ERa LUC BG1 assay was several orders of magnitude less

  20. Genetic toxicity assessment of engineered nanoparticles using a 3D in vitro skin model (EpiDerm™)

    OpenAIRE

    Wills, JW; Hondow, N; Thomas, AD; Chapman, KE; Fish, D; Maffeis, TG; Penny, MW; Brown, RA; Jenkins, GJS; Brown, AP; White, PA; Doak, SH

    2016-01-01

    Background The rapid production and incorporation of engineered nanomaterials into consumer products alongside research suggesting nanomaterials can cause cell death and DNA damage (genotoxicity) makes in vitro assays desirable for nanosafety screening. However, conflicting outcomes are often observed when in vitro and in vivo study results are compared, suggesting more physiologically representative in vitro models are required to minimise reliance on animal testing. Method BASF Levasil® sil...

  1. 3D Printing of Tissue Engineered Constructs for In Vitro Modeling of Disease Progression and Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderburgh, Joseph; Sterling, Julie A; Guelcher, Scott A

    2017-01-01

    2D cell culture and preclinical animal models have traditionally been implemented for investigating the underlying cellular mechanisms of human disease progression. However, the increasing significance of 3D vs. 2D cell culture has initiated a new era in cell culture research in which 3D in vitro models are emerging as a bridge between traditional 2D cell culture and in vivo animal models. Additive manufacturing (AM, also known as 3D printing), defined as the layer-by-layer fabrication of parts directed by digital information from a 3D computer-aided design file, offers the advantages of simultaneous rapid prototyping and biofunctionalization as well as the precise placement of cells and extracellular matrix with high resolution. In this review, we highlight recent advances in 3D printing of tissue engineered constructs that recapitulate the physical and cellular properties of the tissue microenvironment for investigating mechanisms of disease progression and for screening drugs.

  2. Development of 3D in vitro platform technology to engineer mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseinkhani H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hossein Hosseinkhani,1 Po-Da Hong,1 Dah-Shyong Yu,2 Yi-Ru Chen,3 Diana Ickowicz,4 Ira-Yudovin Farber,4 Abraham J Domb41Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (TAIWANTECH, 2Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, 4Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy-Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, IsraelAbstract: This study aims to develop a three-dimensional in vitro culture system to genetically engineer mesenchymal stem cells (MSC to express bone morphogenic protein-2. We employed nanofabrication technologies borrowed from the spinning industry, such as electrospinning, to mass-produce identical building blocks in a variety of shapes and sizes to fabricate electrospun nanofiber sheets comprised of composites of poly (glycolic acid and collagen. Homogenous nanoparticles of cationic biodegradable natural polymer were formed by simple mixing of an aqueous solution of plasmid DNA encoded bone morphogenic protein-2 with the same volume of cationic polysaccharide, dextran-spermine. Rat bone marrow MSC were cultured on electrospun nanofiber sheets comprised of composites of poly (glycolic acid and collagen prior to the incorporation of the nanoparticles into the nanofiber sheets. Bone morphogenic protein-2 was significantly detected in MSC cultured on nanofiber sheets incorporated with nanoparticles after 2 days compared with MSC cultured on nanofiber sheets incorporated with naked plasmid DNA. We conclude that the incorporation of nanoparticles into nanofiber sheets is a very promising strategy to genetically engineer MSC and can be used for further applications in regenerative medicine therapy.Keywords: 3D culture, nanoparticles, nanofibers, polycations, tissue engineering

  3. In vitro solubility assays in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Edward H; Di, Li; Carter, Guy T

    2008-11-01

    The solubility of a compound depends on its structure and solution conditions. Structure determines the lipophilicity, hydrogen bonding, molecular volume, crystal energy and ionizability, which determine solubility. Solution conditions are affected by pH, co-solvents, additives, ionic strength, time and temperature. Many drug discovery experiments are conducted under "kinetic" solubility conditions. In drug discovery, solubility has a major impact on bioassays, formulation for in vivo dosing, and intestinal absorption. A good goal for the solubility of drug discovery compounds is >60 ug/mL. Equilibrium solubility assays can be conducted in moderate throughput, by incubating excess solid with buffer and agitating for several days, prior to filtration and HPLC quantitation. Kinetic solubility assays are performed in high throughput with shorter incubation times and high throughput analyses using plate readers. The most frequently used of these are the nephelometric assay and direct UV assay, which begin by adding a small volume of DMSO stock solution of each test compound to buffer. In nephelometry, this solution is serially diluted across a microtitre plate and undissolved particles are detected via light scattering. In direct UV, undissolved particles are separated by filtration, after which the dissolved material is quantitated using UV absorption. Equilibrium solubility is useful for preformulation. Kinetic solubility is useful for rapid compound assessment, guiding optimization via structure modification, and diagnosing bioassays. It is often useful to customize solubility experiments using conditions that answer specific research questions of drug discovery teams, such as compound selection and vehicle development for pharmacology and PK studies.

  4. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay. PMID:28240272

  5. Further development of the EpiDerm 3D reconstructed human skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Greg C; Aardema, Marilyn J; Hu, Ting; Barnett, Brenda; Kaluzhny, Yulia; Klausner, Mitchell; Karetsky, Viktor; Dahl, Erica L; Curren, Rodger D

    2009-03-17

    The upcoming ban on testing of cosmetics in animals by the European Union's 7th Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive will require genotoxicity safety assessments of cosmetics ingredients and final formulations to be based primarily on in vitro genotoxicity tests. The current in vitro test battery produces an unacceptably high rate of false positives, and used by itself would effectively prevent the use and development of many ingredients that are actually safe for human use. To address the need for an in vitro test that is more predictive of genotoxicity in vivo, we have developed an in vitro micronucleus assay using a three-dimensional human reconstructed skin model (EpiDerm) that more closely mimics the normal dermal exposure route of chemicals. We have refined this model and assessed its ability to predict genotoxicity of a battery of chemicals that have been previously classified as genotoxins or non-genotoxins based on in vivo rodent skin tests. Our reconstructed skin micronucleus assay correctly identified 7 genotoxins and 5 non-genotoxins, demonstrating its potential to have a higher predictive value than currently available in vitro genotoxicity tests, and its utility as part of a comprehensive in vitro genotoxicity testing strategy.

  6. Network dynamics of 3D engineered neuronal cultures: a new experimental model for in-vitro electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frega, Monica; Tedesco, Mariateresa; Massobrio, Paolo; Pesce, Mattia; Martinoia, Sergio

    2014-06-30

    Despite the extensive use of in-vitro models for neuroscientific investigations and notwithstanding the growing field of network electrophysiology, all studies on cultured cells devoted to elucidate neurophysiological mechanisms and computational properties, are based on 2D neuronal networks. These networks are usually grown onto specific rigid substrates (also with embedded electrodes) and lack of most of the constituents of the in-vivo like environment: cell morphology, cell-to-cell interaction and neuritic outgrowth in all directions. Cells in a brain region develop in a 3D space and interact with a complex multi-cellular environment and extracellular matrix. Under this perspective, 3D networks coupled to micro-transducer arrays, represent a new and powerful in-vitro model capable of better emulating in-vivo physiology. In this work, we present a new experimental paradigm constituted by 3D hippocampal networks coupled to Micro-Electrode-Arrays (MEAs) and we show how the features of the recorded network dynamics differ from the corresponding 2D network model. Further development of the proposed 3D in-vitro model by adding embedded functionalized scaffolds might open new prospects for manipulating, stimulating and recording the neuronal activity to elucidate neurophysiological mechanisms and to design bio-hybrid microsystems.

  7. Effective inhibition of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV replication in vitro by vector-delivered microRNAs targeting the 3D gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Xuepeng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV causes an economically important and highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. RNAi triggered by small RNA molecules, including siRNAs and miRNAs, offers a new approach for controlling viral infections. There is no report available for FMDV inhibition by vector-delivered miRNA, although miRNA is believed to have more potential than siRNA. In this study, the inhibitory effects of vector-delivered miRNAs targeting the 3D gene on FMDV replication were examined. Results Four pairs of oligonucleotides encoding 3D-specific miRNA of FMDV were designed and selected for construction of miRNA expression plasmids. In the reporter assays, two of four miRNA expression plasmids were able to significantly silence the expression of 3D-GFP fusion proteins from the reporter plasmid, p3D-GFP, which was cotransfected with each miRNA expression plasmid. After detecting the silencing effects of the reporter genes, the inhibitory effects of FMDV replication were determined in the miRNA expression plasmid-transfected and FMDV-infected cells. Virus titration and real-time RT-PCR assays showed that the p3D715-miR and p3D983-miR plasmids were able to potently inhibit the replication of FMDV when BHK-21 cells were infected with FMDV. Conclusion Our results indicated that vector-delivered miRNAs targeting the 3D gene efficiently inhibits FMDV replication in vitro. This finding provides evidence that miRNAs could be used as a potential tool against FMDV infection.

  8. Understanding the impact of 2D and 3D fibroblast cultures on in vitro breast cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Eun Sung

    Full Text Available The utilization of 3D, physiologically relevant in vitro cancer models to investigate complex interactions between tumor and stroma has been increasing. Prior work has generally focused on the cancer cells and, the role of fibroblast culture conditions on tumor-stromal cell interactions is still largely unknown. Here, we focus on the stroma by comparing functional behaviors of human mammary fibroblasts (HMFs cultured in 2D and 3D and their effects on the invasive progression of breast cancer cells (MCF10DCIS.com. We identified increased levels of several paracrine factors from HMFs cultured in 3D conditions that drive the invasive transition. Using a microscale co-culture model with improved compartmentalization and sensitivity, we demonstrated that HMFs cultured in 3D intensify the promotion of the invasive progression through the HGF/c-Met interaction. This study highlights the importance of the 3D stromal microenvironment in the development of multiple cell type in vitro cancer models.

  9. Low-cost, rapidly-developed, 3D printed in vitro corpus callosum model for mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabet, Anthony; Gardner, Matthew; Swanson, Sebastian; Crump, Sydney; McMeekin, Austin; Gong, Diana; Tabet, Rebecca; Hacker, Benjamin; Nestrasil, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The rising prevalence of high throughput screening and the general inability of (1) two dimensional (2D) cell culture and (2) in vitro release studies to predict in vivo neurobiological and pharmacokinetic responses in humans has led to greater interest in more realistic three dimensional (3D) benchtop platforms. Advantages of 3D human cell culture over its 2D analogue, or even animal models, include taking the effects of microgeometry and long-range topological features into consideration. In the era of personalized medicine, it has become increasingly valuable to screen candidate molecules and synergistic therapeutics at a patient-specific level, in particular for diseases that manifest in highly variable ways. The lack of established standards and the relatively arbitrary choice of probing conditions has limited in vitro drug release to a largely qualitative assessment as opposed to a predictive, quantitative measure of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in tissue. Here we report the methods used in the rapid, low-cost development of a 3D model of a mucopolysaccharidosis type I patient’s corpus callosum, which may be used for cell culture and drug release. The CAD model is developed from in vivo brain MRI tracing of the corpus callosum using open-source software, printed with poly (lactic-acid) on a Makerbot Replicator 5X, UV-sterilized, and coated with poly (lysine) for cellular adhesion. Adaptations of material and 3D printer for expanded applications are also discussed. PMID:28357042

  10. In vitro activity of ceftazidime-avibactam combination in in vitro checkerboard assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, J.; Melchers, M.J.B.; Mil, A.C. van; Nichols, W.W.; Mouton, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro effects of the combination of ceftazidime and avibactam on the MICs of both compounds, checkerboard assays were performed for 81 clinical strains, including 55 Enterobacteriaceae strains (32 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 Escherichia coli, 1 Citrobacter freundii, and 3 Enterobact

  11. Protein-engineered scaffolds for in vitro 3D culture of primary adult intestinal organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Rebecca L; Dewi, Ruby E; Bernal, Gabriela; Kuo, Calvin; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-10-15

    Though in vitro culture of primary intestinal organoids has gained significant momentum in recent years, little has been done to investigate the impact of microenvironmental cues provided by the encapsulating matrix on the growth and development of these fragile cultures. In this work, the impact of various in vitro culture parameters on primary adult murine organoid formation and growth are analyzed with a focus on matrix properties and geometric culture configuration. The air-liquid interface culture configuration was found to result in enhanced organoid formation relative to a traditional submerged configuration. Additionally, through use of a recombinantly engineered extracellular matrix (eECM), the effects of biochemical and biomechanical cues were independently studied. Decreasing mechanical stiffness and increasing cell adhesivity were found to increase organoid yield. Tuning of eECM properties was used to obtain organoid formation efficiency values identical to those observed in naturally harvested collagen I matrices but within a stiffer construct with improved ease of physical manipulation. Increased ability to remodel the surrounding matrix through mechanical or enzymatic means was also shown to enhance organoid formation. As the engineering and tunability of recombinant matrices is essentially limitless, continued property optimization may result in further improved matrix performance and may help to identify additional microenvironmental cues that directly impact organoid formation, development, differentiation, and functional behavior. Continued culture of primary organoids in recombinant matrices could therefore prove to be largely advantageous in the field of intestinal tissue engineering for applications in regenerative medicine and in vitro tissue mimics.

  12. Combining 3D human in vitro methods for a 3Rs evaluation of novel titanium surfaces in orthopaedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, G.; Rehman, S.; Draper, E.; Hernández‐Nava, E.; Hunt, J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we report on a group of complementary human osteoblast in vitro test methods for the preclinical evaluation of 3D porous titanium surfaces. The surfaces were prepared by additive manufacturing (electron beam melting [EBM]) and plasma spraying, allowing the creation of complex lattice surface geometries. Physical properties of the surfaces were characterized by SEM and profilometry and 3D in vitro cell culture using human osteoblasts. Primary human osteoblast cells were found to elicit greater differences between titanium sample surfaces than an MG63 osteoblast‐like cell line, particularly in terms of cell survival. Surface morphology was associated with higher osteoblast metabolic activity and mineralization on rougher titanium plasma spray coated surfaces than smoother surfaces. Differences in osteoblast survival and metabolic activity on titanium lattice structures were also found, despite analogous surface morphology at the cellular level. 3D confocal microscopy identified osteoblast organization within complex titanium surface geometries, adhesion, spreading, and alignment to the biomaterial strut geometries. Mineralized nodule formation throughout the lattice structures was also observed, and indicative of early markers of bone in‐growth on such materials. Testing methods such as those presented are not traditionally considered by medical device manufacturers, but we suggest have value as an increasingly vital tool in efficiently translating pre‐clinical studies, especially in balance with current regulatory practice, commercial demands, the 3Rs, and the relative merits of in vitro and in vivo studies. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1586–1599. © 2015 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26702609

  13. 3D super-resolved in vitro multiphoton microscopy by saturation of excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Anh Dung; Bouwens, Arno; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Egrise, Dominique; Van Simayes, Gaetan; Emplit, Philippe; Goldman, Serge; Gorza, Simon-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a significant resolution enhancement beyond the conventional limit in multiphoton microscopy (MPM) using saturated excitation of fluorescence. Our technique achieves super-resolved imaging by temporally modulating the excitation laser-intensity and demodulating the higher harmonics from the saturated fluorescence signal. The improvement of the lateral and axial resolutions is measured on a sample of fluorescent microspheres. While the third harmonic already provides an enhanced resolution, we show that a further improvement can be obtained with an appropriate linear combination of the demodulated harmonics. Finally, we present in vitro imaging of fluorescent microspheres incorporated in HeLa cells to show that this technique performs well in biological samples.

  14. Chemosensitizing acridones: in vitro calmodulin dependent cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibition, docking, pharmacophore modeling and 3D QSAR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra Prasad, V V S; Deepak Reddy, G; Appaji, D; Peters, G J; Mayur, Y C

    2013-03-01

    Calmodulin inhibitors have proved to play a significant role in sensitizing MDR cancer cells by interfering with cellular drug accumulation. The present investigation focuses on the evaluation of in vitro inhibitory efficacy of chloro acridones against calmodulin dependent cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE1c). Moreover, molecular docking of acridones was performed with PDE1c in order to identify the possible protein ligand interactions and results thus obtained were compared with in vitro data. In addition an efficient pharmacophore model was developed from a set of 38 chemosensitizing acridones effective against doxorubicin resistant (HL-60/DX) cancer cell lines. Pharmacophoric features such as one hydrogen bond acceptor, one hydrophobic region, a positive ion group and three aromatic rings i.e., AHPRRR have been identified. Ligand based 3D-QSAR was also performed by employing partial least square regression analysis.

  15. High-resolution 3D ultrasound jawbone surface imaging for diagnosis of periodontal bony defects: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ngan, Peter; Crout, Richard; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2010-11-01

    Although medical specialties have recognized the importance of using ultrasonic imaging, dentistry is only beginning to discover its benefit. This has particularly been important in the field of periodontics which studies infections in the gum and bone tissues that surround the teeth. This study investigates the feasibility of using a custom-designed high-frequency ultrasound imaging system to reconstruct high-resolution (3D) surface images of periodontal defects in human jawbone. The system employs single-element focused ultrasound transducers with center frequencies ranging from 30 to 60 MHz. Continuous acquisition using a 1 GHz data acquisition card is synchronized with a high-precision two-dimensional (2D) positioning system of ±1 μm resolution for acquiring accurate measurements of the mandible, in vitro. Signal and image processing algorithms are applied to reconstruct high-resolution ultrasound images and extract the jawbone surface in each frame. Then, all edges are combined and smoothed in order to render a 3D surface image of the jawbone. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the system performance using mandibles with teeth (dentate) or without (nondentate). The system was able to reconstruct 3D images for the mandible's outer surface with superior spatial resolution down to 24 μm, and to perform the whole scanning in images were confirmed with the anatomical structures on the mandibles. All the anatomical landmarks were detected and fully described as 3D images using this novel ultrasound imaging technique, whereas the 2D X-ray radiographic images suffered from poor contrast. These results indicate the great potential of utilizing high-resolution ultrasound as a noninvasive, nonionizing imaging technique for the early diagnosis of the more severe form of periodontal disease.

  16. In Vitro Model of the Epidermis: Connecting Protein Function to 3D Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnette, Christopher; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Hoover, Paul; Getsios, Spiro; Green, Kathleen J

    2016-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the biological processes that underlie cellular functions in humans, such as cell-cell communication, intracellular signaling, and transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of gene expression, has been acquired from studying cells in a two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture environment. However, it has become increasingly evident that the 2D environment does not support certain cell functions. The need for more physiologically relevant models prompted the development of three-dimensional (3D) cultures of epithelial, endothelial, and neuronal tissues (Shamir & Ewald, 2014). These models afford investigators with powerful tools to study the contribution of spatial organization, often in the context of relevant extracellular matrix and stromal components, to cellular and tissue homeostasis in normal and disease states.

  17. The development and characterization of a human mesothelioma in vitro 3D model to investigate immunotoxin therapy.

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    Xinran Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to penetration by antibodies and immunoconjugates. Tumor microenvironments, however, are difficult to study in vitro. Cells cultured as monolayers exhibit less resistance to therapy than those grown in vivo and an alternative research model more representative of the in vivo tumor is more desirable. SS1P is an immunotoxin composed of the Fv portion of a mesothelin-specific antibody fused to a bacterial toxin that is presently undergoing clinical trials in mesothelioma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we examined how the tumor microenvironment affects the penetration and killing activity of SS1P in a new three-dimensional (3D spheroid model cultured in vitro using the human mesothelioma cell line (NCI-H226 and two primary cell lines isolated from the ascites of malignant mesothelioma patients. Mesothelioma cells grown as monolayers or as spheroids expressed comparable levels of mesothelin; however, spheroids were at least 100 times less affected by SS1P. To understand this disparity in cytotoxicity, we made fluorescence-labeled SS1P molecules and used confocal microscopy to examine the time course of SS1P penetration within spheroids. The penetration was limited after 4 hours. Interestingly, we found a significant increase in the number of tight junctions in the core area of spheroids by electron microscopy. Expression of E-Cadherin, a protein involved in the assembly and sealing of tight junctions and highly expressed in malignant mesothelioma, was found significantly increased in spheroids as compared to monolayers. Moreover, we found that siRNA silencing and antibody inhibition targeting E-Cadherin could enhance SS1P immunotoxin therapy in vitro. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This work is one of the first to investigate immunotoxins in 3D tumor spheroids in vitro. This initial description of an in vitro tumor model may offer a simple and more representative model of in vivo

  18. A Novel Qualitative and Quantitative Biofilm Assay Based on 3D Soft Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Hakonen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of predictable in vitro methods to analyze antimicrobial activity could play a role in the development of resistance to antibiotics. Current used methods analyze planktonic cells but for the method to be clinically relevant, biofilm in in vivo like conditions ought to be studied. Hence, our group has developed a qualitative and quantitative method with in vivo like 3D tissue for prediction of antimicrobial activity in reality. Devices (wound dressings were applied on top of Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated Muller-Hinton (MH agar or 3D synthetic soft tissues (SST and incubated for 24 hours. The antibacterial activity was then analyzed visually and by viable counts. On MH agar two out of three silver containing devices showed zone of inhibitions (ZOI and on SST, ZOI were detected for all three. Corroborating results were found upon evaluating the bacterial load in SST and shown to be silver concentration dependent. In conclusion, a novel method was developed combining visual rapid screening and quantitative evaluation of the antimicrobial activity in both tissue and devices. It uses tissue allowing biofilm formation thus mimicking reality closely. These conditions are essential in order to predict antimicrobial activity of medical devices in the task to prevent device related infections.

  19. Generation of orientation tools for automated zebrafish screening assays using desktop 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The zebrafish has been established as the main vertebrate model system for whole organism screening applications. However, the lack of consistent positioning of zebrafish embryos within wells of microtiter plates remains an obstacle for the comparative analysis of images acquired in automated screening assays. While technical solutions to the orientation problem exist, dissemination is often hindered by the lack of simple and inexpensive ways of distributing and duplicating tools. Results Here, we provide a cost effective method for the production of 96-well plate compatible zebrafish orientation tools using a desktop 3D printer. The printed tools enable the positioning and orientation of zebrafish embryos within cavities formed in agarose. Their applicability is demonstrated by acquiring lateral and dorsal views of zebrafish embryos arrayed within microtiter plates using an automated screening microscope. This enables the consistent visualization of morphological phenotypes and reporter gene expression patterns. Conclusions The designs are refined versions of previously demonstrated devices with added functionality and strongly reduced production costs. All corresponding 3D models are freely available and digital design can be easily shared electronically. In combination with the increasingly widespread usage of 3D printers, this provides access to the developed tools to a wide range of zebrafish users. Finally, the design files can serve as templates for other additive and subtractive fabrication methods. PMID:24886511

  20. In vitro 3-D model based on extending time of culture for studying chronological epidermis aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Morgan; Metral, Elodie; Boher, Aurélie; Rousselle, Patricia; Thepot, Amélie; Damour, Odile

    2015-09-01

    Skin aging is a complex phenomenon in which several mechanisms operate simultaneously. Among them, intrinsic aging is a time-dependent process, which leads to gradual skin changes affecting its structure and function such as thinning down of both epidermal and dermal compartments and a flattening and fragility of the dermo-epidermal junction. Today, several approaches have been proposed for the generation of aged skin in vitro, including skin explants from aged donors and three-dimensional skin equivalent treated by aging-inducing chemical compounds or engineered with human cells isolated from aged donors. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new in vitro model of aging based on skin equivalent demonstrating the same phenotypic changes that were observed in chronological aging. By using prolonged culture as a proxy for cellular aging, we extended to 120 days the culture time of a skin equivalent model based on collagen-glycosaminoglycan-chitosan porous polymer and engineered with human skin cells from photo-protected sites of young donors. Morphological, immunohistological and ultrastructural analysis at different time points of the culture allowed characterizing the phenotypic changes observed in our model in comparison to samples of non photo-exposed normal human skin from different ages. We firstly confirmed that long-term cultured skin equivalents are still morphologically consistent and functionally active even after 120 days of culture. However, similar to in vivo chronological skin aging a significant decrease of the epidermis thickness as well as the number of keratinocyte expressing proliferation marker Ki67 are observed in extended culture time skin equivalent. Epidermal differentiation markers loricrin, filaggrin, involucrin and transglutaminase, also strongly decreased. Ultrastructural analysis of basement membrane showed typical features of aged skin such as duplication of lamina densa and alterations of hemidesmosomes. Moreover, the

  1. In vitro bioactivity of 3D Ti-mesh with bioceramic coatings in simulated body fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available 3D Ti-mesh has been coated with bioceramics under different coating conditions, such as material compositions and micro-porosity, using a dip casting method. Hydroxyapatite (HA, micro-HA particles (HAp, a bioglass (BG and their different mixtures together with polymer additives were used to control HA-coating microstructures. Layered composites with the following coating-to-substrate designs, such as BG/Ti, HA + BG/BG/Ti and HAp + BG/BG/Ti, were fabricated. The bioactivity of these coated composites and the uncoated Ti-mesh substrate was then investigated in a simulated body fluid (SBF. The Ti-mesh substrate and BG/Ti composite did not induce biomimetic apatite deposition when they were immersed in SBF for the selected BG, a pressable dental ceramic, used in this study. After seven days in SBF, an apatite layer was formed on both HA + BG/BG/Ti and HAp + BG/BG/Ti composites. The difference is the apatite layer on the HAp + BG/BG/Ti composite was rougher and contained more micro-pores, while the apatite layer on the HA + BG/BG/Ti composite was dense and smooth. The formation of biomimetic apatite, being more bioresorbable, is favored for bone regeneration.

  2. Development of a 3D matrix for modeling mammalian spinal cord injury in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Felipe Diaz Quiroz; Yuping Li; Conrado Aparicio; Karen Echeverri

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury affects millions of people around the world, however, limited therapies are available to improve the quality of life of these patients. Spinal cord injury is usually modeled in rats and mice using contusion or complete transection models and this has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular complexities of the injury. However, it has not to date led to development of successful novel ther-apies, this is in part due to the complexity of the injury and the diffculty of deciphering the exact roles and interactions of different cells within this complex environment. Here we developed a collagen matrix that can be molded into the 3D tubular shape with a lumen and can hence support cell interactions in a similar architecture to a spinal cord. We show that astrocytes can be successfully grown on this matrixin vitro and when injured, the cells respond as they doin vivo and undergo reactive gliosis, one of the steps that lead to formation of a glial scar, the main barrier to spinal cord regeneration. In the future, this system can be used to quickly assess the effect of drugs on glial scar protein activity or to perform live imaging of labeled cells atfer exposure to drugs.

  3. Development of 3D in vitro platform technology to engineer mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Hong, Po-Da; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Chen, Yi-Ru; Ickowicz, Diana; Farber, Ira-Yudovin; Domb, Abraham J

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to develop a three-dimensional in vitro culture system to genetically engineer mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to express bone morphogenic protein-2. We employed nanofabrication technologies borrowed from the spinning industry, such as electrospinning, to mass-produce identical building blocks in a variety of shapes and sizes to fabricate electrospun nanofiber sheets comprised of composites of poly (glycolic acid) and collagen. Homogenous nanoparticles of cationic biodegradable natural polymer were formed by simple mixing of an aqueous solution of plasmid DNA encoded bone morphogenic protein-2 with the same volume of cationic polysaccharide, dextran-spermine. Rat bone marrow MSC were cultured on electrospun nanofiber sheets comprised of composites of poly (glycolic acid) and collagen prior to the incorporation of the nanoparticles into the nanofiber sheets. Bone morphogenic protein-2 was significantly detected in MSC cultured on nanofiber sheets incorporated with nanoparticles after 2 days compared with MSC cultured on nanofiber sheets incorporated with naked plasmid DNA. We conclude that the incorporation of nanoparticles into nanofiber sheets is a very promising strategy to genetically engineer MSC and can be used for further applications in regenerative medicine therapy.

  4. Characterization of Silk Fibroin/Chitosan 3D Porous Scaffold and In Vitro Cytology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuguang Zeng

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering is a powerful tool to treat bone defects caused by trauma, infection, tumors and other factors. Both silk fibroin (SF and chitosan (CS are non-toxic and have good biocompatibility, but are poor biological scaffolds when used alone. In this study, the microscopic structure and related properties of SF/CS composite scaffolds with different component ratios were examined. The scaffold material most suitable for osteoblast growth was determined, and these results offer an experimental basis for the future reconstruction of bone defects. First, via freeze-drying and chemical crosslinking methods, SF/CS composites with different component ratios were prepared and their structure was characterized. Changes in the internal structure of the SF and CS mixture were observed, confirming that the mutual modification between the two components was complete and stable. The internal structure of the composite material was porous and three-dimensional with a porosity above 90%. We next studied the pore size, swelling ratio, water absorption ratio, degradation and in vitro cell proliferation. For the 40% SF-60% CS group, the pore size of the scaffold was suitable for the growth of osteoblasts, and the rate of degradation was steady. This favors the early adhesion, growth and proliferation of MG-63 cells. In addition to good biocompatibility and satisfactory cell affinity, this material promotes the secretion of extracellular matrix materials by osteoblasts. Thus, 40% SF-60% CS is a good material for bone tissue engineering.

  5. 3D polylactide-based scaffolds for studying human hepatocarcinoma processes in vitro

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    Roberto Scaffaro, Giada Lo Re, Salvatrice Rigogliuso and Giulio Ghersi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the combination of leaching techniques and melt blending of polymers and particles for the preparation of highly interconnected three-dimensional polymeric porous scaffolds for in vitro studies of human hepatocarcinoma processes. More specifically, sodium chloride and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG were used as water-soluble porogens to form porous and solvent-free poly(L,D-lactide (PLA-based scaffolds. Several characterization techniques, including porosimetry, image analysis and thermogravimetry, were combined to improve the reliability of measurements and mapping of the size, distribution and microarchitecture of pores. We also investigated the effect of processing, in PLA-based blends, on the simultaneous bulk/surface modifications and pore architectures in the scaffolds, and assessed the effects on human hepatocarcinoma viability and cell adhesion. The influence of PEG molecular weight on the scaffold morphology and cell viability and adhesion were also investigated. Morphological studies indicated that it was possible to obtain scaffolds with well-interconnected pores of assorted sizes. The analysis confirmed that SK-Hep1 cells adhered well to the polymeric support and emitted surface protrusions necessary to grow and differentiate three-dimensional systems. PEGs with higher molecular weight showed the best results in terms of cell adhesion and viability.

  6. AlgiMatrix™-Based 3D Cell Culture System as an In Vitro Tumor Model: An Important Tool in Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godugu, Chandraiah; Singh, Mandip

    2016-01-01

    Routinely used two-dimensional cell culture-based models often fail while translating the observations into in vivo models. This setback is more common in cancer research, due to several reasons. The extracellular matrix and cell-to-cell interactions are not present in two-dimensional (2D) cell culture models. Diffusion of drug molecules into cancer cells is hindered by barriers of extracellular components in in vivo conditions, these barriers are absent in 2D cell culture models. To better mimic or simulate the in vivo conditions present in tumors, the current study used the alginate based three-dimensional cell culture (AlgiMatrix™) model, which resembles close to the in vivo tumor models. The current study explains the detailed protocols involved in AlgiMatrix™ based in vitro non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) models. The suitability of this model was studied by evaluating, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and penetration of nanoparticles into the in vitro tumor spheroids. This study also demonstrated the effect of EphA2 receptor targeted docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles on MDA-MB-468 TNBC cell lines. The methods section is subdivided into three subsections such as (1) preparation of AlgiMatrix™-based 3D in vitro tumor models and cytotoxicity assays, (2) free drug and nanoparticle uptake into spheroid studies, and (3) western blot, IHC, and RT-PCR studies.

  7. Osteoblasts and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells control hematopoietic stem cell migration and proliferation in 3D in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula D N de Barros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34(+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34(+ cells was decreased. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation.

  8. Advances in 3D cell culture technologies enabling tissue-like structures to be created in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Eleanor; Przyborski, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Research in mammalian cell biology often relies on developing in vitro models to enable the growth of cells in the laboratory to investigate a specific biological mechanism or process under different test conditions. The quality of such models and how they represent the behavior of cells in real tissues plays a critical role in the value of the data produced and how it is used. It is particularly important to recognize how the structure of a cell influences its function and how co-culture models can be used to more closely represent the structure of real tissue. In recent years, technologies have been developed to enhance the way in which researchers can grow cells and more readily create tissue-like structures. Here we identify the limitations of culturing mammalian cells by conventional methods on two-dimensional (2D) substrates and review the popular approaches currently available that enable the development of three-dimensional (3D) tissue models in vitro. There are now many ways in which the growth environment for cultured cells can be altered to encourage 3D cell growth. Approaches to 3D culture can be broadly categorized into scaffold-free or scaffold-based culture systems, with scaffolds made from either natural or synthetic materials. There is no one particular solution that currently satisfies all requirements and researchers must select the appropriate method in line with their needs. Using such technology in conjunction with other modern resources in cell biology (e.g. human stem cells) will provide new opportunities to create robust human tissue mimetics for use in basic research and drug discovery. Application of such models will contribute to advancing basic research, increasing the predictive accuracy of compounds, and reducing animal usage in biomedical science.

  9. Evaluation of immunostimulatory activity of Chyawanprash using in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaan, Alka; Kanjilal, Satyajyoti; Gupta, Arun; Sastry, J L N; Verma, Ritu; Singh, Anu T; Jaggi, Manu

    2015-03-01

    Chyawanprash is an ayurvedic formulation used in Indian traditional medicinal system for its beneficial effect on human health. We investigated the immunostimulatory effects of Chyawanprash (CHY) using in vitro assays evaluating the secretion of cytokines such as Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1-alpha (MIP-1-α) from murine bone marrow derived Dendritic Cells (DC) which play pivotal role in immunostimulation. The effects of CHY on phagocytosis in murine macrophages (RAW264.7) and Natural Killer (NK) cell activity were also investigated. At non-cytotoxic concentrations (20-500 μg/ml), CHY enhanced the secretion of all the three cytokines from DC. CHY also stimulated both, macrophage (RAW264.7) as well as NK cell activity, in vitro. In conclusion, the data substantiates the immunoprotective role of CHY at cellular level mediated by immunostimulation in key immune cells viz. dendritic Cells, macrophages and NK cells.

  10. Automation and validation of micronucleus detection in the 3D EpiDerm™ human reconstructed skin assay and correlation with 2D dose responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, K. E.; Thomas, A. D.; Jenkins, G. J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent restrictions on the testing of cosmetic ingredients in animals have resulted in the need to test the genotoxic potential of chemicals exclusively in vitro prior to licensing. However, as current in vitro tests produce some misleading positive results, sole reliance on such tests could prevent some chemicals with safe or beneficial exposure levels from being marketed. The 3D human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay is a promising new in vitro approach designed to assess genotoxicity of dermally applied compounds. The assay utilises a highly differentiated in vitro model of the human epidermis. For the first time, we have applied automated micronucleus detection to this assay using MetaSystems Metafer Slide Scanning Platform (Metafer), demonstrating concordance with manual scoring. The RSMN assay’s fixation protocol was found to be compatible with the Metafer, providing a considerably shorter alternative to the recommended Metafer protocol. Lowest observed genotoxic effect levels (LOGELs) were observed for mitomycin-C at 4.8 µg/ml and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) at 1750 µg/ml when applied topically to the skin surface. In-medium dosing with MMS produced a LOGEL of 20 µg/ml, which was very similar to the topical LOGEL when considering the total mass of MMS added. Comparisons between 3D medium and 2D LOGELs resulted in a 7-fold difference in total mass of MMS applied to each system, suggesting a protective function of the 3D microarchitecture. Interestingly, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a positive clastogen in 2D systems, tested negative in this assay. A non-genotoxic carcinogen, methyl carbamate, produced negative results, as expected. We also demonstrated expression of the DNA repair protein N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase in EpiDerm™. Our preliminary validation here demonstrates that the RSMN assay may be a valuable follow-up to the current in vitro test battery, and together with its automation, could contribute to minimising unnecessary in

  11. Increased sensitivity of 3D-Well enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for infectious disease detection using 3D-printing fabrication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Le Van, An; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay or ELISA -based diagnostics are considered the gold standard in the demonstration of various immunological reaction including in the measurement of antibody response to infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification with application potential in infectious disease outbreaks and individual patients' treatment and clinical care. The rapid prototyping of ELISA-based diagnostics using available 3D printing technologies provides an opportunity for a further exploration of this platform into immunodetection systems. In this study, a '3D-Well' was designed and fabricated using available 3D printing platforms to have an increased surface area of more than 4 times for protein-surface adsorption compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity in designing-product development-feedback cycle offered through 3D printing platforms provided an opportunity for its rapid assessment, in which a chemical etching process was used to make the surface hydrophilic followed by validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA for infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The higher sensitivity of the 3D-Well (3-folds higher) compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for laboratory or field diagnosis of infectious diseases including applications in other disciplines.

  12. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury Materials & Methods: Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining.Results: The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Conclusion: Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any

  13. Validation of an in vitro 3D bone culture model with perfused and mechanically stressed ceramic scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bouet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An engineered three dimensional (3D in vitro cell culture system was designed with the goal of inducing and controlling in vitro osteogenesis in a reproducible manner under conditions more similar to the in vivo bone microenvironment than traditional two-dimensional (2D models. This bioreactor allows efficient mechanical loading and perfusion of an original cubic calcium phosphate bioceramic of highly controlled composition and structure. This bioceramic comprises an internal portion containing homogeneously interconnected macropores surrounded by a dense layer, which minimises fluid flow bypass around the scaffold. This dense and flat layer permits the application of a homogeneous loading on the bioceramic while also enhancing its mechanical strength. Numerical modelling of constraints shows that the system provides direct mechanical stimulation of cells within the scaffold. Experimental results establish that under perfusion at a steady flow of 2 µL/min, corresponding to 3 ≤ Medium velocity ≤ 23 µm/s, mouse calvarial cells grow and differentiate as osteoblasts in a reproducible manner, and lay down a mineralised matrix. Moreover, cells respond to mechanical loading by increasing C-fos expression, which demonstrates the effective mechanical stimulation of the culture within the scaffold. In summary, we provide a “proof-of-concept” for osteoblastic cell culture in a controlled 3D culture system under perfusion and mechanical loading. This model will be a tool to analyse bone cell functions in vivo, and will provide a bench testing system for the clinical assessment of bioactive bone-targeting molecules under load.

  14. 3D tumor microtissues as an in vitro testing platform for microenvironmentally-triggered drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancato, Virginia; Gioiella, Filomena; Profeta, Martina; Imparato, Giorgia; Guarnieri, Daniela; Urciuolo, Francesco; Melone, Pietro; Netti, Paolo A

    2017-07-15

    Therapeutic approaches based on nanomedicine have garnered great attention in cancer research. In vitro biological models that better mimic in vivo conditions are crucial tools to more accurately predict their therapeutic efficacy in vivo. In this work, a new 3D breast cancer microtissue has been developed to recapitulate the complexity of the tumor microenvironment and to test its efficacy as screening platform for drug delivery systems. The proposed 3D cancer model presents human breast adenocarcinoma cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts embedded in their own ECM, thus showing several features of an in vivo tumor, such as overexpression of metallo-proteinases (MMPs). After demonstrating at molecular and protein level the MMP2 overexpression in such tumor microtissues, we used them to test a recently validated formulation of endogenous MMP2-responsive nanoparticles (NP). The presence of the MMP2-sensitive linker allows doxorubicin release from NP only upon specific enzymatic cleavage of the peptide. The same NP without the MMP-sensitive linker and healthy breast microtissues were also produced to demonstrate NP specificity and selectivity. Cell viability after NP treatment confirmed that controlled drug delivery is achieved only in 3D tumor microtissues suggesting that the validation of therapeutic strategies in such 3D tumor model could predict human response. A major issue of modern cancer research is the development of accurate and predictive experimental models of human tumors consistent with tumor microenvironment and applicable as screening platforms for novel therapeutic strategies. In this work, we developed and validated a new 3D microtissue model of human breast tumor as a testing platform of anti-cancer drug delivery systems. To this aim, biodegradable nanoparticles responsive to physiological changes specifically occurring in tumor microenvironment were used. Our findings clearly demonstrate that the breast tumor microtissue well recapitulates in

  15. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, F.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Montaldo, G.; Marsac, L.; Tanter, M.; Fink, M.

    2009-05-01

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  16. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquet, F; Pernot, M; Aubry, J-F; Montaldo, G; Tanter, M; Fink, M [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, ESPCI, Universite Paris VII, UMR CNRS 7587, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France); Marsac, L [Supersonic Imagine, Les Jardins de la Duranne, 510 rue Rene Descartes, 13857 Aix-en-Provence (France)], E-mail: fabrice.marquet@espci.org

    2009-05-07

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  17. High-frequency 3D echodentographic imaging modality for early assessment of periodontal diseases: in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ngan, Peter; Crout, Richard; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2009-02-01

    The use of ultrasound in dentistry is still an open growing area of research. Currently, there is a lack of imaging modalities to accurately predict minute structures and defects in the jawbone. In particular, the inability of 2D radiographic images to detect bony periodontal defects resulted from infection of the periodontium. This study investigates the feasibility of high frequency ultrasound to reconstruct high resolution 3D surface images of human jawbone. Methods: A dentate and non-dentate mandibles were used in this study. The system employs high frequency single-element ultrasound focused transducers (15-30 MHz) for scanning. Continuous acquisition using a 1 GHz data acquisition card is synchronized with a high precision two-dimensional stage positioning system of +/-1 μm resolution for acquiring accurate and quantitative measurements of the mandible in vitro. Radio frequency (RF) signals are acquired laterally 44-45.5 μm apart for each frame. Different frames are reconstructed 500 μm apart for the 3D reconstruction. Signal processing algorithms are applied on the received ultrasound signals for filtering, focusing, and envelope detection before frame reconstruction. Furthermore, an edge detection technique is adopted to detect the bone surface in each frame. Finally, all edges are combined together in order to render a 3D surface image of the jawbone. Major anatomical landmarks on the resultant images were confirmed with the anatomical structures on the mandibles to show the efficacy of the system. Comparison were also made with conventional 2D radiographs to show the superiority of the ultrasound imaging system in diagnosing small defects in the lateral, axial and elevation planes of space. Results: The landmarks on all ultrasound images matched with those on the mandible, indicating the efficacy of the system in detecting small structures in human jaw bones. Comparison with conventional 2D radiographic images of the same mandible showed superiority of

  18. Development of in vitro assay method with radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Hong, S. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, O. D. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    Radioimmunoassay (RIA) and related competitive protein-binding methods began a little over 20 years ago as a cumbersome research methodology in a few specialized laboratories. Endocrinology has been greatly enriched by the new knowledge that has come as a direct result of RIA methods. Establishment of the taxol RIA system will be expected to develop RIA for drug monitoring. Scintillation proximity assay was useful since any separation step is not required, it has the advantage of dealing with multiple samples. The increased sensitivity of the new assay in determining HCV RT([{sup 125}I]dUTP) suggests that it would be worth investigating whether the system can be applied to analysis. [{sup 125}I] lodotyramine with 98.5% radiochemical purity. Optimal background counts was certificated using varied radioactivity of radionuclides. Appropriate standard curve was obtained from SPA method successively, and the concentration of hCG from unknown serum was determined by standard curve. The result concentration of hCG from unknown serum was determined by synthesized successively and purified by HPLC system. Hybridoma reducing monoclonal anti thyroglobulin antibodies titer is measured by ELISA. These studies play an important role in development of in vitro assay with radionuclides.

  19. In Vitro Transcription Assays and Their Application in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Ma, Cong

    2016-09-20

    In vitro transcription assays have been developed and widely used for many years to study the molecular mechanisms involved in transcription. This process requires multi-subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) and a series of transcription factors that act to modulate the activity of RNAP during gene expression. Sequencing gel electrophoresis of radiolabeled transcripts is used to provide detailed mechanistic information on how transcription proceeds and what parameters can affect it. In this paper we describe the protocol to study how the essential elongation factor NusA regulates transcriptional pausing, as well as a method to identify an antibacterial agent targeting transcription initiation through inhibition of RNAP holoenzyme formation. These methods can be used a as platform for the development of additional approaches to explore the mechanism of action of the transcription factors which still remain unclear, as well as new antibacterial agents targeting transcription which is an underutilized drug target in antibiotic research and development.

  20. Simulating pancreatic neuroplasticity: in vitro dual-neuron plasticity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Tieftrunk, Elke; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2014-04-14

    Neuroplasticity is an inherent feature of the enteric nervous system and gastrointestinal (GI) innervation under pathological conditions. However, the pathophysiological role of neuroplasticity in GI disorders remains unknown. Novel experimental models which allow simulation and modulation of GI neuroplasticity may enable enhanced appreciation of the contribution of neuroplasticity in particular GI diseases such as pancreatic cancer (PCa) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Here, we present a protocol for simulation of pancreatic neuroplasticity under in vitro conditions using newborn rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and myenteric plexus (MP) neurons. This dual-neuron approach not only permits monitoring of both organ-intrinsic and -extrinsic neuroplasticity, but also represents a valuable tool to assess neuronal and glial morphology and electrophysiology. Moreover, it allows functional modulation of supplied microenvironmental contents for studying their impact on neuroplasticity. Once established, the present neuroplasticity assay bears the potential of being applicable to the study of neuroplasticity in any GI organ.

  1. Assessment of gastrointestinal motility using three different assays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Cristina; Poli, Enzo

    2010-11-01

    The protocols detailed in this unit are designed to assess the motor activity of different gastric and intestinal muscle preparations in vitro and the effects of drugs that modulate gastrointestinal motility. The preparations described are characterized by different contractile behaviors, consisting of spontaneous (duodenum), neurogenic (ileum), and drug-stimulated (fundus, ileum) motility; these reproduce motility patterns occurring in the gut wall in vivo. These protocols document the variety of factors that can influence the responses of isolated tissues and describe how such tissues can be used for testing substances that affect gut movements. These preparations allow evaluation of direct interactions with the processes that control contractile machinery, as well as indirect effects resulting from the modification of neurotransmitter release from myenteric neurons. These models can be exploited to assay novel compounds undergoing preclinical development or to evaluate the functional toxicity exerted by environmental or alimentary pollutants, like xenobiotics and naturally occurring toxins, as well as the mechanisms underlying these effects.

  2. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun-Ah, E-mail: j.sarah.k@gmail.com [Department of Biomedicine & Health Sciences, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Kyung, E-mail: leeek@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Evolution Research Center, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kuh, Hyo-Jeong, E-mail: hkuh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biomedicine & Health Sciences, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Evolution Research Center, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis.

  3. Strain and rate-dependent neuronal injury in a 3D in vitro compression model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Scimone, Mark T; Estrada, Jonathan B; Franck, Christian

    2016-08-02

    In the United States over 1.7 million cases of traumatic brain injury are reported yearly, but predictive correlation of cellular injury to impact tissue strain is still lacking, particularly for neuronal injury resulting from compression. Given the prevalence of compressive deformations in most blunt head trauma, this information is critically important for the development of future mitigation and diagnosis strategies. Using a 3D in vitro neuronal compression model, we investigated the role of impact strain and strain rate on neuronal lifetime, viability, and pathomorphology. We find that strain magnitude and rate have profound, yet distinctively different effects on the injury pathology. While strain magnitude affects the time of neuronal death, strain rate influences the pathomorphology and extent of population injury. Cellular injury is not initiated through localized deformation of the cytoskeleton but rather driven by excess strain on the entire cell. Furthermore we find that, mechanoporation, one of the key pathological trigger mechanisms in stretch and shear neuronal injuries, was not observed under compression.

  4. Strain and rate-dependent neuronal injury in a 3D in vitro compression model of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Scimone, Mark T.; Estrada, Jonathan B.; Franck, Christian

    2016-08-01

    In the United States over 1.7 million cases of traumatic brain injury are reported yearly, but predictive correlation of cellular injury to impact tissue strain is still lacking, particularly for neuronal injury resulting from compression. Given the prevalence of compressive deformations in most blunt head trauma, this information is critically important for the development of future mitigation and diagnosis strategies. Using a 3D in vitro neuronal compression model, we investigated the role of impact strain and strain rate on neuronal lifetime, viability, and pathomorphology. We find that strain magnitude and rate have profound, yet distinctively different effects on the injury pathology. While strain magnitude affects the time of neuronal death, strain rate influences the pathomorphology and extent of population injury. Cellular injury is not initiated through localized deformation of the cytoskeleton but rather driven by excess strain on the entire cell. Furthermore we find that, mechanoporation, one of the key pathological trigger mechanisms in stretch and shear neuronal injuries, was not observed under compression.

  5. Genotoxicity Assessment of Mixed Oligomers of Chlorotrifluoroethylene using a Battery of In Vitro and In Vivo/In Vitro Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    exchange among more than two chromosomes or fragments which is the result of several breaks. D Dicentric : An exchange between two chromosomes which results...in a chromosome with two centromeres. This is often associated with an acentric fragment in which case it is classified as DF. DF Dicentric with... Chromosome Aberration Assay, the BALB/c- 3T3 Cell Transformation Assay an in In Vivo/lIn Vitro Unscheduled DNA Synthesis Assay and S-Phase Synthesis Assay

  6. In vitro antiplasmodial effiacy of mangrove plant, Ipomoea pes-caprae against Plasmodium falciparum (3D7 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veera Venkata Satish Pothula

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antiplasmodial activity of mangrove plant, Ipomoea pes-caprae (I. pes-caprae (leaves, stems, flowers and roots against chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum (3D7 strain (P. falciparum and cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae and THP-1 cell line. Methods: The plants (I. pes-caprae were collected from Machilipatnam mangrove forest (latitude 16°17′ N and longitude 81 °13′ E of Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh, India. Crude extracts from dried leaves, stems, flowers and roots of I. pes-caprae were prepared through Soxhlet extraction using methanol, chloroform, hexane, ethyl acetate and aqueous sequentially. These extracts were tested in vitro against P. falciparum (3D7 strain adopted in laboratory. The crude extracts were also tested for their cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae and THP-1 cell line. The phytochemical screenings were also conducted with standard methods. As the part of the study, the extracts were checked for any chemical injury to erythrocytes. Results: Out of these extracts, methanolic and aqueous extracts of all plant parts and chloroform extract of stems were active, and the ethyl acetate extracts were weekly active against P. falciparum. The extracts of chloroform (except stems and hexane were inactive. Amongst these extracts, the methanolic extract of root showed excellent antimalarial activity with the IC 50 value of 15.00 µg/mL. Cytotoxic evaluation revealed that methanolic, aqueous and ethyl acetate extracts were slightly cytotoxic whereas chloroform and hexane extracts were more toxic against brine shrimp. All extracts were non-toxic to THP-1 cells. The chemical injury to erythrocytes was also evaluated and it did not show any morphological changes in erythrocytes due to the effect of plant extracts of I. pes-caprae after 48 h of incubation. The phytochemical screening of the extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, triterpenes, flavonoids, tannins, coumarins

  7. Structure, Properties, and In Vitro Behavior of Heat-Treated Calcium Sulfate Scaffolds Fabricated by 3D Printing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Asadi-Eydivand

    Full Text Available The ability of inkjet-based 3D printing (3DP to fabricate biocompatible ceramics has made it one of the most favorable techniques to generate bone tissue engineering (BTE scaffolds. Calcium sulfates exhibit various beneficial characteristics, and they can be used as a promising biomaterial in BTE. However, low mechanical performance caused by the brittle character of ceramic materials is the main weakness of 3DP calcium sulfate scaffolds. Moreover, the presence of certain organic matters in the starting powder and binder solution causes products to have high toxicity levels. A post-processing treatment is usually employed to improve the physical, chemical, and biological behaviors of the printed scaffolds. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the structural, mechanical, and physical characteristics of 3DP calcium sulfate prototypes were investigated. Different microscopy and spectroscopy methods were employed to characterize the printed prototypes. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the specimens was also evaluated before and after heat treatment. Results showed that the as-printed scaffolds and specimens heat treated at 300°C exhibited severe toxicity in vitro but had almost adequate strength. By contrast, the specimens heat treated in the 500°C-1000°C temperature range, although non-toxic, had insufficient mechanical strength, which was mainly attributed to the exit of the organic binder before 500°C and the absence of sufficient densification below 1000°C. The sintering process was accelerated at temperatures higher than 1000°C, resulting in higher compressive strength and less cytotoxicity. An anhydrous form of calcium sulfate was the only crystalline phase existing in the samples heated at 500°C-1150°C. The formation of calcium oxide caused by partial decomposition of calcium sulfate was observed in the specimens heat treated at temperatures higher than 1200°C. Although considerable improvements in cell viability of heat

  8. Structure, Properties, and In Vitro Behavior of Heat-Treated Calcium Sulfate Scaffolds Fabricated by 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Shafiei, Seyedeh Sara; Mohammadi, Sepideh; Hafezi, Masoud; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2016-01-01

    The ability of inkjet-based 3D printing (3DP) to fabricate biocompatible ceramics has made it one of the most favorable techniques to generate bone tissue engineering (BTE) scaffolds. Calcium sulfates exhibit various beneficial characteristics, and they can be used as a promising biomaterial in BTE. However, low mechanical performance caused by the brittle character of ceramic materials is the main weakness of 3DP calcium sulfate scaffolds. Moreover, the presence of certain organic matters in the starting powder and binder solution causes products to have high toxicity levels. A post-processing treatment is usually employed to improve the physical, chemical, and biological behaviors of the printed scaffolds. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the structural, mechanical, and physical characteristics of 3DP calcium sulfate prototypes were investigated. Different microscopy and spectroscopy methods were employed to characterize the printed prototypes. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the specimens was also evaluated before and after heat treatment. Results showed that the as-printed scaffolds and specimens heat treated at 300°C exhibited severe toxicity in vitro but had almost adequate strength. By contrast, the specimens heat treated in the 500°C-1000°C temperature range, although non-toxic, had insufficient mechanical strength, which was mainly attributed to the exit of the organic binder before 500°C and the absence of sufficient densification below 1000°C. The sintering process was accelerated at temperatures higher than 1000°C, resulting in higher compressive strength and less cytotoxicity. An anhydrous form of calcium sulfate was the only crystalline phase existing in the samples heated at 500°C-1150°C. The formation of calcium oxide caused by partial decomposition of calcium sulfate was observed in the specimens heat treated at temperatures higher than 1200°C. Although considerable improvements in cell viability of heat-treated scaffolds were

  9. Assay of mitochondrial functions by resazurin in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-xia ZHANG; Guan-hua DU; Jun-tian ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism of resazurin as indicator of mitochondrial function and to develop a rapid and sensitive assay for measuring metabolic activity of isolated mitochondria from rat liver in vitro. METHODS: The screening was carried out on 96-well microtitre plates by monitoring fluorescence intensity of resazurin reduced by mitochondria. Experimental conditions were optimized and influences of several inhibitors on mitochondrial function were observed. RESULTS: Fluorescence intensity increased in a linear manner when the mitochondrial protein concentration from 5 to 50 μg protein per well was incubated with resazurin (5 μmol/L) during 230 min period at 37 ℃. Edetic acid could promote the reduction of resazurin in mitochondria. The fluorescence intensity decreased greatly after pretreatment with NaN3, antimycin A, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP),and oligomycin compared with the control. However, the typical complex I inhibitor, rotenone enhanced the fluorescence intensity without mitochondria. CONCLUSION: Using resazurin to determine mitochondrial function is sensitive, inexpensive and could be easily automated for high throughput screening.

  10. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Magnetic Resonance Imaging of An in Vitro 3D Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, C; Long, T; Siow, B; Loizidou, M; Royle, G; Ricketts, K [University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of an in vitro 3D tumor model (tumoroid) as a bio-phantom for repetitive and sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. Methods: The tissue engineered tumoroid comprised an artificial cancer mass (ACM) containing 30 million HT29 cancer cells seeded in a collagen type I matrix, whose density was increased by plastic compression (dry/wet weight=40%). The ACM was embedded in an uncompressed collagen gel that mimicked the tumor stroma, and the tumoroid was incubated for 24h before imaging. Images were acquired using the 1T ICON™ (Bruker Corporation, Billerica, MA) MRI scanner. T1 maps were calculated using an IR-RARE sequence (TE=12ms, TR=10000ms, 7 inversion times), while for T2 maps a MSME technique (TR=6000ms, 16 echoes) was used. T1 and T2 fittings were performed using a pixel-wise approach to produce relaxometric parametric maps. Results: The images acquired and corresponding T1 and T2 maps indicate contrast between the ACM and the stroma. T1 was 2500 and 2800ms, while T2 was 520 and 760ms, for the ACM and stroma respectively. The ACM construct was not homogenous and internal features were visible, which can be explained by local gradients of cell and/or collagen density. The viability of the cells was confirmed via confocal microscopy for several days after the imaging session, demonstrating the suitability of the tumoroid for sequential imaging studies. Conclusions: We have engineered a tumor model compatible with repetitive and sequential MRI. We found T1 and T2 contrast between the ACM and stroma using a pre-clinical MRI scanner. The model, which enables controllable cell and matrix densities, has potential for a wide range of applications in radiotherapy, such as to study tumor progression and to validate imaging biomarkers. Further work is necessary to understand the mechanisms behind the contrast achieved, and to correlate findings with biology and histology data.

  11. Toxicity assessment of aggregated/agglomerated cerium oxide nanoparticles in an in vitro 3D airway model: The influence of mucociliary clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, C.F.; Gröllers-Mulderij, M.; Maarschalkerweerd, T.; Meulendijks, N.M.M.; Reus, A.; Acker, F. van; Zondervan-van den Beuken, E.K.; Wouters, M.E.L.; Bijlsma, S.; Kooter, I.M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the toxicity of aggregated nanoparticles of cerium oxide (CeO2) using an in vitro 3D human bronchial epithelial model that included a mucociliary apparatus (MucilAir™). CeO2 was dispersed in saline and applied to the apical surface of the model. CeO2 did not induce distinct effects

  12. Toxicity assessment of aggregated/agglomerated cerium oxide nanoparticles in an in vitro 3D airway model: The influence of mucociliary clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, C.F.; Gröllers-Mulderij, M.; Maarschalkerweerd, T.; Meulendijks, N.M.M.; Reus, A.; Acker, F. van; Zondervan-van den Beuken, E.K.; Wouters, M.E.L.; Bijlsma, S.; Kooter, I.M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the toxicity of aggregated nanoparticles of cerium oxide (CeO2) using an in vitro 3D human bronchial epithelial model that included a mucociliary apparatus (MucilAir™). CeO2 was dispersed in saline and applied to the apical surface of the model. CeO2 did not induce distinct effects i

  13. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M; Becker, Jeanne L; Souza, Glauco R

    2015-09-14

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5'-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (-control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z' = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments.

  14. A novel 3D fibril force assay implicates src in tumor cell force generation in collagen networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Polackwich

    Full Text Available New insight into the biomechanics of cancer cell motility in 3D extracellular matrix (ECM environments would significantly enhance our understanding of aggressive cancers and help identify new targets for intervention. While several methods for measuring the forces involved in cell-matrix interactions have been developed, previous to this study none have been able to measure forces in a fibrillar environment. We have developed a novel assay for simultaneously measuring cell mechanotransduction and motility in 3D fibrillar environments. The assay consists of a controlled-density fibrillar collagen gel atop a controlled-stiffness polyacrylamide (PAA surface. Forces generated by living cells and their migration in the 3D collagen gel were measured with the 3D motion of tracer beads within the PAA layer. Here, this 3D fibril force assay is used to study the role of the invasion-associated protein kinase Src in mechanotransduction and motility. Src expression and activation are linked with proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, and have been shown to be required in 2D for invadopodia membranes to direct and mediate invasion. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MD-231 was stably transfected with GFP-tagged constitutively active Src or wild-type Src. In 3D fibrillar collagen matrices we found that, relative to wild-type Src, constitutively active Src: 1 increased the strength of cell-induced forces on the ECM, 2 did not significantly change migration speed, and 3 increased both the duration and the length, but not the number, of long membrane protrusions. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Src controls invasion by controlling the ability of the cell to form long lasting cellular protrusions to enable penetration through tissue barriers, in addition to its role in promoting invadopodia matrix-degrading activity.

  15. Development of an Innovative in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-Botulinum Antitoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osnat Rosen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. Therapy relies mostly on post-intoxication antibody treatment. The only accepted method to measure the potency of, and to approve, antitoxin preparations is the mouse lethality neutralization bioassay. However, this assay is time-consuming, labor-intensive, costly, and raises ethical issues related to the large numbers of laboratory animals needed. Until now, all efforts to develop an alternative in vitro assay have not provided a valid replacement to the mouse potency assay. In the present study, we report the development of an innovative in vitro assay for determining botulinum antitoxin potency, using botulinum type B as a model. The concept of the assay is to mimic two fundamental steps in botulinum intoxication: receptor binding and catalytic activity. By simulating these steps in vitro we were able to accurately determine the potency of antitoxin preparations. The reproducibility of the assay was high with a CV < 13%. Most importantly, the antitoxin potency measured by the in vitro assay highly correlated with that measured by the standard in vivo mouse assay (r = 0.9842, p < 0.0001. Thus, this new in vitro assay has the potential to be considered, after validation, as a replacement to the mouse assay for quantitating neutralizing antibody concentrations in pharmaceutical botulinum antitoxin preparations. Future adoption of this in vitro assay would minimize the use of laboratory animals, speed up the time, and reduce the cost of botulinum antitoxin approval.

  16. Noninvasive quantification of in vitro osteoblastic differentiation in 3D engineered tissue constructs using spectral ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Rao, Rameshwar R; Peterson, Alexis W; Caldwell, David J; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive monitoring of engineered tissues is needed for translation of these products from the lab to the clinic. In this study, non-invasive, high resolution spectral ultrasound imaging (SUSI) was used to monitor the differentiation of MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts seeded within collagen hydrogels. SUSI was used to measure the diameter, concentration and acoustic attenuation of scatterers within such constructs cultured in either control or osteogenic medium over 21 days. Conventional biochemical assays were used on parallel samples to determine DNA content and calcium deposition. Construct volume and morphology were accurately imaged using ultrasound. Cell diameter was estimated to be approximately 12.5-15.5 µm using SUSI, which corresponded well to measurements of fluorescently stained cells. The total number of cells per construct assessed by quantitation of DNA content decreased from 5.6±2.4×10(4) at day 1 to 0.9±0.2×10(4) at day 21. SUSI estimation of the equivalent number of acoustic scatters showed a similar decreasing trend, except at day 21 in the osteogenic samples, which showed a marked increase in both scatterer number and acoustic impedance, suggestive of mineral deposition by the differentiating MC3T3 cells. Estimation of calcium content by SUSI was 41.7±11.4 µg/ml, which agreed well with the biochemical measurement of 38.7±16.7 µg/ml. Color coded maps of parameter values were overlaid on B-mode images to show spatiotemporal changes in cell diameter and calcium deposition. This study demonstrates the use of non-destructive ultrasound imaging to provide quantitative information on the number and differentiated state of cells embedded within 3D engineered constructs, and therefore presents a valuable tool for longitudinal monitoring of engineered tissue development.

  17. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora B. Petropolis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I. This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited “freeze and run” migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular “home”—macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model.

  18. Polymer-based mesh as supports for multi-layered 3D cell culture and assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Karen A; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron D; Ngo, Philip M; Whitesides, George M

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM)-that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells-layer-by-layer-within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis-(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format.

  19. In vitro study of 3D PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP composite scaffolds with etched oxygen plasma surface modification in bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hee-Sang; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kook, Min-Suk; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds have many advantageous properties for bone tissue engineering application, due to its controllable properties such as pore size, structural shape and interconnectivity. In this study, effects on oxygen plasma surface modification and adding of nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAp) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on the 3D PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP scaffolds for improving preosteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, proliferation and differentiation were investigated. The 3D PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP scaffolds were fabricated by 3D Bio-Extruder equipment. The 3D scaffolds were prepared with 0°/90° architecture and pore size of approximately 300 μm. In addition 3D scaffolds surface were etched by oxygen plasma to enhance the hydrophilic property and surface roughness. After oxygen plasma treatment, the surface chemistry and morphology were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. And also hydrophilic property was measured by contact angle. The MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and differentiation were investigated by MTT assay and ALP activity. In present work, the 3D PLGA/HAp/beta-TCP composite scaffold with suitable structure for the growth of osteoblast cells was successfully fabricated by 3D rapid prototyping technique. The surface hydrophilicity and roughness of 3D scaffold increased by oxygen plasma treatment had a positive effect on cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cell was significantly enhanced by adding of n-HAp and β-TCP on 3D PLGA scaffold. As a result, combination of bioceramics and oxygen plasma treatment showed a synergistic effect on biocompatibility of 3D scaffolds. This result confirms that this technique was useful tool for improving the biocompatibility in bone tissue engineering application.

  20. Implementation and Use of State-of-the-Art, Cell-Based In Vitro Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The impressive advances in the generation and interpretation of functional omics data have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the (patho-)physiology of many biological systems and led to a massive increase in the number of specific targets and phenotypes to investigate in both basic and applied research. The obvious complexity revealed by these studies represents a major challenge to the research community and asks for improved target characterisation strategies with the help of reliable, high-quality assays. Thus, the use of living cells has become an integral part of many research activities because the cellular context more closely represents target-specific interrelations and activity patterns. Although still predominant, the use of traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models has been gradually complemented by studies based on three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (Sutherland 1988) and other 3D tissue culture systems (Santos et al. 2012; Matsusaki et al. 2014) in an attempt to employ model systems more closely representing the microenvironment of cells in the body. Hence, quite a variety of state-of-the-art cell culture models are available for the generation of novel chemical probes or the identification of starting points for drug development in translational research and pharma drug discovery. In order to cope with these information-rich formats and their increasing technical complexity, cell-based assay development has become a scientific research topic in its own right and is used to ensure the provision of significant, reliable and high-quality data outlasting any discussions related to the current "irreproducibility epidemic" (Dolgin 2014; Prinz et al. 2011; Schatz 2014). At the same time the use of cells in microplate assay formats has become state of the art and greatly facilitates rigorous cell-based assay development by providing the researcher with the opportunity to address the multitude of factors affecting the actual

  1. Low-cost, rapidly-developed, 3D printed in vitro corpus callosum model for mucopolysaccharidosis type I [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Tabet

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of high throughput screening and the general inability of (1 two dimensional (2D cell culture and (2 in vitro release studies to predict in vivo neurobiological and pharmacokinetic responses in humans has led to greater interest in more realistic three dimensional (3D benchtop platforms. Advantages of 3D human cell culture over its 2D analogue, or even animal models, include taking the effects of microgeometry and long-range topological features into consideration. In the era of personalized medicine, it has become increasingly valuable to screen candidate molecules and synergistic therapeutics at a patient-specific level, in particular for diseases that manifest in highly variable ways. The lack of established standards and the relatively arbitrary choice of probing conditions has limited in vitro drug release to a largely qualitative assessment as opposed to a predictive, quantitative measure of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in tissue. Here we report the methods used in the rapid, low-cost development of a 3D model of a mucopolysaccharidosis type I patient’s corpus callosum, which may be used for cell culture and drug release. The CAD model is developed from in vivo brain MRI tracing of the corpus callosum using open-source software, printed with poly (lactic-acid on a Makerbot Replicator 5X, UV-sterilized, and coated with poly (lysine for cellular adhesion. Adaptations of material and 3D printer for expanded applications are also discussed.

  2. Low-cost, rapidly-developed, 3D printed in vitro corpus callosum model for mucopolysaccharidosis type I [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Tabet

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of high throughput screening and the general inability of (1 two dimensional (2D cell culture and (2 in vitro release studies to predict in vivo neurobiological and pharmacokinetic responses in humans has led to greater interest in more realistic three dimensional (3D benchtop platforms. Advantages of 3D human cell culture over its 2D analogue, or even animal models, include taking the effects of microgeometry and long-range topological features into consideration. In the era of personalized medicine, it has become increasingly valuable to screen candidate molecules and synergistic therapeutics at a patient-specific level, in particular for diseases that manifest in highly variable ways. The lack of established standards and the relatively arbitrary choice of probing conditions has limited in vitro drug release to a largely qualitative assessment as opposed to a predictive, quantitative measure of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in tissue. Here we report the methods used in the rapid, low-cost development of a 3D model of a mucopolysaccharidosis type I patient’s corpus callosum, which may be used for cell culture and drug release. The CAD model is developed from in vivo brain MRI tracing of the corpus callosum using open-source software, printed with poly (lactic-acid on a Makerbot Replicator 5X, UV-sterilized, and coated with poly (lysine for cellular adhesion. Adaptations of material and 3D printer for expanded applications are also discussed.

  3. A Functional High-Throughput Assay of Myelination in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Myelination in Vitro PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moore, Michael J. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Tulane University...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect

  4. Experiences with the in vivo and in vitro comet assay in regulatory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frötschl, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo comet assay has recently been implemented into regulatory genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals with inclusion into the ICH S2R1 guidance. Regulatory genotoxicity testing aims to detect DNA alterations in form of gene mutations, larger scale chromosomal damage and recombination and aneuploidy. The ICH S2R1 guideline offers two options of standard batteries of tests for the detection of these endpoints. Both options start with an AMES assay and option 1 includes an in vitro mammalian cell assay and an in vivo micronucleus assay in rodent, whereas option 2 includes an in vivo micronucleus assay in bone marrow in rodent and a second in vivo assay in a second tissue with a second endpoint. The test recommended as second in vivo test is the comet assay in rat liver. The in vivo comet assay is considered as mature enough to ensure reliable detection of relevant in vivo genotoxicants in combination with the micronucleus test in bone marrow and the AMES assay. Although lots of research papers have been published using the in vitro comet assay, the in vitro version has not been implemented into official regulatory testing guidelines. A survey of the years 1999-2014 revealed 27 in vivo comet assays submitted to BfArM with market authorisation procedures, European and national advice procedures and clinical trial applications. In three procedures, in vitro comet assays had been submitted within the genetic toxicology packages.

  5. Influence of In Vitro Assay pH and Extractant Composition on As Bioaccessibility in Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro bioaccessibility assays are often utilised to determine the potential human exposure to soil contaminants through soil ingestion. Comparative studies have identified inconsistencies in the results obtained with different in vitro assays. In this study we investigated the...

  6. Development of an Innovative in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-Botulinum Antitoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Osnat; Ozeri, Eyal; Barnea, Ada; David, Alon Ben; Zichel, Ran

    2016-09-24

    Botulinum neurotoxins are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. Therapy relies mostly on post-intoxication antibody treatment. The only accepted method to measure the potency of, and to approve, antitoxin preparations is the mouse lethality neutralization bioassay. However, this assay is time-consuming, labor-intensive, costly, and raises ethical issues related to the large numbers of laboratory animals needed. Until now, all efforts to develop an alternative in vitro assay have not provided a valid replacement to the mouse potency assay. In the present study, we report the development of an innovative in vitro assay for determining botulinum antitoxin potency, using botulinum type B as a model. The concept of the assay is to mimic two fundamental steps in botulinum intoxication: receptor binding and catalytic activity. By simulating these steps in vitro we were able to accurately determine the potency of antitoxin preparations. The reproducibility of the assay was high with a CV vitro assay highly correlated with that measured by the standard in vivo mouse assay (r = 0.9842, p vitro assay has the potential to be considered, after validation, as a replacement to the mouse assay for quantitating neutralizing antibody concentrations in pharmaceutical botulinum antitoxin preparations. Future adoption of this in vitro assay would minimize the use of laboratory animals, speed up the time, and reduce the cost of botulinum antitoxin approval.

  7. Measurement of dynamic cell-induced 3D displacement fields in vitro for traction force optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A; Bordeleau, François; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Adie, Steven G

    2017-02-01

    Traction force microscopy (TFM) is a method used to study the forces exerted by cells as they sense and interact with their environment. Cell forces play a role in processes that take place over a wide range of spatiotemporal scales, and so it is desirable that TFM makes use of imaging modalities that can effectively capture the dynamics associated with these processes. To date, confocal microscopy has been the imaging modality of choice to perform TFM in 3D settings, although multiple factors limit its spatiotemporal coverage. We propose traction force optical coherence microscopy (TF-OCM) as a novel technique that may offer enhanced spatial coverage and temporal sampling compared to current methods used for volumetric TFM studies. Reconstructed volumetric OCM data sets were used to compute time-lapse extracellular matrix deformations resulting from cell forces in 3D culture. These matrix deformations revealed clear differences that can be attributed to the dynamic forces exerted by normal versus contractility-inhibited NIH-3T3 fibroblasts embedded within 3D Matrigel matrices. Our results are the first step toward the realization of 3D TF-OCM, and they highlight the potential use of OCM as a platform for advancing cell mechanics research.

  8. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  9. The EpiDerm™ 3D human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay: Historical control data and proof of principle studies for mechanistic assay adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shambhu; Kulkarni, Rohan; Hewitt, Nicola J; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay in EpiDerm™ is a promising novel animal alternative for evaluating genotoxicity of topically applied chemicals. It is particularly useful for assessing cosmetic ingredients that can no longer be tested using in vivo assays. To advance the use of this test especially for regulatory decision-making, we have established the RSMN assay in our laboratory according to Good Laboratory Practice and following the principles of the OECD test guideline 487 in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test. Proficiency with the assay was established by correctly identifying direct-acting genotoxins and genotoxins requiring metabolism, as well as non-genotoxic/non-carcinogenic chemicals. We also report the analysis of our historical control data that demonstrate vehicle control and positive control values for %micronuclei in binucleated cells are in the ranges reported previously. Technical issues including evaluating various solvents with both 48h and 72h treatment regimens were investigated. For the first time, mechanistic studies using CREST analysis revealed that the RSMN assay is suitable for distinguishing aneugens and clastogens. Moreover, the assay is also suitable for measuring cytokines as markers for proliferative and toxic effects of chemicals.

  10. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  11. 3D highly heterogeneous thermal model of pineal gland in-vitro study for electromagnetic exposure using finite volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Wei; Hoppe, Ralph; Lu, Rongbo; Cai, Zhaoquan; Gu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the relationship between electromagnetic power absorption and temperature distributions inside highly heterogeneous biological samples was accurately determinated using finite volume method. An in-vitro study on pineal gland that is responsible for physiological activities was for the first time simulated to illustrate effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Network dynamics of 3D engineered neuronal cultures: a new experimental model for in-vitro electrophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frega, M.; Tedesco, M.; Massobrio, P.; Pesce, M.; Martinoia, S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the extensive use of in-vitro models for neuroscientific investigations and notwithstanding the growing field of network electrophysiology, all studies on cultured cells devoted to elucidate neurophysiological mechanisms and computational properties, are based on 2D neuronal networks. These

  13. A high throughput colorimetric assay of β-1,3-D-glucans by Congo red dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semedo, Magda C; Karmali, Amin; Fonseca, Luís

    2015-02-01

    Mushroom strains contain complex nutritional biomolecules with a wide spectrum of therapeutic and prophylactic properties. Among these compounds, β-d-glucans play an important role in immuno-modulating and anti-tumor activities. The present work involves a novel colorimetric assay method for β-1,3-d-glucans with a triple helix tertiary structure by using Congo red. The specific interaction that occurs between Congo red and β-1,3-d-glucan was detected by bathochromic shift from 488 to 516 nm (>20 nm) in UV-Vis spectrophotometer. A micro- and high throughput method based on a 96-well microtiter plate was devised which presents several advantages over the published methods since it requires only 1.51 μg of polysaccharides in samples, greater sensitivity, speed, assay of many samples and very cheap. β-D-Glucans of several mushrooms (i.e., Coriolus versicolor, Ganoderma lucidum, Pleurotus ostreatus, Ganoderma carnosum, Hericium erinaceus, Lentinula edodes, Inonotus obliquus, Auricularia auricular, Polyporus umbellatus, Cordyseps sinensis, Agaricus blazei, Poria cocos) were isolated by using a sequence of several extractions with cold and boiling water, acidic and alkaline conditions and quantified by this microtiter plate method. FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the structural features of β-1,3-D-glucans in these mushroom samples as well as the specific interaction of these polysaccharides with Congo red. The effect of NaOH on triple helix conformation of β-1,3-D-glucans was investigated in several mushroom species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro assays for the study of erythrocyte invasion by malarial parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, J P; McNally, J; O'Donovan, S M

    1993-03-01

    In vitro assays for the study o f erythrocyte invasion by merozoites are available for several primate and rodent malarial species. These assays are essential means by which potential anti-merozoite vaccine candidates are identified. John Dalton, John McNally and Susan O'Donovan describe the various types of invasion assays that are in current use, outline the procedures for performing these assays and add some pointers on interpretation of data derived from them.

  15. Synthesis, Spectral Analysis and Preliminary in Vitro Evaluation of Some Tetrapyrrolic Complexes with 3d Metal Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Socoteanu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two tetrapyrrolic complexes, Zn(II-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20-tris-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenylporphyrin and Cu(II-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20-tris-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenylporphyrin were synthesized, and characterized from a spectral and biological point of view. The study provided data concerning the behavior of identical external substituents vs. two different core insertions. Some of the properties of the proposed tetrapyrrolic structures were highlighted, having photodynamic therapy of cancer as a targeted biomedical application. Elemental analysis, NMR, FTIR and UV-Vis data in various solvents were provided. A preliminary in vitro study on normal and cancer cultured cells was carried out for biocompatibility assessment in dark conditions. The preliminary in vitro study performed on human peripheral mononuclear cells exposed to tetrapyrrolic compounds (2 µM showed that the proposed compounds had a convenient cytotoxic profile on human normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells under dark conditions. Meanwhile, the investigated compounds reduced the number of metabolically active breast tumor MCF-7 cells, with the exception of Zn(II complex-containing a symmetrical ligand. Accordingly, preliminary in vitro data suggest that the proposed tetrapyrrolic compounds are good candidates for PDT, as they limit tumor expansion even under dark conditions, whilst sparing normal cells.

  16. An in vitro clonogenic assay to assess radiation damage in rat CNS glial progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Verhagen, I.; Kogel, A.J. van der (Katholieke Univ., Nijmegen (Netherlands). Inst. of Radiotherapy)

    1990-11-01

    Normal glial progenitor cells can be isolated from the rat central nervous system (CNS) and cultured in vitro on a monolayer of type-1 astrocytes. These monolayers are able to support and stimulate explanted glial progenitor cells to proliferate. Employing these in vitro interactions of specific glial cell types, an in vivo-in vitro clonogenic assay has been developed. This method offers the possibility to study the intrinsic radiosensitivity, repair and regeneration of glial progenitor cells after in vitro or in vivo irradiation. (author).

  17. The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay as an indicator of cytotoxicity for the in vitro comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Vesely, Alexandra; Schütz, Petra; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Bausinger, Julia

    2014-07-01

    The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay (LMW assay) has been recommended as a measure for cytotoxicity for the in vivo comet assay. To better understand the relationship between effects in the LMW assay, DNA migration in the comet assay and effects in established cytotoxicity tests, we performed in vitro experiments with cultured human cell lines (TK6, A549) and comparatively investigated five test substances (methyl methanesulfonate, (±)-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, sodium dodecyl sulphate, menthol and sodium arsenite). We measured DNA migration (tail intensity) in the comet assay and the frequency of 'hedgehogs' (cells with almost all DNA in the tail), DNA diffusion in the LMW assay, cell viability (trypan blue and fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide staining) and inhibition of proliferation (relative cell counts). Our in vitro experiments indicate that effects in the LMW assay occur independently from DNA effects in the comet assay and are not related to the occurrence of hedgehogs. Results from the LMW assay are in good agreement with results from viability assays and seem to allow discriminating genotoxic from non-genotoxic substances when appropriate preparation times are considered. Measurements of cytotoxicity by these methods only at an early preparation time after exposure to genotoxic substances may lead to erroneous results.

  18. 3D kinematic in-vitro comparison of posterolateral corner reconstruction techniques in a combined injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Thomas; Chevalier, Yan; Hagemeister, Nicola; Duval, Nicolas; deGuise, Jacques A

    2005-10-01

    With the variable injury pattern to the posterolateral structures (PLS) of the knee, a number of reconstructive procedures have been introduced. It was the aim of the present study to evaluate the resulting 3D kinematics following three different surgical techniques of reconstruction in a combined posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)/PLS injury model. In nine human cadaveric knees, 3D kinematics were recorded during the path of flexion-extension using a computer based custom made 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) testing apparatus. Additional laxity tests were conducted at 30 and 90 degrees of flexion. Testing was performed before and after cutting the PLS and PCL, followed by PCL reconstruction alone. Reconstructing the posterolateral corner, three surgical techniques were compared: (a) the posterolateral corner sling procedure (PLCS), (b) the biceps tenodesis (BT), and (c) a bone patellar-tendon bone (BTB) allograft reconstruction. Posterior as well as rotational laxity were significantly increased after PCL/PLS transection at 30 and 90 degrees of flexion. Isolated PCL reconstruction resulted in a remaining external rotational deficiency for both tested flexion angles. Additional PLS reconstruction closely restored external rotation as well as posterior translation to intact values by all tested procedures. Compared to the intact knee, dynamic testing revealed a significant internal tibial rotation for (b) BT (mean=3.9 degrees, p=0.043) and for (c) BTB allograft (mean=4.3 degrees, p=0.012). (a) The PLCS demonstrated a tendency to internal tibial rotation between 0 and 60 degrees of flexion (mean=2.2 degrees, p=0.079). Varus/valgus rotation as well as anterior/posterior translation did not show significant differences for any of the tested techniques. The present study shows that despite satisfying results in static laxity testing, pathological 3D knee kinematics were not restored to normal, demonstrated by a nonphysiological internal tibial rotation during the path of

  19. 3D bone mineral density distribution and shape reconstruction of the proximal femur from a single simulated DXA image: an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmarsh, Tristan; Humbert, Ludovic; De Craene, Mathieu; del Río Barquero, Luis M.; Fritscher, Karl; Schubert, Rainer; Eckstein, Felix; Link, Thomas; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2010-03-01

    Area Bone Mineral Density (aBMD) measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) is an established criterion in the evaluation of hip fracture risk. The evaluation from these planar images, however, is limited to 2D while it has been shown that proper 3D assessment of both the shape and the Bone Mineral Density (BMD) distribution improves the fracture risk estimation. In this work we present a method to reconstruct both the 3D bone shape and 3D BMD distribution of the proximal femur from a single DXA image. A statistical model of shape and a separate statistical model of the BMD distribution were automatically constructed from a set of Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT) scans. The reconstruction method incorporates a fully automatic intensity based 3D-2D registration process, maximizing the similarity between the DXA and a digitally reconstructed radiograph of the combined model. For the construction of the models, an in vitro dataset of QCT scans of 60 anatomical specimens was used. To evaluate the reconstruction accuracy, experiments were performed on simulated DXA images from the QCT scans of 30 anatomical specimens. Comparisons between the reconstructions and the same subject QCT scans showed a mean shape accuracy of 1.2mm, and a mean density error of 81mg/cm3. The results show that this method is capable of accurately reconstructing both the 3D shape and 3D BMD distribution of the proximal femur from DXA images used in clinical routine, potentially improving the diagnosis of osteoporosis and fracture risk assessments at a low radiation dose and low cost.

  20. An experiment to study the effects of space flight cells of mesenchymal origin in the new model 3D-graft in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volova, Larissa

    One of the major health problems of the astronauts are disorders of the musculoskeletal system, which determines the relevance of studies of the effect of space flight factors on osteoblastic and hondroblastic cells in vitro. An experiment to study the viability and proliferative activity of cells of mesenchymal origin on culture: chondroblasts and dermal fibroblasts was performed on SC "BION -M" № 1 with scientific equipment " BIOKONT -B ." To study the effect of space flight conditions in vitro at the cellular level has developed a new model with 3D- graft as allogeneic demineralized spongiosa obtained on technology Lioplast ®. For space and simultaneous experiments in the laboratory of the Institute of Experimental Medicine and Biotechnology Samara State Medical University were obtained from the cell culture of hyaline cartilage and human skin, which have previously been grown, and then identified by morphological and immunohistochemical methods. In the experiment, they were seeded on the porous 3D- graft (controlled by means of scanning electron and confocal microscopy) and cultured in full growth medium. After completion of the flight of spacecraft "BION -M" № 1 conducted studies of biological objects using a scanning electron microscope (JEOL JSM-6390A Analysis Station, Japan), confocal microscopy and LDH - test. According to the results of the experiment revealed that after a 30- day flight of the cells not only retained vitality, but also during the flight actively proliferate, and their number has increased by almost 8 times. In synchronous experiment, all the cells died by this date. The experimentally confirmed the adequacy of the proposed model 3D- graft in studying the effect of space flight on the morphological and functional characteristics of cells in vitro.

  1. The comet assay: assessment of in vitro and in vivo DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpayee, Mahima; Kumar, Ashutosh; Dhawan, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Rapid industrialization and pursuance of a better life have led to an increase in the amount of chemicals in the environment, which are deleterious to human health. Pesticides, automobile exhausts, and new chemical entities all add to air pollution and have an adverse effect on all living organisms including humans. Sensitive test systems are thus required for accurate hazard identification and risk assessment. The Comet assay has been used widely as a simple, rapid, and sensitive tool for assessment of DNA damage in single cells from both in vitro and in vivo sources as well as in humans. Already, the in vivo comet assay has gained importance as the preferred test for assessing DNA damage in animals for some international regulatory guidelines. The advantages of the in vivo comet assay are its ability to detect DNA damage in any tissue, despite having non-proliferating cells, and its sensitivity to detect genotoxicity. The recommendations from the international workshops held for the comet assay have resulted in establishment of guidelines. The in vitro comet assay conducted in cultured cells and cell lines can be used for screening large number of compounds and at very low concentrations. The in vitro assay has also been automated to provide a high-throughput screening method for new chemical entities, as well as environmental samples. This chapter details the in vitro comet assay using the 96-well plate and in vivo comet assay in multiple organs of the mouse.

  2. Effects of solvents and dosing procedure on chemical toxicity in cell-based in vitro assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanneberger, K.; Rico Rico, A.; Kramer, N.I.; Busser, F.J.M.; Hermens, J.L.M.; Schirmer, K.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the implementation of new legislation, such as REACh, a dramatic increase of animal use for toxicity testing is expected and the search for alternatives is timely. Cell-based in vitro assays are promising alternatives. However, the behavior of chemicals in these assays is still poorly underst

  3. The development of 3-D, in vitro, endothelial culture models for the study of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Richard

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The response of the vascular endothelium to wall shear stress plays a central role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Current studies have investigated endothelial response using idealized in vitro flow chambers. Such cell culture models are unable to accurately replicate the complex in vivo wall shear stress patterns arising from anatomical geometries. To better understand this implication, we have created both simplified/tubular and anatomically realistic in vitro endothelial flow models of the human right coronary artery. A post-mortem vascular cast of the human left ventricular outflow tract was used to create geometrically accurate silicone elastomer models. Straight, tubular models were created using a custom made mold. Following the culture of human abdominal aortic endothelial cells within the inner lumen, cells were exposed to steady flow (Re = 233 for varying time periods. The resulting cell morphology was analyzed in terms of shape index and angle of orientation relative to the flow direction. In both models a progressive elongation and alignment of the endothelium in the flow direction was observed following 8, 12, and 24 hours. This change, however, was significantly less pronounced in the anatomical model (as observed from morphological variations indicative of localized flow features. Differences were also observed between the inner and outer walls at the disease-prone proximal region. Since morphological adaptation is a visual indication of endothelial shear stress activation, the use of anatomical models in endothelial genetic and biochemical studies may offer better insight into the disease process.

  4. In vitro antileukemia, antibacterial and antifungal activities of some 3d metal complexes: chemical synthesis and structure - activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulea, Aurelian; Poirier, Donald; Roy, Jenny; Stavila, Vitalie; Bulimestru, Ion; Tapcov, Victor; Birca, Maria; Popovschi, Lilia

    2008-12-01

    The present paper describes the synthesis, characterization and in vitro biological evaluation screening of different classes (ammoniacates, dioximates, carboxylates, semi- and thiosemicarbazidates) of Co(II), Co(III), Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III) complexes. Schiff bases were obtained from the reaction of some salicyl aldehydes with, respectively, furoylhydrazine, benzoylhydrazine, semicarbazide, thiosemicarbazide and S-methylthiosemicarbazide to give tridentate ligands containing ONO, ONS or ONN as donor atoms. The synthetic metal complexes are of various geometrical and electronic structures, thermodynamic and thermal stabilities, and magnetic and conductance properties. All complexes, except those of Cu, are octahedral. Some Cu, Co and Mn compounds have a dimeric or a polymeric structure. The composition and structure of complexes were analysed by elemental analysis, IR and (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopies, and magnetochemical, thermoanalytical and molar conductance measurements. All ligands and metal complexes were tested as inhibitors of human leukemia (HL-60) cells growth, and the most potent, the Cu(II) complexes, have been also tested for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities. Structure-activity relationships were carried out.

  5. In Vitro Model for Hepatotoxicity Studies Based on Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultivation in a Perfused 3D Bioreactor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Knöspel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of the potential hepatotoxic nature of new pharmaceuticals remains highly challenging. Therefore, novel in vitro models with improved external validity are needed to investigate hepatic metabolism and timely identify any toxicity of drugs in humans. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac, as a model substance with a known risk of hepatotoxicity in vivo, in a dynamic multi-compartment bioreactor using primary human liver cells. Biotransformation pathways of the drug and possible effects on metabolic activities, morphology and cell transcriptome were evaluated. Formation rates of diclofenac metabolites were relatively stable over the application period of seven days in bioreactors exposed to 300 µM diclofenac (300 µM bioreactors (300 µM BR, while in bioreactors exposed to 1000 µM diclofenac (1000 µM BR metabolite concentrations declined drastically. The biochemical data showed a significant decrease in lactate production and for the higher dose a significant increase in ammonia secretion, indicating a dose-dependent effect of diclofenac application. The microarray analyses performed revealed a stable hepatic phenotype of the cells over time and the observed transcriptional changes were in line with functional readouts of the system. In conclusion, the data highlight the suitability of the bioreactor technology for studying the hepatotoxicity of drugs in vitro.

  6. In Vitro Model for Hepatotoxicity Studies Based on Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultivation in a Perfused 3D Bioreactor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöspel, Fanny; Jacobs, Frank; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; De Bondt, An; van den Wyngaert, Ilse; Snoeys, Jan; Monshouwer, Mario; Richter, Marco; Strahl, Nadja; Seehofer, Daniel; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2016-04-16

    Accurate prediction of the potential hepatotoxic nature of new pharmaceuticals remains highly challenging. Therefore, novel in vitro models with improved external validity are needed to investigate hepatic metabolism and timely identify any toxicity of drugs in humans. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac, as a model substance with a known risk of hepatotoxicity in vivo, in a dynamic multi-compartment bioreactor using primary human liver cells. Biotransformation pathways of the drug and possible effects on metabolic activities, morphology and cell transcriptome were evaluated. Formation rates of diclofenac metabolites were relatively stable over the application period of seven days in bioreactors exposed to 300 µM diclofenac (300 µM bioreactors (300 µM BR)), while in bioreactors exposed to 1000 µM diclofenac (1000 µM BR) metabolite concentrations declined drastically. The biochemical data showed a significant decrease in lactate production and for the higher dose a significant increase in ammonia secretion, indicating a dose-dependent effect of diclofenac application. The microarray analyses performed revealed a stable hepatic phenotype of the cells over time and the observed transcriptional changes were in line with functional readouts of the system. In conclusion, the data highlight the suitability of the bioreactor technology for studying the hepatotoxicity of drugs in vitro.

  7. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Juergen; Robbins, Justin B.; Crogan-Grundy, Candace; Presnell, Sharon C.; Singer, Thomas; Roth, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI). This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM). Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level. PMID:27387377

  8. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah G Nguyen

    Full Text Available Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI. This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM. Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level.

  9. Gain in cellular organization of inflammatory breast cancer: A 3D in vitro model that mimics the in vivo metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpaugh Mary L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The initial step of metastasis in carcinomas, often referred to as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, occurs via the loss of adherens junctions (e.g. cadherins by the tumor embolus. This leads to a subsequent loss of cell polarity and cellular differentiation and organization, enabling cells of the embolus to become motile and invasive. However highly malignant inflammatory breast cancer (IBC over-expresses E-cadherin. The human xenograft model of IBC (MARY-X, like IBC, displays the signature phenotype of an exaggerated degree of lymphovascular invasion (LVI in situ by tumor emboli. An intact E-cadherin/α, β-catenin axis mediates the tight, compact clump of cells found both in vitro and in vivo as spheroids and tumor emboli, respectively. Methods Using electron microscopy and focused ion beam milling to acquire in situ sections, we performed ultrastructural analysis of both an IBC and non-IBC, E-cadherin positive cell line to determine if retention of this adhesion molecule contributed to cellular organization. Results Here we report through ultrastructural analysis that IBC exhibits a high degree of cellular organization with polar elements such as apical/lateral positioning of E-cadherin, apical surface microvilli, and tortuous lumen-like (canalis structures. In contrast, agarose-induced spheroids of MCF-7, a weakly invasive E-cadherin positive breast carcinoma cell line, do not exhibit ultrastructural polar features. Conclusions This study has determined that the highly metastatic IBC with an exaggerated malignant phenotype challenges conventional wisdom in that instead of displaying a loss of cellular organization, IBC acquires a highly structured architecture. These findings suggest that the metastatic efficiency might be linked to the formation and maintenance of these architectural features. The comparative architectural features of both the spheroid and embolus of MARY-X provide an in vitro model with

  10. Production and in vitro characterization of 3D porous scaffolds made of magnesium carbonate apatite (MCA)/anionic collagen using a biomimetic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sader, Marcia S., E-mail: msader@metalmat.ufrj.br [Prog. Engenharia Metalúrgica e Materiais, COPPE/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil); Martins, Virginia C.A. [Depto. de Química e Física Molecular, IQSC/USP, SP (Brazil); Gomez, Santiago [Dept. Anatomía Patológica, Universidad de Cádiz, Cadiz (Spain); LeGeros, Racquel Z. [Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, NY (United States); Soares, Gloria A. [Prog. Engenharia Metalúrgica e Materiais, COPPE/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    3D porous scaffolds are relevant biomaterials to bone engineering as they can be used as templates to tissue reconstruction. The aim of the present study was to produce and characterize in vitro 3D magnesium-carbonate apatite/collagen (MCA/col) scaffolds. They were prepared by using biomimetic approach, followed by cross-linking with 0.25% glutaraldehyde solution (GA) and liofilization. Results obtained with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the type-B carbonate substitution, while by X-ray diffraction (XRD), a crystallite size of ∼ 10 nm was obtained. Optical and electron microscopy showed that the cylindrical samples exhibited an open-porous morphology, with apatite nanocrystals precipitated on collagen fibrils. The cross-linked 3D scaffolds showed integrity when immersed in culture medium up to 14 days. Also, the immersion of such samples into an acid buffer solution, to mimic the osteoclastic resorption environment, promotes the release of important ions for bone repair, such as calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Bone cells (SaOs2) adhered, and proliferated on the 3D composite scaffolds, showing that synthesis and the cross-linking processes did not induce cytotoxicity. Highlights: • 3D scaffolds of Mg-carbonate–apatite and anionic-collagen were produced. • The biomimetic approach and the cross-linking with 0.25% GA solution were employed. • The scaffolds showed open-porous structure and apatite crystals on collagen fibrils. • The cross-linked scaffolds exhibited integrity when immersed in culture medium. • SaOs2 cells adhered and proliferated on the cross-linked scaffolds confirming no cytotoxicity.

  11. Synthesis and in vitro Antibacterial Activities of 5-(2,3,4,5- Tetrahydro-1 H-chromeno[2,3-dJpyrimidin-5-yl)pyrimidione Derivatives%Synthesis and in vitro Antibacterial Activities of 5-(2,3,4,5- Tetrahydro-1 H-chromeno[2,3-dJpyrimidin-5-yl)pyrimidione Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng, Qingfang; Wang, Qifa; Tan, Ting; Wang, Mingxiao; Chen, Na

    2012-01-01

    A series of novel 5-(2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-lH-chromeno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5-yl)pyrimidione derivatives have been synthesized from substituted salicylaldehydes and barbituric acid or 2-thiobarbituric acid in water catalyzed by phase transfer catalysis of triethylbenzyl ammonium chloride (TEBA). Elemental analysis, IR, 1HNMR, and 13C NMR elucidated the structures of all the newly synthesized compounds. In vitro antimicrobial activities of synthesized compounds have been investigated against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudornonas aeruginosa. These newly synthesized derivatives exhibited significant in vitro antibacterial activity.

  12. Nano-TiO2 penetration of oral mucosa: in vitro analysis using 3D organotypic human buccal mucosa models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinova, Victoria; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Lie, Stein A; Birkeland, Eivind Salmorin; Neppelberg, Evelyn; Marthinussen, Mihaela Cuida; Costea, Daniela Elena; Cimpan, Mihaela R

    2017-03-01

    Oral cavity is a doorway for a variety of products containing titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) (nano-TiO2 ) such as food additives, oral healthcare products and dental materials. Their potential to penetrate and affect normal human oral mucosa is not yet determined. To evaluate the ability of nano-TiO2 to penetrate the in vitro reconstructed normal human buccal mucosa (RNHBM). RNHBM was generated from primary normal human oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts isolated from buccal oral mucosa of healthy patients (n = 6). The reconstructed tissues were exposed after 10 days to clinically relevant concentrations of spherical or spindle rutile nano-TiO2 in suspension for short (20 min) and longer time (24 h). Ultrahigh-resolution imaging (URI) microscopy (CytoViva(™) , Auburn, AL, USA) was used to assess the depth of penetration into reconstructed tissues. Ultrahigh-resolution imaging microscopy demonstrated the presence of nano-TiO2 mostly in the epithelium of RNHBM at both 20 min and 24-h exposure, and this was shape and doze dependent at 24 h of exposure. The depth of penetration diminished in time at higher concentrations. The exposed epithelium showed increased desquamation but preserved thickness. Nano-TiO2 is able to penetrate RNHBM and to activate its barrier function in a doze- and time-dependent manner. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Hepatic stellate cells on poly(DL-lactic acid surfaces control the formation of 3D hepatocyte co-culture aggregates in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R J Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for the functional superiority of cells cultured as 3D aggregates or on 3D scaffolds over conventional 2D monolayer cultures has created interest in material and cell based methods that influence the formation and structure of multicellular aggregates in vitro. We have created a co-culture of primary rat hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells on a poly(DL-lactic acid surface, a poor substrate for rat hepatocyte adhesion, to study the dynamics of multicellular spheroid formation and the resultant cell arrangement. The poly(DL-lactic acid surface allows dynamic and rapid interaction of hepatocytes and stellate cells to form co-culture spheroids in a complex multistage process (shown by time lapse microscopy. This spheroid morphology supports enhanced cell viability relative to a mono-culture mono-layer system (measured by lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The distribution of the aggregating cell type in the final structure is related to the mechanics of formation i.e. mainly central and peripheral. This study provides a unique and generically applicable insight into the dynamics of multicellular spheroid formation where aggregation is induced by one cell type and imposed on another. This has implications for 3D cell culture models and a wide number of currently used stromal co-culture systems.

  14. In vitro comparison of Doppler and catheter-measured pressure gradients in 3D models of mitral valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Tarrah A; Siefert, Andrew W; Pressman, Gregg S; Gollin, Hannah R; Touchton, Steven A; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2013-09-01

    Mitral annular calcification (MAC) involves calcium deposition in the fibrous annulus supporting the mitral valve (MV). When calcification extends onto the leaflets, valve opening can be restricted. The influence of MAC MV geometry on Doppler gradients is unknown. This study describes a novel methodology to rapid-prototype subject-specific MAC MVs. Replicated valves were used to assess the effects of distorted annular-leaflet geometry on Doppler-derived, transmitral gradients in comparison to direct pressure measurements and to determine if transmitral gradients vary according to measurement location. Three-dimensional echocardiography data sets were selected for two MAC MVs and one healthy MV. These MVs were segmented and rapid prototyped in their middiastolic configuration for in vitro testing. The effects of MV geometry, measurement modality, and measurement location on transmitral pressure gradient were assessed by Doppler and catheter at three locations along the MV's intercommissural axis. When comparing dimensions of the rapid-prototyped valves to the subject echocardiography data sets, mean relative errors ranged from 6.2% to 35%. For the evaluated MVs, Doppler pressure gradients exhibited good agreement with catheter-measured gradients at a variety of flow rates, though with slight systematic overestimation in the recreated MAC valves. For all of the tested MVs, measuring the transmitral pressure gradient at differing valve orifice positions had minimal impact on observed gradients. Upon the testing of additional normal and calcific MVs, these data may contribute to an improved clinical understanding of MAC-related mitral stenosis. Moreover, they provide the ability to statistically evaluate between measurement locations, flow rates, and valve geometries for Doppler-derived pressure gradients. Determining these end points will contribute to greater clinical understanding for the diagnosis MAC patients and understanding the use and application of Doppler

  15. Anticoccidial efficacy testing: In vitro Eimeria tenella assays as replacement for animal experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Ahmed; Zhang, Runhui; Alnassan, Alaa-Aldin; Daugschies, Arwid; Bangoura, Berit

    2017-01-15

    Availability of an accurate in vitro assay is a crucial demand to determine sensitivity of Eimeria spp. field strains toward anticoccidials routinely. In this study we tested in vitro models of Eimeria tenella using various polyether ionophores (monensin, salinomycin, maduramicin, and lasalocid) and toltrazuril. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC95, MIC50/95) for the tested anticoccidials were defined based on a susceptible reference (Houghton strain), Ref-1. In vitro sporozoite invasion inhibition assay (SIA) and reproduction inhibition assay (RIA) were applied on sensitive laboratory (Ref-1 and Ref-2) and field (FS-1, FS-2, and FS-3) strains to calculate percent of inhibition under exposure of these strains to the various anticoccidials (%ISIA and%IRIA, respectively). The in vitro data were related to oocyst excretion, lesion scores, performance, and global resistance indices (GI) assessed in experimentally infected chickens. Polyether ionophores applied in the RIA were highly effective at MIC95 against Ref-1 and Ref-2 (%IRIA≥95%). In contrast, all tested field strains displayed reduced to low efficacy (%IRIAanimal model (p89%) against all strains used in this study. However, adjusted GI (GIadj) for toltrazuril-treated groups exhibited differences between reference and field strains which might indicate varying sensitivity. RIA is a suitable in vitro tool to detect sensitivity of E. tenella towards polyether ionophores, and may thus help to reduce, replace, or refine use of animal experimentation for in vivo sensitivity assays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro assays for cobblestone area-forming cells, LTC-IC, and CFU-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os, Ronald P; Dethmers-Ausema, Bertien; de Haan, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Various assays exist that measure the function of hematopoietic stemcells (HSCs). In this chapter, in vitro assays are described that measure the frequency of progenitors (colony-forming unit in culture; CFU-C), stem cells (long-term culture-initiating cell; LTC-IC), or both (cobblestone area-forming cell assay; CAFC). These assays measure the potential of a test cell population retrospectively, i.e., at the time its activity is evident when the stem cell itself is often not detectable anymore. Although the in vitro LTC-IC and CAFC assays have been shown to correlate with in vivo activity, in vivo transplantation assays, where it can be shown that cells possess the ability to indefinitely repopulate all blood lineages, are the ultimate proof for HSC activity. Nevertheless, these in vitro assays provide an excellent method to screen for stem cell activity of a putative stem cell population or for screening the effect of a certain treatment on HSCs.

  17. A Combined 3D Tissue Engineered In Vitro/In Silico Lung Tumor Model for Predicting Drug Effectiveness in Specific Mutational Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttlich, Claudia; Müller, Lena C; Kunz, Meik; Schmitt, Franziska; Walles, Heike; Walles, Thorsten; Dandekar, Thomas; Dandekar, Gudrun; Nietzer, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we combined an in vitro 3D lung tumor model with an in silico model to optimize predictions of drug response based on a specific mutational background. The model is generated on a decellularized porcine scaffold that reproduces tissue-specific characteristics regarding extracellular matrix composition and architecture including the basement membrane. We standardized a protocol that allows artificial tumor tissue generation within 14 days including three days of drug treatment. Our article provides several detailed descriptions of 3D read-out screening techniques like the determination of the proliferation index Ki67 staining's, apoptosis from supernatants by M30-ELISA and assessment of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which are helpful tools for evaluating the effectiveness of therapeutic compounds. We could show compared to 2D culture a reduction of proliferation in our 3D tumor model that is related to the clinical situation. Despite of this lower proliferation, the model predicted EGFR-targeted drug responses correctly according to the biomarker status as shown by comparison of the lung carcinoma cell lines HCC827 (EGFR -mutated, KRAS wild-type) and A549 (EGFR wild-type, KRAS-mutated) treated with the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor (TKI) gefitinib. To investigate drug responses of more advanced tumor cells, we induced EMT by long-term treatment with TGF-beta-1 as assessed by vimentin/pan-cytokeratin immunofluorescence staining. A flow-bioreactor was employed to adjust culture to physiological conditions, which improved tissue generation. Furthermore, we show the integration of drug responses upon gefitinib treatment or TGF-beta-1 stimulation - apoptosis, proliferation index and EMT - into a Boolean in silico model. Additionally, we explain how drug responses of tumor cells with a specific mutational background and counterstrategies against resistance can be predicted. We are confident that our 3D in vitro approach especially with its

  18. Innovative mode of action based in vitro assays for detection of marine neurotoxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolas, J.A.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Innovative mode of action based in vitro assays for detection of marine neurotoxins J. Nicolas, P.J.M. Hendriksen, T.F.H. Bovee, I.M.C.M. Rietjens Marine biotoxins are naturally occurring compounds produced by particular phytoplankton species. These toxins often accumulate in seafood and thereby

  19. Synthesis of Some Polysubstituted Nicotinonitriles and Derived Pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines as In Vitro Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan M. Faidallah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of polysubstituted pyridines, in addition to some derived pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine ring systems supported with chemotherapeutically active functionalities, is described. They were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic effects against three different human tumor cell lines (human colon carcinoma HT29, hepatocellular carcinoma Hep-G2, and Caucasian breast adenocarcinoma MCF7. Nine compounds displayed variable cytotoxic potential, among which alkylthio analogs 33, 34, and 37 emerged as the most active members, being almost twice as active as doxorubicin against the colon carcinoma HT29 cell line. In addition, the same three analogs showed a clear differential cytotoxic profile as they exhibited a marginal inhibitory effect on the growth of the normal nontransformed human foreskin fibroblast Hs27 cell line. Meanwhile, nineteen compounds were able to exhibit significant antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, together with moderate antifungal activities. The pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2(1H-thione 30 together with its alkylthio derivatives 33 and 34 stemmed as the most active antimicrobial members being equipotent to ampicillin against S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa, together with a noticeable antifungal activity against C. albicans. Compounds 33 and 34 could be considered as a promising template for possible dual antimicrobial-anticancer candidates.

  20. Development of a new in vitro skin sensitization assay (Epidermal Sensitization Assay; EpiSensA) using reconstructed human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazutoshi; Nukada, Yuko; Takenouchi, Osamu; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Naohiro

    2013-12-01

    Recent changes in regulatory requirements and social views on animal testing have accelerated the development of reliable alternative tests for predicting skin sensitizing potential of chemicals. In this study, we aimed to develop a new in vitro skin sensitization assay using reconstructed human epidermis, RhE model, which is expected to have broader applicability domain rather than existing in vitro assays. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of five genes (ATF3, DNAJB4, GCLM, HSPA6 and HSPH1) related to cellular stress response were significantly up-regulated in RhE model after 6h treatment with representative skin sensitizers, 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and oxazolone, but not a non-sensitizer, benzalkonium chloride. The predictive performance of five genes was examined with eight skin sensitizers (e.g., cinnamic aldehyde), four non-sensitizers (e.g., sodium lauryl sulfate) and four pre-/pro-haptens (e.g., p-phenylenediamine, isoeugenol). When the positive criteria were set to obtain the highest accuracy with the animal testing (LLNA), ATF3, DNAJB4 and GCLM exhibited a high predictive accuracy (100%, 93.8% and 87.5%, respectively). All tested pre-/pro-haptens were correctly predicted by both ATF3 and DNAJB4. These results suggested that the RhE-based assay, termed epidermal sensitization assay (EpiSensA), could be an useful skin sensitization assay with a broad applicability domain including pre-/pro-haptens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of In Vitro Assays in Selecting Radiotracers for In Vivo P-Glycoprotein PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renske M. Raaphorst

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET imaging of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in the blood-brain barrier can be important in neurological diseases where P-gp is affected, such as Alzheimer´s disease. Radiotracers used in the imaging studies are present at very small, nanomolar, concentration, whereas in vitro assays where these tracers are characterized, are usually performed at micromolar concentration, causing often discrepant in vivo and in vitro data. We had in vivo rodent PET data of [11C]verapamil, (R-N-[18F]fluoroethylverapamil, (R-O-[18F]fluoroethyl-norverapamil, [18F]MC225 and [18F]MC224 and we included also two new molecules [18F]MC198 and [18F]KE64 in this study. To improve the predictive value of in vitro assays, we labeled all the tracers with tritium and performed bidirectional substrate transport assay in MDCKII-MDR1 cells at three different concentrations (0.01, 1 and 50 µM and also inhibition assay with P-gp inhibitors. As a comparison, we used non-radioactive molecules in transport assay in Caco-2 cells at a concentration of 10 µM and in calcein-AM inhibition assay in MDCKII-MDR1 cells. All the P-gp substrates were transported dose-dependently. At the highest concentration (50 µM, P-gp was saturated in a similar way as after treatment with P-gp inhibitors. Best in vivo correlation was obtained with the bidirectional transport assay at a concentration of 0.01 µM. One micromolar concentration in a transport assay or calcein-AM assay alone is not sufficient for correct in vivo prediction of substrate P-gp PET ligands.

  2. In vitro screening assay for teratogens using growth inhibition of human embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, R M; Willis, W D

    1985-01-01

    We have tested 35 teratogenic and 20 nonteratogenic chemicals or drugs in a short-term, in vitro assay that identifies teratogens by their ability to inhibit growth of an established line of human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells. Only those chemicals that exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of growth at concentrations less than 1 mM were classified as inhibitory. An Aroclor-induced rat liver S-9 system was effective in metabolizing cyclophosphamide to its teratogenic form in culture. We suggest that this assay, along with the complementary tumor cell-attachment assay of Braun et al. [Braun, A. G., Emerson, D. J. & Nichinson, B. B. (1979) Nature (London) 282, 507-509] may be useful as a short-term in vitro battery for assessment of the teratogenic potential in environmental agents and to prioritize those chemicals which merit further testing in vivo. Images PMID:3862095

  3. In vitro screening assay for teratogens using growth inhibition of human embryonic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, R.M.; Willis, W.D.

    1985-09-01

    The authors have tested 35 teratogenic and 20 nonteratogenic chemicals or drugs in a short-term, in vitro assay that identifies teratogens by their ability to inhibit growth of an established line of human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells. Only those chemicals that exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of growth at concentrations less than 1 mM were classified as inhibitory. An Aroclor-induced rat liver S-9 system was effective in metabolizing cyclophosphamide to its teratogenic form in culture. The authors suggest that this assay, along with the complementary tumor cell-attachment assay of Braun may be useful as a short-term in vitro battery for assessment of the teratogenic potential in environmental agents and to prioritize those chemicals which merit further testing in vivo.

  4. Thyroid endocrine system disruption by pentachlorophenol: an in vitro and in vivo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongyong; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2013-10-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the disruption caused to the thyroid endocrine system by pentachlorophenol (PCP) using in vitro and in vivo assays. In the in vitro assay, rat pituitary GH3 cells were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 μM PCP. PCP exposure significantly downregulated basal and triiodothyronine (T3)-induced Dio 1 transcription, indicating the antagonistic activity of PCP in vitro. In the in vivo assay, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0, 1, 3, and 10 μg/L of PCP until 14 days post-fertilization. PCP exposure resulted in decreased thyroxine (T4) levels, but elevated contents of whole-body T3. PCP exposure significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of genes along hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, including those encoding thyroid-stimulating hormone, sodium/iodide symporter, thyroglobulin, Dio 1 and Dio 2, alpha and beta thyroid hormone receptor, and uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyl-transferase. PCP exposure did not influence the transcription of the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The results indicate that PCP potentially disrupts the thyroid endocrine system both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Evaluation of genotoxicity of nitrile fragrance ingredients using in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, S P; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-09-01

    Genotoxicity studies were conducted on a group of 8 fragrance ingredients that belong to the nitrile family. These nitriles are widely used in consumer products however there is very limited data in the literature regarding the genotoxicity of these nitriles. The 8 nitriles were assessed for genotoxicity using an Ames test, in vitro chromosome aberration test or in vitro micronucleus test. The positive results observed in the in vitro tests were further investigated using an in vivo micronucleus test. The results from these different tests were compared and these 8 nitriles are not considered to be genotoxic. Dodecanitrile and 2,2,3-trimethylcyclopent-3-enylacetonitrile were negative in the in vitro chromosome aberration test and in vitro micronucleus test, respectively. While citronellyl nitrile, 3-methyl-5-phenylpentanenitrile, cinnamyl nitrile, and 3-methyl-5-phenylpent-2-enenitrile revealed positive results in the in vitro tests, but confirmatory in vivo tests determined these nitriles to be negative in the in vivo micronucleus assay. The remaining two nitriles (benzonitrile and α-cyclohexylidene benzeneacetonitrile) were negative in the in vivo micronucleus test. This study aims to evaluate the genotoxicity potential of these nitriles as well as enrich the literature with genotoxicity data on fragrance ingredients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human low density lipoprotein as a substrate for in vitro steroidogenesis assays with fathead minnow ovary explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonad explant in vitro steroidogenesis assays are used as part of a multifaceted strategy to detect endocrine active chemicals capable of altering steroid hormone synthesis. An in vitro steroidogenesis assay used in our laboratory involves exposing fathead minnow (FHM) gonad exp...

  7. Human low density lipoprotein as a substrate for in vitro steroidogenesis assays with fathead minnow ovary explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonad explant in vitro steroidogenesis assays are used as part of a multifaceted strategy to detect endocrine active chemicals capable of altering steroid hormone synthesis. An in vitro steroidogenesis assay used in our laboratory involves exposing fathead minnow (FHM) gonad exp...

  8. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro reporter gene assays for short-term screening of estrogenic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Zeinstra, L.M.; Schuitemaker, F.; Lanser, P.H.; Bogerd, J.; Brouwer, A.; Vethaak, A.D.; Voogt, de P.; Murk, A.J.; Burg, van der B.

    2002-01-01

    Functional in vitro and in vivo reporter gene assays have recently been developed for the rapid determination of exposure to (xeno)estrogens. The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated chemically activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay uses T47D human breast cancer cells stably trans

  9. Comparison of the unlabeled and labeled pre-mRNA splicing assays in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN XU BU; JING XIN HONG; ZHI YAO; JIE YANG

    2006-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental process required for the expression of most metazoan genes. It is carried out by the spliceosome that catalyzes the removal of non-coding intron sequences to ligate exons into mature mRNA prior to transport and translation. The purpose of our study is to explore whether the in vitro unlabeled pre-mRNA splicing assay could be performed as an alternative method of splicing reaction other than the radiolabeled one. Two different splicing methods in vitro, 32P labeled and unlabeled pre-mRNA as the substrates in the reaction, were investigated. The radiolabeled products were visualized by autoradiography while the unlabeled products were observed by Ethidium Bromide (EB)staining. As a result, although there are more unspecific bands in the EB staining assay than 32P labeled one, the RNA products of in vitro splicing could be observed clearly. This suggests that the unlabeled pre-mRNA splicing assay can be an optional substitution for the isotope-labeled assay.

  10. Assessing cytogenotoxicity of cigarette smoke condensates using three in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianlin, Lou; Guohai, Chu; Guojun, Zhou; Jian, Jiang; Fangfang, Huang; Juanjuan, Xu; Shu, Zheng; Zhijian, Chen; Wei, Jiang; Yezhen, Lu; Xiaoxue, Li; Jiliang, He

    2009-01-01

    Cigarette smoke condensates (CSCs) are complex mixed compounds that contain both direct and indirect mutagens/carcinogens. To detect genotoxicity of CSCs in vitro, a combination of various enzymes (e.g. activation and detoxification enzymes) called S9 is usually added. However, as S9 may induce cytotoxicity in target cells, it is unclear whether the addition of S9 can impact CSC-induced toxicity. Here, differences in cytogenotoxicity between CSCs in the presence or absence of S9 were studied using three in vitro assays (neutral red uptake assay, comet assay, and TCR gene mutation test) in human peripheral lymphocytes, which were exposed to CSCs at doses of 25, 50, 75, 100 and 125 microg/ml for 4 h. Assay results showed that both CSCs + S9 or CSCs - S9 could induce a dose-dependent elevation of cytogenotoxic effects in human lymphocytes with some differences between the two groups. The cytogenotoxicity induced by CSCs - S9 was significantly higher than that induced by CSCs + S9 in all three assays. The comet and NRU assays revealed that a dose-response relationship of cytogenotoxicity induced by CSCs + S9 was less typical than that induced by CSCs - S9, possibly due to specific cytogenotoxic agents in CSCs and enzymes contained in the S9 mixture. Thus, the three in vitro assays used in the present study are suitable for detecting cytogenotoxic effects in human lymphocytes induced by CSCs. Furthermore, the cytogenotoxicity induced by both CSCs + S9 and CSCs - S9 should be measured simultaneously when assessing and comparing the biological activity of different CSCs.

  11. Genetic toxicity assessment: employing the best science for human safety evaluation. Part II: Performances of the in vitro micronucleus test compared to the mouse lymphoma assay and the in vitro chromosome aberration assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorge, Elisabeth; Lambert, Carine; Gervais, Véronique; Becourt-Lhote, Nathalie; Delongeas, Jean-Luc; Claude, Nancy

    2007-04-01

    The in vitro micronucleus test is commonly used in the early stages of pharmaceutical development as a predictive tool for the regulatory mouse lymphoma assay or in vitro chromosome aberration test. The accumulated data from this assay leads to the suggestion that it could be used as an alternative to the chromosome aberration test or the mouse lymphoma assay in the regulatory genotoxicity battery. In this paper, we present the results of the in vitro micronucleus test on L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells with 25 compounds from Servier research and have compared these results to those obtained in the genotoxicity regulatory battery. All the negative compounds were also negative in the in vitro micronucleus assay. Among the 14 positive compounds, two of them, positive in the mouse lymphoma assay, were found negative in the in vitro micronucleus test. However, this apparent discordance was likely to be due to cytotoxicity- or high concentration-related false positive responses in the mouse lymphoma assay. In addition, we confirmed that the in vitro micronucleus assay is useful for detecting aneugens, especially, when cells in metaphasis and multinucleated cells are also scored and when cells are allowed to recover after the long treatment. On this series of compounds, the in vitro micronucleus assay showed high sensitivity and possibly a better specificity than the mouse lymphoma assay. Thus, the in vitro micronucleus assay was shown to be at least as adequate as the mouse lymphoma assay or the in vitro chromosome aberration test to be used in the standard genotoxicity battery.

  12. Osteomimicry of mammary adenocarcinoma cells in vitro; increased expression of bone matrix proteins and proliferation within a 3D collagen environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel F Cox

    Full Text Available Bone is the most common site of metastasis for breast cancer, however the reasons for this remain unclear. We hypothesise that under certain conditions mammary cells possess osteomimetic capabilities that may allow them to adapt to, and flourish within, the bone microenvironment. Mammary cells are known to calcify within breast tissue and we have recently reported a novel in vitro model of mammary mineralization using murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1 cells. In this study, the osteomimetic properties of the mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and the conditions required to induce mineralization were characterized extensively. It was found that exogenous organic phosphate and inorganic phosphate induce mineralization in a dose dependent manner in 4T1 cells. Ascorbic acid and dexamethasone alone have no effect. 4T1 cells also show enhanced mineralization in response to bone morphogenetic protein 2 in the presence of phosphate supplemented media. The expression of several bone matrix proteins were monitored throughout the process of mineralization and increased expression of collagen type 1 and bone sialoprotein were detected, as determined by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, we have shown for the first time that 3D collagen glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, bioengineered to represent the bone microenvironment, are capable of supporting the growth and mineralization of 4T1 adenocarcinoma cells. These 3D scaffolds represent a novel model system for the study of mammary mineralization and bone metastasis. This work demonstrates that mammary cells are capable of osteomimicry, which may ultimately contribute to their ability to preferentially metastasize to, survive within and colonize the bone microenvironment.

  13. Predicting changes in cardiac myocyte contractility during early drug discovery with in vitro assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, M.J., E-mail: michael.morton@astrazeneca.com [Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Armstrong, D.; Abi Gerges, N. [Drug Safety and Metabolism, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Bridgland-Taylor, M. [Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Pollard, C.E.; Bowes, J.; Valentin, J.-P. [Drug Safety and Metabolism, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular-related adverse drug effects are a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Activity of an investigational drug at the L-type calcium channel could manifest in a number of ways, including changes in cardiac contractility. The aim of this study was to define which of the two assay technologies – radioligand-binding or automated electrophysiology – was most predictive of contractility effects in an in vitro myocyte contractility assay. The activity of reference and proprietary compounds at the L-type calcium channel was measured by radioligand-binding assays, conventional patch-clamp, automated electrophysiology, and by measurement of contractility in canine isolated cardiac myocytes. Activity in the radioligand-binding assay at the L-type Ca channel phenylalkylamine binding site was most predictive of an inotropic effect in the canine cardiac myocyte assay. The sensitivity was 73%, specificity 83% and predictivity 78%. The radioligand-binding assay may be run at a single test concentration and potency estimated. The least predictive assay was automated electrophysiology which showed a significant bias when compared with other assay formats. Given the importance of the L-type calcium channel, not just in cardiac function, but also in other organ systems, a screening strategy emerges whereby single concentration ligand-binding can be performed early in the discovery process with sufficient predictivity, throughput and turnaround time to influence chemical design and address a significant safety-related liability, at relatively low cost. - Highlights: • The L-type calcium channel is a significant safety liability during drug discovery. • Radioligand-binding to the L-type calcium channel can be measured in vitro. • The assay can be run at a single test concentration as part of a screening cascade. • This measurement is highly predictive of changes in cardiac myocyte contractility.

  14. Establishment of a Predictive In Vitro Assay for Assessment of the Hepatotoxic Potential of Oligonucleotide Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewing, Sabine; Boess, Franziska; Moisan, Annie; Bertinetti-Lapatki, Cristina; Minz, Tanja; Hedtjaern, Maj; Tessier, Yann; Schuler, Franz; Singer, Thomas; Roth, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    Single stranded oligonucleotides (SSO) represent a novel therapeutic modality that opens new space to address previously undruggable targets. In spite of their proven efficacy, the development of promising SSO drug candidates has been limited by reported cases of SSO-associated hepatotoxicity. The mechanisms of SSO induced liver toxicity are poorly understood, and up to now no preclinical in vitro model has been established that allows prediction of the hepatotoxicity risk of a given SSO. Therefore, preclinical assessment of hepatic liability currently relies on rodent studies that require large cohorts of animals and lengthy protocols. Here, we describe the establishment and validation of an in vitro assay using primary hepatocytes that recapitulates the hepatotoxic profile of SSOs previously observed in rodents. In vitro cytotoxicity upon unassisted delivery was measured as an increase in extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and concomitant reduction in intracellular glutathione and ATP levels after 3 days of treatment. Furthermore, toxic, but not safe, SSOs led to an increase in miR-122 in cell culture supernatants after 2 days of exposure, revealing the potential use of miR122 as a selective translational biomarker for detection of SSO-induced hepatotoxicity. Overall, we have developed and validated for the first time a robust in vitro screening assay for SSO liver safety profiling which allows rapid prioritization of candidate molecules early on in development. PMID:27442522

  15. Establishment of a Predictive In Vitro Assay for Assessment of the Hepatotoxic Potential of Oligonucleotide Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Sewing

    Full Text Available Single stranded oligonucleotides (SSO represent a novel therapeutic modality that opens new space to address previously undruggable targets. In spite of their proven efficacy, the development of promising SSO drug candidates has been limited by reported cases of SSO-associated hepatotoxicity. The mechanisms of SSO induced liver toxicity are poorly understood, and up to now no preclinical in vitro model has been established that allows prediction of the hepatotoxicity risk of a given SSO. Therefore, preclinical assessment of hepatic liability currently relies on rodent studies that require large cohorts of animals and lengthy protocols. Here, we describe the establishment and validation of an in vitro assay using primary hepatocytes that recapitulates the hepatotoxic profile of SSOs previously observed in rodents. In vitro cytotoxicity upon unassisted delivery was measured as an increase in extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH levels and concomitant reduction in intracellular glutathione and ATP levels after 3 days of treatment. Furthermore, toxic, but not safe, SSOs led to an increase in miR-122 in cell culture supernatants after 2 days of exposure, revealing the potential use of miR122 as a selective translational biomarker for detection of SSO-induced hepatotoxicity. Overall, we have developed and validated for the first time a robust in vitro screening assay for SSO liver safety profiling which allows rapid prioritization of candidate molecules early on in development.

  16. Development and molecular characterization of polymeric micro-nanofibrous scaffold of a defined 3-D niche for in vitro chemosensitivity analysis against acute myeloid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair MS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Maya S Nair,1 Ullas Mony,1 Deepthy Menon,1 Manzoor Koyakutty,1 Neeraj Sidharthan,2 Keechilat Pavithran,2 Shantikumar V Nair,1 Krishnakumar N Menon11Amrita Centre for Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine, 2Department of Oncology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham University, Kerala, IndiaAbstract: Standard in vitro drug testing employs 2-D tissue culture plate systems to test anti-leukemic drugs against cell adhesion-mediated drug-resistant leukemic cells that harbor in 3-D bone marrow microenvironments. This drawback necessitates the fabrication of 3-D scaffolds that have cell adhesion-mediated drug-resistant properties similar to in vivo niches. We therefore aimed at exploiting the known property of polyurethane (PU/poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA in forming a micro-nanofibrous structure to fabricate unique, not presented before, as far as we are aware, 3-D micro-nanofibrous scaffold composites using a thermally induced phase separation technique. Among the different combinations of PU/PLLA composites generated, the unique PU/PLLA 60:40 composite displayed micro-nanofibrous morphology similar to decellularized bone marrow with increased protein and fibronectin adsorption. Culturing of acute myeloid leukemia (AML KG1a cells in FN-coated PU/PLLA 60:40 shows increased cell adhesion and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance to the drugs cytarabine and daunorubicin without changing the original CD34+/CD38-/CD33- phenotype for 168 hours compared to fibronectin tissue culture plate systems. Molecularly, as seen in vivo, increased chemoresistance is associated with the upregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 and the cell cycle regulatory protein p27Kip1leading to cell growth arrest. Abrogation of Bcl2 activity by the Bcl2-specific inhibitor ABT 737 led to cell death in the presence of both cytarabine and daunorubicin, demonstrating that the cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance induced by Bcl2 and p27

  17. A combination of in vitro comet assay and micronucleus test using human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Aoi; Miyata, Atsuro; Honma, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    The comet assay has been widely used as a genotoxicity test for detecting primary DNA damage in individual cells. The micronucleus (MN) test is also a well-established assay for detecting clastogenicity and aneugenicity. A combination of the comet assay (COM) and MN test is capable of detecting a variety of genotoxic potentials as an in vitro screening system. Although the in vitro MN test has a robust protocol and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline, the in vitro COM does not. To establish a robust protocol for the COM and to compare its sensitivity with that of the MN, we conducted COM and MN concurrently for five genotoxic agents (ethyl methanesulfonate, methyl methanesulfonate, hydrogen peroxide, gamma-rays and mitomycin C) and one non-genotoxic agent (triton X-100), using human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Relative cell count (RCC), relative population doubling (RPD), relative increase in cell count (RICC) and relative cell viability determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay (TBDE) were employed as cytotoxic measurements. However, the relative cell viability determined by TBDE just after the treatment was not an appropriate parameter of cytotoxicity for the genotoxic agents because it remained constant even at the highest doses, which showed severe cytotoxicity by RCC, RPD and RICC. The results of the COM showed qualitative agreement (positive or negative) with those of the MN except for mitomycin C, which is an interstrand cross-linker. The COM always required higher doses than the MN to detect the genotoxic potential of the genotoxic agents under the test conditions applied here. The doses that induced a comet tail always yielded test guideline for MN because of their high cytotoxicity. These results are helpful for interpreting the results of the COM and MN in in vitro genotoxic hazard assessments. Further investigation is required to standardise the COM.

  18. Development of assay platforms for in vitro screening of Treg modulating potential of pharmacological compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Holmstrøm, Kim; Jørgensen, Flemming;

    2015-01-01

    sorting (FACS) sorted CD4 + CD25(high)CD127(dim/-)CD45RA+ naïve Treg cells followed by in vitro expansion. We report on the use of these cells in a short-term assay based on Treg mediated inhibition of the early effector T cell activation markers CD69 and CD154. Additionally, we investigate the use...

  19. Transcription in Archaea: in vitro transcription assays for mjRNAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smollett, Katherine; Blombach, Fabian; Werner, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The fully recombinant Methanocaldococcus jannaschii RNA polymerase allows for a detailed dissection of the different stages of the transcription. In the previous chapter, we discussed how to purify the different components of the M. jannaschii transcription system, the RNA polymerase subunits, and general transcription factors and how to assemble a functional M. jannaschii enzyme. Standard in vitro transcription assays can be used to examine the different stages of transcription. In this chapter, we describe how some of these assays have been optimized for M. jannaschii RNA polymerase, which transcribes at much higher temperatures than many other transcription complexes.

  20. In vitro comparative assessment of different viability assays in Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredero-Bermejo, I; Copa-Patiño, J L; Soliveri, J; Gómez, R; de la Mata, F J; Pérez-Serrano, J

    2013-12-01

    The species of the genus Acanthamoeba are opportunistic protozoan parasites that cause different diseases in humans, such as amoebic keratitis and granulomatous encephalitis. The rise in the rate of Acanthamoeba keratitis, mainly due to the increase in contact lens wearers, turns the development of viability assays using a multi-well plate reader as a tool for screening new antiamoebic agents in vitro into an important goal. In our study, the viability assays PrestoBlue®, resazurin sodium salt, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and CellTiter96® were tested for their suitability as time-saving alternatives to the classical manual or direct-counting method, assessing the effect of the antiamoebic agent chlorhexidine digluconate and temperature on Acanthamoeba castellanii (ATCC® 30234™) and Acanthamoeba polyphaga 2961. Although resazurin and MTT have already been previously used in amoeba viability assays to test the activities of antiamoebic agents in vitro, it is the first time that PrestoBlue® and CellTiter96® are used for this purpose. Results indicated that the viability assays were strain-dependent leading in some cases to an overestimation of the real situation of viable cells. This implies that each viability assay ought to be set up for each amoeba strain studied.

  1. Antioxidant activities of Indigofera cassioides Rottl. Ex. DC. using various in vitro assay models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Senthil Kumar; B Rajkapoor; P Perumal

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant potential of methanolic leaf extract of Indigoferacassioides (MEIC) using various in vitro antioxidant assay systems. Methods: Antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of MEIC was assayed by using different in vitro models like ABTS, DPPH, nitric oxide, superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical. Reductive ability of the extract was tested by the complex formation with potassium ferricyanide. Further total phenol and flavonoid contents of the crude extract were also determined. Rutin and ascorbic acid were used as standards. Results: MEIC exhibited potent and concentration dependent free radical scavenging activity in all the tested models. Reductive ability was also found to increase with increase in MEIC concentration. Total phenol and flavonoid content determination showed that the extract is rich in phenols and flavonoids. Conclusions: All the results of the in vitro antioxidant assays reveal potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of the leaves of Indigofera cassioides, equivalent to that of standard ascorbic acid and rutin. This potent antioxidant activity may be attributed to its high phenolic and flavonoid contents

  2. Evaluation of wetland and tertiary wastewater treatments for estrogenicity using in vivo and in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L; Sapozhnikova, Y; Bawardi, O; Schlenk, D

    2005-01-01

    The effects of wetland wastewater treatment on estrogenic activity and estrogenic activity of water after tertiary treatment were evaluated using in vivo (rainbow trout vitellogenin [VTG] expression) and in vitro (yeast estrogen screening) assays. Juvenile rainbow trout exposed to tertiary-treated wastewater from the Green Acres Treatment Plant in Orange County Water District had increased plasma VTG levels compared with control fish. When trout were exposed to wastewater-dominated water before it entered into Prado Wetland (Riverside County, CA), VTG concentrations were increased above those of controls and were not significantly different from fish exposed to water exiting the wetland. VTG E2-equivalent concentrations (EEQs) of the water samples from the Green Acres Plant were 16.92 +/- 16.49 ng/L. Activity of water entering Prado Wetland was 29.80 +/- 28.41 ng/L EEQ, and water exiting was 24.34 +/- 23.17 ng/L EEQ. In vitro assays estimated that estrogenic activity of water from the Green Acres Plant was estrogen screening EEQs of 2.57 and estrogens that are not potent estrogen-receptor ligands exist in wastewaters from the Green Acres Plant as well as water entering and exiting Prado Wetland. Wetland treatment did not remove environmental estrogens in the water. Our results also suggest that in vitro assays may underestimate estrogenic activity of sampled water.

  3. Genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles evaluated using the Ames test and in vitro micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, David H; Yan, Jian; Chen, Ying; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Zhang, Yongbin; Biris, Alexandru S; Heflich, Robert H; Chen, Tao

    2012-06-14

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have antimicrobial properties, which have contributed to their widespread use in consumer products. A current issue regarding nanomaterials is the extent to which existing genotoxicity assays are useful for evaluating the risks associated with their use. In this study, the genotoxicity of 5 nm AgNPs was assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the in vitro micronucleus assay. Using the preincubation version of the Ames assay, Salmonella strains TA102, TA100, TA1537, TA98, and TA1535 were treated with 0.15-76.8 μg/plate of the AgNPs. Toxicity limited the doses that could be assayed to 2.4-38.4 μg/plate; no increases in mutant frequency over the vehicle control were found for the concentrations that could be assayed. Human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were treated with 10-30 μg/ml AgNPs, and additional cells were treated with water and 0.73 gy X-rays as vehicle and positive controls. Micronucleus frequency was increased by the AgNP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 30 μg/ml (with 45.4% relative population doubling), AgNPs induced a significant, 3.17-fold increase with a net increase of 1.60% in micronucleus frequency over the vehicle control, a weak positive response by our criteria. These results demonstrate that the 5 nm AgNP are genotoxic in TK6 cells. Also, the data suggest that the in vitro micronucleus assay may be more appropriate than the Ames test for evaluating the genotoxicity of the AgNPs.

  4. Prevalidation of the rat CFU-GM assay for in vitro toxicology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessina, Augusto; Bonomi, Arianna; Cavicchini, Loredana; Albella, Beatriz; Cerrato, Laura; Parent-Massin, Dominique; Sibiril, Yann; Parchment, Ralph; Behrsing, Holger; Verderio, Paolo; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Giangreco, Manuela; Baglio, Carolina; Coccè, Valentina; Sisto, Francesca; Gribaldo, Laura

    2010-05-01

    In vitro haematotoxicity assays are thought to have the potential to significantly reduce and refine the use of animals for haematotoxicity testing. These assays are used successfully in all types of studies - however, their use is not so common in human toxicology studies in the preclinical setting, as they are not required for regulatory testing in this case. Furthermore, these assays could play a key role in bridging the gap between preclinical toxicology studies in animal models and clinical investigations. In previous studies, the Colony Forming Unit-Granulocyte Macrophage (CFU-GM) assay has been validated for testing drug haematotoxicity (with both mouse bone-marrow and human cord blood) and for predicting the in vivo human maximal tolerated dose (MTD) by adjusting in vivo data on mouse toxicity. Recently, a Colony Forming Unit-Megakaryocyte (CFU-MK) assay has also been prevalidated for testing drug toxicity toward megakaryocytes. The rat CFU-GM assay has been used by many researchers for its ability to evaluate in vitro haematotoxicity. Although it is not yet available, a standardised procedure for data comparison could be very important, since the rat is the most widely-used species for the in vivo testing of toxicants. This report presents the results of the prevalidation study developed to analyse the intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory variability of a standardised operating procedure for this assay and its performance for the in vitro determination of the inhibitory concentration (IC) values of drugs on rat myeloid progenitors (CFU-GM). The results demonstrate that the CFU-GM assay can be performed with cryopreserved rat bone-marrow cells (rBMC). The assay represents a useful tool for evaluating the toxicity of a compound, in terms of both relative toxicity (when different molecules are compared) and the prediction of the degree of in vivo toxicity. The use of this assay could greatly reduce the number of rats used in experimental procedures, and

  5. Potencies of estrogenic compounds in in vitro screening assays and in life cycle tests with zebrafish in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segner, H; Navas, J M; Schäfers, C; Wenzel, A

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the estrogenic potency of environmental estrogens at two testing tiers: at the initial level of in vitro screening assays, and at the level of definitive fish reproduction tests in vivo. The in vitro tests included a recombinant yeast estrogen receptor (ER) assay, a competitive radioreceptor assay using the hepatic ER of carp (Cyprinus carpio), and assays on vitellogenin induction in cultured hepatocytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and carp. In vivo, full life cycle tests with zebrafish (Danio rerio) were performed, using fertilization success as estrogen-sensitive reproductive endpoint. The test compounds included the natural estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E2) (only applied in the in vitro assays); the synthetic estrogen ethynylestradiol (EE2); and two xenoestrogens, 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and bisphenol A (BPA). Among the in vitro assays, differences were observed in the relative ranking of the test substances, and in the absolute sensitivity (EC50 values), although the interassay differences of EC50 values were within one order of magnitude. The in vivo activity of the test compounds was not accurately predicted by the in vitro assays, with respect to neither sensitivity nor ranking. The in vitro assays tended to overestimate the relative potency of the xenoestrogens; i.e. the ratio between the activity of the reference compound, EE2, and that of the test compound. The best prediction of the in vivo fish test results was obtained from the recombinant yeast assay.

  6. Factors affecting the in vitro micronucleus assay for evaluation of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Doak, Shareen H; Yan, Jian; Chen, David H; Zhou, Min; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Chen, Ying; Li, Chun; Chen, Tao

    2017-01-01

    A number of in vitro methodologies have been used to assess the genotoxicity of different nanomaterials, including titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The in vitro micronucleus assay is one of the most commonly used test methods for genotoxicity evaluation of nanomaterials. However, due to the novel features of nanomaterials, such as high adsorption capacity and fluorescence properties, there are unexpected interactions with experimental components and detection systems. In this study, we evaluate the interference by two nanoparticles, AgNPs and TiO2 NPs, with the in vitro micronucleus assay system and possible confounding factors affecting cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of the nanomaterials including cell lines with different p53 status, nanoparticle coatings and fluorescence, cytochalasin B, fetal bovine serum in cell treatment medium and different measurement methodologies for detecting micronuclei. Our results showed that micronucleus induction by AgNPs was similar when evaluated using flow cytometry or microscope, whereas the induction by TiO2 NPs was different using the two methods due to TiO2's fluorescence interference with the cytometry equipment. Cells with the mutated p53 gene were more sensitive to micronucleus induction by AgNPs than the p53 wild-type cells. The presence of serum during treatment increased the toxicity of AgNPs. The coatings of nanoparticles played an important role in the genotoxicity of AgNPs. These collective data highlight the importance of considering the unique properties of nanoparticles in assessing their genotoxicity using the in vitro micronucleus assay.

  7. Amelioration of oxidative stress by anthraquinones in various in vitro assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The use of natural phytoconstituents for food and as nutritional supplements is an easiest way to be healthier. Anthraquinone pigments have been traditionally used for various purposes viz. food colorants, textile staining, color paints and medicines. Rubia cordifolia L. is a perennial, herbaceous climbing plant belonging to family Rubiaceae. This plant contain substantial amounts of anthraquinones, especially in the roots. The present study deals with the bioactivity evaluation of phytoconstituents viz. alizarin and purpurin from Rubia cordifolia. Methods: The DNA protective and antioxidant potential of alizarin and purpurin was evaluated using different in vitro assays viz. DNA protection assay, ABTS assay, DPPH assay, Ferric ion reduction potential and Phosphomolybdenum assay. Results: Alizarin and purpurin exhibited good free radical scavenging activity in various assays. In DNA protection assay, alizarin showed more DNA protection against hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton ’s reagent in comparison to purpurin. Conclusions: Being potent antioxidants, these natural coloring compounds can be boon to the food industry as nutraceuticals. Further, these phytochemicals can be explored for their anticancer activity and may serve as potent cancer chemopreventive molecules.

  8. 45S5-Bioglass(®)-based 3D-scaffolds seeded with human adipose tissue-derived stem cells induce in vivo vascularization in the CAM angiogenesis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Marina; Hammer, Timo R; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Hoefer, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Poor vascularization is the key limitation for long-term acceptance of large three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering constructs in regenerative medicine. 45S5 Bioglass(®) was investigated given its potential for applications in bone engineering. Since native Bioglass(®) shows insufficient angiogenic properties, we used a collagen coating, to seed human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASC) confluently onto 3D 45S5 Bioglass(®)-based scaffolds. To investigate vascularization by semiquantitative analyses, these biofunctionalized scaffolds were then subjected to in vitro human umbilical vein endothelial cells formation assays, and were also investigated in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) angiogenesis model, an in vivo angiogenesis assay, which uses the CAM of the hen's egg. In their native, nonbiofunctionalized state, neither Bioglass(®)-based nor biologically inert fibrous polypropylene control scaffolds showed angiogenic properties. However, significant vascularization was induced by hASC-seeded scaffolds (Bioglass(®) and polypropylene) in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Biofunctionalized scaffolds also showed enhanced tube lengths, compared to unmodified scaffolds or constructs seeded with fibroblasts. In case of biologically inert hernia meshes, the quantification of vascular endothelial growth factor secretion as the key angiogenic stimulus strongly correlated to the tube lengths and vessel numbers in all models. This correlation proved the CAM angiogenesis assay to be a suitable semiquantitative tool to characterize angiogenic effects of larger 3D implants. In addition, our results suggest that combinations of suitable scaffold materials, such as 45S5 Bioglass(®), with hASC could be a promising approach for future tissue engineering applications.

  9. Immunological assays for chemokine detection in in-vitro culture of CNS cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Supriya D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we review the various methods currently in use for determining the expression of chemokines by CNS cells in vitro. Chemokine detection assays are used in conjuction with one another to provide a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines which is necessary for correct data interpretation of a specific observed biological effect. The methods described include bioassays for soluble chemokine receptors, RNA extraction, RT-PCR, Real - time quantitative PCR, gene array analysis, northern blot analysis, Ribonuclease Protection assay, Flow cytometry, ELISPOT, western blot analysis, and ELISA. No single method of analysis meets the criteria for a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines, therefore more than one assay might be necessary for correct data interpretation, a choice that is based on development of a scientific rationale for the method with emphasis on the reliability and relevance of the method.

  10. The influence of haemoglobin and iron on in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Rachel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; White, Andrew D.; Müller, Julius; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Matsumiya, Magali; Dennis, Mike J.; Parizotto, Eneida A.; Harris, Stephanie; Stylianou, Elena; Naranbhai, Vivek; Bettencourt, Paulo; Drakesmith, Hal; Sharpe, Sally; Fletcher, Helen A.; McShane, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The current vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG, has variable efficacy, but development of an effective alternative is severely hampered by the lack of an immune correlate of protection. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in functional in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays (MGIAs), which provide a measure of a range of different immune mechanisms and their interactions. We identified a positive correlation between mean corpuscular haemoglobin and in vitro growth of BCG in whole blood from healthy UK human volunteers. Mycobacterial growth in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both humans and macaques was increased following the experimental addition of haemoglobin (Hb) or ferric iron, and reduced following addition of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO). Expression of Hb genes correlated positively with mycobacterial growth in whole blood from UK/Asian adults and, to a lesser extent, in PBMC from South African infants. Taken together our data indicate an association between Hb/iron levels and BCG growth in vitro, which may in part explain differences in findings between whole blood and PBMC MGIAs and should be considered when using such assays. PMID:28256545

  11. Dose assessment of SiC nanoparticle dispersions during in vitro assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, Jorge, E-mail: jorge.mejiamendoza@unamur.be [University of Namur, Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (LARN-PMR) NARILIS (Belgium); Piret, Jean-Pascal; Noeel, Florence [University of Namur, Research Unit in Cellular Biology (URBC) NARILIS (Belgium); Masereel, Bernard [University of Namur, Department of Pharmacy NAMEDIC, Namur Thrombosis and Homeostasis Center (NTHC) NARILIS (Belgium); Toussaint, Olivier [University of Namur, Research Unit in Cellular Biology (URBC) NARILIS (Belgium); Lucas, Stephane [University of Namur, Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (LARN-PMR) NARILIS (Belgium)

    2013-08-15

    Here, we show that key physicochemical parameters of commercial Silicon Carbide nanoparticles, such as the primary particles of about 53 nm in size, the agglomerates size, and the surface composition, are considerably modified with respect to the pristine conditions, during in vitro assessment. The use of sample conditioning stages, such as the pre-dispersion in aqueous media and the subsequent dispersion in a culture medium specific to the in vitro assay, produce modifications as the absorption of N, C, and O, from the culture medium, in the nanoparticles surface. Our results show that the sedimented dose, fraction of sedimented NPs during incubation and consequently in contact with cells seeded at the bottom, of Silicon Carbide nanoparticles can be measured from the particle size distribution obtained using a centrifugal liquid sedimentation technique. It is underlined that the variations observed in the physicochemical properties are related to the in vitro assay conditions. Culture medium and incubation time are found to influence the most the sedimented dose and consequently the cells dose uptake.

  12. Development of a novel in vitro assay for the evaluation of integron DNA integrase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Tohidi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Integrons play an important role in multidrug resistance. The integron platform codes for integrase (intI that is required for gene cassette integration through site-specific recombination. The recombination crossover occurs between the G and TT nucleotides in non-palindromic attI and palindromic attC sites. The aim of this study was to establish an efficient in vitro assay for integrase purification and activity detection. To this end, the intI gene was cloned into the pET-22b plasmid. Then, the resulting recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli Origami™ strain. The recombinant protein expression was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and western blot assays. The recombinant intI protein was purified by nickel–nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni–NTA affinity chromatography, and its activity was measured by a newly introduced assay. Briefly, specific primers for each side of attI and attC were used, thereby, a polymerase chain reaction would be performed, if a fused plasmid containing both attI and attC sites was created upon recombination. SDS-PAGE and western blotting confirmed the presence of a 38-kDa recombinant protein. Optimum conditions were established for the measurement of the integrase activity and a new model assay was conducted to analyse the recombination activity in vitro. Although the electrophoretic mobility shift assay is an efficient and reliable method, the newly introduced assay provided new or enhanced capability to determine the integrase activity, suggesting that there is no need for expensive and advanced equipment.

  13. Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Shiratori, Tomomi; An, Le Van; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a ‘3D well’ was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines. PMID:26184194

  14. Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Shiratori, Tomomi; An, Le Van; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-07-08

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a '3D well' was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines.

  15. Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA for Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpal Singh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a ‘3D well’ was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines.

  16. In vitro antioxidant assay of selected aqueous plant extracts and their polyherbal formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganga Raju M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To support the use of selected plant extracts in Ayurveda, naturopathy, the antioxidant potential of the aqueous extract of Vincarosea (VR, Gymnemasylvestre (GS, Tinosporacordifolia (TC and Emblicaofficinalis (EO and their mixture (PHF of Indian origin was investigated for in vitro antioxidant activity by using in vitro models like superoxide, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxide inhibition assay. The results were compared with standard (ascorbic acid, a known antioxidant. The various phytoconstituents identified in the above selected plants extracts were poly phenols, flavonoids, terpenoids, tannins, alkaloids. The terpenoids were reported to protect lipids, blood and body fluids against the attack of free radicals, some types of reactive oxygen, hydroxylic groups, peroxides and superoxide radicals. The presence of these phytoconstituents in selected plants might be responsible for antioxidant activity with that of known antioxidant ascorbic acid.

  17. Bacteroides fragilis induce necrosis on mice peritoneal macrophages: In vitro and in vivo assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, J.M.B.D., E-mail: jmanya@terra.com.br [Laboratorio de Tecnologia em Cultura de Celulas, UEZO, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biologia de Anaerobios, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Seabra, S.H. [Laboratorio de Tecnologia em Cultura de Celulas, UEZO, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Vallim, D.C. [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Americo, M.A.; Fracallanza, S.E.L. [Laboratorio de Bacteriologia Medica, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Vommaro, R.C. [Laboratorio de Ultra-estrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, IBCCF, UFRJ (Brazil); Domingues, R.M.C.P. [Laboratorio de Biologia de Anaerobios, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-10-02

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacteria component of human intestinal microbiota and agent of infections. In the host B. fragilis interacts with macrophages, which produces toxic radicals like NO. The interaction of activated mice peritoneal macrophages with four strains of B. fragilis was evaluated on this study. Previously was shown that such strains could cause metabolic and morphologic alterations related to macrophage death. In this work propidium iodide staining showed the strains inducing macrophage necrosis in that the labeling was evident. Besides nitroblue tetrazolium test showed that B. fragilis stimulates macrophage to produce oxygen radicals. In vivo assays performed in BalbC mice have results similar to those for in vitro tests as well as scanning electron microscopy, which showed the same surface pore-like structures observed in vitro before. The results revealed that B. fragilis strains studied lead to macrophage death by a process similar to necrosis.

  18. Development and in vitro assay of oxidative stress modifying formulations for wound healing promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrux-Tallau, Nicolas; Callejon, Sylvie; Migdal, Camille; Padois, Karine; Bertholle, Valérie; Denis, Alain; Chavagnac-Bonneville, Marlène; Haftek, Marek; Falson, Françoise; Pirot, Fabrice

    2011-05-01

    Often presented as metabolism byproducts, reactive oxygen species are linked to detrimental effects such as chronic wound, mutagenesis, cancer and skin ageing. However, recent in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that ROS, and mainly hydrogen peroxide, interfere with cell signaling acting like second messenger and inducing adaptive responses. This is particularly observed in skin wound healing where cells are exposed to H₂O₂ following injury. In this study, we developed and characterized an innovative formulation producing H₂O₂ at low concentrations, in order to mimic physiological inflammation phase. Then, this pro-oxidative formulation (CAM-GOx) was assayed in vitro on keratinocytes cell culture, compared to the blank formulation (CAM) and the anti-oxidative formulation (CAM-CAT) to assess whether oxidative stress was implied or not in cellular responses.

  19. Use of In Vitro Assays to Assess Immunogenicity Risk of Antibody-Based Biotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Marisa K.; Deshpande, Meghana; Yang, Jane; Reynolds, Helen; Bryson, Christine; Fogg, Mark; Baker, Matthew P.; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Goletz, Theresa J.; Zhou, Lei; Moxness, Michael; Flynn, Gregory C.; Narhi, Linda O.; Jawa, Vibha

    2016-01-01

    An In Vitro Comparative Immunogenicity Assessment (IVCIA) assay was evaluated as a tool for predicting the potential relative immunogenicity of biotherapeutic attributes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from up to 50 healthy naïve human donors were monitored up to 8 days for T-cell proliferation, the number of IL-2 or IFN-γ secreting cells, and the concentration of a panel of secreted cytokines. The response in the assay to 10 monoclonal antibodies was found to be in agreement with the clinical immunogenicity, suggesting that the assay might be applied to immunogenicity risk assessment of antibody biotherapeutic attributes. However, the response in the assay is a measure of T-cell functional activity and the alignment with clinical immunogenicity depends on several other factors. The assay was sensitive to sequence variants and could differentiate single point mutations of the same biotherapeutic. Nine mAbs that were highly aggregated by stirring induced a higher response in the assay than the original mAbs before stirring stress, in a manner that did not match the relative T-cell response of the original mAbs. In contrast, mAbs that were glycated by different sugars (galactose, glucose, and mannose) showed little to no increase in response in the assay above the response to the original mAbs before glycation treatment. The assay was also used successfully to assess similarity between multiple lots of the same mAb, both from the same manufacturer and from different manufacturers (biosimilars). A strategy for using the IVCIA assay for immunogenicity risk assessment during the entire lifespan development of biopharmaceuticals is proposed. PMID:27494246

  20. Quantitative Validation of the Presto Blue Metabolic Assay for Online Monitoring of Cell Proliferation in a 3D Perfusion Bioreactor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnaert, Maarten; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan Ir

    2015-06-01

    As the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine mature toward clinical applications, the need for online monitoring both for quantitative and qualitative use becomes essential. Resazurin-based metabolic assays are frequently applied for determining cytotoxicity and have shown great potential for monitoring 3D bioreactor-facilitated cell culture. However, no quantitative correlation between the metabolic conversion rate of resazurin and cell number has been defined yet. In this work, we determined conversion rates of Presto Blue, a resazurin-based metabolic assay, for human periosteal cells during 2D and 3D static and 3D perfusion cultures. Our results showed that for the evaluated culture systems there is a quantitative correlation between the Presto Blue conversion rate and the cell number during the expansion phase with no influence of the perfusion-related parameters, that is, flow rate and shear stress. The correlation between the cell number and Presto Blue conversion subsequently enabled the definition of operating windows for optimal signal readouts. In conclusion, our data showed that the conversion of the resazurin-based Presto Blue metabolic assay can be used as a quantitative readout for online monitoring of cell proliferation in a 3D perfusion bioreactor system, although a system-specific validation is required.

  1. Synthesis, in vitro antimycobacterial evaluation and docking studies of some new 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrido[4',3':4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one schiff bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malothu, Narender; Bhandaru, Jaswanth S; Kulandaivelu, Umasankar; Jojula, Malathi; Adidala, Raghuram Reddy; K R, Umadevi; A V N, Dusthackeer; Kaki, Venkat Rao; Akkinepally, Raghuram R

    2016-02-01

    Development of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) has been considered as major health burden, globally. In order to develop novel, potential molecules against drug resistant TB, twenty two (22) new 3-substituted-7-benzyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrido[4',3':4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one (6a-k) and 3-substituted-7-benzyl-2-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrido[4',3':4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one (7a-k) derivatives were designed and synthesized by using appropriate synthetic protocols. Pantothenate synthetase (PS) was considered as the target for the molecular docking studies and evaluated the binding pattern at active site, as PS plays a significant role in the biosynthesis of pantothenate in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The preliminary in vitro antibacterial screening of test compounds was carried out against two strains of Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacteria. The antimycobacterial screening was performed against MTB H37Rv and an isoniazid-resistant clinical isolate of MTB. The compounds 6b, 6c, 6d, 6k, 7b, 7c, 7d and 7k exhibited promising antibacterial activity MIC in the range of 15-73 μM against all bacterial strains used and compounds 6d and 7b showed antimycobacterial activity (IC50 <340 μM in LRP assay) and (MIC <9 μM in broth microdilution method).

  2. In vitro pituitary and thyroid cell proliferation assays and their relevance as alternatives to animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Barae; Aarts, Jac M M J G; de Haan, Laura H J; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Bovee, Toine F H; Murk, Albertinka J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro effect of eleven thyroid-active compounds known to affect pituitary and/or thyroid weights in vivo, using the proliferation of GH3 rat pituitary cells in the so-called "T-screen," and of FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in a newly developed test denoted "TSH-screen" to gain insight into the relative value of these in vitro proliferation tests for an integrated testing strategy (ITS) for thyroid activity. Pituitary cell proliferation in the T-screen was stimulated by three out of eleven tested compounds, namely thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Of these three compounds, only T4 causes an increase in relative pituitary weight, and thus T4 was the only compound for which the effect in the in vitro assay correlated with a reported in vivo effect. As to the newly developed TSH-screen, two compounds had an effect, namely, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) induced and T4 antagonized FRTL-5 cell proliferation. These effects correlated with in vivo changes induced by these compounds on thyroid weight. Altogether, the results indicate that most of the selected compounds affect pituitary and thyroid weights by modes of action different from a direct thyroid hormone receptor (THR) or TSH receptor (TSHR)-mediated effect, and point to the need for additional in vitro tests for an ITS. Additional analysis of the T-screen revealed a positive correlation between the THR-mediated effects of the tested compounds in vitro and their effects on relative heart weight in vivo, suggesting that the T-screen may directly predict this THR-mediated in vivo adverse effect.

  3. Development of fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum for in vitro growth inhibition assays

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    Crabb Brendan S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum in vitro growth inhibition assays are widely used to evaluate and quantify the functional activity of acquired and vaccine-induced antibodies and the anti-malarial activity of known drugs and novel compounds. However, several constraints have limited the use of these assays in large-scale population studies, vaccine trials and compound screening for drug discovery and development. Methods The D10 P. falciparum line was transfected to express green fluorescent protein (GFP. In vitro growth inhibition assays were performed over one or two cycles of P. falciparum asexual replication using inhibitory polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits, an inhibitory monoclonal antibody, human serum samples, and anti-malarials. Parasitaemia was evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Results Transfected parasites expressed GFP throughout all asexual stages and were clearly detectable by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Measurement of parasite growth inhibition was the same when determined by detection of GFP fluorescence or staining with ethidium bromide. There was no difference in the inhibitory activity of samples when tested against the transfected parasites compared to the parental line. The level of fluorescence of GFP-expressing parasites increased throughout the course of asexual development. Among ring-stages, GFP-fluorescent parasites were readily separated from uninfected erythrocytes by flow cytometry, whereas this was less clear using ethidium bromide staining. Inhibition by serum and antibody samples was consistently higher when tested over two cycles of growth compared to one, and when using a 1 in 10 sample dilution compared to 1 in 20, but there was no difference detected when using a different starting parasitaemia to set-up growth assays. Flow cytometry based measurements of parasitaemia proved more reproducible than microscopy counts. Conclusions Flow cytometry based assays using GFP

  4. Genotoxicity of nano/microparticles in in vitro micronuclei, in vivo comet and mutation assay systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukumori Nobutaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, manufactured nano/microparticles such as fullerenes (C60, carbon black (CB and ceramic fiber are being widely used because of their desirable properties in industrial, medical and cosmetic fields. However, there are few data on these particles in mammalian mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. To examine genotoxic effects by C60, CB and kaolin, an in vitro micronuclei (MN test was conducted with human lung cancer cell line, A549 cells. In addition, DNA damage and mutations were analyzed by in vivo assay systems using male C57BL/6J or gpt delta transgenic mice which were intratracheally instilled with single or multiple doses of 0.2 mg per animal of particles. Results In in vitro genotoxic analysis, increased MN frequencies were observed in A549 cells treated with C60, CB and kaolin in a dose-dependent manner. These three nano/microparticles also induced DNA damage in the lungs of C57BL/6J mice measured by comet assay. Moreover, single or multiple instillations of C60 and kaolin, increased either or both of gpt and Spi- mutant frequencies in the lungs of gpt delta transgenic mice. Mutation spectra analysis showed transversions were predominant, and more than 60% of the base substitutions occurred at G:C base pairs in the gpt genes. The G:C to C:G transversion was commonly increased by these particle instillations. Conclusion Manufactured nano/microparticles, CB, C60 and kaolin, were shown to be genotoxic in in vitro and in vivo assay systems.

  5. Replacing animal experiments in developmental toxicity testing of phenols by combining in vitro assays with physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strikwold, Marije

    2016-01-01

    Many efforts have been undertaken over the past decades to develop in vitro tests for a wide range of toxicological endpoints as an alternative to animal testing. The principle application of in vitro toxicity assays still lies in the hazard assessment and the prioritisation of chemicals for further

  6. In vitro comet and micronucleus assays do not predict morphological transforming effects of silica particles in Syrian Hamster Embryo cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darne, Christian; Coulais, Catherine; Terzetti, Francine; Fontana, Caroline; Binet, Stéphane; Gaté, Laurent; Guichard, Yves

    2016-01-15

    Crystalline silica particles and asbestos have both been classified as carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). However, because of the limited data available, amorphous silica was not classifiable. In vitro, the carcinogenic potential of natural crystalline and amorphous silica particles has been revealed by the Syrian Hamster Embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay. On the other hand, the genotoxic potential of those substances has not been investigated in SHE cells. And yet, genotoxicity assays are commonly used for hazard evaluation and they are often used as in vitro assays of reference to predict a possible carcinogenic potential. The main objective of this study was to compare the genotoxic potential and the carcinogenic potential of different crystalline and amorphous silica particles in SHE cells. Three silica samples of different crystallinity were used: natural amorphous silica, partially crystallized silica and quartz silica particles. Their genotoxicity were tested through the in vitro micronucleus assay and the comet assay in SHE, and their carcinogenic potential through the SHE transformation assay. In addition, silica samples were also tested with the same genotoxicity assays in V79 hamster-lung cells, a common in vitro model for particle exposure. Results obtained in the micronucleus and the comet assays show that none of the silica was capable of inducing genotoxic effects in SHE cells and only the amorphous silica induced genotoxic effects in V79 cells. However in the SHE cell transformation assays, the partially crystallized and quartz silica were able to induce morphological cell transformation. Together, these data suggest that, in vitro, the short-term genotoxic assays alone are not sufficient to predict the hazard and the carcinogenic potential of this type of particles; SHE transformation assay appears a more reliable tool for this purpose and should be included in the "in vitro battery assays" for hazard

  7. Assessing transmissible spongiform encephalopathy species barriers with an in vitro prion protein conversion assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Carlson, Christina M.; Morawski, Aaron R.; Manthei, Alyson; Cashman, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Studies to understanding interspecies transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) are challenging in that they typically rely upon lengthy and costly in vivo animal challenge studies. A number of in vitro assays have been developed to aid in measuring prion species barriers, thereby reducing animal use and providing quicker results than animal bioassays. Here, we present the protocol for a rapid in vitroprion conversion assay called the conversion efficiency ratio (CER) assay. In this assay cellular prion protein (PrPC) from an uninfected host brain is denatured at both pH 7.4 and 3.5 to produce two substrates. When the pH 7.4 substrate is incubated with TSE agent, the amount of PrPC that converts to a proteinase K (PK)-resistant state is modulated by the original host’s species barrier to the TSE agent. In contrast, PrPC in the pH 3.5 substrate is misfolded by any TSE agent. By comparing the amount of PK-resistant prion protein in the two substrates, an assessment of the host’s species barrier can be made. We show that the CER assay correctly predicts known prion species barriers of laboratory mice and, as an example, show some preliminary results suggesting that bobcats (Lynx rufus) may be susceptible to white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) chronic wasting disease agent.

  8. Fabrication, in vitro Degradation and Cytotoxic Assay of Different Cystalline Phases Calcium Polyphosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Fabrication, in vitro degradation and cytotoxic assay of different crystalline phases calcium polyphosphate (CPP) were reported. The CPP ceramics were fabricated by crystallizing the amorphous frits , and sintered at 550 ℃ ,875 ℃ ,1000 ℃ for 1 h to obtain the γ-CPP, β-CPP anda-CPP respectively. The effects of the different crystalline phases on their weight loss and released PO4 3- were investigated during the degradation.And the surface change was observed by the SEM. The osteoblastic ROS17/2.8 cell line was used to estimate the cytotoxicity of CPP. The effects of CPP on cells' proliferation were evaluated by using MTT assay. The experimental results showed that γ-CPP, β- CPP and α-CPP did not exert cytotoxic effect on the cells. In addition, the proliferation of the growth of ROS17/2.8 cells on β-CPP was optimal.

  9. Validation of an in vitro contractility assay using canine ventricular myocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmer, A.R., E-mail: alex.harmer@astrazeneca.com; Abi-Gerges, N.; Morton, M.J.; Pullen, G.F.; Valentin, J.P.; Pollard, C.E.

    2012-04-15

    Measurement of cardiac contractility is a logical part of pre-clinical safety assessment in a drug discovery project, particularly if a risk has been identified or is suspected based on the primary- or non-target pharmacology. However, there are limited validated assays available that can be used to screen several compounds in order to identify and eliminate inotropic liability from a chemical series. We have therefore sought to develop an in vitro model with sufficient throughput for this purpose. Dog ventricular myocytes were isolated using a collagenase perfusion technique and placed in a perfused recording chamber on the stage of a microscope at ∼ 36 °C. Myocytes were stimulated to contract at a pacing frequency of 1 Hz and a digital, cell geometry measurement system (IonOptix™) was used to measure sarcomere shortening in single myocytes. After perfusion with vehicle (0.1% DMSO), concentration–effect curves were constructed for each compound in 4–30 myocytes taken from 1 or 2 dog hearts. The validation test-set was 22 negative and 8 positive inotropes, and 21 inactive compounds, as defined by their effect in dog, cynolomolgous monkey or humans. By comparing the outcome of the assay to the known in vivo contractility effects, the assay sensitivity was 81%, specificity was 75%, and accuracy was 78%. With a throughput of 6–8 compounds/week from 1 cell isolation, this assay may be of value to drug discovery projects to screen for direct contractility effects and, if a hazard is identified, help identify inactive compounds. -- Highlights: ► Cardiac contractility is an important physiological function of the heart. ► Assessment of contractility is a logical part of pre-clinical drug safety testing. ► There are limited validated assays that predict effects of compounds on contractility. ► Using dog myocytes, we have developed an in vitro cardiac contractility assay. ► The assay predicted the in vivo contractility with a good level of accuracy.

  10. A facile and green strategy for preparing newly-designed 3D graphene/gold film and its application in highly efficient electrochemical mercury assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Yan; Ding, Shiming; Chu, Zhenyu; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Danfeng; Luo, Jingyi; Jin, Wanqin

    2017-03-15

    In this work, we report a facile and green strategy for in situ and one step preparation of a novel 3D graphene/gold (G/Au) film. Triggering with unique driving force from hydrothermal growth, a 3D interlaced graphene framework with hierarchically porous structures was directly attached on a gold substrate pretreated with a self-assembled monolayer. Simultaneously, highly dispersive Au nanoparticles with tunable morphologies were anchored on the framework utilizing generated graphene as an endogenous reductant. Newly-designed 3D G/Au film possessed excellent properties of significantly large specific area, good electrical conductivity, high structure stability and substrate binding strength, etc. As a paradigm, an electrochemical Hg(2+) biosensor was constructed on 3D G/Au film, in which an exonuclease III-assisted target recycling was introduced. Impressively, an ultralow detection limit of 50 aM (S/N=3), a wide linear range from 0.1 fM to 0.1μM, a high selectivity and a good reliability for Hg(2+) assay in real water and serum samples were realized using prepared biosensor. It is highly envisioned that this work opens the door towards simply fabricating varying types of 3D graphene based hybrid films, and such G/Au film will have widespread applications in electroanalysis and electrocatalysis.

  11. Evaluation of Antioxidant Capacity of Solanum sessiliflorum (Cubiu Extract: An In Vitro Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Rocha de Lucena Herrera Mascato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cubiu is a vegetable of Solanaceae family, native to the Amazon, which is widely distributed through Brazil, Peru, and Colombia. It is used in food, medicine, and cosmetics by native populations. Research has shown that cubiu extracts have antioxidant activities with great biological relevance. We performed a phytochemical screening to identify the main chemical groups that could confer antioxidant activity to this extract. Several tests and qualitative precipitation specific staining for major classes of secondary metabolites were used. Antioxidant capacity in vitro tests (DPPH and ABTS were also used to assess the extract’s ability to sequester free radicals of 70% hydroethanolic and aqueous extracts of cubiu flour. Alkaloids, organic acids, phenols, flavonoid glycosides, and coumarins were found in the hydroethanolic extract while the aqueous extract presented anthocyanins, gums, tannins and mucilage, amino groups, and volatile and fixed acids. For in vitro tests, the IC50 value obtained in the DPPH assay was 606.3 ± 3.5 μg/mL while that for the ABTS assay was 290.3 ± 10.7 µg/mL. Although cubiu extracts present chemical compounds directly related to antioxidant activity, our results show that it has a low antioxidant activity. Additional studies will be needed to isolate and characterize specific compounds to further assess antioxidant activity.

  12. Evaluation of standard reagents for radial-immunodiffusion assays. In vitro control of rabies vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICELI Graciela S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The RID assay is one of the in vitro methods used for in-process control in the production of rabies vaccines for veterinary use. It has been shown to be very useful for determining antigen concentration in the final bulk product. The work presented in this paper, including the production and standardization of candidate standard reagents for use in the Radial Immunodiffusion Assay (RID was carried out at the Pan American Institute for Food Protection and Zoonoses (INPPAZ/PAHO/WHO. The study was completed with the cooperation of the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, National University of La Plata (NULP, Argentina, where the validation of the proposed standards and the quality control of samples from 28 different batches of rabies vaccines produced with Pasteur strain rabies virus (PV in BHK cells were performed. The activity of the vaccines was determined by in vivo (NIH and in vitro (RIDassays. The results of the candidate reagents for the reagent standardization tests showed stability, sensitivity and reproducibility. The Relative Potency the 1.2 between the problem vaccines and the reference vaccine was estimated by variance and regression analysis. The results of our validation study show that the INPPAZ (PAHO/WHO is capable of producing and distributing the above-mentioned standard reagents, as well as of providing support for the incorporation of the RID technique (sensitive, rapid and inexpensive to the laboratories that manufacture rabies vaccines in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  13. Development of an in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-anthrax Lethal Toxin Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd Rijpkema

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lethal toxin (LT of Bacillus anthracis reduces the production of a number of inflammatory mediators, including transcription factors, chemokines and cytokines in various human cell lines, leading to down-regulation of the host inflammatory response. Previously we showed that the reduction of interleukin-8 (IL-8 is a sensitive marker of LT-mediated intoxication in human neutrophil-like NB-4 cells and that IL-8 levels are restored to normality when therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAb with toxin-neutralising (TN activity are added. We used this information to develop cell-based assays that examine the effects of TN therapeutic mAbs designed to treat LT intoxication and here we extend these findings. We present an in vitro assay based on human endothelial cell line HUVEC jr2, which measures the TN activity of therapeutic anti-LT mAbs using IL-8 as a marker for intoxication. HUVEC jr2 cells have the advantage over NB-4 cells that they are adherent, do not require a differentiation step and can be used in a microtitre plate format and therefore can facilitate high throughput analysis. This human cell-based assay provides a valid alternative to the mouse macrophage assay as it is a more biologically relevant model of the effects of toxin-neutralising antibodies in human infection.

  14. Comparison between fibroblast wound healing and cell random migration assays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascione, Flora; Vasaturo, Angela; Caserta, Sergio; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Formisano, Pietro; Guido, Stefano

    2016-09-10

    Cell migration plays a key role in many biological processes, including cancer growth and invasion, embryogenesis, angiogenesis, inflammatory response, and tissue repair. In this work, we compare two well-established experimental approaches for the investigation of cell motility in vitro: the cell random migration (CRM) and the wound healing (WH) assay. In the former, extensive tracking of individual live cells trajectories by time-lapse microscopy and elaborate data processing are used to calculate two intrinsic motility parameters of the cell population under investigation, i.e. the diffusion coefficient and the persistence time. In the WH assay, a scratch is made in a confluent cell monolayer and the closure time of the exposed area is taken as an easy-to-measure, empirical estimate of cell migration. To compare WH and CRM we applied the two assays to investigate the motility of skin fibroblasts isolated from wild type and transgenic mice (TgPED) overexpressing the protein PED/PEA-15, which is highly expressed in patients with type 2 diabetes. Our main result is that the cell motility parameters derived from CRM can be also estimated from a time-resolved analysis of the WH assay, thus showing that the latter is also amenable to a quantitative analysis for the characterization of cell migration. To our knowledge this is the first quantitative comparison of these two widely used techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A DNA immunoprecipitation assay used in quantitative detection of in vitro DNA-protein complex binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Young; Chae, Ji Hyung; Oh, Chang-Ho; Kim, Chul Geun

    2013-10-15

    To begin gene transcription, several transcription factors must bind to specific DNA sequences to form a complex via DNA-protein interactions. We established an in vitro method for specific and sensitive analyses of DNA-protein interactions based on a DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) method. We verified the accuracy and efficiency of the DIP assay in quantitatively measuring DNA-protein binding using transcription factor CP2c as a model. With our DIP assay, we could detect specific interactions within a DNA-CP2c complex, with reproducible and quantitative binding values. In addition, we were able to effectively measure the changes in DNA-CP2c binding by the addition of a small molecule, FQI1 (factor quinolinone inhibitor 1), previously identified as a specific inhibitor of this binding. To identify a new regulator of DNA-CP2c binding, we analyzed several CP2c binding peptides and found that only one class of peptide severely inhibits DNA-CP2c binding. These data show that our DIP assay is very useful in quantitatively detecting the binding dynamics of DNA-protein complex. Because DNA-protein interaction is very dynamic in different cellular environments, our assay can be applied to the detection of active transcription factors, including promoter occupancy in normal and disease conditions. Moreover, it may be used to develop a targeted regulator of specific DNA-protein interaction.

  16. Micro-arrayed human embryonic stem cells-derived cardiomyocytes for in vitro functional assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Serena

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The heart is one of the least regenerative organs in the body and any major insult can result in a significant loss of heart cells. The development of an in vitro-based cardiac tissue could be of paramount importance for many aspects of the cardiology research. In this context, we developed an in vitro assay based on human cardiomyocytes (hCMs and ad hoc micro-technologies, suitable for several applications: from pharmacological analysis to physio-phatological studies on transplantable hCMs. We focused on the development of an assay able to analyze not only hCMs viability, but also their functionality. METHODS: hCMs were cultured onto a poly-acrylamide hydrogel with tunable tissue-like mechanical properties and organized through micropatterning in a 20×20 array. Arrayed hCMs were characterized by immunofluorescence, GAP-FRAP analyses and live and dead assay. Their functionality was evaluated monitoring the excitation-contraction coupling. RESULTS: Micropatterned hCMs maintained the expression of the major cardiac markers (cTnT, cTnI, Cx43, Nkx2.5, α-actinin and functional properties. The spontaneous contraction frequency was (0.83±0.2 Hz, while exogenous electrical stimulation lead to an increase up to 2 Hz. As proof of concept that our device can be used for screening the effects of pathological conditions, hCMs were exposed to increasing levels of H(2O(2. Remarkably, hCMs viability was not compromised with exposure to 0.1 mM H(2O(2, but hCMs contractility was dramatically suppressed. As proof of concept, we also developed a microfluidic platform to selectively treat areas of the cell array, in the perspective of performing multi-parametric assay. CONCLUSIONS: Such system could be a useful tool for testing the effects of multiple conditions on an in vitro cell model representative of human heart physiology, thus potentially helping the processes of therapy and drug development.

  17. Technical feasibility of 2D-3D coregistration for visualization of self-expandable microstents to facilitate coil embolization of broad-based intracranial aneurysms: an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Gregor [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Kreisklinikum Siegen, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Siegen (Germany); Pfister, Marcus [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Struffert, Tobias; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doelken, Marc; Doerfler, Arnd [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Spiegel, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim [University of Erlangen, Department of Informatics 5, Erlangen (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    The use of self-expandable microstents for treatment of broad-based intracranial aneurysms is widely spread. However, poor fluoroscopic visibility of the stents remains disadvantageous during the coiling procedure. Flat detector angiographic computed tomography (ACT) provides high resolution imaging of microstents even though integration of this imaging modality in the neurointerventional workflow has not been widely reported. An acrylic glass model was used to simulate the situation of a broad-based sidewall aneurysm. After insertion of a self-expandable microstent, ACT was performed. The resulting 3D dataset of the Microstent was subsequently projected into a conventional 2D fluoroscopic roadmap. This 3D visualization of the stent supported the coil embolization procedure of the in vitro aneurysm. In vitro 2D-3D coregistration with integration of 3D ACT data of a self-expandable microstent in a conventional 2D roadmap is feasible. Unsatisfying stent visibility constrains clinical cases with complex parent vessel anatomy and challenging aneurysm geometry; hence, this technique potentially may be useful in such cases. In our opinion, the clinical feasibility and utility of this new technique should be verified in a clinical aneurysm embolization study series using 2D-3D coregistration. (orig.)

  18. Technical feasibility of 2D-3D coregistration for visualization of self-expandable microstents to facilitate coil embolization of broad-based intracranial aneurysms: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Gregor; Pfister, Marcus; Struffert, Tobias; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doelken, Marc; Spiegel, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2009-12-01

    The use of self-expandable microstents for treatment of broad-based intracranial aneurysms is widely spread. However, poor fluoroscopic visibility of the stents remains disadvantageous during the coiling procedure. Flat detector angiographic computed tomography (ACT) provides high resolution imaging of microstents even though integration of this imaging modality in the neurointerventional workflow has not been widely reported. An acrylic glass model was used to simulate the situation of a broad-based sidewall aneurysm. After insertion of a self-expandable microstent, ACT was performed. The resulting 3D dataset of the Microstent was subsequently projected into a conventional 2D fluoroscopic roadmap. This 3D visualization of the stent supported the coil embolization procedure of the in vitro aneurysm. In vitro 2D-3D coregistration with integration of 3D ACT data of a self-expandable microstent in a conventional 2D roadmap is feasible. Unsatisfying stent visibility constrains clinical cases with complex parent vessel anatomy and challenging aneurysm geometry; hence, this technique potentially may be useful in such cases. In our opinion, the clinical feasibility and utility of this new technique should be verified in a clinical aneurysm embolization study series using 2D-3D coregistration.

  19. Development of an in vitro assay for teratogens: Final report, 1 July 1983 to 31 August 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the work were to apply an in vitro teratogen assay system to samples of fossil fuel combustion products and to extend the assay system by incorporating metabolic activation. Potential teratogenicity was measured by the ability of a test compound to inhibit the attachment of tumor cells to lectin coated plastic surfaces.

  20. In vitro genotoxicity of fipronil sister chromatid exchange, cytokinesis block micronucleus test, and comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ayla; Ekinci, Seda Yaprak; Güler, Gizem; Yildirim, Seda

    2014-03-01

    Fipronil (FP) is a phenylpyrazole pesticide developed by the transnational company Rhône-Poulenc Agro in 1987. Data on the genotoxicity and toxicity of FP are rather inadequate. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential genotoxic activity of FP using the single-cell microgel electrophoresis or comet assay, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), and micronuclei (MN) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In addition, the cytokinesis block proliferation index (CBPI) and proliferation index (PRI) were measured for cytotoxicity. In this study, three different doses of FP were used (0.7, 0.3, 0.1 μg/mL). Mitomycin C (2 μg/mL) and hydrogen peroxide were used as positive controls for SCE MN test systems, and comet assay, respectively. FP induced a statistically significant increase in the MN and SCE frequency and DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (pcomet assay, we showed that all the doses of the FP induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro (p<0.05).

  1. Human melanocytes mitigate keratinocyte-dependent contraction in an in vitro collagen contraction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakar, Jonathan; Krammer, Markus P; Kratz, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Scarring is an extensive problem in burn care, and treatment can be especially complicated in cases of hypertrophic scarring. Contraction is an important factor in scarring but the contribution of different cell types remains unclear. We have investigated the contractile behavior of keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts by using an in vitro collagen gel assay aimed at identifying a modulating role of melanocytes in keratinocyte-mediated contraction. Cells were seeded on a collagen type I gel substrate and the change in gel dimensions were measured over time. Hematoxylin & Eosin-staining and immunohistochemistry against pan-cytokeratin and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor showed that melanocytes integrated between keratinocytes and remained there throughout the experiments. Keratinocyte- and fibroblast-seeded gels contracted significantly over time, whereas melanocyte-seeded gels did not. Co-culture assays showed that melanocytes mitigate the keratinocyte-dependent contraction (significantly slower and 18-32% less). Fibroblasts augmented the contraction in most assays (approximately 6% more). Non-contact co-cultures showed some influence on the keratinocyte-dependent contraction. Results show that mechanisms attributable to melanocytes, but not fibroblasts, can mitigate keratinocyte contractile behavior. Contact-dependent mechanisms are stronger modulators than non-contact dependent mechanisms, but both modes carry significance to the contraction modulation of keratinocytes. Further investigations are required to determine the mechanisms involved and to determine the utility of melanocytes beyond hypopigmentation in improved clinical regimes of burn wounds and wound healing.

  2. An in vitro assay utilising parasitic larval Haemonchus contortus to detect resistance to closantel and other anthelmintics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, J T; Sangster, N C

    1993-08-01

    A new assay for detecting resistance to anthelmintics in vitro is described. The assay uses a simple culture system in which the ability of anthelmintics to kill or inhibit the migration of parasitic third and fourth stage Haemonchus contortus larvae through a 50 microns aperture mesh is assessed. The assay detects 2-10-fold resistance to closantel. Resistance to benzimidazoles, levamisole and ivermectin can also be detected.

  3. Experimental Study on Self-assembly of KLD-12 Peptide Hydrogel and 3-D Culture of MSC Encapsulated within Hydrogel In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua SUN; Qixin ZHENG

    2009-01-01

    o-fiber hydrogel in vitro. MSCs in KLD-12 peptide hydrogel grew well and proliferated with the culture time. KLD-12 peptide hydrogel can serve as an excellent injectable material of biological scaffolds in tissue engineering of IVD.

  4. In vitro measurement of cell death with the annexin A5 affinity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genderen, Hugo; Kenis, Heidi; Lux, Petra; Ungeth, Lisette; Maassen, Cecile; Deckers, Niko; Narula, Jagat; Hofstra, Leo; Reutelingsperger, Chris

    2006-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cell death is the cell surface-expression of phosphatidylserine. Expression of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface can be measured in vitro with the phosphatidylserine-binding protein annexin A5 conjugated to fluorochromes. This measurement can be made by flow cytometry or by confocal scanning-laser microscopy. The annexin A5 affinity assay comprises the incubation of cells stimulated to execute cell death with fluorescence-labeled annexin A5 and propidium iodide. Living cells are annexin A5-negative and propidium iodide negative, cells in the early phases of cell death are annexin A5 positive-and propidium iodide-negative, and secondary necrotic cells are annexin A5-positive and propidium iodide-positive. The entire procedure takes about 30 minutes for flow cytometry and 45 minutes for confocal scanning-laser microscopy. Various precautions and considerations are discussed further in the protocol described here.

  5. In vitro cytotoxicity assays of solid lipid nanoparticles in epithelial and dermal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, D. M.; Marcato, P. D.; Machado, D.; Silva, R. A.; Justo, G. Z.; Durán, N.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, the interest in nanostructured systems to drug delivery has increased because they offer several advantages over conventional dosage forms. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN) have been highlighted among these systems because they have advantages such as high physical stability, protection against drug degradation and ease of scale-up and manufacturing, without using organic solvent. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of SLN, by in vitro cytotoxicity assays, for dermal drug delivery. SLN of three different lipids were prepared by hot high pressure homogenization and the cytotoxicity was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) test in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and human HaCaT keratinocytes. SLN showed no cytotoxic potential suggesting a great potential for dermal application.

  6. In vitro cytotoxicity assays of solid lipid nanoparticles in epithelial and dermal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridolfi, D M; Marcato, P D; Duran, N [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil); Machado, D; Silva, R A [Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil); Justo, G Z, E-mail: daniela_ridolfi@hotmail.com [Departamento de BioquImica, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-06

    In recent years, the interest in nanostructured systems to drug delivery has increased because they offer several advantages over conventional dosage forms. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN) have been highlighted among these systems because they have advantages such as high physical stability, protection against drug degradation and ease of scale-up and manufacturing, without using organic solvent. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of SLN, by in vitro cytotoxicity assays, for dermal drug delivery. SLN of three different lipids were prepared by hot high pressure homogenization and the cytotoxicity was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) test in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and human HaCaT keratinocytes. SLN showed no cytotoxic potential suggesting a great potential for dermal application.

  7. Predictive endocrine testing in the 21st century using in vitro assays of estrogen receptor signaling responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotroff, Daniel M; Martin, Matt T; Dix, David J; Filer, Dayne L; Houck, Keith A; Knudsen, Thomas B; Sipes, Nisha S; Reif, David M; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Judson, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of environmental chemicals are subject to regulatory review for their potential to be endocrine disruptors (ED). In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays have emerged as a potential tool for prioritizing chemicals for ED-related whole-animal tests. In this study, 1814 chemicals including pesticide active and inert ingredients, industrial chemicals, food additives, and pharmaceuticals were evaluated in a panel of 13 in vitro HTS assays. The panel of in vitro assays interrogated multiple end points related to estrogen receptor (ER) signaling, namely binding, agonist, antagonist, and cell growth responses. The results from the in vitro assays were used to create an ER Interaction Score. For 36 reference chemicals, an ER Interaction Score >0 showed 100% sensitivity and 87.5% specificity for classifying potential ER activity. The magnitude of the ER Interaction Score was significantly related to the potency classification of the reference chemicals (p vivo uterotrophic data, the ER Interaction Scores showed 91% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Overall, this study provides a novel method for combining in vitro concentration response data from multiple assays and, when applied to a large set of ER data, accurately predicted estrogenic responses and demonstrated its utility for chemical prioritization.

  8. Human primary osteoclasts: in vitro generation and applications as pharmacological and clinical assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamurovic Natasa

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteoclasts are cells of hematopoietic origin with a unique property of dissolving bone; their inhibition is a principle for treatment of diseases of bone loss. Protocols for generation of human osteoclasts in vitro have been described, but they often result in cells of low activity, raising questions on cell phenotype and suitability of such assays for screening of bone resorption inhibitors. Here we describe an optimized protocol for the production of stable amounts of highly active human osteoclasts. Mononuclear cells were isolated from human peripheral blood by density centrifugation, seeded at 600,000 cells per 96-well and cultured for 17 days in α-MEM medium, supplemented with 10% of selected fetal calf serum, 1 μM dexamethasone and a mix of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, 25 ng/ml, receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL, 50 ng/ml, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, 5 ng/ml. Thus, in addition to widely recognized osteoclast-generating factors M-CSF and RANKL, other medium supplements and lengthy culture times were necessary. This assay reliably detected inhibition of osteoclast formation (multinucleated cells positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and activity (resorbed area and collagen fragments released from bone slices in dose response curves with several classes of bone resorption inhibitors. Therefore, this assay can be applied for monitoring bone-resorbing activity of novel drugs and as an clinical test for determining the capacity of blood cells to generate bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Isolation of large quantities of active human osteoclast mRNA and protein is also made possible by this assay.

  9. Antioxidant Activity of Seaweed Extracts: In Vitro Assays, Evaluation in 5 % Fish Oil-in-Water Emulsions and Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin Habebullah, Sabeena; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    In this study the antioxidant activity of absolute ethanol, 50 % ethanol and water extracts of two species of seaweeds, namely Fucus serratus and Polysiphonia fucoides, were evaluated both in in vitro assays and in 5 % fish oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions. The 50 % ethanolic extracts of P. fucoides...... showed higher antioxidant activity both in in vitro assays and in 5 % oil-in-water emulsion in the presence or absence of iron. In spite of the higher phenolic content and very good antioxidant activity in some of the in vitro assays, the absolute ethanol extracts of both the species showed a pro......-oxidative tendency in 5 % fish oil-in-water emulsion in the presence or absence of iron. In order to investigate the reason for the higher antioxidant activity of 50 % ethanolic extracts of P. fucoides, these extracts were further fractionated into polyphenol-rich, protein-rich, polysaccharide-rich and low...

  10. In vitro RNA-binding assay for studying trans-factors for RNA editing in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikanai, Toshiharu; Okuda, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    In plant organelles, specific C residues are modified to U by RNA editing. Short RNA sequences surrounding the target site (i.e., cis-elements) are recognized by trans-factors, which were recently shown to be pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins. PPR proteins consist of tandem arrays of a highly degenerate unit of 35 (pentatrico) amino acids, and PPR motifs are believed to recognize specific RNA sequences. In Arabidopsis thaliana, more than 450 sites are edited in mitochondria and plastids, and a similar number of PPR proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. To study how the tandem array of a PPR motif facilitates the recognition of RNA sequences, an efficient biochemical strategy is an in vitro binding assay of recombinant PPR proteins with target RNA. This analysis is especially powerful with a combination of in vivo analyses based on the phenotypes of mutants and transgenic plants. In this chapter, we describe methods for the expression of recombinant PPR proteins in Escherichia coli, preparation of probe RNAs, and RNA gel shift assays. These methods can also be utilized for other RNA-binding proteins.

  11. Probing regenerative potential of Moringa oleifera aqueous extracts using In vitro cellular assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangeline E Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecules stimulating regeneration and proliferation of cells are of significance in combating ailments caused due to tissue injury, inflammation, and degenerative disorders. Moringa oleifera is one of the most valued food plants having the profile of important nutrients and impressive range of medicinal uses. Objective: To evaluate the potential of M. oleifera aqueous leaf and flower extracts to promote the proliferation of cells and explore their effect on cancer cell lines for assessment of safety. Materials and Methods: Aqueous leaf and flower extracts of M. oleifera were investigated for effect on rat-derived primary fibroblast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, and cancer cell lines using cell proliferation assay. They were also tested and compared for wound healing, angiogenesis, and hepatoprotective effect using in vitro assays. Results: Statistically significant increase in the proliferation of primary rat fibroblast, MSCs, and angiogenesis was observed after treatment with aqueous flower extract. The aqueous leaf extract determined a comparatively moderate increment in the proliferation of MSCs and angiogenesis. It however showed prominent cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines and a significant hepatoprotective effect. Conclusion: A very clear difference in response of the two extracts to different types of cells was detected in this study. The aqueous flower extract exhibited a higher potential to stimulate cell proliferation while not exerting the same effect on cancer cell lines. The leaf extract on the other hand, had a prominent antitumor and hepatoptotective effects.

  12. Sensitivity of two in vitro assays for evaluating plant activity against the infective stage of Haemonchus contortus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rofaai, A; Rahman, W A; Abdulghani, Mahfoudh

    2013-02-01

    The sensitivity of larval paralysis assay (LPA) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide-formazan (MTT-formazan) assay was compared to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of plant extracts. In this study, the methanolic extract of Azadirachta indica (neem) was evaluated for its activity against the infective-stage larvae (L(3)) of susceptible and resistant Haemonchus contortus strains using the two aforementioned assays. In both in vitro assays, the same serial concentrations of the extract were used, and the median lethal concentrations were determined to compare the sensitivity of both assays. The results revealed a significant difference (P formazan assay. The MTT-formazan assay is more feasible for practical applications because it measured the L(3) mortality more accurately than LPA. This study may help find a suitable assay for investigating the anthelmintic activity of plant extracts against trichostrongylid nematodes.

  13. Compounds used to produce cloned animals are genotoxic and mutagenic in mammalian assays in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.J. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto de Biociências de Rio Claro, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde em Desenvolvimento na Região Centro-Oeste, Faculdade de Medicina “Dr. Hélio Mandetta”, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Mestrado em Farmácia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Mantovani, M.S.; Silva, A.F. da [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pesarini, J.R. [Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde em Desenvolvimento na Região Centro-Oeste, Faculdade de Medicina “Dr. Hélio Mandetta”, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Mauro, M.O. [Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Doutorado em Biotecnologia e Biodiversidade - Rede Pró Centro-Oeste, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Ribeiro, L.R. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto de Biociências de Rio Claro, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-28

    The compounds 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide promote the successful production of cloned mammals and have been used in the development of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This study investigated the effects of 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide in vitro, using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay to assess cytotoxicity, the trypan blue exclusion assay to assess cell viability, the comet assay to assess genotoxicity, and the micronucleus test with cytokinesis block to test mutagenicity. In addition, the comet assay and the micronucleus test were also performed on peripheral blood cells of 54 male Swiss mice, 35 g each, to assess the effects of the compounds in vivo. The results indicated that both 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide, at the concentrations and doses tested, were cytotoxic in vitro and genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro and in vivo, altered the nuclear division index in vitro, but did not diminish cell viability in vitro. Considering that alterations in DNA play important roles in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and morphofunctional teratogenesis and reduce embryonic viability, this study indicated that 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide utilized in the process of mammalian cloning may be responsible for the low embryo viability commonly seen in nuclear transfer after implantation in utero.

  14. Factors influencing in vitro respiratory burst assays with head kidney leucocytes from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Holten-Andersen, Lars; Buchmann, Kurt

    Head kidney leukocytes are central elements in a number of in vivo and in vitro assays elucidating innate and adaptive immune mechanisms in teleosts following stimulation with various antigens. These systems are sensitive to a number of factors affecting the outcome of the assays. The present work...... describes the importance of temperature, cell concentration, immunostimulant, exposure time and immune-modulatory molecules on the respiratory burst activity of rainbow trout head kidney leukocytes in vitro. Some variation in RBA was observed among individual fish. However, use of cells pooled from four...

  15. THE EFFECTS OF OXIMES IN THE ASSAY OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN LYSED ERYTHROCYTES IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdollahi.

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus compounds are known to inhibit the esteratic site of acetylcholinesterase by phosphorylation. The phosphorylated esteratic site of acetylcholinesterase undergoes hydrolytic regeneration at a slow or negligible rate. Nucleophilic agents such as hydroxytamine, hydroxamic acids, and oximes reactivate the enzyme more erapidfy than does spontaneous hydrolysis. The red cell cholinesterose activity was assayed using dithio bis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB commonly known as Ellman's reagent. The principle of this assay method is the rate of hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine (substrate by a red celt suspension. Thiocholine that is produced, forms a yellow complex, when EUman's reagent (DTNB is used in the assay. This was tested in vitro in lysed erythrocyte samples of 35 healthy persons who had no known exposure to cholinesterose inhibitors, after the observation of immediate increase in absorption of light at 440 nm. All of data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and student t-test. A value of p<0.01 was considered. Results of this study show an increased absorbance in 440 nm, for pretreated samples with pratidoxime. This was observed by doses of (0.1, 0.5, 1,2 mmol, p<0.01. It was also a good dose dependent increase in absorbance at 440 nm for pralidoxime, (r=0.940, p<0.01. Also there is a significant increase in absorbance at 440 nm for samples pretreated by obidoxime at doses of (0.1, 0.5, 1,2 mmol. There is also a good correlation between absorbance at 440 nm and variou doses of obidoxime (r=0.946 , p<0.01. It is concluded that oximes can hydrofyzes the substrate, which then would be a source of error in determination of acetylcholinesterase activity and must be token into account.

  16. An In Vitro Assay to Study Induction of the Regenerative State in Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, E.; Valakh, V.; Karney-Grobe, S.; Shi, Y.; Milbrandt, J.; DiAntonio, A.

    2014-01-01

    After injury, peripheral neurons activate a pro-regenerative program that facilitates axon regeneration. While many regeneration-associated genes have been identified, the mechanism by which injury activates this program is less well understood. Furthermore, identifying pharmacological methods to induce a pro-regenerative state could lead to novel treatments to repair the injured nervous system. Therefore, we have developed an in vitro assay to study induction of the pro-regenerative state following injury or pharmacological treatment. First, we took advantage of the observation that dissociating and culturing sensory neurons from dorsal root ganglia activates a pro-regenerative program. We show that cultured neurons activate transcription factors and upregulate regeneration-associated genes common to the pro-regenerative program within the first hours after dissection. In a paradigm similar to pre-conditioning, neurons injured by dissociation display enhanced neurite outgrowth when replated as early as 12 hours after being removed from the animal. Furthermore, stimulation of the pro-regenerative state improves growth on inhibitory substrates and requires DLK/JNK signaling, both hallmarks of the pro-regeneration response in vivo. Finally, we modified this assay in order to identify new methods to activate the pro-regenerative state in an effort to mimic the pre-conditioning effect. We report that after several days in culture, neurons down-regulate many molecular hallmarks of injury and no longer display enhanced neurite outgrowth after replating. Hence, these neurons are functionally naïve and are a useful tool for identifying methods to induce the pro-regenerative state. We show that both injury and pre-treatment with forskolin reactivate the pro-regenerative state in this paradigm. Hence, this assay is useful for identifying pharmacological agents that induce the pro-regenerative state in the absence of injury. PMID:25447942

  17. In vitro assay for HCV serine proteinase expressed in insect cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Hua Hou; Gui-Xin Du; Rong-Bin Guan; Yi-Gang Tong; Hai-Tao Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To produce the recombinant NS3 protease of hepatitis C virus with enzymatic activity in insect cells.METHODS: The gene of HCV serine proteinase domain which encodes 181 amino acids was inserted into pFastBacHTc and the recombinant plasmid pFBCNS3N was transformed into DH10Bac competent cells for transposition.After the recombinant bacmids had been determined to be correct by both blue-white colonies and PCR analysis, the isolated bacmid DNAs were transfected into Sf9 insect cells.The bacmids DNA was verified to replicate in insect cells and packaged into baculovirus particles via PCR and electronic microscopic analysis. The insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus were determined by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot assays. The recombinant protein was soluted in N-lauryl sarcosine sodium (NLS) and purifed by metalchelated-affinity chromatography, then the antigenicity of recombinant protease was determined by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay and its enzymatic activity was detected.RESULTS: The HCV NS3 protease domain was expressed in insect cells at high level and it was partially solved in NLS.Totally 0.2 mg recombinant serine proteinase domain with high purity was obtained by metal-chelated-affinity chromatography from 5×107 cells, and both antigenicity and specificity of the protein were evaluated to be high when used as antigen to detect hepatitis C patients′ sera in indirect ELISA format. In vitro cleavage assay corroborated its enzymatic activity.CONCLUSION: The recombinant HCV NS3 proteinase expressed by insect cells is a membrane-binding protein with good antigenicity and enzymatic activity.

  18. Soil quality in the Lomellina area using in vitro models and ecotoxicological assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baderna, Diego, E-mail: diego.baderna@marionegri.it [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Colombo, Andrea [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Romeo, Margherita [Department of Molecular Biochemistry and Pharmacology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Cambria, Felice; Teoldi, Federico; Lodi, Marco [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Diomede, Luisa [Department of Molecular Biochemistry and Pharmacology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Benfenati, Emilio [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Soil quality is traditionally evaluated by chemical characterization to determine levels of pollutants. Biological tools are now employed for soil monitoring since they can take account of the global biological effects induced by all xenobiotics. A combined monitoring of soils based on chemical analyses, human-related in vitro models and ecotoxicological assay was applied in the Lomellina, a semirural area of northern Italy. Chemical characterization indicated overall good quality of the soils, with low levels of toxic and carcinogenic pollutants such as heavy metals, PAHs, PCDD/Fs and PCBs. HepG2 cells were used as a model for the human liver and BALB/c 3T3 cells to evaluate carcinogenic potential. Cells were treated with soil extractable organic matter (EOM) and the MTS assay, DNA release and morphological transformation were selected as endpoints for toxicity and carcinogenicity. Soil EOMs induced dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth at low doses and cytotoxicity only at doses of 500 and 1000 mg soil equivalents/ml. Potential issues for human health can be hypothesized after ingestion of soil samples from some sites. No statistically significant inductions of foci were recorded after exposure to EOMs, indicating that the levels of the soil-extracted organic pollutants were too low to induce carcinogenesis in our experimental conditions. An acute phytotoxicity test and studies on Caenorhabditis elegans were used as ecotoxicological assays for plants and small invertebrates. No significant alerts for ecotoxicity were found. In this proposed case study, HepG2 cells detected differences in the toxicity of soil EOMs, indicating that this cell line could be appropriate to assess the potential harm caused by the ingestion of contaminated soil. Additional information on the carcinogenic potential of mixtures was provided by the cell transformation assay, strengthening the combined approach. - Highlights: • A combined approach for evaluation of soil quality is

  19. Development of an in vitro binding assay for ecdysone receptor of mysid shrimp (Americamysis bahia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Hirofumi, E-mail: h-yokota@mail.kobe-c.ac.jp [Department of Biosphere Sciences, School of Human Sciences, Kobe College 4-1, Okadayama, Nishinomiya-shi, Hyogo 662-8505 (Japan); Eguchi, Sayaka [Department of Biosphere Sciences, School of Human Sciences, Kobe College 4-1, Okadayama, Nishinomiya-shi, Hyogo 662-8505 (Japan); Nakai, Makoto [Hita Laboratory, Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute (CERI), 3-822, Ishii-machi, Hita-shi, Oita 877-0061 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: We successfully performed cDNA cloning of EcR and USP of mysid shrimp. We then expressed the ligand-binding domains of the corresponding receptor peptides. The translated peptides could bind to ecdysone agonists as heterodimers. These results indicate that they are functional hormone receptors of mysid shrimp. - Abstract: A global effort has been made to establish screening and testing methods that can identify the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on invertebrates. The purpose of our study was to develop an in vitro receptor binding assay for ecdysone receptor (EcR) in mysid shrimp (Americamysis bahia). We cloned mysid shrimp EcR cDNA (2888 nucleotides) and ultraspiracle (USP) cDNA (2116 nucleotides), and determined that they encode predicted proteins of length 570 and 410 amino acids, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of these proteins shared 36-71% homology for EcR and 44-65% for USP with those of other arthropods. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that mysid shrimp EcR was classified into an independent cluster together with the EcRs of another mysid species, Neomysis integer and the cluster diverged early from those of the other taxonomic orders of crustaceans. We then expressed the ligand-binding domains (DEF regions) of mysid shrimp EcR (abEcRdef) and USP (abUSPdef) as glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion peptides in Escherichia coli. After purifying the fusion peptides by affinity chromatography and removing the GST labels, we subjected the peptides to a ligand-receptor binding assay. [{sup 3}H]-ponasterone A did not bind to abEcRdef or abUSPdef peptides alone but bound strongly to the abEcRdef/abUSPdef mixture with dissociation constant (K{sub d}) = 2.14 nM. Competitive binding assays showed that the IC{sub 50} values for ponasterone A, muristerone A, 20-hydroxyecdysone, and {alpha}-ecdysone were 1.2, 1.9, 35, and 1200 nM, respectively. In contrast, the IC{sub 50} values for two dibenzoylhydrazine ligands

  20. Comparison of the sensitivities of common in vitro and in vivo assays of estrogenic activity: application of chemical toxicity distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Laura L; Brain, Richard A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2008-12-01

    A number of contaminants in municipal effluent discharges are estrogen agonists to fish. Whereas several in vitro and in vivo techniques have been developed to assess the estrogenic activity of these compounds or ambient environmental samples, previous comparisons of the relative sensitivities of these approaches remain inconclusive. We employed a probabilistic hazard assessment approach using chemical toxicity distributions (CTDs) to perform a novel evaluation of relative sensitivities of six common in vitro and in vivo assays. We predicted that there was an 8.3% (human breast ademocarcinoma cell line, MCF-7, assay), 6.3% (yeast estrogen screen assay), or 1.9% (fish hepatocyte vitellogenin, VTG, assay) probability of detecting a compound in aquatic systems that will elicit an estrogenic response at concentrations at or below 0.1 microg/L, suggesting that the MCF-7 assay was the most sensitive in vitro assay evaluated in this study. The probabilities of eliciting the estrogenic response of VTG induction at a concentration less than 0.1 microg/L in rainbow trout, fathead minnow, and Japanese medaka were determined at 29.9, 26.2, and 18.8%, respectively. Thus, rainbow trout VTG induction was the most sensitive in vivo assay assessed. Subsequently, CTDs may provide a useful technique for hazard assessment of chemical classes for which exposure data are limited and for chemicals with common toxicological mechanisms and modes of action.

  1. In vitro pharmacodynamic evaluation of antiviral medicinal plants using a vector-based assay technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esimone, C O; Grunwald, T; Wildner, O; Nchinda, G; Tippler, B; Proksch, P; Uberla, K

    2005-01-01

    Medicinal plants are increasingly being projected as suitable alternative sources of antiviral agents. The development of a suitable in vitro pharmacodynamic screening technique could contribute to rapid identification of potential bioactive plants and also to the standardization and/or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic profiling of the bioactive components. Recombinant viral vectors (lentiviral, retroviral and adenoviral) transferring the firefly luciferase gene were constructed and the inhibition of viral vector infectivity by various concentrations of plant extracts was evaluated in HeLa or Hep2 cells by measuring the changes in luciferase activity. Cytotoxicity of the extracts was evaluated in parallel on HeLa or Hep2 cells stably expressing luciferase. Amongst the 15 extracts screened, only the methanol (ME) and the ethyl acetate (ET) fractions of the lichen, Ramalina farinacea specifically reduced lentiviral and adenoviral infectivity in a dose-dependent manner. Further, chromatographic fractionation of ET into four fractions (ET1-ET4) revealed only ET4 to be selectively antiviral with an IC50 in the 20 microg ml(-1) range. Preliminary mechanistic studies based on the addition of the extracts at different time points in the viral infection cycle (kinetic studies) revealed that the inhibitory activity was highest if extract and vectors were preincubated prior to infection, suggesting that early steps in the lentiviral or adenoviral replication cycle could be the major target of ET4. Inhibition of wild-type HIV-1 was also observed at a 10-fold lower concentration of the extract. The vector-based assay is a suitable in vitro pharmacodynamic evaluation technique for antiviral medicinal plants. The technique has successfully demonstrated the presence of antiviral principles in R. farinacea. Potential anti-HIV medicinal plants could rapidly be evaluated with the reported vector-based technique. The lichen, R. farinacea could represent a lead source of antiviral

  2. Arsenic bioaccessibility in contaminated soils: Coupling in vitro assays with sequential and HNO3 extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Wei; Li, Jie; Li, Hong-Bo; Naidu, Ravi; Ma, L Q

    2015-09-15

    Arsenic bioaccessibility varies with in vitro methods and soils. Four assays including unified BARGE method (UBM), Solubility Bioaccessibility Research Consortium method (SBRC), in vitro gastrointestinal method (IVG), and physiologically based extraction test (PBET), were used to determine As bioaccessibility in 11 contaminated soils (22-4,172 mg kg(-1)). The objective was to understand how bioaccessible As by different methods was related to different As pools based on sequential extraction and 0.43 M HNO3 extraction. Arsenic bioaccessibility was 7.6-25, 2.3-49, 7.3-44, and 1.3-38% in gastric phase (GP), and 5.7-53, 0.46-33, 2.3-42, and 0.86-43% in intestinal phase (IP) for UBM, SBRC, IVG, and PBET, respectively, with HNO3-extractable As being 0.90-60%. Based on sequential extraction, As was primarily associated with amorphous (AF3; 17-79%) and crystallized Fe/Al oxides (CF4; 6.4-73%) while non-specifically sorbed (NS1), specifically sorbed (SS2), and residual fractions (RS5) were 0-10%, 3.4-20% and 3.2-25%. Significant correlation was found between As bioaccessibility by PBET and NS1+SS2 (R(2) = 0.55-0.69), and UBM-GP and NS1 + SS2 + AF3 (R(2) = 0.58), indicating PBET mostly targeted As in NS1+SS2 whereas UBM in NS1 + SS2 + AF3. HNO3-extractable As was correlated to bioaccessible As by four methods (R(2) = 0.42-0.72) with SBRC-GP having the best correlation. The fact that different methods targeted different As fractions in soils suggested the importance of validation by animal test. Our data suggested that HNO3 may have potential to determine bioaccessible As in soils. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. An in vitro DNA double-strand break repair assay based on end-joining of defined duplex oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Kamal; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Neumann, Ronald D; Winters, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are caused by endogenous cellular processes such as oxidative metabolism, or by exogenous events like exposure to ionizing radiation or other genotoxic agents. Repair of these DSBs is essential for the maintenance of cellular genomic integrity. In human cells, and cells of other higher eukaryotes, DSBs are primarily repaired by the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) DSB repair pathway. Most in vitro assays that have been designed to measure NHEJ activity employ linear plasmid DNA as end-joining substrates, and such assays have made significant contributions to our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of NHEJ. Here we describe an in vitro end-joining assay employing linear oligonucleotides that has distinct advantages over plasmid-based assays for the study of structure-function relationships between the proteins of the NHEJ pathway and synthetic DNA end-joining substrates possessing predetermined DSB configurations and chemistries.

  4. Comparison of in vitro cell culture and a mouse assay for measuring infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Paul A; Marshall, Marilyn M; Mead, Jan R; Johnson, Anne M; Korich, Dick G; Rosen, Jeffrey S; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-08-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the "gold standard," mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  5. Silver nanoparticles: Significance of physicochemical properties and assay interference on the interpretation of in vitro cytotoxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz Ahmed, Kausar B; Nagy, Amber M; Brown, Ronald P; Zhang, Qin; Malghan, Subhas G; Goering, Peter L

    2017-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have generated a great deal of interest in the research, consumer product, and medical product communities due to their antimicrobial and anti-biofouling properties. However, in addition to their antimicrobial action, concerns have been expressed about the potential adverse human health effects of AgNPs. In vitro cytotoxicity studies often are used to characterize the biological response to AgNPs and the results of these studies may be used to identify hazards associated with exposure to AgNPs. Various factors, such as nanomaterial size (diameter), surface area, surface charge, redox potential, surface functionalization, and composition play a role in the development of toxicity in in vitro test systems. In addition, the interference of AgNPs with in vitro cytotoxicity assays may result in false negative or false positive results in some in vitro biological tests. The goal of this review is to: 1) summarize the impact of physical-chemical parameters, including size, shape, surface chemistry and aggregate formation on the in vitro cytotoxic effects of AgNPs; and 2) explore the nature of AgNPs interference in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. What level of estrogenic activity determined by in vitro assays in municipal waste waters can be considered as safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarošová, Barbora; Bláha, Luděk; Giesy, John P; Hilscherová, Klára

    2014-03-01

    In vitro assays are broadly used tools to evaluate the estrogenic activity in Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) effluents and their receiving rivers. Since potencies of individual estrogens to induce in vitro and in vivo responses can differ it is not possible to directly evaluate risks based on in vitro measures of estrogenic activity. Estrone, 17beta-estradiol, 17alfa-ethinylestradiol and to some extent, estriol have been shown to be responsible for the majority of in vitro estrogenic activity of municipal WWTP effluents. Therefore, in the present study safe concentrations of Estrogenic Equivalents (EEQs-SSE) in municipal WWTP effluents were derived based on simplified assumption that the steroid estrogens are responsible for all estrogenicity determined with particular in vitro assays. EEQs-SSEs were derived using the bioassay and testing protocol-specific in vitro potencies of steroid estrogens, in vivo predicted no effect concentration (PNECs) of these compounds, and their relative contributions to the overall estrogenicity detected in municipal WWTP effluents. EEQs-SSEs for 15 individual bioassays varied from 0.1 to 0.4ng EEQ/L. The EEQs-SSEs are supposed to be increased by use of location-specific dilution factors of WWTP effluents entering receiving rivers. They are applicable to municipal wastewater and rivers close to their discharges, but not to industrial waste waters.

  7. Comparative tumor promotion assessment of e-cigarette and cigarettes using the in vitro Bhas 42 cell transformation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breheny, Damien; Oke, Oluwatobiloba; Pant, Kamala; Gaça, Marianna

    2017-05-01

    In vitro cell transformation assays (CTA) are used to assess the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and complex mixtures and can detect nongenotoxic as well as genotoxic carcinogens. The Bhas 42 CTA has been developed with both initiation and promotion protocols to distinguish between these two carcinogen classes. Cigarette smoke is known to be carcinogenic and is positive in in vitro genotoxicity assays. Cigarette smoke also contains nongenotoxic carcinogens and is a tumour promoter and cocarcinogen in vivo. We have combined a suite of in vitro assays to compare the relative biological effects of new categories of tobacco and nicotine products with traditional cigarettes. The Bhas promotion assay has been included in this test battery to provide an in vitro surrogate for detecting tumor promoters. The activity of an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette; Vype ePen) was compared to that of a reference cigarette (3R4F) in the promotion assay, using total particulate matter (TPM)/aerosol collected matter (ACM) and aqueous extracts (AqE) of product aerosol emissions. 3R4F TPM was positive in this assay at concentrations ≥6 µg/mL, while e-cigarette ACM did not have any promoter activity. AqE was found to be a lesssuitable test matrix in this assay due to high cytotoxicity. This is the first study to use the Bhas assay to compare tobacco and nicotine products and demonstrates the potential for its future application as part of a product assessment framework. These data add to growing evidence suggesting that e-cigarettes may provide a safer alternative to traditional cigarettes. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:190-198, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro reporter gene assays for short-term screening of estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Zeinstra, Laura M; Schuitemaker, Femke; Lanser, Peter H; Bogerd, Jan; Brouwer, Abraham; Vethaak, A Dick; De Voogt, Pim; Murk, Albertinka J; Van der Burg, Bart

    2002-10-15

    Functional in vitro and in vivo reporter gene assays have recently been developed for the rapid determination of exposure to (xeno)estrogens. The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated chemically activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay uses T47D human breast cancer cells stably transfected with an ER-mediated luciferase gene construct. In the in vivo assay, transgenic zebrafish are used in which the same luciferase construct has been stably introduced. In both assays, luciferase reporter gene activity can be easily quantified following short-term exposure to chemicals activating endogenous estrogen receptors. The objective of this study was to compare responses by known (xeno)estrogenic compounds in both assays. Exposure to the (xeno)estrogens estradiol (E2), estrone, ethynylestradiol (EE2), o,p'-DDT, nonylphenol (NP), and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) revealed that EE2 was the most potent (xeno)estrogen tested and was 100 times more potent than E2 in the transgenic zebrafish assay, whereas in the in vitro ER-CALUX assay, EE2 and E2 were equipotent Although the xenoestrogens o,p'-DDT and NP were full estrogen agonists in the in vitro ER-CALUX assay, only o,p'-DDT demonstrated weak dose-related estrogenic activity in vivo. To determine if differences in reporter gene activity may be explained by differential affinity of (xeno)estrogens to human and zebrafish ERs, full-length sequences of the zebrafish ER subtypes alpha, beta, and gamma were cloned, and transactivation by (xeno)estrogens was compared to human ERalpha and ERbeta. Using transiently transfected recombinant ER and reporter gene constructs, EE2 also showed relatively potent activation of zebrafish ERalpha and ERbeta compared to human ERalpha and ERbeta. Zebrafish ERbeta and ERgamma showed higher transactivation by (xeno)estrogens relative to E2 than human ERbeta.

  9. A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi Willcoxon, Michi; Dennis, Jaclyn R; Lau, Sabina I; Xie, Weiping; You, You; Leng, Song; Fong, Ryan C; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-01-10

    A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins designated as Cry was developed and evaluated for screening a large number of Cry protein variants produced by DNA shuffling. This automation-amenable assay exploits an insect cell line expressing a single receptor of Bt Cry proteins. The Cry toxin used to develop this assay is a variant of the Cry1Ab protein called IP1-88, which was produced previously by DNA shuffling. Cell mortality caused by the activated Bt Cry toxin was determined by chemical cell viability assay in 96/384-well microtiter plates utilizing CellTiter 96(®) obtained from Promega. A widely-accepted mode-of-action theory of certain Bt Cry proteins suggests that the activated toxin binds to one or more receptors and forms a pore through the insect gut epithelial cell apical membrane. A number of insect proteins such as cadherin-like protein (Cad), aminopeptidase-N (APN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and ABC transporter (ABCC) have been identified as the receptors of Bt Cry toxins. In this study, Bt Cry toxin receptors Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer) cadherin-like protein (On-Cad) and aminopeptidase-N 1 and 3 (On-APN1, On-APN3) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) cadherin-like protein (Sf-Cad) were cloned in an insect cell line, Sf21, and a mammalian cell line, Expi293F. It was observed by ligand blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy that trypsin-activated IP1-88 bound to On-Cad and On-APN1, but not Sf-Cad or On-APN3. In contrast, IP1-88 bound only to APN1 in BBMV (Brush Border Membrane Vesicles) prepared from the third and fourth-instar O. nubilalis larval midgut. The sensitivity of the recombinant cells to the toxin was then tested. IP1-88 showed no toxicity to non-recombinant Sf21 and Expi293F. Toxicity was observed only when the On-Cad gene was cloned and expressed. Sf-Cad and On-APN1 were not able to make those cells sensitive to the toxin. Since the expression of On-Cad alone was

  10. Synthesis and in-vitro evaluation of 2-amino-4-arylthiazole as inhibitor of 3D polymerase against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kwi-Wan; Lee, Jung-Hun; Park, Sun-Mi; Choi, Joo-Hyung; Jeong, Dae-Youn; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Nam, Yeonju; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Su-Mi; Ku, Jin-Mo

    2015-09-18

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious vesicular disease of livestock caused by a highly variable RNA virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). One of the targets to suppress expansion of and to control FMD is 3D polymerase (FMDV 3Dpol). In this study, 2-amino-4-arylthiazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against FMDV 3Dpol. Among them, compound 20i exhibited the most potent functional inhibition (IC50 = 0.39 μM) of FMDV 3D polymerase and compound 24a (EC50 = 13.09 μM) showed more potent antiviral activity than ribavirin (EC50 = 1367 μM) and T1105 (EC50 = 347 μM) with IBRS-2 cells infected by the FMDV O/SKR/2010 strain.

  11. Application of standard cell cultures and 3D in vitro tissue models as an effective tool in drug design and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelian, Aleksandra; Wasilewska, Katarzyna; Megias, Diego; Winnicka, Katarzyna

    2017-03-23

    Cell culture systems are essential tools used in a wide range of biomedical and clinical studies. Two dimensional cell culture models (2D) provide basic information on cytotoxicity, penetration and accumulation of drugs in cells and they are of outmost importance when selecting new compounds of the desired biopharmaceutical properties as candidates for novel drugs. The improvement over 2D growing cells are three dimensional (3D) tissue models that mimic in vivo conditions and the functions of living tissue more accurately. These models reduce the cost of drug development, enable more efficient drug screening, minimise failure rate in medicine discovery and eliminate animal use during experiments. The article provides an overview of 2D cell cultures and 3D tissue models - their properties, basic procedures, conditions of culturing and applications. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Pulmonary toxicity of nanomaterials: a critical comparison of published in vitro assays and in vivo inhalation or instillation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsiedel, Robert; Sauer, Ursula G; Ma-Hock, Lan; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Wiemann, Martin

    2014-11-01

    To date, guidance on how to incorporate in vitro assays into integrated approaches for testing and assessment of nanomaterials is unavailable. In addressing this shortage, this review compares data from in vitro studies to results from in vivo inhalation or intratracheal instillation studies. Globular nanomaterials (ion-shedding silver and zinc oxide, poorly soluble titanium dioxide and cerium dioxide, and partly soluble amorphous silicon dioxide) and nanomaterials with higher aspect ratios (multiwalled carbon nanotubes) were assessed focusing on the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) reference nanomaterials for these substances. If in vitro assays are performed with dosages that reflect effective in vivo dosages, the mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity can be assessed. In early tiers of integrated approaches for testing and assessment, knowledge on mechanisms of toxicity serves to group nanomaterials thereby reducing the need for animal testing.

  14. Characterization of rhodamine-123 as a tracer dye for use in in vitro drug transport assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Forster

    Full Text Available Fluorescent tracer dyes represent an important class of sub-cellular probes and allow the examination of cellular processes in real-time with minimal impact upon these processes. Such tracer dyes are becoming increasingly used for the examination of membrane transport processes, as they are easy-to-use, cost effective probe substrates for a number of membrane protein transporters. Rhodamine 123, a member of the rhodamine family of flurone dyes, has been used to examine membrane transport by the ABCB1 gene product, MDR1. MDR1 is viewed as the archetypal drug transport protein, and is able to efflux a large number of clinically relevant drugs. In addition, ectopic activity of MDR1 has been associated with the development of multiple drug resistance phenotype, which results in a poor patient response to therapeutic intervention. It is thus important to be able to examine the potential for novel compounds to be MDR1 substrates. Given the increasing use rhodamine 123 as a tracer dye for MDR1, a full characterisation of its spectral properties in a range of in vitro assay-relevant media is warranted. Herein, we determine λmax for excitation and emission or rhodamine 123 and its metabolite rhodamine 110 in commonly used solvents and extraction buffers, demonstrating that fluorescence is highly dependent on the chemical environment: Optimal parameters are 1% (v/v methanol in HBSS, with λex = 505 nm, λem = 525 nm. We characterise the uptake of rhodamine 123 into cells, via both passive and active processes, and demonstrate that this occurs primarily through OATP1A2-mediated facilitated transport at concentrations below 2 µM, and via micelle-mediated passive diffusion above this. Finally, we quantify the intracellular sequestration and metabolism of rhodamine 123, demonstrating that these are both cell line-dependent factors that may influence the interpretation of transport assays.

  15. 78 FR 24425 - Assay Migration Studies for In Vitro Diagnostic Devices; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... study approach in support of the change. The FDA believes that the assay migration study paradigm... new system (previously not approved or licensed). The paradigm is suitable in cases when sufficient...'s current thinking on ``migration studies'' for in vitro diagnostic device. It does not create or...

  16. Development of an in vitro assay for teratogens. Progress report, 1 July 1983-31 August 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    An in vitro teratogen assay system was applied to samples of fossil fuel combustion products. Potential teratogenicity was measured by the ability of a test compound to inhibit the attachment of tumor cells to lectin coated plastic surfaces. 13 refs., 3 tabs. (DT)

  17. Comparison of genotoxicity of textile dyestuffs in Salmonella mutagenicity assay, in vitro micronucleus assay, and single cell gel/comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollin, Klaus-M; Gorlitz, Bernd-D

    2004-01-01

    The mutagenicity of textile dyes is an important consideration for the assurance of consumer protection and work safety. The mutagenicity testing of textile dyestuffs is crucial for accurately predicting health risks for consumers and workers exposed to dyes. Unfortunately, these data are often lacking. We studied the genotoxic activity of ten selected commercial textile dyestuffs, which are made up of mixtures of azo dyes and azo metal complex dyes as well as two anthraquinone dyestuffs. We used the Salmonella mutagenicity assay and cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cell line). In the S. typhimurium strain TA98, with and without S9, eight often dyestuffs investigated, and in strain TA 100, with and without S9, six often dyes caused frameshift mutations and base-pair substitutions in the dose range of 1-5000 microg/plate in a dose-related manner. All dyes, including those negative in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay, induced clastogenic effects in the in vitro micronucleus (MN) test in HaCaT cells as direct-acting mutagens in the concentration range of 5-150 microg/mL and with maximum MN frequencies between 1.1 and 7.2%, compared to negative controls that showed 0.2-0.4% MN cells. In the single cell gel/comet assay, all ten dyestuffs investigated caused DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes. The alkaline (pH >13) version used is capable of detecting DNA single strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, and DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking. Under the conditions of these screening tests, the textile dyes investigated are direct-acting genotoxic substances. The HaCaT cells testing protocol proposed has been shown to be an appropriate test system for evaluating mutagenicity of textile dyes on a base level.

  18. Antioxidant and Antiinflammatory Compounds in Nutmeg (Myristicafragrans) Pericarp as Determined by in vitro Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan-rui; Jayashre, Ettannil; Kumar, Paramasivam Suresh; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2015-08-01

    Nutmeg, Myristicafragrans, is known for its culinary and medicinal values. The nutmeg pericarp, abundant during the production of the seed, is also used in food and beverage preparations. In this study, the pericarp of M. fragrans was evaluated for its bioactive components using in vitro antioxidant and antiinflammatory assays. The hexane, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts inhibited lipid peroxidation (LPO) by 82.5, 70.1 and 73.2%, and cyclooxygenase enzymes COX-1 by 44, 44 and 42% and COX-2 by 47, 41 and 36%, respectively, at 100 microg/mL. The bioassay-guided purifications of extracts yielded 20 compounds belonged to neolignans (0.13%), phenylpropanoids (0.28%), phenolic aldehyde (0.35%), triterpenoids (0.06%), triglycerides (0.20%), sugars (10.2%) and steroids (0.49%). Pure isolates 1-5 inhibited LPO by 70-99% and 3-12 inhibited COX-1 and -2 enzymes by 37-49%. This is the first report on the bioassay-guided characterization of constituents in nutmeg pericarp. Our results support the medicinal claims of nutmeg pericarp.

  19. Efficacy Study of Broken Rice Maltodextrin in In Vitro Wound Healing Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahiah Mohamed Amin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maltodextrins that contain both simple sugars and polymers of saccharides have been widely used as ingredients in food products and pharmaceutical delivery systems. To date, no much work has been reported on the applications of maltodextrin from broken rice (RB sources. Therefore, the objective of this work was to investigate the in vitro wound healing efficacy of RB maltodextrin at different conditions. Wounds treated with lower dextrose equivalent (DE range (DE 10–14 of maltodextrins at a concentration of 10% obtained from RB were found to be able to heal the wounds significantly faster (p<0.01 than maltodextrin with higher DE ranges (DE 15–19 and DE 20–24 and concentrations of 5% and 20%. The findings from both BrdU and MTT assay further confirmed its wound healing properties as the NIH 3T3 fibroblast wounded cells were able to proliferate without causing cytotoxic effect when wounded cell was treated with maltodextrin. All these findings indicated that the RB maltodextrin could perform better than the commercial maltodextrin at the same DE range. This study showed that RB maltodextrins had better functionality properties than other maltodextrin sources and played a beneficial role in wound healing application.

  20. The Use of MTT Assay, In Vitro and Ex Vivo, to Predict the Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Mi Sook; Kang, Chang Mo; Shin, Hye Kyung; Choi, Chul Won; Seo, Young Seok; Ji, Young Hoon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Il [Seoul Women' s University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    The measurement of radiosensitivity of individuals is useful in radiation therapy. Unfortunately, the measurement of radiation survival using a clonogenic assay, which is the established standard, can be difficult and time consuming. The aim of this study is to compare radiosensitivity results obtained from the MTT and clonogenic assays, and to evaluate whether the MTT assay can be used on clinical specimens. Materials and Methods: HCT-8, LoVo, CT-26, and WiDr were the colon cancer cell lines used for this study. The clonogenic assay was performed to obtain the cell survival curves and surviving fractions at a dose of 2 Gy (SF2) as the standard technique for radiosensitivity. Also, the MTT assay was performed for each of the cell lines (in vitro). To simulate clinical specimens, the cell lines were inoculated into nude mice, removed when the tumors reached 1 cm in diameter, and chopped. Next, the tumors were subjected to the same process involved with the MTT assay in vitro. The inhibition rates (IR) of 10 Gy or 20 Gy of irradiation for in vitro and ex vivo were calculated based on the optical density of the MTT assay, respectively. Results: According to SF2 and the cell survival curve, the HCT-8 and WiDr cell lines were more resistant to radiation than LoVo and CT-26 (p<0.05). The IR was measured by in vitro. The MTT assay IR was 17.3%, 21%, 30% and 56.5% for the WiDr, HCT-8, LoVo and CT-26 cell lines, respectively. In addition, the IR measured ex vivo by the MTT assay was 23.5%, 26%, 38% and 53% in the HCT-8, WiDr, LoVo and CT-26 tumors, respectively. Conclusion: The radiosensitivity measured by the MTT assay was correlated with the measures obtained from the clonogenic assay. This result highlights the possibility that the MTT assay could be used in clinical specimens for individual radiosensitivity assays.

  1. Detection of genotoxic carcinogens in the in vivo-in vitro hepatocyte DNA repair assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsalis, J C; Tyson, C K; Butterworth, B E

    1982-01-01

    The in vivo-in vitro hepatocyte DNA repair assay has been shown to be useful in the evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals. The purpose of this study was to apply this assay to determining the genotoxicity of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. Male Fischer-334 rats were treated by gavage or ip injection with compounds dissolved in either corn oil, water, or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). At selected times after treatment, hepatocytes were isolated by liver perfusion and cultured with 3H-thymidine, Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was measured by quantitative autoradiography as net grains/nucleus (NG); greater than or equal to 5 NG was considered positive. Water, corn oil, or DMSO controls produced -3 to -6 NG with less than or equal to 6% of the cells in repair. All genotoxic hepatocarcinogens tested produced strong positive responses of greater than 15 NG including dimethylnitrosamine, 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), azoxymethane, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, benzidine, aflatoxin B1, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, and 2,4-diaminotoluene. The noncarcinogen, 2,6-diaminotoluene, was negative. The mutagen and rat brain carcinogen methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the rat pancreatic carcinogen azaserine were also positive. The carcinogens benzo(a)pyrene and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene yielded from -2 to -4 NG. This negative response is consistent with their lack of carcinogenic activity in rat liver. MMS produced the greatest amount of UDS 2 hr after treatment whereas 2-AAF did not induce its maximum response until 12 hr post-treatment. The potent hepatotoxin carbon tetrachloride induced a 40-fold elevation in DNA replication 48 hr after a 400 mg/kg dose, but no UDS was observed at 2, 12, 24, or 48 hr post-treatment. The weak hepatocarcinogen safrole induced no UDS suggesting that it is either nongenotoxic or is metabolized to an active form at an extremely slow rate following a single administration. These results demonstrate that this assay is

  2. Analysis of linear measurements on 3D surface models using CBCT data segmentation obtained by automatic standard pre-set thresholds in two segmentation software programs: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleti, Marcelo Lupion; Fernandes, Thais Maria Freire; Pagin, Otávio; Moretti, Marcela Rodrigues; Rubira-Bullen, Izabel Regina Fischer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of linear measurements on three-dimensional (3D) surface models obtained by standard pre-set thresholds in two segmentation software programs. Ten mandibles with 17 silica markers were scanned for 0.3-mm voxels in the i-CAT Classic (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA). Twenty linear measurements were carried out by two observers two times on the 3D surface models: the Dolphin Imaging 11.5 (Dolphin Imaging & Management Solutions, Chatsworth, CA, USA), using two filters(Translucent and Solid-1), and in the InVesalius 3.0.0 (Centre for Information Technology Renato Archer, Campinas, SP, Brazil). The physical measurements were made by another observer two times using a digital caliper on the dry mandibles. Excellent intra- and inter-observer reliability for the markers, physical measurements, and 3D surface models were found (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Pearson's r ≥ 0.91). The linear measurements on 3D surface models by Dolphin and InVesalius software programs were accurate (Dolphin Solid-1 > InVesalius > Dolphin Translucent). The highest absolute and percentage errors were obtained for the variable R1-R1 (1.37 mm) and MF-AC (2.53 %) in the Dolphin Translucent and InVesalius software, respectively. Linear measurements on 3D surface models obtained by standard pre-set thresholds in the Dolphin and InVesalius software programs are reliable and accurate compared with physical measurements. Studies that evaluate the reliability and accuracy of the 3D models are necessary to ensure error predictability and to establish diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis in a more realistic way.

  3. Genotoxicity Assessment of Chlorotrifluoroethylene Tetramer Acid using a Battery of In Vitro and In Vivo/In Vitro Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    thy:’ f’yl)- phthalate: An industrial plastieizer induces hypolipidemia and 3nhncl:ci hepatic catalase and carnitine acetyltransferase activities in...assay, the top agar was melted and supplemented with a sterile solution that contained 0.5 mM L-histidine and 0.5 mM D-biotin (10% v/v). Minimal...Bottom Agar: The bottom agar was Vogel-Bonner minimal medium E (Vogel and Bonner, 1956), supplemented with 0.2% (w/v) glucose. Nutrient Broth: The

  4. Comparison between 3D volumetric rendering and multiplanar slices on the reliability of linear measurements on CBCT images: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Maria Freire FERNANDES

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of two methods of measurements of linear distances (multiplanar 2D and tridimensional reconstruction 3D obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT with different voxel sizes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten dry human mandibles were scanned at voxel sizes of 0.2 and 0.4 mm. Craniometric anatomical landmarks were identified twice by two independent operators on the multiplanar reconstructed and on volume rendering images that were generated by the software Dolphin®. Subsequently, physical measurements were performed using a digital caliper. Analysis of variance (ANOVA, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman were used for evaluating accuracy and reliability (p<0.05. RESULTS: Excellent intraobserver reliability and good to high precision interobserver reliability values were found for linear measurements from CBCT 3D and multiplanar images. Measurements performed on multiplanar reconstructed images were more accurate than measurements in volume rendering compared with the gold standard. No statistically significant difference was found between voxel protocols, independently of the measurement method. CONCLUSIONS: Linear measurements on multiplanar images of 0.2 and 0.4 voxel are reliable and accurate when compared with direct caliper measurements. Caution should be taken in the volume rendering measurements, because the measurements were reliable, but not accurate for all variables. An increased voxel resolution did not result in greater accuracy of mandible measurements and would potentially provide increased patient radiation exposure.

  5. Skin sensitization risk assessment model using artificial neural network analysis of data from multiple in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujita-Inoue, Kyoko; Hirota, Morihiko; Ashikaga, Takao; Atobe, Tomomi; Kouzuki, Hirokazu; Aiba, Setsuya

    2014-06-01

    The sensitizing potential of chemicals is usually identified and characterized using in vivo methods such as the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Due to regulatory constraints and ethical concerns, alternatives to animal testing are needed to predict skin sensitization potential of chemicals. For this purpose, combined evaluation using multiple in vitro and in silico parameters that reflect different aspects of the sensitization process seems promising. We previously reported that LLNA thresholds could be well predicted by using an artificial neural network (ANN) model, designated iSENS ver.1 (integrating in vitro sensitization tests version 1), to analyze data obtained from two in vitro tests: the human Cell Line Activation Test (h-CLAT) and the SH test. Here, we present a more advanced ANN model, iSENS ver.2, which additionally utilizes the results of antioxidant response element (ARE) assay and the octanol-water partition coefficient (LogP, reflecting lipid solubility and skin absorption). We found a good correlation between predicted LLNA thresholds calculated by iSENS ver.2 and reported values. The predictive performance of iSENS ver.2 was superior to that of iSENS ver.1. We conclude that ANN analysis of data from multiple in vitro assays is a useful approach for risk assessment of chemicals for skin sensitization.

  6. Risk-based high-throughput chemical screening and prioritization using exposure models and in vitro bioactivity assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Ernstoff, Alexi; Arnot, Jon;

    2015-01-01

    . Bioactivity quotients (BQs) are calculated as iR/OED to obtain estimates of potential impact associated with each relevant use scenario. Of the 180 chemicals considered, 38 had maximum iRs exceeding minimum OEDs (i.e., BQs > 1). For most of these compounds, exposures are associated with direct intake, food...... with use scenario-specific estimates of chemical quantity to calculate daily intake rates (iR; mg/kg/day). These intake rates are compared to oral equivalent doses (OED; mg/kg/day), calculated from a suite of ToxCast in vitro bioactivity assays using in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation and reverse dosimetry...

  7. Pore size and LbL chitosan coating influence mesenchymal stem cell in vitro fibrosis and biomineralization in 3D porous poly(epsilon-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Nima Ghavidel; Li, Xian; Chen, Gaoping; Favis, Basil D; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) is a hydrophobic bioplastic under development for bone tissue engineering applications. Limited information is available on the role of internal geometry and cell-surface attachment on osseous integration potential. We tested the hypothesis that human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) deposit more mineral inside porous 3D PCL scaffolds with fully interconnected 84 or 141 µm pores, when the surfaces are coated with chitosan via Layer-by-Layer (LbL)-deposited polyelectrolytes. Freshly trypsinized MSCs were seeded on PCL 3D cylinders using a novel static cold seeding method in 2% serum to optimally populate all depths of the scaffold discs, followed by 10 days of culture in proliferation medium and 21 additional days in osteogenic medium. MSCs were observed by SEM and histology to spread faster and to proliferate more on chitosan-coated pore surfaces. Most pores, with or without chitosan, became filled by collagen networks sparsely populated with fibroblast-like cells. After 21 days of culture in osteogenic medium, sporadic matrix mineralization was detected histologically and by micro-CT in highly cellular surface layers that enveloped all scaffolds and in cell aggregates in 141 µm pores near the edges. LbL-chitosan promoted punctate mineral deposition on the surfaces of 84 µm pores (p chitosan coatings are sufficient to promote MSC attachment to PCL but only enhance mineral formation in 84 µm pores, suggesting a potential inhibitory role for MSC-derived fibroblasts in osteoblast terminal differentiation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane-mediated surface functionalization of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vitro toxicity assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Shige Wang1, Shihui Wen2, Mingwu Shen2, Rui Guo2, Xueyan Cao2, Jianhua Wang3, Xiangyang Shi1,2,41State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, 2College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Centro de Química da Madeira, Universidade da Madeira, Campus da Penteada, Funchal, PortugalBackground: We report on aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS-mediated surface modification of nanohydroxyapatite with different surface functional groups for potential biomedical applications. In this study, nanohydroxyapatite covalently linked with APTS (n-HA-APTS was reacted with acetic anhydride or succinic anhydride to produce neutralized (n-HA-APTS.Ac or negatively charged (n-HA-APTS.SAH nanohydroxyapatite, respectively. Nanohydroxyapatite formed with amine, acetyl, and carboxyl groups was extensively characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements.Results: In vitro 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay revealed that the slight toxicity of the amine-functionalized n-HA-APTS could be eliminated by post-functionalization of APTS amines to form acetyl and carboxyl groups. Blood compatibility assessment demonstrated that the negligible hemolytic activity of the pristine nanohydroxyapatite particles did not appreciably change after APTS-mediated surface functionalization.Conclusion: APTS-mediated functionalization of nanohydroxyapatite with different surface groups may be useful for further functionalization of nanohydroxyapatite with biologically active materials, thereby providing possibilities for a broad range of

  9. In Vitro Assays for RNA Binding and Protein Priming of Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel N; Jones, Scott A; Hu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase synthesizes the viral DNA genome from the pre-genomic RNA (pgRNA) template through reverse transcription. Initiation of viral DNA synthesis is accomplished via a novel protein priming mechanism, so named because the polymerase itself acts as a primer, whereby the initiating nucleotide becomes covalently linked to a tyrosine residue on the viral polymerase. Protein priming, in turn, depends on specific recognition of the packaging signal on pgRNA called epsilon. These early events in viral DNA synthesis can now be dissected in vitro as described here.The polymerase is expressed in mammalian cells and purified by immunoprecipitation. The purified protein is associated with host cell factors, is enzymatically active, and its priming activity is epsilon dependent. A minimal epsilon RNA construct from pgRNA is co-expressed with the polymerase in cells. This RNA binds to and co-immunoprecipitates with the polymerase. Modifications can be made to either the epsilon RNA or the polymerase protein by manipulating the expression plasmids. Also, the priming reaction itself can be modified to assay for the initiation or subsequent DNA synthesis during protein priming, the susceptibility of the polymerase to chemical inhibitors, and the precise identification of the DNA products upon their release from the polymerase. The identity of associated host factors can also be evaluated. This protocol closely mirrors our current understanding of the RNA binding and protein priming steps of the HBV replication cycle, and it is amenable to modification. It should therefore facilitate both basic research and drug discovery.

  10. Characterization of the in vitro propagation of epileptiform electrophysiological activity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures coupled to 3D microelectrode arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pisciotta, Marzia; Morgavi, Giovanna; Jahnsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic aspects of the propagation of epileptiform activity have so far received little attention. With the aim of providing new insights about the spatial features of the propagation of epileptic seizures in the nervous system, we studied in vitro the initiation and propagation of traveling epil......AnimalsAnimals, NewbornConvulsants/pharmacologyElectric Stimulation/methodsElectrophysiological Phenomena/drug effectsElectrophysiological Phenomena/physiology*Evoked Potentials/drug effectsEvoked Potentials/physiology*Hippocampus/anatomy & histologyHippocampus/drug effects......Hippocampus/physiology*Microelectrodes*Organ Culture TechniquesPicrotoxin/pharmacologyRatsRats, WistarReaction Time/drug effectsReaction Time/physiologyTime FactorsSubstancesConvulsantsPicrotoxin LinkOut - more resourcesFull Text SourcesElsevier ScienceEBSCOOhioLINK Electronic Journal CenterSwets Information ServicesMolecular Biology Databases...

  11. Probing Regenerative Potential of Moringa oleifera Aqueous Extracts Using In vitro Cellular Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Evangeline E.; Pulwale, Anubha V.; Patil, Gauri A.; Moghe, Alpana S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Molecules stimulating regeneration and proliferation of cells are of significance in combating ailments caused due to tissue injury, inflammation, and degenerative disorders. Moringa oleifera is one of the most valued food plants having the profile of important nutrients and impressive range of medicinal uses. Objective: To evaluate the potential of M. oleifera aqueous leaf and flower extracts to promote the proliferation of cells and explore their effect on cancer cell lines for assessment of safety. Materials and Methods: Aqueous leaf and flower extracts of M. oleifera were investigated for effect on rat-derived primary fibroblast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cancer cell lines using cell proliferation assay. They were also tested and compared for wound healing, angiogenesis, and hepatoprotective effect using in vitro assays. Results: Statistically significant increase in the proliferation of primary rat fibroblast, MSCs, and angiogenesis was observed after treatment with aqueous flower extract. The aqueous leaf extract determined a comparatively moderate increment in the proliferation of MSCs and angiogenesis. It however showed prominent cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines and a significant hepatoprotective effect. Conclusion: A very clear difference in response of the two extracts to different types of cells was detected in this study. The aqueous flower extract exhibited a higher potential to stimulate cell proliferation while not exerting the same effect on cancer cell lines. The leaf extract on the other hand, had a prominent antitumor and hepatoptotective effects. SUMMARY Moringa oleifera flower extract showed significant ability to promote proliferation of rat fibroblast and mesenchymal stem cells. The extract also had prominent angiogenic and hepatoprotective effects.The extract did not influence proliferation of cancer cell lines indicating its safety for human consumption and use in pharmaceuticals.The Moringa oleifera leaf extract

  12. Probing Regenerative Potential of Moringa oleifera Aqueous Extracts Using In vitro Cellular Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Evangeline E; Pulwale, Anubha V; Patil, Gauri A; Moghe, Alpana S

    2016-01-01

    Molecules stimulating regeneration and proliferation of cells are of significance in combating ailments caused due to tissue injury, inflammation, and degenerative disorders. Moringa oleifera is one of the most valued food plants having the profile of important nutrients and impressive range of medicinal uses. To evaluate the potential of M. oleifera aqueous leaf and flower extracts to promote the proliferation of cells and explore their effect on cancer cell lines for assessment of safety. Aqueous leaf and flower extracts of M. oleifera were investigated for effect on rat-derived primary fibroblast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cancer cell lines using cell proliferation assay. They were also tested and compared for wound healing, angiogenesis, and hepatoprotective effect using in vitro assays. Statistically significant increase in the proliferation of primary rat fibroblast, MSCs, and angiogenesis was observed after treatment with aqueous flower extract. The aqueous leaf extract determined a comparatively moderate increment in the proliferation of MSCs and angiogenesis. It however showed prominent cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines and a significant hepatoprotective effect. A very clear difference in response of the two extracts to different types of cells was detected in this study. The aqueous flower extract exhibited a higher potential to stimulate cell proliferation while not exerting the same effect on cancer cell lines. The leaf extract on the other hand, had a prominent antitumor and hepatoptotective effects. Moringa oleifera flower extract showed significant ability to promote proliferation of rat fibroblast and mesenchymal stem cells. The extract also had prominent angiogenic and hepatoprotective effects.The extract did not influence proliferation of cancer cell lines indicating its safety for human consumption and use in pharmaceuticals.The Moringa oleifera leaf extract showed relatively less potential to stimulate cells but had prominent cytotoxic

  13. In Vitro Bioactivity in ToxCast Assays for Fruit and Vegetable Juices (TDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast and Tox21 programs have generated in vitro screening data for over 1000 chemicals to aid in hazard identification and setting chemical testing priorities. These data, together with in vitro pharmacokinetic data, are used to infer possible toxic responses and external ...

  14. Fortifying the Bone-Implant Interface Part 1: An In Vitro Evaluation of 3D-Printed and TPS Porous Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Derek P.; Bahney, Chelsea S.; Woods, Shane A.; Wolfe, Mark L.; Yerby, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Background An aging society and concomitant rise in the incidence of impaired bone health have led to the need for advanced osteoconductive spinal implant surfaces that promote greater biological fixation (e.g. for interbody fusion cages, sacroiliac joint fusion implants, and artificial disc replacements). Additive manufacturing, i.e. 3D-printing, may improve bone integration by generating biomimetic spinal implant surfaces that mimic bone morphology. Such surfaces may foster an enhanced cellular response compared to traditional implant surfacing processes. Methods This study investigated the response of human osteoblasts to additive manufactured (AM) trabecular-like titanium implant surfaces compared to traditionally machined base material with titanium plasma spray (TPS) coated surfaces, with and without a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. For TPS-coated discs, wrought Ti6Al4V ELI was machined and TPS-coating was applied. For AM discs, Ti6Al4V ELI powder was 3D-printed to form a solid base and trabecular-like porous surface. The HA-coating was applied via a precipitation dip-spin method. Surface porosity, pore size, thickness, and hydrophilicity were characterized. Initial cell attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and calcium production of hFOB cells (n=5 per group) were measured. Results Cells on AM discs exhibited expedited proliferative activity. While there were no differences in mean ALP expression and calcium production between TPS and AM discs, calcium production on the AM discs trended 48% higher than on TPS discs (p=0.07). Overall, HA-coating did not further enhance results compared to uncoated TPS and AM discs. Conclusions Results demonstrate that additive manufacturing allows for controlled trabecular-like surfaces that promote earlier cell proliferation and trends toward higher calcium production than TPS coating. Results further showed that nanocrystalline HA may not provide an advantage on porous titanium

  15. Fortifying the Bone-Implant Interface Part 1: An In Vitro Evaluation of 3D-Printed and TPS Porous Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBarb, Regina F; Lindsey, Derek P; Bahney, Chelsea S; Woods, Shane A; Wolfe, Mark L; Yerby, Scott A

    2017-01-01

    An aging society and concomitant rise in the incidence of impaired bone health have led to the need for advanced osteoconductive spinal implant surfaces that promote greater biological fixation (e.g. for interbody fusion cages, sacroiliac joint fusion implants, and artificial disc replacements). Additive manufacturing, i.e. 3D-printing, may improve bone integration by generating biomimetic spinal implant surfaces that mimic bone morphology. Such surfaces may foster an enhanced cellular response compared to traditional implant surfacing processes. This study investigated the response of human osteoblasts to additive manufactured (AM) trabecular-like titanium implant surfaces compared to traditionally machined base material with titanium plasma spray (TPS) coated surfaces, with and without a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. For TPS-coated discs, wrought Ti6Al4V ELI was machined and TPS-coating was applied. For AM discs, Ti6Al4V ELI powder was 3D-printed to form a solid base and trabecular-like porous surface. The HA-coating was applied via a precipitation dip-spin method. Surface porosity, pore size, thickness, and hydrophilicity were characterized. Initial cell attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and calcium production of hFOB cells (n=5 per group) were measured. Cells on AM discs exhibited expedited proliferative activity. While there were no differences in mean ALP expression and calcium production between TPS and AM discs, calcium production on the AM discs trended 48% higher than on TPS discs (p=0.07). Overall, HA-coating did not further enhance results compared to uncoated TPS and AM discs. Results demonstrate that additive manufacturing allows for controlled trabecular-like surfaces that promote earlier cell proliferation and trends toward higher calcium production than TPS coating. Results further showed that nanocrystalline HA may not provide an advantage on porous titanium surfaces. Additive manufactured porous

  16. 3D models of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer metastasis: high-throughput screening assay development, validation, and pilot screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Chen, Chaoyu; Kapadia, Amit; Zhou, Qiong; Harper, Mary Kay; Schaack, Jerome; LaBarbera, Daniel V

    2011-02-01

    Despite advancements in therapies developed for the treatment of cancer, patient prognosis and mortality rates have improved minimally, and metastasis remains the primary cause of cancer mortality worldwide. An underlying mechanism promoting metastasis in many types of cancer is epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here the authors report a novel 3D model of EMT and metastatic breast cancer suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) drug discovery. The primary assay incorporates the expression of the prognostic biomarker vimentin, as a luciferase reporter of EMT, in basil-like/triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma spheroids. Using this model, the authors developed a number of known antitumor agents as control modulators of EMT. U0126, PKC412, PF2341066, dasatinib, and axitinib downregulated vimentin expression by 70% to 90% as compared to untreated spheroids. Counterassays were developed to measure spheroid viability and the invasive potential of MDA-MB-231 spheroids after small-molecule treatment and used to confirm hits from primary screening. Finally, the authors conducted a pilot screen to validate this model for HTS using a purified library of marine secondary metabolites. From 230 compounds screened, they obtained a Z' score of 0.64, indicative of an excellent assay, and confirmed 4 hits, including isonaamidine B, papuamine, mycalolide E, and jaspamide. This HTS model demonstrates the potential to identify small-molecule modulators of EMT that could be used to discover novel antimetastatic agents for the treatment of cancer.

  17. [Gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting promotes cell adhesion and proliferation of human dental pulp cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai-Yue; Ma, Dan-Dan; Wu, Bu-Ling

    2017-05-20

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) and compare the cell adhesion and proliferation of the cells seeded in the biomaterial using two different methods. HDPCs isolated by tissue block culture and enzyme digestion were cultured and passaged. Gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds were printed using a bioplotter, and the cytotoxicity of the aqueous extracts of the scaffold material was tested in the third passage of HDPCs using cell counting kit-8. Scanning electron microscopy and trypan blue were used to assess the adhesion and proliferation of the cells seeded in the scaffold material at a low or high concentration. The aqueous extract of the scaffolds at different concentrations showed no obvious cytotoxicity and promoted the proliferation of HDPCs. The scaffolds had a good biocompatibility and HDPCs seeded in the scaffold showed good cell growth. Cell seeding at a high concentration in the scaffold better promoted the adhesion of HDPCs and resulted in a greater cell number on the scaffold surface compared with low-concentration cell seeding after a 5-day culture (Padhesion to the scaffold material.

  18. Relationship between the results of in vitro receptor binding assay to human estrogen receptor alpha and in vivo uterotrophic assay: comparative study with 65 selected chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahori, Yumi; Nakai, Makoto; Yamasaki, Kanji; Takatsuki, Mineo; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki; Ohtaki, Masahiro

    2008-02-01

    For screening chemicals possessing endocrine disrupting potencies, the uterotrophic assay has been placed in a higher level in the OECD testing framework than the ER binding assay to detect ER-mediated activities. However, there are no studies that can demonstrate a clear relationship between these assays. In order to clarify the relationship between the in vitro ER binding and in vivo uterotrophic assays and to determine meaningful binding potency from the ER binding assay, we compared the results from these assays for 65 chemicals spanning a variety of chemicals classes. Under the quantitative comparison between logRBAs (relative binding affinities) and logLEDs (lowest effective doses), the log RBA was well correlated with both logLEDs of estrogenic and anti-estrogenic compounds at r(2)=0.67 (n=28) and 0.79 (n=23), respectively. The RBA of 0.00233% was found to be the lowest ER binding potency to elicit estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities in the uterotrophic assay, accordingly this value is considered as the detection limit of estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities in the uterotrophic assay. The usage of this value as cutoff provided the best concordance rate (82%). These findings are useful in a tiered approach for identifying chemicals that have potential to induce ER-mediated effects in vivo.

  19. Liposomal-benzocaine gel formulation: correlation between in vitro assays and in vivo topical anesthesia in volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz-Montan, Michelle; Cereda, Cintia Maria Saia; Gaspari, Adele; da Silva, Camila Morais Gonçalves; de Araújo, Daniele Ribeiro; Padula, Cristina; Santi, Patrizia; Narvaes, Eliene; Novaes, Pedro Duarte; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; de Paula, Eneida

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize a liposome-based benzocaine (BZC) formulation designed for topical use on the oral mucosa and to evaluate its in vitro retention and permeation using the Franz-type diffusion cells through pig esophagus mucosa. To predict the effectiveness of new designed formulations during preclinical studies, a correlation between in vitro assays and in vivo efficacy was performed. Liposomal BZC was characterized in terms of membrane/water partition coefficient, encapsulation efficiency, size, polydispersity, zeta potential, and morphology. Liposomal BZC (BL10) was incorporated into gel formulation and its performances were compared to plain BZC gel (B10) and the commercially available BZC gel (B20). BL10 and B10 presented higher flux and retention on pig esophagus mucosa with a shorter lag time, when compared to B20. BZC flux was strongly correlated with in vivo anesthetic efficacy, but not with topical anesthesia duration. The retention studies did not correlate with any of the in vivo efficacy parameters. Thus, in vitro permeation study can be useful to predict anesthetic efficacy during preclinical tests, because a correlation between flux and anesthetic efficacy was observed. Therefore, in vitro assays, followed by in vivo efficacy, are necessary to confirm anesthetic performance.

  20. An in vitro immune response model to determine tetanus toxoid antigen (vaccine) specific immunogenicity: Selection of sensitive assay criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersma, Sytse J; Leenaars, Marlies P P A M; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Summerfield, Artur; Hendriksen, Coenraad F M; McCullough, Ken C

    2006-04-12

    Many vaccines employed in childhood vaccination programmes are produced by conventional techniques, resulting in complex biological mixtures for which batch-related quality control requires in vivo potency testing. Monitoring consistency via in vitro tests during the vaccine production has the capacity to replace certain of the in vivo methods. In this respect, determining vaccine antigen immunogenicity through functional immunological tests has high potential. Advances in immunology have made it possible to analyse this biological activity by in vitro means. The present study established such an in vitro test system for tetanus toxoid (TT). This measured vaccine immunogenicity through an antigen-specific secondary (recall) response in vitro, using a porcine model growing in value for its closeness to human immune response characteristics. Discrimination between the specific recall TT antigen and diphtheria toxoid (DT) was possible using both peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures and monocyte-derived dendritic cells in co-culture with autologous specific lymphocytes. TT-specific activation was detected with highest discrimination capacity using proliferation assays, as well as IFN-gamma and TT-specific antibody ELISPOTS (measuring secreting T and B lymphocytes, respectively). These in vitro systems show a high potential for replacing animal experimentation to evaluate the immunogenicity of complex vaccines.

  1. Assessment of Chemical Skin-Sensitizing Potency by an In Vitro Assay Based on Human Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrechts, Nathalie; Vanheel, Hanne; Nelissen, Inge; Witters, Hilda; VAN DEN HEUVEL Rosette; Van Tendeloo, Viggo; Schoeters, Greet; HOOYBERGHS, Jef

    2010-01-01

    The skin-sensitizing potential of chemicals is an important concern for public health and thus a significant end point in the hazard identification process. To determine skin-sensitizing capacity, large research efforts focus on the development of assays, which do not require animals. As such, an in vitro test has previously been developed based on the differential expression of CREM and CCR2 transcripts in CD34(+) progenitor-derived dendritic cells (CD34-DC), which allows to classify chemica...

  2. The prediction of human skin responses by using the combined in vitro fluorescein leakage/Alamar Blue (resazurin) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, Richard; Starzec, Gemma; Pradel, Lionel; Baxter, Victoria; Jones, Melanie; Cox, Helen; Noble, Linda

    2002-01-01

    A range of cosmetics formulations with human patch-test data were supplied in a coded form, for the examination of the use of a combined in vitro permeability barrier assay and cell viability assay to generate, and then test, a prediction model for assessing potential human skin patch-test results. The target cells employed were of the Madin Darby canine kidney cell line, which establish tight junctions and adherens junctions able to restrict the permeability of sodium fluorescein across the barrier of the confluent cell layer. The prediction model for interpretation of the in vitro assay results included initial effects and the recovery profile over 72 hours. A set of the hand-wash, surfactant-based formulations were tested to generate the prediction model, and then six others were evaluated. The model system was then also evaluated with powder laundry detergents and hand moisturisers: their effects were predicted by the in vitro test system. The model was under-predictive for two of the ten hand-wash products. It was over-predictive for the moisturisers, (two out of six) and eight out of ten laundry powders. However, the in vivo human patch test data were variable, and 19 of the 26 predictions were correct or within 0.5 on the 0-4.0 scale used for the in vivo scores, i.e. within the same variable range reported for the repeat-test hand-wash in vivo data.

  3. Physicomechanical, In Vitro and In Vivo Performance of 3D Printed Doped Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Solaiman

    Although tricalcium phosphate (TCP) is widely used in bone tissue engineering, the strength degradation kinetics is not well controlled. This study focuses on the underlying mechanism of strength degradation kinetics by incorporating trace elements in TCP. The objective of this research is to modify the mechanical properties of TCP to achieve the desired degradation rate for the specific need, and improve the in vivo bioactivity for early wound healing by incorporating trace elements such as strontium (Sr2+), magnesium (Mg2+) and silicon (Si4+) as dopants. The hypothesis of this research is that the presence of different trace elements in TCP will influence its phase stability, microstructure, mechanical strength, and both in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. Direct three dimensional printing (3DP) was used to fabricate designed interconnected macroporous pure and doped TCP scaffolds. Microwave sintering as opposed to conventional sintering was also used for better densification and higher mechanical strength. A maximum compressive strength of 10.95 +/- 1.28 MPa and 12.01 +/- 1.56 MPa were achieved for pure and Sr2+-Mg2+ doped TCP scaffolds with 500 microm designed pores (˜400 microm after sintering) sintered in microwave furnace, respectively. Substitution of Mg2+ and Sr2+ into calcium (Ca2+) sites of TCP crystal lattice contributed to phase stability and controlled gradual degradation. On the other hand, Si4+ substitution into phosphorous (P5+) sites destabilized the crystal structure and accelerated degradation of TCP. Interconnected macroporous beta-TCP scaffolds facilitated in vivo guided bone tissue regeneration through infiltration of cells and extracellular matrix into the designed pores. Presence of Sr2+, Mg2+ and Si4+ into beta-TCP induced increased in vivo early bone formation and better bone remodeling through increased extracellular matrix production such as, collagen and osteocalcin, when tested in rat and rabbit distal femur model. The presence of Si4

  4. Development of silicon photonic microring resonator biosensors for multiplexed cytokine assays and in vitro diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchansky, Matthew Sam

    In order to guide critical care therapies that are personalized to a patient's unique disease state, a diagnostic or theranostic medical device must quickly provide a detailed biomolecular understanding of disease onset and progression. This detailed molecular understanding of cellular processes and pathways requires the ability to measure multiple analytes in parallel. Though many traditional sensing technologies for biomarker analysis and fundamental biological studies (i.e. enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, real-time polymerase chain reaction, etc.) rely on single-parameter measurements, it has become increasingly clear that the inherent complexity of many human illnesses and pathways necessitates quantitative and multiparameter analysis of biological samples. Currently used analytical methods are deficient in that they often provide either highly quantitative data for a single biomarker or qualitative data for many targets, but methods that simultaneously provide highly quantitative analysis of many targets have yet to be adequately developed. Fields such as medical diagnostics and cellular biology would benefit greatly from a technology that enables rapid, quantitative and reproducible assays for many targets within a single sample. In an effort to fill this unmet need, this doctoral dissertation describes the development of a clinically translational biosensing technology based on silicon photonics and developed in the chemistry research laboratory of Ryan C. Bailey. Silicon photonic microring resonators, a class of high-Q optical sensors, represent a promising platform for rapid, multiparameter in vitro measurements. The original device design utilizes 32-ring arrays for real-time biomolecular sensing without fluorescent labels, and these optical biosensors display great potential for more highly multiplexed (100s-1000s) measurements based on the impressive scalability of silicon device fabrication. Though this technology can be used to detect a variety of

  5. Relationship of two in vitro assays in protein efficiency ratio determination on selected agricultural by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster B. Wardlaw

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of agricultural by-products as food and feed has been of increasing interest. Protein is a crucial nutrient obtained from those sources. However, in vivo method (a rat study for protein efficiency ratio (PER determination is time consuming and expensive. C-PER and DC-PER are in vitro assays, which involve mathematical calculations using amino acid information from the sample. These two methods have been proven suitable for predicting protein quality of various samples with high correlation to the in vivo assay. Rapid prediction with less cost is the advantage of these methods. Theoretically, C-PER and DC-PER of each sample should have high correlation as they are computed from the same amino acid information. However, the efficiency of the methods is probably based on a range of certain information, especially protein digestibility. This study was conducted to demonstrate one of the limitations of the in vitro assays as shown in selected agricultural by-products. Three categories of selected agricultural by-products were feed-grade egg product (FGEP; 8 samples, distillers' dried grain (DDG; 4 samples, and defatted wheat germ (DWG; 8 samples. Protein contents, amino acid profiles, in vitro protein digestibility, C-PER and DC-PER were determined. Proteins in FGEP categories were significantly higher (P<0.05 than DWG and DDG, respectively. Both C-PER and DC-PER of all samples showed high correlation except in DWG-424. The low correlation in DWG-424 may be due to its low protein digestibility. It may also indicate the limitation of C-PER assay. The assay therefore may not be suitable for samples with low protein digestibility.

  6. Comet assay measures of DNA damage as biomarkers of irinotecan response in colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joanna P; Smith, Andrew J O; Bowman, Karen J; Thomas, Anne L; Jones, George D D

    2015-09-01

    The use of irinotecan to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) is limited by unpredictable response and variable toxicity; however, no reliable clinical biomarkers are available. Here, we report a study to ascertain whether irinotecan-induced DNA damage measures are suitable/superior biomarkers of irinotecan effect. CRC-cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated in vitro with irinotecan and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were isolated from patients before and after receiving irinotecan-based chemotherapy. Levels of in vitro-, in vivo-, and ex vivo-induced DNA damage were measured using the Comet assay; correlations between damage levels with in vitro cell survival and follow-up clinical data were investigated. Irinotecan-induced DNA damage was detectable in both CRC cell-lines in vitro, with higher levels of immediate and residual damage noted for the more sensitive HT-29 cells. DNA damage was not detected in vivo, but was measurable in PBLs upon mitogenic stimulation prior to ex vivo SN-38 treatment. Results showed that, following corrections for experimental error, those patients whose PBLs demonstrated higher levels of DNA damage following 10 h of SN-38 exposure ex vivo had significantly longer times to progression than those with lower damage levels (median 291 vs. 173 days, P = 0.014). To conclude, higher levels of irinotecan-induced initial and residual damage correlated with greater cell kill in vitro and a better clinical response. Consequently, DNA damage measures may represent superior biomarkers of irinotecan effect compared to the more often-studied genetic assays for differential drug metabolism.

  7. Repair capacity of adult rat glial progenitor cells determined by an in vitro clonogenic assay after in vitro or in vivo fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Kleiboer, B.J.; Verhagen, I.; Kogel, A.J. van der (Nijmegen Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. of Radiotherapy)

    1993-05-01

    Demyelination is one condition identified as a late response of the central nervous system (CNS) to irradiation. In the present study the repair capacity of glial stem cells was investigated and compared with the repair capacity of the CNS in vivo using functional endpoints. For this purpose, glial stem cells, derived from the adult rat optic nerve, were subjected to fractionated irradiation in vivo and in vitro and their survival was quantified with an in vitro clonogenic assay. The data were analysed by three different methods all based on the LQ-model (single dose survival curve; '[beta][sub RR]', 'F[sub e]-plot'). The resulting value of the [beta]-parameter of adult glial stem cells is consistent with values obtained for functional endpoints after irradiation of the CNS in vivo. The [alpha]/[beta]-ratio (4.9-7.3 Gy) of adult glial stem cells, however, is higher than the [alpha]/[beta]-ratio ([approx] 2 Gy) obtained for CNS in vivo and is closer to that of an acute responding tissue. (Author).

  8. Gaining acceptance for the use of in vitro toxicity assays and QIVIVE in regulatory risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, M E Bette; Lipscomb, John C

    2015-06-05

    Testing strategies are anticipated to increasingly rely on in vitro data as a basis to characterize early steps or key events in toxicity at relevant dose levels in human tissues. Such strategies require quantitative in vitro to in vivo extrapolation to characterize dose-response as a basis for comparison with exposure to estimate risk. Current experience in the incorporation of mechanistic and in vitro data in risk assessment is considered here in the context of identified principles to increase the potential for timely acceptance of more progressive and tailored testing strategies by the regulatory community. These principles are outlined as transitioning in a familiar context, tiering to acquire experience and increase confidence, contextual knowledge transfer to facilitate interpretation and communication, coordination and development of expertise and continuing challenge. A proposed pragmatic tiered data driven framework which includes increasing reliance on in vitro data and quantitative in vitro to in vivo extrapolation is considered in the context of these principles. Based on this analysis, possible additional steps that might facilitate timely evolution and potentially, uptake are identified.

  9. Assessment of chemical skin-sensitizing potency by an in vitro assay based on human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Nathalie; Vanheel, Hanne; Nelissen, Inge; Witters, Hilda; Van Den Heuvel, Rosette; Van Tendeloo, Viggo; Schoeters, Greet; Hooyberghs, Jef

    2010-07-01

    The skin-sensitizing potential of chemicals is an important concern for public health and thus a significant end point in the hazard identification process. To determine skin-sensitizing capacity, large research efforts focus on the development of assays, which do not require animals. As such, an in vitro test has previously been developed based on the differential expression of CREM and CCR2 transcripts in CD34(+) progenitor-derived dendritic cells (CD34-DC), which allows to classify chemicals as skin (non-)sensitizing. However, skin sensitization is not an all-or-none phenomenon, and up to now, the assessment of relative potency can only be derived using the in vivo local lymph node assay (LLNA). In our study, we analyzed the feasibility to predict the sensitizing potency, i.e., the LLNA EC3 values, of 15 skin sensitizers using in vitro data from the CD34-DC-based assay. Hereto, we extended the in vitro-generated gene expression data set by an additional source of information, the concentration of the compound that causes 20% cell damage (IC20) in CD34-DC. We statistically confirmed that this IC20 is linearly independent from the gene expression changes but that it does correlate with LLNA EC3 values. In a further analysis, we applied a robust linear regression with both IC20 and expression changes of CREM and CCR2 as explanatory variables. For 13 out of 15 compounds, a high linear correlation was established between the in vitro model and the LLNA EC3 values over a range of four orders of magnitude, i.e., from weak to extreme sensitizers.

  10. Assay of tolnaftate in human skin samples after in vitro penetration studies using high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezutyte, Toma; Kornysova, Olga; Maruska, Audrius; Briedis, Vitalis

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Tolnaftate, an antifungal of thiocarbamate class, is used topically in 1% formulations. Its penetration into skin layers is a prerequisite for tolnaftate action against dermatophytes. The aim of this work was to optimize and validate a simple, rapid, accurate and reproducible procedure for tolnaftate assay in human skin samples and to apply this procedure for in vitro tolnaftate penetration studies. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection was used to validate tolnaftate assay for linearity, specificity, accuracy, precision, limit of quantitation, limit of detection, drug extraction recovery and stability in skin extracts. In vitro tolnaftate penetration studies were carried out using flow-through diffusion cells, mounted with human skin. Epidermis and dermis, separated by heat-separation method, were extracted using ultrasonication in methanol. Linear range of the analytical procedure was within 0.6-100 pg/mL. The assay was specific, accurate (within-day and between-day recovery values were 98.2-104.2% and 98.7-101.4%, respectively) and precise (within-day and between-day imprecision was = 3.8%). Mean extraction recoveries of tolnaftate from epidermis and dermis were satisfactory and reaching 90%. In vitro skin penetration studies revealed that after application of 1% (w/w) tolnaftate solution in polyethylene glycol 400 for 24 hours, the mean amount of tolnaftate penetrating into the epidermis and dermis was 2.60 +/- 0.28 microg/cm2 and 0.92 +/- 0.12 microg/cm2, respectively. A validated reliable HPLC method could be recommended for biopharmaceutical evaluation of tolnaftate preparations and studies of pharmacokinetics in human skin after in vitro penetration studies.

  11. Intra-laboratory validation of a human cell based in vitro angiogenesis assay for testing angiogenesis modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jertta-Riina Sarkanen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The developed standardized human cell based in vitro angiogenesis assay was intra-laboratory validated to verify that the method is reliable and relevant for routine testing of modulators of angiogenesis e.g. pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. This assay is based on the earlier published method but it was improved and shown to be more sensitive and rapid than the previous assay. The performance of the assay was assessed by using 6 reference chemicals, which are widely used pharmaceuticals that inhibit angiogenesis: acetyl salicylic acid, erlotinib, 2-methoxyestradiol, levamisole, thalidomide, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. In the intra-laboratory validation, the sensitivity of the assay (upper and lower limits of detection and linearity of response in tubule formation, batch to batch variation in tubule formation between different Master cell bank batches, and precision as well as the reliability of the assay (reproducibility and repeatability were tested. The pre-set acceptance criteria for the intra-laboratory validation study were met. The relevance of the assay in man was investigated by comparing the effects of reference chemicals and their concentrations to the published human data. The comparison showed a good concordance, which indicates that this human cell based angiogenesis model predicts well the effects in man and has the potential to be used to supplement and/or replace of animal tests.

  12. Validation of a high-throughput in vitro alkaline elution/rat hepatocyte assay for DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gealy, Robert; Wright-Bourque, Jennifer L; Kraynak, Andrew R; McKelvey, Troy W; Barnum, John E; Storer, Richard D

    2007-04-20

    In vitro alkaline elution is a sensitive and specific short term assay which measures DNA strand breakage in a mammalian test system (primary rat hepatocytes). This lab has previously demonstrated the performance of the assay with known genotoxic and non-genotoxic compounds. The methodology employed has relatively low sample throughput and is labor-intensive, requiring a great deal of manual processing of samples in a format that is not amenable to automation. Here, we present an automated version of the assay. This high-throughput alkaline elution assay (HT-AE) was made possible through 3 key developments: (1) DNA quantitation using PicoGreen and OliGreen fluorescent DNA binding dyes; (2) design and implementation of a custom automation system; and (3) reducing the assay to a 96-well plate format. The assay can now be run with 5-50mg of test compound. HT-AE was validated in a similar manner as the original assay, including assessment of non-genotoxic and non-carcinogenic compounds and evaluation of cytotoxicity to avoid confounding effects of toxicity-associated DNA degradation. The validation test results from compounds of known genotoxic potential were used to set appropriate criteria to classify alkaline elution results for genotoxicity.

  13. Quantitative predictivity of the transformation in vitro assay compared with the Ames test. [Hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parodi, S.; Taningher, M.; Russo, P.; Pala, M.; Vecchio, D.; Fassina, G.; Santi, L.

    For 59 chemical compounds, homogeneous data on transformation in vitro, mutagenicity in the Ames test, and carcinogenicity was reviewed. The potency in inducing transformation in vitro in hamster fibroblast cells was compared with the carcinogenic potency and a modest correlation coefficient was found between the two parameters. For these same 59 compounds it was also possible to compare mutagenic potency in the Ames test with carcinogenic potency. The correlation level was very similar. The predictivity of transformation in vitro increased significantly when only compounds for which some kind of dose-response relationship was available were utilized. This result stresses the importance of the quantitative aspect of the response in predictivity studies. The present study is compared with previous studies on the quantitative predictivity of different short-term tests. The work is not definitive, but gives an idea of the possible type of approach to the problem of comparing quantitative predictivities.

  14. Antioxidant activites of Xanthosoma sagittifolium Schott using various in vitro assay models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antony Nishanthini; Veerabahu Ramasamy Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the total phenolic, flavonoid contents and in vitro antioxidant activity of methanol extract of Xanthosoma sagittifolium corm. Methods: Total phenolic content was estimated using the Folin Ciocalteu method. The flavonoid content was determined using aluminium chloride. In vitro antioxidant activities were evaluated by studying DPPH radical scavenging activity, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, superoxide radical scavenging activity, ABTS radical cation scavenging activity and reducing power capacity were determined using standard procedure. Results:Xanthosoma sagittifolium corm exhibited 0.32g100g-1 total phenolic; 0.26g100g-1 flavonoid and better scavenging activity of DPPH (78.22±0.56%), hydroxyl radical (69.11±0.21%), superoxide radical (83.27±0.08%) and ABTS radical cations(76.11±0.07%).Conclusions: The present studies confirm the methanol extracts have potential in vitro antioxidant activity.

  15. Fibrinolytic Activity and Dose-Dependent Effect of Incubating Human Blood Clots in Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: In Vitro Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuzar Elnager

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE has been reported to possess time-dependent fibrinolytic activity by in vitro assay. This study is aimed at investigating fibrinolytic dose-dependent activity of CAPE using in vitro assays. Methods. Standardized human whole blood (WB clots were incubated in either blank controls or different concentrations of CAPE (3.75, 7.50, 15.00, 22.50, and 30.00 mM. After 3 hours, D-dimer (DD levels and WB clot weights were measured for each concentration. Thromboelastography (TEG parameters were recorded following CAPE incubation, and fibrin morphology was examined under a confocal microscope. Results. Overall, mean DD (μg/mL levels were significantly different across samples incubated with different CAPE concentrations, and the median pre- and postincubation WB clot weights (grams were significantly decreased for each CAPE concentration. Fibrin removal was observed microscopically and indicated dose-dependent effects. Based on the TEG test, the Ly30 fibrinolytic parameter was significantly different between samples incubated with two different CAPE concentrations (15.0 and 22.50 mM. The 50% effective dose (ED50 of CAPE (based on DD was 1.99 mg/mL. Conclusions. This study suggests that CAPE possesses fibrinolytic activity following in vitro incubation and that it has dose-dependent activities. Therefore, further investigation into CAPE as a potential alternative thrombolytic agent should be conducted.

  16. PENGHAMBATAN CAJUPUTS CANDY TERHADAP VIABILITAS KHAMIR Candida albicans SECARA IN VITRO [Inhibition of Cajuputs Candy Toward the Viability of Candida albicans by using In Vitro Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hanny Wijaya1*

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of cajuput essential oil as a flavor in candy may produce a physiological active added value. Some compounds of cajuput plant (Melaleuca cajuputi L have been reported for their anti-microbial activities. Candida albicans is a normal commensal organism in human mouth. However, it may become virulent and responsible for oral diseases known as oral candidiasis. This study aimed to determine the effect of cajuput and peppermint oil in cajuputs candy in inhibiting the C. albicans biofilms formation by using in vitro biofilm assay and viability assay. Furthermore, the influence of concentration of cajuput oil on the anti-microbial activities had been analyzed. All the tested concentration of cajuput oil in cajuputs candy was effective to inhibit the viability of C. albicans. The provision of flavor components of cajuput and peppermint oil could produce synergistic effects compared to a single flavor component. The addition of cajuput oil at 0.6% was able to inhibit the viability of C. albicans. The activities of the cajuput oil showed positive correlation to the concentration. The variable of plus and minus 0.1% addition of the cajuput oil concentration, however, produced no significant difference to inhibit the growth of C. albicans in biofilm. Sensory test, hedonic test, was conducted to evaluate the flavor, aroma, and overall attributes, resulting in no significant difference between 0.6 to 0.8% additions of cajuput oil upon the sensory acceptance.

  17. Modification and application of an in vitro assay to examine inositol phosphate degradation in the digestive tract of poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeld, Vera; Schollenberger, Margit; Hemberle, Luca; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2017-09-01

    An in vitro assay was modified to study the disappearance of inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6 ) and the formation of lower inositol phosphate (InsP) isomers in the poultry digestive tract, and three experiments investigated the influence of diets with different ingredients and additives. Using the poultry diet as a matrix, the assay simulated the conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, proteolytic enzymes, water content, and retention time) of the crop, stomach, and small intestine, and extraction and analysis of InsP isomers were immediately conducted. The assay produced highly reproducible results with coefficients of variation ≤10% for an InsP isomer concentration ≥0.4 µmol g(-1) DM (n = 3), and it was sensitive to the factors that varied in the three experiments. The described assay is a suitable tool that can be used to screen feed enzymes and to investigate the effects of supplements in the absence of endogenous phytases. The ease of handling and high reproducibility of the assay indicated that the assay is a rapid and feasible method that can be used to examine the degradation pathway of phytate in feed under gastrointestinal conditions. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. A rapid colorimetric assay for the quantitation of the viability of free-living larvae of nematodes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Catherine E; Davey, Mary W

    2007-09-01

    With increasing drug resistance in gastrointestinal parasites, identification of new anthelmintics is essential. The non-parasitic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is used extensively as a model to identify drug targets and potential novel anthelmintics because it can be readily cultured in vitro. Traditionally, the assessment of worm viability has relied on labour-intensive developmental and behavioral assays. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide-formazan (MTT-formazan) colorimetric assay uses metabolic activity as a marker of viability in mammalian cell culture systems and has been applied for use with filarial nematodes. In the present study, this assay has been optimized and validated to rapidly assess the viability of C. elegans after drug treatment. Living, but not dead, C. elegans take up MTT and reduce it to the blue formazan, providing visual, qualitative, and quantitative assessment of viability. MTT at a concentration of 5 mg/ml with 3 h incubation was optimal for detecting changes in viability with drug treatment. We have applied this assay to quantitate the effects of ivermectin and short-chain alcohols on the viability of C. elegans. This assay is also applicable to first-stage larvae of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. The advantage of this assay is the rapid quantitation in screening drugs to identify potential anthelmintics.

  19. Assessing the efficiency and significance of Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation (MeDIP assays in using in vitro methylated genomic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Jinsong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation contributes to the regulation of gene expression during development and cellular differentiation. The recently developed Methylated DNA ImmunoPrecipitation (MeDIP assay allows a comprehensive analysis of this epigenetic mark at the genomic level in normal and disease-derived cells. However, estimating the efficiency of the MeDIP technique is difficult without previous knowledge of the methylation status of a given cell population. Attempts to circumvent this problem have involved the use of in vitro methylated DNA in parallel to the investigated samples. Taking advantage of this stratagem, we sought to improve the sensitivity of the approach and to assess potential biases resulting from DNA amplification and hybridization procedures using MeDIP samples. Findings We performed MeDIP assays using in vitro methylated DNA, with or without previous DNA amplification, and hybridization to a human promoter array. We observed that CpG content at gene promoters indeed correlates strongly with the MeDIP signal obtained using in vitro methylated DNA, even when lowering significantly the amount of starting material. In analyzing MeDIP products that were subjected to whole genome amplification (WGA, we also revealed a strong bias against CpG-rich promoters during this amplification procedure, which may potentially affect the significance of the resulting data. Conclusion We illustrate the use of in vitro methylated DNA to assess the efficiency and accuracy of MeDIP procedures. We report that efficient and reproducible genome-wide data can be obtained via MeDIP experiments using relatively low amount of starting genomic DNA; and emphasize for the precaution that must be taken in data analysis when an additional DNA amplification step is required.

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy of a therapeutic HIV vaccine by in vitro stimulation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaozhou; Wang, Wandi; Xu, Ke; Feng, Xia; Zeng, Yi

    2017-03-01

    A novel method for HIV vaccine efficacy evaluation was established and the experimental conditions optimized. This novel method was then applied to determine whether a recombinant adenovirus type 5 HIV therapeutic vaccine expressing Gag antigen (Ad5-HIVgag) could stimulate HIV-specific cellular responses in vitro. The results indicated that HIV-specific IFN-gama production lymphocytes were induced by the Ad5-HIVgag vaccine. Compared with other methods, this in vitro stimulation method is safe and time-efficient, and the result is more intuitive. It has the potential to be regarded as a supplement to other methods for evaluating the IFN-gamma production by PBMCs to HIV vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro androgenetic cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L., H. albus L. and alkaloid content assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wesołwska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L. and H. albus L. anthers were initiated which resulted in obtaining androgenectic plants and callus cultures. The leaves of these pants and the callus cultures were subjected to analysis (TLC, GC for the presence of alkaloids, derivatives of tropane. In the studied material, alkaloids of different qualitative and quantitative composition from that of ground-grown plants were found.

  2. Efficacy Study of Broken Rice Maltodextrin in In Vitro Wound Healing Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Zahiah Mohamed Amin; Soo Peng Koh; Swee Keong Yeap; Nur Syazwani Abdul Hamid; Chin Ping Tan; Kamariah Long

    2015-01-01

    Maltodextrins that contain both simple sugars and polymers of saccharides have been widely used as ingredients in food products and pharmaceutical delivery systems. To date, no much work has been reported on the applications of maltodextrin from broken rice (RB) sources. Therefore, the objective of this work was to investigate the in vitro wound healing efficacy of RB maltodextrin at different conditions. Wounds treated with lower dextrose equivalent (DE) range (DE 10–14) of maltodextrins at ...

  3. Unsaturated compounds induce up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells in the in vitro sensitization assay LCSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohwein, Thomas Armin; Sonnenburg, Anna; Zuberbier, Torsten; Stahlmann, Ralf; Schreiner, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Unsaturated compounds are known to cause false-positive reactions in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) but not in the guinea pig maximization test. We have tested a panel of substances (succinic acid, undecylenic acid, 1-octyn-3-ol, fumaric acid, maleic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, squalene, and arachidonic acid) in the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA) to evaluate whether unspecific activation of dendritic cells is a confounder for sensitization testing in vitro. Eight out of 10 tested substances caused significant up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells cocultured with keratinocytes and would have been classified as sensitizers; only succinic acid was tested negative, and squalene had to be excluded from data analysis due to poor solubility in cell culture medium. Based on human data, only undecylenic acid can be considered a true sensitizer. The true sensitizing potential of 1-octyn-3-ol is uncertain. Fumaric acid and its isomer maleic acid are not known as sensitizers, but their esters are contact allergens. A group of 18- to 20-carbon chain unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid) elicited the strongest reaction in vitro. This is possibly due to the formation of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators in the cell culture causing nonspecific activation of dendritic cells. In conclusion, both the LLNA and the LCSA seem to provide false-positive results for unsaturated fatty acids. The inclusion of T cells in dendritic cell-based in vitro sensitization assays may help to eliminate false-positive results due to nonspecific dendritic cell activation. This would lead to more accurate prediction of sensitizers, which is paramount for consumer health protection and occupational safety.

  4. Activity of sertraline against Cryptococcus neoformans: in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; Villanueva-Lozano, Hiram; Hernández-Rodríguez, Pedro; Martínez-Reséndez, Michel F; García-Juárez, Jaime; Rodríguez-Rocha, Humberto; González, Gloria M

    2016-03-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans infection is an important cause of meningitis in HIV/AIDS endemic regions. Antifungals for its management include amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole. Recently, treatment of this mycosis with sertraline has been studied with variable clinical outcomes. The aim of the study was to assess the in vitro antifungal effect of sertraline against clinical isolates of Cryptococcus spp. as well as its in vivo activity in a murine model of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. The in vitro susceptibility to fluconazole, amphotericin B, voriconazole and sertraline of 153 Cryptococcus spp. strains were evaluated according to CLSI procedures. Fungal tissue burden, serum antigenaemia and histopathology, together with the therapeutic efficacy of amphotericin B (3 mg/kg), fluconazole (15 mg/kg), and sertraline (3, 10, and 15 mg/kg) were evaluated in mice intracranially inoculated with one isolate of Cryptococcus neoformans. All strains were susceptible to the antifungals studied and exhibited growth inhibition with sertraline at clinically relevant concentrations. Sertraline at a dose of 15 mg/kg reduced the fungal burden in the brain and spleen with an efficacy comparable to that of fluconazole. In conclusion, sertraline exhibited an excellent in vitro-in vivo anti-cryptococcal activity, representing a possible new alternative for the clinical management of meningeal cryptococcosis.

  5. Establishment of a simple assay in vitro for hepatitis C virus NS3 serine protease based on recombinant substrate and single—Chain protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-BinGuan; Yi-GangTong; Hai-TaoWang; Gui-XinDu; Li-HuaHou

    2002-01-01

    AIM:To establish a simple and convenient assay in vitro for the Hepatitis C virus NS3 serine prtease based on the recombinant protease and substrate,and to evaluate its feasibility in screening the enzyme inhibitors.

  6. Identification of Chemical Vascular Disruptors During Development Using An Integrative Predictive Toxicity Model and Zebrafish and in Vitro Functional Angiogenesis Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of chemical vascular disruptors during development using an integrative predictive toxicity model and zebrafish and in vitro functional angiogenesis assays Chemically-induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse pre...

  7. Identification of Chemical Vascular Disruptors During Development Using An Integrative Predictive Toxicity Model and Zebrafish and in Vitro Functional Angiogenesis Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of chemical vascular disruptors during development using an integrative predictive toxicity model and zebrafish and in vitro functional angiogenesis assays Chemically-induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse pre...

  8. Integrated Model of Chemical Perturbations of a Biological PathwayUsing 18 In Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays for the Estrogen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrate a computational network model that integrates 18 in vitro, high-throughput screening assays measuring estrogen receptor (ER) binding, dimerization, chromatin binding, transcriptional activation and ER-dependent cell proliferation. The network model uses activity pa...

  9. Editor's Highlight: Analysis of the Effects of Cell Stress and Cytotoxicity on In Vitro Assay Activity Across a Diverse Chemical and Assay Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Richard; Houck, Keith; Martin, Matt; Richard, Ann M; Knudsen, Thomas B; Shah, Imran; Little, Stephen; Wambaugh, John; Woodrow Setzer, R; Kothya, Parth; Phuong, Jimmy; Filer, Dayne; Smith, Doris; Reif, David; Rotroff, Daniel; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Sipes, Nisha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Crofton, Kevin; Thomas, Russell S

    2016-08-01

    Chemical toxicity can arise from disruption of specific biomolecular functions or through more generalized cell stress and cytotoxicity-mediated processes. Here, responses of 1060 chemicals including pharmaceuticals, natural products, pesticidals, consumer, and industrial chemicals across a battery of 815 in vitro assay endpoints from 7 high-throughput assay technology platforms were analyzed in order to distinguish between these types of activities. Both cell-based and cell-free assays showed a rapid increase in the frequency of responses at concentrations where cell stress/cytotoxicity responses were observed in cell-based assays. Chemicals that were positive on at least 2 viability/cytotoxicity assays within the concentration range tested (typically up to 100 μM) activated a median of 12% of assay endpoints whereas those that were not cytotoxic in this concentration range activated 1.3% of the assays endpoints. The results suggest that activity can be broadly divided into: (1) specific biomolecular interactions against one or more targets (eg, receptors or enzymes) at concentrations below which overt cytotoxicity-associated activity is observed; and (2) activity associated with cell stress or cytotoxicity, which may result from triggering specific cell stress pathways, chemical reactivity, physico-chemical disruption of proteins or membranes, or broad low-affinity non-covalent interactions. Chemicals showing a greater number of specific biomolecular interactions are generally designed to be bioactive (pharmaceuticals or pesticidal active ingredients), whereas intentional food-use chemicals tended to show the fewest specific interactions. The analyses presented here provide context for use of these data in ongoing studies to predict in vivo toxicity from chemicals lacking extensive hazard assessment.

  10. Determination of Interference During In Vitro Pyrogen Detection: Development and Characterization of a Cell-Based Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Linda; Rossetti, Francesca; Dominici, Sabrina; Buondelmonte, Costantina; Rocchi, Marco B L; Rizzardi, Gian P; Vallanti, Giuliana; Magnani, Mauro

    2016-12-20

    Contamination of pharmaceutical products and medical devices with pyrogens such as endotoxins is the most common cause of systemic inflammation and, in worst cases, of septic shock. Thus, quantification of pyrogens is crucial. The limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assays are the reference tests for in vitro endotoxin detection, in association with the in vivo rabbit pyrogen test (RPT), according to European Pharmacopoeia (EP 2.6.14), and U.S. Pharmacopoeia (USP ). However, several substances interfere with LAL assay, while RPT is not accurate, not quantitative, and raises ethical limits. Biological assays, as monocyte activation tests, have been developed and included in European Pharmacopoeia (EP 7.0; 04/2010:20630) guidelines as an alternative to RPT and proved relevant to the febrile reaction in vivo. Because this reaction is carried out by endogenous mediators under the transcriptional control of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), we sought to determine whether a NF-kappaB reporter-gene assay, based on MonoMac-6 (MM6) cells, could reconcile the basic mechanism of innate immune response with the relevance of monocytoid cell lines to the organism reaction to endotoxins. This article describes both optimization and characterization of the reporter cells-based assay, which overall proved the linearity, accuracy, and precision of the test, and demonstrated the sensitivity of the assay to 0.24 EU/mL endotoxin, close to the pyrogenic threshold in humans. Moreover, the assay was experimentally compared to the LAL test in the evaluation of selected interfering samples. The good performance of the MM6 reporter test demonstrates the suitability of this assay to evaluate interfering or false-positive samples.

  11. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants — Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing...... from silicone to the H295R steroidogenesis assay: (1) Measured concentrations of POPs in silicone breast implants were taken from a recent study and silicone disks were loaded according to these measurements. (2) Silicone disks were transferred into H295R cell culture plates in order to control...

  12. An in vitro assay to study the recruitment and substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Michiel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of core histones play an important role in regulating fundamental biological processes such as DNA repair, transcription and replication. In this paper, we describe a novel assay that allows sequential targeting of distinct histone modifying enzymes to immobilized nucleosomal templates using recombinant chimeric targeting molecules. The assay can be used to study the histone substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes as well as whether and how certain enzymes affect each other's histone modifying activities. As such the assay can help to understand how a certain histone code is established and interpreted.

  13. Optimizing the HRP-2 In Vitro Malaria Drug Susceptibility Assay Using a Reference Clone to Improve Comparisons of Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    available soon. Optimizing the HRP-2 in vitro malaria drug susceptibility assay using a reference clone to improve comparisons of Plasmodium falciparum...Optimizing the HRP-2 in vitro malaria drug susceptibility assay using a reference clone to improve comparisons of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates 5a...Date: 13 September 2012 14. ABSTRACT Apparent emerging artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Southeast Asia requires development

  14. Validation and application of a rapid in vitro assay for assessing the estrogenic potency of halogenated phenolic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, W; Hanf, V; Schuller, W; Bartsch, H; Zwirner, M; Hagenmaier, H

    1998-01-01

    The E-Screen assay serves as an in vitro tool for the detection of estrogenic activity of chemicals and extracts of environmental samples. Based on the induction of proliferation in human estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells we could substantially simplify the assay. As one important step of validation we applied the modified assay for testing nine known xenoestrogens. We could confirm the results of other groups assuring the reproducibility of the E-Screen assay. The results provide evidence that the E-Screen assay is suitable for determination of estradiol equivalency factors (EEFs) for environmental estrogens to rank their estrogenic potency relative to the natural estrogen 17 beta-estradiol. Further, we used the optimized proliferation test to screen nine halogenated phenolic compounds for their possible estrogenic potency. Three widely applied chemicals expressed a weak receptor-mediated estrogenic activity: the flame retardant Tetrabromo-Bisphenol-A, the disinfectant 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, and the herbicide educt 4-chloro-2-methylphenol. Their estrogenic potencies were five to six orders of magnitude lower than that of 17 beta-estradiol.

  15. Assays for the in vitro establishment of Swietenia macrophylla and Cedrela odorata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Pérez Flores

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Título en español: Ensayos para el establecimiento in vitro de Swietenia macrophylla y Cedrela odorata Abstract: Recalcitrance and contamination in Mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King and Spanish cedar (Cedrela odorata L. stem tissues are the main causes of its ineffective in vitro propagation. The objectives of this research were: a to evaluate sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and plant preservative mixture (PPM® as surface disinfectants and/or added to the culture medium for the in vitro establishment of nodal explants taken from 10-year-old Mahogany and Spanish cedar plants, and b to evaluate the in vitro response of such explants treated with N6-benzylaminopurine (BAP (0, 2.2, 4.4, 8.8, 17.7 μM, silver nitrate (AgNO3 (0, 3 mg l-1, activated charcoal (0, 1 g l-1 and vented caps. All the experiments were arranged in a completely randomized design. The NaOCl at 15%, for 20 min, as a surface sterilization or PPM® at 2 ml l-1  into the culture medium, were the best treatments to reduce contamination for both species. For Mahogany explants, BAP at 17.7 μM resulted in higher percentages of bud breaks than Spanish cedar (64% and 25%, respectively. Leaves on elongated shoots dropped off by 20 days after

  16. p53 Promoter-based Reporter Gene in vitro Assays for Quick Assessment of Agents with Genotoxic Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaixing LI; Ke SHI; Ruiwen CHEN; Yan HE; Dan WU; Shuhan SUN

    2007-01-01

    The p53 promoter-based green fluorescent protein (GFP) and luciferase reporter gene assays have been established for detecting DNA damage induced by genotoxic agents.To evaluate the system,NIH3T3 cells transfected with either pHP53-GFP or pMP53-GFP construct were treated with mitomycin or 5-fluorouracil.Expression of the GFP reporter gene was significantly and specifically induced in the cells exposed to mitomycin or 5-fluorouracil.Then we treated NIH3T3 cells harboring pHP53-Luc or pMP53-Luc vector with mitomycin,5-fluorouracil or cisplatin at various concentrations.Similarly,exposure of the cells to these agents with genotoxic potentials resulted in a dose-dependent induction in luciferase reporter gene expression.Thus,these in vitro reporter gene assays could provide an ideal system for quick assessment or screening of agents with genotoxic potential.

  17. An in vitro larval migration assay for assessing anthelmintic activity of different drug classes against Ascaris suum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jianguo; Williams, Andrew R; Hansen, Tina Vicky Alstrup

    2017-01-01

    and agar gel larval migration assay to test the effect of benzimidazole and tetrahydropyrimidin/imidazothiazole anthelmintics against nine isolates of A. suum collected from locations in China and Denmark. Drugs tested were thiabendazole, fenbendazole, mebendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel. The percentages...... of larvae that migrated to the surface of each treated and control well were used to calculate the drug concentration which inhibits 50% of the larvae migration (EC50). The values of EC50 of thiabendazole, fenbendazole, mebendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel against A. suum isolates ranged 74-150, 4.......9-13.9, 2.3-4.3, 358-1150 and 1100-4000nM, respectively. This combined multi-well culture and agar gel larval migration assay was a sensitive bioassay for anthelmintic activity and could serve as an in vitro method to detect for lowered drug efficacy against A. suum or possibly to screen for anthelmintic...

  18. Suitability of the in vitro Caco-2 assay to predict the oral absorption of aromatic amine hair dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obringer, Cindy; Manwaring, John; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola J; Rothe, Helga

    2016-04-01

    Oral absorption is a key element for safety assessments of cosmetic ingredients, including hair dye molecules. Reliable in vitro methods are needed since the European Union has banned the use of animals for the testing of cosmetic ingredients. Caco-2 cells were used to measure the intestinal permeability characteristics (Papp) of 14 aromatic amine hair dye molecules with varying chemical structures, and the data were compared with historical in vivo oral absorption rat data. The majority of the hair dyes exhibited Papp values that indicated good in vivo absorption. The moderate to high oral absorption findings, i.e. ≥60%, were confirmed in in vivo rat studies. Moreover, the compound with a very low Papp value (APB: 3-((9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-4-(methylamino)-1-anthracenyl)amino)-N,N-dimethyl-N-propyl-1-propanaminium) was poorly absorbed in vivo as well (5% of the dose). This data set suggests that the Caco-2 cell model is a reliable in vitro tool for the determination of the intestinal absorption of aromatic amines with diverse chemical structures. When used in combination with other in vitro assays for metabolism and skin penetration, the Caco-2 model can contribute to the prediction and mechanistic interpretation of the absorption, metabolism and elimination properties of cosmetic ingredients without the use of animals.

  19. Size- and coating-dependent cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles evaluated using in vitro standard assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Li, Yan; Yan, Jian; Ingle, Taylor; Jones, Margie Yvonne; Mei, Nan; Boudreau, Mary D; Cunningham, Candice K; Abbas, Mazhar; Paredes, Angel M; Zhou, Tong; Moore, Martha M; Howard, Paul C; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) may greatly alter their toxicological potential. To explore the effects of size and coating on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of AgNPs, six different types of AgNPs, having three different sizes and two different coatings, were investigated using the Ames test, mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. The genotoxicities of silver acetate and silver nitrate were evaluated to compare the genotoxicity of nanosilver to that of ionic silver. The Ames test produced inconclusive results for all types of the silver materials due to the high toxicity of silver to the test bacteria and the lack of entry of the nanoparticles into the cells. Treatment of L5718Y cells with AgNPs and ionic silver resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity, mutagenicity in the Tk gene and the induction of micronuclei from exposure to nearly every type of the silver materials. Treatment of TK6 cells with these silver materials also resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and significantly increased micronucleus frequency. With both the MLA and micronucleus assays, the smaller the AgNPs, the greater the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. The coatings had less effect on the relative genotoxicity of AgNPs than the particle size. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of the induced Tk mutants indicated that the types of mutations induced by AgNPs were different from those of ionic silver. These results suggest that AgNPs induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a size- and coating-dependent manner. Furthermore, while the MLA and in vitro micronucleus assay (in both types of cells) are useful to quantitatively measure the genotoxic potencies of AgNPs, the Ames test cannot.

  20. Hydroxyethyl disulfide as an efficient metabolic assay for cell viability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Donglan; Ward, Kathleen M; Prendergast, George C; Ayene, Iraimoudi S

    2012-06-01

    Cell viability assays have a variety of well known practical and technical limitations. All the available approaches have disadvantages, such as non-linearity, high background and cumbersome protocols. Several commonly used tetrazolium chemicals rely upon generation of a colored formazan product formed by mitochondrial reduction of these compounds via phenazine methosulfate (PMS). However, sensitivity is inherently limited because their reduction relies on mitochondrial bioreduction and cellular transport of PMS, as well as accessibility to tetrazolium chemicals. In this study, we identify hydroxethyldisulfide (HEDS) as an inexpensive probe that can measure cellular metabolic activity without the need of PMS. In tissue culture medium, HEDS accurately quantitated metabolically active live cells in a linear manner superior to tetrazolium based and other assays. Cell toxicity produced by chemotherapeutics (cisplatin, etoposide), oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, acetaminophen), toxins (phenyl arsine oxide, arsenite) or ionizing radiation was rapidly determined by the HEDS assay. We found that HEDS was superior to other commonly used assays for cell viability determinations in its solubility, membrane permeability, and intracellular conversion to a metabolic reporter that is readily transported into the extracellular medium. Our findings establish the use of HEDS in a simple, rapid and low cost assay to accurately quantify viable cells.

  1. Investigations of plant-derived products with the in vitro comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Verschaeve

    2015-08-01

    It is impossible to perform a wide range of tests for screening purposes and often only the Ames assay is performed, which is insufficient. Furthermore, this test is most probably not the best choice when plant extracts need to be tested, because they often contain high amounts of histidine and have antibacterial properties. We have participated in many screening programs of medicinal plants and used different genotoxicity tests (mainly Ames assay, Vitotox test, micronucleus test and comet assay. Or results revealed that a combination of the Vitotox test and comet assay provides sufficiently reliable data with respect to genotoxicity as well as antigenotoxicity. This holds true for the testing of (medicinal plant extracts but also other plant derived products, for example those aimed at identifying novel TB chemotherapeutic drugs. The investigation of smoke and smoke compounds as enhancers of seed germination and smoke treated plants provides another example in which the comet assay proved to be valuable in the assessment of potential adverse health effects resulting from such treatment.

  2. Genotoxic investigation of a thiazolidinedione PPARγ agonist using the in vitro micronucleus test and the in vivo homozygotization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Janicélle Fernandes; Sant'Anna, Juliane Rocha de; Pereira, Tais Susane; Franco, Claudinéia Conationi da Silva; Mathias, Paulo Cezar de Freitas; de Castro-Prado, Marialba Avezum Alves

    2016-07-01

    Pioglitazone (PTZ) is an oral antidiabetic agent whose anti-cancer properties have been described recently. Since PTZ increases the production of reactive oxygen species in mammalian cells, the aim of current study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic effects of PTZ using respectively the in vitro mitotic index assay and the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test in human peripheral lymphocytes, and the in vivo homozygotization assay in Aspergillus nidulans, which detects the loss of heterozygosity due to somatic recombination. Although the lowest PTZ concentrations (4-36 μM) did not show any significant rise in the micronucleus production, the higher PTZ concentration (108 μM) produced a statistically higher number of micronuclei than the negative control and significantly altered the cell-proliferation kinetics, demonstrating the mutagenic and antiproliferative effects of PTZ, respectively. The recombinogenic activity of PTZ, demonstrated here for the first time, was observed at the highest tested concentration (400 μM) through the homozygotization index rates significantly different from the negative control. Taken together, our results show that PTZ is genotoxic at a concentration higher than the therapeutic plasma concentration. This PTZ genotoxicity may be a potential benefit to its previously described antitumour activity.

  3. Technical Advance: New in vitro method for assaying the migration of primary B cells using an endothelial monolayer as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Hutchinson, Phillip J; Szasz, Taylor P; Jaeger, Emily R; Onken, Michael D; Cooper, John A; Morley, Sharon Celeste

    2017-09-01

    Migration of B cells supports their development and recruitment into functional niches. Therefore, defining factors that control B cell migration will lead to a better understanding of adaptive immunity. In vitro cell migration assays with B cells have been limited by poor adhesion of cells to glass coated with adhesion molecules. We have developed a technique using monolayers of endothelial cells as the substrate for B cell migration and used this technique to establish a robust in vitro assay for B cell migration. We use TNF-α to up-regulate surface expression of the adhesion molecule VCAM-1 on endothelial cells. The ligand VLA-4 is expressed on B cells, allowing them to interact with the endothelial monolayer and migrate on its surface. We tested our new method by examining the role of L-plastin (LPL), an F-actin-bundling protein, in B cell migration. LPL-deficient (LPL(-/-)) B cells displayed decreased speed and increased arrest coefficient compared with wild-type (WT) B cells, following chemokine stimulation. However, the confinement ratios for WT and LPL(-/-) B cells were similar. Thus, we demonstrate how the use of endothelial monolayers as a substrate will support future interrogation of molecular pathways essential to B cell migration. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  4. In vitro activity assays for MYST histone acetyltransferases and adaptation for high-throughput inhibitor screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification that is carried out by acetyltransferases. The MYST proteins form the largest and most diverse family of acetyltransferases, which regulate gene expression, DNA repair, and cell cycle homeostasis, among other activities, by acetylating both histone and non-histone proteins. This chapter will describe methods for the preparation and biochemical characterization of MYST family acetyltransferases, including protocols for the preparation of recombinant protein, enzyme assays for measuring steady state parameters and binding assays to measure cofactor and inhibitor binding. We also provide details on adapting these assays for high throughput screening for small molecule MYST inhibitors. This chapter seeks to prepare researchers for some hurdles that they may encounter when studying the MYST proteins so that there may be better opportunity to plan appropriate controls and obtain high quality data. PMID:27372752

  5. Evaluation of Estrogenic Activity of Wastewater: Comparison Among In Vitro ERα Reporter Gene Assay, In Vivo Vitellogenin Induction, and Chemical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Masaru; Kitamura, Tomokazu; Kumar, Vimal; Park, Chang-Beom; Ihara, Mariko O; Lee, Sang-Jung; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Iguchi, Taisen; Okamoto, Seiichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2015-05-19

    The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER) reporter gene assay has long been used to measure estrogenic activity in wastewater. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the assay represents net estrogenic activity in the balance between estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in wastewater. However, it remained unclear whether the net estrogenic activity measured by the in vitro ERα reporter gene assay can predict the in vivo estrogenic effect of wastewater. To determine this, we measured the following: estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of wastewater and reclaimed water by the in vitro ERα reporter gene assay, expression of vitellogenin-1 (vtg1) and choriogenin-H (chgH) in male medaka (Oryzias latipes) by quantitative real-time PCR, and estrone, 17β-estradiol, estriol, and 17α-ethynylestradiol concentrations chemically to predict estrogenic activity. The net estrogenic activity measured by the in vitro medaka ERα reporter gene assay predicted the in vivo vtg1/chgH expression in male medaka more accurately than the concentrations of estrogens. These results also mean that in vivo vtg1/chgH expression in male medaka is determined by the balance between estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities. The in vitro medaka ERα reporter gene assay also predicted in vivo vtg1/chgH expression on male medaka better than the human ERα reporter gene assay.

  6. Glucocorticoid activity detected by in vivo zebrafish assay and in vitro glucocorticoid receptor bioassay at environmental relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiyu; Jia, Ai; Snyder, Shane A; Gong, Zhiyuan; Lam, Siew Hong

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are pharmaceutical contaminants of emerging concern due to their incomplete removal during wastewater treatment, increased presence in aquatic environment and their biological potency. The zebrafish is a popular model for aquatic toxicology and environmental risk assessment. This study aimed to determine if glucocorticoids at environmental concentrations would perturb expression of selected glucocorticoid-responsive genes in zebrafish and to investigate their potentials as an in vivo zebrafish assay in complementing in vitro glucocorticoid receptor bioassay. The relative expression of eleven glucocorticoid-responsive genes in zebrafish larvae and liver of adult male zebrafish exposed to three representative glucocorticoids (dexamethasone, prednisolone and triamcinolone) was determined. The expression of pepck, baiap2 and pxr was up-regulated in zebrafish larvae and the expression of baiap2, pxr and mmp-2 was up-regulated in adult zebrafish exposed to glucocorticoids at concentrations equivalent to total glucocorticoids reported in environmental samples. The responsiveness of the specific genes were sufficiently robust in zebrafish larvae exposed to a complex environmental sample detected with in vitro glucocorticoid activity equivalent to 478 pM dexamethasone (DEX-EQ) and confirmed to contain low concentration (0.2 ng/L or less) of the targeted glucocorticoids, and possibly other glucocorticoid-active compounds. The findings provided in vivo relevance to the in vitro glucocorticoid activity and suggested that the environmental sample can perturb glucocorticoid-responsive genes in its original, or half the diluted, concentration as may be found in the environment. The study demonstrated the important complementary roles of in vivo zebrafish and in vitro bioassays coupled with analytical chemistry in monitoring environmental glucocorticoid contaminants.

  7. Measuring melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes elicited by dendritic cell vaccines with a tumor inhibition assay in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczesny, Sophie; Shi, Honhgzhen; Saito, Hiroaki; Mannoni, Patrice; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, A Karolina

    2005-01-01

    Improving cancer vaccines depends on assays measuring elicited tumor-specific T-cell immunity. Cytotoxic effector cells are essential for tumor clearance and are commonly evaluated using 51Cr release from labeled target cells after a short (4 hours) incubation with T cells. The authors used a tumor inhibition assay (TIA) that assesses the capacity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) to control the survival/growth of EGFP-labeled tumor cell lines. TIA was validated using CD8+ T cells primed in vitro against melanoma and breast cancer cells. TIA was then used to assess the CTL function of cultured CD8+ T cells isolated from patients with metastatic melanoma who underwent vaccination with peptide-pulsed CD34+ HPCs-derived DCs. After the DC vaccination, T cells from six of eight patients yielded CTLs that could inhibit the survival/growth of melanoma cells. The results of TIA correlated with killing of tumor cells in a standard 4-hour 51Cr release assay, yet TIA allowed detection of CTL activities that appeared marginal in the 51Cr release assay. Thus, TIA might prove valuable for measuring spontaneous and induced antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells.

  8. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  9. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Dennekamp, M.; Vethaak, A.D.; Brouwer, A.; Koeman, J.H.; Burg, van der B.; Murk, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-) estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-

  10. In vitro Assays of Staphylococcus epidermidis Characteristics and Outcome in an Endocarditis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Herndon

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Staphylococcus epidermidis adherence to indwelling polymers is important in prosthetic valve endocarditis. Earlier studies have related streptococcal endocarditis to isolates with high levels of cell-associated hexoses. The objective of the present study was to determine if a relationship exists between an S epidermidis isolate assay score and production/severity of experimental endocarditis.

  11. Colony formation in agar: in vitro assay for haemopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicke, K.A.; Platenburg, M.G.C.; Bekkum, D.W. van

    1971-01-01

    Using a method in which embryo fibroblasts were used as feeder layers, the colony forming capacity in agar of a variety of mouse haemopoietic suspensions was compared with their CFUs content. A striking parallelism between the results of the two assays was found. In addition, under certain condition

  12. Quantifying the effect of experimental design choices for in vitro scratch assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Stuart T; Ross, Joshua V; Binder, Benjamin J; Sean McElwain, D L; Haridas, Parvathi; Simpson, Matthew J

    2016-07-07

    Scratch assays are often used to investigate potential drug treatments for chronic wounds and cancer. Interpreting these experiments with a mathematical model allows us to estimate the cell diffusivity, D, and the cell proliferation rate, λ. However, the influence of the experimental design on the estimates of D and λ is unclear. Here we apply an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) parameter inference method, which produces a posterior distribution of D and λ, to new sets of synthetic data, generated from an idealised mathematical model, and experimental data for a non-adhesive mesenchymal population of fibroblast cells. The posterior distribution allows us to quantify the amount of information obtained about D and λ. We investigate two types of scratch assay, as well as varying the number and timing of the experimental observations captured. Our results show that a scrape assay, involving one cell front, provides more precise estimates of D and λ, and is more computationally efficient to interpret than a wound assay, with two opposingly directed cell fronts. We find that recording two observations, after making the initial observation, is sufficient to estimate D and λ, and that the final observation time should correspond to the time taken for the cell front to move across the field of view. These results provide guidance for estimating D and λ, while simultaneously minimising the time and cost associated with performing and interpreting the experiment.

  13. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Dennekamp, M.; Vethaak, A.D.; Brouwer, A.; Koeman, J.H.; Burg, van der B.; Murk, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-) estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-

  14. Statistical procedures for the design and analysis of in vitro mutagenesis assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaldor, J.

    1983-03-01

    In previous statistical treatments of a certain class of mutagenesis assays, stochastic models of mutation and cell growth have not been utilized. In this paper, we review the assumptions under which these models are derived, introduce some further assumptions, and propose ways to estimate and test hypotheses regarding the parameters of the models from assay data. It is shown via simulation and exact calculation that if the models are valid, the proposed statistical procedures provide very accurate Type I error rates for hypothesis tests, and coverage probabilities for confidence intervals. The cases of a linear dose response relationship for mutagenesis, and a comparison of a set of treated cell cultures with a set of control cultures are treated in detail. Approximate power functions for hypothesis tests of interest are then derived, and these are also shown to be satisfactorily close to the true power functions. The approximations are used to develop guidelines for planning aspects of a mutagenesis assay, including the number, spacing and range of dose levels employed. Examples of applications of the procedures are provided, and the paper concludes with a discussion of future statistical work which may be carried out in the area of mutagenesis assays. 38 references, 8 figures, 7 tables.

  15. Does the duration of lysis affect the sensitivity of the in vitro alkaline comet assay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, José Manuel; Sánchez, Oscar; López de Cerain, Adela; Azqueta, Amaya

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline comet assay is now the method of choice for measuring different kinds of DNA damage in cells. Several attempts have been made to identify and evaluate the critical points affecting the comet assay outcome, highlighting the requirement of arriving at a standardised protocol in order to be able to compare the results obtained in different laboratories. However, reports on the effect of modifying the time of lysis are lacking. Here we tested different times of lysis (from no lysis to 1 week) in control HeLa cells and HeLa cells treated with different concentrations of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or H2O2. We also tested different times of lysis in the comet assay combined with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) in untreated and Ro 19-8022 plus light-treated HeLa cells. The same DNA damage levels were detected in the absence of lysis or after 1h of lysis when the standard comet assay was used to detect the MMS- and H2O2-induced lesions; the response increased when longer lysis was used, up to at least 1 week. When FPG was used, a minimum lysis period of 5 min was necessary to allow the enzyme to reach the DNA; the same DNA damage levels were detected after 5 min or 1h of lysis and the response increased up to 24h. In conclusion, the time of lysis can be varied depending on the sensitivity needed in both versions of the assay, and a constant time of lysis should be used if results from different experiments or laboratories are to be compared.

  16. Development and validation of a high-content screening in vitro micronucleus assay in CHO-k1 and HepG2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, W.M.; Schirris, T.J.J.; Horbach, G.J.; Schoonen, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study an automated image analysis assisted in vitro micronucleus assay was developed with the rodent cell line CHO-k1 and the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, which are both commonly used in regulatory genotoxicity assays. The HepG2 cell line was chosen because of the presence in these

  17. Development and validation of a high-content screening in vitro micronucleus assay in CHO-k1 and HepG2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, W.M.; Schirris, T.J.J.; Horbach, G.J.; Schoonen, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study an automated image analysis assisted in vitro micronucleus assay was developed with the rodent cell line CHO-k1 and the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, which are both commonly used in regulatory genotoxicity assays. The HepG2 cell line was chosen because of the presence in these

  18. In vitro assay of nuclear uptake of doxorubicin hydrochloride in osteosarcoma cells of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, M J; Berg, J; Kusuzaki, K; Springfield, D S; Gebhardt, M C; Mankin, H J

    1991-12-01

    A rapid, simple chemosensitivity assay, assessing tumor cell nuclear uptake of doxorubicin hydrochloride, was evaluated in 16 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma. Doxorubicin was administered to dogs in 5 biweekly treatments, and surgical resection was performed after the second or third treatment. The chemosensitivity assay was performed on biopsy specimens from all dogs before chemotherapy. It was repeated on tissue from resected tumors, and tumors were evaluated histologically to determine the degree of necrosis resulting from chemotherapy. Disease-free and total survival time correlated significantly (P less than 0.05 in both cases) with the degree of postchemotherapy necrosis of the primary tumors. Significant correlation was not apparent between the percentage of tumor cells with nuclear uptake of doxorubicin (in either biopsy or resection samples) and disease-free or total survival time. The percentage of cells with nuclear uptake of doxorubicin in surgically resected tumors correlated significantly (P less than 0.05) with percentage of necrosis.

  19. Biocompatibility of various ferrite nanoparticles evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assays using HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomitaka, Asahi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: d07gd158@ynu.ac.jp; Hirukawa, Atsuo; Yamada, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Morishita, Shin [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Takemura, Yasushi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles for thermotherapy must be biocompatible and possess high thermal efficiency as heating elements. The biocompatibility of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (20-30 nm), ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (15-30 nm) and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (20-30 nm) nanoparticles was studied using a cytotoxicity colony formation assay and a cell viability assay. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} sample was found to be biocompatible on HeLa cells. While ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were non-toxic at low concentrations, HeLa cells exhibited cytotoxic effects when exposed to concentrations of 100 {mu}g/ml nanoparticles.

  20. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Dennekamp, Martine; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan H; van der Burg, Bart; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-07-03

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-)estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-CALUX assay was more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol (E2) than the recombinant yeast screen, with an EC50 of 6 pM E2 compared to 100 pM in the yeast screen. Yeast cells were unable to distinguish the anti-estrogens ICI 182,780 and (4-hydroxy)tamoxifen, which were agonistic in the yeast. Acetone-soluble fractions of hexane/acetone extracts of sediments showed higher estrogenic potency than hexane-soluble extracts in the ER-CALUX assay. Sediments obtained from industrialized areas such as the Port of Rotterdam showed the highest estrogenic potency of the 12 marine sediments tested (up to 40 pmol estradiol equivalents per gram sediment). The estrogenic activity of individual chemicals that can be found in sediments including: alkylphenol ethoxylates and carboxylates; phthalates; and pesticides, was tested. Increasing sidechain length of various nonylphenol ethoxylates resulted in decreased estrogenic activity. Of the phthalates tested, butylbenzylphthalate was the most estrogenic, though with a potency approximately 100,000 times less than E2. The organochlorine herbicides atrazine and simazine failed to induce reporter gene activity. As metabolic activation may be required to induce estrogenic activity, a metabolic transformation step was added to the ER-CALUX assay using incubation of compounds with liver microsomes obtained from PCB-treated rats. Results indicate that metabolites of E2, NP and bisphenol A were less active than the parent compounds, while metabolites of methoxychlor were more estrogenic following microsomal incubations.

  1. High content screening as high quality assay for biological evaluation of photosensitizers in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela M F Vaz

    Full Text Available A novel single step assay approach to screen a library of photdynamic therapy (PDT compounds was developed. Utilizing high content analysis (HCA technologies several robust cellular parameters were identified, which can be used to determine the phototoxic effects of porphyrin compounds which have been developed as potential anticancer agents directed against esophageal carcinoma. To demonstrate the proof of principle of this approach a small detailed study on five porphyrin based compounds was performed utilizing two relevant esophageal cancer cell lines (OE21 and SKGT-4. The measurable outputs from these early studies were then evaluated by performing a pilot screen using a set of 22 compounds. These data were evaluated and validated by performing comparative studies using a traditional colorimetric assay (MTT. The studies demonstrated that the HCS assay offers significant advantages over and above the currently used methods (directly related to the intracellular presence of the compounds by analysis of their integrated intensity and area within the cells. A high correlation was found between the high content screening (HCS and MTT data. However, the HCS approach provides additional information that allows a better understanding of the behavior of these compounds when interacting at the cellular level. This is the first step towards an automated high-throughput screening of photosensitizer drug candidates and the beginnings of an integrated and comprehensive quantitative structure action relationship (QSAR study for photosensitizer libraries.

  2. Intralaboratory validation of four in vitro assays for the prediction of the skin sensitizing potential of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Caroline; Kolle, Susanne N; Fabian, Eric; Pachel, Christina; Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Wiench, Benjamin; Wruck, Christoph J; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is induced by repeated skin contact with an allergen. Assessment of the skin sensitizing potential of chemicals, agrochemicals, and especially cosmetic ingredients is currently performed with the use of animals. Animal welfare and EU legislation demand animal-free alternatives reflected in a testing and marketing ban for cosmetic ingredients beginning in 2013. The underlying mechanisms of induction and elicitation of skin sensitization are complex and a chemical needs to comply several properties being skin sensitizing. To account for the multitude of events in the induction of skin sensitization an in vitro test system will consist of a battery of various tests. Currently, we performed intralaboratory validations of four assays addressing three different events during induction of skin sensitization. (1) The Direct Peptide Reactivity Assay (DPRA) according to Gerberick and co-workers (Gerberick et al., 2004) using synthetic peptides and HPLC analysis. (2) Two dendritic cell activation assays based on the dendritic cell like cell lines U-937 and THP-1 and flow cytometric detection of the maturation markers CD54 and/or CD86 (Ashikaga et al., 2006; Python et al., 2007; Sakaguchi et al., 2006). (3) Antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent gene activity in a HaCaT reporter gene cell line (Emter et al., 2010). We present the results of our intralaboratory validation of these assays with 23 substances of known sensitizing potential. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the individual tests were obtained by comparison to human epidemiological data as well as to data from animal tests such as the local lymph node assay. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy Study of Broken Rice Maltodextrin in In Vitro Wound Healing Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Amin, Zahiah; Koh, Soo Peng; Yeap, Swee Keong; Abdul Hamid, Nur Syazwani; Tan, Chin Ping; Long, Kamariah

    2015-01-01

    Maltodextrins that contain both simple sugars and polymers of saccharides have been widely used as ingredients in food products and pharmaceutical delivery systems. To date, no much work has been reported on the applications of maltodextrin from broken rice (RB) sources. Therefore, the objective of this work was to investigate the in vitro wound healing efficacy of RB maltodextrin at different conditions. Wounds treated with lower dextrose equivalent (DE) range (DE 10-14) of maltodextrins at a concentration of 10% obtained from RB were found to be able to heal the wounds significantly faster (p healing properties as the NIH 3T3 fibroblast wounded cells were able to proliferate without causing cytotoxic effect when wounded cell was treated with maltodextrin. All these findings indicated that the RB maltodextrin could perform better than the commercial maltodextrin at the same DE range. This study showed that RB maltodextrins had better functionality properties than other maltodextrin sources and played a beneficial role in wound healing application.

  4. New hosts of Myrothecium spp. in Brazil and a preliminary in vitro assay of fungicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Quezado Duval

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Myrothecium roridum and M. verrucaria are two plant pathogenic species causing foliar spots in a large number of cultivated plants. This paper aims to study the causal agents of foliar spots in vegetable crops (sweet pepper, tomato and cucumber, ornamental plants (Spathiphyllum wallisii, Solidago canadensis, Anthurium andreanum, Dieffenbachia amoena and a solanaceous weed plant (Nicandra physaloides. Most of the isolates were identified as M. roridum; only the isolate 'Myr-02' from S. canadensis was identified as M. verrucaria. All the isolates were pathogenic to their original plant hosts and also to some other plants. Some fungicides were tested in vitro against an isolate of M. roridum and the mycelial growth recorded after seven days. Fungicides with quartenary ammonium, tebuconazole and copper were highly effective in inhibiting the mycelial growth of M. roridum. This paper confirms the first record of M. roridum causing leaf spots in sweet pepper, tomato, Spathiphyllum, Anthurium, Dieffenbachia and N. physaloides in Brazil. We also report M. roridum as causal agent of cucumber fruit rot and M. verrucaria as a pathogen of tango plants.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, M.N.M. [Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG (United Kingdom); School of Life and Health Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham, B4 7EJ (United Kingdom); Wright, K.T.; Fuller, H.R. [Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG (United Kingdom); MacNeil, S. [Kroto Research Institute and Centre for Nanoscience and Technology, Sheffield University, Sheffield, S1 2UE (United Kingdom); Johnson, W.E.B., E-mail: w.e.johnson@aston.ac.uk [School of Life and Health Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham, B4 7EJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-{beta}1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  6. Development and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro coupled transcription-translation assay system for evaluation of translation inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Corey; Sutcliffe, Joyce A.; Grossman, Trudy H.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial transcription and translation have proven to be effective targets for broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapies owing to the critical role they play in bacterial propagation and the overall conservation of the associated machinery involved. Escherichia coli is the most common source of S30 extract used in bacterial in vitro coupled transcription-translation assays, however, transcription-translation assays in other important pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae have been described (Murray et al., 2001; Dandliker et al., 2003). Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important and difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogen. In a drug discovery program, to de-risk any potential species specificity of novel inhibitors, we developed and optimized a robust method for the preparation of S30 extract from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. Further, a P. aeruginosa transcription-translation assay using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid was validated and compared to an E. coli S30-based system using a wide range of antibiotics encompassing multiple classes of translation inhibitors. Results showed a similar ranking of the activities of known inhibitors, illustrative of the high degree of conservation between the transcription-translation pathways in both organisms. PMID:22677604

  7. Correlation of In Vivo and In Vitro Assay Results for Assessment of Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Green Tea Nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-ElSalam, Heba-Alla H; Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad; Nassar, Noha; Zaazaa, Hala E; Ibrahim, Mohamed A

    2016-07-01

    Green tea (GT)-derived catechins; epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in particular are commonly used nutraceuticals for their free-radical scavenging activity (FRSA). The influence of photodegradation on the protective power of GT nutracenticals against oxidative stress was thoroughly explored. Photodegradation of GT extracts was carried out and monitored using orthogonal stability-indicating testing protocol; in vitro and in vivo assays. Total polyphenol content (TPC) and FRSA were determined spectrophotometrically while EGCG was selectively monitored using SPE-HPLC. In vivo assessment of photodegraded samples was investigated via measuring a number of biomarkers for hepatic oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, mitogen-activated protein kinase, glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, nuclear factor kappa beta, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor) as well as liver damage (alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase) in serum of rats previously subjected to oxidative stress. Results showed complete degradation of EGCG in photodegraded green tea samples with no correlation with either TPC or FRSA. On the other hand, in vivo assay results revealed not only loss of activity but formation of harmful pro-oxidants. Photostability was found crucial for the protective effect of GT extract against lead acetate insult. Results confirmed that careful design of quality control protocols requires correlation of chemical assays to bioassays to verify efficacy, stability, and most importantly safety of nutraceuticals.

  8. Anti-apical-membrane-antigen-1 antibody is more effective than anti-42-kilodalton-merozoite-surface-protein-1 antibody in inhibiting plasmodium falciparum growth, as determined by the in vitro growth inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Zhou, Hong; Diouf, Ababacar; Moretz, Samuel E; Fay, Michael P; Miller, Louis H; Martin, Laura B; Pierce, Mark A; Ellis, Ruth D; Mullen, Gregory E D; Long, Carole A

    2009-07-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the 42-kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1(42)) are leading malaria vaccine candidates. Several preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted, and an in vitro parasite growth inhibition assay has been used to evaluate the biological activities of the resulting antibodies. In a U.S. phase 1 trial with AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel plus CPG 7909, the vaccination elicited anti-AMA1 immunoglobulin G (IgG) which showed up to 96% inhibition. However, antibodies induced by MSP1(42)-C1/Alhydrogel plus CPG 7909 vaccine showed less than 32% inhibition in vitro. To determine whether anti-MSP1(42) IgG had less growth-inhibitory activity than anti-AMA1 IgG in vitro, the amounts of IgG that produced 50% inhibition of parasite growth (Ab(50)) were compared for rabbit and human antibodies. The Ab(50)s of rabbit and human anti-MSP1(42) IgGs were significantly higher (0.21 and 0.62 mg/ml, respectively) than those of anti-AMA1 IgGs (0.07 and 0.10 mg/ml, respectively) against 3D7 parasites. Ab(50) data against FVO parasites also demonstrated significant differences. We further investigated the Ab(50)s of mouse and monkey anti-AMA1 IgGs and showed that there were significant differences between the species (mouse, 0.28 mg/ml, and monkey, 0.14 mg/ml, against 3D7 parasites). Although it is unknown whether growth-inhibitory activity in vitro reflects protective immunity in vivo, this study showed that the Ab(50) varies with both antigen and species. Our data provide a benchmark for antibody levels for future AMA1- or MSP1(42)-based vaccine development efforts in preclinical and clinical trials.

  9. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Safety Evaluation of Papain (Carica papaya L. Using In Vitro Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R. da Silva

    2010-01-01

    This work evaluated the toxic and mutagenic potential of papain and its potential antioxidant activity against induced-H2O2 oxidative stress in Escherichia coli strains. Cytotoxicity assay, Growth inhibition test, WP2-Mutoxitest and Plasmid-DNA treatment, and agarose gel electrophoresis were used to investigate if papain would present any toxic or mutagenic potential as well as if papain would display antioxidant properties. Papain exhibited negative results for all tests. This agent presented an activity protecting cells against H2O2-induced mutagenesis.

  10. A Demonstration of the Uncertainty in Predicting the Estrogenic Activity of Individual Chemicals and Mixtures From an In Vitro Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activation Assay (T47D-KBluc) to the In Vivo Uterotrophic Assay Using Oral Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Justin M; Hannas, Bethany R; Furr, Johnathan R; Wilson, Vickie S; Gray, L Earl

    2016-10-01

    In vitro estrogen receptor assays are valuable tools for identifying environmental samples and chemicals that display estrogenic activity. However, in vitro potency cannot necessarily be extrapolated to estimates of in vivo potency because in vitro assays are currently unable to fully account for absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. To explore this issue, we calculated relative potency factors (RPF), using 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) as the reference compound, for several chemicals and mixtures in the T47D-KBluc estrogen receptor transactivation assay. In vitro RPFs were used to predict rat oral uterotrophic assay responses for these chemicals and mixtures. EE2, 17β-estradiol (E2), benzyl-butyl phthalate (BBP), bisphenol-A (BPA), bisphenol-AF (BPAF), bisphenol-C (BPC), bisphenol-S (BPS), and methoxychlor (MET) were tested individually, while BPS + MET, BPAF + MET, and BPAF + BPC + BPS + EE2 + MET were tested as equipotent mixtures. In vivo ED50 values for BPA, BPAF, and BPC were accurately predicted using in vitro data; however, E2 was less potent than predicted, BBP was a false positive, and BPS and MET were 76.6 and 368.3-fold more active in vivo than predicted from the in vitro potency, respectively. Further, mixture ED50 values were more accurately predicted by the dose addition model using individual chemical in vivo uterotrophic data (0.7-1.5-fold difference from observed) than in vitro data (1.4-86.8-fold). Overall, these data illustrate the potential for both underestimating and overestimating in vivo potency from predictions made with in vitro data for compounds that undergo substantial disposition following oral administration. Accounting for aspects of toxicokinetics, notably metabolism, in in vitro models will be necessary for accurate in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolations.

  11. Varying assay geometry to emulate connective tissue planes in an in vitro model of acupuncture needling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julias, Margaret; Buettner, Helen M; Shreiber, David I

    2011-02-01

    During traditional acupuncture, fine needles are inserted subcutaneously and rotated, which causes loose fascial tissue to wind around the needle. This coupling is stronger at acupuncture points, which tend to fall above intermuscular fascial planes, than control points, which lay above skeletal muscle. These different anatomical constraints may affect the mechanical coupling. Fascia at acupuncture points is bounded on two sides by skeletal muscle, but at control points is essentially unbounded. These differences were approximated in simple in vitro models. To emulate the narrower boundary within the intermuscular plane, type I collagen was cast in circular gels of different radii. To model the channel-like nature of these planes, collagen was cast in elliptical gels with major and minor axes matching the large and small circular gels, respectively, and in planar gels constrained on two sides. Acupuncture needles were inserted into the gels and rotated via a computer-controlled motor while capturing the evolution of fiber alignment under cross-polarization. Small circular gels aligned faster, but failed earlier than large circular gels. Rotation in elliptical and planar gels generated more alignment-per-revolution than circular gels. Planar gels were particularly resistant to failure. Fiber alignment in circular gels was isotropic, but was stronger in the direction of the minor axis in elliptical and planar gels. In fibroblast-populated gels, cells followed the alignment of the collagen fibers, and also became denser in regions of stronger alignment. These results suggest that the anatomy at acupuncture points provides unique boundaries that accentuate the mechanical response to needle manipulation.

  12. Analysis of In Vitro DNA Interactions of Brassinosteroid-Controlled Transcription Factors Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Most signaling cascades ultimately lead to changes in gene expression by modulating the activity of transcription factors (TFs). The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) is a simple but powerful in vitro method for investigation of specific protein-DNA interactions. It makes use of the fact that protein-DNA complexes have a lower electrophoretic mobility in gels than free DNA has. The application of labeled probes in combination with unlabeled competitors allows investigation of DNA-binding specificity and identification of binding motifs with single base-pair resolution. Here we describe the application of EMSAs for the study of interactions of the brassinosteroid-regulated TFs, BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1, (BZR1), BRI1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 (BES1)/BZR2, and CESTA with putative binding sites. The classical approach using radiolabeled probes, as well as the more recent application of fluorescent probes, is described and the advantages and disadvantages of both methods are discussed.

  13. Rhodacyanine dye MKT-077 inhibits in vitro telomerase assay but has no detectable effects on telomerase activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Renu; Colgin, Lorel; Yaguchi, Tomoko; Taira, Kazunari; Reddel, Roger R; Kaul, Sunil C

    2002-08-01

    MKT-077, a cationic rhodacyanine dye analogue, causes selective toxicity to cancer cells. Its cellular targets elucidated thus far include oncogenic Ras, F-actin, mortalin (hmot-2)/mthsp70, and telomerase. Here we report that MKT-077 causes growth arrest of cancer cells in culture independent of their Ras, p53, or telomerase status. Telomerase activity is inhibited in vitro by MKT-077 in the telomerase assay used. However, the in vivo toxicity seen in telomerase-positive cancer cells was not accompanied by inhibition of telomerase activity or telomere shortening. Furthermore, cells with an alternative mechanism for lengthening of telomeres were also sensitive to MKT-077 and showed enhanced formation of alternative mechanism for lengthening of telomeres-associated PML bodies in their nuclei. The data suggested that inhibition of telomerase activity is unlikely to be a prime cause of MKT-077-induced toxicity in cancer cells.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF GLUCOSE TRANSPORTER-1 AND ITS FUNCTIONAL ASSAY IN MOUSE GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS CULTURED IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章精; 刘志红; 刘栋; 黎磊石

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the role of glucose transporter-l (GLUT1) in the glucose uptake of glomerular mesangial cells. Methods. Cultured C57/SJL mouse mesangial cells were used in the study. The expression of GLUT1 mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The expression of GLUT1 protein was detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. The uptake of glucose and its kinetics were determined by 2-deoxy-[3H] -D-glucose uptake. Results. Both GLUT1 mRNA and protein were found in mouse glomerular mesangial cells. 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake and kinetics assay showed that this glucose transporter had high affinity for glucose and the glucose uptake specificity was further confirmed by phloretin. Conclusion. Functional GLUT1 did present in mouse mesangial cells cultured in vitro and it might be the predominant transporter mediated the uptake of glucose into mesangial cells.

  15. A simple in vitro acylation assay based on optimized HlyA and HlyC purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sabrina; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2014-11-01

    HlyA is a toxin secreted by uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. HlyA belongs to the repeats in the toxin protein family and needs (i) a posttranslational, fatty acylation at two internal lysines by the acyltransferase HlyC and (ii) extracellular ion binding to achieve its active conformation. Both processes are not fully understood and experiments are often limited due to the low amounts of protein available. Here, we present an optimized purification protocol for the proteins involved in HlyA activation as well as a quick and nonradioactive assay for in vitro HlyA acylation. These may simplify future experiments, e.g., activity scanning and characterization of HlyA or HlyC mutants as demonstrated with single and double HlyA lysine mutants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants--Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2015-11-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing from silicone to the H295R steroidogenesis assay: (1) Measured concentrations of POPs in silicone breast implants were taken from a recent study and silicone disks were loaded according to these measurements. (2) Silicone disks were transferred into H295R cell culture plates in order to control exposure of the adrenal cells by equilibrium partitioning. (3) Hormone production of the adrenal cells was measured as toxicity endpoint. 4-Nonylphenol was used for method development, and the new dosing method was compared to conventional solvent-dosing. The two dosing modes yielded similar dose-dependent hormonal responses of H295R cells. However, with the partitioning-controlled freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree) as dose metrics, dose-response curves were left-shifted by two orders of magnitude relative to spiked concentrations. Partitioning-controlled dosing of POPs resulted in up to 2-fold increases in progestagen and corticosteroid levels at Cfree of individual POPs in or below the femtomolar range. Silicone acted not only as source of the POPs but also as a sorption sink for lipophilic hormones, stimulating the cellular hormone production. Methodologically, the study showed that silicone can be used as reference partitioning phase to transfer in vivo exposure in humans (silicone implants) to in vitro assays (partition-controlled dosing). The main finding was that POPs at the levels at which they are found in humans can interfere with steroidogenesis in a human adrenocortical cell line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of currently used pesticides in assays for estrogenicity, androgenicity, and aromatase activity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Vinggaard, Anne; Rasmussen, Thomas Høj

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-four pesticides were tested for interactions with the estrogen receptor (ER) and the androgen receptor (AR) in transactivation assays. Estrogen-like effects on MCF-7 cell proliferation and effects on CYP19 aromatase activity in human placental microsomes were also investigated. Pesticides...... to their frequent use in Danish greenhouses. In addition, the metabolite mercaptodimethur sulfoxide, the herbicide tribenuron-methyl, and the organochlorine dieldrin, were included. Several of the pesticides, dieldrin, endosulfan, methiocarb, and fenarimol, acted both as estrogen agonists and androgen antagonists....... Prochloraz reacted as both an estrogen and an androgen antagonist. Furthermore, fenarimol and prochloraz were potent aromatase inhibitors while endosulfan was a weak inhibitor. Hence, these three pesticides possess at least three different ways to potentially disturb sex hormone actions. In addition...

  18. Comparison of in vitro hormone activities of selected phthalates using reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ouxi; Du, Guizhen; Sun, Hong; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Song, Ling; Wang, Xinru

    2009-12-01

    Phthalates are widely used in the plastic industry and food packaging, imparting softness and flexibility to normally rigid plastic medical devices and children's toys. Even though phthalates display low general toxicity, there is increasing concern on the effects of endocrine system induced by some of phthalate compounds. The hormone activity of dibutyl phthalate (DBP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were assessed using the luciferase reporter gene assays. The results showed that DBP, MBP and DEHP, not only exhibited potent antiandrogenic activity, with IC(50) value of 1.05x10(-6), 1.22x10(-7)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, but also showed the androgenic activity with EC(50) value of 6.17x10(-6), 1.13x10(-5)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M. We also found that all the three related chemicals possessed thyroid receptor (TR) antagonist activity with IC(50) of 1.31x10(-5), 2.77x10(-6)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, and none showed TR agonist activity. These results indicate that TR might be the targets of industrial chemicals. In the ER mediate reporter gene assay, three chemicals showed no agonistic activity except for DBP, which appeared weakly estrogenic at the concentration of 1.0x10(-4)M. Together, the findings demonstrate that the three phthalates could simultaneously disrupt the function of two or more hormonal receptors. Therefore, these phthalates should be considered in risk assessments for human health.

  19. Skin sensitizers in cosmetics and beyond: potential multiple mechanisms of action and importance of T-cell assays for in vitro screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmanović, Stanislav; Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2017-03-22

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction induced by repeated contact with sensitizers. The ability of a chemical to act as a sensitizer has most frequently been tested in animals. As the use of animals for these purposes is gradually and globally being phased out, there is a need for reliable in vitro surrogate assays. Currently proposed in vitro assays are designed to test four key events of the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) involving covalent modification of self-proteins by sensitizers (haptenation) and presentation of new antigens (hapten/carrier complexes) to the immune system. There appears to be imperfect alignment of in vitro assays with clinical and/or animal data, suggesting possibly additional mechanisms of ACD development. Indeed, studies on allergies to small drugs, small chemical-induced HLA-peptide exchange for vaccination purposes and cosmetic ingredient-induced exposure of autoantigens suggest a possibility of DTH response promotion by hapten/carrier-independent mechanisms. Therefore, there is a need for additional appropriate in vitro assays, in order to achieve maximal concordance between clinical and/or animal data and in vitro assays. In this paper, we will review evidence supporting the idea of diverse mechanisms of ACD development. We will also discuss the impact of these multiple mechanisms, on the AOP and on the in vitro assays that should be used for allergen detection. We will propose alloreactivity-like reactions, aided by computer modeling and biochemical tests of compound-HLA binding, as additional tools for better prediction of DTH reactions, resulting from exposure to ingredients in cosmetic products. The combination of the proposed tests, along with the existing assays, should further enhance animal-free assessment of sensitizing potential of individual chemicals.

  20. Experimental Assessment of Moringa oleifera Leaf and Fruit for Its Antistress, Antioxidant, and Scavenging Potential Using In Vitro and In Vivo Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Suaib Luqman; Suchita Srivastava; Ritesh Kumar; Anil Kumar Maurya; Debabrata Chanda

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated effect of Moringa oleifera leaf and fruit extracts on markers of oxidative stress, its toxicity evaluation, and correlation with antioxidant properties using in vitro and in vitro assays. The aqueous extract of leaf was able to increase the GSH and reduce MDA level in a concentration-dependent manner. The ethanolic extract of fruit showed highest phenolic content, strong reducing power and free radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant capacity of ethanolic extract of ...

  1. Fluorescent ester dye-based assays for the in vitro measurement of Neospora caninum proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Caroline M; Ferreira, Marcela D; Costa, Lourenço F; Barros, Patrício S C; Silva, Murilo V; Santiago, Fernanda M; Mineo, José R; Mineo, Tiago W P

    2014-09-15

    Techniques for the measurement of parasite loads in different experimental models have evolved throughout the years. The quantification of stained slides using regular cytological stains is currently the most common technique. However, this modality of evaluation is labor-intensive, and the interpretation of the results is subjective because the successes of the assays mainly rely on the abilities of the professionals involved. Moreover, the novel genetic manipulation techniques that are commonly applied for closely related Toxoplasma gondii have not yet been developed for Neospora caninum. Thus, we aimed to develop a simple protocol for parasite quantification using pre-stained N. caninum tachyzoites and fluorescent probes based on ester compounds (i.e., CFSE and DDAO). For this purpose, we employed a quantification procedure based on flow cytometry analysis. Pre-stained parasites were also examined with a fluorescent microscope, which revealed that both dyes were detectable. Direct comparison of the numbers of CFSE+ and DDAO+ cells to the values obtained with classical cytology techniques yielded statistically comparable results that also accorded with genomic DNA amplification results. Although the fluorescence emitted by DDAO was more intense and provided better discrimination between the populations of parasitized cells, CFSE+ tachyzoites were detected for several days. In conclusion, this study describes a simple, fast, low-cost and reproducible protocol for N. caninum quantification that is based on parasite pre-staining with fluorescent ester-based probes.

  2. In vitro transport assays of rufinamide, pregabalin, and zonisamide by human P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pui Shan; Zhang, Chunbo; Zuo, Zhong; Kwan, Patrick; Baum, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Epilepsy is resistant to treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in about one third of epilepsy patients. AED export by P-glycoprotein (Pgp) overexpressed in the blood-brain barrier may contribute to AED resistance. The Pgp transport status of many of the recently approved AEDs remains unknown. We investigated whether several new AEDs - zonisamide (ZNS), pregabalin (PGB), and rufinamide (RFM) - are human Pgp substrates. MDCKII and LLC-PK1 cells transfected with the human MDR1 gene, which encodes the Pgp protein, were used in concentration equilibrium transport assays (CETA) to determine the substrate status of ZNS, PGB, and RFM. For each drug, an equal concentration was added to apical and basal chambers, and the concentration in both chambers was measured up to 4h. RFM, ZNS, and PGB were not transported by MDR1-transfected cells from basolateral to apical sides in CETA. ZNS, RFM, and PGB are not substrates of human Pgp. These data suggest that resistance to these drugs may not be attributed to increased Pgp activity in resistant patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Establishment and Validation of a Non-Radioactive Method for In Vitro Transcription Assay Using Primer Extension and Quantitative Real Time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Shasha; Zhou, Ying; Wei, Yun; Deng, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Primer extension-dependent in vitro transcription assay is one of the most important approaches in the research field of gene transcription. However, conventional in vitro transcription assays incorporates radioactive isotopes that cause environmental and health concerns and restricts its scope of application. Here we report a novel non-radioactive method for in vitro transcription analysis by combining primer extension with quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). We show that the DNA template within the transcription system can be effectively eliminated to a very low level by our specially designed approach, and that the primers uniquely designed for primer extension and qPCR can specifically recognize the RNA transcripts. Quantitative PCR data demonstrate that the novel method has successfully been applied to in vitro transcription analyses using the adenovirus E4 and major late promoters. Furthermore, we show that the TFIIB recognition element inhibits transcription of TATA-less promoters using both conventional and nonradioactive in vitro transcription assays. Our method will benefit the laboratories that need to perform in vitro transcription but either lack of or choose to avoid radioactive facilities.

  4. Comparative Study of Cigarette Smoke Cytotoxicity Using Two In Vitro Assay Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukushima Toshiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available L'objet de la présente étude fut de comparer les résultats obtenus à partir de deux essais de cytotoxicité in vitro s'appuyant sur des mécanismes/modes d'action différents. Le test de fixation du rouge neutre (Neutral Red Uptake - NRU se fonde sur l'endocytose tandis que le test des sels de tetrazolium hydrosolubles (WST-1 s'appuie sur l'activité de la déshydrogénase mitochondriale. Ces deux tests furent analysés à la lumière de leur fréquence d'utilisation et de leur validation documentée. La matière particulaire totale (MPT et la phase gaz/vapeur (PGV de la fumée principale produite par les cigarettes de référence Kentucky 3R4F et les dix cigarettes testées composées à 100% de tabac Burley ou à 100% de tabac jaune furent appliquées individuellement dans les deux essais utilisant des cellules CHO-K1. En outre, les constituants de fumée de cigarette et les agents cytotoxiques connus, dont la capacité à affecter certains indicateurs de résultat est documentée, furent évalués lors des deux tests. Bien que le test de fixation du rouge neutre se révéla, dans un premier temps, plus sensible que le test aux WST-1, les deux essais livrèrent des résultats comparables en termes de classement par ordre de rang de la cytotoxicité des échantillons de fumée de cigarette. Eu égard à la cytotoxicité des constituants de fumée de cigarette, l'acroléine, l'hydroquinone et la catéchine présentèrent de claires diminutions de viabilité cellulaire proportionnelles à la dose (un indicateur de résultat commun aux deux essais. Par ailleurs, les inhibiteurs enzymatiques de la chaîne respiratoire mitochondriale et les produits chimiques portant atteinte à la membrane cellulaire présentèrent également des réactions similaires, indépendamment de l'indicateur de résultat spécifique visé lors du test de cytotoxicité. En conclusion, les résultats glanés lors du test de fixation du rouge neutre et du test aux sels de

  5. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-07

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models.

  6. In vitro assessment of genotoxic effects of electric arc furnace dust on human lymphocytes using the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Orescanin, Visnja; Ruk, Damir; Gajski, Goran

    2009-02-15

    In vitro genotoxic effects of leachates of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) on human peripheral lymphocytes, assessed prior and following the treatment with a strong alkaline solution were investigated using the alkaline comet assay. Prior and following the treatment, lymphocytes were incubated with leachate of EAFD for 6 and 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Negative controls were also included. Mean values of the tail lengths established in the samples treated with the leachate stemming from the original dust for 6 and 24 hours, were 15.70 microm and 16.78 microm, respectively, as compared to 12.33 microm found in the control sample. Slight, but significant increase in the tail length was also found with the dust treated with a strong alkaline solution (13.37 microm and 13.60 microm). In case of high heavy metal concentrations (the extract of the original furnace dust), the incubation period was revealed to be of significance as well. The obtained results lead to the conclusion that alkaline comet assay could be used as a rapid, sensitive and low-cost tool when assessing genotoxicity of various waste materials, such as leachates of the electric arc furnace dust.

  7. Specific in vitro toxicity of crude and refined petroleum products: 3. Estrogenic responses in mammalian assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrabie, Cozmina M; Candido, Angelica; van den Berg, Hans; Murk, Albertinka J; van Duursen, Majorie B M; Jonker, Michiel T O

    2011-04-01

    Current petroleum risk assessment considers only narcosis as the mode of action, but several studies have demonstrated that oils contain compounds with dioxin-like, estrogenic or antiestrogenic, and androgenic or antiandrogenic activities. The present study is the third in a series investigating the specific toxic effects of 11 crude oils and refined products. By employing recombinant mammalian cells stably transfected with the human estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) or beta (ERβ), and expressing the luciferase protein (ERα-U2OS-Luc and ERβ-U2OS-Luc assay), the estrogenicity or antiestrogenicity of oils was studied. All oils, except for two refined oils and one crude oil, induced estrogenic responses. The calculated estrogenic potencies of the oils were six to nine orders of magnitude lower than the potency of 17β-estradiol (E2). Upon coexposure to a fixed concentration of E2 and increasing concentrations of oils, additive, antagonistic, and synergistic effects were revealed. One nautical fuel oil was tested in the human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7, in which it induced cell proliferation up to 70% relative to the maximal induction by E2. At its minimum effect concentration of 25 mg/L, the oil was also capable of inducing mRNA expression of the estrogen-dependent protein pS2 by a factor of two. The present results indicate that oils naturally contain potentially endocrine-disrupting compounds that are able to influence the estrogenicity of other compounds and may cause biological responses beyond receptor binding.

  8. A human in vitro whole blood assay to predict the systemic cytokine response to therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Coch

    Full Text Available Therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA and immunostimulatory ligands of Toll-like receptors (TLR or RIG-I like helicases (RLH are a promising novel class of drugs. They are in clinical development for a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. as adjuvants in vaccines and for the immunotherapy of cancer. Species-specific immune activation leading to cytokine release is characteristic for therapeutic oligonucleotides either as an unwanted side effect or intended pharmacology. Reliable in vitro tests designed for therapeutic oligonucleotides are therefore urgently needed in order to predict clinical efficacy and to prevent unexpected harmful effects in clinical development. To serve this purpose, we here established a human whole blood assay (WBA that is fast and easy to perform. Its response to synthetic TLR ligands (R848: TLR7/8, LPS: TLR4 was on a comparable threshold to the more time consuming peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC based assay. By contrast, the type I IFN profile provoked by intravenous CpG-DNA (TLR9 ligand in humans in vivo was more precisely replicated in the WBA than in stimulated PBMC. Since Heparin and EDTA, but not Hirudin, displaced oligonucleotides from their delivery agent, only Hirudin qualified as the anticoagulant to be used in the WBA. The Hirudin WBA exhibited a similar capacity as the PBMC assay to distinguish between TLR7-activating and modified non-stimulatory siRNA sequences. RNA-based immunoactivating TLR7/8- and RIG-I-ligands induced substantial amounts of IFN-α in the Hirudin-WBA dependent on delivery agent used. In conclusion, we present a human Hirudin WBA to determine therapeutic oligonucleotide-induced cytokine release during preclinical development that can readily be performed and offers a close reflection of human cytokine response in vivo.

  9. A 155-plex high-throughput in vitro coregulator binding assay for (anti-)estrogenicity testing evaluated with 23 reference compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si; Houtman, René; Melchers, Diana; Aarts, Jac; Peijnenburg, Ad; van Beuningen, Rinie; Rietjens, Ivonne; Bovee, Toine F

    2013-01-01

    To further develop an integrated in vitro testing strategy for replacement of in vivo tests for (anti-)estrogenicity testing, the ligand-modulated interaction of coregulators with estrogen receptor α was assessed using a PamChip® plate. The relative estrogenic potencies determined, based on ERα binding to coregulator peptides in the presence of ligands on the PamChip® plate, were compared to the relative estrogenic potencies as determined in the in vivo uterotrophic assay. The results show that the estrogenic potencies predicted by the 57 coactivators on the peptide microarray for 18 compounds that display a clear E2 dose-dependent response (goodness of fit of a logistic dose-response model of 0.90 or higher) correlated very well with their in vivo potencies in the uterotrophic assay, i.e., coefficient of determination values for 30 coactivators higher than or equal to 0.85. Moreover, this coregulator binding assay is able to distinguish ER agonists from ER antagonists: profiles of selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as tamoxifen, were distinct from those of pure ER agonists, such as dienestrol. Combination of this coregulator binding assay with other types of in vitro assays, e.g., reporter gene assays and the H295R steroidogenesis assay, will frame an in vitro test panel for screening and prioritization of chemicals, thereby contributing to the reduction and ultimately the replacement of animal testing for (anti-)estrogenic effects.

  10. Total antioxidant potential of juices, beverages and hot drinks consumed in Egypt screened by DPPH in vitro assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan-Hassanien, Mohamed Fawzy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant foods contain different classes and types of antioxidants and knowledge of their total antioxidant potential (TAP, which is the cumulative capacity of food components to scavenge free radicals, would be useful for epidemiological purposes.To accomplish this, a variety of fruit juices, hot drinks and beverages commonly consumed in Egypt were analyzed using in vitro DPPH assay. The order of effectiveness of fruit juices in inhibiting free radicals was as follows: red grapes juice > mango juice > guava juice > cocktail juice > pineapple juice > orange juice > cherry juice > apple juice. Among beverages and hot drinks, teas followed by coffees had the greatest TAP. These data confirm grape juice, teas and coffees as good dietary sources of antioxidants.Las plantas comestibles contienen diferentes clases y tipos de antioxidantes y el conocimiento de su potencial antioxidante total (TAP, que es la capacidad acumulativa de los componentes de los alimentos para captar radicales libres, debería ser útil en estudios epidemiológicos. De acuerdo a esto, una variedad de zumos de fruta, bebidas calientes y bebidas consumidas habitualmente en Egipto fueron analizadas usando un ensayo in vitro con DPPH. El orden de efectividad de los zumos de frutas en inhibir los radicales libres fue el siguiente: zumo de uva tinta > zumo de mango > zumo de guayaba > zumo de macedonia de frutas > zumo de piña >zumo de naranja > zumo de cereza > zumo de manzana. Entre las bebidas y bebidas calientes, el té seguido por el café son los que tuvieron mayores TAPs. Estos datos confirman que el zumo de uva, el té y el café son buenas fuentes de antioxidantes.

  11. 3D video

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  12. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  13. Experimental Assessment of Moringa oleifera Leaf and Fruit for Its Antistress, Antioxidant, and Scavenging Potential Using In Vitro and In Vivo Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suaib Luqman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated effect of Moringa oleifera leaf and fruit extracts on markers of oxidative stress, its toxicity evaluation, and correlation with antioxidant properties using in vitro and in vitro assays. The aqueous extract of leaf was able to increase the GSH and reduce MDA level in a concentration-dependent manner. The ethanolic extract of fruit showed highest phenolic content, strong reducing power and free radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant capacity of ethanolic extract of both fruit and leaf was higher in the in vitro assay compared to aqueous extract which showed higher potential in vivo. Safety evaluation studies showed no toxicity of the extracts up to a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Our results support the potent antioxidant activity of aqueous and ethanolic extract of Moringa oleifera which adds one more positive attribute to its known pharmacological importance.

  14. Experimental Assessment of Moringa oleifera Leaf and Fruit for Its Antistress, Antioxidant, and Scavenging Potential Using In Vitro and In Vivo Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqman, Suaib; Srivastava, Suchita; Kumar, Ritesh; Maurya, Anil Kumar; Chanda, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated effect of Moringa oleifera leaf and fruit extracts on markers of oxidative stress, its toxicity evaluation, and correlation with antioxidant properties using in vitro and in vitro assays. The aqueous extract of leaf was able to increase the GSH and reduce MDA level in a concentration-dependent manner. The ethanolic extract of fruit showed highest phenolic content, strong reducing power and free radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant capacity of ethanolic extract of both fruit and leaf was higher in the in vitro assay compared to aqueous extract which showed higher potential in vivo. Safety evaluation studies showed no toxicity of the extracts up to a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Our results support the potent antioxidant activity of aqueous and ethanolic extract of Moringa oleifera which adds one more positive attribute to its known pharmacological importance.

  15. Experimental Assessment of Moringa oleifera Leaf and Fruit for Its Antistress, Antioxidant, and Scavenging Potential Using In Vitro and In Vivo Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqman, Suaib; Srivastava, Suchita; Kumar, Ritesh; Maurya, Anil Kumar; Chanda, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated effect of Moringa oleifera leaf and fruit extracts on markers of oxidative stress, its toxicity evaluation, and correlation with antioxidant properties using in vitro and in vitro assays. The aqueous extract of leaf was able to increase the GSH and reduce MDA level in a concentration-dependent manner. The ethanolic extract of fruit showed highest phenolic content, strong reducing power and free radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant capacity of ethanolic extract of both fruit and leaf was higher in the in vitro assay compared to aqueous extract which showed higher potential in vivo. Safety evaluation studies showed no toxicity of the extracts up to a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Our results support the potent antioxidant activity of aqueous and ethanolic extract of Moringa oleifera which adds one more positive attribute to its known pharmacological importance. PMID:22216055

  16. High-throughput in vitro assay to evaluate the cytotoxicity of liberated platinum compounds for stimulating neural electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Kyle M; Kumsa, Doe W; Srivastava, Vishnupriya; Hudak, Eric M; Untereker, Darrel F; Kelley, Shawn C; von Recum, Horst A; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2016-11-01

    It is currently unclear how the platinum (Pt) species released from platinum-containing stimulating electrodes may affect the health of the surrounding tissue. This study develops an effective system to assess the cytotoxicity of any electrode-liberated Pt over a short duration, to screen systems before future in vivo testing. A platinum electrode was stimulated for two hours under physiologically relevant conditions to induce the liberation of Pt species. The total concentration of liberated Pt species was quantified and the concentration found was used to develop a range of Pt species for our model system comprised of microglia and neuron-like cells. Under our stimulation conditions (k=2.3, charge density of 57.7μC/cm(2)), Pt was liberated to a concentration of 1ppm. Interestingly, after 24h of Pt exposure, the dose-dependent cytotoxicity plots revealed that cell death became statistically significant at 10ppm for microglia and 20ppm for neuronal cells. However, in neuron-like cell cultures, concentrations above 1ppm resulted in significant neurite loss after 24h. To our knowledge, there does not exist a simple, in vitro assay system for assessing the cytotoxicity of Pt liberated from stimulating neural electrodes. This work describes a simple model assay that is designed to be applicable to almost any electrode and stimulation system where the electrode is directly juxtaposed to the neural target. Based on the application, the duration of stimulation and Pt exposure may be varied. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Comparison of three different in vitro mutation assays used for the investigation of cytochrome P450-mediated mutagenicity of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, W.A.; Och, F.M.M. van; Groene, E.M. de; Horbach, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Three different in vitro mutation assays were used to investigate the involvement of cytochrome P450 enzymes in the activation of the nitro- polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitroPAHs) 1-nitropyrene and 2- nitrofluorene and their reduced metabolites amino-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (aminoPAHs

  18. In vitro mutagenicity testing. I. Kermide 601 resin, Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin, and Sylgard 184 curing agent. [Ames Salmonella assay system used

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.Y.; Smith, D.M.

    1978-08-01

    Five compounds, Kerimide 601 resin, Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin, Sylgard 184 curing agent, benzo(a)pyrene, and acridine orange were tested for in vitro mutagenicity using the Ames Salmonella assay system. Kerimide 601 resin, Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin, and Sylgard 184 curing agent were not mutagenic under the described experimental conditions, while benzo(a)pyrene and acridine orange were both mutagenic.

  19. In vitro cytotoxicity studies on Carissa congesta, Polyalthia longifolia, and Benincasa hispida extracts by Sulforhodamine B assay method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Mahesh Doshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indian medicinal plants have contributed to the growth of world′s ethnopharmacological heritage. Roots of Carissa congesta (CC powder are mixed with horse urine, lime juice, and camphor and used as remedies for relieving itching conditions, Polyalthia longifolia (PL leaves are aromatic and used for decoration in festivals as sonamukhi and Benincasa hispida (BH seeds provide treatment for cough and vitiated conditions of pitta. Aims of the Study: In the current studies, crude petroleum ether extracts (BH and CC and ethanolic extract of (PL were screened for in vitro cytotoxicity activity using different cell lines. Settings and Design: In the experiment, human colon cancer HCT15, human breast cancer MCF7 and human leukemia MOLT4 cell lines were studied on the extracts. Materials and Methods: The method used was Sulforhodamine B (SRB assay method in which growth inhibition of 50% (GI 50 was analyzed by comparing it with standard drug Adriamycin (ADR (doxorubicin. Results: The CC and PL extracts showed equivalent activity to ADR (doxorubicin for human breast cancer cell line MCF7 and human leukemia cell line MOLT4 respectively. BH extract did not show satisfactory activity on selected cell lines. Conclusion: In the future, new cell lines may be screened in order to check the potency of CC, PL, and BH extracts.

  20. Application of in vitro cell transformation assays in regulatory toxicology for pharmaceuticals, chemicals, food products and cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanparys, Philippe; Corvi, Raffaella; Aardema, Marilyn J; Gribaldo, Laura; Hayashi, Makoto; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Schechtman, Leonard

    2012-04-11

    Two year rodent bioassays play a key role in the assessment of carcinogenic potential of chemicals to humans. The seventh amendment to the European Cosmetics Directive will ban in 2013 the marketing of cosmetic and personal care products that contain ingredients that have been tested in animal models. Thus 2-year rodent bioassays will not be available for cosmetics/personal care products. Furthermore, for large testing programs like REACH, in vivo carcinogenicity testing is impractical. Alternative ways to carcinogenicity assessment are urgently required. In terms of standardization and validation, the most advanced in vitro tests for carcinogenicity are the cell transformation assays (CTAs). Although CTAs do not mimic the whole carcinogenesis process in vivo, they represent a valuable support in identifying transforming potential of chemicals. CTAs have been shown to detect genotoxic as well as non-genotoxic carcinogens and are helpful in the determination of thresholds for genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. The extensive review on CTAs by the OECD (OECD (2007) Environmental Health and Safety Publications, Series on Testing and Assessment, No. 31) and the proven within- and between-laboratories reproducibility of the SHE CTAs justifies broader use of these methods to assess carcinogenic potential of chemicals.

  1. Quantitative in vitro assay to measure neutrophil adhesion to activated primary human microvascular endothelial cells under static conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Farrar, Katherine; Hellman, Judith

    2013-08-23

    The vascular endothelium plays an integral part in the inflammatory response. During the acute phase of inflammation, endothelial cells (ECs) are activated by host mediators or directly by conserved microbial components or host-derived danger molecules. Activated ECs express cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules that mobilize, activate and retain leukocytes at the site of infection or injury. Neutrophils are the first leukocytes to arrive, and adhere to the endothelium through a variety of adhesion molecules present on the surfaces of both cells. The main functions of neutrophils are to directly eliminate microbial threats, promote the recruitment of other leukocytes through the release of additional factors, and initiate wound repair. Therefore, their recruitment and attachment to the endothelium is a critical step in the initiation of the inflammatory response. In this report, we describe an in vitro neutrophil adhesion assay using calcein AM-labeled primary human neutrophils to quantitate the extent of microvascular endothelial cell activation under static conditions. This method has the additional advantage that the same samples quantitated by fluorescence spectrophotometry can also be visualized directly using fluorescence microscopy for a more qualitative assessment of neutrophil binding.

  2. Evaluation of the in vitro activities of ceftobiprole and comparators in staphylococcal colony or microtitre plate biofilm assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbanat, Darren; Shang, Wenchi; Amsler, Karen; Santoro, Colleen; Baum, Ellen; Crespo-Carbone, Steven; Lynch, A Simon

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of ceftobiprole and comparator antibiotics, either alone or in combination, in staphylococcal MBEC™ (minimum biofilm eradication concentration) and colony biofilm assays at dilutions of the maximum free-drug plasma concentration attained during clinical use (fCmax). Staphylococci tested included meticillin-susceptible and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n=6) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=2). Relative to no-drug controls, after 7 days of exposure ceftobiprole concentrations from 1/4 fCmax to fCmax generally decreased CFUs in MBEC or colony biofilms of S. aureus isolates by ca. 1.5log10 to ≥2.5log10. Gentamicin reduced colony biofilm CFUs by ≥1.4log10 at these concentrations with gentamicin-susceptible isolates. Following 7 days of exposure, vancomycin and rifampicin were ineffective as single agents or in combination in the colony model, but yielded CFU decreases from 0 to 5log10 in the MBEC model. Treatment of biofilms with rifampicin for 7 days yielded rifampicin-resistant mutants, and the selection of rifampicin resistance was inhibited by co-treatment with ceftobiprole. Thus, ceftobiprole alone or in combination demonstrated promising activity against biofilms of meticillin-susceptible and -resistant staphylococci at clinically relevant concentrations. In contrast, vancomycin and rifampicin, two agents used clinically for the treatment of biofilm infections, tested separately or together gave inconsistent results and generally had little impact on cell viability.

  3. Biological measurement of estrogenic activity in urine and bile conjugates with the in vitro ER-CALUX reporter gene assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Jonas, Arjen; Lahr, Joost; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-03-01

    Although estrogens are excreted as biologically inactive conjugates, they can be reconverted to an active form, possibly by bacteria. A simple method was developed to deconjugate estrogen metabolites present in human urine and fish bile back to active estrogens by enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase or live Escherichia coli cells. Deconjugated extracts were tested for estrogenic activity in the in vitro stable estrogen receptor-mediated chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay. Estrogen glucuronides in urine obtained from human males and females were effectively converted to active forms after incubation with beta-glucuronidase or E. coli. The highest estrogenic activity was found in deconjugated metabolites from urine of a pregnant woman, in which levels up to 3,000 nmol estradiol equivalents per liter of urine were found after overnight incubation of urine with E. coli. Bile sampled from male bream and flounder from various freshwater and marine locations was also deconjugated and a good correlation was found between high biliary estrogenic activity and elevated levels of xenoestrogenic activity in surface water as well as in plasma vitellogenin. Therefore, the measurement of deconjugated bile could form a useful (indirect) biomarker for internal dose of xenoestrogens in male fish.

  4. Novel insights for permeant lead structures through in vitro skin diffusion assays of Prunus lusitanica L., the Portugal Laurel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Maria do Céu; Duarte, Patrícia; Neng, Nuno R.; Nogueira, José M. F.; Costa, Filomena; Rosado, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    As a contribution for the generation of libraries in which a natural product (NP) is used as the guiding structure, this work sought to investigate molecular features of triterpenes as deliver leads to cross the stratum corneum at a significant rate. Seeking a bioguided investigation of the dermocosmetic lead-like potential of triterpenes in Prunus lusitanica L., various extracts were obtained by two different methods (Soxhlet extractor and Accelerated Solvent Extraction-ASE) and analyzed by GC-MS and NMR. In vitro assays were conducted to quantify the friedelin 1 and crude plant extract permeation through a membrane of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), as well as their skin penetration enhancement capacity using two model molecules, caffeine 19 and ibuprofen 20. Friedelin 1 was identified as the major component (16-77%, GC) with isolated yield of 51% w/w (94%, GC) from Soxhlet residue (1.7% p/p) of the dried aerial parts of the plant harvested when in early flowering stage. Friedelin 1 promoted the penetration of the lipophilic molecule 20, however, it did not influence the permeation of the hydrophilic permeant 20. On the other hand, the crude extract acted as a retardant of the penetration of both substances. Molecular characteristics for the applicability of P. lusitanica L. in the development of dermocosmetics, as well as a new potential use for friedelin 1 in particular, are demonstrated. Probable mechanisms for chemical penetration enhancement using triterpenes as models for transdermal administration are herein discussed.

  5. In vitro Antimicrobial Assay of Actinomycetes in Rice AgainstXanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola and as Potential Plant Growth Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erneeza Mohd Hata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this work was to invitro assay the antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes in rice against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola and as potential plant growth promoter. A total of 92 actinomycete strains were isolated from different rice plant components and field locations. Of these, only 21.74% showed antagonistic activity against the Xoc pathogen. Molecular identification via 16s rRNA amplification revealed that 60% of the active antagonistic strains belonged to the genus Streptomyces. Isolates that demonstrated the highest antagonistic activity were also able to produce hydrolytic enzymes and plant growth-promoting hormones. Combination of preliminary screening based on in vitro antagonistic, hydrolytic enzyme and plant growth hormone activity facilitated the best selection of actinomycete candidates as evidenced by strains classification using cluster analysis (Ward's Method. Results from the preliminary screening showed that actinomycetes, especially Streptomycetes, could offer a promising source for both biocontrol and plant growth-promotion agents against BLS disease in rice.

  6. Development of paper-based microfluidic analytical device for iron assay using photomask printed with 3D printer for fabrication of hydrophilic and hydrophobic zones on paper by photolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Shiraishi, Yukihide

    2015-07-09

    This paper describes a paper-based microfluidic analytical device for iron assay using a photomask printed with a 3D printer for fabrication of hydrophilic and hydrophobic zones on the paper by photolithography. Several designed photomasks for patterning paper-based microfluidic analytical devices can be printed with a 3D printer easily, rapidly and inexpensively. A chromatography paper was impregnated with the octadecyltrichlorosilane n-hexane solution and hydrophobized. After the hydrophobic zone of the paper was exposed to the UV light through the photomask, the hydrophilic zone was generated. The smallest functional hydrophilic channel and hydrophobic barrier were ca. 500 μm and ca. 100 μm in width, respectively. The fabrication method has high stability, resolution and precision for hydrophilic channel and hydrophobic barrier. This test paper was applied to the analysis of iron in water samples using a colorimetry with phenanthroline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. PubChem3D: Biologically relevant 3-D similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sunghwan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of 3-D similarity techniques in the analysis of biological data and virtual screening is pervasive, but what is a biologically meaningful 3-D similarity value? Can one find statistically significant separation between "active/active" and "active/inactive" spaces? These questions are explored using 734,486 biologically tested chemical structures, 1,389 biological assay data sets, and six different 3-D similarity types utilized by PubChem analysis tools. Results The similarity value distributions of 269.7 billion unique conformer pairs from 734,486 biologically tested compounds (all-against-all from PubChem were utilized to help work towards an answer to the question: what is a biologically meaningful 3-D similarity score? The average and standard deviation for the six similarity measures STST-opt, CTST-opt, ComboTST-opt, STCT-opt, CTCT-opt, and ComboTCT-opt were 0.54 ± 0.10, 0.07 ± 0.05, 0.62 ± 0.13, 0.41 ± 0.11, 0.18 ± 0.06, and 0.59 ± 0.14, respectively. Considering that this random distribution of biologically tested compounds was constructed using a single theoretical conformer per compound (the "default" conformer provided by PubChem, further study may be necessary using multiple diverse conformers per compound; however, given the breadth of the compound set, the single conformer per compound results may still apply to the case of multi-conformer per compound 3-D similarity value distributions. As such, this work is a critical step, covering a very wide corpus of chemical structures and biological assays, creating a statistical framework to build upon. The second part of this study explored the question of whether it was possible to realize a statistically meaningful 3-D similarity value separation between reputed biological assay "inactives" and "actives". Using the terminology of noninactive-noninactive (NN pairs and the noninactive-inactive (NI pairs to represent comparison of the "active/active" and

  8. EUROPEANA AND 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pletinckx

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  9. Stability of solutions of antineoplastic agents during preparation and storage for in vitro assays. General considerations, the nitrosoureas and alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanquet, A G

    1985-01-01

    In vitro drug sensitivity of tumour biopsies is currently being determined using a variety of methods. For these chemosensitivity assays many drugs are required at short notice, and this in turn means that the drugs must generally be stored in solution. There are, however, a number of potential problems associated with dissolving and storing drugs for in vitro use, which include (a) drug adsorption; (b) effects of freezing; (c) drug stability under the normal conditions of dilution and setting up of an in vitro assay; and (d) insolubility of drugs in normal saline (NS) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). These problems are considered in general, and some recommendations for use of solutions of drugs in in vitro assays are suggested. The nitrosoureas and alkylating agents are also investigated in greater detail in this respect. The nitrosoureas are found to be very labile in PBS at pH 7, with 5% degradation (t0.95) occurring in 10-50 min at room temperature. These values are increased about 10-fold on refrigeration and about 5- to 10-fold on reduction of the pH of the medium to pH 4-5. At pH 7 and room temperature, t0.95 is observed in under 1 h with the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard, chlorambucil, melphalan, 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,6-bis(2-hydroxyethylamino)-1,4-benzoquinone (BZQ), dibromodulcitol, dibromomannitol, treosulphan, and procarbazine. Of the other alkylating agents, 4-hydroperoxycylophosphamide (sometimes used in vitro in place of cyclophosphamide), busulphan, dianhydrogalactitol, aziridinylbenzoquinone (AZQ), and dacarbazine have a t0.95 of between 2 and 24 h, while ifosfamide and pentamethylmelamine are both stable in aqueous solution for greater than 7 days. About half the drugs studied in detail have been stored frozen in solution for in vitro use, although very little is known about their stability under these conditions.

  10. Combination of retinyl palmitate and UV-filters: phototoxic risk assessment based on photostability and in vitro and in vivo phototoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevenuto, Carolina Gomes; Guerra, Lucas Offenbecker; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo

    2015-02-20

    This study aimed to assess the phototoxic potential of combined UV-filters and retinyl palmitate (RP) in the presence or not of bemotrizinol (BMTZ), employing photostability and in vitro and in vivo phototoxicity assays. The formulations tested contained octocrylene (OCT), octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC), benzophenone-3 (BZP-3) and RP (photostable) or octocrylene (OCT), octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC), avobenzone (AVO) and RP (less photostable). Both formulations were supplemented with bemotrizinol. Photostability was evaluated by exposing, or not, formulations spread on a glass plate to UVA/UVB irradiation. The resulting products were quantified by HPLC analysis. In vitro phototoxicity of UV-filters and combinations were evaluated using 3T3 viable monolayer fibroblast cultures submitted, or not, to irradiation according to OECD TG 432. In vivo photoallergy and photoxicity were assessed by clinical studies (photopatch test). Photostability assays showed that UV-filter bemotrizinol was a better photostabilizer for RP/benzophenone-3 than for RP/avobenzone. The in vitro phototoxicity of the combination RP/avobenzone was reduced by bemotrizinol. Clinical studies did not indicate phototoxic or photoallergenic potentials in all formulations tested. It is concluded that the 3T3 NRU phototoxicity test may be considered a supplementary assay in formulation developments, since it can detect chemically unstable and potentially phototoxic combinations. However, extrapolation of in vitro positive results to human photopatch tests may be performed only to a limited extent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-small cell lung cancer 95D cells co-cultured with 3D-bioprinted scaffold to construct a lung cancer model in vitro%95 D细胞与三维打印支架共培养构建体外肺癌模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟好; 王剑; 胡慧珍; 徐炜; 陈清勇

    2015-01-01

    Objective To fabricate an innovative scaffold for lung cancer cell culture and establish a three⁃dimensional lung cancer model in vitro, and to reveal the differences in biological functions of lung cancer cells under the two⁃dimensional and three⁃dimensional culture conditions. Methods We chose agarose and alginate as the scaffold materials, and 3D printing technique was applied to construct cell culture scaffold. 95D cells were co⁃cultured with this scaffold. The differences of cell morphology, proliferation ability, protein expression, etc. in the cells cultured under 2D and 3D cultural conditions were evaluated by light microscopy using HE staining, MTT assay, scanning electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Results Cells cultured in 2D wells displayed a spindle and polygonal morphology, whereas those grown in the 3D culture aggregated into spheroids, which invaded, migrated and disseminated into the surrounding scaffold. MTT assay showed that the proliferation rates of the 3D⁃cultured cells for 2⁃6 days were significantly lower than, but those cultured for 8⁃9 days were significantly higher than that of the 2D⁃cultured cells, indicating that proliferative activity of the cells grown in 2D cultures for 8⁃9 days was inhibited. In contrast, cells grown on 3D scaffolds still maintained a higher proliferation. The Western blot assay showed that the expression of Cdc42, p53, mTOR were significantly down⁃regulated in 3D scaffold⁃cultured group (0.529± 0.103, 0.820±0.038 vs. 1.967±0.066), compared with that of the 2D⁃cultured group (3.063±0.139, 1.738 ±0.122 vs. 2.472±0.151)(P may provide a promising model for lung cancer research in vitro.%目的:探讨非小细胞肺癌细胞在二维和三维培养条件下的生物学行为差异。方法选用琼脂和海藻酸钠材料,利用三维(3D)打印技术制备细胞支架,并与肺癌95D细胞共培养,利用光学显微镜、电子显微镜、HE染色、四甲

  12. Screening of Antioxidant Potential of Selected Barks of Indian Medicinal Plants by Multiple in vitro Assays LI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ARCHANA KUMARI; POONAM KAKKAR

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antioxidant potential in herbal extract barks of five therapeutically important medicinal plants native to India,i.e.Crataeva nurvala Buch.-Ham.,Buchanania lanzan Spreng.,Aegle marmelos Corr.,Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.ex DC.,and Cedrela toona Roxb.Methods Standardized aqueous alcoholic extracts from the selected barks having different target radicals,such as superoxide radical,nitric oxide,ABTS radical,and peroxidative decomposition of phosphohpids.were prepared and screened bv multiple in vitro assays.These extracts were also tested for total phenolic and tannin content and correlated with antioxidant capacity. Results Tbtal phenolic and tannin contents were found to be the highest in C. nurvala (195 GAE mg/g and 218.3 mg/g CE).SOD mimetic activity was found to be the highest in Crataeva nurvula,although all barks showed activity more than 100 units/mg extract.Lipid peroxidation inhibitory potential was found to be the highest in Crataeva nurvala(83.4% inhibition of MDA formation/10 μg extract),and also showed a comparatively high NO quenching capacity (45.5% per 10 μg extract).The highest NO quenching potential was found in Aegle marmelos(47.3% per 10 μg extract).Cedrela toona showed the lowest LPO inhibitory potential and NO quenching capacity(50.5% and 30.5%,respectively).Buchanania lanzan,a medicinal plant extensively used for inflammatory disorders and Dalbergia sissoo also showed 72.5% and 69.1% LPO inhibitory potential/10 μg extract.Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity ranged from 0.24 to 0.39 mmol/L TEAC/mg extract,indicating that all the barks tested had ABTS+ radical quenching capacity.Conclusion Bark of Crataeva nurvulahas the highest antioxidant capacity and a positive correlation between antioxidant activity and their plendic content was found.

  13. In vitro adhesion assay of lactic acid bacteria, Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. by microbiological and PCR methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Montet

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In vitro adhesion assay using Lactobacillus reuteri KUB-AC5 as a test strain has been studied by applying simple PCR reaction together with image analysis and plate count techniques. Critical factor affecting the PCR method was quality and quantity of DNA. The cell lysis technique was modified to optimize this method. Thus, lysozyme and proteinase K were added to lyse the cells, followed by SDS solution to obtain a complete cell lysis. Only PCR products from total cells (TC were obtained, with low consistency, but none from cells bound to mucus (BC at either 0.1 or 0.5 mg/mL concentration. It was hypothesized that the attached cells might not be extracted into the cell suspension. Therefore, 1% SDS solution and 0.1M NaOH were used directly in the extraction. As expected, PCR products were observed when both TC and BC were used as a DNA template. Adhesion appeared at a wide range of 0-45%, with low consistency. Therefore, a simple microbiological method (plate count was used. The extraction of bound cells into cell suspension was critical in this method. Extraction times of 20, 60, 120 and 150 min were tried. Results showed that maximum cell number was obtained with 120 min extraction. L. reuteri KUB-AC5, L. reuteri KUB-AC16, L. reuteri KUB-AC20, L. salivarius KUB-AC21, L. acidophilus KV-1, Escherichia coli E010, Salmonella sp. S003, E. coli ATCC8739, and S. typhimurium ATCC 13311 exhibited adhesion activity of 21.6%, 0.8%, 5.7%, 1.1%, 23.1%, 10.7%, 10.3%, 4.4% and 3.2%, respectively. Among the 9 types of microorganisms tested L. acidophilus KV-1 and L. reuteri KUB-AC5 showed higher adhesion activity than the others.

  14. EVALUATION OF THE ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY OF HUMAN IL-4 BY IN VITRO AND IN V1VO ASSAYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彤钢; 陈慰峰

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of rhuIL-4 induced cytotoxicity was detected in vitro by using 51 Cr release assay and the anti-tumor activity of rhuIL-4 induced killer cell was evaluated in vivo by using a human tumor model in nudemice.huIL-4 can induce LAK activity from peripheral blood lymphocytes(PBMC) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin(PHA).Compared with the LAK activity induced by rhuIL-2,the cytotoxicity of the killer cells induced by rhuIL-4 to K562 and Raji cells was lower ,but that to TBL-E,a human lymphoid leukemia cell line established in our laboratory,and PHA-activated blast cells(PHA-blasts) was of similar magnitude.In the cytotoxicity assay using PHA-blasts,the addition of PHA increased the IL-4 induced killer cell cytotoxicity by 131%,but had no effect on IL-2-induced ki8ller cell cytotoxicity.This implies that IL-4 mainly induces CTL-like activity,while IL-2 mainly induces NK-like activity,An experimental human tumor model in nude mice was established by injection of TBL-E human leukemia cells.The anti-tumor activity of rhuIL-4 was evaluated by injection of haman LAK cells induced from PHA-blasts by rhuIL-2+rhuIL-4 and human cytokines into tumor-bearing nude mice.The results showed that human LAK cells effectively inhibit the tumorigenicity of TBL-E cells in nude mice with an inhibition rate of 61%.The antitumor effect of rhuIL-2 was better than that of rIL-4 ,and the antitumor effect of rhuIL-2+rhuIL-4 was similar to that of rhuIL-2 ,though the former delayed the occurence of tumors.Our data imply the potential application of human IL-4 in clinic,and provide an animal model to evaluate the anti-tumor activity of human cytokine(s) with species specificity.

  15. IZDELAVA TISKALNIKA 3D

    OpenAIRE

    Brdnik, Lovro

    2015-01-01

    Diplomsko delo analizira trenutno stanje 3D tiskalnikov na trgu. Prikazan je razvoj in principi delovanja 3D tiskalnikov. Predstavljeni so tipi 3D tiskalnikov, njihove prednosti in slabosti. Podrobneje je predstavljena zgradba in delovanje koračnih motorjev. Opravljene so meritve koračnih motorjev. Opisana je programska oprema za rokovanje s 3D tiskalniki in komponente, ki jih potrebujemo za izdelavo. Diploma se oklepa vprašanja, ali je izdelava 3D tiskalnika bolj ekonomična kot pa naložba v ...

  16. Automation of the in vitro micronucleus and chromosome aberration assay for the assessment of the genotoxicity of the particulate and gas-vapor phase of cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Ewald; Zenzen, Volker; Conroy, Lynda L; Luedemann, Kathrin; Dempsey, Ruth; Schunck, Christian; Sticken, Edgar Trelles

    2015-01-01

    Total particulate matter (TPM) and the gas-vapor phase (GVP) of mainstream smoke from the Reference Cigarette 3R4F were assayed in the cytokinesis-block in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay and the in vitro chromosome aberration (CA) assay, both using V79-4 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts exposed for up to 24 h. The Metafer image analysis platform was adapted resulting in a fully automated evaluation system of the MN assay for the detection, identification and reporting of cells with micronuclei together with the determination of the cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI) to quantify the treatment-related cytotoxicity. In the CA assay, the same platform was used to identify, map and retrieve metaphases for a subsequent CA evaluation by a trained evaluator. In both the assays, TPM and GVP provoked a significant genotoxic effect: up to 6-fold more micronucleated target cells than in the negative control and up to 10-fold increases in aberrant metaphases. Data variability was lower in the automated version of the MN assay than in the non-automated. It can be estimated that two test substances that differ in their genotoxicity by approximately 30% can statistically be distinguished in the automated MN and CA assays. Time savings, based on man hours, due to the automation were approximately 70% in the MN and 25% in the CA assays. The turn-around time of the evaluation phase could be shortened by 35 and 50%, respectively. Although only cigarette smoke-derived test material has been applied, the technical improvements should be of value for other test substances.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of viral fitness due to a single nucleotide polymorphism in the Marek's disease virus UL41 gene via an in vitro competition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weifeng; Niikura, Masahiro; Silva, Robert F; Cheng, Hans H

    2008-03-01

    Marek's disease, a T cell lymphoma, is an economically important disease of poultry caused by the Marek's disease virus (MDV), a highly cell-associated alphaherpesvirus. A greater understanding of viral gene function and the contribution of sequence variation to virulence should facilitate efforts to control Marek's disease in chickens. To characterize a naturally occurring single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; AY510475:g.108,206C>T) in the MDV UL41 gene that results in a missense mutation (AAS01683:p.Arg377Cys), bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-derived MDVs that differed only in the UL41 SNP were evaluated using a head-to-head competition assay in vitro. Monitoring the frequency of each SNP by pyrosequencing during virus passage determined the ratio of each viral genome in a single monolayer, which is a very sensitive method to monitor viral fitness. MDV with the UL41*Cys allele showed enhanced fitness in vitro. To evaluate the mechanism of altered viral fitness caused by this SNP, the virion-associated host shutoff (vhs) activity of both UL41 alleles was determined. The UL41*Cys allele had no vhs activity, which suggests that enhanced fitness in vitro for MDV with inactive vhs was due to reduced degradation of viral transcripts. The in vitro competition assay should be applicable to other MDV genes and mutations.

  18. Ethamsylate (Dicynone) interference in determination of serum creatinine, uric acid, triglycerides, and cholesterol in assays involving the Trinder reaction; in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastych, Milan; Wiewiorka, Ondrej; Benovská, Miroslava

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our research was the quantification of interfering properties of the haemostatic drug Dicynone (ethamsylate) in serum creatinine, uric acid, cholesterol, and triglyceride assays using the Trinder reaction. Blood from patients was collected before and 15 minutes after administration of 500 mg Dicynone dose i.v. and the above mentioned analytes were quantified using Roche assays (Cobas 8000). In our in vitro experiment, we measured concentrations of the analytes in pooled serum aliquots with final concentrations of Dicynone additions 0, 30, 60, 150, and 300 mg/L. Aliquots with 60 mg/L Dicynone were also measured at 2, 6, and 8 hours after initial measurement when stored in 22 degrees C and 4 degrees C for comparison. Concentrations of the measured analytes in samples from patients administered with a 500 mg dose of Dicynone were lower in all cases (n = 10) when compared to values in samples taken immediately before treatment. The in vitro samples showed that considerable negative interference occurred even with the low concentrations of Dicynone additions (30 and 60 mg/L), showing the strongest negative interference in creatinine values, followed by uric acid, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Using in vitro samples, we showed strong time and temperature dependence on Dicynone interference. We found and proved significant negative interference of the drug Dicynone (ethamsylate) in the clinical analysis of blood using in vivo and in vitro experiments. Furthermore, we observed a change of this effect in serum matrix over time and at different storage temperatures.

  19. In vitro immunomodulation of a whole blood IFN-γ release assay enhances T cell responses in subjects with latent tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv L Gaur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activation of innate immunity via pathogen recognition receptors (PRR modulates adaptive immune responses. PRR ligands are being exploited as vaccine adjuvants and as therapeutics, but their utility in diagnostics has not been explored. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs are functional T cell assays used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI; however, novel approaches are needed to improve their sensitivity. METHODS: In vitro immunomodulation of a whole blood IGRA (QuantiFERON®-TB GOLD In-Tube with Toll-like receptor agonists poly(I:C, LPS, and imiquimod was performed on blood from subjects with LTBI and negative controls. RESULTS: In vitro immunomodulation significantly enhanced the response of T cells stimulated with M. tuberculosis antigens from subjects with LTBI but not from uninfected controls. Immunomodulation of IGRA revealed T cell responses in subjects with LTBI whose T cells otherwise do not respond to in vitro stimulation with antigens alone. Similar to their in vivo functions, addition of poly(I:C and LPS to whole blood induced secretion of inflammatory cytokines and IFN-α and enhanced the surface expression of antigen presenting and costimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells. CONCLUSIONS: In vitro immunomodulation of whole blood IGRA may be an effective strategy for enhancing the sensitivity of T cells for diagnosis of LTBI.

  20. Evaluation of Dimethyl Methylphosphonate and Exo-Tetrahydrodi- (Cyclopentadiene) in a Battery of in Vitro Short-Term Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    sites of both chromatids of a chromosome . These include breaks, fragments, markers (i.e., dicentrics , rings), and gaps. 2. Chromatid aberrations - changes...Ames Salmonella/mammalian microsomal mutagenicity assay, the CHO/HGPRT gene mutation assay, the CHO/sister chromatid exchange assay, the CHO/ chromosome ...exhibited a low clastogenic activity in the CHO/ chromosome aberrations assay and was negative in the remaining four assays. Compound JP-1O also had a

  1. In vitro effects of piracetam on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells (adaptation of MTT assay to hypoxic conditions); Effets in vitro du piracetam sur la radiosensibilite des cellules hypoxiques (adapatation du test au MTT aux conditions d`hypoxie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheuens, E.E.O.; Bruijn, E.A. de; Van der Heyden, S.; Van Oosterom, A.T. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium); Lagarde, P. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)]|[Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Pooter, C.M.J. de [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)]|[Hopital de Middelheim, Anvers (Belgium); Chomy, F. [Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the adaptation of the MTT assay to hypoxic conditions in order to test the in vitro effect of piracetam on hypoxic cells and particularly on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells since this drug has shown clinical effect on acute and chronic hypoxia. The V79 cell line was selected by reference to preliminary hypoxic experiments using clonogenic assay and euoxic experiments using clonogenic and MTT assays. Cell growth and survival in our hypoxic conditions were assessed using MTT assay with an enclosure and special 48-well plates both made of glass. Growth curves on glass plates after 1-hour exposure to nitrogen versus air were comparable, so there is no bias effect due to gas composition. Survival curves using MTT versus reference clonogenic assay were comparable after radiation exposure in eu- and hypoxic conditions, and confirm the validity of our original technique for creating hypoxia. The Oxygen Enhancement Ratio was of about 3 for 1-hour hypoxic exposure. Piracetam gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Growth curves after continuous drug exposure and 1-hour euoxic versus hypoxic exposure gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Survival curves after continuous drug exposure to 10 mM of piracetam gave no significant effect on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic V79 cells using MTT or clonogenic assay. (author). 32 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Evaluation of Abelmoschus moschatus extracts for antioxidant, free radical scavenging, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities using in vitro assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Insaf A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abelmoschus moschatus Medik. leaves and seeds are considered as valuable traditional medicine. The aromatic seeds of this plant are aphrodisiac, ophthalmic, cardio tonic, antispasmodic and used in the treatment of intestinal complaints and check queasiness. To give a scientific basis for traditional usage of this medicinal plant, the seed and leaf extracts were evaluated for their antioxidant, free radical scavenging, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities. Methods In this study, antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of A. moschatus extracts were evaluated in a series of in vitro assay involving free radicals, reactive oxygen species and their IC50 values were also determined. The antioxidant activities of the seed and leaf extracts of A. moschatus were determined by total antioxidant, DPPH, and ferrous reducing antioxidant property (FRAP methods. In addition, the antiproliferative activity was also evaluated using colorectal adenocarcinoma and retinoblastoma human cancer cell lines. Moreover, six bacterial reference strains, two gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, four gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Salmonella enterica paratyphi and one fungal strain (Candida albicans were used to evaluate its antimicrobial activity. Results The results from this study showed that the antioxidant activities of A. moschatus as determined by the total phenol, flavonoids, total antioxidant and FRAP methods were higher in leaf than that of the seed extracts. On the other hand, the aqueous overnight seed extract (AMS-I has shown significant radical scavenging activity as in 1, 1- Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, superoxide and lipid peroxidation as compared to other seed and leaf extracts. The AMS-I and AML-IV have shown activity against six and seven microorganisms respectively. Simulteneously, AMS-IV and AML

  3. Evaluation of Abelmoschus moschatus extracts for antioxidant, free radical scavenging, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities using in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Mir Z; Bhakshu, Lepakshi M; Ahmad, Farhan; Kondapi, Anand K; Qureshi, Insaf A; Ghazi, Irfan A

    2011-08-17

    Abelmoschus moschatus Medik. leaves and seeds are considered as valuable traditional medicine. The aromatic seeds of this plant are aphrodisiac, ophthalmic, cardio tonic, antispasmodic and used in the treatment of intestinal complaints and check queasiness. To give a scientific basis for traditional usage of this medicinal plant, the seed and leaf extracts were evaluated for their antioxidant, free radical scavenging, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities. In this study, antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of A. moschatus extracts were evaluated in a series of in vitro assay involving free radicals, reactive oxygen species and their IC50 values were also determined. The antioxidant activities of the seed and leaf extracts of A. moschatus were determined by total antioxidant, DPPH, and ferrous reducing antioxidant property (FRAP) methods. In addition, the antiproliferative activity was also evaluated using colorectal adenocarcinoma and retinoblastoma human cancer cell lines. Moreover, six bacterial reference strains, two gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), four gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Salmonella enterica paratyphi) and one fungal strain (Candida albicans) were used to evaluate its antimicrobial activity. The results from this study showed that the antioxidant activities of A. moschatus as determined by the total phenol, flavonoids, total antioxidant and FRAP methods were higher in leaf than that of the seed extracts. On the other hand, the aqueous overnight seed extract (AMS-I) has shown significant radical scavenging activity as in 1, 1- Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, superoxide and lipid peroxidation as compared to other seed and leaf extracts. The AMS-I and AML-IV have shown activity against six and seven microorganisms respectively. Simulteneously, AMS-IV and AML-IV have demonstrated potential antiproliferative

  4. Quantitative Correlation of in Vivo Properties with in Vitro Assay Results: The in Vitro Binding of a Biotin-DNA Analogue Modifier with Streptavidin Predicts the in Vivo Avidin-Induced Clearability of the Analogue-Modified Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Shuping; Virostko, John; Greiner, Dale L; Powers, Alvin C; Liu, Guozheng

    2015-08-03

    Quantitative prediction of in vivo behavior using an in vitro assay would dramatically accelerate pharmaceutical development. However, studies quantitatively correlating in vivo properties with in vitro assay results are rare because of the difficulty in quantitatively understanding the in vivo behavior of an agent. We now demonstrate such a correlation as a case study based on our quantitative understanding of the in vivo chemistry. In an ongoing pretargeting project, we designed a trifunctional antibody (Ab) that concomitantly carried a biotin and a DNA analogue (hereafter termed MORF). The biotin and the MORF were fused into one structure prior to conjugation to the Ab for the concomitant attachment. Because it was known that avidin-bound Ab molecules leave the circulation rapidly, this design would theoretically allow complete clearance by avidin. The clearability of the trifunctional Ab was determined by calculating the blood MORF concentration ratio of avidin-treated Ab to non-avidin-treated Ab using mice injected with these compounds. In theory, any compromised clearability should be due to the presence of impurities. In vitro, we measured the biotinylated percentage of the Ab-reacting (MORF-biotin)⊃-NH2 modifier, by addition of streptavidin to the radiolabeled (MORF-biotin)⊃-NH2 samples and subsequent high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. On the basis of our previous quantitative understanding, we predicted that the clearability of the Ab would be equal to the biotinylation percentage measured via HPLC. We validated this prediction within a 3% difference. In addition to the high avidin-induced clearability of the trifunctional Ab (up to ∼95%) achieved by the design, we were able to predict the required quality of the (MORF-biotin)⊃-NH2 modifier for any given in vivo clearability. This approach may greatly reduce the steps and time currently required in pharmaceutical development in the process of synthesis, chemical analysis, in

  5. 3D and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  6. A whole blood in vitro cytokine release assay with aqueous monoclonal antibody presentation for the prediction of therapeutic protein induced cytokine release syndrome in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Babette; Morgan, Hannah; Krieg, Jennifer; Gani, Zaahira; Milicov, Adriana; Warncke, Max; Brennan, Frank; Jones, Stewart; Sims, Jennifer; Kiessling, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    The administration of several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to humans has been associated with acute adverse events characterized by clinically significant release of cytokines in the blood. The limited predictive value of toxicology species in this field has triggered intensive research to establish human in vitro assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells or blood to predict cytokine release in humans. A thorough characterization of these assays is required to understand their predictive value for hazard identification and risk assessment in an optimal manner, and to highlight potential limitations of individual assay formats. We have characterized a whole human blood cytokine release assay with only minimal dilution by the test antibodies (95% v/v blood) in aqueous presentation format, an assay which has so far received less attention in the scientific world with respect to the evaluation of its suitability to predict cytokine release in humans. This format was compared with a human PBMC assay with immobilized mAbs presentation already well-characterized by others. Cytokine secretion into plasma or cell culture supernatants after 24h incubation with the test mAbs (anti-CD28 superagonist TGN1412-like material (TGN1412L), another anti-CD28 superagonistic mAb (ANC28.1), a T-cell depleting mAb (Orthoclone™), and a TGN1412 isotype-matched control (Tysabri™) not associated with clinically-relevant cytokine release) was detected by a multiplex assay based on electrochemiluminescent excitation. We provide proof that this whole blood assay is a suitable new method for hazard identification of safety-relevant cytokine release in the clinic based on its ability to detect the typical cytokine signatures found in humans for the tested mAbs and on a markedly lower assay background and cytokine release with the isotype-matched control mAb Tysabri™ - a clear advantage over the PBMC assay. Importantly, quantitative and qualitative differences in the relative cytokine

  7. Comparison of five different in vitro assays for assessment of sodium metavanadate cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 line).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Iwona

    2015-08-01

    This investigation was undertaken to compare five different in vitro cytotoxicity assays for their power in revealing vanadium-mediated toxicity in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells. The cells were exposed to sodium metavanadate (NaVO(3)) in the range of 10-1000 µM for 24 h and thereafter the cytotoxic effects of NaVO(3) were measured by colorimetric in vitro assays: the neutral red (NR) test, the 2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide inner salt (XTT) assay, the resazurin assay, the sulforhodamine B (SR-B) assay, and by microscopic assessment of cell viability using the trypan blue (TB) staining method. Among the assays used, the NR test was the most sensitive, since it revealed metavanadate cytotoxicity at the lowest NaVO(3) dose (=50 µM). Also, NaVO(3) cytotoxicity expressed as inhibitory concentration (IC) showed the lowest values for the NR test. Three other tests XTT, resazurin, and SR-B assays showed intermediate sensitivity revealing the cytotoxicity of NaVO(3) at 100 µM. The corresponding IC10 and IC50 values calculated for the XTT, resazurin, and SR-B tests were similar. The TB staining method was the least sensitive, since it recorded metavanadate cytotoxicity at the highest NaVO(3) concentration tested (=600 µM). Based on the cytotoxicity end points measured with the above assays, it can be concluded that lysosomal/Golgi apparatus damage (measured by NR assay) may be the primary effect of NaVO(3) on CHO-K1 cells. The disintegration of mitochondria (assessed with the XTT and resazurin assays) probably follows lysosomal impairment. Plasma membrane permeability (staining with TB) occurs at a late stage of NaVO(3)-induced cytotoxicity on CHO-K1 cells. The results obtained in this research work show that the NR test can be recommended as a very sensitive assay for the assessment of NaVO(3) cytotoxicity in the CHO-K1 cell culture model. Considering the convenience of assay performance along with adequate sensitivity

  8. TEHNOLOGIJE 3D TISKALNIKOV

    OpenAIRE

    Kolar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Diplomsko delo predstavi razvoj tiskanja skozi čas. Podrobneje so opisani 3D tiskalniki, ki uporabljajo različne tehnologije 3D tiskanja. Predstavljene so različne tehnologije 3D tiskanja, njihova uporaba in narejeni prototipi oz. končni izdelki. Diplomsko delo opiše celoten postopek, od zamisli, priprave podatkov in tiskalnika do izdelave prototipa oz. končnega izdelka.

  9. Recent advances in 2D and 3D in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes, alternative hepatocyte sources and non-parenchymal liver cells and their use in investigating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity, cell signaling and ADME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godoy, Patricio; Hewitt, Nicola J.; Albrecht, Ute; Andersen, Melvin E.; Ansari, Nariman; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Bode, Johannes Georg; Bolleyn, Jennifer; Borner, Christoph; Boettger, Jan; Braeuning, Albert; Budinsky, Robert A.; Burkhardt, Britta; Cameron, Neil R.; Camussi, Giovanni; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Rowlands, J. Craig; Dahmen, Uta; Damm, Georg; Dirsch, Olaf; Teresa Donato, Maria; Dong, Jian; Dooley, Steven; Drasdo, Dirk; Eakins, Rowena; Ferreira, Karine Sa; Fonsato, Valentina; Fraczek, Joanna; Gebhardt, Rolf; Gibson, Andrew; Glanemann, Matthias; Goldring, Chris E. P.; Jose Gomez-Lechon, Maria; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Gustavsson, Lena; Guyot, Christelle; Hallifax, David; Hammad, Seddik; Hayward, Adam; Haeussinger, Dieter; Hellerbrand, Claus; Hewitt, Philip; Hoehme, Stefan; Holzhuetter, Hermann-Georg; Houston, J. Brian; Hrach, Jens; Ito, Kiyomi; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Keitel, Verena; Kelm, Jens M.; Park, B. Kevin; Kordes, Claus; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A.; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Lu, Peng; Luebke-Wheeler, Jennifer; Lutz, Anna; Maltman, Daniel J.; Matz-Soja, Madlen; McMullen, Patrick; Merfort, Irmgard; Messner, Simon; Meyer, Christoph; Mwinyi, Jessica; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Nussler, Andreas K.; Olinga, Peter; Pampaloni, Francesco; Pi, Jingbo; Pluta, Linda; Przyborski, Stefan A.; Ramachandran, Anup; Rogiers, Vera; Rowe, Cliff; Schelcher, Celine; Schmich, Kathrin; Schwarz, Michael; Singh, Bijay; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Stieger, Bruno; Stoeber, Regina; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Tetta, Ciro; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu; Weiss, Thomas S.; Widera, Agata; Woods, Courtney G.; Xu, Jinghai James; Yarborough, Kathy M.; Hengstler, Jan G.

    2013-01-01

    This review encompasses the most important advances in liver functions and hepatotoxicity and analyzes which mechanisms can be studied in vitro. In a complex architecture of nested, zonated lobules, the liver consists of approximately 80 % hepatocytes and 20 % non-parenchymal cells, the latter being

  10. Recent advances in 2D and 3D in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes, alternative hepatocyte sources and non-parenchymal liver cells and their use in investigating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity, cell signaling and ADME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godoy, Patricio; Hewitt, Nicola J.; Albrecht, Ute; Andersen, Melvin E.; Ansari, Nariman; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Bode, Johannes Georg; Bolleyn, Jennifer; Borner, Christoph; Boettger, Jan; Braeuning, Albert; Budinsky, Robert A.; Burkhardt, Britta; Cameron, Neil R.; Camussi, Giovanni; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Rowlands, J. Craig; Dahmen, Uta; Damm, Georg; Dirsch, Olaf; Teresa Donato, Maria; Dong, Jian; Dooley, Steven; Drasdo, Dirk; Eakins, Rowena; Ferreira, Karine Sa; Fonsato, Valentina; Fraczek, Joanna; Gebhardt, Rolf; Gibson, Andrew; Glanemann, Matthias; Goldring, Chris E. P.; Jose Gomez-Lechon, Maria; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Gustavsson, Lena; Guyot, Christelle; Hallifax, David; Hammad, Seddik; Hayward, Adam; Haeussinger, Dieter; Hellerbrand, Claus; Hewitt, Philip; Hoehme, Stefan; Holzhuetter, Hermann-Georg; Houston, J. Brian; Hrach, Jens; Ito, Kiyomi; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Keitel, Verena; Kelm, Jens M.; Park, B. Kevin; Kordes, Claus; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A.; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Lu, Peng; Luebke-Wheeler, Jennifer; Lutz, Anna; Maltman, Daniel J.; Matz-Soja, Madlen; McMullen, Patrick; Merfort, Irmgard; Messner, Simon; Meyer, Christoph; Mwinyi, Jessica; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Nussler, Andreas K.; Olinga, Peter; Pampaloni, Francesco; Pi, Jingbo; Pluta, Linda; Przyborski, Stefan A.; Ramachandran, Anup; Rogiers, Vera; Rowe, Cliff; Schelcher, Celine; Schmich, Kathrin; Schwarz, Michael; Singh, Bijay; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Stieger, Bruno; Stoeber, Regina; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Tetta, Ciro; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu; Weiss, Thomas S.; Widera, Agata; Woods, Courtney G.; Xu, Jinghai James; Yarborough, Kathy M.; Hengstler, Jan G.

    This review encompasses the most important advances in liver functions and hepatotoxicity and analyzes which mechanisms can be studied in vitro. In a complex architecture of nested, zonated lobules, the liver consists of approximately 80 % hepatocytes and 20 % non-parenchymal cells, the latter being

  11. Comparison of human skin irritation patch test data with in vitro skin irritation assays and animal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jírová, Dagmar; Basketter, David; Liebsch, Manfred; Bendová, Hana; Kejlová, Kristina; Marriott, Marie; Kandárová, Helena

    2010-02-01

    Efforts to replace the rabbit skin irritation test have been underway for many years, encouraged by the EU Cosmetics Directive and REACH. Recently various in vitro tests have been developed, evaluated and validated. A key difficulty in confirming the validity of in vitro methods is that animal data are scarce and of limited utility for prediction of human effects, which adversely impacts their acceptance. This study examines whether in vivo or in vitro data most accurately predicted human effects. Using the 4-hr human patch test (HPT) we examined a number of chemicals whose EU classification of skin irritancy is known to be borderline, or where in vitro methods provided conflicting results. Of the 16 chemicals classified as irritants in the rabbit, only five substances were found to be significantly irritating to human skin. Concordance of the rabbit test with the 4-hr HPT was only 56%, whereas concordance of human epidermis models with human data was 76% (EpiDerm) and 70% (EPISKIN). The results confirm observations that rabbits overpredict skin effects in humans. Therefore, when validating in vitro methods, all available information, including human data, should be taken into account before making conclusions about their predictive capacity.

  12. Optimization of liquid overlay technique to formulate heterogenic 3D co-cultures models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Elisabete C; Gaspar, Vítor M; Coutinho, Paula; Correia, Ilídio J

    2014-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models of solid tumors are currently having a tremendous impact in the in vitro screening of candidate anti-tumoral therapies. These 3D models provide more reliable results than those provided by standard 2D in vitro cell cultures. However, 3D manufacturing techniques need to be further optimized in order to increase the robustness of these models and provide data that can be properly correlated with the in vivo situation. Therefore, in the present study the parameters used for producing multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) by liquid overlay technique (LOT) were optimized in order to produce heterogeneous cellular agglomerates comprised of cancer cells and stromal cells, during long periods. Spheroids were produced under highly controlled conditions, namely: (i) agarose coatings; (ii) horizontal stirring, and (iii) a known initial cell number. The simultaneous optimization of these parameters promoted the assembly of 3D characteristic cellular organization similar to that found in the in vivo solid tumors. Such improvements in the LOT technique promoted the assembly of highly reproducible, individual 3D spheroids, with a low cost of production and that can be used for future in vitro drug screening assays.

  13. Development of an in vitro assay and demonstration of Plasmodium berghei liver-stage inhibition by TRAP-specific CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea J Longley

    Full Text Available The development of an efficacious vaccine against the Plasmodium parasite remains a top priority. Previous research has demonstrated the ability of a prime-boost virally vectored sub-unit vaccination regimen, delivering the liver-stage expressed malaria antigen TRAP, to produce high levels of antigen-specific T cells. The liver-stage of malaria is the main target of T cell-mediated immunity, yet a major challenge in assessing new T cell inducing vaccines has been the lack of a suitable pre-clinical assay. We have developed a flow-cytometry based in vitro T cell killing assay using a mouse hepatoma cell line, Hepa1-6, and Plasmodium berghei GFP expressing sporozoites. Using this assay, P. berghei TRAP-specific CD8+ T cell enriched splenocytes were shown to inhibit liver-stage parasites in an effector-to-target ratio dependent manner. Further development of this assay using human hepatocytes and P. falciparum would provide a new method to pre-clinically screen vaccine candidates and to elucidate mechanisms of protection in vitro.

  14. Refinement and optimisation of the rat CFU-GM assay to incorporate the use of cryopreserved bone-marrow cells for in vitro toxicology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessina, Augusto; Bonomi, Arianna; Baglio, Carolina; Cavicchini, Loredana; Gribaldo, Laura

    2009-09-01

    The colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) assay has been validated for testing drug haematotoxicity (with both mouse bone-marrow and human cord blood cells) and for predicting in vivo human Maximal Tolerated Dose (MTD) values by extrapolating in vivo data on mouse toxicity. The rat CFU-GM assay is widely used for its capability to evaluate in vitro haematotoxicity, but no standardised procedure suitable for data comparison has been developed. A validated rat CFU-GM assay is needed for many reasons - not least because the rat is the most commonly-used species for the in vivo testing of toxicants. This report describes the refinement and optimisation of a standardised protocol for entering into the prevalidation phase of test development. The sensitivity of rat progenitors to granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the correlation between the number of cells seeded and the number of colonies obtained, the role of mesenchymal cells on CFU-GM proliferation and the performance of the assay, and the effects of using different types of plastic dishes and sources of cytokines, are described. A standard operating procedure (SOP) based on the use of cryopreserved progenitors has been generated, to be applied to the in vitro toxicity testing of compounds. This SOP dramatically reduces the number of rats used and increases the homogeneity of the data obtained.

  15. Novel phenotypic assays for the detection of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Cambodia: in-vitro and ex-vivo drug-response studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Khim, Nimol; Sreng, Sokunthea; Chim, Pheaktra; Kim, Saorin; Lim, Pharath; Mao, Sivanna; Sopha, Chantha; Sam, Baramey; Anderson, Jennifer M; Duong, Socheat; Chuor, Char Meng; Taylor, Walter R J; Suon, Seila; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Fairhurst, Rick M; Menard, Didier

    2013-12-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum lengthens parasite clearance half-life during artemisinin monotherapy or artemisinin-based combination therapy. Absence of in-vitro and ex-vivo correlates of artemisinin resistance hinders study of this phenotype. We aimed to assess whether an in-vitro ring-stage survival assay (RSA) can identify culture-adapted P falciparum isolates from patients with slow-clearing or fast-clearing infections, to investigate the stage-dependent susceptibility of parasites to dihydroartemisinin in the in-vitro RSA, and to assess whether an ex-vivo RSA can identify artemisinin-resistant P falciparum infections. We culture-adapted parasites from patients with long and short parasite clearance half-lives from a study done in Pursat, Cambodia, in 2010 (registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00341003) and used novel in-vitro survival assays to explore the stage-dependent susceptibility of slow-clearing and fast-clearing parasites to dihydroartemisinin. In 2012, we implemented the RSA in prospective parasite clearance studies in Pursat, Preah Vihear, and Ratanakiri, Cambodia (NCT01736319), to measure the ex-vivo responses of parasites from patients with malaria. Continuous variables were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test. Correlations were analysed with the Spearman correlation test. In-vitro survival rates of culture-adapted parasites from 13 slow-clearing and 13 fast-clearing infections differed significantly when assays were done on 0-3 h ring-stage parasites (10·88% vs 0·23%; p=0·007). Ex-vivo survival rates significantly correlated with in-vivo parasite clearance half-lives (n=30, r=0·74, 95% CI 0·50-0·87; p<0·0001). The in-vitro RSA of 0-3 h ring-stage parasites provides a platform for the molecular characterisation of artemisinin resistance. The ex-vivo RSA can be easily implemented where surveillance for artemisinin resistance is needed. Institut Pasteur du Cambodge and the Intramural Research Program, NIAID, NIH

  16. 3D virtuel udstilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tournay, Bruno; Rüdiger, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s.......3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s....

  17. Two simple cleanup methods combined with LC-MS/MS for quantification of steroid hormones in in vivo and in vitro assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisser, Johan Juhl; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Poulsen, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    . The in vitro assay was validated by exposing H295R cells to prochloraz for inhibiting steroid hormone secretion and by exposing cells to forskolin for inducing steroid hormone secretion. The developed method fulfills the recommendations for the H295R assay suggested by the OECD. Furthermore, a simple off......-line SPE methodology was developed for the necessary clean-up of in vivo assays. Samples, such as gonad tissue, plasma and serum, are complex biological matrixes, and the SPE methodology was optimized to remove salts and proteins prior to elution of target analytes. At the same time, lipophilic compounds...... of steroid hormones in plasma, testes, and H295R cell medium corresponded well with previous studies. The off-line SPE method was validated using spiked charcoal-stripped serum. Method recovery, accuracy, precision and robustness were all good. Instrument sensitivity was in the range of 55-530 pg/mL (LLOQ)....

  18. MTS colorimetric assay in combination with a live-dead assay for testing encapsulated L929 fibroblasts in alginate poly-L-lysine microcapsules in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunger, CM; Jahnke, A; Stange, J; de Vos, P; Hopt, UT

    Biomaterials such as applied in microcapsules may have harmful effects on encapsulated cells. Up to now, there are no adequate assays available for testing the function and viability of cells in capsules. Therefore, we investigated whether the combination of MTS proliferation assay and live-dead

  19. MTS colorimetric assay in combination with a live-dead assay for testing encapsulated L929 fibroblasts in alginate poly-L-lysine microcapsules in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunger, CM; Jahnke, A; Stange, J; de Vos, P; Hopt, UT

    2002-01-01

    Biomaterials such as applied in microcapsules may have harmful effects on encapsulated cells. Up to now, there are no adequate assays available for testing the function and viability of cells in capsules. Therefore, we investigated whether the combination of MTS proliferation assay and live-dead via

  20. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants — Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing...

  1. A 155-plex High-Throughput In Vitro Coregulator Binding Assay for (Anti-) Estrogenicity Testing Evaluated with 23 Reference Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.; Houtman, R.; Melchers, D.; Aarts, J.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Beuningen, van R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bovee, T.F.H.

    2013-01-01

    To further develop an integrated in vitro testing strategy for replacement of in vivo tests for (anti-)estrogenicity testing, the ligand-modulated interaction of coregulators with estrogen receptor a was assessed using a PamChip® plate. The relative estrogenic potencies determined, based on ERa bind

  2. In vitro micronucleus assay for the analysis of total particulate matter in cigarette smoke: comparison of flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry with microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianhua; Gao, Qian; Mi, Qili; Li, Xuemei; Miao, Mingming; Cheng, Peng; Luo, Ying

    2013-08-15

    The possible genotoxicity of the total particulate matter (TPM) in cigarette smoke has typically been evaluated using the in vitro micronucleus assay. In recent years, automated scoring techniques have been developed to replace the manual counting process in this assay. However, these automated scoring techniques have not been applied in routine genotoxicity assays for the analysis of TPM to improve the assay efficiency. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were treated with TPM produced from 14 types of cigarettes at five concentrations (25-200μg/ml) without exogenous metabolic activation. The three following methods were used to score the micronucleus (MN) frequency: (a) flow cytometry with SYTOX and EMA dyes, which differentially stain micronuclei and apoptotic/necrotic chromatin to enhance assay reliability; (b) laser scanning cytometry with FITC and PI dyes, which is a system that combines the analytical capabilities of flow and image cytometry; and (c) visual microcopy with Giemsa dye. The test results obtained using the three methods were compared using correlation analysis. The key findings for this set of compounds include the following: (a) both flow cytometry- and laser scanning cytometry-based methods were effective for MN identification, (b) the three scoring methods could detect dose-dependent micronucleus formation for the 14 types of TPM, and (c) the MN frequencies that were measured in the same samples by flow cytometry, laser scanning cytometry, and visual microscopy were highly correlated, and there were no significant differences (p>0.05). In conclusion, both flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry can be used to evaluate the MN frequency induced by TPM without exogenous metabolic activation. The simpler and faster processing and the high correlation of the results make these two automatic methods appropriate tools for use in in vitro micronucleus assays for the analysis of TPM using CHO cells.

  3. From the Cover: An Investigation of the Genotoxicity and Interference of Gold Nanoparticles in Commonly Used In Vitro Mutagenicity and Genotoxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jiya M; Magogotya, Millicent; Vetten, Melissa A; Buys, Antoinette V; Gulumian, Mary

    2017-03-01

    The suitability of 4 in vitro assays, commonly used for mutagenicity and genotoxicity assessment, was investigated in relation to treatment with 14 nm citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Specifically, the Ames test was conducted without metabolic activation, where no mutagenic effects were observed. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Cytoviva dark-field image analysis showed that AuNPs did not enter the bacterial cells, thus confirming the unreliability of the Ames test for nanoparticle mutagenicity studies. In addition, the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line was used for Comet, Chromosome aberration and Micronucleus assays. CHO cells were treated with AuNPs for 20 h at 37 °C. Cytotoxicity was not detected by cell impedance studies even though AuNP uptake was confirmed using Cytoviva image analysis. The DNA damage was statistically significant in treated cells when assessed by the Comet assay. However, minimal and nonstatistically significant chromosomal DNA damage was observed using the chromosome aberration and micronucleus assays. In this study, we showed that false positive results obtained with Comet assay may have been due to the possibility of direct contact between the residual, intracellular AuNPs and DNA during the assay procedure. Therefore, the chromosome aberration and micronucleus assays are better suited to assess the genotoxic effects of nanoparticles due to low probability of such direct contact occurring. Genotoxic effect of 14 and 20 nm citrate-stabilized, as well as, 14 nm PCOOH AuNPs were also investigated using chromosome aberration and micronucleus assays. Based on our acceptance criteria for a positive genotoxic response, none of the AuNPs were found to be genotoxic in either of these assays. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Blender 3D cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Valenza, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed at the professionals that already have good 3D CGI experience with commercial packages and have now decided to try the open source Blender and want to experiment with something more complex than the average tutorials on the web. However, it's also aimed at the intermediate Blender users who simply want to go some steps further.It's taken for granted that you already know how to move inside the Blender interface, that you already have 3D modeling knowledge, and also that of basic 3D modeling and rendering concepts, for example, edge-loops, n-gons, or samples. In any case, it'

  5. Comparing an in vivo egg reduction test and in vitro egg hatching assay for different anthelmintics against Fasciola species, in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Waleed M; Shokeir, Khalid M; Khateib, Abdelrahman M

    2015-11-30

    This study aimed to compare between the efficiency of in vivo fecal egg reduction test (FERT) and in vitro egg hatching assay (EHA) in evaluating of the anti-Fasciola activity of albendazole, triclabendazole, oxyclozanide and praziquantel. A field trial was carried out on fifty naturally Fasciola infected cattle that were divided equally into 5 groups (A-E). On day zero; groups A-D were drenched with albendazole, triclabendazole, oxyclozanide or praziquantel, respectively, while the remaining one, group E, was kept as untreated control. Fecal egg counts of the different groups were conducted weekly over a period of one month post-treatment. In vitro, commercial albendazole and oxyclozanide were diluted to 0.0002, 0.002, 0.02, 0.2 and 2.0 μg/ml, while commercial triclabendazole and praziquantel were diluted to concentrations of 25, 50, 75 and 100 μg/ml with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). In vivo, at the 2nd week post-treatment, triclabendazole and oxyclozanide showed 100% fecal egg reduction (FER), and albendazole had a maximum of 73.7% reduction (P egg counts. In vitro, triclabendazole treated Fasciola gigantica eggs showed early embryonic lysis with zero% hatching at the different concentrations (P egg development and hatching percentage of oxyclozanide or praziquantel treated groups. In conclusion, the efficacy of triclabendazole and albendazole as fasciolicdes could be predicted by Egg Hatching Assay (EHA). Meanwhile fasciolicide activity of oxyclozanide could not be assessed with EHA. Based on in vivo and in vitro findings, paraziquantel did not show any fasciolicide effect.

  6. In silico and in vitro evaluation of PCR-based assays for the detection of Bacillus anthracis chromosomal signature sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agren, J.; Hamidjaja, R.A.; Hansen, T.; Ruuls, R.C.; Thierry, S.; Vigre, H.; Janse, I.; Sundström, A.; Segerman, B.; Koene, M.G.J.; Löfström, Ch.; Rotterdam, van B.; Derzelle, S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a zoonotic pathogen that is relatively common throughout the world and may cause life threatening diseases in animals and humans. There are many PCR-based assays in use for the detection of B. anthracis. While most of the developed assays rely o

  7. Highly miniaturized formats for in vitro drug metabolism assays using vivid fluorescent substrates and recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, Olga V; Gibson, Jasmin R; Marks, Bryan D

    2005-02-01

    Highly miniaturized P450 screening assays designed to enable facile analysis of P450 drug interactions in a 1536-well plate format with the principal human cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, 2C19, and 1A2) and Vivid fluorogenic substrates were developed. The detailed characterization of the assays included stability, homogeneity, and reproducibility of the recombinant P450 enzymes and the kinetic parameters of their reactions with Vivid fluorogenic substrates, with a focus on the specific characteristics of each component that enable screening in a low-volume 1536-well plate assay format. The screening assays were applied for the assessment of individual cytochrome P450 inhibition profiles with a panel of selected assay modifiers, including isozyme-specific substrates and inhibitors. IC(50) values obtained for the modifiers in 96- and 1536-well plate formats were similar and comparable with values obtained in assays with conventional substrates. An overall examination of the 1536-well assay statistics, such as signal-to-background ratio and Z' factor, demonstrated that these assays are a robust, successful, and reliable tool to screen for cytochrome P450 metabolism and inhibition in an ultra-high-throughput screening format.

  8. 3D-printing zirconia implants; a dream or a reality? An in-vitro study evaluating the dimensional accuracy, surface topography and mechanical properties of printed zirconia implant and discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Reham B; van der Veen, Albert J; Huiberts, Dennis; Wismeijer, Daniel; Alharbi, Nawal

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional accuracy, surface topography of a custom designed, 3D-printed zirconia dental implant and the mechanical properties of printed zirconia discs. A custom designed implant was 3D-printed in zirconia using digital light processing technique (DLP). The dimensional accuracy was assessed using the digital-subtraction technique. The mechanical properties were evaluated using biaxial flexure strength test. Three different build angles were adopted to print the specimens for the mechanical test; 0°(Vertical), 45° (Oblique) and 90°(Horizontal) angles. The surface topography, crystallographic phase structure and surface roughness were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy analysis (SEM), X-ray diffractometer and confocal microscopy respectively. The printed implant was dimensionally accurate with a root mean square (RMSE) value of 0.1mm. The Weibull analysis revealed a statistically significant higher characteristic strength (1006.6MPa) of 0° printed specimens compared to the other two groups and no significant difference between 45° (892.2MPa) and 90° (866.7MPa) build angles. SEM analysis revealed cracks, micro-porosities and interconnected pores ranging in size from 196nm to 3.3µm. The mean Ra (arithmetic mean roughness) value of 1.59µm (±0.41) and Rq (root mean squared roughness) value of 1.94µm (±0.47) was found. A crystallographic phase of primarily tetragonal zirconia typical of sintered Yttria tetragonal stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) was detected. DLP prove to be efficient for printing customized zirconia dental implants with sufficient dimensional accuracy. The mechanical properties showed flexure strength close to those of conventionally produced ceramics. Optimization of the 3D-printing process parameters is still needed to improve the microstructure of the printed objects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The relevance of chemical interactions with CYP17 enzyme activity: Assessment using a novel in vitro assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Maarke J.E., E-mail: m.j.e.roelofs@uu.nl [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Berg, Martin van den; Duursen, Majorie B.M. van [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-05-01

    The steroidogenic cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme produces dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is the most abundant circulating endogenous sex steroid precursor. DHEA plays a key role in e.g. sexual functioning and development. To date, no rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available. In this study, a novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. Effects of twenty-eight suggested endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on CYP17 activity were compared with effects in the US EPA validated H295R (human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line) steroidogenesis assay. In the PACM assay DHEA production was higher compared with the H295R assay (4.4 versus 2.2 nmol/h/mg protein). To determine the additional value of a CYP17 assay, all compounds were also tested for interaction with CYP19 (aromatase) using human placental microsomes (HPMs) and H295R cells. 62.5% of the compounds showed enzyme inhibition in at least one of the microsomal assays. Only the cAMP inducer forskolin induced CYP17 activity, while CYP19 was induced by four test compounds in the H295R assay. These effects remained unnoticed in the PACM and HPM assays. Diethylstilbestrol and tetrabromobisphenol A inhibited CYP17 but not CYP19 activity, indicating different mechanisms for the inhibition of these enzymes. From our results it becomes apparent that CYP17 can be a target for EDCs and that this interaction differs from interactions with CYP19. Our data strongly suggest that research attention should focus on validating a specific assay for CYP17 activity, such as the PACM assay, that can be included in the EDC screening battery. - Highlights: ► DHEA, produced by CYP17, plays a key role in sexual functioning and development. ► No rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available yet. ► A novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. ► Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) targeting CYP17 interact differently with CYP19. ► A

  10. Effect of high mobility group nonhistone proteins HMG-20 (ubiquitin) and HMG-17 on histone deacetylase activity assayed in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquita, J; Chiva, M; Vidal, S; Mezquita, C

    1982-03-11

    We have used a method previously described by Reeves and Candido (1) to partially release histone deacetylase from cell nuclei together with putative regulators of the enzyme. Histone deacetylase released from testis cell nuclei and its putative regulators were separated by gel filtration in Sepharose 6B. A peak of low molecular weight contains a heat-stable factor that stimulate histone deacetylase in vitro. Many of the properties of the activator coincide with those of the protein HMG-20 (ubiquitin). Ubiquitin isolated from testis cell nuclei stimulated histone deacetylase in vitro. It has been suggested that HMG-17 partially inhibits histone deacetylase in Fried cell nuclei (2). In our system, HMG-17 shows no inhibitory effect on histone deacetylase activity

  11. 3D Digital Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper

    wave of new building information modelling tools demands further investigation, not least because of industry representatives' somewhat coarse parlance: Now the word is spreading -3D digital modelling is nothing less than a revolution, a shift of paradigm, a new alphabet... Research qeustions. Based...... on empirical probes (interviews, observations, written inscriptions) within the Danish construction industry this paper explores the organizational and managerial dynamics of 3D Digital Modelling. The paper intends to - Illustrate how the network of (non-)human actors engaged in the promotion (and arrest) of 3......D Modelling (in Denmark) stabilizes - Examine how 3D Modelling manifests itself in the early design phases of a construction project with a view to discuss the effects hereof for i.a. the management of the building process. Structure. The paper introduces a few, basic methodological concepts...

  12. DELTA 3D PRINTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ȘOVĂILĂ Florin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a very used process in industry, the generic name being “rapid prototyping”. The essential advantage of a 3D printer is that it allows the designers to produce a prototype in a very short time, which is tested and quickly remodeled, considerably reducing the required time to get from the prototype phase to the final product. At the same time, through this technique we can achieve components with very precise forms, complex pieces that, through classical methods, could have been accomplished only in a large amount of time. In this paper, there are presented the stages of a 3D model execution, also the physical achievement after of a Delta 3D printer after the model.

  13. Binding and cleavage (BINACLE) assay for the functional in vitro detection of tetanus toxin: applicability as alternative method for the safety testing of tetanus toxoids during vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrensdorf-Nicol, Heike A; Bonifas, Ursula; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Krämer, Beate; Weißer, Karin

    2013-12-16

    Tetanus toxoids (i.e. chemically inactivated preparations of tetanus neurotoxin) are used for the production of tetanus vaccines. In order to exclude the risk of residual toxicity or of a "reversion to toxicity", each batch of tetanus toxoid is subject to strict safety testing. Up to now, these prescribed safety tests have to be performed as in vivo toxicity tests in guinea pigs. However, as animal tests are generally slow, costly and ethically disputable, a replacement by an in vitro method would be desirable. A suitable alternative method would have to be able to sensitively detect already low concentrations of active tetanus neurotoxin in matrices containing large amounts of inactivated toxoid molecules. We have developed a method which detects active tetanus neurotoxin molecules based on their specific receptor-binding capacity as well as their proteolytic activity. By taking into account two relevant functional characteristics, this combined "BINding And CLEavage" (BINACLE) assay more reliably discriminates between toxic and detoxified molecules than other in vitro assays which solely rely on one single toxin function (e.g. endopeptidase assays). Data from an in-house validation show that the BINACLE assay is able to detect active tetanus neurotoxin with a detection limit comparable to the in vivo test. The sensitive detection of active toxin which has been spiked into toxoid samples from different manufacturers could also be demonstrated. Specificity and precision of the method have been shown to be satisfactory. The presented data indicate that for toxoid batches from some of the most relevant European vaccine manufacturers, the BINACLE assay may represent a potential alternative to the prescribed animal safety tests. In addition, this novel method may also provide a convenient tool for monitoring batch-to-batch consistency during toxoid production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A sensitive and quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based cell free in vitro non-homologous end joining assay for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijian Shao

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are responsible for sustaining hematopoietic homeostasis and regeneration after injury for the entire lifespan of an organism. Maintenance of genomic stability is crucial for the preservation of HSCs, which depends on their efficient repair of DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. Because of the paucity of HSCs and lack of sensitive assays, directly measuring the ability of HSCs to repair DSBs has been difficult. Therefore, we developed a sensitive and quantitative cell free in vitro non-homologous end joining (NHEJ assay using linearized plasmids as the substrates and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR technique. This assay can sensitively detect DSB repair via NHEJ in less than 1 µg 293T cell nuclear proteins or nuclear extracts from about 5,000 to 10,000 human BM CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Using this assay, we confirmed that human bone marrow HSCs (CD34(+CD38(- cells are less proficient in the repair of DSBs by NHEJ than HPCs (CD34(+CD38(+ cells. In contrast, mouse quiescent HSCs (Pyronin-Y(low LKS(+ cells and cycling HSCs (Pyronin-Y(hi LKS(+ cells repaired the damage more efficiently than HPCs (LKS(- cells. The difference in the abilities of human and mouse HSCs and HPCs to repair DSBs through NHEJ is likely attributed to their differential expression of key NHEJ DNA damage repair genes such as LIG4. These findings suggest that the qPCR-based cell free in vitro NHEJ assay can be used to sensitively measure the ability of human and mouse HSCs to repair DSBs.

  15. Professional Papervision3D

    CERN Document Server

    Lively, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Professional Papervision3D describes how Papervision3D works and how real world applications are built, with a clear look at essential topics such as building websites and games, creating virtual tours, and Adobe's Flash 10. Readers learn important techniques through hands-on applications, and build on those skills as the book progresses. The companion website contains all code examples, video step-by-step explanations, and a collada repository.

  16. AE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  17. A novel mycobacterial In Vitro infection assay identifies differences of induced macrophage apoptosis between CD4+ and CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkwouano, Vanesa; Witkowski, Sven; Rehberg, Nidja; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Nausch, Norman; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are natural host cells for pathogenic mycobacteria, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb). Immune surveillance by T cells and interaction with M.tb infected macrophages is crucial for protection against M.tb reactivation and development of active tuberculosis. Several factors play a role in the control of M.tb infection but reliable biomarkers remain elusive. One major obstacle is the absence of functional in vitro assays which allow concomitant determination of i) mycobacterial eradication; ii) cytotoxic effects on host macrophages; and iii) effector T-cell functions. We established a novel functional in vitro assay based on flow cytometry analysis of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) infected with a Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain containing a tetracycline inducible live/dead reporter plasmid (LD-BCG). MDM of healthy human donors were generated in vitro and infected with defined LD-BCG numbers. After short-term MDM/LD-BCG co-incubation with autologous effector T cells or in the presence of antibiotics, proportions of MDM containing live or dead LD-BCG were determined by flow cytometry. Concomitant measure of defined numbers of added beads allowed comparison of absolute MDM numbers between samples. Differential effects of T-cell subpopulations on anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity and on MDM apoptosis were determined. Flow cytometry measure of MDM/LD-BCG treated with rifampicin correlated well with mycobacterial colony forming units and fluorescence microscopy results. Co-culture with pre-activated effector T cells reduced viability of both, LD-BCG and MDM, in a concentration-dependent manner. M.tb protein specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells contributed similarly to anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity but CD4+ T cells induced higher levels of apoptosis in infected MDMs. This novel assay enables rapid quantification of anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity and characterization of effector functions. Our functional in vitro assay has the potential to contribute to the

  18. In silico and in vitro evaluation of PCR-based assays for the detection of Bacillus anthracis chromosomal signature sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ågren, Joakim; Raditijo A Hamidjaja; Hansen, Trine; Ruuls, Robin; Thierry, Simon; Vigre, Håkan; Janse, Ingmar; Sundström, Anders; Segerman, Bo; Koene, Miriam; Löfström, Charlotta; van Rotterdam, Bart; Derzelle, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a zoonotic pathogen that is relatively common throughout the world and may cause life threatening diseases in animals and humans. There are many PCR-based assays in use for the detection of B. anthracis. While most of the developed assays rely on unique markers present on virulence plasmids pXO1 and pXO2, relatively few assays incorporate chromosomal DNA markers due to the close relatedness of B. anthracis to the B. cereus group strains. ...

  19. Assays for in vitro monitoring of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Migration of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells contributes to vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Evidence also indicates that, in part, migration of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells may contribute to airway remodeling associated with asthma. Here we describe migration of VSM and ASM cells in vitro using Transwell or Boyden chamber assays. Because dissecting signaling mechanisms regulating cell migration requires molecular approaches, our protocol also describes how to assess migration of transfected VSM and ASM cells. Transwell or Boyden chamber assays can be completed in approximately 8 h and include plating of serum-deprived VSM or ASM cell suspension on membrane precoated with collagen, migration of cells toward chemotactic gradient and visual (Transwell) or digital (Boyden chamber) analysis of membrane. Although the Transwell assay is easy, the Boyden chamber assay requires hands-on experience; however, both assays are reliable cell-based approaches providing valuable information on how chemotactic and inflammatory factors modulate VSM and ASM migration.

  20. Improving the in vitro ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay with RTL-W1 by metabolic normalization and use of β-naphthoflavone as the reference substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Patrick; Diehl, Ulrike; Förster, Franziska; Braunbeck, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay is a widely applied method for the evaluation of the dioxin-like activity of single substances and environmental samples. As for most enzyme assays, the specific activity is normally related to total protein contents, the determination of which has clear limitations in high-throughput assays. EROD induction potentials are usually expressed as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) equivalents, a substance highly toxic to humans. In order to compensate for these shortcomings, two modifications of the EROD protocol are proposed: (1) EROD activity is normalized to the metabolic activity of the cells as determined by a modified thiazolyl blue tetrazolium (MTT) assay and expressed as metabolic cell equivalents (MCE) based on MTT data rather than to protein contents. Via MCE data, cytotoxicity information can always be reported in parallel to EROD data; with the protocol presented here, MTT and EROD data are collected simultaneously. (2) Among several reference substances tested (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), β-naphthoflavone and benzo[a]pyrene), β-naphthoflavone proved to be the most suitable reference for the routine in vitro EROD assay, although TCDD has generally been preferred for purely scientific reasons.

  1. In silico and in vitro evaluation of PCR-based assays for the detection of Bacillus anthracis chromosomal signature sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ågren, Joakim; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Hansen, Trine; Ruuls, Robin; Thierry, Simon; Vigre, Håkan; Janse, Ingmar; Sundström, Anders; Segerman, Bo; Koene, Miriam; Löfström, Charlotta; Van Rotterdam, Bart; Derzelle, Sylviane

    2013-11-15

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a zoonotic pathogen that is relatively common throughout the world and may cause life threatening diseases in animals and humans. There are many PCR-based assays in use for the detection of B. anthracis. While most of the developed assays rely on unique markers present on virulence plasmids pXO1 and pXO2, relatively few assays incorporate chromosomal DNA markers due to the close relatedness of B. anthracis to the B. cereus group strains. For the detection of chromosomal DNA, different genes have been used, such as BA813, rpoB, gyrA, plcR, S-layer, and prophage-lambda. Following a review of the literature, an in silico analysis of all signature sequences reported for identification of B. anthracis was conducted. Published primer and probe sequences were compared for specificity against 134 available Bacillus spp. genomes. Although many of the chromosomal targets evaluated are claimed to be specific to B. anthracis, cross-reactions with closely related B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains were often observed. Of the 35 investigated PCR assays, only 4 were 100% specific for the B. anthracis chromosome. An interlaboratory ring trial among five European laboratories was then performed to evaluate six assays, including the WHO recommended procedures, using a collection of 90 Bacillus strains. Three assays performed adequately, yielding no false positive or negative results. All three assays target chromosomal markers located within the lambdaBa03 prophage region (PL3, BA5345, and BA5357). Detection limit was further assessed for one of these highly specific assays.

  2. Radiosensitivity of glial progenitor cells of the perinatal and adult rat optic nerve studied by an in vitro clonogenic assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Verhagen, I.; Kleiboer, B.J.; Kogel, A.J. van der (Nijmegen University (Netherlands). Institute of Radiotherapy)

    1991-04-01

    The cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS), is poorly understood. Glial cells responsible for myelination in the CNS might be the target cells of this type of damage. Glial cells with stem cell properties derived from the perinatal and adult rat CNS can be cultured in vitro. These cells are able to differentiate into oligodendrocytes or type-2 astrocytes (O-2A) depending on the culture conditions. Growth factors produced by monolayers of type-1 astrocytes inhibit premature differentiation of O-2A progenitor cells and allow colony formation. A method which employs these monolayers of type-1 astrocytes to culture O-2A progenitor cells has been adapted to allow the analysis of colonies of surviving cells after X-irradiation. In vitro survival curves were obtained for glial progenitor cells derived from perinatal and adult optic nerves. The intrinsic radiosensitivity of perinatal and adult O-2A progenitor cells showed a large difference. Perinatal O-2A progenitor cells are quite radiosensitive, in contrast to adult O-2A progenitor cells. For both cell types an inverse relationship was found between the dose and the size of colonies derived from surviving cells. Surviving O-2A progenitor cells maintain their ability to differentiate into oligo-dendrocytes or type-2 astrocytes. This system to assess radiation-induced damage to glial progenitor cells in vitro systems to have a great potential in unraveling the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelinating syndromes of the CNS. (author). 28 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab.

  3. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Emnéus

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements.

  4. Assessment of cosmetic ingredients in the in vitro reconstructed human epidermis test method EpiSkin™ using HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry in the MTT-reduction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alépée, N; Hibatallah, J; Klaric, M; Mewes, K R; Pfannenbecker, U; McNamee, P

    2016-06-01

    Cosmetics Europe recently established HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry as a suitable alternative endpoint detection system for measurement of formazan in the MTT-reduction assay of reconstructed human tissue test methods irrespective of the test system involved. This addressed a known limitation for such test methods that use optical density for measurement of formazan and may be incompatible for evaluation of strong MTT reducer and/or coloured chemicals. To build on the original project, Cosmetics Europe has undertaken a second study that focuses on evaluation of chemicals with functionalities relevant to cosmetic products. Such chemicals were primarily identified from the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS) 2010 memorandum (addendum) on the in vitro test EpiSkin™ for skin irritation testing. Fifty test items were evaluated in which both standard photometry and HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry were used for endpoint detection. The results obtained in this study: 1) provide further support for Within Laboratory Reproducibility of HPLC-UPLC-spectrophotometry for measurement of formazan; 2) demonstrate, through use a case study with Basazol C Blue pr. 8056, that HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry enables determination of an in vitro classification even when this is not possible using standard photometry and 3) addresses the question raised by SCCS in their 2010 memorandum (addendum) to consider an endpoint detection system not involving optical density quantification in in vitro reconstructed human epidermis skin irritation test methods.

  5. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants — Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing...... exposure of the adrenal cells by equilibrium partitioning. (3) Hormone production of the adrenal cells was measured as toxicity endpoint. 4-Nonylphenol was used for method development, and the new dosing method was compared to conventional solvent-dosing. The two dosing modes yielded similar dose...

  6. Comparison of an array of in vitro assays for the assessment of the estrogenic potential of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutendorf, B; Westendorf, J

    2001-09-14

    Many chemicals in surface waters and sediments have recently been discovered to have estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity. Among these compounds, known as 'endocrine disrupters', are natural and synthetic hormones, phytoestrogenes and a variety of industrial chemicals, such as certain detergents and pesticides. These substances are supposed to affect the development and reproduction in wildlife and humans and may also be involved in the induction of cancer. In order to assess the estrogenic/antiestrogenic potential of pure compounds and complex environmental samples we compared an array of in vitro test systems, (i) two luciferase reporter gene assays using transgenic human MVLN cells (derived from MCF-7 cells) and HGELN cells (derived from HeLa cells); (ii) a competitive binding assay with recombinant human estrogen receptors (ER) alpha and beta; and (iii) a proliferation assay with MCF7-cells (E-Screen). The sensitivity of the assays for 17-beta-estradiol decreased in the order: MVLN-cells=E-Screen>HGELN-cells>binding to ER-alpha>binding to ER-beta. A good correlation was obtained between the estrogenic potencies of 11 compounds (17-beta-estradiol (E(2)), estrone (E(1)), estriol (E(3)), ethinylestradiol (EE(2)), diethylstilbestrol (DES), coumestrol, beta-sitosterol, genistein, 4-nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol, bisphenol A) in the three tissue culture assays. The relative potencies of the compounds obtained by the cell free binding assays were one to two orders of magnitude higher compared with the cell culture assays. The phytoestrogens showed a preference to bind to ER-beta, but only genistein showed a much lower activity in the E-Screen (growth induction in breast cancer cells) compared with the luciferase induction in MVLN and HGELN-cells.

  7. In vitro xanthine oxidase and albumin denaturation inhibition assay of Barringtonia racemosa L. and total phenolic content analysis for potential anti-inflammatory use in gouty arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Nurul Izzati; Sidik, Norrizah Jaafar; Awal, Asmah; Adam, Nurul Athirah Mohamad; Rezali, Nur Inani

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities and total phenolic content (TPC) of methanolic extracts of infloresence axes, endosperms, leaves, and pericarps of Barringtonia racemosa L. Methods: The anti-inflammatory study was conducted by assessing the potential through xanthine oxidase (XO) and albumin denaturation inhibition assays. Meanwhile, the TPC in the extracts were assessed by Folin-Ciocalteu assay. Results: In the XO inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract was found to exert the highest inhibition capacity at 0.1% (w/v) with 59.54 ± 0.001% inhibition followed by leaves (58.82 ± 0.001%), pericarps (57.99 ± 0.003%), and endosperms (57.20 ± 0.003%) extracts. Similarly in the albumin denaturation inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract had shown the greatest inhibition capacity with 70.58 ± 0.004% inhibition followed by endosperms (66.80 ± 0.024%), leaves (65.29 ± 0.006%), and pericarps extracts (43.33 ± 0.002%). Meanwhile, for TPC analysis, leaves extract was found to have the highest phenolic content (53.94 ± 0.000 mg gallic acid equivalent [GAE]/g DW) followed by infloresence axes (31.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), endosperms (22.63 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), and the least was found in pericarps (15.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW). Conclusion: The results indeed verified the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of B. racemosa and supported its potential to be used in alleviating gouty arthritis and XO-related diseases. PMID:27757263

  8. Flow cytometric 96-well microplate-based in vitro micronucleus assay with human TK6 cells: protocol optimization and transferability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Steven M; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Tate, Matthew; Walmsley, Richard M; Saad, Frédéric; Van Dijck, Kris; De Boeck, Marlies; Van Goethem, Freddy; Lukamowicz-Rajska, Magdalena; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2013-04-01

    An automated approach for scoring in vitro micronuclei (MN) has been described in which flow cytometric analysis is combined with compound exposure, processing, and sampling in a single 96-well plate (Bryce SM et al. [2010]: Mutat Res 703:191-199). The current report describes protocol optimization and an interlaboratory assessment of the assay's transferability and reproducibility. In a training phase, the methodology was refined and collaborating laboratories were qualified by repeatedly testing three compounds. Second, a set of 32 chemicals comprised of reference genotoxicants and presumed non-genotoxicants was tested at each of four sites. TK6 cells were exposed to 10 closely spaced compound concentrations for 1.5- to 2-cell population doublings, and were then stained and lysed for flow cytometric analysis. MN frequencies were determined by evaluating ≥ 5,000 cells per replicate well, and several indices of cytotoxicity were acquired. The prevalence of positive results varied according to the MN-fold increase used to signify a genotoxic result, as well as the endpoint used to define a cytotoxicity limit. By varying these parameters, assay sensitivity and specificity values ranged from 82 to 98%, and 86 to 97%, respectively. In a third phase, one laboratory tested a further six genotoxicants and five non-genotoxic apoptosis inducers. In these experiments assay specificity was markedly improved when top concentration selection was based on two cytotoxicity endpoints-relative survival and quantification of ethidium monoazide-positive events. Collectively, the results indicate that the miniaturized assay is transferable across laboratories. The 96-well format consumes considerably less compound than conventional in vitro MN test methods, and the high information content provided by flow cytometry helps guard against irrelevant positive results arising from overt toxicity.

  9. Comparing the sensitivity of two in vitro assays to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of tropical tannin rich plant extracts against Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Díaz, M A; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Hoste, H

    2011-09-27

    The present trial aimed at comparing the sensitivity of two in vitro methods, i.e. the larval migration inhibition assay (LMIA) and the larval exsheathment inhibition assay (LEIA), to evaluate the anthelmintic (AH) properties of tannin-rich plant extracts against Haemonchus contortus infective larvae. The two assays were applied on the same batch of H. contortus infective larvae exposed to water/acetonic extracts obtained from four tropical plants with different tannin contents: Acacia gaumeri, Brosimum alicastrum, Havardia albicans and Leucaena leucocephala. Increasing concentrations (0, 75, 150, 300, 600, 1200 μg/ml PBS) of lyophilized extracts were used in both in vitro assays. A general lineal model test was used to determine the dose-effect in the LMIA or the difference in the percentage of exsheathed larvae between the respective control and treated groups. The LMIA showed a dose-dependent AH effect for H. albicans (Palicastrum. In contrast, the exsheathment process was significantly affected by all doses of H. albicans and A. gaumeri extracts and a significant dose-dependent effect was found for B. alicastrum and L. leucocephala. Calculation of lethal dose (LD) was possible with LEIA using B. alicastrum and L. leucocephala but not with H. albicans and A. gaumeri as the lowest tested concentration was achieving more than 50% inhibition. Calculation of LD with the LMIA results was not feasible. These results suggest that tannin-rich plant extracts are more potent inhibitors of the exsheathment of H. contortus L(3) larvae than their motility. This information underlines the difference of sensitivity between methodological procedures to evaluate the AH properties of plant extracts on the same nematode stage.

  10. Human T cell priming assay: depletion of peripheral blood lymphocytes in CD25(+) cells improves the in vitro detection of weak allergen-specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocanson, Marc; Achachi, Amine; Mutez, Virginie; Cluzel-Tailhardat, Magalie; Varlet, Béatrice Le; Rozières, Aurore; Fournier, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    To develop an in vitro assay that recapitulates the key event of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), that is the priming of effector T cells by hapten-presenting dendritic cells, and then allows for the sensitive detection of chemical allergens represents a major challenge. Classical human T cell priming assays (hTCPA) that have been developed in the past, using hapten-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) as antigen-presenting cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) as responding cells, were not efficient to prime T cells to common allergens with moderate/weak sensitizing properties. Recent progress in the understanding of the effector and regulatory mechanisms of ACD have shown that T cell priming requires efficient uptake of allergens by immunogenic DCs and that it is controlled by several subsets of regulatory cells including CD25(+) Tregs. We therefore analyzed various parameters involved in allergen-specific T cell activation in vitro and showed that priming of allergen-specific T cells is hampered by several subsets of immune cells comprising CD1a(neg) DCs, CD25(+) T cells, and CD56(+) regulatory cells.CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs prevented the in vitro T cell priming to moderate/weak allergens, and depletion of human PBLs in CD25(+) cells significantly increased specific T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. CD56(+) cells exerted an additional control of T cell priming since co-depletion of both CD56(+) and CD25(+) cells improved the magnitude of chemical-specific T cell activation. Finally, CD1a(low) MDDCs were able to inhibit T cell activation obtained by allergen-pulsed CD1a(high) MDDC. Moreover, we showed that uptake by DC of allergen-encapsulated nanoparticles significantly increased their activation status and their ability to prompt specific T cell activation. Hence, by combining the different strategies, i.e., depletion of CD25(+) and CD56(+) cells, use of CD1a(high) MDDC, and nanoparticle encapsulation of allergens, it was

  11. 3D Projection Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halskov, Kim; Johansen, Stine Liv; Bach Mikkelsen, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional projection installations are particular kinds of augmented spaces in which a digital 3-D model is projected onto a physical three-dimensional object, thereby fusing the digital content and the physical object. Based on interaction design research and media studies, this article...... contributes to the understanding of the distinctive characteristics of such a new medium, and identifies three strategies for designing 3-D projection installations: establishing space; interplay between the digital and the physical; and transformation of materiality. The principal empirical case, From...... Fingerplan to Loop City, is a 3-D projection installation presenting the history and future of city planning for the Copenhagen area in Denmark. The installation was presented as part of the 12th Architecture Biennale in Venice in 2010....

  12. 3D Spectroscopic Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Bershady, Matthew A

    2009-01-01

    In this Chapter we review the challenges of, and opportunities for, 3D spectroscopy, and how these have lead to new and different approaches to sampling astronomical information. We describe and categorize existing instruments on 4m and 10m telescopes. Our primary focus is on grating-dispersed spectrographs. We discuss how to optimize dispersive elements, such as VPH gratings, to achieve adequate spectral resolution, high throughput, and efficient data packing to maximize spatial sampling for 3D spectroscopy. We review and compare the various coupling methods that make these spectrographs ``3D,'' including fibers, lenslets, slicers, and filtered multi-slits. We also describe Fabry-Perot and spatial-heterodyne interferometers, pointing out their advantages as field-widened systems relative to conventional, grating-dispersed spectrographs. We explore the parameter space all these instruments sample, highlighting regimes open for exploitation. Present instruments provide a foil for future development. We give an...

  13. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosime