WorldWideScience

Sample records for 3d gene expression

  1. A generic 3D kinetic model of gene expression

    Zhdanov, Vladimir

    2012-04-01

    Recent experiments show that mRNAs and proteins can be localized both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. To describe such situations, I present a 3D mean-field kinetic model aimed primarily at gene expression in prokaryotic cells, including the formation of mRNA, its translation into protein, and slow diffusion of these species. Under steady-state conditions, the mRNA and protein spatial distribution is described by simple exponential functions. The protein concentration near the gene transcribed into mRNA is shown to depend on the protein and mRNA diffusion coefficients and degradation rate constants.

  2. Visualization and analysis of 3D gene expression patterns in zebrafish using web services

    Potikanond, D.; Verbeek, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of patterns of gene expression patterns analysis plays an important role in developmental biology and molecular genetics. Visualizing both quantitative and spatio-temporal aspects of gene expression patterns together with referenced anatomical structures of a model-organism in 3D can help identifying how a group of genes are expressed at a certain location at a particular developmental stage of an organism. In this paper, we present an approach to provide an online visualization of gene expression data in zebrafish (Danio rerio) within 3D reconstruction model of zebrafish in different developmental stages. We developed web services that provide programmable access to the 3D reconstruction data and spatial-temporal gene expression data maintained in our local repositories. To demonstrate this work, we develop a web application that uses these web services to retrieve data from our local information systems. The web application also retrieve relevant analysis of microarray gene expression data from an external community resource; i.e. the ArrayExpress Atlas. All the relevant gene expression patterns data are subsequently integrated with the reconstruction data of the zebrafish atlas using ontology based mapping. The resulting visualization provides quantitative and spatial information on patterns of gene expression in a 3D graphical representation of the zebrafish atlas in a certain developmental stage. To deliver the visualization to the user, we developed a Java based 3D viewer client that can be integrated in a web interface allowing the user to visualize the integrated information over the Internet.

  3. Integrating Data Clustering and Visualization for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    Data Analysis and Visualization (IDAV) and the Department of Computer Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis CA 95616, USA,; nternational Research Training Group ``Visualization of Large and Unstructured Data Sets,' ' University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA; Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA,; Computer Science Division,University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA,; Computer Science Department, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA,; All authors are with the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Huang, Min-Yu; Bethel, E. Wes; Biggin, Mark D.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Hendriks, Cris L. Luengo; Keranen, Soile V. E.; Eisen, Michael B.; Knowles, David W.; Malik, Jitendra; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd

    2008-05-12

    The recent development of methods for extracting precise measurements of spatial gene expression patterns from three-dimensional (3D) image data opens the way for new analyses of the complex gene regulatory networks controlling animal development. We present an integrated visualization and analysis framework that supports user-guided data clustering to aid exploration of these new complex datasets. The interplay of data visualization and clustering-based data classification leads to improved visualization and enables a more detailed analysis than previously possible. We discuss (i) integration of data clustering and visualization into one framework; (ii) application of data clustering to 3D gene expression data; (iii) evaluation of the number of clusters k in the context of 3D gene expression clustering; and (iv) improvement of overall analysis quality via dedicated post-processing of clustering results based on visualization. We discuss the use of this framework to objectively define spatial pattern boundaries and temporal profiles of genes and to analyze how mRNA patterns are controlled by their regulatory transcription factors.

  4. 3D culture increases pluripotent gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells through relaxation of cytoskeleton tension.

    Zhou, Ying; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Hong; Wu, Yaojiong

    2017-03-09

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture has been shown to improve pluripotent gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but the underlining mechanisms were poorly understood. Here, we found that the relaxation of cytoskeleton tension of MSCs in 3D culture was critically associated with the expressional up-regulation of Nanog. Cultured in spheroids, MSCs showed decreased integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion but increased cadherin-based cell-cell interaction. Different from that in 2D culture, where MSCs exhibited branched and multiple-directed F-actin stress bundles at the cell edge and strengthened stress fibres transversing the cell body, MSCs cultured in spheroids showed compact cell body, relaxed cytoskeleton tension with very thin cortical actin filament outlining the cell, and increased expression of Nanog along with reduced levels of Suv39h1 (H3K9 methyltransferase) and H3K9me3. Notably, pharmaceutical inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasin D or silencing Suv39h1 expression with siRNA in 2D-cultured MSCs elevated the expression of Nanog via H3K9 demethylation. Thus, our data suggest that 3D culture increases the expression of Nanog through the relaxation of actin cytoskeleton, which mediates reduced Suv39h1 and H3K9me3 levels.

  5. PointCloudExplore 2: Visual exploration of 3D gene expression

    International Research Training Group Visualization of Large and Unstructured Data Sets, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization, University of California, Davis, CA; Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA; Genomics Division, LBNL; Computer Science Department, University of California, Irvine, CA; Computer Science Division,University of California, Berkeley, CA; Life Sciences Division, LBNL; Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and the Center for Integrative Genomics, University of California, Berkeley, CA; Ruebel, Oliver; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Huang, Min-Yu; Bethel, E. Wes; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Hendriks, Cris L. Luengo; DePace, Angela H.; Simirenko, L.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hagen, Hand; Malik, Jitendra; Knowles, David W.; Hamann, Bernd

    2008-03-31

    To better understand how developmental regulatory networks are defined inthe genome sequence, the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDNTP)has developed a suite of methods to describe 3D gene expression data, i.e.,the output of the network at cellular resolution for multiple time points. To allow researchersto explore these novel data sets we have developed PointCloudXplore (PCX).In PCX we have linked physical and information visualization views via the concept ofbrushing (cell selection). For each view dedicated operations for performing selectionof cells are available. In PCX, all cell selections are stored in a central managementsystem. Cells selected in one view can in this way be highlighted in any view allowingfurther cell subset properties to be determined. Complex cell queries can be definedby combining different cell selections using logical operations such as AND, OR, andNOT. Here we are going to provide an overview of PointCloudXplore 2 (PCX2), thelatest publicly available version of PCX. PCX2 has shown to be an effective tool forvisual exploration of 3D gene expression data. We discuss (i) all views available inPCX2, (ii) different strategies to perform cell selection, (iii) the basic architecture ofPCX2., and (iv) illustrate the usefulness of PCX2 using selected examples.

  6. Comparative analysis of 3D expression patterns of transcription factor genes and digit fate maps in the developing chick wing.

    Malcolm Fisher

    Full Text Available Hoxd13, Tbx2, Tbx3, Sall1 and Sall3 genes are candidates for encoding antero-posterior positional values in the developing chick wing and specifying digit identity. In order to build up a detailed profile of gene expression patterns in cell lineages that give rise to each of the digits over time, we compared 3 dimensional (3D expression patterns of these genes during wing development and related them to digit fate maps. 3D gene expression data at stages 21, 24 and 27 spanning early bud to digital plate formation, captured from in situ hybridisation whole mounts using Optical Projection Tomography (OPT were mapped to reference wing bud models. Grafts of wing bud tissue from GFP chicken embryos were used to fate map regions of the wing bud giving rise to each digit; 3D images of the grafts were captured using OPT and mapped on to the same models. Computational analysis of the combined computerised data revealed that Tbx2 and Tbx3 are expressed in digit 3 and 4 progenitors at all stages, consistent with encoding stable antero-posterior positional values established in the early bud; Hoxd13 and Sall1 expression is more dynamic, being associated with posterior digit 3 and 4 progenitors in the early bud but later becoming associated with anterior digit 2 progenitors in the digital plate. Sox9 expression in digit condensations lies within domains of digit progenitors defined by fate mapping; digit 3 condensations express Hoxd13 and Sall1, digit 4 condensations Hoxd13, Tbx3 and to a lesser extent Tbx2. Sall3 is only transiently expressed in digit 3 progenitors at stage 24 together with Sall1 and Hoxd13; then becomes excluded from the digital plate. These dynamic patterns of expression suggest that these genes may play different roles in digit identity either together or in combination at different stages including the digit condensation stage.

  7. Linking Advanced Visualization and MATLAB for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    Ruebel, Oliver; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Biggin, Mark; Knowles, David W.; Weber, Gunther H.; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2011-03-30

    Three-dimensional gene expression PointCloud data generated by the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) provides quantitative information about the spatial and temporal expression of genes in early Drosophila embryos at cellular resolution. The BDTNP team visualizes and analyzes Point-Cloud data using the software application PointCloudXplore (PCX). To maximize the impact of novel, complex data sets, such as PointClouds, the data needs to be accessible to biologists and comprehensible to developers of analysis functions. We address this challenge by linking PCX and Matlab via a dedicated interface, thereby providing biologists seamless access to advanced data analysis functions and giving bioinformatics researchers the opportunity to integrate their analysis directly into the visualization application. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we computationally model parts of the expression pattern of the gene even skipped using a genetic algorithm implemented in Matlab and integrated into PCX via our Matlab interface.

  8. Poster: Observing change in crowded data sets in 3D space - Visualizing gene expression in human tissues

    Rogowski, Marcin

    2013-03-01

    We have been confronted with a real-world problem of visualizing and observing change of gene expression between different human tissues. In this paper, we are presenting a universal representation space based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as opposed to force-directed layouts encountered most often in similar problems. We are discussing the methods we devised to make observing change more convenient in a 3D virtual reality environment. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Impact of the 3D microenvironment on phenotype, gene expression, and EGFR inhibition of colorectal cancer cell lines.

    Anna C Luca

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D tumor cell cultures grown in laminin-rich-extracellular matrix (lrECM are considered to reflect human tumors more realistic as compared to cells grown as monolayer on plastic. Here, we systematically investigated the impact of ECM on phenotype, gene expression, EGFR signaling pathway, and on EGFR inhibition in commonly used colorectal cancer (CRC cell lines. LrECM on-top (3D culture assays were performed with the CRC cell lines SW-480, HT-29, DLD-1, LOVO, CACO-2, COLO-205 and COLO-206F. Morphology of lrECM cultivated CRC cell lines was determined by phase contrast and confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. Proliferation of cells was examined by MTT assay, invasive capacity of the cell lines was assayed using Matrigel-coated Boyden chambers, and migratory activity was determined employing the Fence assay. Differential gene expression was analyzed at the transcriptional level by the Agilent array platform. EGFR was inhibited by using the specific small molecule inhibitor AG1478. A specific spheroid growth pattern was observed for all investigated CRC cell lines. DLD-1, HT-29 and SW-480 and CACO-2 exhibited a clear solid tumor cell formation, while LOVO, COLO-205 and COLO-206F were characterized by forming grape-like structures. Although the occurrence of a spheroid morphology did not correlate with an altered migratory, invasive, or proliferative capacity of CRC cell lines, gene expression was clearly altered in cells grown on lrECM as compared to 2D cultures. Interestingly, in KRAS wild-type cell lines, inhibition of EGFR was less effective in lrECM (3D cultures as compared to 2D cell cultures. Thus, comparing both 2D and 3D cell culture models, our data support the influence of the ECM on cancer growth. Compared to conventional 2D cell culture, the lrECM (3D cell culture model offers the opportunity to investigate permanent CRC cell lines under more physiological conditions, i.e. in the context of molecular

  10. Lossless 3-D reconstruction and registration of semi-quantitative gene expression data in the mouse brain.

    Enlow, Matthew A; Ju, Tao; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A; Carson, James P

    2011-01-01

    As imaging, computing, and data storage technologies improve, there is an increasing opportunity for multiscale analysis of three-dimensional datasets (3-D). Such analysis enables, for example, microscale elements of multiple macroscale specimens to be compared throughout the entire macroscale specimen. Spatial comparisons require bringing datasets into co-alignment. One approach for co-alignment involves elastic deformations of data in addition to rigid alignments. The elastic deformations distort space, and if not accounted for, can distort the information at the microscale. The algorithms developed in this work address this issue by allowing multiple data points to be encoded into a single image pixel, appropriately tracking each data point to ensure lossless data mapping during elastic spatial deformation. This approach was developed and implemented for both 2-D and 3D registration of images. Lossless reconstruction and registration was applied to semi-quantitative cellular gene expression data in the mouse brain, enabling comparison of multiple spatially registered 3-D datasets without any augmentation of the cellular data. Standard reconstruction and registration without the lossless approach resulted in errors in cellular quantities of ∼ 8%.

  11. Cloning, 3D modeling and expression analysis of three vacuolar invertase genes from cassava (Manihot Esculenta Crantz).

    Yao, Yuan; Wu, Xiao-Hui; Geng, Meng-Ting; Li, Rui-Mei; Liu, Jiao; Hu, Xin-Wen; Guo, Jian-Chun

    2014-05-15

    Vacuolar invertase is one of the key enzymes in sucrose metabolism that irreversibly catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose to glucose and fructose in plants. In this research, three vacuolar invertase genes, named MeVINV1-3, and with 653, 660 and 639 amino acids, respectively, were cloned from cassava. The motifs of NDPNG (β-fructosidase motif), RDP and WECVD, which are conserved and essential for catalytic activity in the vacuolar invertase family, were found in MeVINV1 and MeVINV2. Meanwhile, in MeVINV3, instead of NDPNG we found the motif NGPDG, in which the three amino acids GPD are different from those in other vacuolar invertases (DPN) that might result in MeVINV3 being an inactivated protein. The N-terminal leader sequence of MeVINVs contains a signal anchor, which is associated with the sorting of vacuolar invertase to vacuole. The overall predicted 3D structure of the MeVINVs consists of a five bladed β-propeller module at N-terminus domain, and forms a β-sandwich module at the C-terminus domain. The active site of the protein is situated in the β-propeller module. MeVINVs are classified in two subfamilies, α and β groups, in which α group members of MeVINV1 and 2 are highly expressed in reproductive organs and tuber roots (considered as sink organs), while β group members of MeVINV3 are highly expressed in leaves (source organs). All MeVINVs are highly expressed in leaves, while only MeVINV1 and 2 are highly expressed in tubers at cassava tuber maturity stage. Thus, MeVINV1 and 2 play an important role in sucrose unloading and starch accumulation, as well in buffering the pools of sucrose, hexoses and sugar phosphates in leaves, specifically at later stages of plant development.

  12. 2D and 3D collagen and fibrin biopolymers promote specific ECM and integrin gene expression by vascular smooth muscle cells

    HONG, HELEN; STEGEMANN, JAN P.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen Type I and fibrin are polymeric proteins commonly used in the field of regenerative medicine as the foundational matrix of engineered tissues. We examined the response of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to both two-dimensional (2D) substrates as well as three-dimensional (3D) matrices of these biopolymers. Pure collagen Type I, pure fibrin and composite matrices consisting of 1:1 mixtures of collagen and fibrin were studied. Relative gene expression of three ECM molecules (collagen Type I and III, and tropoelastin) and three integrin subunits (integrins α1, β1 and β3) was determined over 7 days in culture using quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of all of these marker genes was up-regulated in 3D matrices, relative to 2D substrates. Tropoelastin, integrin α1 and integrin β1 were highest in collagen matrices, while collagen III and integrin β3 expression were highest in pure fibrin, and collagen I expression was highest in the collagen-fibrin composite materials. Both the compositional and temporal expression patterns of these specific ECM-related genes were suggestive of a wound healing response. These results illuminate the short-term responses of VSMC to 2D and 3D biopolymer matrices, and have relevance to tissue engineering and cardiovascular biology. PMID:18854122

  13. Using machine learning to speed up manual image annotation: application to a 3D imaging protocol for measuring single cell gene expression in the developing C. elegans embryo

    Waterston Robert H

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image analysis is an essential component in many biological experiments that study gene expression, cell cycle progression, and protein localization. A protocol for tracking the expression of individual C. elegans genes was developed that collects image samples of a developing embryo by 3-D time lapse microscopy. In this protocol, a program called StarryNite performs the automatic recognition of fluorescently labeled cells and traces their lineage. However, due to the amount of noise present in the data and due to the challenges introduced by increasing number of cells in later stages of development, this program is not error free. In the current version, the error correction (i.e., editing is performed manually using a graphical interface tool named AceTree, which is specifically developed for this task. For a single experiment, this manual annotation task takes several hours. Results In this paper, we reduce the time required to correct errors made by StarryNite. We target one of the most frequent error types (movements annotated as divisions and train a support vector machine (SVM classifier to decide whether a division call made by StarryNite is correct or not. We show, via cross-validation experiments on several benchmark data sets, that the SVM successfully identifies this type of error significantly. A new version of StarryNite that includes the trained SVM classifier is available at http://starrynite.sourceforge.net. Conclusions We demonstrate the utility of a machine learning approach to error annotation for StarryNite. In the process, we also provide some general methodologies for developing and validating a classifier with respect to a given pattern recognition task.

  14. Facial Expression Recognition Using 3D Convolutional Neural Network

    Young-Hyen Byeon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with video-based facial expression recognition frequently used in conjunction with HRI (Human-Robot Interaction that can naturally interact between human and robot. For this purpose, we design a 3D-CNN(3D Convolutional Neural Networks by augmenting dimensionality reduction methods such as PCA(Principal Component Analysis and TMPCA(Tensor-based Multilinear Principal Component Analysis to recognize simultaneously the successive frames with facial expression images obtained through video camera. The 3D-CNN can achieve some degree of shift and deformation invariance using local receptive fields and spatial subsampling through dimensionality reduction of redundant CNN’s output. The experimental results on video-based facial expression database reveal that the presented method shows a good performance in comparison to the conventional methods such as PCA and TMPCA.

  15. Changes in gene expression, protein content and morphology of chondrocytes cultured on a 3D Random Positioning Machine and 2D rotating clinostat

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela; Sahana, Jayashree

    Chondrocytes are the only cell type found in human cartilage consisting of proteoglycans and type II collagen. Several studies on chondrocytes cultured either in Space or on a ground-based facility for simulation of microgravity revealed that these cells are very resistant to adverse effects and stress induced by altered gravity. Tissue engineering of chondrocytes is a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. Using a three-dimensional Random Positioning Machine and a 2D rotating clinostat, devices designed to simulate microgravity on Earth, we investigated the early effects of microgravity exposure on human chondrocytes of six different donors after 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h and compared the results with the corresponding static controls cultured under normal gravity conditions. As little as 30 min of exposure resulted in increased expression of several genes responsible for cell motility, structure and integrity (beta-actin); control of cell growth, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and cytoskeletal components such as microtubules (beta-tubulin) and intermediate filaments (vimentin). After 4 hours disruptions in the vimentin network were detected. These changes were less dramatic after 16 hours, when human chondrocytes appeared to reorganize their cytoskeleton. However, the gene expression and protein content of TGF-β1 was enhanced for 24 h. Based on the results achieved, we suggest that chondrocytes exposed to simulated microgravity seem to change their extracellular matrix production behavior while they rearrange their cytoskeletal proteins prior to forming three-dimensional aggregates.

  16. Analysis of Gene Expression Signatures for Osteogenic 3D Perfusion-Bioreactor Cell Cultures Based on a Multifactorial DoE Approach

    Ioannis Papantoniou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of multifactorial design of experiments (DoE in tissue engineering bioprocess development will contribute to the robust manufacturing of tissue engineered constructs by linking their quality characteristics to bioprocess operating parameters. In this work, perfusion bioreactors were used for the in vitro culture and osteogenic differentiation of human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs seeded on three-dimensional titanium (Ti alloy scaffolds. A CaP-supplemented medium was used to induce differentiation of the cultured hPDCs. A two-level, three-factor fractional factorial design was employed to evaluate a range of bioreactor operating conditions by changing the levels of the following parameters: flow rate (0.5–2 mL/min, cell culture duration (7–21 days and cell seeding density (1.5 × 103–3 × 103 cells/cm2. This approach allowed for evaluating the individual impact of the aforementioned process parameters upon a range of genes that are related to the osteogenic lineage, such as collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, osterix, osteopontin and osteocalcin. Furthermore, by overlaying gene-specific response surfaces, an integrated operating process space was highlighted within which predetermined values of the six genes of interest (i.e., gene signature could be minimally met over the course of the bioreactor culture time.

  17. A 3D Facial Expression Tracking Method Using Piecewise Deformations

    Jing Chi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a new fast method for 3D facial expression tracking based on piecewise non-rigid deformations. Our method takes as input a video-rate sequence of face meshes that record the shape and time-varying expressions of a human face, and deforms a source mesh to match each input mesh to output a new mesh sequence with the same connectivity that reflects the facial shape and expressional variations. In mesh matching, we automatically segment the source mesh and estimate a non-rigid transformation for each segment to approximate the input mesh closely. Piecewise non-rigid transformation significantly reduces computational complexity and improves tracking speed because it greatly decreases the unknowns to be estimated. Our method can also achieve desired tracking accuracy because segmentation can be adjusted automatically and flexibly to approximate arbitrary deformations on the input mesh. Experiments demonstrate the efficiency of our method.

  18. Genome-Wide Identification, 3D Modeling, Expression and Enzymatic Activity Analysis of Cell Wall Invertase Gene Family from Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz

    Yuan Yao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall invertases play a crucial role on the sucrose metabolism in plant source and sink organs. In this research, six cell wall invertase genes (MeCWINV1-6 were cloned from cassava. All the MeCWINVs contain a putative signal peptide with a predicted extracellular location. The overall predicted structures of the MeCWINV1-6 are similar to AtcwINV1. Their N-terminus domain forms a β-propeller module and three conserved sequence domains (NDPNG, RDP and WECP(VD, in which the catalytic residues are situated in these domains; while the C-terminus domain consists of a β-sandwich module. The predicted structure of Pro residue from the WECPD (MeCWINV1, 2, 5, and 6, and Val residue from the WECVD (MeCWINV3 and 4 are different. The activity of MeCWINV1 and 3 were higher than other MeCWINVs in leaves and tubers, which suggested that sucrose was mainly catalyzed by the MeCWINV1 and 3 in the apoplastic space of cassava source and sink organs. The transcriptional levels of all the MeCWINVs and their enzymatic activity were lower in tubers than in leaves at all the stages during the cassava tuber development. It suggested that the major role of the MeCWINVs was on the regulation of carbon exportation from source leaves, and the ratio of sucrose to hexose in the apoplasts; the role of these enzymes on the sucrose unloading to tuber was weaker.

  19. Genome-wide identification, 3D modeling, expression and enzymatic activity analysis of cell wall invertase gene family from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    Yao, Yuan; Geng, Meng-Ting; Wu, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Jiao; Li, Rui-Mei; Hu, Xin-Wen; Guo, Jian-Chun

    2014-04-28

    The cell wall invertases play a crucial role on the sucrose metabolism in plant source and sink organs. In this research, six cell wall invertase genes (MeCWINV1-6) were cloned from cassava. All the MeCWINVs contain a putative signal peptide with a predicted extracellular location. The overall predicted structures of the MeCWINV1-6 are similar to AtcwINV1. Their N-terminus domain forms a β-propeller module and three conserved sequence domains (NDPNG, RDP and WECP(V)D), in which the catalytic residues are situated in these domains; while the C-terminus domain consists of a β-sandwich module. The predicted structure of Pro residue from the WECPD (MeCWINV1, 2, 5, and 6), and Val residue from the WECVD (MeCWINV3 and 4) are different. The activity of MeCWINV1 and 3 were higher than other MeCWINVs in leaves and tubers, which suggested that sucrose was mainly catalyzed by the MeCWINV1 and 3 in the apoplastic space of cassava source and sink organs. The transcriptional levels of all the MeCWINVs and their enzymatic activity were lower in tubers than in leaves at all the stages during the cassava tuber development. It suggested that the major role of the MeCWINVs was on the regulation of carbon exportation from source leaves, and the ratio of sucrose to hexose in the apoplasts; the role of these enzymes on the sucrose unloading to tuber was weaker.

  20. The 3D chromatin structure of the mouse β-haemoglobin gene cluster

    M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); E. de Boer (Ernie); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); M. Lesnussa (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHere we show a 3D DNA-FISH method to visualizes the 3D structure of the β-globin locus. Geometric size and shape measurements of the 3D rendered signals (128Kb) show that the volume of the β-globin locus decreases almost two fold upon gene activation. A decrease in length and a distinc

  1. A novel MCF-10A line allowing conditional oncogene expression in 3D culture

    Danke Christina

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-transformed mammary epithelial cell lines such as MCF-10A recapitulate epithelial morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D tissue culture by forming acinar structures. They represent an important tool to characterize the biological properties of oncogenes and to model early carcinogenic events. So far, however, these approaches were restricted to cells with constitutive oncogene expression prior to the set-up of 3D cultures. Although very informative, this experimental setting has precluded the analysis of effects caused by sudden oncoprotein expression or withdrawal in established epithelial cultures. Here, we report the establishment and use of a stable MCF-10A cell line (MCF-10Atet fitted with a novel and improved doxycycline (dox-regulated expression system allowing the conditional expression of any transgene. Methods MCF-10Atet cells were generated by stable transfection with pWHE644, a vector expressing a second generation tetracycline-regulated transactivator and a novel transcriptional silencer. In order to test the properties of this new repressor/activator switch, MCF-10Atet cells were transfected with a second plasmid, pTET-HABRAF-IRES-GFP, which responds to dox treatment with the production of a bi-cistronic transcript encoding hemagglutinin-tagged B-Raf and green fluorescent protein (GFP. This improved conditional expression system was then characterized in detail in terms of its response to various dox concentrations and exposure times. The plasticity of the phenotype provoked by oncogenic B-RafV600E in MCF-10Atet cells was analyzed in 3D cultures by dox exposure and subsequent wash-out. Results MCF-10Atet cells represent a tightly controlled, conditional gene expression system. Using B-RafV600E as a model oncoprotein, we show that its sudden expression in established 3D cultures results in the loss of acinar organization, the induction of an invasive phenotype and hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

  2. Coupled Dictionary Learning for the Detail-Enhanced Synthesis of 3-D Facial Expressions.

    Liang, Haoran; Liang, Ronghua; Song, Mingli; He, Xiaofei

    2016-04-01

    The desire to reconstruct 3-D face models with expressions from 2-D face images fosters increasing interest in addressing the problem of face modeling. This task is important and challenging in the field of computer animation. Facial contours and wrinkles are essential to generate a face with a certain expression; however, these details are generally ignored or are not seriously considered in previous studies on face model reconstruction. Thus, we employ coupled radius basis function networks to derive an intermediate 3-D face model from a single 2-D face image. To optimize the 3-D face model further through landmarks, a coupled dictionary that is related to 3-D face models and their corresponding 3-D landmarks is learned from the given training set through local coordinate coding. Another coupled dictionary is then constructed to bridge the 2-D and 3-D landmarks for the transfer of vertices on the face model. As a result, the final 3-D face can be generated with the appropriate expression. In the testing phase, the 2-D input faces are converted into 3-D models that display different expressions. Experimental results indicate that the proposed approach to facial expression synthesis can obtain model details more effectively than previous methods can.

  3. Discovering hidden relationships between renal diseases and regulated genes through 3D network visualizations

    Bhavnani Suresh K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recent study, two-dimensional (2D network layouts were used to visualize and quantitatively analyze the relationship between chronic renal diseases and regulated genes. The results revealed complex relationships between disease type, gene specificity, and gene regulation type, which led to important insights about the underlying biological pathways. Here we describe an attempt to extend our understanding of these complex relationships by reanalyzing the data using three-dimensional (3D network layouts, displayed through 2D and 3D viewing methods. Findings The 3D network layout (displayed through the 3D viewing method revealed that genes implicated in many diseases (non-specific genes tended to be predominantly down-regulated, whereas genes regulated in a few diseases (disease-specific genes tended to be up-regulated. This new global relationship was quantitatively validated through comparison to 1000 random permutations of networks of the same size and distribution. Our new finding appeared to be the result of using specific features of the 3D viewing method to analyze the 3D renal network. Conclusions The global relationship between gene regulation and gene specificity is the first clue from human studies that there exist common mechanisms across several renal diseases, which suggest hypotheses for the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the study suggests hypotheses for why the 3D visualization helped to make salient a new regularity that was difficult to detect in 2D. Future research that tests these hypotheses should enable a more systematic understanding of when and how to use 3D network visualizations to reveal complex regularities in biological networks.

  4. CD36 selection of 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria results in reduced VAR4 expression

    Hviid Lars

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A subset of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1SM is involved in the cytoadherence of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBC contributing to the pathogenesis of severe disease among young children in malaria endemic areas. The PfEMP1SM are encoded by group A var genes that are composed of a more constrained range of amino acid sequences than groups B and C var genes encoding PfEMP1UM associated with uncomplicated malaria. Also, unlike var genes from groups B and C, those from group A do not have sequences consistent with CD36 binding – a major cytoadhesion phenotype of P. falciparum isolates. Methods A 3D7 PfEMP1SM sub-line (3D7SM expressing VAR4 (PFD1235w/MAL8P1.207 was selected for binding to CD36. The protein expression of this parasite line was monitored by surface staining of iRBC using VAR4-specific antibodies. The serological phenotype of the 3D7SM parasites was determined by flow cytometry using malaria semi-immune and immune plasma and transcription of the 59 var genes in 3D7 were analysed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using var-specific primers. Results A selection-induced increased adhesion of 3D7SM iRBC to CD36 resulted in a reduced var4 transcription and VAR4 surface expression. Conclusion VAR4 is not involved in CD36 adhesion. The current findings are consistent with the notion that CD36 adhesion is not associated with particular virulent parasite phenotypes, such as those believed to be exhibited by VAR4 expressing parasites.

  5. In vivo biomarker expression patterns are preserved in 3D cultures of Prostate Cancer

    Windus, Louisa C.E.; Kiss, Debra L.; Glover, Tristan [Eskitis Institute for Cell and Molecular Therapies, Discovery Biology, Griffith University, Nathan 4111, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Avery, Vicky M., E-mail: v.avery@griffith.edu.au [Eskitis Institute for Cell and Molecular Therapies, Discovery Biology, Griffith University, Nathan 4111, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-11-15

    Here we report that Prostate Cancer (PCa) cell-lines DU145, PC3, LNCaP and RWPE-1 grown in 3D matrices in contrast to conventional 2D monolayers, display distinct differences in cell morphology, proliferation and expression of important biomarker proteins associated with cancer progression. Consistent with in vivo growth rates, in 3D cultures, all PCa cell-lines were found to proliferate at significantly lower rates in comparison to their 2D counterparts. Moreover, when grown in a 3D matrix, metastatic PC3 cell-lines were found to mimic more precisely protein expression patterns of metastatic tumour formation as found in vivo. In comparison to the prostate epithelial cell-line RWPE-1, metastatic PC3 cell-lines exhibited a down-regulation of E-cadherin and {alpha}6 integrin expression and an up-regulation of N-cadherin, Vimentin and {beta}1 integrin expression and re-expressed non-transcriptionally active AR. In comparison to the non-invasive LNCaP cell-lines, PC3 cells were found to have an up-regulation of chemokine receptor CXCR4, consistent with a metastatic phenotype. In 2D cultures, there was little distinction in protein expression between metastatic, non-invasive and epithelial cells. These results suggest that 3D cultures are more representative of in vivo morphology and may serve as a more biologically relevant model in the drug discovery pipeline. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed and optimised 3D culturing techniques for Prostate Cancer cell-lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated biomarker expression in 2D versus 3D culture techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PC3 cells re-expressed non-transcriptionally active androgen receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PCa cell lines retain in vivo-like antigenic profiles in 3D cultures.

  6. Cloning, Expression and 3D Structure Prediction of Chitinase from Chitinolyticbacter meiyuanensis SYBC-H1

    Zhikui Hao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Two CHI genes from Chitinolyticbacter meiyuanensis SYBC-H1 encoding chitinases were identified and their protein 3D structures were predicted. According to the amino acid sequence alignment, CHI1 gene encoding 166 aa had a structural domain similar to the GH18 type II chitinase, and CHI2 gene encoding 383 aa had the same catalytic domain as the glycoside hydrolase family 19 chitinase. In this study, CHI2 chitinase were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells, and this protein was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose, and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. Optimal activity of CHI2 chitinase occurred at a temperature of 40 °C and a pH of 6.5. The presence of metal ions Fe3+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ inhibited CHI2 chitinase activity, while Na+ and K+ promoted its activity. Furthermore, the presence of EGTA, EDTA, and β-mercaptoethanol significantly increased the stability of CHI2 chitinase. The CHI2 chitinase was active with p-NP-GlcNAc, with the Km and Vm values of 23.0 µmol/L and 9.1 mM/min at a temperature of 37 °C, respectively. Additionally, the CHI2 chitinase was characterized as an N-acetyl glucosaminidase based on the hydrolysate from chitin. Overall, our results demonstrated CHI2 chitinase with remarkable biochemical properties is suitable for bioconversion of chitin waste.

  7. Learning deformation model for expression-robust 3D face recognition

    Guo, Zhe; Liu, Shu; Wang, Yi; Lei, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Expression change is the major cause of local plastic deformation of the facial surface. The intra-class differences with large expression change somehow are larger than the inter-class differences as it's difficult to distinguish the same individual with facial expression change. In this paper, an expression-robust 3D face recognition method is proposed by learning expression deformation model. The expression of the individuals on the training set is modeled by principal component analysis, the main components are retained to construct the facial deformation model. For the test 3D face, the shape difference between the test and the neutral face in training set is used for reconstructing the expression change by the constructed deformation model. The reconstruction residual error is used for face recognition. The average recognition rate on GavabDB and self-built database reaches 85.1% and 83%, respectively, which shows strong robustness for expression changes.

  8. Relations of 3D directional derivatives and expressions of typical differential operators

    YIN Li; LV Gui-xia; SHEN Long-jun

    2009-01-01

    Relations of the 3D multi-directional derivatives are studied in this paper. These relations are applied to a general second-order linear elliptical operator and the corresponding expression are obtained. These relations and expressions play important roles in the meshless finite point method.

  9. 3D facial expression recognition based on histograms of surface differential quantities

    Li, Huibin

    2011-01-01

    3D face models accurately capture facial surfaces, making it possible for precise description of facial activities. In this paper, we present a novel mesh-based method for 3D facial expression recognition using two local shape descriptors. To characterize shape information of the local neighborhood of facial landmarks, we calculate the weighted statistical distributions of surface differential quantities, including histogram of mesh gradient (HoG) and histogram of shape index (HoS). Normal cycle theory based curvature estimation method is employed on 3D face models along with the common cubic fitting curvature estimation method for the purpose of comparison. Based on the basic fact that different expressions involve different local shape deformations, the SVM classifier with both linear and RBF kernels outperforms the state of the art results on the subset of the BU-3DFE database with the same experimental setting. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  10. FaceWarehouse: a 3D facial expression database for visual computing.

    Cao, Chen; Weng, Yanlin; Zhou, Shun; Tong, Yiying; Zhou, Kun

    2014-03-01

    We present FaceWarehouse, a database of 3D facial expressions for visual computing applications. We use Kinect, an off-the-shelf RGBD camera, to capture 150 individuals aged 7-80 from various ethnic backgrounds. For each person, we captured the RGBD data of her different expressions, including the neutral expression and 19 other expressions such as mouth-opening, smile, kiss, etc. For every RGBD raw data record, a set of facial feature points on the color image such as eye corners, mouth contour, and the nose tip are automatically localized, and manually adjusted if better accuracy is required. We then deform a template facial mesh to fit the depth data as closely as possible while matching the feature points on the color image to their corresponding points on the mesh. Starting from these fitted face meshes, we construct a set of individual-specific expression blendshapes for each person. These meshes with consistent topology are assembled as a rank-3 tensor to build a bilinear face model with two attributes: identity and expression. Compared with previous 3D facial databases, for every person in our database, there is a much richer matching collection of expressions, enabling depiction of most human facial actions. We demonstrate the potential of FaceWarehouse for visual computing with four applications: facial image manipulation, face component transfer, real-time performance-based facial image animation, and facial animation retargeting from video to image.

  11. An Efficient Multimodal 2D + 3D Feature-based Approach to Automatic Facial Expression Recognition

    Li, Huibin

    2015-07-29

    We present a fully automatic multimodal 2D + 3D feature-based facial expression recognition approach and demonstrate its performance on the BU-3DFE database. Our approach combines multi-order gradient-based local texture and shape descriptors in order to achieve efficiency and robustness. First, a large set of fiducial facial landmarks of 2D face images along with their 3D face scans are localized using a novel algorithm namely incremental Parallel Cascade of Linear Regression (iPar-CLR). Then, a novel Histogram of Second Order Gradients (HSOG) based local image descriptor in conjunction with the widely used first-order gradient based SIFT descriptor are used to describe the local texture around each 2D landmark. Similarly, the local geometry around each 3D landmark is described by two novel local shape descriptors constructed using the first-order and the second-order surface differential geometry quantities, i.e., Histogram of mesh Gradients (meshHOG) and Histogram of mesh Shape index (curvature quantization, meshHOS). Finally, the Support Vector Machine (SVM) based recognition results of all 2D and 3D descriptors are fused at both feature-level and score-level to further improve the accuracy. Comprehensive experimental results demonstrate that there exist impressive complementary characteristics between the 2D and 3D descriptors. We use the BU-3DFE benchmark to compare our approach to the state-of-the-art ones. Our multimodal feature-based approach outperforms the others by achieving an average recognition accuracy of 86.32%. Moreover, a good generalization ability is shown on the Bosphorus database.

  12. Effective inhibition of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV replication in vitro by vector-delivered microRNAs targeting the 3D gene

    Cai Xuepeng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV causes an economically important and highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. RNAi triggered by small RNA molecules, including siRNAs and miRNAs, offers a new approach for controlling viral infections. There is no report available for FMDV inhibition by vector-delivered miRNA, although miRNA is believed to have more potential than siRNA. In this study, the inhibitory effects of vector-delivered miRNAs targeting the 3D gene on FMDV replication were examined. Results Four pairs of oligonucleotides encoding 3D-specific miRNA of FMDV were designed and selected for construction of miRNA expression plasmids. In the reporter assays, two of four miRNA expression plasmids were able to significantly silence the expression of 3D-GFP fusion proteins from the reporter plasmid, p3D-GFP, which was cotransfected with each miRNA expression plasmid. After detecting the silencing effects of the reporter genes, the inhibitory effects of FMDV replication were determined in the miRNA expression plasmid-transfected and FMDV-infected cells. Virus titration and real-time RT-PCR assays showed that the p3D715-miR and p3D983-miR plasmids were able to potently inhibit the replication of FMDV when BHK-21 cells were infected with FMDV. Conclusion Our results indicated that vector-delivered miRNAs targeting the 3D gene efficiently inhibits FMDV replication in vitro. This finding provides evidence that miRNAs could be used as a potential tool against FMDV infection.

  13. Pulmonary surfactant expression analysis--role of cell-cell interactions and 3-D tissue-like architecture.

    Nandkumar, Maya A; Ashna, U; Thomas, Lynda V; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-03-01

    Surfactant production is important in maintaining alveolar function both in vivo and in vitro, but surfactant expression is the primary property lost by alveolar Type II Pneumocytes in culture and its maintenance is a functional requirement. To develop a functional tissue-like model, the in vivo cell-cell interactions and three dimensional architecture has to be reproduced. To this end, 3D button-shaped synthetic gelatin vinyl acetate (GeVAc) co-polymer scaffold was seeded with different types of lung cells. Functionality of the construct was studied under both static and dynamic conditions. The construct was characterized by Environmental Scanning Electron and fluorescent microscopy, and functionality of the system was analyzed by studying mRNA modulations of all four surfactant genes A, B, C, and D by real time-PCR and varying culture conditions. The scaffold supports alveolar cell adhesion and maintenance of cuboidal morphology, and the alveolar-specific property of surfactant synthesis, which would otherwise be rapidly lost in culture. This is a novel 3D system that expresses all 4 surfactants for a culture duration of 3 weeks.

  14. 3D facial expression recognition using maximum relevance minimum redundancy geometrical features

    Rabiu, Habibu; Saripan, M. Iqbal; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Marhaban, Mohd Hamiruce

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, facial expression recognition (FER) has become an attractive research area, which besides the fundamental challenges, it poses, finds application in areas, such as human-computer interaction, clinical psychology, lie detection, pain assessment, and neurology. Generally the approaches to FER consist of three main steps: face detection, feature extraction and expression recognition. The recognition accuracy of FER hinges immensely on the relevance of the selected features in representing the target expressions. In this article, we present a person and gender independent 3D facial expression recognition method, using maximum relevance minimum redundancy geometrical features. The aim is to detect a compact set of features that sufficiently represents the most discriminative features between the target classes. Multi-class one-against-one SVM classifier was employed to recognize the seven facial expressions; neutral, happy, sad, angry, fear, disgust, and surprise. The average recognition accuracy of 92.2% was recorded. Furthermore, inter database homogeneity was investigated between two independent databases the BU-3DFE and UPM-3DFE the results showed a strong homogeneity between the two databases.

  15. Facial expression identification using 3D geometric features from Microsoft Kinect device

    Han, Dongxu; Al Jawad, Naseer; Du, Hongbo

    2016-05-01

    Facial expression identification is an important part of face recognition and closely related to emotion detection from face images. Various solutions have been proposed in the past using different types of cameras and features. Microsoft Kinect device has been widely used for multimedia interactions. More recently, the device has been increasingly deployed for supporting scientific investigations. This paper explores the effectiveness of using the device in identifying emotional facial expressions such as surprise, smile, sad, etc. and evaluates the usefulness of 3D data points on a face mesh structure obtained from the Kinect device. We present a distance-based geometric feature component that is derived from the distances between points on the face mesh and selected reference points in a single frame. The feature components extracted across a sequence of frames starting and ending by neutral emotion represent a whole expression. The feature vector eliminates the need for complex face orientation correction, simplifying the feature extraction process and making it more efficient. We applied the kNN classifier that exploits a feature component based similarity measure following the principle of dynamic time warping to determine the closest neighbors. Preliminary tests on a small scale database of different facial expressions show promises of the newly developed features and the usefulness of the Kinect device in facial expression identification.

  16. MRI of Transgene Expression: Correlation to Therapeutic Gene Expression

    Tomotsugu Ichikawa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can provide highresolution 3D maps of structural and functional information, yet its use of mapping in vivo gene expression has only recently been explored. A potential application for this technology is to noninvasively image transgene expression. The current study explores the latter using a nonregulatable internalizing engineered transferrin receptor (ETR whose expression can be probed for with a superparamagnetic Tf-CLIO probe. Using an HSV-based amplicon vector system for transgene delivery, we demonstrate that: 1 ETR is a sensitive MR marker gene; 2 several transgenes can be efficiently expressed from a single amplicon; 3 expression of each transgene results in functional gene product; and 4 ETR gene expression correlates with expression of therapeutic genes when the latter are contained within the same amplicon. These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression.

  17. Single cell visualization of transcription kinetics variance of highly mobile identical genes using 3D nanoimaging.

    Annibale, Paolo; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-03-19

    Multi-cell biochemical assays and single cell fluorescence measurements revealed that the elongation rate of Polymerase II (PolII) in eukaryotes varies largely across different cell types and genes. However, there is not yet a consensus whether intrinsic factors such as the position, local mobility or the engagement by an active molecular mechanism of a genetic locus could be the determinants of the observed heterogeneity. Here by employing high-speed 3D fluorescence nanoimaging techniques we resolve and track at the single cell level multiple, distinct regions of mRNA synthesis within the model system of a large transgene array. We demonstrate that these regions are active transcription sites that release mRNA molecules in the nucleoplasm. Using fluctuation spectroscopy and the phasor analysis approach we were able to extract the local PolII elongation rate at each site as a function of time. We measured a four-fold variation in the average elongation between identical copies of the same gene measured simultaneously within the same cell, demonstrating a correlation between local transcription kinetics and the movement of the transcription site. Together these observations demonstrate that local factors, such as chromatin local mobility and the microenvironment of the transcription site, are an important source of transcription kinetics variability.

  18. Comparison of plasma data from ASPERA-3/Mars-Express with a 3-D hybrid simulation

    A. Bößwetter

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The ELS and IMA sensors of the ASPERA-3 experiment onboard of Mars-Express (MEX can measure electron as well as ion moments. We compare these measurements for a specific orbit with the simulation results from a 3-D hybrid model. In the hybrid approximation the electrons are modeled as a massless charge-neutralizing fluid, whereas the ions are treated as individual particles. This approach allows gyroradius effects to be included in our model calculations of the Martian plasma environment because the gyroradii of the solar wind protons are in the range of several hundred kilometers and therefore comparable with the characteristic scales of the subsolar ionospheric interaction region. The position of both the bow shock and the Ion Composition Boundary (ICB manifest in the MEX data as well as in the results from the hybrid simulation nearly at the same location. The characteristic features of these boundaries, i.e. an increase of proton density and temperature at the Bow Shock and a transition from solar wind to ionospheric particles at the ICB, are clearly identifiable in the data.

  19. Vorinostat eliminates multicellular resistance of mesothelioma 3D spheroids via restoration of Noxa expression.

    Barbone, Dario; Cheung, Priscilla; Battula, Sailaja; Busacca, Sara; Gray, Steven G; Longley, Daniel B; Bueno, Raphael; Sugarbaker, David J; Fennell, Dean A; Broaddus, V Courtney

    2012-01-01

    When grown in 3D cultures as spheroids, mesothelioma cells acquire a multicellular resistance to apoptosis that resembles that of solid tumors. We have previously found that resistance to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in 3D can be explained by a lack of upregulation of Noxa, the pro-apoptotic BH3 sensitizer that acts via displacement of the Bak/Bax-activator BH3-only protein, Bim. We hypothesized that the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat might reverse this block to Noxa upregulation in 3D. Indeed, we found that vorinostat effectively restored upregulation of Noxa protein and message and abolished multicellular resistance to bortezomib in the 3D spheroids. The ability of vorinostat to reverse resistance was ablated by knockdown of Noxa or Bim, confirming the essential role of the Noxa/Bim axis in the response to vorinostat. Addition of vorinostat similarly increased the apoptotic response to bortezomib in another 3D model, the tumor fragment spheroid, which is grown from human mesothelioma ex vivo. In addition to its benefit when used with bortezomib, vorinostat also enhanced the response to cisplatin plus pemetrexed, as shown in both 3D models. Our results using clinically relevant 3D models show that the manipulation of the core apoptotic repertoire may improve the chemosensitivity of mesothelioma. Whereas neither vorinostat nor bortezomib alone has been clinically effective in mesothelioma, vorinostat may undermine chemoresistance to bortezomib and to other therapies thereby providing a rationale for combinatorial strategies.

  20. Vorinostat eliminates multicellular resistance of mesothelioma 3D spheroids via restoration of Noxa expression.

    Dario Barbone

    Full Text Available When grown in 3D cultures as spheroids, mesothelioma cells acquire a multicellular resistance to apoptosis that resembles that of solid tumors. We have previously found that resistance to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in 3D can be explained by a lack of upregulation of Noxa, the pro-apoptotic BH3 sensitizer that acts via displacement of the Bak/Bax-activator BH3-only protein, Bim. We hypothesized that the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat might reverse this block to Noxa upregulation in 3D. Indeed, we found that vorinostat effectively restored upregulation of Noxa protein and message and abolished multicellular resistance to bortezomib in the 3D spheroids. The ability of vorinostat to reverse resistance was ablated by knockdown of Noxa or Bim, confirming the essential role of the Noxa/Bim axis in the response to vorinostat. Addition of vorinostat similarly increased the apoptotic response to bortezomib in another 3D model, the tumor fragment spheroid, which is grown from human mesothelioma ex vivo. In addition to its benefit when used with bortezomib, vorinostat also enhanced the response to cisplatin plus pemetrexed, as shown in both 3D models. Our results using clinically relevant 3D models show that the manipulation of the core apoptotic repertoire may improve the chemosensitivity of mesothelioma. Whereas neither vorinostat nor bortezomib alone has been clinically effective in mesothelioma, vorinostat may undermine chemoresistance to bortezomib and to other therapies thereby providing a rationale for combinatorial strategies.

  1. Expression robust 3D face recognition via mesh-based histograms of multiple order surface differential quantities

    Li, Huibin

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a mesh-based approach for 3D face recognition using a novel local shape descriptor and a SIFT-like matching process. Both maximum and minimum curvatures estimated in the 3D Gaussian scale space are employed to detect salient points. To comprehensively characterize 3D facial surfaces and their variations, we calculate weighted statistical distributions of multiple order surface differential quantities, including histogram of mesh gradient (HoG), histogram of shape index (HoS) and histogram of gradient of shape index (HoGS) within a local neighborhood of each salient point. The subsequent matching step then robustly associates corresponding points of two facial surfaces, leading to much more matched points between different scans of a same person than the ones of different persons. Experimental results on the Bosphorus dataset highlight the effectiveness of the proposed method and its robustness to facial expression variations. © 2011 IEEE.

  2. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  3. Sub-grouping of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 var genes based on sequence analysis of coding and non-coding regions

    Lavstsen, Thomas; Salanti, Ali; Jensen, Anja T R;

    2003-01-01

    and organization of the 3D7 PfEMP1 repertoire was investigated on the basis of the complete genome sequence. METHODS: Using two tree-building methods we analysed the coding and non-coding sequences of 3D7 var and rif genes as well as var genes of other parasite strains. RESULTS: var genes can be sub...

  4. CV3D – Reconstrucción tridimensional de imágenes tomográficas

    Juan Mejía

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Las técnicas de reconstrucción tridimensional han ampliado el
    horizonte de las imágenes médicas al permitir la visualización de volúmenes en lugar de superficies de 2 dimensiones lo que permite encontrar relaciones anatómicas que facilitan los diagnósticos y mejoran los enfoques terapéuticos. Se desarrollará un programa en entorno MATLAB® para la reconstrucción 3D de imágenes tomográficas digitales.

  5. Simultaneous localization of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes in interphase nuclei by 3D-FISH: MLL translocation revisited

    Sun Jian-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haematological cancer is characterised by chromosomal translocation (e.g. MLL translocation in acute leukaemia and two models have been proposed to explain the origins of recurrent reciprocal translocation. The first, established from pairs of translocated genes (such as BCR and ABL, considers the spatial proximity of loci in interphase nuclei (static "contact first" model. The second model is based on the dynamics of double strand break ends during repair processes (dynamic "breakage first" model. Since the MLL gene involved in 11q23 translocation has more than 40 partners, the study of the relative positions of the MLL gene with both the most frequent partner gene (AF4 and a less frequent partner gene (ENL, should elucidate the MLL translocation mechanism. Methods Using triple labeling 3D FISH experiments, we have determined the relative positions of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes, in two lymphoblastic and two myeloid human cell lines. Results In all cell lines, the ENL gene is significantly closer to the MLL gene than the AF4 gene (with P value loci would indicate a greater probability of the occurrence of t(11;19(q23;p13.3 compared to t(4;11(q21;q23. However this is in contradiction to the epidemiology of 11q23 translocation. Conclusion The simultaneous multi-probe hybridization in 3D-FISH is a new approach in addressing the correlation between spatial proximity and occurrence of translocation. Our observations are not consistent with the static "contact first" model of translocation. The recently proposed dynamic "breakage first" model offers an attractive alternative explanation.

  6. A closed-form expression of the positional uncertainty for 3D point clouds.

    Bae, Kwang-Ho; Belton, David; Lichti, Derek D

    2009-04-01

    We present a novel closed-form expression of positional uncertainty measured by a near-monostatic and time-of-flight laser range finder with consideration of its measurement uncertainties. An explicit form of the angular variance of the estimated surface normal vector is also derived. This expression is useful for the precise estimation of the surface normal vector and the outlier detection for finding correspondence in order to register multiple three-dimensional point clouds. Two practical algorithms using these expressions are presented: a method for finding optimal local neighbourhood size which minimizes the variance of the estimated normal vector and a resampling method of point clouds.

  7. Changes in morphology of actin filaments and expression of alkaline phosphatase at 3D cultivation of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells on mineralized fibroin scaffolds.

    Goncharenko, A V; Malyuchenko, N V; Moisenovich, A M; Kotlyarova, M S; Arkhipova, A Yu; Kon'kov, A S; Agapov, I I; Molochkov, A V; Moisenovich, M M; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2016-09-01

    3D cultivation of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells on mineralized fibroin scaffolds leads to an increase in the expression of alkaline phosphatase, an early marker of bone formation. Increased expression is associated with the actin cytoskeleton reorganization under the influence of 3D cultivation and osteogenic calcium phosphate component of the microcarrier.

  8. 3D Face Model Dataset: Automatic Detection of Facial Expressions and Emotions for Educational Environments

    Chickerur, Satyadhyan; Joshi, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Emotion detection using facial images is a technique that researchers have been using for the last two decades to try to analyze a person's emotional state given his/her image. Detection of various kinds of emotion using facial expressions of students in educational environment is useful in providing insight into the effectiveness of tutoring…

  9. Static and dynamic 3D facial expression recognition: A comprehensive survey

    Sandbach, G.; Zafeiriou, S.; Pantic, Maja; Yin, Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Automatic facial expression recognition constitutes an active research field due to the latest advances in computing technology that make the user's experience a clear priority. The majority of work conducted in this area involves 2D imagery, despite the problems this presents due to inherent pose a

  10. Genetic Analysis of Chromomere 3d4 in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER . II. Regulatory Sites for the Dunce Gene

    Salz, Helen K.; Kiger, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Chromomere 3D4 of the X chromosome of D. melanogaster contains two genes, dunce (dnc) and sperm amotile (sam ). Mutations in dnc cause defects in memory formation and female fertility and reduce or eliminate the activity of a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase designated form II. A fine structure map of this region has been constructed showing the locations of two sam mutations, five dnc mutations and a newly identified locus designated control of fertility (cf) that acts in cis to regulate the...

  11. Genetic and comparative genomics mapping reveals that a powdery mildew resistance gene Ml3D232 originating from wild emmer co-segregates with an NBS-LRR analog in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Zhang, Hongtao; Guan, Haiying; Li, Jingting; Zhu, Jie; Xie, Chaojie; Zhou, Yilin; Duan, Xiayu; Yang, Tsomin; Sun, Qixin; Liu, Zhiyong

    2010-11-01

    Powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici is one of the most important wheat diseases worldwide and breeding for resistance using diversified disease resistance genes is the most promising approach to prevent outbreaks of powdery mildew. A powdery mildew resistance gene, originating from wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum var. dicoccoides) accessions collected from Israel, has been transferred into the hexaploid wheat line 3D232 through crossing and backcrossing. Inoculation results with 21 B. graminis f. sp. tritici races indicated that 3D232 is resistant to all of the powdery mildew isolates tested. Genetic analyses of 3D232 using an F(2) segregating population and F(3) families indicated that a single dominant gene, Ml3D232, confers resistance in the host seedling stage. By applying molecular markers and bulked segregant analysis (BSA), we have identified polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSR), expressed sequence tags (EST) and derived sequence tagged site (STS) markers to determine that the Ml3D232 is located on chromosome 5BL bin 0.59-0.76. Comparative genetic analyses using mapped EST markers and genome sequences of rice and Brachypodium established co-linearity of the Ml3D232 genomic region with a 1.4 Mb genomic region on Brachypodium distachyon chromosome 4, and a 1.2 Mb contig located on the Oryza sativa chromosome 9. Our comparative approach enabled us to develop new EST-STS markers and to delimit the genomic region carrying Ml3D232 to a 0.8 cM segment that is collinear with a 558 kb region on B. distachyon. Eight EST markers, including an NBS-LRR analog, co-segregated with Ml3D232 to provide a target site for fine genetic mapping, chromosome landing and map-based cloning of the powdery mildew resistance gene. This newly developed common wheat germplasm provides broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildew and a valuable resource for wheat breeding programs.

  12. Toll-like receptor 22 in Labeo rohita: molecular cloning, characterization, 3D modeling, and expression analysis following ligands stimulation and bacterial infection.

    Samanta, Mrinal; Swain, Banikalyan; Basu, Madhubanti; Mahapatra, Girishbala; Sahoo, Bikash R; Paichha, Mahismita; Lenka, Saswati S; Jayasankar, Pallipuram

    2014-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a class of innate immune receptors that sense pathogens or their molecular signatures and activate signaling cascades to induce a quick and non-specific immune response in the host. Among various types of TLRs, TLR22 is exclusively present in teleosts and amphibians and is expected to play the distinctive role in innate immunity. This report describes molecular cloning, three-dimensional (3D) modeling, and expression analysis of TLR22 in rohu (Labeo rohita), the most commercially important freshwater fish species in the Indian subcontinent. The open reading frame (ORF) of rohu TLR22 (LrTLR22) comprised of 2,838 nucleotides (nt), encoding 946 amino acid (aa) residues with the molecular mass of ∼ 107.6 kDa. The secondary structure of deduced LrTLR22 exhibited the presence of signal peptide (1-22 aa), 18 leucine-rich repeat (LRR) regions (79-736 aa), and TIR domain (792-935 aa). The 3D model of LrTLR22-LRR regions together elucidated the horse-shoe-shaped structure having parallel β-strands at the concave surface and few α-helices at the convex surface. The TIR domain structure revealed alternate presence of five α-helices and β-sheets. Phylogenetically, LrTLR22 was closely related to common carp and exhibited significant similarity (92.2 %) and identity (86.1 %) in their amino acids. In rohu, TLR22 was constitutively expressed in all embryonic developmental stages, and tissue-specific analysis illustrated its expression in all examined tissues, highest was in liver and lowest in brain. In vivo modulation of TLR22 gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), synthetic double stranded RNA (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid), and bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) RNA. Among these ligands, bacterial RNA most significantly (p < 0.05) induced TLR22 gene expression in most of the tested tissues. In A. hydrophila infection, induction of TLR22 gene expression

  13. Modeling Three-Dimensional Chromosome Structures Using Gene Expression Data.

    Xiao, Guanghua; Wang, Xinlei; Khodursky, Arkady B

    2011-03-01

    Recent genomic studies have shown that significant chromosomal spatial correlation exists in gene expression of many organisms. Interestingly, coexpression has been observed among genes separated by a fixed interval in specific regions of a chromosome chain, which is likely caused by three-dimensional (3D) chromosome folding structures. Modeling such spatial correlation explicitly may lead to essential understandings of 3D chromosome structures and their roles in transcriptional regulation. In this paper, we explore chromosomal spatial correlation induced by 3D chromosome structures, and propose a hierarchical Bayesian method based on helical structures to formally model and incorporate the correlation into the analysis of gene expression microarray data. It is the first study to quantify and infer 3D chromosome structures in vivo using expression microarrays. Simulation studies show computing feasibility of the proposed method and that, under the assumption of helical chromosome structures, it can lead to precise estimation of structural parameters and gene expression levels. Real data applications demonstrate an intriguing biological phenomenon that functionally associated genes, which are far apart along the chromosome chain, are brought into physical proximity by chromosomal folding in 3D space to facilitate their coexpression. It leads to important biological insight into relationship between chromosome structure and function.

  14. Tumor-specific gene expression patterns with gene expression profiles

    RUAN Xiaogang; LI Yingxin; LI Jiangeng; GONG Daoxiong; WANG Jinlian

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of 14 common tumors and their counterpart normal tissues were analyzed with machine learning methods to address the problem of selection of tumor-specific genes and analysis of their differential expressions in tumor tissues. First, a variation of the Relief algorithm, "RFE_Relief algorithm" was proposed to learn the relations between genes and tissue types. Then, a support vector machine was employed to find the gene subset with the best classification performance for distinguishing cancerous tissues and their counterparts. After tissue-specific genes were removed, cross validation experiments were employed to demonstrate the common deregulated expressions of the selected gene in tumor tissues. The results indicate the existence of a specific expression fingerprint of these genes that is shared in different tumor tissues, and the hallmarks of the expression patterns of these genes in cancerous tissues are summarized at the end of this paper.

  15. The interactive presentation of 3D information obtained from reconstructed datasets and 3D placement of single histological sections with the 3D portable document format

    B.A. de Boer; A.T. Soufan; J. Hagoort; T.J. Mohun; M.J.B. van den Hoff; A. Hasman; F.P.J.M. Voorbraak; A.F.M. Moorman; J.M. Ruijter

    2011-01-01

    Interpretation of the results of anatomical and embryological studies relies heavily on proper visualization of complex morphogenetic processes and patterns of gene expression in a three-dimensional (3D) context. However, reconstruction of complete 3D datasets is time consuming and often researchers

  16. GeoSOT-3D椭球体剖分真三维数据表达%True 3D Data Expression Based on GeoSOT-3D Ellipsoid Subdivision

    孙忠秋; 程承旗

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of the earth observation technology and information technology, the digital earth platform has developed. However, the existing digital earth model has been constructed by using the spherical surface of the 2.5 dimensional earth surface. The nature of the model is the earth's surface without the inner of the earth. At present, the scientific exploration of the earth is increasingly extensive, not only the earth's surface, but also underground, underwater, air and other levels of space have been greatly concerned. The subdivision of the earth can be used to construct the true 3D data model, and then the organization, management, expression and application of the spatial data could be realized through the data model. In this paper, the theoretical system of the GeoSOT-3D ellipsoid subdivision frame is proposed, discussed the different types of the division code and the split scale characteristic. A true 3D representation model of spatial objects based on GeoSOT-3D is established for different spatial entities including the point, line, and body. Based on the true 3D model, the true 3D model visualization of spatial entity body is realized. At last, a true 3D digital spatial data system is designed. Through the experiments built on the true 3D system, the research shows that the GeoSOT-3D ellipsoid subdivision frame has the advantage characteristics of simple, complete, and identical in the two and three dimension, the true 3D data model can be used to organize and manage the spatial data in the next generation of GIS.%随着地球观测技术和信息技术的进步,以全球为背景的科学探索不断增多,不仅是地球表面信息,地下、水下、空中等地球上各个层次的空间信息都受到极大的关注。地球球体剖分网格可以构建真三维的数据模型,进而实现空天地、地下水下一体化的空间数据组织、管理、表达与应用。本文详细论述了GeoSOT-3D椭球体剖分网格

  17. Contribution of C3d-P28 repeats to enhancement of immune responses against HBV-preS2/S induced by gene immunization

    Li-Xin Wang; Wei Xu; Qing-Dong Guan; Yi-Wei Chu; Ying Wang; Si-Dong Xiong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether P28 derived from C3d can enhance the immune response to HBV-preS2/S induced by directly injection of naked plasmids containing variable repeats of P28 and HBV-preS2/S in fusion form.METHODS: One to four copies of C3d-P28 coding gene,amplified by PCR and modified by restriction endonucleases digestion, were subcloned into a eukaryotic expression vector pVAON33 to construct pVAON33-P28, pVAON33-P28.2, pVAON33-P28.3 and pVAON33-P28.4 (pVAON33-P28.[1-4]). HBV-preS2/S coding sequence was then introduced into the pVAON33-P28.[1-4] and identified by both PCR and DNA sequencing. BALB/c mice were primed by intramuscular gene immunization with 100 μg different recombinant plasmids on day 0 and were boosted by subcutaneous inoculation with HBsAg protein (1 μg) 12wk post-priming. The levels and avidity of specific IgG in sera collected at the indicated times from each group were determined by ELISA and NaSCN-displacement ELISA,respectively.RESULTS: HBsAg specific antibody response was elicited in groups primed with plasmids pVAON33-S2/S-P28.[1-4]and pVAON33-S2/S. However, the response against HBsAg in the groups primed with pVAON33-S2/S-P28.[1-4] was significantly higher than that in pVAON33-S2/S group, the highest level of the specific antibody response was observed in the groups primed with pVAON33-S2/S-P28.4 (P<0.01).After secondary immunization with specific antigen, the acceleration of antibody levels was significantly higher and faster in the mice primed with DNA expressing preS2/S-P28 fusions than that with DNA expressing preS2/S only (P<0.05).Interestingly, mice primed with DNA expressing preS2/SP28.4 fusions maintained the highest levels of anti-HBs antibodies in all animals. The avidity assay showed that the avidity index (AI) collected at 18 wk from mice primed with pVAON33-S2/S-P28.3 and pVAON33-S2/S-P28.4 were significantly higher than that from preS2/S-DNA vaccinated mice (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Different repeats of C3d-P28 can

  18. Molecular cloning, expression pattern, and 3D structural prediction of the cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Yang, Xiao; Gao, Jinning; Ma, Liman; Li, Zan; Wang, Wenji; Wang, Zhongkai; Yu, Haiyang; Qi, Jie; Wang, Xubo; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2015-02-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a kind of RNA binding proteins that plays important roles in many physiological processes. The CIRP has been widely studied in mammals and amphibians since it was first cloned from mammals. On the contrary, there are little reports in teleosts. In this study, the Po CIRP gene of the Japanese flounder was cloned and sequenced. The genomic sequence consists of seven exons and six introns. The putative PoCIRP protein of flounder was 198 amino acid residues long containing the RNA recognition motif (RRM). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the flounder PoCIRP is highly conserved with other teleost CIRPs. The 5' flanking sequence was cloned by genome walking and many transcription factor binding sites were identified. There is a CpGs region located in promoter and exon I region and the methylation state is low. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis uncovered that Po CIRP gene was widely expressed in adult tissues with the highest expression level in the ovary. The mRNA of the Po CIRP was maternally deposited and the expression level of the gene was regulated up during the gastrula and neurula stages. In order to gain the information how the protein interacts with mRNA, we performed the modeling of the 3D structure of the flounder PoCIRP. The results showed a cleft existing the surface of the molecular. Taken together, the results indicate that the CIRP is a multifunctional molecular in teleosts and the findings about the structure provide valuable information for understanding the basis of this protein's function.

  19. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern, and 3D Structural Prediction of the Cold Inducible RNA - Binding Protein (CIRP) in Japanese Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    YANG Xiao; WANG Zhigang; ZHANG Quanqi; GAO Jinning; MA Liman; LI Zan; WANG Wenji; WANG Zhongkai; YU Haiyang; QI Jie; WANG Xubo

    2015-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a kind of RNA binding proteins that plays important roles in many physiological processes. The CIRP has been widely studied in mammals and amphibians since it was first cloned from mammals. On the contrary, there are little reports in teleosts. In this study, the PoCIRP gene of the Japanese flounder was cloned and sequenced. The genomic sequence consists of seven exons and six introns. The putative PoCIRP protein of flounder was 198 amino acid residues long containing the RNA recognition motif (RRM). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the flounder PoCIRP is highly conserved with other teleost CIRPs. The 5’ flanking sequence was cloned by genome walking and many transcription factor binding sites were iden-tified. There is a CpGs region located in promoter and exon I region and the methylation state is low. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis uncovered that PoCIRP gene was widely expressed in adult tissues with the highest expression level in the ovary. The mRNA of the PoCIRP was maternally deposited and the expression level of the gene was regulated up during the gastrula and neu-rula stages. In order to gain the information how the protein interacts with mRNA, we performed the modeling of the 3D structure of the flounder PoCIRP. The results showed a cleft existing the surface of the molecular. Taken together, the results indicate that the CIRP is a multifunctional molecular in teleosts and the findings about the structure provide valuable information for understanding the basis of this protein’s function.

  20. Human keratinocyte caspase-14 expression is altered in human epidermal 3D models by dexamethasone and by natural products used in cosmetics.

    Kataoka, Saori; Hattori, Kenji; Date, Akira; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2013-10-01

    Caspase-14 is a cysteinyl-aspartate-specific proteinase that is specifically expressed in epidermal keratinocytes. Dysregulation of caspase-14 expression is implicated in impaired skin barrier formation. To elucidate the regulation of caspase-14 in differentiated keratinocytes, we characterized the expression of caspase-14 in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and two types of three-dimensional (3D) human epidermis culture models, EPI-200 and EPI-201, via RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses. Caspase-14 expression was absent in subconfluent NHEKs, but was present in confluent NHEKs as well as those induced to differentiate by calcium. Caspase-14 expression levels in the 3D epidermis models were almost equal to that in the Ca(2+)-treated differentiated NHEKs. Despite the presence of caspase-14 expression in these models, caspase-14 activity was found only in the mature 3D skin model, EPI-200. This was confirmed by detection of a 17 kDa cleaved fragment of caspase-14 present only in the EPI-200 model. Since glucocorticoid (GC) receptor is required for skin barrier competence, we investigated whether the GC dexamethasone (Dex) and various natural components of common skin moisturizers affect caspase-14 expression in keratinocytes. Dex decreased caspase-14 expression in undifferentiated, but not differentiated, NHEKs. Conversely, Dex increased caspase-14 expression in both 3D skin models, although it did not alter caspase protease activity. Similar to treatment with Dex, treatment of the premature 3D skin mode, EPI-201 with a Galactomyces ferment filtrate markedly increased expression of caspase-14. Further, these results suggest that the effect of Dex, or lack thereof, on caspase-14 expression is dependent on the stage of keratinocyte differentiation.

  1. Influence of Matrices on 3D-Cultured Prostate Cancer Cells' Drug Response and Expression of Drug-Action Associated Proteins.

    Edmondson, Rasheena; Adcock, Audrey F; Yang, Liju

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of matrix on the behaviors of 3D-cultured cells of two prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and DU145. Two biologically-derived matrices, Matrigel and Cultrex BME, and one synthetic matrix, the Alvetex scaffold, were used to culture the cells. The cell proliferation rate, cellular response to anti-cancer drugs, and expression levels of proteins associated with drug sensitivity/resistance were examined and compared amongst the 3D-cultured cells on the three matrices and 2D-cultured cells. The cellular responses upon treatment with two common anti-cancer drugs, Docetaxel and Rapamycin, were examined. The expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β-III tubulin in DU145 cells and p53 in LNCaP cells were examined. The results showed that the proliferation rates of cells cultured on the three matrices varied, especially between the synthetic matrix and the biologically-derived matrices. The drug responses and the expressions of drug sensitivity-associated proteins differed between cells on various matrices as well. Among the 3D cultures on the three matrices, increased expression of β-III tubulin in DU145 cells was correlated with increased resistance to Docetaxel, and decreased expression of EGFR in DU145 cells was correlated with increased sensitivity to Rapamycin. Increased expression of a p53 dimer in 3D-cultured LNCaP cells was correlated with increased resistance to Docetaxel. Collectively, the results showed that the matrix of 3D cell culture models strongly influences cellular behaviors, which highlights the imperative need to achieve standardization of 3D cell culture technology in order to be used in drug screening and cell biology studies.

  2. The flow of gene expression.

    Misteli, Tom

    2004-03-01

    Gene expression is a highly interconnected multistep process. A recent meeting in Iguazu Falls, Argentina, highlighted the need to uncover both the molecular details of each single step as well as the mechanisms of coordination among processes in order to fully understand the expression of genes.

  3. Three-dimensional (3D) printing of mouse primary hepatocytes to generate 3D hepatic structure

    Kim, Yohan; Kang, Kyojin; Jeong, Jaemin; Paik, Seung Sam; Kim, Ji Sook; Park, Su A; Kim, Wan Doo; Park, Jisun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The major problem in producing artificial livers is that primary hepatocytes cannot be cultured for many days. Recently, 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology draws attention and this technology regarded as a useful tool for current cell biology. By using the 3D bio-printing, these problems can be resolved. Methods To generate 3D bio-printed structures (25 mm × 25 mm), cells-alginate constructs were fabricated by 3D bio-printing system. Mouse primary hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of 6–8 weeks old mice by a 2-step collagenase method. Samples of 4 × 107 hepatocytes with 80%–90% viability were printed with 3% alginate solution, and cultured with well-defined culture medium for primary hepatocytes. To confirm functional ability of hepatocytes cultured on 3D alginate scaffold, we conducted quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence with hepatic marker genes. Results Isolated primary hepatocytes were printed with alginate. The 3D printed hepatocytes remained alive for 14 days. Gene expression levels of Albumin, HNF-4α and Foxa3 were gradually increased in the 3D structures. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the primary hepatocytes produced hepatic-specific proteins over the same period of time. Conclusion Our research indicates that 3D bio-printing technique can be used for long-term culture of primary hepatocytes. It can therefore be used for drug screening and as a potential method of producing artificial livers. PMID:28203553

  4. Ascidian gene-expression profiles

    Jeffery, William R.

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of gene-expression profiling, a large number of genes can now be investigated simultaneously during critical stages of development. This approach will be particularly informative in studies of ascidians, basal chordates whose genomes and embryology are uniquely suited for mapping developmental gene networks.

  5. 3D seismic expression of fluid migration and mud remobilization on the Gjallar Ridge, offshore mid-Norway

    Hansen, J.P.V.; Cartwright, J.A.; Huuse, M.;

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) seismic analysis of sediment remobilization and fluid migration in a 2000-km2 area above the Gjallar Ridge located in the Vøring Basin, offshore Norway. Three distinct types of mounded structures have been identified as resulting from focused fluid/gas...... on the Norwegian Margin and associated with igneous sill intrusion during North Atlantic breakup. This study highlights the utility of 3D seismic data for mapping of fluid and sediment mobilization through time over large basinal areas.......This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) seismic analysis of sediment remobilization and fluid migration in a 2000-km2 area above the Gjallar Ridge located in the Vøring Basin, offshore Norway. Three distinct types of mounded structures have been identified as resulting from focused fluid...

  6. Learning weighted sparse representation of encoded facial normal information for expression-robust 3D face recognition

    Li, Huibin

    2011-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for 3D face recognition by learning weighted sparse representation of encoded facial normal information. To comprehensively describe 3D facial surface, three components, in X, Y, and Z-plane respectively, of normal vector are encoded locally to their corresponding normal pattern histograms. They are finally fed to a sparse representation classifier enhanced by learning based spatial weights. Experimental results achieved on the FRGC v2.0 database prove that the proposed encoded normal information is much more discriminative than original normal information. Moreover, the patch based weights learned using the FRGC v1.0 and Bosphorus datasets also demonstrate the importance of each facial physical component for 3D face recognition. © 2011 IEEE.

  7. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation.

    Sunita Sharma

    Full Text Available Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC. This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2 in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone{poly(LLA-co-CL}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2 and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo.

  8. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression

    Aakalu, Vinay Kumar; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Bahroos, Neil; Shah, Dhara; Ali, Marwan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Background The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development. Methods We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium. Results The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described. Conclusions Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas. PMID:28081151

  9. Research Progress of 3 D Facial Expression Recognition Technology%三维面部表情识别技术的研究进展

    魏永超; 庄夏; 傅强; 杜冬

    2015-01-01

    三维采集设备的快速发展,极大推动了三维数据技术的研究。其中,以三维人脸数据为载体的三维面部表情识别研究成果不断涌现。三维面部表情识别可以极大克服二维识别中的姿态和光照变化等方面问题。对三维表情识别技术进行了系统概括,尤其针对三维表情的关键技术,即对表情特征提取、表情编码分类及表情数据库进行了总结分析,并提出了三维表情识别的研究建议。三维面部表情识别技术在识别率上基本满足要求,但实时性上需要进一步优化。相关内容对该领域的研究具有指导意义。%The rapid development of three-dimensional(3D) acquisition devices has greatly promoted the researches based on dimensional data and the achievements in 3 D facial expression recognition research is constantly emerging. 3D facial recognition can greatly overcome the gesture and illumination changes and other issues of two-dimensional(2D) recognition. This paper summarizes 3D facial expression recognition technologies with emphasis on analysis of the key technologies of 3D expression,including expression fea-ture extraction,coding and database. It also gives some research suggestions about 3D facial expression rec-ognition. 3D facial expression recognition technology can basically meet the requirements in recognition rate,but its real-time performance needs to be further optimized. The research in this paper has reference value for researchers in the field.

  10. Shuffling Yeast Gene Expression Data

    Bilke, S

    2000-01-01

    A new method to sort gene expression patterns into functional groups is presented. The method is based on a sorting algorithm using a non-local similarity score, which takes all other patterns in the dataset into account. The method is therefore very robust with respect to noise. Using the expression data for yeast, we extract information about functional groups. Without prior knowledge of parameters the cell cycle regulated genes in yeast can be identified. Furthermore a second, independent cell clock is identified. The capability of the algorithm to extract information about signal flow in the regulatory network underlying the expression patterns is demonstrated.

  11. Simultaneous tracking of fly movement and gene expression using GFP

    Tavaré Simon

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP is used extensively as a reporter for transgene expression in Drosophila and other organisms. However, GFP has not generally been used as a reporter for circadian patterns of gene expression, and it has not previously been possible to correlate patterns of reporter expression with 3D movement and behavior of transgenic animals. Results We present a video tracking system that allows tissue-specific GFP expression to be quantified and correlated with 3D animal movement in real time. eyeless/Pax6 reporter expression had a 12 hr period that correlated with fly activity levels. hsp70 and hsp22 gene reporters were induced during fly aging in circadian patterns (24 hr and 18 hr periods, respectively, and spiked in the hours preceding and overlapping the death of the animal. The phase of hsp gene reporter expression relative to fly activity levels was different for each fly, and remained the same throughout the life span. Conclusion These experiments demonstrate that GFP can readily be used to assay longitudinally fly movement and tissue-specific patterns of gene expression. The hsp22-GFP and hsp70-GFP expression patterns were found to reflect accurately the endogenous gene expression patterns, including induction during aging and circadian periodicity. The combination of these new tracking methods with the hsp-GFP reporters revealed additional information, including a spike in hsp22 and hsp70 reporter expression preceding death, and an intriguing fly-to-fly variability in the phase of hsp70 and hsp22 reporter expression patterns. These methods allow specific temporal patterns of gene expression to be correlated with temporal patterns of animal activity, behavior and mortality.

  12. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each p...... with a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity. The genes and ESTs presented in this study encode new potential tumor markers as well as potential novel therapeutic targets for prevention or therapy of CRC.......Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  13. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate interstitial flow mechanotransduction regulating MMP-13 expression and cell motility via FAK-ERK in 3D collagen.

    Zhong-Dong Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interstitial flow directly affects cells that reside in tissues and regulates tissue physiology and pathology by modulating important cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and migration. However, the structures that cells utilize to sense interstitial flow in a 3-dimensional (3D environment have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have shown that interstitial flow upregulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts via activation of an ERK1/2-c-Jun pathway, which in turn promotes cell migration in collagen. Herein, we focused on uncovering the flow-induced mechanotransduction mechanism in 3D. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cleavage of rat vascular SMC surface glycocalyx heparan sulfate (HS chains from proteoglycan (PG core proteins by heparinase or disruption of HS biosynthesis by silencing N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 1 (NDST1 suppressed interstitial flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, interstitial collagenase (MMP-13 expression, and SMC motility in 3D collagen. Inhibition or knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK also attenuated or blocked flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility. Interstitial flow induced FAK phosphorylation at Tyr925, and this activation was blocked when heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs were disrupted. These data suggest that HSPGs mediate interstitial flow-induced mechanotransduction through FAK-ERK. In addition, we show that integrins are crucial for mechanotransduction through HSPGs as they mediate cell spreading and maintain cytoskeletal rigidity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose a conceptual mechanotransduction model wherein cell surface glycocalyx HSPGs, in the presence of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions and cytoskeleton organization, sense interstitial flow and activate the FAK-ERK signaling axis, leading to upregulation of MMP expression and cell motility in 3D

  14. 3D Face Apperance Model

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Astrom, K

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations......We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations...

  15. 3D Face Appearance Model

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Åström, Kalle

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}......We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}...

  16. 3D Animation Essentials

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  17. 3D video

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  18. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    Furusawa, C; Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2002-01-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1, i.e., they obey Zipf's law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intra-cellular reaction network, we found that Zipf's law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  19. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf’s law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf’s law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  20. Correction of gene expression data

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin;

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies...... an analytical approach to examine the suitability of correction methods by considering the inter-treatment bias as well as the inter-replicate variance, which allows use of the best correction method with minimum residual bias. Analyses of RNA sequencing and microarray data showed that the efficiencies...

  1. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. Not...

  2. Expression-robust 3D face recognition via weighted sparse representation of multi-scale and multi-component local normal patterns

    Li, Huibin

    2014-06-01

    In the theory of differential geometry, surface normal, as a first order surface differential quantity, determines the orientation of a surface at each point and contains informative local surface shape information. To fully exploit this kind of information for 3D face recognition (FR), this paper proposes a novel highly discriminative facial shape descriptor, namely multi-scale and multi-component local normal patterns (MSMC-LNP). Given a normalized facial range image, three components of normal vectors are first estimated, leading to three normal component images. Then, each normal component image is encoded locally to local normal patterns (LNP) on different scales. To utilize spatial information of facial shape, each normal component image is divided into several patches, and their LNP histograms are computed and concatenated according to the facial configuration. Finally, each original facial surface is represented by a set of LNP histograms including both global and local cues. Moreover, to make the proposed solution robust to the variations of facial expressions, we propose to learn the weight of each local patch on a given encoding scale and normal component image. Based on the learned weights and the weighted LNP histograms, we formulate a weighted sparse representation-based classifier (W-SRC). In contrast to the overwhelming majority of 3D FR approaches which were only benchmarked on the FRGC v2.0 database, we carried out extensive experiments on the FRGC v2.0, Bosphorus, BU-3DFE and 3D-TEC databases, thus including 3D face data captured in different scenarios through various sensors and depicting in particular different challenges with respect to facial expressions. The experimental results show that the proposed approach consistently achieves competitive rank-one recognition rates on these databases despite their heterogeneous nature, and thereby demonstrates its effectiveness and its generalizability. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Desarrollo práctico del proceso de captura y tratamiento digital en 3D de imágenes para ser utilizadas en impresión 3D y aplicaciones de animación y realidad aumentada

    Soler Abelló, Joan

    2014-01-01

    El desarrollo práctico que se quiere elaborar tiene como objetivo describir paso a paso el proceso de captura o adquisición de datos de formas reales con cámaras capaces de obtener información 3D. Una vez realizada la captura, se deberá proceder a su tratamiento digital en 3D para posteriormente ser utilizadas en aplicaciones de realidad aumentada, animación e impresión 3D. The practical development that it is wanted to develop is to describe step by step the process for data capture or ac...

  4. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  5. Main: TATCCAYMOTIFOSRAMY3D [PLACE

    Full Text Available TATCCAYMOTIFOSRAMY3D S000256 01-August-2006 (last modified) kehi TATCCAY motif foun...d in rice (O.s.) RAmy3D alpha-amylase gene promoter; Y=T/C; a GATA motif as its antisense sequence; TATCCAY ...motif and G motif (see S000130) are responsible for sugar repression (Toyofuku et al. 1998); GATA; amylase; sugar; repression; rice (Oryza sativa) TATCCAY ...

  6. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  7. The Researches and Progress of 3D Facial Expression Recognition%三维人脸表情识别研究与进展

    严政; 潘志庚

    2016-01-01

    随着人机交互与情感计算的快速发展,人脸表情识别已经成为研究热点。二维人脸表情图像对于姿态变化与光照变化不具备鲁棒性,为了解决这些问题,研究者们使用三维人脸表情数据进行表情分析研究。本文在前人工作的基础上,对三维人脸表情识别中的对齐与跟踪、表情数据库、特征提取等方面进行综述。指出人脸表情识别的热点与趋势以及存在的局限,并对未来发展进行了展望。%With the fast development of human‐computer interaction ,the recognition of facial expression has already become the research focus .2D facial expression images do not have the robustness of posture change and illumination variation .In order to solve these problems ,researchers use 3D facial expression data to analyze expression .Basing on the prophase work ,this survey summarizes the registration and tracing ,expression data and feature extraction in 3D facial expression recognition .The focus ,trend and limitation of facial expression recognition are put forward ,and the future development is discussed .

  8. Classification with binary gene expressions

    Tuna, Salih; Niranjan, Mahesan

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression measurements are reported, used and archived usually to high numerical precision. However, properties of mRNA molecules, such as their low stability and availability in small copy numbers, and the fact that measurements correspond to a population of cells, rather than a single cell, makes high precision meaningless. Recent work shows that reducing measurement precision leads to very little loss of information, right down to binary levels. In this paper we show how p...

  9. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  10. (1) The Relationship of Protein Expression and Cell Division, (2) 3D Imaging of Cells Using Digital Holography, and (3) General Chemistry Enrollment at University of Michigan

    Matz, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 1: The role of cell division in protein expression is important to understand in order to guide the development of better nonviral gene delivery materials that can transport DNA to the nucleus with high efficiency for a variety of cell types, particularly when nondividing cells are targets of gene therapy. We evaluated the relationship…

  11. Feasibility of Bioprinting with a Modified Desktop 3D Printer.

    Goldstein, Todd A; Epstein, Casey J; Schwartz, John; Krush, Alex; Lagalante, Dan J; Mercadante, Kevin P; Zeltsman, David; Smith, Lee P; Grande, Daniel A

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown the capabilities of three-dimensional (3D) printing for use in the medical industry. At the time of this publication, basic home desktop 3D printer kits can cost as little as $300, whereas medical-specific 3D bioprinters can cost more than $300,000. The purpose of this study is to show how a commercially available desktop 3D printer could be modified to bioprint an engineered poly-l-lactic acid scaffold containing viable chondrocytes in a bioink. Our bioprinter was used to create a living 3D functional tissue-engineered cartilage scaffold. In this article, we detail the design, production, and calibration of this bioprinter. In addition, the bioprinted cells were tested for viability, proliferation, biochemistry, and gene expression; these tests showed that the cells survived the printing process, were able to continue dividing, and produce the extracellular matrix expected of chondrocytes.

  12. Antisense expression increases gene expression variability and locus interdependency

    Xu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wu; Gagneur, Julien; Clauder-Münster, Sandra; Smolik, Miłosz; Huber, Wolfgang; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide transcription profiling has revealed extensive expression of non-coding RNAs antisense to genes, yet their functions, if any, remain to be understood. In this study, we perform a systematic analysis of sense–antisense expression in response to genetic and environmental changes in yeast. We find that antisense expression is associated with genes of larger expression variability. This is characterized by more ‘switching off' at low levels of expression for genes with antisense compa...

  13. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata;

    2015-01-01

    expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  14. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  15. IZDELAVA TISKALNIKA 3D

    Brdnik, Lovro

    2015-01-01

    Diplomsko delo analizira trenutno stanje 3D tiskalnikov na trgu. Prikazan je razvoj in principi delovanja 3D tiskalnikov. Predstavljeni so tipi 3D tiskalnikov, njihove prednosti in slabosti. Podrobneje je predstavljena zgradba in delovanje koračnih motorjev. Opravljene so meritve koračnih motorjev. Opisana je programska oprema za rokovanje s 3D tiskalniki in komponente, ki jih potrebujemo za izdelavo. Diploma se oklepa vprašanja, ali je izdelava 3D tiskalnika bolj ekonomična kot pa naložba v ...

  16. Visual exploration of three-dimensional gene expression using physical views and linked abstract views.

    Weber, Gunther H; Rübel, Oliver; Huang, Min-Yu; DePace, Angela H; Fowlkes, Charless C; Keränen, Soile V E; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Hagen, Hans; Knowles, David W; Malik, Jitendra; Biggin, Mark D; Hamann, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    During animal development, complex patterns of gene expression provide positional information within the embryo. To better understand the underlying gene regulatory networks, the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) has developed methods that support quantitative computational analysis of three-dimensional (3D) gene expression in early Drosophila embryos at cellular resolution. We introduce PointCloudXplore (PCX), an interactive visualization tool that supports visual exploration of relationships between different genes' expression using a combination of established visualization techniques. Two aspects of gene expression are of particular interest: 1) gene expression patterns defined by the spatial locations of cells expressing a gene and 2) relationships between the expression levels of multiple genes. PCX provides users with two corresponding classes of data views: 1) Physical Views based on the spatial relationships of cells in the embryo and 2) Abstract Views that discard spatial information and plot expression levels of multiple genes with respect to each other. Cell Selectors highlight data associated with subsets of embryo cells within a View. Using linking, these selected cells can be viewed in multiple representations. We describe PCX as a 3D gene expression visualization tool and provide examples of how it has been used by BDTNP biologists to generate new hypotheses.

  17. 3D and Education

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  18. Correlating Expression Data with Gene Function Using Gene Ontology

    LIU,Qi; DENG,Yong; WANG,Chuan; SHI,Tie-Liu; LI,Yi-Xue

    2006-01-01

    Clustering is perhaps one of the most widely used tools for microarray data analysis. Proposed roles for genes of unknown function are inferred from clusters of genes similarity expressed across many biological conditions.However, whether function annotation by similarity metrics is reliable or not and to what extent the similarity in gene expression patterns is useful for annotation of gene functions, has not been evaluated. This paper made a comprehensive research on the correlation between the similarity of expression data and of gene functions using Gene Ontology. It has been found that although the similarity in expression patterns and the similarity in gene functions are significantly dependent on each other, this association is rather weak. In addition, among the three categories of Gene Ontology, the similarity of expression data is more useful for cellular component annotation than for biological process and molecular function. The results presented are interesting for the gene functions prediction research area.

  19. An interactive tool for visualization of relationships between gene expression profiles

    Jones Steven JM

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Application of phenetic methods to gene expression analysis proved to be a successful approach. Visualizing the results in a 3-dimentional space may further enhance these techniques. Results We designed and built TreeBuilder3D, an interactive viewer for visualizing the hierarchical relationships between expression profiles such as SAGE libraries or microarrays. The program allows loading expression data as plain text files and visualizing the relative differences of the analyzed datasets in 3-dimensional space using various distance metrics. Conclusion TreeBuilder3D provides a simple interface and has a small size. Written in Java, TreeBuilder3D is a platform-independent, open source application, which may be useful in analysis of large-scale gene expression data.

  20. TEHNOLOGIJE 3D TISKALNIKOV

    Kolar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Diplomsko delo predstavi razvoj tiskanja skozi čas. Podrobneje so opisani 3D tiskalniki, ki uporabljajo različne tehnologije 3D tiskanja. Predstavljene so različne tehnologije 3D tiskanja, njihova uporaba in narejeni prototipi oz. končni izdelki. Diplomsko delo opiše celoten postopek, od zamisli, priprave podatkov in tiskalnika do izdelave prototipa oz. končnega izdelka.

  1. Osteomimicry of mammary adenocarcinoma cells in vitro; increased expression of bone matrix proteins and proliferation within a 3D collagen environment.

    Rachel F Cox

    Full Text Available Bone is the most common site of metastasis for breast cancer, however the reasons for this remain unclear. We hypothesise that under certain conditions mammary cells possess osteomimetic capabilities that may allow them to adapt to, and flourish within, the bone microenvironment. Mammary cells are known to calcify within breast tissue and we have recently reported a novel in vitro model of mammary mineralization using murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1 cells. In this study, the osteomimetic properties of the mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and the conditions required to induce mineralization were characterized extensively. It was found that exogenous organic phosphate and inorganic phosphate induce mineralization in a dose dependent manner in 4T1 cells. Ascorbic acid and dexamethasone alone have no effect. 4T1 cells also show enhanced mineralization in response to bone morphogenetic protein 2 in the presence of phosphate supplemented media. The expression of several bone matrix proteins were monitored throughout the process of mineralization and increased expression of collagen type 1 and bone sialoprotein were detected, as determined by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, we have shown for the first time that 3D collagen glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, bioengineered to represent the bone microenvironment, are capable of supporting the growth and mineralization of 4T1 adenocarcinoma cells. These 3D scaffolds represent a novel model system for the study of mammary mineralization and bone metastasis. This work demonstrates that mammary cells are capable of osteomimicry, which may ultimately contribute to their ability to preferentially metastasize to, survive within and colonize the bone microenvironment.

  2. MPML3D: Scripting Agents for the 3D Internet.

    Prendinger, Helmut; Ullrich, Sebastian; Nakasone, Arturo; Ishizuka, Mitsuru

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, it describes a scripting language for specifying communicative behavior and interaction of computer-controlled agents ("bots") in the popular three-dimensional (3D) multiuser online world of "Second Life" and the emerging "OpenSimulator" project. While tools for designing avatars and in-world objects in Second Life exist, technology for nonprogrammer content creators of scenarios involving scripted agents is currently missing. Therefore, we have implemented new client software that controls bots based on the Multimodal Presentation Markup Language 3D (MPML3D), a highly expressive XML-based scripting language for controlling the verbal and nonverbal behavior of interacting animated agents. Second, the paper compares Second Life and OpenSimulator platforms and discusses the merits and limitations of each from the perspective of agent control. Here, we also conducted a small study that compares the network performance of both platforms.

  3. 3D virtuel udstilling

    Tournay, Bruno; Rüdiger, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s.......3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s....

  4. The organic osmolyte betaine induces keratin 2 expression in rat epidermal keratinocytes - A genome-wide study in UVB irradiated organotypic 3D cultures.

    Rauhala, Leena; Hämäläinen, Lasse; Dunlop, Thomas W; Pehkonen, Petri; Bart, Geneviève; Kokkonen, Maarit; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-12-25

    The moisturizing and potentially protective properties of the organic osmolyte betaine (trimethylglycine) have made it an attractive component for skin care products. Its wide use despite the lack of comprehensive studies addressing its specific effects in skin led us to characterize the molecular targets of betaine in keratinocytes and to explore, whether it modifies the effects of acute UVB exposure. Genome-wide expression analysis was performed on organotypic cultures of rat epidermal keratinocytes, treated either with betaine (10mM), UVB (30 mJ/cm(2)) or their combination. Results were verified with qRT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cell proliferation and differentiation were analyzed. Among the 89 genes influenced by betaine, the differentiation marker keratin 2 showed the highest upregulation, which was also confirmed at protein level. Expression of Egr1, a transcription factor, and Purkinje cell protein 4, a regulator of Ca(2+)/calmodulin metabolism, also increased, while downregulated genes included several ion-channel components, such as Fxyd2. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that genes modulated by betaine are involved in DNA replication, might counteract UV-induced processes, and include many targets of transcription factors associated with cell proliferation and differentiation. Our results indicate that betaine controls unique gene expression pathways in keratinocytes, including some involved in differentiation.

  5. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Bachkirova, Elena (Davis, CA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA)

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  6. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  7. Blender 3D cookbook

    Valenza, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed at the professionals that already have good 3D CGI experience with commercial packages and have now decided to try the open source Blender and want to experiment with something more complex than the average tutorials on the web. However, it's also aimed at the intermediate Blender users who simply want to go some steps further.It's taken for granted that you already know how to move inside the Blender interface, that you already have 3D modeling knowledge, and also that of basic 3D modeling and rendering concepts, for example, edge-loops, n-gons, or samples. In any case, it'

  8. cis sequence effects on gene expression

    Jacobs Kevin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and transcriptional variability within and between individuals are typically studied independently. The joint analysis of sequence and gene expression variation (genetical genomics provides insight into the role of linked sequence variation in the regulation of gene expression. We investigated the role of sequence variation in cis on gene expression (cis sequence effects in a group of genes commonly studied in cancer research in lymphoblastoid cell lines. We estimated the proportion of genes exhibiting cis sequence effects and the proportion of gene expression variation explained by cis sequence effects using three different analytical approaches, and compared our results to the literature. Results We generated gene expression profiling data at N = 697 candidate genes from N = 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines for this study and used available candidate gene resequencing data at N = 552 candidate genes to identify N = 30 candidate genes with sufficient variance in both datasets for the investigation of cis sequence effects. We used two additive models and the haplotype phylogeny scanning approach of Templeton (Tree Scanning to evaluate association between individual SNPs, all SNPs at a gene, and diplotypes, with log-transformed gene expression. SNPs and diplotypes at eight candidate genes exhibited statistically significant (p cis sequence effects in our study, respectively. Conclusion Based on analysis of our results and the extant literature, one in four genes exhibits significant cis sequence effects, and for these genes, about 30% of gene expression variation is accounted for by cis sequence variation. Despite diverse experimental approaches, the presence or absence of significant cis sequence effects is largely supported by previously published studies.

  9. 3D Digital Modelling

    Hundebøl, Jesper

    wave of new building information modelling tools demands further investigation, not least because of industry representatives' somewhat coarse parlance: Now the word is spreading -3D digital modelling is nothing less than a revolution, a shift of paradigm, a new alphabet... Research qeustions. Based...... on empirical probes (interviews, observations, written inscriptions) within the Danish construction industry this paper explores the organizational and managerial dynamics of 3D Digital Modelling. The paper intends to - Illustrate how the network of (non-)human actors engaged in the promotion (and arrest) of 3......D Modelling (in Denmark) stabilizes - Examine how 3D Modelling manifests itself in the early design phases of a construction project with a view to discuss the effects hereof for i.a. the management of the building process. Structure. The paper introduces a few, basic methodological concepts...

  10. Professional Papervision3D

    Lively, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Professional Papervision3D describes how Papervision3D works and how real world applications are built, with a clear look at essential topics such as building websites and games, creating virtual tours, and Adobe's Flash 10. Readers learn important techniques through hands-on applications, and build on those skills as the book progresses. The companion website contains all code examples, video step-by-step explanations, and a collada repository.

  11. AE3D

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  12. Synthetic promoter libraries- tuning of gene expression

    Hammer, Karin; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2006-01-01

    The study of gene function often requires changing the expression of a gene and evaluating the consequences. In principle, the expression of any given gene can be modulated in a quasi-continuum of discrete expression levels but the traditional approaches are usually limited to two extremes: gene...... knockout and strong overexpression. However, applications such as metabolic optimization and control analysis necessitate a continuous set of expression levels with only slight increments in strength to cover a specific window around the wildtype expression level of the studied gene; this requirement can...... be met by using promoter libraries. This approach generally consists of inserting a library of promoters in front of the gene to be studied, whereby the individual promoters might deviate either in their spacer sequences or bear slight deviations from the consensus sequence of a vegetative promoter. Here...

  13. An interactive tool for visualization of relationships between gene expression profiles

    Jones Steven JM; Ruzanov Peter

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Application of phenetic methods to gene expression analysis proved to be a successful approach. Visualizing the results in a 3-dimentional space may further enhance these techniques. Results We designed and built TreeBuilder3D, an interactive viewer for visualizing the hierarchical relationships between expression profiles such as SAGE libraries or microarrays. The program allows loading expression data as plain text files and visualizing the relative differences of the an...

  14. Expression of adhesion molecules and collagen on rat chondrocyte seeded into alginate and hyaluronate based 3D biosystems. Influence of mechanical stresses.

    Gigant-Huselstein, C; Hubert, P; Dumas, D; Dellacherie, E; Netter, P; Payan, E; Stoltz, J F

    2004-01-01

    Chondrocytes use mechanical signals, via interactions with their environment, to synthesize an extracellular matrix capable to withstanding high loads. Most chondrocyte-matrix interactions are mediated via transmembrane receptors such as integrins or non-integrins receptors (i.e. annexin V and CD44). The aim of this study was to analyze, by flow cytometry, the adhesion molecules (alpha5/beta1 integrins and CD44) on rat chondrocytes seeded into 3D biosystem made of alginate and hyaluronate. These biosystems were submitted to mechanical stress by knocking the biosystems between them for 48 hours. The expression of type I and type II collagen was also evaluated. The results of the current study showed that mechanical stress induced an increase of type II collagen production and weak variations of alpha5/beta1 receptors expression no matter what biosystems. Moreover, our results indicated that hyaluronan receptor CD44 expression depends on extracellular matrix modifications. Thus, these receptors were activated by signals resulted from cell environment variations (HA addition and modifications owing to mechanical stress). It suggested that this kind of receptor play a crucial role in extracellular matrix homeostasis. Finally, on day 24, no dedifferentiation of chondrocytes was noted either in biosystems or under mechanical stress. For all biosystems, the neosynthesized matrix contained an important level of collagen, which was type II, whatever biosystems. In conclusion, it appeared that the cells, under mechanical stress, maintained their phenotype. In addition, it seems that, on rat chondrocytes, alpha5/beta1 integrins did not act as the main mechanoreceptor (as described for human chondrocytes). In return, hyaluronan receptor CD44 seems to be in relation with matrix composition.

  15. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... beta-glucuronidase, resulting in an operon structure in which both genes are transcribed from a common promoter. We show that there is a linear correlation between the expressions of the two genes, which facilitates screening for mutants with suitable enzyme activities. In a second example, we show......, overexpression was achieved by introducing an additional gene copy into a phage attachment site on the chromosome. This resulted in a series of strains with phosphofructokinase activities from 1.4 to 11 times the wild-type activity level. In this example, the pfk gene was cloned upstream of a gusA gene encoding...

  16. From 3D view to 3D print

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  17. Aspects of defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study supersymmetric co-dimension 2 and 4 defects in the compactification of the 6d (2, 0) theory of type A N -1 on a 3-manifold M . The so-called 3d-3d correspondence is a relation between complexified Chern-Simons theory (with gauge group SL(N,C) ) on M and a 3d N=2 theory T N [ M ]. We study this correspondence in the presence of supersymmetric defects, which are knots/links inside the 3-manifold. Our study employs a number of different methods: state-integral models for complex Chern-Simons theory, cluster algebra techniques, domain wall theory T [SU( N )], 5d N=2 SYM, and also supergravity analysis through holography. These methods are complementary and we find agreement between them. In some cases the results lead to highly non-trivial predictions on the partition function. Our discussion includes a general expression for the cluster partition function, which can be used to compute in the presence of maximal and certain class of non-maximal punctures when N > 2. We also highlight the non-Abelian description of the 3d N=2 T N [ M ] theory with defect included, when such a description is available. This paper is a companion to our shorter paper [1], which summarizes our main results.

  18. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSESB.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt11Department of Reproductiv...

  19. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  20. Microanalysis of gene expression in cultured cells

    E. van der Veer (Eveliene)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis two aspects of gene expression in cultured cells have been studied: the heterogeneity in gene expression in relation with the development and application of microchemical techniques for the prenatal diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism and the possibility of inducing g

  1. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  2. Analysis of gene expression profile of aspermia using cDNA microarray

    杨波; 高晓康; 王禾; 刘贺亮; 陈宝琦; 秦荣良; 康福霞; 邵国兴; 邵晨

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To identify the differential gene expression profiles between the normal and aspermia human testes utilizing cDNA microarray. Methods: cDNA probes were prepared by labeling mRNA of aspermia testes tissues with Cy5-dUTP and mRNA of normal testes tissues with Cy3-dUTP respectively through reverse transcription. The mixed cDNA probes were then hybridized with 4096 cDNA arrays (4096 unique human cDNA sequences), and the fluorescent signals were scanned by ScanArray 3000 scanner (General Scanning, Inc.). The values of Cy5-dUTP and Cy3-dUTP on each spot were analyzed and calculated by ImaGene 3.0 software (BioDiscovery, Inc.). Differentially expressed genes were screened according to the criterion that the absolute value of natural logarithm of the ratio of Cy5-dUTP to Cy3-dUTP was greater-than 2.0 or less-than 0.5. A randomly chosen gene RAP1A was studied by in situ hybridization to evaluate the accuracy of the results. Results: 623 differential expressed genes related to aspermia were found. There were 303 up-expressed genes and 320 down-expressed genes. A distinct up-expressed gene RAP1A was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Conclusions: Screening the differential gene expression profiles between the normal and aspermia human testis by cDNA microarray can be used in the study of aspermia-related genes and the further research due to its properties, RAP1A may play some roles in the development and progression of aspermia.

  3. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

    Piepho Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis (GSA has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information with

  4. FARO server: Meta-analysis of gene expression by matching gene expression signatures to a compendium of public gene expression data

    Manijak, Mieszko P.; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although, systematic analysis of gene annotation is a powerful tool for interpreting gene expression data, it sometimes is blurred by incomplete gene annotation, missing expression response of key genes and secondary gene expression responses. These shortcomings may be partially...... circumvented by instead matching gene expression signatures to signatures of other experiments. FINDINGS: To facilitate this we present the Functional Association Response by Overlap (FARO) server, that match input signatures to a compendium of 242 gene expression signatures, extracted from more than 1700...

  5. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  6. 3D Spectroscopic Instrumentation

    Bershady, Matthew A

    2009-01-01

    In this Chapter we review the challenges of, and opportunities for, 3D spectroscopy, and how these have lead to new and different approaches to sampling astronomical information. We describe and categorize existing instruments on 4m and 10m telescopes. Our primary focus is on grating-dispersed spectrographs. We discuss how to optimize dispersive elements, such as VPH gratings, to achieve adequate spectral resolution, high throughput, and efficient data packing to maximize spatial sampling for 3D spectroscopy. We review and compare the various coupling methods that make these spectrographs ``3D,'' including fibers, lenslets, slicers, and filtered multi-slits. We also describe Fabry-Perot and spatial-heterodyne interferometers, pointing out their advantages as field-widened systems relative to conventional, grating-dispersed spectrographs. We explore the parameter space all these instruments sample, highlighting regimes open for exploitation. Present instruments provide a foil for future development. We give an...

  7. 3D Projection Installations

    Halskov, Kim; Johansen, Stine Liv; Bach Mikkelsen, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional projection installations are particular kinds of augmented spaces in which a digital 3-D model is projected onto a physical three-dimensional object, thereby fusing the digital content and the physical object. Based on interaction design research and media studies, this article...... contributes to the understanding of the distinctive characteristics of such a new medium, and identifies three strategies for designing 3-D projection installations: establishing space; interplay between the digital and the physical; and transformation of materiality. The principal empirical case, From...... Fingerplan to Loop City, is a 3-D projection installation presenting the history and future of city planning for the Copenhagen area in Denmark. The installation was presented as part of the 12th Architecture Biennale in Venice in 2010....

  8. Reconhecimento de faces 3D com Kinect

    Cardia Neto, João Baptista [UNESP

    2014-01-01

    For person identification, facil recognition has several advantages over other biometric traits due mostly to its high universelly, collectability, and acceptability. When dealing with 2D face images several problems arise related to pose, illumination, and facial expressions. To increase the performance of facial recognition, 3D mehtods have been proposed and developedm since working with 3D objects allow us to handle better the aforementioned problems. With 3D object, it is possible to rota...

  9. Interaktiv 3D design

    Villaume, René Domine; Ørstrup, Finn Rude

    2002-01-01

    Projektet undersøger potentialet for interaktiv 3D design via Internettet. Arkitekt Jørn Utzons projekt til Espansiva blev udviklet som et byggesystem med det mål, at kunne skabe mangfoldige planmuligheder og mangfoldige facade- og rumudformninger. Systemets bygningskomponenter er digitaliseret som...... 3D elementer og gjort tilgængelige. Via Internettet er det nu muligt at sammenstille og afprøve en uendelig  række bygningstyper som  systemet blev tænkt og udviklet til....

  10. The functional landscape of mouse gene expression

    Zhang Wen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale quantitative analysis of transcriptional co-expression has been used to dissect regulatory networks and to predict the functions of new genes discovered by genome sequencing in model organisms such as yeast. Although the idea that tissue-specific expression is indicative of gene function in mammals is widely accepted, it has not been objectively tested nor compared with the related but distinct strategy of correlating gene co-expression as a means to predict gene function. Results We generated microarray expression data for nearly 40,000 known and predicted mRNAs in 55 mouse tissues, using custom-built oligonucleotide arrays. We show that quantitative transcriptional co-expression is a powerful predictor of gene function. Hundreds of functional categories, as defined by Gene Ontology 'Biological Processes', are associated with characteristic expression patterns across all tissues, including categories that bear no overt relationship to the tissue of origin. In contrast, simple tissue-specific restriction of expression is a poor predictor of which genes are in which functional categories. As an example, the highly conserved mouse gene PWP1 is widely expressed across different tissues but is co-expressed with many RNA-processing genes; we show that the uncharacterized yeast homolog of PWP1 is required for rRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We conclude that 'functional genomics' strategies based on quantitative transcriptional co-expression will be as fruitful in mammals as they have been in simpler organisms, and that transcriptional control of mammalian physiology is more modular than is generally appreciated. Our data and analyses provide a public resource for mammalian functional genomics.

  11. Tangible 3D Modelling

    Hejlesen, Aske K.; Ovesen, Nis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental approach to teaching 3D modelling techniques in an Industrial Design programme. The approach includes the use of tangible free form models as tools for improving the overall learning. The paper is based on lecturer and student experiences obtained through...

  12. Shaping 3-D boxes

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data...

  13. 3D Wire 2015

    Jordi, Moréton; F, Escribano; J. L., Farias

    This document is a general report on the implementation of gamification in 3D Wire 2015 event. As the second gamification experience in this event, we have delved deeply in the previous objectives (attracting public areas less frequented exhibition in previous years and enhance networking) and ha......, improves socialization and networking, improves media impact, improves fun factor and improves encouragement of the production team....

  14. Culture phases, cytotoxicity and protein expressions of agarose hydrogel induced Sp2/0, A549, MCF-7 cell line 3D cultures.

    Ravi, Maddaly; Kaviya, S R; Paramesh, V

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in cell cultures are occurring at a rapid pace, an important direction is culturing cells in 3D conditions. We demonstrate the usefulness of agarose hydrogels in obtaining 3 dimensional aggregates of three cell lines, A549, MCF-7 and Sp2/0. The differences in culture phases, susceptibility to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity are studied. Also, the 3D aggregates of the three cell lines were reverted into 2D cultures and the protein profile differences among the 2D, 3D and revert cultures were studied. The analysis of protein profile differences using UniProt data base further augment the usefulness of agarose hydrogels for obtaining 3D cell cultures.

  15. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  16. Differential gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Marco Aurelio Krieger

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic trypomastigotes involves changes in the pattern of expressed genes, resulting in important morphological and functional differences between these developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to identify and characterize genes involved in triggering the metacyclogenesis process and in conferring to metacyclic trypomastigotes their stage specific biological properties, we have developed a method allowing the isolation of genes specifically expressed when comparing two close related cell populations (representation of differential expression or RDE. The method is based on the PCR amplification of gene sequences selected by hybridizing and subtracting the populations in such a way that after some cycles of hybridization-amplification genes specific to a given population are highly enriched. The use of this method in the analysis of differential gene expression during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis (6 hr and 24 hr of differentiation and metacyclic trypomastigotes resulted in the isolation of several clones from each time point. Northern blot analysis showed that some genes are transiently expressed (6 hr and 24 hr differentiating cells, while others are present in differentiating cells and in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Nucleotide sequencing of six clones characterized so far showed that they do not display any homology to gene sequences available in the GeneBank.

  17. Multivariate search for differentially expressed gene combinations

    Klebanov Lev

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify differentially expressed genes, it is standard practice to test a two-sample hypothesis for each gene with a proper adjustment for multiple testing. Such tests are essentially univariate and disregard the multidimensional structure of microarray data. A more general two-sample hypothesis is formulated in terms of the joint distribution of any sub-vector of expression signals. Results By building on an earlier proposed multivariate test statistic, we propose a new algorithm for identifying differentially expressed gene combinations. The algorithm includes an improved random search procedure designed to generate candidate gene combinations of a given size. Cross-validation is used to provide replication stability of the search procedure. A permutation two-sample test is used for significance testing. We design a multiple testing procedure to control the family-wise error rate (FWER when selecting significant combinations of genes that result from a successive selection procedure. A target set of genes is composed of all significant combinations selected via random search. Conclusions A new algorithm has been developed to identify differentially expressed gene combinations. The performance of the proposed search-and-testing procedure has been evaluated by computer simulations and analysis of replicated Affymetrix gene array data on age-related changes in gene expression in the inner ear of CBA mice.

  18. Gene Expression Profiling in Porcine Fetal Thymus

    Yanjiong Chen; Shengbin Li; Lin Ye; Jianing Geng; Yajun Deng; Songnian Hu

    2003-01-01

    obtain an initial overview of gene diversity and expression pattern in porcinethymus, 11,712 ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags) from 100-day-old porcine thymus(FTY) were sequenced and 7,071 cleaned ESTs were used for gene expressionanalysis. Clustered by the PHRAP program, 959 contigs and 3,074 singlets wereobtained. Blast search showed that 806 contigs and 1,669 singlets (totally 5,442ESTs) had homologues in GenBank and 1,629 ESTs were novel. According to theGene Ontology classification, 36.99% ESTs were cataloged into the gene expressiongroup, indicating that although the functional gene (18.78% in defense group) ofthymus is expressed in a certain degree, the 100-day-old porcine thymus still existsin a developmental stage. Comparative analysis showed that the gene expressionpattern of the 100-day-old porcine thymus is similar to that of the human infantthymus.

  19. GENIS: gene expression of sodium iodide symporter for noninvasive imaging of gene therapy vectors and quantification of gene expression in vivo.

    Barton, Kenneth N; Tyson, Donald; Stricker, Hans; Lew, Young S; Heisey, Gregory; Koul, Sweaty; de la Zerda, Alberto; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Hui; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Randall, Kelly Ann; Jin, Guk Kim; Fenstermacher, Joseph D; Jhiang, Sissy; Ho Kim, Jae; Freytag, Svend O; Brown, Stephen L

    2003-09-01

    With the goal of optimizing adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer, we have developed a method based on the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) that allows for noninvasive monitoring of adenoviral vectors and quantification of gene expression magnitude and volume within the prostate. A replication-competent adenovirus (Ad5-yCD/mutTK(SR39)rep-hNIS) coexpressing a therapeutic yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD)/mutant herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (mutTK(SR39)) fusion gene and the hNIS gene was developed. Ad5-yCD/mutTK(SR39)rep-hNIS and a replication-defective hNIS adenovirus (rAd-CMV-FLhNIS) were injected into contralateral lobes of the dog prostate and hNIS activity was monitored in live animals following administration of Na(99m)TcO(4) using gamma camera scintigraphy. Despite the close proximity of the urinary bladder, (99m)TcO(4)(-) uptake was readily detected in the prostate using viral dose levels (10(10) to 10(12) viral particles) that have been safely administered to humans. Due to its rapid clearance and short physical half-life (6 h), it was possible to obtain daily measurements of (99m)TcO(4)(-) uptake in vivo, allowing for dynamic monitoring of reporter gene expression within the prostate as well as biodistribution throughout the body. High-resolution autoradiography of prostate sections coupled with 3D reconstruction of gene expression demonstrated that the magnitude and volume of gene expression could be quantified with submillimeter resolution. Implementation of the GENIS (gene expression of Na/I symporter) technology in the clinic will facilitate optimization of future human gene therapy trials.

  20. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  1. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  2. Gene expression profile of sprinter's muscle.

    Yoshioka, M; Tanaka, H; Shono, N; Shindo, M; St-Amand, J

    2007-12-01

    We have characterized the global gene expression profile in left vastus lateralis muscles of sprinters and sedentary men. The gene expression profile was analyzed by using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) method. The abundantly expressed transcripts in the sprinter's muscle were mainly involved in contraction and energy metabolism, whereas six transcripts were corresponding to potentially novel transcripts. Thirty-eight transcripts were differentially expressed between the sprinter and sedentary individuals. Moreover, sprinters showed higher expressions of both uncharacterized and potentially novel transcripts. Sprinters also highly expressed seven transcripts, such as glycine-rich protein, myosin heavy polypeptide (MYH) 2, expressed sequence tag similar to (EST) fructose-bisphosphate aldolase 1 isoform A (ALDOA), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ATP synthase F0 subunit 6. On the other hand, 20 transcripts such as MYH1, tropomyosin 2 and 3, troponin C slow, C2 fast, I slow, T1 slow and T3 fast, myoglobin, creatine kinase, ALDOA, glycogen phosphorylase, cytochrome c oxidase II and III, and NADH dehydrogenase 1 and 2 showed lower expression levels in the sprinters than the sedentary controls. The current study has characterized the global gene expressions in sprinters and identified a number of transcripts that can be subjected to further mechanistic analysis.

  3. Regulation of meiotic gene expression in plants

    Adele eZhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in genomics and sequencing technologies, databases of transcriptomes representing many cellular processes have been built. Meiotic transcriptomes in plants have been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice (Oryza sativa, wheat (Triticum aestivum, petunia (Petunia hybrida, sunflower (Helianthus annuus, and maize (Zea mays. Studies in all organisms, but particularly in plants, indicate that a very large number of genes are expressed during meiosis, though relatively few of them seem to be required for the completion of meiosis. In this review, we focus on gene expression at the RNA level and analyze the meiotic transcriptome datasets and explore expression patterns of known meiotic genes to elucidate how gene expression could be regulated during meiosis. We also discuss mechanisms, such as chromatin organization and non-coding RNAs, that might be involved in the regulation of meiotic transcription patterns.

  4. Expression of polarity genes in human cancer.

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical-basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function.

  5. Unoriented 3d TFTs

    Bhardwaj, Lakshya

    2016-01-01

    This paper generalizes two facts about oriented 3d TFTs to the unoriented case. On one hand, it is known that oriented 3d TFTs having a topological boundary condition admit a state-sum construction known as the Turaev-Viro construction. This is related to the string-net construction of fermionic phases of matter. We show how Turaev-Viro construction can be generalized to unoriented 3d TFTs. On the other hand, it is known that the "fermionic" versions of oriented TFTs, known as Spin-TFTs, can be constructed in terms of "shadow" TFTs which are ordinary oriented TFTs with an anomalous Z_2 1-form symmetry. We generalize this correspondence to Pin+ TFTs by showing that they can be constructed in terms of ordinary unoriented TFTs with anomalous Z_2 1-form symmetry having a mixed anomaly with time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding Pin+ TFT does not have any anomaly for time-reversal symmetry however and hence it can be unambiguously defined on a non-orientable manifold. In case a Pin+ TFT admits a topological bou...

  6. Transcriptional gene expression profiles of HGF/SF-met signaling pathway in colorectal carcinoma

    Xue-Nong Li; Yan-Qing Ding; Guo-Bing Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the transcriptional gene expression profiles of HGF/SF-met signaling pathway in colorectal carcinoma to understand mechanisms of the signaling pathway at so gene level.METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from human colorectal carcinoma cell line LoVo treated with HGF/SF (80 ng/L)for 48 h. Fluorescent probes were prepared from RNA labeled with cy3-dUTP for the control groups and with cy5-dUTP for the HGF/SF-treated groups through reversetranscription. The probes were mixed and hybridized on the microarray at 60 ℃ for 15-20 h, then the microarray was scanned by laser scanner (GenePix 4000B). The intensity of each spot and ratios of Cy5/Cy3 were analyzed and finally the differentially expressed genes were selected by GenePix Pro 3.0 software. 6 differential expression genes (3 up-regulated genes and 3 down-regulated genes) were selected randomly and analyzed by β-actin semiquantitative RT-PCR.RESULTS: The fluorescent intensities of built-in negative control spots were less than 200, and the fluorescent intensities of positive control spots were more than 5000.Of the 4004 human genes analyzed by microarray, 129 genes (holding 3.22 % of the investigated genes) revealed differential expression in HGF/SF-treated groups compared with the control groups, of which 61 genes were up-regulated (holding 1.52 % of the investigated genes) and 68 genes were down-regulated (holding 1.70 % of the investigated genes), which supplied abundant information about target genes of HGF/SF-met signaling.CONCLUSION: HGF/SF-met signaling may up-regulate oncogenes, signal transduction genes, apoptosis-related genes, metastasis related genes, and down-regulate a number of genes. The complexity of HGF/SF-met signaling to control the gene expression is revealed as a whole by the gene chip technology.

  7. Identification of stable reference genes for gene expression analysis of three-dimensional cultivated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    Rauh, Juliane; Jacobi, Angela; Stiehler, Maik

    2015-02-01

    The principles of tissue engineering (TE) are widely used for bone regeneration concepts. Three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of autologous human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on porous scaffolds is the basic prerequisite to generate newly formed bone tissue. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a specific and sensitive analytical tool for the measurement of mRNA-levels in cells or tissues. For an accurate quantification of gene expression levels, stably expressed reference genes (RGs) are essential to obtain reliable results. Since the 3D environment can affect a cell's morphology, proliferation, and gene expression profile compared with two-dimensional (2D) cultivation, there is a need to identify robust RGs for the quantification of gene expression. So far, this issue has not been adequately investigated. The aim of this study was to identify the most stably expressed RGs for gene expression analysis of 3D-cultivated human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). For this, we analyzed the gene expression levels of n=31 RGs in 3D-cultivated human BM-MSCs from six different donors compared with conventional 2D cultivation using qRT-PCR. MSCs isolated from bone marrow aspirates were cultivated on human cancellous bone cube scaffolds for 14 days. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed by cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expression of osteogenic marker genes. Expression levels of potential reference and target genes were quantified using commercially available TaqMan(®) assays. mRNA expression stability of RGs was determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) and using the algorithms of geNorm and NormFinder. Using both algorithms, we identified TATA box binding protein (TBP), transferrin receptor (p90, CD71) (TFRC), and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) as the most stably expressed RGs in 3D-cultivated BM-MSCs. Notably, genes that are routinely used as RGs, for example, beta actin

  8. The morphologies of breast cancer cell lines in three-dimensionalassays correlate with their profiles of gene expression

    Kenny, Paraic A.; Lee, Genee Y.; Myers, Connie A.; Neve, RichardM.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Spellman, Paul T.; Lorenz, Katrin; Lee, Eva H.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, MinaJ.

    2007-01-31

    3D cell cultures are rapidly becoming the method of choice for the physiologically relevant modeling of many aspects of non-malignant and malignant cell behavior ex vivo. Nevertheless, only a limited number of distinct cell types have been evaluated in this assay to date. Here we report the first large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles and 3D cell culture phenotypes of a substantial panel of human breast cancer cell lines. Each cell line adopts a colony morphology of one of four main classes in 3D culture. These morphologies reflect, at least in part, the underlying gene expression profile and protein expression patterns of the cell lines, and distinct morphologies were also associated with tumor cell invasiveness and with cell lines originating from metastases. We further demonstrate that consistent differences in genes encoding signal transduction proteins emerge when even tumor cells are cultured in 3D microenvironments.

  9. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  10. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...

  11. Gene Expression Profiles of Inflammatory Myopathies

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous expression of 10,000 genes was measured, using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays, in muscle specimens from 45 patients with various myopathies (dystrophy, congenital myopathy, and inflammatory myopathy examined at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

  12. Inferring gene networks from discrete expression data

    Zhang, L.

    2013-07-18

    The modeling of gene networks from transcriptional expression data is an important tool in biomedical research to reveal signaling pathways and to identify treatment targets. Current gene network modeling is primarily based on the use of Gaussian graphical models applied to continuous data, which give a closedformmarginal likelihood. In this paper,we extend network modeling to discrete data, specifically data from serial analysis of gene expression, and RNA-sequencing experiments, both of which generate counts of mRNAtranscripts in cell samples.We propose a generalized linear model to fit the discrete gene expression data and assume that the log ratios of the mean expression levels follow a Gaussian distribution.We restrict the gene network structures to decomposable graphs and derive the graphs by selecting the covariance matrix of the Gaussian distribution with the hyper-inverse Wishart priors. Furthermore, we incorporate prior network models based on gene ontology information, which avails existing biological information on the genes of interest. We conduct simulation studies to examine the performance of our discrete graphical model and apply the method to two real datasets for gene network inference. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  13. Perspectives: Gene Expression in Fisheries Management

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Pavey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional genes and gene expression have been connected to physiological traits linked to effective production and broodstock selection in aquaculture, selective implications of commercial fish harvest, and adaptive changes reflected in non-commercial fish populations subject to human disturbance and climate change. Gene mapping using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify functional genes, gene expression (analogue microarrays and real-time PCR), and digital sequencing technologies looking at RNA transcripts present new concepts and opportunities in support of effective and sustainable fisheries. Genomic tools have been rapidly growing in aquaculture research addressing aspects of fish health, toxicology, and early development. Genomic technologies linking effects in functional genes involved in growth, maturation and life history development have been tied to selection resulting from harvest practices. Incorporating new and ever-increasing knowledge of fish genomes is opening a different perspective on local adaptation that will prove invaluable in wild fish conservation and management. Conservation of fish stocks is rapidly incorporating research on critical adaptive responses directed at the effects of human disturbance and climate change through gene expression studies. Genomic studies of fish populations can be generally grouped into three broad categories: 1) evolutionary genomics and biodiversity; 2) adaptive physiological responses to a changing environment; and 3) adaptive behavioral genomics and life history diversity. We review current genomic research in fisheries focusing on those that use microarrays to explore differences in gene expression among phenotypes and within or across populations, information that is critically important to the conservation of fish and their relationship to humans.

  14. Developing 3D microstructures for tissue engineering

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    casting process to generate various large scale tissue engineering constructs with single pore geometry with the desired mechanical stiffness and porosity. In addition, a new technique was developed to fa bricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue-engineering applications where 3D printing...... materials have been developed and tested for enhancing the differentiation of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes and fabricating biodegradable scaffolds for in-vivo tissue engineering applications. Along with various scaffolds fabrication methods we finally presented an optimized study of hepatic differentiation...... doxycycline was loaded into the hydrogel of the IPN materials, and the biological activity of released doxycycline was tested using a doxycycline regulated green fluorescent reporter gene expression assay in HeLa cells. Additionally, decellularized liver extracellular matrix (ECM) and natural silk protein...

  15. Insulin gene: organisation, expression and regulation.

    Dumonteil, E; Philippe, J

    1996-06-01

    Insulin, a major hormone of the endocrine pancreas, plays a key role in the control of glucose homeostasis. This review discusses the mechanisms of cell-specific expression and regulation of the insulin gene. Whereas expression is restricted to islet beta-cells in adults, the insulin gene is more widely expressed at several embryonic stages, although the role of extrapancreatic expression is still unclear. beta-cell-specific expression relies on the interactions of 5'-flanking sequence motifs of the promoter with a number of ubiquitous and islet-specific transcription factors. IEF1 and IPF-1, by their binding to the E and A boxes, respectively, of the insulin gene promoter, appear to be the major determinants of beta-cell-specific expression. IEF1 is a heterodimer of the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, whereas IPF-1 belongs to the homeodomain-containing family. beta-cell specific determinants are conserved throughout evolution, although the human insulin gene 5'-flanking sequence also contains a polymorphic minisatellite which is unique to primates and may play a role in insulin gene regulation. Glucose modulates insulin gene transcription, with multiple elements of the promoter involved in glucose responsiveness. Remarkably, IPF-1 and IEF1 are involved in both beta-cell-specific expression and glucose regulation of the insulin gene. cAMP also regulates insulin gene transcription through a CRE, in response to various hormonal stimuli. On the whole, recent studies have provided a better understanding of beta-cell differentiation and function.

  16. Gene expression studies using microarrays

    Burgess, Janette

    2001-01-01

    1. The rapid progression of the collaborative sequencing programmes that are unravelling the complete genome sequences of many organisms are opening pathways for new approaches to gene analysis. As the sequence data become available, the bottleneck in biological research will shift to understanding

  17. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    Wang, Xuefel (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kang, Huining (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fields, Chris (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Cowie, Jim R. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Mosquera-Caro, Monica P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Xu, Yuexian (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Andries, Erik (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ar, Kerem (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Potter, Jeffrey (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Willman, Cheryl L. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Murphy, Maurice H. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  18. Gene expression profiling: can we identify the right target genes?

    J. E. Loyd

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling allows the simultaneous monitoring of the transcriptional behaviour of thousands of genes, which may potentially be involved in disease development. Several studies have been performed in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, which aim to define genetic links to the disease in an attempt to improve the current understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of the disease and target pathways for intervention. Expression profiling has shown a clear difference in gene expression between IPF and normal lung tissue, and has identified a wide range of candidate genes, including those known to encode for proteins involved in extracellular matrix formation and degradation, growth factors and chemokines. Recently, familial pulmonary fibrosis cohorts have been examined in an attempt to detect specific genetic mutations associated with IPF. To date, these studies have identified families in which IPF is associated with mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein C, or with mutations in genes encoding components of telomerase. Although rare and clearly not responsible for the disease in all individuals, the nature of these mutations highlight the importance of the alveolar epithelium in disease pathogenesis and demonstrate the potential for gene expression profiling in helping to advance the current understanding of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. 3D and beyond

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  20. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching.

  1. The morphologies of breast cancer cell lines in three-dimensional assays correlate with their profiles of gene expression

    Kenny, Paraic A; Lee, Genee Y; Myers, Connie A;

    2007-01-01

    large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles and 3D cell culture phenotypes of a substantial panel of human breast cancer cell lines. Each cell line adopts a colony morphology of one of four main classes in 3D culture. These morphologies reflect, at least in part, the underlying gene...... expression profile and protein expression patterns of the cell lines, and distinct morphologies were also associated with tumor cell invasiveness and with cell lines originating from metastases. We further demonstrate that consistent differences in genes encoding signal transduction proteins emerge when even...

  2. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression.

    Hunter B Fraser

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or "noise." Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  3. Gene expression profiling of solitary fibrous tumors.

    François Bertucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs are rare spindle-cell tumors. Their cell-of-origin and molecular basis are poorly known. They raise several clinical problems. Differential diagnosis may be difficult, prognosis is poorly apprehended by histoclinical features, and no effective therapy exists for advanced stages. METHODS: We profiled 16 SFT samples using whole-genome DNA microarrays and analyzed their expression profiles with publicly available profiles of 36 additional SFTs and 212 soft tissue sarcomas (STSs. Immunohistochemistry was applied to validate the expression of some discriminating genes. RESULTS: SFTs displayed whole-genome expression profiles more homogeneous and different from STSs, but closer to genetically-simple than genetically-complex STSs. The SFTs/STSs comparison identified a high percentage (∼30% of genes as differentially expressed, most of them without any DNA copy number alteration. One of the genes most overexpressed in SFTs encoded the ALDH1 stem cell marker. Several upregulated genes and associated ontologies were also related to progenitor/stem cells. SFTs also overexpressed genes encoding therapeutic targets such as kinases (EGFR, ERBB2, FGFR1, JAK2, histone deacetylases, or retinoic acid receptors. Their overexpression was found in all SFTs, regardless the anatomical location. Finally, we identified a 31-gene signature associated with the mitotic count, containing many genes related to cell cycle/mitosis, including AURKA. CONCLUSION: We established a robust repertoire of genes differentially expressed in SFTs. Certain overexpressed genes could provide new diagnostic (ALDH1A1, prognostic (AURKA and/or therapeutic targets.

  4. 3D Surgical Simulation

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  5. TOWARDS: 3D INTERNET

    Ms. Swapnali R. Ghadge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In today’s ever-shifting media landscape, it can be a complex task to find effective ways to reach your desired audience. As traditional media such as television continue to lose audience share, one venue in particular stands out for its ability to attract highly motivated audiences and for its tremendous growth potential the 3D Internet. The concept of '3D Internet' has recently come into the spotlight in the R&D arena, catching the attention of many people, and leading to a lot of discussions. Basically, one can look into this matter from a few different perspectives: visualization and representation of information, and creation and transportation of information, among others. All of them still constitute research challenges, as no products or services are yet available or foreseen for the near future. Nevertheless, one can try to envisage the directions that can be taken towards achieving this goal. People who take part in virtual worlds stay online longer with a heightened level of interest. To take advantage of that interest, diverse businesses and organizations have claimed an early stake in this fast-growing market. They include technology leaders such as IBM, Microsoft, and Cisco, companies such as BMW, Toyota, Circuit City, Coca Cola, and Calvin Klein, and scores of universities, including Harvard, Stanford and Penn State.

  6. Soybean physiology and gene expression during drought.

    Stolf-Moreira, R; Medri, M E; Neumaier, N; Lemos, N G; Pimenta, J A; Tobita, S; Brogin, R L; Marcelino-Guimarães, F C; Oliveira, M C N; Farias, J R B; Abdelnoor, R V; Nepomuceno, A L

    2010-10-05

    Soybean genotypes MG/BR46 (Conquista) and BR16, drought-tolerant and -sensitive, respectively, were compared in terms of morphophysiological and gene-expression responses to water stress during two stages of development. Gene-expression analysis showed differential responses in Gmdreb1a and Gmpip1b mRNA expression within 30 days of water-deficit initiation in MG/BR46 (Conquista) plants. Within 45 days of initiating stress, Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b had relatively higher expression. Initially, BR16 showed increased expression only for Gmdreb1a, and later (45 days) for Gmp5cs, Gmdefensin and Gmpip1b. Only BR16 presented down-regulated expression of genes, such as Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b, 30 days after the onset of moisture stress, and Gmgols after 45 days of stress. The faster perception of water stress in MG/BR46 (Conquista) and the better maintenance of up-regulated gene expression than in the sensitive BR16 genotype imply mechanisms by which the former is better adapted to tolerate moisture deficiency.

  7. Early gene expression changes with rush immunotherapy

    Barnett Sherry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine whether whole genome expression profiling could reveal changes in mRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from allergic patients undergoing rush immunotherapy (RIT that might be manifest within the first few months of treatment. Methods For this study, PBMC from three allergic patients undergoing RIT were assessed at four timepoints: prior to RIT, at 1 week and 7 week post-RIT, during build-up and at 4 months, after establishment of a maintenance dose. PBMC mRNA gene expression changes over time were determined by oligonucleotide microarrays using the Illumina Human-6 BeadChip Platform, which simultaneously interrogates expression profiles of > 47,000 transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were identified using well-established statistical analysis for microarrays. In addition, we analyzed peripheral blood basophil high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI expression and T-regulatory cell frequency as detected by expression of CD3+CD4+CD25bright cells at each timepoint using flow cytometry. Results In comparing the initial 2 timepoints with the final 2 timepoints and analyzing for genes with ≥1.5-fold expression change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR, we identified 507 transcripts. At a 2-fold change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR, we found 44 transcripts. Of these, 28 were up-regulated and 16 were down-regulated genes. From these datasets, we have identified changes in immunologically relevant genes from both the innate and adaptive response with upregulation of expressed genes for molecules including IL-1β, IL-8, CD40L, BTK and BCL6. At the 4 month timepoint, we noted a downward trend in Fc epsilon RI expression in each of the three patients and increased allergen-specific IgG4 levels. No change was seen in the frequency of peripheral T-regulatory cells expressed over the four timepoints. Conclusions We observed significant changes in gene expression early in peripheral

  8. Transcriptional profiling of epidermal keratinocytes: comparison of genes expressed in skin, cultured keratinocytes, and reconstituted epidermis, using large DNA microarrays.

    Gazel, Alix; Ramphal, Patricia; Rosdy, Martin; De Wever, Bart; Tornier, Carine; Hosein, Nadia; Lee, Brian; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2003-12-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are complex cells that create a unique three-dimensional (3-D) structure, differentiate through a multistage process, and respond to extracellular stimuli from nearby cells. Consequently, keratinocytes express many genes, i.e., have a relatively large "transcriptome." To determine which of the expressed genes are innate to keratinocytes, which are specific for the differentiation and 3-D architecture, and which are induced by other cell types, we compared the transcriptomes of skin from human subjects, differentiating 3-D reconstituted epidermis, cultured keratinocytes, and nonkeratinocyte cell types. Using large oligonucleotide microarrays, we analyzed five or more replicates of each, which yielded statistically consistent data and allowed identification of the differentially expressed genes. Epidermal keratinocytes, unlike other cells, express many proteases and protease inhibitors and genes that protect from UV light. Skin specifically expresses a higher number of receptors, secreted proteins, and transcription factors, perhaps influenced by the presence of nonkeratinocyte cell types. Surprisingly, mitochondrial proteins were significantly suppressed in skin, suggesting a low metabolic rate. Three-dimensional samples, skin and reconstituted epidermis, are similar to each other, expressing epidermal differentiation markers. Cultured keratinocytes express many cell-cycle and DNA replication genes, as well as integrins and extracellular matrix proteins. These results define innate, architecture-specific, and cell-type-regulated genes in epidermis.

  9. Spatial and temporal gene expression differences in core and periinfarct areas in experimental stroke: a microarray analysis.

    Jaime Ramos-Cejudo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large number of genes are regulated to promote brain repair following stroke. The thorough analysis of this process can help identify new markers and develop therapeutic strategies. This study analyzes gene expression following experimental stroke. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A microarray study of gene expression in the core, periinfarct and contralateral cortex was performed in adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 60 after 24 hours (acute phase or 3 days (delayed stage of permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA occlusion. Independent qRT-PCR validation (n = 12 was performed for 22 of the genes. Functional data were evaluated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The number of genes differentially expressed was 2,612 (24 h and 5,717 (3 d in the core; and 3,505 (24 h and 1,686 (3 d in the periinfarct area (logFC>|1|; adjP<0.05. Expression of many neurovascular unit development genes was altered at 24 h and 3 d including HES2, OLIG2, LINGO1 and NOGO-A; chemokines like CXCL1 and CXCL12, stress-response genes like HIF-1A, and trophic factors like BDNF or BMP4. Nearly half of the detected genes (43% had not been associated with stroke previously. CONCLUSIONS: This comprehensive study of gene regulation in the core and periinfarct areas at different times following permanent MCA occlusion provides new data that can be helpful in translational research.

  10. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  11. Analysis of gene expression profile of pancreatic carcinoma using CDNA microarray

    ZhiJun Tan; Xian-Gui Hu; Gui-Song Cao; Yan Tang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify new diagnostic markers and drug targets,the gene expression profiles of pancreatic cancer were compared with that of adjacent normal tissues utilizing cDNA microarray analysis.METHODS: cDNA probes were prepared by labeling mRNA from samples of six pancreatic carcinoma tissues with Cy5dUTP and mRNA from adjacent normal tissues with Cy3dUTP respectively through reverse transcription. The mixed probes of each sample were then hybridized with 12 800cDNA arrays (12 648 unique human cDNA sequences), and the fluorescent signals were scanned by ScanArray 3 000scanner (General Scanning, Inc.). The values of CyS-dUTP and Cy3-dUTP on each spot were analyzed and calculated by ImaGene 3.0 software (BioDiscovery, Inc.). Differentially expressed genes were screened according to the criterion that the absolute value of natural logarithm of the ratio of Cy5-dUTP to Cy3-dUTP was greater-than 0.69.RESETS: Among 6 samples investigated, 301 genes, which accounted for 2.38% of genes on the microarry slides,exhibited differentially expression at least in 5. There were 166 over-expressed genes including 136 having been registered in Genebank, and 135 under-expressed genes including 79 in Genebank in cancerous tissues.CONCLUSION: Microarray analysis may provide invaluable information on disease pathology, progression, resistance to treatment, and response to cellular microenvironments of pancreatic carcinoma and ultimately may lead to improving early diagnosis and discovering innovative therapeutic approaches for cancer.

  12. Lithium ions induce prestalk-associated gene expression and inhibit prespore gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Peters, Dorien J.M.; Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Spek, Wouter; Schaap, Pauline

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Li+ on two types of cyclic AMP-regulated gene expression and on basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) levels. Li+ effectively inhibits cyclic AMP-induced prespore gene expression, half-maximal inhibition occurring at about 2mM-LiCl.

  13. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern......BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have......) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...

  14. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    Sharpe Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages seed coats (globular and torpedo stages and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011 were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152 had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid

  15. Differentiation of infection from vaccination in foot-and-mouth disease by the detection of antibodies to the non-structural proteins 3D, 3AB and 3ABC in ELISA using antigens expressed in baculovirus

    Sørensen, K.J.; Madsen, K.G.; Madsen, E.S.;

    1998-01-01

    a positive result in both the 3AB and the 3ABC ELISA's. Two cattle that had been both vaccinated and infected also gave, positive results in both tests, suggesting that the 3AB and 3ABC ELISA's, but not the 3D ELISA might represent a reliable means of detecting infection in a vaccinated population.......The baculovirus expression system was found to be efficient at expressing the 3D, the 3AB and the 3ABC non-structural proteins (NSP) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) as antigens recognised by immune sera in ELISA. ELISA's using 3D, 3AB and 3ABC detected antibodies from day 8 and 10 after...... experimental infection of susceptible cattle and sheep and cattle remained seropositive for more than 395 days. The ELISA's detected antibodies against any of the seven serotypes of FMDV. The 3D ELISA was specific and precise and as sensitive as established ELISA's which measure antibody to structural proteins...

  16. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  17. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C. [IBFM CNR - LATO, Cefalù, Segrate (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  18. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Nour Hammoudeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica.The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR technique.The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed.Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  19. Extracting expression modules from perturbational gene expression compendia

    Van Dijck Patrick

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compendia of gene expression profiles under chemical and genetic perturbations constitute an invaluable resource from a systems biology perspective. However, the perturbational nature of such data imposes specific challenges on the computational methods used to analyze them. In particular, traditional clustering algorithms have difficulties in handling one of the prominent features of perturbational compendia, namely partial coexpression relationships between genes. Biclustering methods on the other hand are specifically designed to capture such partial coexpression patterns, but they show a variety of other drawbacks. For instance, some biclustering methods are less suited to identify overlapping biclusters, while others generate highly redundant biclusters. Also, none of the existing biclustering tools takes advantage of the staple of perturbational expression data analysis: the identification of differentially expressed genes. Results We introduce a novel method, called ENIGMA, that addresses some of these issues. ENIGMA leverages differential expression analysis results to extract expression modules from perturbational gene expression data. The core parameters of the ENIGMA clustering procedure are automatically optimized to reduce the redundancy between modules. In contrast to the biclusters produced by most other methods, ENIGMA modules may show internal substructure, i.e. subsets of genes with distinct but significantly related expression patterns. The grouping of these (often functionally related patterns in one module greatly aids in the biological interpretation of the data. We show that ENIGMA outperforms other methods on artificial datasets, using a quality criterion that, unlike other criteria, can be used for algorithms that generate overlapping clusters and that can be modified to take redundancy between clusters into account. Finally, we apply ENIGMA to the Rosetta compendium of expression profiles for

  20. Visualizing Gene Expression In Situ

    Burlage, R.S.

    1998-11-02

    Visualizing bacterial cells and describing their responses to the environment are difficult tasks. Their small size is the chief reason for the difficulty, which means that we must often use many millions of cells in a sample in order to determine what the average response of the bacteria is. However, an average response can sometimes mask important events in bacterial physiology, which means that our understanding of these organisms will suffer. We have used a variety of instruments to visualize bacterial cells, all of which tell us something different about the sample. We use a fluorescence activated cell sorter to sort cells based on the fluorescence provided by bioreporter genes, and these can be used to select for particular genetic mutations. Cells can be visualized by epifluorescent microscopy, and sensitive photodetectors can be added that allow us to find a single bacterial cell that is fluorescent or bioluminescent. We have also used standard photomultipliers to examine cell aggregates as field bioreporter microorganisms. Examples of each of these instruments show how our understanding of bacterial physiology has changed with the technology.

  1. Argudas: arguing with gene expression information

    McLeod, Kenneth; Burger, Albert

    2010-01-01

    In situ hybridisation gene expression information helps biologists identify where a gene is expressed. However, the databases that republish the experimental information are often both incomplete and inconsistent. This paper examines a system, Argudas, designed to help tackle these issues. Argudas is an evolution of an existing system, and so that system is reviewed as a means of both explaining and justifying the behaviour of Argudas. Throughout the discussion of Argudas a number of issues will be raised including the appropriateness of argumentation in biology and the challenges faced when integrating apparently similar online biological databases.

  2. Optogenetics for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Müller, Konrad; Naumann, Sebastian; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-02-01

    Molecular switches that are controlled by chemicals have evolved as central research instruments in mammalian cell biology. However, these tools are limited in terms of their spatiotemporal resolution due to freely diffusing inducers. These limitations have recently been addressed by the development of optogenetic, genetically encoded, and light-responsive tools that can be controlled with the unprecedented spatiotemporal precision of light. In this article, we first provide a brief overview of currently available optogenetic tools that have been designed to control diverse cellular processes. Then, we focus on recent developments in light-controlled gene expression technologies and provide the reader with a guideline for choosing the most suitable gene expression system.

  3. Genes Expressed in Human Tumor Endothelium

    St. Croix, Brad; Rago, Carlo; Velculescu, Victor; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Katharine E.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Lal, Anita; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lengauer, Christoph; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2000-08-01

    To gain a molecular understanding of tumor angiogenesis, we compared gene expression patterns of endothelial cells derived from blood vessels of normal and malignant colorectal tissues. Of over 170 transcripts predominantly expressed in the endothelium, 79 were differentially expressed, including 46 that were specifically elevated in tumor-associated endothelium. Several of these genes encode extracellular matrix proteins, but most are of unknown function. Most of these tumor endothelial markers were expressed in a wide range of tumor types, as well as in normal vessels associated with wound healing and corpus luteum formation. These studies demonstrate that tumor and normal endothelium are distinct at the molecular level, a finding that may have significant implications for the development of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  4. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  5. Designing genes for successful protein expression.

    Welch, Mark; Villalobos, Alan; Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequences are now far more readily available in silico than as physical DNA. De novo gene synthesis is an increasingly cost-effective method for building genetic constructs, and effectively removes the constraint of basing constructs on extant sequences. This allows scientists and engineers to experimentally test their hypotheses relating sequence to function. Molecular biologists, and now synthetic biologists, are characterizing and cataloging genetic elements with specific functions, aiming to combine them to perform complex functions. However, the most common purpose of synthetic genes is for the expression of an encoded protein. The huge number of different proteins makes it impossible to characterize and catalog each functional gene. Instead, it is necessary to abstract design principles from experimental data: data that can be generated by making predictions followed by synthesizing sequences to test those predictions. Because of the degeneracy of the genetic code, design of gene sequences to encode proteins is a high-dimensional problem, so there is no single simple formula to guarantee success. Nevertheless, there are several straightforward steps that can be taken to greatly increase the probability that a designed sequence will result in expression of the encoded protein. In this chapter, we discuss gene sequence parameters that are important for protein expression. We also describe algorithms for optimizing these parameters, and troubleshooting procedures that can be helpful when initial attempts fail. Finally, we show how many of these methods can be accomplished using the synthetic biology software tool Gene Designer.

  6. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-12-22

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows.

  7. 3D GEO: AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH

    2016-01-01

    The expression GEO is mostly used to denote relation to the earth. However it should not be confined to what is related to the earth's surface, as other objects also need three dimensional representation and documentation, like cultural heritage objects. They include both tangible and intangible ones. In this paper the 3D data acquisition and 3D modelling of cultural heritage assets are briefly described and their significance is also highlighted. Moreover the organization of such information...

  8. The TRANSFAC system on gene expression regulation.

    Wingender, E; Chen, X; Fricke, E; Geffers, R; Hehl, R; Liebich, I; Krull, M; Matys, V; Michael, H; Ohnhäuser, R; Prüss, M; Schacherer, F; Thiele, S; Urbach, S

    2001-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors and their DNA-binding sites and profiles (http://www.gene-regulation.de/) has been quantitatively extended and supplemented by a number of modules. These modules give information about pathologically relevant mutations in regulatory regions and transcription factor genes (PathoDB), scaffold/matrix attached regions (S/MARt DB), signal transduction (TRANSPATH) and gene expression sources (CYTOMER). Altogether, these distinct database modules constitute the TRANSFAC system. They are accompanied by a number of program routines for identifying potential transcription factor binding sites or for localizing individual components in the regulatory network of a cell.

  9. 3D printing for dummies

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  10. Intraoral 3D scanner

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  11. Martian terrain - 3D

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  12. Identification of genes expressed during myocardial development

    陈小圆; 陈健宏; 张碧琪; 梁瑛; 梁平

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify genes expressed in the fetal heart that are potentially important for myocardial development and cardiomyocyte proliferation.Methods mRNAs from fetal (29 weeks) and adult cardiomyocytes were use for suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Both forward (fetal as tester) and reverse (adult as driver) subtractions were performed. Clones confirmed by dot-blot analysis to be differentially expressed were sequenced and analyzed.Results Differential expressions were detected for 39 out of 96 (41%) clones on forward subtraction and 24 out of 80 (30%) clones on reverse. For fetal dominating genes, 28 clones matched to 10 known genes (COL1A2, COL3A1, endomucin, HBG1, HBG2, PCBP2, LOC51144, TGFBI, vinculin and PND), 9 clones to 5 cDNAs of unknown functions (accession AK021715, AF085867, AB040948, AB051460 and AB051512) and 2 clones had homology to hEST sequences. For the reverse subtraction, all clones showed homology to mitochondrial transcripts.Conclusions We successfully applied SSH to detect those genes differentially expressed in fetal cardiac myocytes, some of which have not been shown relative to myocardial development.

  13. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito;

    2005-01-01

    that compare cells grown in suspension to similar cells grown attached to one another as aggregates have suggested that it is adhesion to the extracellular matrix of the basal membrane that confers resistance to apoptosis and, hence, resistance to cytotoxins. The genes whose expression correlates with poor...

  14. The Low Noise Limit in Gene Expression.

    Roy D Dar

    Full Text Available Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. These results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1 a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2 high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.

  15. Gene expression profiling of human erythroid progenitors by micro-serial analysis of gene expression.

    Fujishima, Naohito; Hirokawa, Makoto; Aiba, Namiko; Ichikawa, Yoshikazu; Fujishima, Masumi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yoshiko; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Miura, Ikuo; Sawada, Ken-ichi

    2004-10-01

    We compared the expression profiles of highly purified human CD34+ cells and erythroid progenitor cells by micro-serial analysis of gene expression (microSAGE). Human CD34+ cells were purified from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized blood stem cells, and erythroid progenitors were obtained by cultivating these cells in the presence of stem cell factor, interleukin 3, and erythropoietin. Our 10,202 SAGE tags allowed us to identify 1354 different transcripts appearing more than once. Erythroid progenitor cells showed increased expression of LRBA, EEF1A1, HSPCA, PILRB, RANBP1, NACA, and SMURF. Overexpression of HSPCA was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. MicroSAGE revealed an unexpected preferential expression of several genes in erythroid progenitor cells in addition to the known functional genes, including hemoglobins. Our results provide reference data for future studies of gene expression in various hematopoietic disorders, including myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia.

  16. Cluster Analysis of Gene Expression Data

    Domany, E

    2002-01-01

    The expression levels of many thousands of genes can be measured simultaneously by DNA microarrays (chips). This novel experimental tool has revolutionized research in molecular biology and generated considerable excitement. A typical experiment uses a few tens of such chips, each dedicated to a single sample - such as tissue extracted from a particular tumor. The results of such an experiment contain several hundred thousand numbers, that come in the form of a table, of several thousand rows (one for each gene) and 50 - 100 columns (one for each sample). We developed a clustering methodology to mine such data. In this review I provide a very basic introduction to the subject, aimed at a physics audience with no prior knowledge of either gene expression or clustering methods. I explain what genes are, what is gene expression and how it is measured by DNA chips. Next I explain what is meant by "clustering" and how we analyze the massive amounts of data from such experiments, and present results obtained from a...

  17. Oit1/Fam3D, a gut-secreted protein displaying nutritional status-dependent regulation.

    de Wit, Nicole J W; IJssennagger, Noortje; Oosterink, Els; Keshtkar, Shohreh; Hooiveld, Guido J E J; Mensink, Ronald P; Hammer, Sebastiaan; Smit, Johannes W A; Müller, Michael; van der Meer, Roelof

    2012-11-01

    Oncoprotein-induced transcript 1 (Oit1) was previously identified as a dietary fat-induced gene in the small intestine of C57Bl/6J mice. In this study, we further characterized Oit1 and its human ortholog family with sequence similarity 3, member D (Fam3D), on the messenger RNA as well as the protein level. Oit1 and Fam3D were found to be predominantly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract of mice and humans, respectively. Dietary fat induced a clear and acute up-regulation of Oit1, especially in the jejunum, whereas fasting led to a reduced gene expression in the small intestine. Regarding protein expression, we found a remarkable pattern of Oit1 along the longitudinal axis of the intestine, a predominant villus-restricted expression in the proximal small intestine and a more pronounced crypt expression in the distal parts of the intestine. Using transfection experiments, we confirmed secretion of the Oit1 protein, as was predicted by a signal peptide sequence. Detection of Oit1 and Fam3D in plasma samples indicated that both proteins are secreted to the basolateral site of enterocytes. Moreover, in human plasma samples, we also found an effect of nutritional status on Fam3D levels, with a postprandial elevation and a reduction after fasting. In conclusion, Oit1 and Fam3D are gut-derived proteins that are expressed and secreted in a nutritional status-dependent manner.

  18. Gene Expression Commons: an open platform for absolute gene expression profiling.

    Jun Seita

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling using microarrays has been limited to comparisons of gene expression between small numbers of samples within individual experiments. However, the unknown and variable sensitivities of each probeset have rendered the absolute expression of any given gene nearly impossible to estimate. We have overcome this limitation by using a very large number (>10,000 of varied microarray data as a common reference, so that statistical attributes of each probeset, such as the dynamic range and threshold between low and high expression, can be reliably discovered through meta-analysis. This strategy is implemented in a web-based platform named "Gene Expression Commons" (https://gexc.stanford.edu/ which contains data of 39 distinct highly purified mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor/differentiated cell populations covering almost the entire hematopoietic system. Since the Gene Expression Commons is designed as an open platform, investigators can explore the expression level of any gene, search by expression patterns of interest, submit their own microarray data, and design their own working models representing biological relationship among samples.

  19. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  20. Regulation of noise in gene expression.

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical processes leading to the synthesis of new proteins are random, as they typically involve a small number of diffusing molecules. They lead to fluctuations in the number of proteins in a single cell as a function of time and to cell-to-cell variability of protein abundances. These in turn can lead to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Phenotypic heterogeneity may have important consequences for the development of multicellular organisms and the fitness of bacterial colonies, raising the question of how it is regulated. Here we review the experimental evidence that transcriptional regulation affects noise in gene expression, and discuss how the noise strength is encoded in the architecture of the promoter region. We discuss how models based on specific molecular mechanisms of gene regulation can make experimentally testable predictions for how changes to the promoter architecture are reflected in gene expression noise.

  1. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression.

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  2. 3D Printing an Octohedron

    Aboufadel, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this short paper is to describe a project to manufacture a regular octohedron on a 3D printer. We assume that the reader is familiar with the basics of 3D printing. In the project, we use fundamental ideas to calculate the vertices and faces of an octohedron. Then, we utilize the OPENSCAD program to create a virtual 3D model and an STereoLithography (.stl) file that can be used by a 3D printer.

  3. Salient Local 3D Features for 3D Shape Retrieval

    Godil, Afzal

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new formulation for the 3D salient local features based on the voxel grid inspired by the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). We use it to identify the salient keypoints (invariant points) on a 3D voxelized model and calculate invariant 3D local feature descriptors at these keypoints. We then use the bag of words approach on the 3D local features to represent the 3D models for shape retrieval. The advantages of the method are that it can be applied to rigid as well as to articulated and deformable 3D models. Finally, this approach is applied for 3D Shape Retrieval on the McGill articulated shape benchmark and then the retrieval results are presented and compared to other methods.

  4. Gene Expression in the Human Endolymphatic Sac

    Møller, Martin Nue; Kirkeby, Svend; Vikeså, Jonas;

    2015-01-01

    of fresh human endolymphatic sac tissue samples. METHODS: Twelve tissue samples of the human endolymphatic sac were obtained during translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannoma. Microarray technology was used to investigate tissue sample expression of solute carrier family genes, using adjacent dura......a1 sodium-bicarbonate transporter, SLC9a2 sodium-hydrogen transporter, SLC12a3 thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl transporter, and SLC34a2 sodium-phosphate transporter. CONCLUSIONS: Several important ion transporters of the SLC family are expressed in the human endolymphatic sac, including Pendrin......OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of the present study is to explore, demonstrate, and describe the expression of genes related to the solute carrier (SLC) molecules of ion transporters in the human endolymphatic sac. STUDY DESIGN: cDNA microarrays and immunohistochemistry were used for analyses...

  5. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  6. Engineering EMT using 3D micro-scaffold to promote hepatic functions for drug hepatotoxicity evaluation.

    Wang, Jingyu; Chen, Fengling; Liu, Longwei; Qi, Chunxiao; Wang, Bingjie; Yan, Xiaojun; Huang, Chenyu; Hou, Wei; Zhang, Michael Q; Chen, Yang; Du, Yanan

    2016-06-01

    Accompanied by decreased hepatic functions, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was observed in two dimensional (2D) cultured hepatocytes with elongated morphology, loss of polarity and weakened cell-cell interaction, while upgrading to 3D culture has been considered as significant improvement of its 2D counterpart for hepatocyte maintenance. Here we hypothesize that 3D culture enhances hepatic functions through regulating the EMT status. Biomaterial-engineered EMT was achieved by culturing HepaRG as 3D spheroids (SP-3D) or 3D stretched cells (ST-3D) in non-adherent and adherent micro-scaffold respectively. In SP-3D, constrained EMT of HepaRG, a hepatic stem cell line, as represented by increased epithelial markers and decreased mesenchymal markers, was echoed by improved hepatic functions. To investigate the relationship between EMT status and hepatic functions, time-series RNA-Seq and gene network analysis were used for comparing different cell culture models, which identified histone deacetylases (HDACs) as key mediating factors. Protein analysis confirmed that high HDAC activity was correlated with high expression of Cadherin-1 (CDH1) and hepatic function genes, which were decreased upon HDAC inhibitor treatment in SP-3D, suggesting HDACs may play positive role in regulating EMT and hepatic functions. To illustrate the application of 3D micro-scaffold culture in drug safety evaluation, hepatotoxicity and metabolism assays of two hepatotoxins (i.e. N-acetyl-p-aminophenol and Doxorubicin) were performed and SP-3D showed more biomimetic toxicity response, indicating regulation of EMT as a vital consideration in designing 3D hepatocyte culture configuration.

  7. Topological features in cancer gene expression data.

    Lockwood, S; Krishnamoorthy, B

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for exploring cancer gene expression data based on tools from algebraic topology. Our method selects a small relevant subset from tens of thousands of genes while simultaneously identifying nontrivial higher order topological features, i.e., holes, in the data. We first circumvent the problem of high dimensionality by dualizing the data, i.e., by studying genes as points in the sample space. Then we select a small subset of the genes as landmarks to construct topological structures that capture persistent, i.e., topologically significant, features of the data set in its first homology group. Furthermore, we demonstrate that many members of these loops have been implicated for cancer biogenesis in scientific literature. We illustrate our method on five different data sets belonging to brain, breast, leukemia, and ovarian cancers.

  8. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  9. Transcriptome-Level Signatures in Gene Expression and Gene Expression Variability during Bacterial Adaptive Evolution

    Erickson, Keesha E.; Otoupal, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious public health concern, as strains emerge that demonstrate resistance to almost all available treatments. One factor that contributes to the crisis is the adaptive ability of bacteria, which exhibit remarkable phenotypic and gene expression heterogeneity in order to gain a survival advantage in damaging environments. This high degree of variability in gene expression across biological populations makes it a challenging task to identify key regulators of bacterial adaptation. Here, we research the regulation of adaptive resistance by investigating transcriptome profiles of Escherichia coli upon adaptation to disparate toxins, including antibiotics and biofuels. We locate potential target genes via conventional gene expression analysis as well as using a new analysis technique examining differential gene expression variability. By investigating trends across the diverse adaptation conditions, we identify a focused set of genes with conserved behavior, including those involved in cell motility, metabolism, membrane structure, and transport, and several genes of unknown function. To validate the biological relevance of the observed changes, we synthetically perturb gene expression using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-dCas9. Manipulation of select genes in combination with antibiotic treatment promotes adaptive resistance as demonstrated by an increased degree of antibiotic tolerance and heterogeneity in MICs. We study the mechanisms by which identified genes influence adaptation and find that select differentially variable genes have the potential to impact metabolic rates, mutation rates, and motility. Overall, this work provides evidence for a complex nongenetic response, encompassing shifts in gene expression and gene expression variability, which underlies adaptive resistance. IMPORTANCE Even initially sensitive bacteria can rapidly thwart antibiotic treatment

  10. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots.

  11. Expression of MTLC gene in gastric carcinoma

    Guang-Bin Qiu; Li-Guo Gong; Dong-Mei Hao; Zhi-Hong Zhen; Kai-Lai Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of c-myc target from laryngeal cancer cells (MTLC) gene in gastric carcinoma (GC)tissues and the effect of MTLC over-expression on gastric carcinoma cell line BGC823.METHODS: RT-PCR was performed to determine the expression of MTLC mRNA in GC and matched control tissues.BGC823 cells were transfected with an expression vector pcDNA3.1-MTLC by liposome and screened by G418. Growth of cells expressing MTLC was observed daily by manual counting. Apoptotic cells were determined by TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay.RESULTS: The expression of MTLC mRNAs was downregulated in 9(60%) of 15 cases of GC tissues. The growth rates of the BGC823 cells expressing MTLC were indistinguishable from that of control cells. A marked acceleration of apoptosis was observed in MTLC-expressing cells.CONCLUSION: MTLC was down-regulated in the majority of GC tissues and could promote apoptosis of GC cell lines,which suggests that MTLC may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of gastric carcinoma.

  12. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ).

  13. Toward stable gene expression in CHO cells

    Mariati; Koh, Esther YC; Yeo, Jessna HM; Ho, Steven CL; Yang, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high gene expression level during long-term culture is critical when producing therapeutic recombinant proteins using mammalian cells. Transcriptional silencing of promoters, most likely due to epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, is one of the major mechanisms causing production instability. Previous studies demonstrated that the core CpG island element (IE) from the hamster adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene is effective to prevent DNA methylation. We generated one set of modified human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoters by insertion of one or two copies of IE in either forward or reverse orientations into different locations of the hCMV promoter. The modified hCMV with one copy of IE inserted between the hCMV enhancer and core promoter in reverse orientation (MR1) was most effective at enhancing expression stability in CHO cells without comprising expression level when compared with the wild type hCMV. We also found that insertion of IE into a chimeric murine CMV (mCMV) enhancer and human elongation factor-1α core (hEF) promoter in reverse orientation did not enhance expression stability, indicating that the effect of IE on expression stability is possibly promoter specific. PMID:25482237

  14. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  15. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression

    Viguerie, Nathalie; Montastier, Emilie; Maoret, Jean-José

    2012-01-01

    Weight control diets favorably affect parameters of the metabolic syndrome and delay the onset of diabetic complications. The adaptations occurring in adipose tissue (AT) are likely to have a profound impact on the whole body response as AT is a key target of dietary intervention. Identification...... interconnection between expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and components of the metabolic syndrome. Sex had a marked influence on AT expression of 88 transcripts, which persisted during the entire dietary intervention and after control for fat mass. In women, the influence of body mass index...

  16. Engineering genes for predictable protein expression.

    Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Ness, Jon; Villalobos, Alan; Welch, Mark

    2012-05-01

    The DNA sequence used to encode a polypeptide can have dramatic effects on its expression. Lack of readily available tools has until recently inhibited meaningful experimental investigation of this phenomenon. Advances in synthetic biology and the application of modern engineering approaches now provide the tools for systematic analysis of the sequence variables affecting heterologous expression of recombinant proteins. We here discuss how these new tools are being applied and how they circumvent the constraints of previous approaches, highlighting some of the surprising and promising results emerging from the developing field of gene engineering.

  17. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    Wong, Darren CJ; Sweetman, Crystal; Ford, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related bi...

  18. Simulated microgravity influenced the expression of DNA damage repair genes

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Jiawei, Liu; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and microgravity were considered to be the most important stress factors of space environmental the respective study of the biological effects of the radiation and microgravity carried out earlier, but the interaction of the effects of radiation with microgravity started later, and due to difference of the materials and methods the result of this experiment were not consistent. To further investigate the influence of microgravity on the expression of the radiation damage repair genes, the seed of Arabidopsis (Col) and its gravity-insensitive mutant (PIN2) were exposed to 0.1Gy of the dose of energetic carbon-ion beam radiation (LET = 30KeV / μm), and the germinated seed were than fixed in the 3D random positioning apparatus immediately for a 10-day simulated microgravity. By measuring the deflection angle of root tip and the changes of the expression of Ku70 and RAD51 protein, we investigated the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems. The results shown that radiation, microgravity and microgravity with radiation could increase the angle of the root of the Col significantly, but no obvious effect on PIN2 type. The radiation could increase the expression of Ku70 significantly in both Col and PIN2, microgravity does not affect the expression, but the microgravity with radiation could decrease the expression of Ku70. This result shown that the microgravity could influence the radiation damage repair systems in molecular level. Moreover, our findings were important to understand the molecular mechanism of the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems in vivo.

  19. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    model to investigate the role of telomerase in AML, we were able to translate the observed effect into human AML patients and identify specific genes involved, which also predict survival patterns in AML patients. During these studies we have applied methods for investigating differentially expressed......Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects....... Here GEPs from purified healthy haematopoietic populations, with different levels of differentiation, form the basis for comparison with diseased samples. We present a mathematical transformation of mRNA microarray data to make it possible to compare AML samples, carrying expanded aberrant...

  20. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    in expression have no current defined function. These genes, as well as those induced by stresses relevant to biofilm growth such as oxygen and nutrient limitation, may be important factors that trigger enhanced resistance mechanisms of sessile communities to antibiotics and hydrodynamic shear forces.......It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance...... to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...

  1. Combinatorial engineering for heterologous gene expression.

    Zwick, Friederike; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2013-01-01

    Tools for strain engineering with predictable outcome are of crucial importance for the nascent field of synthetic biology. The success of combining different DNA biological parts is often restricted by poorly understood factors deriving from the complexity of the systems. We have previously identified variants for different regulatory elements of the expression cassette XylS/Pm. When such elements are combined they act in a manner consistent with their individual behavior, as long as they affect different functions, such as transcription and translation. Interestingly, sequence context does not seem to influence the final outcome significantly. Expression of reporter gene bla could be increased up to 75 times at the protein level by combining three variants in one cassette. For other tested reporter genes similar results were obtained, except that the stimulatory effect was quantitatively less. Combination of individually characterized DNA parts thus stands as suitable method to achieve a desired phenotype.

  2. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells.

  3. The 3D Genome as Moderator of Chromosomal Communication.

    Dekker, Job; Mirny, Leonid

    2016-03-10

    Proper expression of genes requires communication with their regulatory elements that can be located elsewhere along the chromosome. The physics of chromatin fibers imposes a range of constraints on such communication. The molecular and biophysical mechanisms by which chromosomal communication is established, or prevented, have become a topic of intense study, and important roles for the spatial organization of chromosomes are being discovered. Here we present a view of the interphase 3D genome characterized by extensive physical compartmentalization and insulation on the one hand and facilitated long-range interactions on the other. We propose the existence of topological machines dedicated to set up and to exploit a 3D genome organization to both promote and censor communication along and between chromosomes.

  4. Comparative genetic mapping revealed powdery mildew resistance gene MlWE4 derived from wild emmer is located in same genomic region of Pm36 and Ml3D232 on chromosome 5BL

    ZHANG Dong; WANG Yong; CHEN Yong-xing; LIU Zhi-yong; OUYANG Shu-hong; WANG Li-li; CUI Yu; WU Qiu-hong; LIANG Yong; WANG Zhen-zhong; XIE Jing-zhong; ZHANG De-yun

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most devastating wheat diseases. Wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) is a promising source of disease resistance for wheat. A powdery mildew resistance gene conferring resistance to B. graminis f. sp. tritici isolate E09, originating from wild emmer wheat, has been transferred into the hexaploid wheat line WE4 through crossing and backcrossing. Genetic analyses indicated that the powdery mildew resistance was control ed by a single dominant gene, temporarily designated MlWE4. By mean of comparative genomics and bulked segregant analysis, a genetic linkage map of MlWE4 was constructed, and MlWE4 was mapped on the distal region of chromosome arm 5BL. Comparative genetic linkage maps showed that genes MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232 were co-segregated with markers XBD37670 and XBD37680, indicating they are likely the same gene or al eles in the same locus. The co-segregated markers provide a starting point for chromosome landing and map-based cloning of MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232.

  5. Proteomic and gene expression patterns of keratoconus

    Arkasubhra Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a progressive corneal thinning disease associated with significant tissue remodeling activities and activation of a variety of signaling networks. However, it is not understood how differential gene and protein expression direct function in keratoconus corneas to drive the underlying pathology, ectasia. Research in the field has focused on discovering differentially expressed genes and proteins and quantifying their levels and activities in keratoconus patient samples. In this study, both microarray analysis of total ribonucleic acid (RNA and whole proteome analyses are carried out using corneal epithelium and tears from keratoconus patients and compared to healthy controls. A number of structural proteins, signaling molecules, cytokines, proteases, and enzymes have been found to be deregulated in keratoconus corneas. Together, the data provide clues to the complex process of corneal degradation which suggest novel ways to clinically diagnose and manage the disease. This review will focus on discussing these recent advances in the knowledge of keratoconus biology from a gene expression and function point-of-view.

  6. Analysis of gene expression in rabbit muscle

    Alena Gálová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing consumer knowledge of the link between diet and health has raised the demand for high quality food. Meat and meat products may be considered as irreplaceable in human nutrition. Breeding livestock to higher content of lean meat and the use of modern hybrids entails problems with the quality of meat. Analysing of livestock genomes could get us a great deal of important information, which may significantly affect the improvement process. Domestic animals are invaluable resources for study of the molecular architecture of complex traits. Although the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL responsible for economically important traits in domestic animals has achieved remarkable results in recent decades, not all of the genetic variation in the complex traits has been captured because of the low density of markers used in QTL mapping studies. The genome wide association study (GWAS, which utilizes high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, provides a new way to tackle this issue. New technologies now allow producing microarrays containing thousands of hybridization probes on a single membrane or other solid support. We used microarray analysis to study gene expression in rabbit muscle during different developmental age stages. The outputs from GeneSpring GX sotware are presented in this work. After the evaluation of gene expression in rabbits, will be selected genes of interest in relation to meat quality parameters and will be further analyzed by the available methods of molecular biology and genetics.

  7. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    Salem, Tamer Z. [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbial Molecular Biology, AGERI, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Division of Biomedical Sciences, Zewail University, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Zhang, Fengrui [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Thiem, Suzanne M., E-mail: smthiem@msu.edu [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  8. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  9. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  10. 3D Turtle Graphics” by using a 3D Printer

    Yasusi Kanada

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available When creating shapes by using a 3D printer, usually, a static (declarative model designed by using a 3D CAD system is translated to a CAM program and it is sent to the printer. However, widely-used FDM-type 3D printers input a dynamical (procedural program that describes control of motions of the print head and extrusion of the filament. If the program is expressed by using a programming language or a library in a straight manner, solids can be created by a method similar to turtle graphics. An open-source library that enables “turtle 3D printing” method was described by Python and tested. Although this method currently has a problem that it cannot print in the air; however, if this problem is solved by an appropriate method, shapes drawn by 3D turtle graphics freely can be embodied by this method.

  11. 3D IBFV : Hardware-Accelerated 3D Flow Visualization

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D flow visualization problem in a

  12. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  13. Monitoring microarray-based gene expression profile changes in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Hong-Ju Mao; Hong-Nian Li; Xiao-Mei Zhou; Jian-Long Zhao; Da-Fang Wan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To find out key genes responsible for hepatocarc inogenesis and to further understand the underlying molecular mechanism through investigating the differential gene expression between human normal liver tissue and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: DNA microarray was prepared by spotting PCR products of 1 000 human genes including 445 novel genes, 540 known genes as well as 12 positive (housekeeping) and 3 negative controls (plant gene) onto treated glass slides. cDNA probes were prepared by labeling normal liver tissue mRNA and cancer liver tissue mRNA with Cy3-dUTP and Cy5-dUTP separately through reverse transcription. The arrays were hybridized against the cDNA probe and the fluorescent signals were scanned. The dataobtained from repeated experiments were analyzed. RESULTS: Among the 20 couple samples investigated (from cancerous liver tissue and normal liver tissue), 38 genes including 21 novel genes and 17 known genes exhibited different expressions. CONCLUSION: cDNA microarray technique is powerful to identify candidate target genes that may play important roles in human carcinogenesis. Further analysis of the obtained genes is helpful to understand the molecular changes in HCC progression and ultimately may lead to the identification of new targets for HCC diagnosis and intervention.

  14. Interactive 3D multimedia content

    Cellary, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    The book describes recent research results in the areas of modelling, creation, management and presentation of interactive 3D multimedia content. The book describes the current state of the art in the field and identifies the most important research and design issues. Consecutive chapters address these issues. These are: database modelling of 3D content, security in 3D environments, describing interactivity of content, searching content, visualization of search results, modelling mixed reality content, and efficient creation of interactive 3D content. Each chapter is illustrated with example a

  15. A 3-D Contextual Classifier

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1997-01-01

    . This includes the specification of a Gaussian distribution for the pixel values as well as a prior distribution for the configuration of class variables within the cross that is m ade of a pixel and its four nearest neighbours. We will extend this algorithm to 3-D, i.e. we will specify a simultaneous Gaussian...... distr ibution for a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours, and generalise the class variable configuration distribution within the 3-D cross. The algorithm is tested on a synthetic 3-D multivariate dataset....

  16. 3D Bayesian contextual classifiers

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours.......We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours....

  17. 3-D printers for libraries

    Griffey, Jason

    2014-01-01

    As the maker movement continues to grow and 3-D printers become more affordable, an expanding group of hobbyists is keen to explore this new technology. In the time-honored tradition of introducing new technologies, many libraries are considering purchasing a 3-D printer. Jason Griffey, an early enthusiast of 3-D printing, has researched the marketplace and seen several systems first hand at the Consumer Electronics Show. In this report he introduces readers to the 3-D printing marketplace, covering such topics asHow fused deposition modeling (FDM) printing workBasic terminology such as build

  18. 3D for Graphic Designers

    Connell, Ellery

    2011-01-01

    Helping graphic designers expand their 2D skills into the 3D space The trend in graphic design is towards 3D, with the demand for motion graphics, animation, photorealism, and interactivity rapidly increasing. And with the meteoric rise of iPads, smartphones, and other interactive devices, the design landscape is changing faster than ever.2D digital artists who need a quick and efficient way to join this brave new world will want 3D for Graphic Designers. Readers get hands-on basic training in working in the 3D space, including product design, industrial design and visualization, modeling, ani

  19. Identification of common prognostic gene expression signatures with biological meanings from microarray gene expression datasets.

    Yao, Jun; Zhao, Qi; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Li; Liu, Xiaoming; Yung, W K Alfred; Weinstein, John N

    2012-01-01

    Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures for breast cancer were generated previously with few overlap and limited insight into the biology of the disease. Here we introduce a novel algorithm named SCoR (Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard regression and Random resampling) to apply random resampling and clustering methods in identifying gene features correlated with time to event data. This is shown to reduce overfitting noises involved in microarray data analysis and discover functional gene sets linked to patient survival. SCoR independently identified a common poor prognostic signature composed of cell proliferation genes from six out of eight breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, a sequential SCoR analysis on highly proliferative breast cancers repeatedly identified T/B cell markers as favorable prognosis factors. In glioblastoma, SCoR identified a common good prognostic signature of chromosome 10 genes from two gene expression datasets (TCGA and REMBRANDT), recapitulating the fact that loss of one copy of chromosome 10 (which harbors the tumor suppressor PTEN) is linked to poor survival in glioblastoma patients. SCoR also identified prognostic genes on sex chromosomes in lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting patient gender might be used to predict outcome in this disease. These results demonstrate the power of SCoR to identify common and biologically meaningful prognostic gene expression signatures.

  20. Identification of common prognostic gene expression signatures with biological meanings from microarray gene expression datasets.

    Jun Yao

    Full Text Available Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures for breast cancer were generated previously with few overlap and limited insight into the biology of the disease. Here we introduce a novel algorithm named SCoR (Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard regression and Random resampling to apply random resampling and clustering methods in identifying gene features correlated with time to event data. This is shown to reduce overfitting noises involved in microarray data analysis and discover functional gene sets linked to patient survival. SCoR independently identified a common poor prognostic signature composed of cell proliferation genes from six out of eight breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, a sequential SCoR analysis on highly proliferative breast cancers repeatedly identified T/B cell markers as favorable prognosis factors. In glioblastoma, SCoR identified a common good prognostic signature of chromosome 10 genes from two gene expression datasets (TCGA and REMBRANDT, recapitulating the fact that loss of one copy of chromosome 10 (which harbors the tumor suppressor PTEN is linked to poor survival in glioblastoma patients. SCoR also identified prognostic genes on sex chromosomes in lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting patient gender might be used to predict outcome in this disease. These results demonstrate the power of SCoR to identify common and biologically meaningful prognostic gene expression signatures.

  1. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  2. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  3. Gene expression regulators--MicroRNAs

    CHEN Fang; YIN Q. James

    2005-01-01

    A large class of non-coding RNAs found in small molecule RNAs are closely associated with the regulation of gene expression, which are called microRNA (miRNA). MiRNAs are coded in intergenic or intronic regions and can be formed into foldback hairpin RNAs. These transcripts are cleaved by Dicer, generating mature miRNAs that can silence their target genes in different modes of action. Now, research on small molecule RNAs has gotten breakthrough advance in biology. To discover miRNA genes and their target genes has become hot topics in RNA research. This review attempts to look back the history of miRNA discovery, to introduce the methods of screening miRNAs, to localize miRNA loci in genome, to seek miRNA target genes and the biological function, and to discuss the working mechanisms of miRNAs. Finally, we will discuss the potential important roles of miRNAs in modulating the genesis, development, growth, and differentiation of organisms. Thus, it can be predicted that a complete understanding of miRNA functions will bring us some new concepts, approaches and strategies for the study of living beings.

  4. Gene Expression Profiling of Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Bowden Nikola A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare recessive disorder that is characterized by extreme sensitivity to UV light. UV light exposure results in the formation of DNA damage such as cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts. Nucleotide excision repair (NER orchestrates the removal of cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts as well as some forms of bulky chemical DNA adducts. The disease XP is comprised of 7 complementation groups (XP-A to XP-G, which represent functional deficiencies in seven different genes, all of which are believed to be involved in NER. The main clinical feature of XP is various forms of skin cancers; however, neurological degeneration is present in XPA, XPB, XPD and XPG complementation groups. The relationship between NER and other types of DNA repair processes is now becoming evident but the exact relationships between the different complementation groups remains to be precisely determined. Using gene expression analysis we have identified similarities and differences after UV light exposure between the complementation groups XP-A, XP-C, XP-D, XP-E, XP-F, XP-G and an unaffected control. The results reveal that there is a graded change in gene expression patterns between the mildest, most similar to the control response (XP-E and the severest form (XP-A of the disease, with the exception of XP-D. Distinct differences between the complementation groups with neurological symptoms (XP-A, XP-D and XP-G and without (XP-C, XP-E and XP-F were also identified. Therefore, this analysis has revealed distinct gene expression profiles for the XP complementation groups and the first step towards understanding the neurological symptoms of XP.

  5. Studying the Complex Expression Dependences between Sets of Coexpressed Genes

    Mario Huerta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms simplify the orchestration of gene expression by coregulating genes whose products function together in the cell. The use of clustering methods to obtain sets of coexpressed genes from expression arrays is very common; nevertheless there are no appropriate tools to study the expression networks among these sets of coexpressed genes. The aim of the developed tools is to allow studying the complex expression dependences that exist between sets of coexpressed genes. For this purpose, we start detecting the nonlinear expression relationships between pairs of genes, plus the coexpressed genes. Next, we form networks among sets of coexpressed genes that maintain nonlinear expression dependences between all of them. The expression relationship between the sets of coexpressed genes is defined by the expression relationship between the skeletons of these sets, where this skeleton represents the coexpressed genes with a well-defined nonlinear expression relationship with the skeleton of the other sets. As a result, we can study the nonlinear expression relationships between a target gene and other sets of coexpressed genes, or start the study from the skeleton of the sets, to study the complex relationships of activation and deactivation between the sets of coexpressed genes that carry out the different cellular processes present in the expression experiments.

  6. Thermal injuries induce gene expression of endogenous c-fos, c-myc and bFGF in burned tissues

    付小兵; 顾小曼; 孙同柱; 杨银辉; 孙晓庆; 盛志勇

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression sequence and distribution characteristics of the protooncogenes c-fos, c-myc and endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF ) genes in burned tissues, and to explore the possible effects of changes in the se genes' functions on wound healing. Methods Partial-thickness burns of 30% TBSA were established on backs of Wistar rats. Insitu hybridization and histological methods were used to detect expression of c-fos, c-myc and bFGF genes in normal and burned tissue at 3 h, 6 h, 1 d, 3 d , 7 d and 14 d postburn. Results Although expression of c-fos and c-myc genes and bFGF gene could be found in normal skin, the expression of all three were markedly induced by burn wounds and the expression models in sequence and distribution were quite different. Expre ssion of c-fos gene increased and peaked at 6 h. Signals were mainly localiz ed in both nuclei of dermal fibroblasts and monocytes. The expression of bFGF gene increased at 6 h and peaked at 1 d postburn, and was distributed in the cyt oplasm of fibroblasts. C-myc gene peaked 3 d postburn and was also distributed in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts. Conclusions These results indicated that thermal injury could induce the expression of c-fos, c-myc and bFGF at gene level, showing phasic control and regional distributi on. The phasic expression of these genes suggests that there is an interaction between protooncogenes and bFGF, which may play an important role in wound heali ng. The different expressions of c-fos and c-myc play an inducing role in reg ulating bFGF, and in turn affect wound healing.

  7. Gene Expression Omnibus: NCBI gene expression and hybridization array data repository.

    Edgar, Ron; Domrachev, Michael; Lash, Alex E

    2002-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) project was initiated in response to the growing demand for a public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. GEO provides a flexible and open design that facilitates submission, storage and retrieval of heterogeneous data sets from high-throughput gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments. GEO is not intended to replace in house gene expression databases that benefit from coherent data sets, and which are constructed to facilitate a particular analytic method, but rather complement these by acting as a tertiary, central data distribution hub. The three central data entities of GEO are platforms, samples and series, and were designed with gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments in mind. A platform is, essentially, a list of probes that define what set of molecules may be detected. A sample describes the set of molecules that are being probed and references a single platform used to generate its molecular abundance data. A series organizes samples into the meaningful data sets which make up an experiment. The GEO repository is publicly accessible through the World Wide Web at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo.

  8. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  9. Gene expression in developing watermelon fruit

    Hernandez Alvaro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated watermelon form large fruits that are highly variable in size, shape, color, and content, yet have extremely narrow genetic diversity. Whereas a plethora of genes involved in cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, fruit softening, and secondary metabolism during fruit development and ripening have been identified in other plant species, little is known of the genes involved in these processes in watermelon. A microarray and quantitative Real-Time PCR-based study was conducted in watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. Matsum. & Nakai var. lanatus] in order to elucidate the flow of events associated with fruit development and ripening in this species. RNA from three different maturation stages of watermelon fruits, as well as leaf, were collected from field grown plants during three consecutive years, and analyzed for gene expression using high-density photolithography microarrays and quantitative PCR. Results High-density photolithography arrays, composed of probes of 832 EST-unigenes from a subtracted, fruit development, cDNA library of watermelon were utilized to examine gene expression at three distinct time-points in watermelon fruit development. Analysis was performed with field-grown fruits over three consecutive growing seasons. Microarray analysis identified three hundred and thirty-five unique ESTs that are differentially regulated by at least two-fold in watermelon fruits during the early, ripening, or mature stage when compared to leaf. Of the 335 ESTs identified, 211 share significant homology with known gene products and 96 had no significant matches with any database accession. Of the modulated watermelon ESTs related to annotated genes, a significant number were found to be associated with or involved in the vascular system, carotenoid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, pathogen and stress response, and ethylene biosynthesis. Ethylene bioassays, performed with a closely related watermelon

  10. Gene Expression Profile Changes in Germinating Rice

    Dongli He; Chao Han; Pingfang Yang

    2011-01-01

    Water absorption is a prerequisite for seed germination.During imbibition,water influx causes the resumption of many physiological and metabolic processes in growing seed.In order to obtain more complete knowledge about the mechanism of seed germination,two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was applied to investigate the protein profile changes of rice seed during the first 48 h of imbibition.Thirtynine differentially expressed proteins were identified,including 19 down-regulated and 20 up-regulated proteins.Storage proteins and some seed development- and desiccation-associated proteins were down regulated.The changed patterns of these proteins indicated extensive mobilization of seed reserves.By contrast,catabolism-associated proteins were up regulated upon imbibition.Semi-quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that most of the genes encoding the down- or upregulated proteins were also down or up regulated at mRNA level.The expression of these genes was largely consistent at mRNA and protein levels.In providing additional information concerning gene regulation in early plant life,this study will facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of seed germination.

  11. The relationship among gene expression, the evolution of gene dosage, and the rate of protein evolution.

    Jean-François Gout

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of selective constraints affecting genes is a major issue in biology. It is well established that gene expression level is a major determinant of the rate of protein evolution, but the reasons for this relationship remain highly debated. Here we demonstrate that gene expression is also a major determinant of the evolution of gene dosage: the rate of gene losses after whole genome duplications in the Paramecium lineage is negatively correlated to the level of gene expression, and this relationship is not a byproduct of other factors known to affect the fate of gene duplicates. This indicates that changes in gene dosage are generally more deleterious for highly expressed genes. This rule also holds for other taxa: in yeast, we find a clear relationship between gene expression level and the fitness impact of reduction in gene dosage. To explain these observations, we propose a model based on the fact that the optimal expression level of a gene corresponds to a trade-off between the benefit and cost of its expression. This COSTEX model predicts that selective pressure against mutations changing gene expression level or affecting the encoded protein should on average be stronger in highly expressed genes and hence that both the frequency of gene loss and the rate of protein evolution should correlate negatively with gene expression. Thus, the COSTEX model provides a simple and common explanation for the general relationship observed between the level of gene expression and the different facets of gene evolution.

  12. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  13. Spherical 3D Isotropic Wavelets

    Lanusse, F; Starck, J -L

    2011-01-01

    Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D Spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the Fourier-Bessel decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. 2006. We also present a new fast Discrete Spherical Fourier-Bessel Transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel Transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large...

  14. Improvement of 3D Scanner

    2003-01-01

    The disadvantage remaining in 3D scanning system and its reasons are discussed. A new host-and-slave structure with high speed image acquisition and processing system is proposed to quicken the image processing and improve the performance of 3D scanning system.

  15. 3D Printing for Bricks

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2015-01-01

    Building Bytes, by Brian Peters, is a project that uses desktop 3D printers to print bricks for architecture. Instead of using an expensive custom-made printer, it uses a normal standard 3D printer which is available for everyone and makes it more accessible and also easier for fabrication.

  16. 3D vision system assessment

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  17. PLOT3D user's manual

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  18. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  19. Using 3D in Visualization

    Wood, Jo; Kirschenbauer, Sabine; Döllner, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    The notion of three-dimensionality is applied to five stages of the visualization pipeline. While 3D visulization is most often associated with the visual mapping and representation of data, this chapter also identifies its role in the management and assembly of data, and in the media used...... to display 3D imagery. The extra cartographic degree of freedom offered by using 3D is explored and offered as a motivation for employing 3D in visualization. The use of VR and the construction of virtual environments exploit navigational and behavioral realism, but become most usefil when combined...... with abstracted representations embedded in a 3D space. The interactions between development of geovisualization, the technology used to implement it and the theory surrounding cartographic representation are explored. The dominance of computing technologies, driven particularly by the gaming industry...

  20. Expressing exogenous genes in newts by transgenesis.

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Yamada, Shouta; Miura, Tomoya; Nakamura, Kenta; Haynes, Tracy; Maki, Nobuyasu; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2011-05-01

    The great regenerative abilities of newts provide the impetus for studies at the molecular level. However, efficient methods for gene regulation have historically been quite limited. Here we describe a protocol for transgenically expressing exogenous genes in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster. This method is simple: a reaction mixture of I-SceI meganuclease and a plasmid DNA carrying a transgene cassette flanked by the enzyme recognition sites is directly injected into fertilized eggs. The protocol achieves a high efficiency of transgenesis, comparable to protocols used in other animal systems, and it provides a practical number of transgenic newts (∼20% of injected embryos) that survive beyond metamorphosis and that can be applied to regenerative studies. The entire protocol for obtaining transgenic adult newts takes 4-5 months.

  1. Gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy.

    Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) form a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by dysfunction of one of the lysosomal proteins, resulting in the accumulation of certain compounds. Although these disorders are among first genetic diseases for which specific treatments were proposed, there are still serious unsolved problems that require development of novel therapeutic procedures. An example is neuronopathy, which develops in most of LSD and cannot be treated efficiently by currently approved therapies. Recently, a new potential therapy, called gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy (GET IT), has been proposed for a group of LSD named mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), in which storage of incompletely degraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) results in severe symptoms of virtually all tissues and organs, including central nervous system. The idea of this therapy is to inhibit synthesis of GAGs by modulating expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in synthesis of these compounds. Such a modulation is possible by using isoflavones, particularly genistein, which interfere with a signal transduction process necessary for stimulation of expression of certain genes. Results of in vitro experiments and studies on animal models indicated a high efficiency of GET IT, including correction of behavior of affected mice. However, clinical trials, performed with soy isoflavone extracts, revealed only limited efficacy. This caused a controversy about GET IT as a potential, effective treatment of patients suffering from MPS, especially neuronopathic forms of these diseases. It this critical review, I present possible molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action of isoflavones (particularly genistein) and suggest that efficacy of GET IT might be sufficiently high when using relatively high doses of synthetic genistein (which was employed in experiments on cell cultures and mouse models) rather than low doses of soy isoflavone extracts (which were used in clinical trials). This

  2. Gene expression profiling of cutaneous wound healing

    Wang Ena

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sequence of events leading to wound repair has been described at the cellular and, to a limited extent, at the protein level this process has yet to be fully elucidated. Genome wide transcriptional analysis tools promise to further define the global picture of this complex progression of events. Study Design This study was part of a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial in which basal cell carcinomas were treated topically with an immunomodifier – toll-like receptor 7 agonist: imiquimod. The fourteen patients with basal cell carcinoma in the placebo arm of the trial received placebo treatment consisting solely of vehicle cream. A skin punch biopsy was obtained immediately before treatment and at the end of the placebo treatment (after 2, 4 or 8 days. 17.5K cDNA microarrays were utilized to profile the biopsy material. Results Four gene signatures whose expression changed relative to baseline (before wound induction by the pre-treatment biopsy were identified. The largest group was comprised predominantly of inflammatory genes whose expression was increased throughout the study. Two additional signatures were observed which included preferentially pro-inflammatory genes in the early post-treatment biopsies (2 days after pre-treatment biopsies and repair and angiogenesis genes in the later (4 to 8 days biopsies. The fourth and smallest set of genes was down-regulated throughout the study. Early in wound healing the expression of markers of both M1 and M2 macrophages were increased, but later M2 markers predominated. Conclusion The initial response to a cutaneous wound induces powerful transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory stimuli which may alert the host defense. Subsequently and in the absence of infection, inflammation subsides and it is replaced by angiogenesis and remodeling. Understanding this transition which may be driven by a change from a mixed macrophage population to predominately M2

  3. 3D nuclear organization of telomeres in the Hodgkin cell lines U-HO1 and U-HO1-PTPN1: PTPN1 expression prevents the formation of very short telomeres including "t-stumps"

    Lemieux Bruno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cancer cells the three-dimensional (3D telomere organization of interphase nuclei into a telomeric disk is heavily distorted and aggregates are found. In Hodgkin's lymphoma quantitative FISH (3D Q-FISH reveals a major impact of nuclear telomere dynamics during the transition form mononuclear Hodgkin (H to diagnostic multinuclear Reed-Sternberg (RS cells. In vitro and in vivo formation of RS-cells is associated with the increase of very short telomeres including "t-stumps", telomere loss, telomeric aggregate formation and the generation of "ghost nuclei". Results Here we analyze the 3D telomere dynamics by Q-FISH in the novel Hodgkin cell line U-HO1 and its non-receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase N1 (PTPN1 stable transfectant U-HO1-PTPN1, derived from a primary refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma. Both cell lines show equally high telomerase activity but U-HO1-PTPN differs from U-HO1 by a three times longer doubling time, low STAT5A expression, accumulation of RS-cells (p As expected, multinuclear U-HO1-RS-cells and multinuclear U-HO1-PTPN1-RS-cells differ from their mononuclear H-precursors by their nuclear volume (p Conclusion Abundant RS-cells without additional very short telomeres including "t-stumps", high rate of apoptosis, but low STAT5A expression, are hallmarks of the U-HO1-PTPN1 cell line. These characteristics are independent of telomerase activity. Thus, PTPN1 induced dephosphorylation of STAT5 with consecutive lack of Akt/PKB activation and cellular arrest in G2, promoting induction of apoptosis, appears as a possible pathogenetic mechanism deserving further experimental investigation.

  4. Network Completion for Static Gene Expression Data

    Natsu Nakajima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tackle the problem of completing and inferring genetic networks under stationary conditions from static data, where network completion is to make the minimum amount of modifications to an initial network so that the completed network is most consistent with the expression data in which addition of edges and deletion of edges are basic modification operations. For this problem, we present a new method for network completion using dynamic programming and least-squares fitting. This method can find an optimal solution in polynomial time if the maximum indegree of the network is bounded by a constant. We evaluate the effectiveness of our method through computational experiments using synthetic data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our proposed method can distinguish the differences between two types of genetic networks under stationary conditions from lung cancer and normal gene expression data.

  5. Global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences in rice evolution result in two contrasting types of differentially expressed genes

    Horiuchi, Youko

    2015-12-23

    Background Since the development of transcriptome analysis systems, many expression evolution studies characterized evolutionary forces acting on gene expression, without explicit discrimination between global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences. However, different types of gene expression alteration should have different effects on an organism, the evolutionary forces that act on them might be different, and different types of genes might show different types of differential expression between species. To confirm this, we studied differentially expressed (DE) genes among closely related groups that have extensive gene expression atlases, and clarified characteristics of different types of DE genes including the identification of regulating loci for differential expression using expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analysis data. Results We detected differentially expressed (DE) genes between rice subspecies in five homologous tissues that were verified using japonica and indica transcriptome atlases in public databases. Using the transcriptome atlases, we classified DE genes into two types, global DE genes and changed-tissues DE genes. Global type DE genes were not expressed in any tissues in the atlas of one subspecies, however changed-tissues type DE genes were expressed in both subspecies with different tissue specificity. For the five tissues in the two japonica-indica combinations, 4.6 ± 0.8 and 5.9 ± 1.5 % of highly expressed genes were global and changed-tissues DE genes, respectively. Changed-tissues DE genes varied in number between tissues, increasing linearly with the abundance of tissue specifically expressed genes in the tissue. Molecular evolution of global DE genes was rapid, unlike that of changed-tissues DE genes. Based on gene ontology, global and changed-tissues DE genes were different, having no common GO terms. Expression differences of most global DE genes were regulated by cis-eQTLs. Expression

  6. 3D tumor spheroids: an overview on the tools and techniques used for their analysis.

    Costa, Elisabete C; Moreira, André F; de Melo-Diogo, Duarte; Gaspar, Vítor M; Carvalho, Marco P; Correia, Ilídio J

    2016-12-01

    In comparison with 2D cell culture models, 3D spheroids are able to accurately mimic some features of solid tumors, such as their spatial architecture, physiological responses, secretion of soluble mediators, gene expression patterns and drug resistance mechanisms. These unique characteristics highlight the potential of 3D cellular aggregates to be used as in vitro models for screening new anticancer therapeutics, both at a small and large scale. Nevertheless, few reports have focused on describing the tools and techniques currently available to extract significant biological data from these models. Such information will be fundamental to drug and therapeutic discovery process using 3D cell culture models. The present review provides an overview of the techniques that can be employed to characterize and evaluate the efficacy of anticancer therapeutics in 3D tumor spheroids.

  7. Apopotic gene Bax expression in carotid plaque

    Bao-Zhong MEN; Ding-Biao ZHOU; Huai-Yin SHI; Xiao-Ming ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    The expression of BAX in carotid atherosclerosis and its regulation is far from defined. Objectives To investigate BAX expression in stable/fibrous and instable/vulnerable carotid plaque and its clinical significance. Methods 25 cases of carotid plaque specimens obtained from endarterectomy were divided into two groups, stable/fibrous 14 cases, vulnerable/instable 11 cases; aortic artery and its branches from hepatic transplantation donors 6 case as control. The expression of proapoptotic BAX was detected by immunohistochemistry(IHC), in situ hybridization(ISH) and in situ TdT dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results 5 cases of BAX ( + ) were detected by ICH and ISH, 4 case of TUNEL ( + ) were detected by TUNEL in stable/fibrous carotid plaque , while 10 cases were BAX ( + )by IHC(P < 0.05) , 11case by ISH and 9 case by TUNEL were detected in instable/vulnerable carotid plaque ( P < 0.01 ), respectively. The intensity of BAX ( + ) cells by IHC and ISH was 8.63 ± 2.62 and 10.32 ± 3.12 in fibrous plaques, whereas 122 ± 21.64and 152 ± 23.35 in vulnerable plaques, respectively. No expression of BAX was found in controlled group. Conclusion The higher expression of Bax in vulnerable carotid plaque may be one mechanisms in molecular pathogenesis of carotid atherosclerosis which affect plaque stability and be the cause of higher incidence of stroke than fibrous carotid plaques, the regulation of BAX expression in different stage of atherosclerosis may provide targets in gene therapy for carotid atherosclerosis.

  8. ADT-3D Tumor Detection Assistant in 3D

    Jaime Lazcano Bello

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The present document describes ADT-3D (Three-Dimensional Tumor Detector Assistant, a prototype application developed to assist doctors diagnose, detect and locate tumors in the brain by using CT scan. The reader may find on this document an introduction to tumor detection; ADT-3D main goals; development details; description of the product; motivation for its development; result’s study; and areas of applicability.

  9. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  10. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-07

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models.

  11. Expression profiles for six zebrafish genes during gonadal sex differentiation

    Jørgensen, Anne; Morthorst, Jane E.; Andersen, Ole;

    2008-01-01

    the precise timing of expression of six genes previously suggested to be associated with sex differentiation in zebrafish. The current study investigates the expression of all six genes in the same individual fish with extensive sampling dates during sex determination and -differentiation. RESULTS...... the same fish allowing comparison of the high and low expressers of genes that are expected to be highest expressed in either males or females. There were 78% high or low expressers of all three "male" genes (ar, sox9a and dmrt1) in the investigated period and 81% were high or low expressers of both...

  12. Tuotekehitysprojekti: 3D-tulostin

    Pihlajamäki, Janne

    2011-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tutustuttiin 3D-tulostamisen teknologiaan. Työssä käytiin läpi 3D-tulostimesta tehty tuotekehitysprojekti. Sen lisäksi esiteltiin yleisellä tasolla tuotekehitysprosessi ja syntyneiden tulosten mahdollisia suojausmenetelmiä. Tavoitteena tässä työssä oli kehittää markkinoilta jo löytyvää kotitulostin-tasoista 3D-laiteteknologiaa lähemmäksi ammattilaistason ratkaisua. Tavoitteeseen pyrittiin keskittymällä parantamaan laitteella saavutettavaa tulostustarkkuutta ja -nopeutt...

  13. Handbook of 3D integration

    Garrou , Philip; Ramm , Peter

    2014-01-01

    Edited by key figures in 3D integration and written by top authors from high-tech companies and renowned research institutions, this book covers the intricate details of 3D process technology.As such, the main focus is on silicon via formation, bonding and debonding, thinning, via reveal and backside processing, both from a technological and a materials science perspective. The last part of the book is concerned with assessing and enhancing the reliability of the 3D integrated devices, which is a prerequisite for the large-scale implementation of this emerging technology. Invaluable reading fo

  14. Color 3D Reverse Engineering

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a principle and a method of col or 3D laser scanning measurement. Based on the fundamental monochrome 3D measureme nt study, color information capture, color texture mapping, coordinate computati on and other techniques are performed to achieve color 3D measurement. The syste m is designed and composed of a line laser light emitter, one color CCD camera, a motor-driven rotary filter, a circuit card and a computer. Two steps in captu ring object's images in the measurement process: Firs...

  15. Exploration of 3D Printing

    Lin, Zeyu

    2014-01-01

    3D printing technology is introduced and defined in this Thesis. Some methods of 3D printing are illustrated and their principles are explained with pictures. Most of the essential parts are presented with pictures and their effects are explained within the whole system. Problems on Up! Plus 3D printer are solved and a DIY product is made with this machine. The processes of making product are recorded and the items which need to be noticed during the process are the highlight in this th...

  16. Detection of gene expression pattern in the early stage after spinal cord injury by gene chip

    刘成龙; 靳安民; 童斌辉

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of the gene expression pattern of spinal cord tissues in the early stage after injury by DNA microarray (gene chip). Methods: The contusion model of rat spinal cord was established according to Allen's falling strike method and the gene expression patterns of normal and injured spinal cord tissues were studied by gene chip. Results: The expression of 45 genes was significantly changed in the early stage after spinal cord injury, in which 22 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated. Conclusions: The expression of some genes changes significantly in the early stage after spinal cord injury, which indicates the complexity of secondary spinal cord injury.

  17. Gene expression profile in rat small intestinal allografts after cold preservation/reperfusion

    Shu-Feng Wang; Qi Liang; Guo-Wei Li; Kun Gao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the changes of gene expression profile in small intestinal allografts in rats after cold preservation/reperfusion, and to identify the genes relevant to cold preservation/reperfusion injury.METHODS: Heterotopic segmental small bowel transplantation was performed in six rats with a sham operation and they were used as controls. Total RNA was extracted from the allografts (experimental group) and normal intestines (control group) 1 h after cold preservation/reperfusion, and then purified to mRNA, which was then reversely transcribed to cDNA, and labeled with fluorescent Cy5-dUTP and Cy3-dUTP to prepare hybridization probes.The mixed probes were hybridized to the cDNA microarray.After high-stringent washing, the fluorescent signals on cDNA microarray chip werescanned and analyzed.RESULTS: Among the 4 096 target genes, 82 differentially expressed genes were identified between the two groups.There were 18 novel genes, 33 expression sequence tags,and 31 previously reported genes. The selected genes may be divided into four classes: genes modulating cellular adhesion, genes regulating cellular energy, glucose and protein metabolism, early response genes and other genes.CONCLUSION: A total of 82 genes that may be relevant to cold preservation/reperfusion injury in small intestinal allografts are identified. Abnormal adhesion between polymorphonuclears and endothelia and failure in energy,glucose and protein metabolism of the grafts may contribute to preservation/reperfusion injury. The functions of the novel genes identified in our study need to be darified further.

  18. Coactivators in PPAR-Regulated Gene Expression

    Navin Viswakarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα, β (also known as δ, and γ function as sensors for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and control important metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance. PPARs also regulate other diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, inflammation, and neoplasia. In the nucleus, PPARs exist as heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α bound to DNA with corepressor molecules. Upon ligand activation, PPARs undergo conformational changes that facilitate the dissociation of corepressor molecules and invoke a spatiotemporally orchestrated recruitment of transcription cofactors including coactivators and coactivator-associated proteins. While a given nuclear receptor regulates the expression of a prescribed set of target genes, coactivators are likely to influence the functioning of many regulators and thus affect the transcription of many genes. Evidence suggests that some of the coactivators such as PPAR-binding protein (PBP/PPARBP/thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 220 (TRAP220/mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1 may exert a broader influence on the functions of several nuclear receptors and their target genes. Investigations into the role of coactivators in the function of PPARs should strengthen our understanding of the complexities of metabolic diseases associated with energy metabolism.

  19. Gene expression profiling of mouse embryos with microarrays

    Sharov, Alexei A; Piao, Yulan; Minoru S.H. Ko

    2010-01-01

    Global expression profiling by DNA microarrays provides a snapshot of cell and tissue status and becomes an essential tool in biological and medical sciences. Typical questions that can be addressed by microarray analysis in developmental biology include: (1) to find a set of genes expressed in a specific cell type; (2) to identify genes expressed commonly in multiple cell types; (3) to follow the time-course changes of gene expression patterns; (4) to demonstrate cell’s identity by showing s...

  20. A digital framework to build, visualize and analyze a gene expression atlas with cellular resolution in zebrafish early embryogenesis.

    Carlos Castro-González

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A gene expression atlas is an essential resource to quantify and understand the multiscale processes of embryogenesis in time and space. The automated reconstruction of a prototypic 4D atlas for vertebrate early embryos, using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with nuclear counterstain, requires dedicated computational strategies. To this goal, we designed an original methodological framework implemented in a software tool called Match-IT. With only minimal human supervision, our system is able to gather gene expression patterns observed in different analyzed embryos with phenotypic variability and map them onto a series of common 3D templates over time, creating a 4D atlas. This framework was used to construct an atlas composed of 6 gene expression templates from a cohort of zebrafish early embryos spanning 6 developmental stages from 4 to 6.3 hpf (hours post fertilization. They included 53 specimens, 181,415 detected cell nuclei and the segmentation of 98 gene expression patterns observed in 3D for 9 different genes. In addition, an interactive visualization software, Atlas-IT, was developed to inspect, supervise and analyze the atlas. Match-IT and Atlas-IT, including user manuals, representative datasets and video tutorials, are publicly and freely available online. We also propose computational methods and tools for the quantitative assessment of the gene expression templates at the cellular scale, with the identification, visualization and analysis of coexpression patterns, synexpression groups and their dynamics through developmental stages.

  1. 3D fast wavelet network model-assisted 3D face recognition

    Said, Salwa; Jemai, Olfa; Zaied, Mourad; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2015-12-01

    In last years, the emergence of 3D shape in face recognition is due to its robustness to pose and illumination changes. These attractive benefits are not all the challenges to achieve satisfactory recognition rate. Other challenges such as facial expressions and computing time of matching algorithms remain to be explored. In this context, we propose our 3D face recognition approach using 3D wavelet networks. Our approach contains two stages: learning stage and recognition stage. For the training we propose a novel algorithm based on 3D fast wavelet transform. From 3D coordinates of the face (x,y,z), we proceed to voxelization to get a 3D volume which will be decomposed by 3D fast wavelet transform and modeled after that with a wavelet network, then their associated weights are considered as vector features to represent each training face . For the recognition stage, an unknown identity face is projected on all the training WN to obtain a new vector features after every projection. A similarity score is computed between the old and the obtained vector features. To show the efficiency of our approach, experimental results were performed on all the FRGC v.2 benchmark.

  2. Analysis of multiplex gene expression maps obtained by voxelation

    Smith Desmond J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological disease. Researchers have previously used voxelation in combination with microarrays for acquisition of genome-wide atlases of expression patterns in the mouse brain. On the other hand, some work has been performed on studying gene functions, without taking into account the location information of a gene's expression in a mouse brain. In this paper, we present an approach for identifying the relation between gene expression maps obtained by voxelation and gene functions. Results To analyze the dataset, we chose typical genes as queries and aimed at discovering similar gene groups. Gene similarity was determined by using the wavelet features extracted from the left and right hemispheres averaged gene expression maps, and by the Euclidean distance between each pair of feature vectors. We also performed a multiple clustering approach on the gene expression maps, combined with hierarchical clustering. Among each group of similar genes and clusters, the gene function similarity was measured by calculating the average gene function distances in the gene ontology structure. By applying our methodology to find similar genes to certain target genes we were able to improve our understanding of gene expression patterns and gene functions. By applying the clustering analysis method, we obtained significant clusters, which have both very similar gene expression maps and very similar gene functions respectively to their corresponding gene ontologies. The cellular component ontology resulted in prominent clusters expressed in cortex and corpus callosum. The molecular function ontology gave prominent clusters in cortex, corpus callosum and hypothalamus. The biological process ontology resulted in clusters in cortex, hypothalamus and choroid plexus. Clusters from all three ontologies combined were most prominently expressed in

  3. Accepting the T3D

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  4. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    The main purpose of the PhD project was to develop methods that increase the 3-D ultrasound imaging quality available for the medical personnel in the clinic. Acquiring a 3-D volume gives the medical doctor the freedom to investigate the measured anatomy in any slice desirable after the scan has...... been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinics as 2-D imaging. A limiting factor has traditionally been the low image quality achievable using...... Field II simulations and measurements with the ultrasound research scanner SARUS and a 3.5MHz 1024 element 2-D transducer array. In all investigations, 3-D synthetic aperture imaging achieved a smaller main-lobe, lower sidelobes, higher contrast, and better signal to noise ratio than parallel...

  5. Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained...

  6. Differentially expressed genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified through serial analysis of gene expression

    Hustinx, Steven R; Cao, Dengfeng; Maitra, Anirban;

    2004-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool for the discovery of novel tumor markers. The publicly available online SAGE libraries of normal and neoplastic tissues (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/SAGE/) have recently been expanded; in addition, a more complete annotation of the human...

  7. Standard 3D digital atlas of zebrafish embryonic development for projection of experimental data

    Verbeek, Fons J.; den Broeder, M. J.; Boon, Paul J.; Buitendijk, B.; Doerry, E.; van Raaij, E. J.; Zivkovic, D.

    1999-12-01

    In developmental biology an overwhelming amount of experimental data concerning patterns of gene expression is produced revealing the genetic layout of the embryo and finding evidence for anomalies. Genes are part of complex genetic cascades and consequently their study requires tools for handling combinatorial problems. Gene expression is spatio-temporal and generally, imagin is used to analyze expression in four dimensions. Reporting and retrieving experimental data has become so complex that printed literature is no longer adequate and therefore databases are being implemented. Zebrafish is a popular model system in developmental biology. We are developing a 3D digital atlas of the zebrafish embryo, which is envisaged as standard allowing comparisons of experimentally induced and normally developing embryos. This 3D atlas is based on microscopical anatomy. From serial sections 3D images are reconstructed by capturing section images and registering these images respectively. This is accomplished for al developmental stages. Data management is solved using XML which is platform independent, ASCII-based, interchangeable and allows easy browsing. Applying supervised segmentation accomplishes a completely anatomically annotated 3D image. It divides the image into domains required for comparison and mapping. Experts provided with dedicated software and Internet-access to the images review annotations. Complete annotation and review is stored in a database.

  8. Evolution of Gene Expression Balance Among Homeologs of Natural Polyploids

    Jasdeep S. Mutti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidy is a major evolutionary process in eukaryotes, yet the expression balance of homeologs in natural polyploids is largely unknown. To study this expression balance, the expression patterns of 2180 structurally well-characterized genes of wheat were studied, of which 813 had the expected three copies and 375 had less than three. Copy numbers of the remaining 992 ranged from 4 to 14, including homeologs, orthologs, and paralogs. Of the genes with three structural copies corresponding to homeologs, 55% expressed from all three, 38% from two, and the remaining 7% expressed from only one of the three copies. Homeologs of 76–87% of the genes showed differential expression patterns in different tissues, thus have evolved different gene expression controls, possibly resulting in novel functions. Homeologs of 55% of the genes showed tissue-specific expression, with the largest percentage (14% in the anthers and the smallest (7% in the pistils. The highest number (1.72/3 of homeologs/gene expression was in the roots and the lowest (1.03/3 in the anthers. As the expression of homeologs changed with changes in structural copy number, about 30% of the genes showed dosage dependence. Chromosomal location also impacted expression pattern as a significantly higher proportion of genes in the proximal regions showed expression from all three copies compared to that present in the distal regions.

  9. Evolution of Gene Expression Balance Among Homeologs of Natural Polyploids.

    Mutti, Jasdeep S; Bhullar, Ramanjot K; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2017-04-03

    Polyploidy is a major evolutionary process in eukaryotes, yet the expression balance of homeologs in natural polyploids is largely unknown. To study this expression balance, the expression patterns of 2180 structurally well-characterized genes of wheat were studied, of which 813 had the expected three copies and 375 had less than three. Copy numbers of the remaining 992 ranged from 4 to 14, including homeologs, orthologs, and paralogs. Of the genes with three structural copies corresponding to homeologs, 55% expressed from all three, 38% from two, and the remaining 7% expressed from only one of the three copies. Homeologs of 76-87% of the genes showed differential expression patterns in different tissues, thus have evolved different gene expression controls, possibly resulting in novel functions. Homeologs of 55% of the genes showed tissue-specific expression, with the largest percentage (14%) in the anthers and the smallest (7%) in the pistils. The highest number (1.72/3) of homeologs/gene expression was in the roots and the lowest (1.03/3) in the anthers. As the expression of homeologs changed with changes in structural copy number, about 30% of the genes showed dosage dependence. Chromosomal location also impacted expression pattern as a significantly higher proportion of genes in the proximal regions showed expression from all three copies compared to that present in the distal regions.

  10. Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression

    Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional-but often neglected-layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an experiment

  11. 3D-mallinnus ja 3D-animaatiot biovoimalaitoksesta

    Hiltula, Tytti

    2014-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tehtiin biovoimalaitoksen piirustuksista 3D-mallinnus ja animaatiot. Työn tarkoituksena oli saada valmiiksi Recwell Oy:lle markkinointiin tarkoitetut kuva- ja videomateriaalit. Työssä perehdyttiin 3D-mallintamisen perustietoihin ja lähtökohtiin sekä animaation laatimiseen. Työ laadittiin kokonaisuudessaan AutoCAD-ohjelmalla, ja työn aikana tutustuttiin huolellisesti myös ohjelman käyttöohjeisiin. Piirustusten mitoituksessa huomattiin jo alkuvaiheessa suuria puutteita, ...

  12. 3D culture broadly regulates tumor cell hypoxia response and angiogenesis via pro-inflammatory pathways.

    DelNero, Peter; Lane, Maureen; Verbridge, Scott S; Kwee, Brian; Kermani, Pouneh; Hempstead, Barbara; Stroock, Abraham; Fischbach, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen status and tissue dimensionality are critical determinants of tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer and an enduring target for therapeutic intervention. However, it is unclear how these microenvironmental conditions interact to promote neovascularization, due in part to a lack of comprehensive, unbiased data sets describing tumor cell gene expression as a function of oxygen levels within three-dimensional (3D) culture. Here, we utilized alginate-based, oxygen-controlled 3D tumor models to study the interdependence of culture context and the hypoxia response. Microarray gene expression analysis of tumor cells cultured in 2D versus 3D under ambient or hypoxic conditions revealed striking interdependence between culture dimensionality and hypoxia response, which was mediated in part by pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. In particular, interleukin-8 (IL-8) emerged as a major player in the microenvironmental regulation of the hypoxia program. Notably, this interaction between dimensionality and oxygen status via IL-8 increased angiogenic sprouting in a 3D endothelial invasion assay. Taken together, our data suggest that pro-inflammatory pathways are critical regulators of tumor hypoxia response within 3D environments that ultimately impact tumor angiogenesis, potentially providing important therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of pathologically relevant tissue culture models to study the complex physical and chemical processes by which the cancer microenvironment mediates new vessel formation.

  13. Gene expression during fruit ripening in avocado.

    Christoffersen, R E; Warm, E; Laties, G G

    1982-06-01

    The poly(A) (+)RNA populations from avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill cv. Hass) at four stages of ripening were isolated by two cycles of oligo-dT-cellulose chromatography and examined by invitro translation, using the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system, followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (isoelectric focusing followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of the resulting translation products. Three mRNAs increased dramatically with the climacteric rise in respiration and ethylene production. The molecular weights of the corresponding translation products from the ripening-related mRNAs are 80,000, 36,000, and 16,500. These results indicate that ripening may be linked to the expression of specific genes.

  14. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo; Tong, Shurong

    2011-01-01

    is proposed and analyzed, as well as its three categories i.e., the operator gene, the structural gene and the regulator gene. Second, the trigger mechanism that design objectives and constraints trigger the operator gene is constructed. Third, the expression principle of structural gene is analyzed......To improve the design process efficiency, this paper proposes the principle and methodology that design process gene controls the characteristics of design process under the framework of design process reuse and optimization based on design process gene. First, the concept of design process gene...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications....

  15. Individual variation of adipose gene expression and identification of covariated genes by cDNA microarrays

    Boeuf, S.; Keijer, J.; Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Klaus, S.

    2002-01-01

    Gene expression profiling through the application of microarrays provides comprehensive assessment of gene expression levels in a given tissue or cell population, as well as information on changes of gene expression in altered physiological or pathological situations. Microarrays are particularly su

  16. Monoallelic expression of the human FOXP2 speech gene.

    Adegbola, Abidemi A; Cox, Gerald F; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Hafler, David A; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Chess, Andrew

    2015-06-02

    The recent descriptions of widespread random monoallelic expression (RMAE) of genes distributed throughout the autosomal genome indicate that there are more genes subject to RMAE on autosomes than the number of genes on the X chromosome where X-inactivation dictates RMAE of X-linked genes. Several of the autosomal genes that undergo RMAE have independently been implicated in human Mendelian disorders. Thus, parsing the relationship between allele-specific expression of these genes and disease is of interest. Mutations in the human forkhead box P2 gene, FOXP2, cause developmental verbal dyspraxia with profound speech and language deficits. Here, we show that the human FOXP2 gene undergoes RMAE. Studying an individual with developmental verbal dyspraxia, we identify a deletion 3 Mb away from the FOXP2 gene, which impacts FOXP2 gene expression in cis. Together these data suggest the intriguing possibility that RMAE impacts the haploinsufficiency phenotypes observed for FOXP2 mutations.

  17. Phenotypic plasticity and divergence in gene expression.

    Healy, Timothy M; Schulte, Patricia M

    2015-07-01

    The extent to which phenotypic plasticity, or the ability of a single genotype to produce different phenotypes in different environments, impedes or promotes genetic divergence has been a matter of debate within evolutionary biology for many decades (see, for example, Ghalambor et al. ; Pfennig et al. ). Similarly, the role of evolution in shaping phenotypic plasticity remains poorly understood (Pigliucci ). In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Dayan et al. () provide empirical data relevant to these questions by assessing the extent of plasticity and divergence in the expression levels of 2272 genes in muscle tissue from killifish (genus Fundulus) exposed to different temperatures. F. heteroclitus (Fig. A) and F. grandis are minnows that inhabit estuarine marshes (Fig. B) along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico in North America. These habitats undergo large variations in temperature both daily and seasonally, and these fish are known to demonstrate substantial phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature change (e.g. Fangue et al. ). Furthermore, the range of F. heteroclitus spans a large latitudinal gradient of temperatures, such that northern populations experience temperatures that are on average ~10°C colder than do southern populations (Schulte ). By comparing gene expression patterns between populations of these fish from different thermal habitats held in the laboratory at three different temperatures, Dayan et al. () address two important questions regarding the interacting effects of plasticity and evolution: (i) How does phenotypic plasticity affect adaptive divergence? and (ii) How does adaptive divergence affect plasticity?

  18. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  19. Modulation of R-gene expression across environments.

    MacQueen, Alice; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-03-01

    Some environments are more conducive to pathogen growth than others, and, as a consequence, plants might be expected to invest more in resistance when pathogen growth is favored. Resistance (R-) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana have unusually extensive variation in basal expression when comparing the same R-gene among accessions collected from different environments. R-gene expression variation was characterized to explore whether R-gene expression is up-regulated in environments favoring pathogen proliferation and down-regulated when risks of infection are low; down-regulation would follow if costs of R-gene expression negatively impact plant fitness in the absence of disease. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was used to quantify the expression of 13 R-gene loci in plants grown in eight environmental conditions for each of 12 A. thaliana accessions, and large effects of the environment on R-gene expression were found. Surprisingly, almost every change in the environment--be it a change in biotic or abiotic conditions--led to an increase in R-gene expression, a response that was distinct from the average transcriptome response and from that of other stress response genes. These changes in expression are functional in that environmental change prior to infection affected levels of specific disease resistance to isolates of Pseudomonas syringae. In addition, there are strong latitudinal clines in basal R-gene expression and clines in R-gene expression plasticity correlated with drought and high temperatures. These results suggest that variation in R-gene expression across environments may be shaped by natural selection to reduce fitness costs of R-gene expression in permissive or predictable environments.

  20. Integrated analysis of gene expression by association rules discovery

    Carazo Jose M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology is generating huge amounts of data about the expression level of thousands of genes, or even whole genomes, across different experimental conditions. To extract biological knowledge, and to fully understand such datasets, it is essential to include external biological information about genes and gene products to the analysis of expression data. However, most of the current approaches to analyze microarray datasets are mainly focused on the analysis of experimental data, and external biological information is incorporated as a posterior process. Results In this study we present a method for the integrative analysis of microarray data based on the Association Rules Discovery data mining technique. The approach integrates gene annotations and expression data to discover intrinsic associations among both data sources based on co-occurrence patterns. We applied the proposed methodology to the analysis of gene expression datasets in which genes were annotated with metabolic pathways, transcriptional regulators and Gene Ontology categories. Automatically extracted associations revealed significant relationships among these gene attributes and expression patterns, where many of them are clearly supported by recently reported work. Conclusion The integration of external biological information and gene expression data can provide insights about the biological processes associated to gene expression programs. In this paper we show that the proposed methodology is able to integrate multiple gene annotations and expression data in the same analytic framework and extract meaningful associations among heterogeneous sources of data. An implementation of the method is included in the Engene software package.

  1. 3D future internet media

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2014-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The main contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Projects ROMEO, which focus on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the Future Internet (www.ict-romeo.eu). The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of constant video quality to both fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will design and develop hybrid-networking solutions that co...

  2. Materialedreven 3d digital formgivning

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med forskningsprojektet er for det første at understøtte keramikeren i at arbejde eksperimenterende med digital formgivning, og for det andet at bidrage til en tværfaglig diskurs om brugen af digital formgivning. Forskningsprojektet fokuserer på 3d formgivning og derved på 3d digital...... formgivning og Rapid Prototyping (RP). RP er en fællesbetegnelse for en række af de teknikker, der muliggør at overføre den digitale form til 3d fysisk form. Forskningsprojektet koncentrerer sig om to overordnede forskningsspørgsmål. Det første handler om, hvordan viden og erfaring indenfor det keramiske...... fagområde kan blive udnyttet i forhold til 3d digital formgivning. Det andet handler om, hvad en sådan tilgang kan bidrage med, og hvordan den kan blive udnyttet i et dynamisk samspil med det keramiske materiale i formgivningen af 3d keramiske artefakter. Materialedreven formgivning er karakteriseret af en...

  3. Novel 3D media technologies

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2015-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Project ROMEO, which focuses on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the future Internet. The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of consistent video quality to fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will present hybrid networking solutions that combine the DVB-T2 and DVB-NGH broadcas...

  4. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  5. Screening and expression of genes from metagenomes.

    Leis, Benedikt; Angelov, Angel; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are the most abundant and widely spread organisms on earth. They colonize a huge variety of natural and anthropogenic environments, including very specialized ecological niches and even extreme habitats, which are made possible by the immense metabolic diversity and genetic adaptability of microbes. As most of the organisms from environmental samples defy cultivation, cultivation-independent metagenomics approaches have been applied since more than one decade to access and characterize the phylogenetic diversity in microbial communities as well as their metabolic potential and ecological functions. Thereby, metagenomics has fully emerged as an own scientific field for mining new biocatalysts for many industrially relevant processes in biotechnology and pharmaceutics. This review summarizes common metagenomic approaches ranging from sampling, isolation of nucleic acids, construction of metagenomic libraries and their evaluation. Sequence-based screenings implement next-generation sequencing platforms, microarrays or PCR-based methods, while function-based analysis covers heterologous expression of metagenomic libraries in diverse screening setups. Major constraints and advantages of each strategy are described. The importance of alternative host-vector systems is discussed, and in order to underline the role of phylogenetic and physiological distance from the gene donor and the expression host employed, a case study is presented that describes the screening of a genomic library from an extreme thermophilic bacterium in both Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and single-cell-based methods are expected to complement metagenomic screening efforts to identify novel biocatalysts from environmental samples.

  6. CDX2 gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Hanaa H. Arnaoaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CDX genes are classically known as regulators of axial elongation during early embryogenesis. An unsuspected role for CDX genes has been revealed during hematopoietic development. The CDX gene family member CDX2 belongs to the most frequent aberrantly expressed proto-oncogenes in human acute leukemias and is highly leukemogenic in experimental models. We used reversed transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to determine the expression level of CDX2 gene in 30 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL at diagnosis and 30 healthy volunteers. ALL patients were followed up to detect minimal residual disease (MRD on days 15 and 42 of induction. We found that CDX2 gene was expressed in 50% of patients and not expressed in controls. Associations between gene expression and different clinical and laboratory data of patients revealed no impact on different findings. With follow up, we could not confirm that CDX2 expression had a prognostic significance.

  7. Modification of 3D milling machine to 3D printer

    Halamíček, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Tato práce se zabývá přestavbou gravírovací frézky na 3D tiskárnu. V první části se práce zabývá možnými technologiemi 3D tisku a možností jejich využití u přestavby. Dále jsou popsány a vybrány vhodné součásti pro přestavbu. V další části je realizováno řízení ohřevu podložky, trysky a řízení posuvu drátu pomocí softwaru TwinCat od společnosti Beckhoff na průmyslovém počítači. Výsledkem práce by měla být oživená 3D tiskárna. This thesis deals with rebuilding of engraving machine to 3D pri...

  8. 3-D Vector Flow Imaging

    Holbek, Simon

    studies and in vivo. Phantom measurements are compared with their corresponding reference value, whereas the in vivo measurement is validated against the current golden standard for non-invasive blood velocity estimates, based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The study concludes, that a high precision......, if this significant reduction in the element count can still provide precise and robust 3-D vector flow estimates in a plane. The study concludes that the RC array is capable of estimating precise 3-D vector flow both in a plane and in a volume, despite the low channel count. However, some inherent new challenges......For the last decade, the field of ultrasonic vector flow imaging has gotten an increasingly attention, as the technique offers a variety of new applications for screening and diagnostics of cardiovascular pathologies. The main purpose of this PhD project was therefore to advance the field of 3-D...

  9. 3D vector flow imaging

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... conventional methods can estimate only the axial component. Several approaches for 3D vector velocity estimation have been suggested, but none of these methods have so far produced convincing in vivo results nor have they been adopted by commercial manufacturers. The basis for this project is the Transverse...... on the TO fields are suggested. They can be used to optimize the TO method. In the third part, a TO method for 3D vector velocity estimation is proposed. It employs a 2D phased array transducer and decouples the velocity estimation into three velocity components, which are estimated simultaneously based on 5...

  10. Markerless 3D Face Tracking

    Walder, Christian; Breidt, Martin; Bulthoff, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the markerless tracking of deforming surfaces such as faces. We acquire a sequence of 3D scans along with color images at 40Hz. The data is then represented by implicit surface and color functions, using a novel partition-of-unity type method of efficiently...... combining local regressors using nearest neighbor searches. Both these functions act on the 4D space of 3D plus time, and use temporal information to handle the noise in individual scans. After interactive registration of a template mesh to the first frame, it is then automatically deformed to track...... the scanned surface, using the variation of both shape and color as features in a dynamic energy minimization problem. Our prototype system yields high-quality animated 3D models in correspondence, at a rate of approximately twenty seconds per timestep. Tracking results for faces and other objects...

  11. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression: Applications in Human Studies

    2004-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool, which provides quantitative and comprehensive expression profile of genes in a given cell population. It works by isolating short fragments of genetic information from the expressed genes that are present in the cell being studied. These short sequences, called SAGE tags, are linked together for efficient sequencing. The frequency of each SAGE tag in the cloned multimers directly reflects the transcript abundance. Therefore, SAGE r...

  12. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  13. Microfluidic 3D Helix Mixers

    Georgette B. Salieb-Beugelaar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric microfluidic systems are well suited for miniaturized devices with complex functionality, and rapid prototyping methods for 3D microfluidic structures are increasingly used. Mixing at the microscale and performing chemical reactions at the microscale are important applications of such systems and we therefore explored feasibility, mixing characteristics and the ability to control a chemical reaction in helical 3D channels produced by the emerging thread template method. Mixing at the microscale is challenging because channel size reduction for improving solute diffusion comes at the price of a reduced Reynolds number that induces a strictly laminar flow regime and abolishes turbulence that would be desired for improved mixing. Microfluidic 3D helix mixers were rapidly prototyped in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS using low-surface energy polymeric threads, twisted to form 2-channel and 3-channel helices. Structure and flow characteristics were assessed experimentally by microscopy, hydraulic measurements and chromogenic reaction, and were modeled by computational fluid dynamics. We found that helical 3D microfluidic systems produced by thread templating allow rapid prototyping, can be used for mixing and for controlled chemical reaction with two or three reaction partners at the microscale. Compared to the conventional T-shaped microfluidic system used as a control device, enhanced mixing and faster chemical reaction was found to occur due to the combination of diffusive mixing in small channels and flow folding due to the 3D helix shape. Thus, microfluidic 3D helix mixers can be rapidly prototyped using the thread template method and are an attractive and competitive method for fluid mixing and chemical reactions at the microscale.

  14. Differential Expression of Salinity Resistance Gene on Cotton

    YE Wu-wei; YU Shu-xun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Salinity resistance and differential gene expression associated with salinity in cotton germplasm were studied,because of the large scale area of salinity in China,and its significant negative effects on the cotton production.The salinityresisted genes and their differential expression were studied under the stress of NaCI on cotton.There were found,under the NaCI stress,1644 genes differentially expressed from the salinity-sensitive cotton and only 817 genes differentially expressed from the salinityresisted cotton.

  15. Transposable element influences on gene expression in plants.

    Hirsch, Cory D; Springer, Nathan M

    2017-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise a major portion of many plant genomes and bursts of TE movements cause novel genomic variation within species. In order to maintain proper gene function, plant genomes have evolved a variety of mechanisms to tolerate the presence of TEs within or near genes. Here, we review our understanding of the interactions between TEs and gene expression in plants by assessing three ways that transposons can influence gene expression. First, there is growing evidence that TE insertions within introns or untranslated regions of genes are often tolerated and have minimal impact on expression level or splicing. However, there are examples in which TE insertions within genes can result in aberrant or novel transcripts. Second, TEs can provide novel alternative promoters, which can lead to new expression patterns or original coding potential of an alternate transcript. Third, TE insertions near genes can influence regulation of gene expression through a variety of mechanisms. For example, TEs may provide novel cis-acting regulatory sites behaving as enhancers or insert within existing enhancers to influence transcript production. Alternatively, TEs may change chromatin modifications in regions near genes, which in turn can influence gene expression levels. Together, the interactions of genes and TEs provide abundant evidence for the role of TEs in changing basic functions within plant genomes beyond acting as latent genomic elements or as simple insertional mutagens. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  16. Evidence for mitochondrial genetic control of autosomal gene expression.

    Kassam, Irfahan; Qi, Tuan; Lloyd-Jones, Luke; Holloway, Alexander; Jan Bonder, Marc; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Powell, Joseph E; Franke, Lude; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M; McRae, Allan F

    2016-10-18

    The mitochondrial and nuclear genomes coordinate and co-evolve in eukaryotes in order to adapt to environmental changes. Variation in the mitochondrial genome is capable of affecting expression of genes on the nuclear genome. Sex-specific mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression has been demonstrated in Drosophila melanogaster, where males were found to drive most of the total variation in gene expression. This has potential implications for male-related health and disease resulting from variation in mtDNA solely inherited from the mother. We used a family-based study comprised of 47,323 gene expression probes and 78 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs) from n = 846 individuals to examine the extent of mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in humans. This identified 15 significant probe-mtSNP associations (P[Formula: see text]) corresponding to 5 unique genes on the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, with three of these genes corresponding to mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in the nuclear genome. The associated mtSNPs for three genes (one cis and two trans associations) were replicated (P expression in any of these five probes. Sex-specific effects were examined by applying our analysis to males and females separately and testing for differences in effect size. The MEST gene was identified as having the most significantly different effect sizes across the sexes (P [Formula: see text]). MEST was similarly expressed in males and females with the G allele; however, males with the C allele are highly expressed for MEST, while females show no expression of the gene. This study provides evidence for the mitochondrial genetic control of expression of several genes in humans, with little evidence found for sex-specific effects.

  17. Quantitative modeling of a gene's expression from its intergenic sequence.

    Md Abul Hassan Samee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling a gene's expression from its intergenic locus and trans-regulatory context is a fundamental goal in computational biology. Owing to the distributed nature of cis-regulatory information and the poorly understood mechanisms that integrate such information, gene locus modeling is a more challenging task than modeling individual enhancers. Here we report the first quantitative model of a gene's expression pattern as a function of its locus. We model the expression readout of a locus in two tiers: 1 combinatorial regulation by transcription factors bound to each enhancer is predicted by a thermodynamics-based model and 2 independent contributions from multiple enhancers are linearly combined to fit the gene expression pattern. The model does not require any prior knowledge about enhancers contributing toward a gene's expression. We demonstrate that the model captures the complex multi-domain expression patterns of anterior-posterior patterning genes in the early Drosophila embryo. Altogether, we model the expression patterns of 27 genes; these include several gap genes, pair-rule genes, and anterior, posterior, trunk, and terminal genes. We find that the model-selected enhancers for each gene overlap strongly with its experimentally characterized enhancers. Our findings also suggest the presence of sequence-segments in the locus that would contribute ectopic expression patterns and hence were "shut down" by the model. We applied our model to identify the transcription factors responsible for forming the stripe boundaries of the studied genes. The resulting network of regulatory interactions exhibits a high level of agreement with known regulatory influences on the target genes. Finally, we analyzed whether and why our assumption of enhancer independence was necessary for the genes we studied. We found a deterioration of expression when binding sites in one enhancer were allowed to influence the readout of another enhancer. Thus, interference

  18. Expressed genes in regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy

    Cun-Shuan Xu; Salman Rahrnan; Jing-Bo Zhang; Cui-Fang Chang; Jin-Yun Yuan; Wen-Qiang Li; Hong-Peng Han; Ke-Jin Yang; Li-Feng Zhao; Yu-Chang Li; Hui-Yong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To reveal the liver regeneration (LR) and its controlas well as the occurrence of liver disease and to study the gene expression profiles of 551 genes after partial hepatectomy (PH) in regenerating rat livers.METHODS: Five hundred and fifty-one expressed sequence tags screened by suppression subtractive hybridization were made into an in-house cDNA microarray, and the expressive genes and their expressive profiles in regenerating rat livers were analyzed by microarray and bioinformatics. RESULTS: Three hundred of the analyzed 551 genes were up- or downregulated more than twofolds at one or more time points during LR. Most of the genes were up- or downregulated 2-5 folds, but the highest reached 90 folds of the control. One hundred and thirty-nine of themshowed upregulation, 135 displayed downregulation, and up or down expression of 26 genes revealed a dependence on regenerating livers. The genes expressedin 24-h regenerating livers were much more than those in the others. Cluster analysis and generalization analysis showed that there were at least six distinct temporal patterns of gene expression in the regenerating livers, that is, genes were expressed in the immediate early phase, early phase, intermediate phase, early-late phase, late phase, terminal phase. CONCLUSION: In LR, the number of down-regulated genes was almost similar to that of the upregulated genes; the successively altered genes were more than the rapidly transient genes. The temporal patterns of gene expression were similar 2 and 4 h, 12 and 16 h, 48 and 96 h, 72 and 144 h after PH. Microarray combined with suppressive subtractive hybridization can effectively identify the genes related to LR.

  19. Visualizing Vertebrate Embryos with Episcopic 3D Imaging Techniques

    Stefan H. Geyer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The creation of highly detailed, three-dimensional (3D computer models is essential in order to understand the evolution and development of vertebrate embryos, and the pathogenesis of hereditary diseases. A still-increasing number of methods allow for generating digital volume data sets as the basis of virtual 3D computer models. This work aims to provide a brief overview about modern volume data–generation techniques, focusing on episcopic 3D imaging methods. The technical principles, advantages, and problems of episcopic 3D imaging are described. The strengths and weaknesses in its ability to visualize embryo anatomy and labeled gene product patterns, specifically, are discussed.

  20. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  1. 3D terahertz beam profiling

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Strikwerda, Andrew; Wang, Tianwu

    2013-01-01

    We present a characterization of THz beams generated in both a two-color air plasma and in a LiNbO3 crystal. Using a commercial THz camera, we record intensity images as a function of distance through the beam waist, from which we extract 2D beam profiles and visualize our measurements into 3D beam...

  2. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  3. When Art Meets 3D

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of the vanguard work,My Dream3D,the innovative production by the China Disabled People’s Performing Art Troupe(CDPPAT),directed by Joy Joosang Park,provided the film’s domestic premiere at Beijing’s Olympic Park onApril7.The show provided an intriguing insight not

  4. Global gene expression analysis for evaluation and design of biomaterials

    Nobutaka Hanagata, Taro Takemura and Takashi Minowa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive gene expression analysis using DNA microarrays has become a widespread technique in molecular biological research. In the biomaterials field, it is used to evaluate the biocompatibility or cellular toxicity of metals, polymers and ceramics. Studies in this field have extracted differentially expressed genes in the context of differences in cellular responses among multiple materials. Based on these genes, the effects of materials on cells at the molecular level have been examined. Expression data ranging from several to tens of thousands of genes can be obtained from DNA microarrays. For this reason, several tens or hundreds of differentially expressed genes are often present in different materials. In this review, we outline the principles of DNA microarrays, and provide an introduction to methods of extracting information which is useful for evaluating and designing biomaterials from comprehensive gene expression data.

  5. Gene Expression Pattern of Signal Transduction in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    LI Huiyu; JIE Shenghua; GUO Tiannan; HUANG Shi'ang

    2006-01-01

    To explore the transcriptional gene expression profiles of signaling pathway in Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a series of cDNA microarray chips were tested. The results showed that differentially expressed genes related to singal transduction in CML were screened out and the genes involved in Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K), Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and other signaling pathway genes simultaneously. The results also showed that most of these genes were up-expression genes , which suggested that signal transduction be overactivated in CML. Further analysis of these differentially expressed signal transduction genes will be helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of CML and find new targets of treatment.

  6. Heterogeneity of astrocytes: from development to injury - single cell gene expression.

    Vendula Rusnakova

    Full Text Available Astrocytes perform control and regulatory functions in the central nervous system; heterogeneity among them is still a matter of debate due to limited knowledge of their gene expression profiles and functional diversity. To unravel astrocyte heterogeneity during postnatal development and after focal cerebral ischemia, we employed single-cell gene expression profiling in acutely isolated cortical GFAP/EGFP-positive cells. Using a microfluidic qPCR platform, we profiled 47 genes encoding glial markers and ion channels/transporters/receptors participating in maintaining K(+ and glutamate homeostasis per cell. Self-organizing maps and principal component analyses revealed three subpopulations within 10-50 days of postnatal development (P10-P50. The first subpopulation, mainly immature glia from P10, was characterized by high transcriptional activity of all studied genes, including polydendrocytic markers. The second subpopulation (mostly from P20 was characterized by low gene transcript levels, while the third subpopulation encompassed mature astrocytes (mainly from P30, P50. Within 14 days after ischemia (D3, D7, D14, additional astrocytic subpopulations were identified: resting glia (mostly from P50 and D3, transcriptionally active early reactive glia (mainly from D7 and permanent reactive glia (solely from D14. Following focal cerebral ischemia, reactive astrocytes underwent pronounced changes in the expression of aquaporins, nonspecific cationic and potassium channels, glutamate receptors and reactive astrocyte markers.

  7. Priprava 3D modelov za 3D tisk

    2015-01-01

    Po mnenju nekaterih strokovnjakov bo aditivna proizvodnja (ali 3D tiskanje) spremenila proizvodnjo industrijo, saj si bo vsak posameznik lahko natisnil svoj objekt po želji. V diplomski nalogi so predstavljene nekatere tehnologije aditivne proizvodnje. V nadaljevanju diplomske naloge je predstavljena izdelava makete hiše v merilu 1:100, vse od modeliranja do tiskanja. Poseben poudarek je posvečen predelavi modela, da je primeren za tiskanje, kjer je razvit pristop za hitrejše i...

  8. Post processing of 3D models for 3D printing

    2015-01-01

    According to the opinion of some experts the additive manufacturing or 3D printing will change manufacturing industry, because any individual could print their own model according to his or her wishes. In this graduation thesis some of the additive manufacturing technologies are presented. Furthermore in the production of house scale model in 1:100 is presented, starting from modeling to printing. Special attention is given to postprocessing of the building model elements us...

  9. Large Scale Gene Expression Meta-Analysis Reveals Tissue-Specific, Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Humans

    Mayne, Benjamin T.; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Buckberry, Sam; Breen, James; Clifton, Vicki; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Roberts, Claire T.

    2016-01-01

    The severity and prevalence of many diseases are known to differ between the sexes. Organ specific sex-biased gene expression may underpin these and other sexually dimorphic traits. To further our understanding of sex differences in transcriptional regulation, we performed meta-analyses of sex biased gene expression in multiple human tissues. We analyzed 22 publicly available human gene expression microarray data sets including over 2500 samples from 15 different tissues and 9 different organs. Briefly, by using an inverse-variance method we determined the effect size difference of gene expression between males and females. We found the greatest sex differences in gene expression in the brain, specifically in the anterior cingulate cortex, (1818 genes), followed by the heart (375 genes), kidney (224 genes), colon (218 genes), and thyroid (163 genes). More interestingly, we found different parts of the brain with varying numbers and identity of sex-biased genes, indicating that specific cortical regions may influence sexually dimorphic traits. The majority of sex-biased genes in other tissues such as the bladder, liver, lungs, and pancreas were on the sex chromosomes or involved in sex hormone production. On average in each tissue, 32% of autosomal genes that were expressed in a sex-biased fashion contained androgen or estrogen hormone response elements. Interestingly, across all tissues, we found approximately two-thirds of autosomal genes that were sex-biased were not under direct influence of sex hormones. To our knowledge this is the largest analysis of sex-biased gene expression in human tissues to date. We identified many sex-biased genes that were not under the direct influence of sex chromosome genes or sex hormones. These may provide targets for future development of sex-specific treatments for diseases.

  10. Microarray gene expression profiling and analysis in renal cell carcinoma

    Sadhukhan Provash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common cancer in adult kidney. The accuracy of current diagnosis and prognosis of the disease and the effectiveness of the treatment for the disease are limited by the poor understanding of the disease at the molecular level. To better understand the genetics and biology of RCC, we profiled the expression of 7,129 genes in both clear cell RCC tissue and cell lines using oligonucleotide arrays. Methods Total RNAs isolated from renal cell tumors, adjacent normal tissue and metastatic RCC cell lines were hybridized to affymatrix HuFL oligonucleotide arrays. Genes were categorized into different functional groups based on the description of the Gene Ontology Consortium and analyzed based on the gene expression levels. Gene expression profiles of the tissue and cell line samples were visualized and classified by singular value decomposition. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the expression alterations of selected genes in RCC. Results Selected genes were annotated based on biological processes and clustered into functional groups. The expression levels of genes in each group were also analyzed. Seventy-four commonly differentially expressed genes with more than five-fold changes in RCC tissues were identified. The expression alterations of selected genes from these seventy-four genes were further verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Detailed comparison of gene expression patterns in RCC tissue and RCC cell lines shows significant differences between the two types of samples, but many important expression patterns were preserved. Conclusions This is one of the initial studies that examine the functional ontology of a large number of genes in RCC. Extensive annotation, clustering and analysis of a large number of genes based on the gene functional ontology revealed many interesting gene expression patterns in RCC. Most

  11. Dissection of C. elegans behavioral genetics in 3-D environments.

    Kwon, Namseop; Hwang, Ara B; You, Young-Jai; V Lee, Seung-Jae; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a widely used model for genetic dissection of animal behaviors. Despite extensive technical advances in imaging methods, it remains challenging to visualize and quantify C. elegans behaviors in three-dimensional (3-D) natural environments. Here we developed an innovative 3-D imaging method that enables quantification of C. elegans behavior in 3-D environments. Furthermore, for the first time, we characterized 3-D-specific behavioral phenotypes of mutant worms that have defects in head movement or mechanosensation. This approach allowed us to reveal previously unknown functions of genes in behavioral regulation. We expect that our 3-D imaging method will facilitate new investigations into genetic basis of animal behaviors in natural 3-D environments.

  12. Expression Divergence of Tandemly Arrayed Genes in Human and Mouse

    Valia Shoja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Tandemly arrayed genes (TAGs account for about one third of the duplicated genes in eukaryotic genomes, yet there has not been any systematic study of their gene expression patterns. Taking advantage of recently published large-scale microarray data sets, we studied the expression divergence of 361 two-member TAGs in human and 212 two-member TAGs in mouse and examined the effect of sequence divergence, gene orientation, and chromosomal proximity on the divergence of TAG expression patterns. Our results show that there is a weak negative correlation between sequence divergence of TAG members and their expression similarity. There is also a weak negative correlation between chromosomal proximity of TAG members and their expression similarity. We did not detect any significant relationship between gene orientation and expression similarity. We also found that downstream TAG members do not show significantly narrower expression breadth than upstream members, contrary to what we predict based on TAG expression divergence hypothesis that we propose. Finally, we show that both chromosomal proximity and expression correlation in TAGs do not differ significantly from their neighboring non-TAG gene pairs, suggesting that tandem duplication is unlikely to be the cause for the higher-than-random expression association between neighboring genes on a chromosome in human and mouse.

  13. Unstable Expression of Commonly Used Reference Genes in Rat Pancreatic Islets Early after Isolation Affects Results of Gene Expression Studies.

    Lucie Kosinová

    Full Text Available The use of RT-qPCR provides a powerful tool for gene expression studies; however, the proper interpretation of the obtained data is crucially dependent on accurate normalization based on stable reference genes. Recently, strong evidence has been shown indicating that the expression of many commonly used reference genes may vary significantly due to diverse experimental conditions. The isolation of pancreatic islets is a complicated procedure which creates severe mechanical and metabolic stress leading possibly to cellular damage and alteration of gene expression. Despite of this, freshly isolated islets frequently serve as a control in various gene expression and intervention studies. The aim of our study was to determine expression of 16 candidate reference genes and one gene of interest (F3 in isolated rat pancreatic islets during short-term cultivation in order to find a suitable endogenous control for gene expression studies. We compared the expression stability of the most commonly used reference genes and evaluated the reliability of relative and absolute quantification using RT-qPCR during 0-120 hrs after isolation. In freshly isolated islets, the expression of all tested genes was markedly depressed and it increased several times throughout the first 48 hrs of cultivation. We observed significant variability among samples at 0 and 24 hrs but substantial stabilization from 48 hrs onwards. During the first 48 hrs, relative quantification failed to reflect the real changes in respective mRNA concentrations while in the interval 48-120 hrs, the relative expression generally paralleled the results determined by absolute quantification. Thus, our data call into question the suitability of relative quantification for gene expression analysis in pancreatic islets during the first 48 hrs of cultivation, as the results may be significantly affected by unstable expression of reference genes. However, this method could provide reliable information

  14. APPLICATION OF CABRI 3D IN TEACHING STEREOMETRY

    Renata Rososzczuk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cabri 3D is a software which connects geometry and algebra to enable measuring length, distance, area, angles, scalar product, volume and use them in calculations or in algebraic expressions. Cabri 3D gives new opportunities for teaching three-dimentional Euclidean geometry. In this work we describe some tools and functions of Cabri 3D. We also give a skech of using this mathematical software to create 2D and 3D figures and explore a figure’s properties by manipulating its variable elements.

  15. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  16. 3D GEO: AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH

    A. Georgopoulos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The expression GEO is mostly used to denote relation to the earth. However it should not be confined to what is related to the earth's surface, as other objects also need three dimensional representation and documentation, like cultural heritage objects. They include both tangible and intangible ones. In this paper the 3D data acquisition and 3D modelling of cultural heritage assets are briefly described and their significance is also highlighted. Moreover the organization of such information, related to monuments and artefacts, into relational data bases and its use for various purposes, other than just geometric documentation is also described and presented. In order to help the reader understand the above, several characteristic examples are presented and their methodology explained and their results evaluated.

  17. 3D Geo: An Alternative Approach

    Georgopoulos, A.

    2016-10-01

    The expression GEO is mostly used to denote relation to the earth. However it should not be confined to what is related to the earth's surface, as other objects also need three dimensional representation and documentation, like cultural heritage objects. They include both tangible and intangible ones. In this paper the 3D data acquisition and 3D modelling of cultural heritage assets are briefly described and their significance is also highlighted. Moreover the organization of such information, related to monuments and artefacts, into relational data bases and its use for various purposes, other than just geometric documentation is also described and presented. In order to help the reader understand the above, several characteristic examples are presented and their methodology explained and their results evaluated.

  18. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood

    Turner Renee J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Methods Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT, 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Results Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder. Conclusion The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  19. Gene ordering in partitive clustering using microarray expressions.

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Pal, Sankar K

    2007-08-01

    A central step in the analysis of gene expression data is the identification of groups of genes that exhibit similar expression patterns. Clustering and ordering the genes using gene expression data into homogeneous groups was shown to be useful in functional annotation, tissue classification, regulatory motif identification, and other applications. Although there is a rich literature on gene ordering in hierarchical clustering framework for gene expression analysis, there is no work addressing and evaluating the importance of gene ordering in partitive clustering framework, to the best knowledge of the authors. Outside the framework of hierarchical clustering, different gene ordering algorithms are applied on the whole data set, and the domain of partitive clustering is still unexplored with gene ordering approaches. A new hybrid method is proposed for ordering genes in each of the clusters obtained from partitive clustering solution, using microarray gene expressions.Two existing algorithms for optimally ordering cities in travelling salesman problem (TSP), namely, FRAG_GALK and Concorde, are hybridized individually with self organizing MAP to show the importance of gene ordering in partitive clustering framework. We validated our hybrid approach using yeast and fibroblast data and showed that our approach improves the result quality of partitive clustering solution, by identifying subclusters within big clusters, grouping functionally correlated genes within clusters, minimization of summation of gene expression distances, and the maximization of biological gene ordering using MIPS categorization. Moreover, the new hybrid approach, finds comparable or sometimes superior biological gene order in less computation time than those obtained by optimal leaf ordering in hierarchical clustering solution.

  20. Gene ordering in partitive clustering using microarray expressions

    Shubhra Sankar Ray; Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay; Sankar K Pal

    2007-08-01

    A central step in the analysis of gene expression data is the identification of groups of genes that exhibit similar expression patterns. Clustering and ordering the genes using gene expression data into homogeneous groups was shown to be useful in functional annotation, tissue classification, regulatory motif identification, and other applications. Although there is a rich literature on gene ordering in hierarchical clustering framework for gene expression analysis, there is no work addressing and evaluating the importance of gene ordering in partitive clustering framework, to the best knowledge of the authors. Outside the framework of hierarchical clustering, different gene ordering algorithms are applied on the whole data set, and the domain of partitive clustering is still unexplored with gene ordering approaches. A new hybrid method is proposed for ordering genes in each of the clusters obtained from partitive clustering solution, using microarray gene expressions. Two existing algorithms for optimally ordering cities in travelling salesman problem (TSP), namely, FRAG_GALK and Concorde, are hybridized individually with self organizing MAP to show the importance of gene ordering in partitive clustering framework. We validated our hybrid approach using yeast and fibroblast data and showed that our approach improves the result quality of partitive clustering solution, by identifying subclusters within big clusters, grouping functionally correlated genes within clusters, minimization of summation of gene expression distances, and the maximization of biological gene ordering using MIPS categorization. Moreover, the new hybrid approach, finds comparable or sometimes superior biological gene order in less computation time than those obtained by optimal leaf ordering in hierarchical clustering solution.

  1. Transgenic zebrafish recapitulating tbx16 gene early developmental expression.

    Simon Wells

    Full Text Available We describe the creation of a transgenic zebrafish expressing GFP driven by a 7.5 kb promoter region of the tbx16 gene. This promoter segment is sufficient to recapitulate early embryonic expression of endogenous tbx16 in the presomitic mesoderm, the polster and, subsequently, in the hatching gland. Expression of GFP in the transgenic lines later in development diverges to some extent from endogenous tbx16 expression with the serendipitous result that one line expresses GFP specifically in commissural primary ascending (CoPA interneurons of the developing spinal cord. Using this line we demonstrate that the gene mafba (valentino is expressed in CoPA interneurons.

  2. Gene expression profiles of the developing human retina

    WANG Feng; LI Huiming; LIU Wenwen; XU Ping; HU Gengxi; CHENG Yidong; JIA Libin; HUANG Qian

    2004-01-01

    Retina is a multilayer and highly specialized tissue important in converting light into neural signals. In humans, the critical period for the formation of complex multiplayer structure takes place during embryogenesis between 12 and 28 weeks. The morphologic changes during retinal development in humans have been studied but little is known about the molecular events essential for the formation of the retina. To gain further insights into this process, cDNA microarrays containing 16361 human gene probes were used to measure the gene expression levels in retinas. Of the 16361 genes, 68.7%, 71.4% and 69.7% showed positive hybridization with cDNAs made from 12-16 week fetal, 22-26 week fetal and adult retinas. A total of 814 genes showed a minimum of 3-fold changes between the lowest and highest expression levels among three time points and among them, 106 genes had expression levels with the hybridization intensity above 100 at one or more time points. The clustering analysis suggested that the majority of differentially expressed genes were down-regulated during the retinal development. The differentially expressed genes were further classified according to functions of known genes, and were ranked in decreasing order according to frequency: development, differentiation, signal transduction, protein synthesis and translation, metabolism, DNA binding and transcription, DNA synthesis-repair-recombination, immuno-response, ion channel- transport, cell receptor, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, pro-oncogene, stress and apoptosis related genes. Among these 106 differentially expressed genes, 60 are already present in NEI retina cDNA or EST Databank but the remaining 46 genes are absent and thus identified as "function unknown". To validate gene expression data from the microarray, real-time RT-PCR was performed for 46 "function unknown" genes and 6 known retina specific expression genes, and β-actin was used as internal control. Twenty-seven of these genes showed very similar

  3. Expression profiles for six zebrafish genes during gonadal sex differentiation

    Rasmussen Lene J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism of sex determination in zebrafish is largely unknown and neither sex chromosomes nor a sex-determining gene have been identified. This indicates that sex determination in zebrafish is mediated by genetic signals from autosomal genes. The aim of this study was to determine the precise timing of expression of six genes previously suggested to be associated with sex differentiation in zebrafish. The current study investigates the expression of all six genes in the same individual fish with extensive sampling dates during sex determination and -differentiation. Results In the present study, we have used quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the expression of ar, sox9a, dmrt1, fig alpha, cyp19a1a and cyp19a1b during the expected sex determination and gonadal sex differentiation period. The expression of the genes expected to be high in males (ar, sox9a and dmrt1a and high in females (fig alpha and cyp19a1a was segregated in two groups with more than 10 times difference in expression levels. All of the investigated genes showed peaks in expression levels during the time of sex determination and gonadal sex differentiation. Expression of all genes was investigated on cDNA from the same fish allowing comparison of the high and low expressers of genes that are expected to be highest expressed in either males or females. There were 78% high or low expressers of all three "male" genes (ar, sox9a and dmrt1 in the investigated period and 81% were high or low expressers of both "female" genes (fig alpha and cyp19a1a. When comparing all five genes with expected sex related expression 56% show expression expected for either male or female. Furthermore, the expression of all genes was investigated in different tissue of adult male and female zebrafish. Conclusion In zebrafish, the first significant peak in gene expression during the investigated period (2–40 dph was dmrt1 at 10 dph which indicates involvement of this gene

  4. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns are altered during spaceflight

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Popp, Michael P.; Gurley, William B.; Guy, Charles; Norwood, Kelly L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments results in differential gene expression. A 5-day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on gene expression patterns initially by using the Adh/GUS transgene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response (Paul, A.L., Daugherty, C.J., Bihn, E.A., Chapman, D.K., Norwood, K.L., Ferl, R.J., 2001. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis, Plant Physiol. 126, 613-621). As a follow-on to the reporter gene analysis, we report here the evaluation of genome-wide patterns of native gene expression within Arabidopsis shoots utilizing the Agilent DNA array of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - Taqman®). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays probed with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to RNA isolated from ground control plants revealed 182 genes that were differentially expressed in response to the spaceflight mission by more than 4-fold, and of those only 50 genes were expressed at levels chosen to support a conservative change call. None of the genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were induced to this level. However, genes related to heat shock were dramatically induced - but in a pattern and under growth conditions that are not easily explained by elevated temperatures. These gene expression data are discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment and with regard to potential future spaceflight experiment

  5. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of

  6. Gene expression profiling of mouse embryos with microarrays

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2011-01-01

    Global expression profiling by DNA microarrays provides a snapshot of cell and tissue status and becomes an essential tool in biological and medical sciences. Typical questions that can be addressed by microarray analysis in developmental biology include: (1) to find a set of genes expressed in a specific cell type; (2) to identify genes expressed commonly in multiple cell types; (3) to follow the time-course changes of gene expression patterns; (4) to demonstrate cell’s identity by showing similarities or differences among two or multiple cell types; (5) to find regulatory pathways and/or networks affected by gene manipulations, such as overexpression or repression of gene expression; (6) to find downstream target genes of transcription factors; (7) to find downstream target genes of cell signaling; (8) to examine the effects of environmental manipulation of cells on gene expression patterns; and (9) to find the effects of genetic manipulation in embryos and adults. Here we describe strategies for executing these experiments and monitoring changes of cell state with gene expression microarrays in application to mouse embryology. Both statistical assessment and interpretation of data are discussed. We also present a protocol for performing microarray analysis on a small amount of embryonic materials. PMID:20699157

  7. Gene expression during anthesis and senescence in Iris flowers

    Doorn, van W.G.; Balk, P.A.; Houwelingen, van A.M.; Hoebrechts, F.A.; Hall, R.D.; Vorst, O.; Schoot, van der C.; Wordragen, van M.F.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated changes in gene expression in Iris hollandicaflowers by microarray technology. Flag tepals were sampled daily, from three days prior to flower opening to the onset of visible senescence symptoms. Gene expression profiles were compared with biochemical data including lipid and protein

  8. Application of four dyes in gene expression analyses by microarrays

    Staal, Y.; van Herwijnen, M.H.M.; van Schooten, F.J.; van Delft, J.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA microarrays are widely used in gene expression analyses. To increase throughput and minimize costs without reducing gene expression data obtained, we investigated whether four mRNA samples can be analyzed simultaneously by applying four different fluorescent dyes. RESULTS: Following

  9. RNA preparation and characterization for gene expression studies

    Stangegaard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Much information can be obtained from knowledge of the relative expression level of each gene in the transcriptome. With the current advances in technology as little as a single cell is required as starting material for gene expression experiments. The mRNA from a single cell may be linearly ampl...

  10. Genome organization and expression of the rat ACBP gene family

    Mandrup, S; Andreasen, P H; Knudsen, J

    1993-01-01

    pool former. We have molecularly cloned and characterized the rat ACBP gene family which comprises one expressed and four processed pseudogenes. One of these was shown to exist in two allelic forms. A comprehensive computer-aided analysis of the promoter region of the expressed ACBP gene revealed...

  11. FGX : a frequentist gene expression index for Affymetrix arrays

    Purutçuoğlu, Vilda; Wit, Ernst

    2007-01-01

    We consider a new frequentist gene expression index for Affymetrix oligonucleotide DNA arrays, using a similar probe intensity model as suggested previously, called the Bayesian gene expression index (BGX). According to this model, the perfect match and mismatch values are assumed to be correlated a

  12. Genetic architecture of gene expression in ovine skeletal muscle

    Kogelman, Lisette Johanna Antonia; Byrne, Keren; Vuocolo, Tony

    2011-01-01

    -based gene expression data we directly tested the hypothesis that there is genetic structure in the gene expression program in ovine skeletal muscle.Results: The genetic performance of six sires for a well defined muscling trait, longissimus lumborum muscle depth, was measured using extensive progeny testing...

  13. Comparative genomics of the relationship between gene structure and expression

    Ren, X.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the structure of genes and their expression is a relatively new aspect of genome organization and regulation. With more genome sequences and expression data becoming available, bioinformatics approaches can help the further elucidation of the relationships between gene struc

  14. ANALYSES ON DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED GENES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN BREAST CANCER

    MENG Xu-li; DING Xiao-wen; XU Xiao-hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular etiology of breast cancer by way of studying the differential expression and initial function of the related genes in the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Methods: Two hundred and eighty-eight human tumor related genes were chosen for preparation of the oligochips probe. mRNA was extracted from 16 breast cancer tissues and the corresponding normal breast tissues, and cDNA probe was prepared through reverse-transcription and hybridized with the gene chip. A laser focused fluorescent scanner was used to scan the chip. The different gene expressions were thereafter automatically compared and analyzed between the two sample groups. Cy3/Cy5>3.5 meant significant up-regulation. Cy3/Cy5<0.25 meant significant down-regulation. Results: The comparison between the breast cancer tissues and their corresponding normal tissues showed that 84 genes had differential expression in the Chip. Among the differently expressed genes, there were 4 genes with significant down-regulation and 6 with significant up-regulation. Compared with normal breast tissues, differentially expressed genes did partially exist in the breast cancer tissues. Conclusion: Changes in multi-gene expression regulations take place during the occurrence and development of breast cancer; and the research on related genes can help understanding the mechanism of tumor occurrence.

  15. Gene Expression Measurement Module (GEMM) - a fully automated, miniaturized instrument for measuring gene expression in space

    Karouia, Fathi; Ricco, Antonio; Pohorille, Andrew; Peyvan, Kianoosh

    2012-07-01

    The capability to measure gene expression on board spacecrafts opens the doors to a large number of experiments on the influence of space environment on biological systems that will profoundly impact our ability to conduct safe and effective space travel, and might also shed light on terrestrial physiology or biological function and human disease and aging processes. Measurements of gene expression will help us to understand adaptation of terrestrial life to conditions beyond the planet of origin, identify deleterious effects of the space environment on a wide range of organisms from microbes to humans, develop effective countermeasures against these effects, determine metabolic basis of microbial pathogenicity and drug resistance, test our ability to sustain and grow in space organisms that can be used for life support and in situ resource utilization during long-duration space exploration, and monitor both the spacecraft environment and crew health. These and other applications hold significant potential for discoveries in space biology, biotechnology and medicine. Accordingly, supported by funding from the NASA Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development Program, we are developing a fully automated, miniaturized, integrated fluidic system for small spacecraft capable of in-situ measuring microbial expression of thousands of genes from multiple samples. The instrument will be capable of (1) lysing bacterial cell walls, (2) extracting and purifying RNA released from cells, (3) hybridizing it on a microarray and (4) providing electrochemical readout, all in a microfluidics cartridge. The prototype under development is suitable for deployment on nanosatellite platforms developed by the NASA Small Spacecraft Office. The first target application is to cultivate and measure gene expression of the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus, i.e. a cyanobacterium known to exhibit remarkable metabolic diversity and resilience to adverse conditions

  16. The effect of negative autoregulation on eukaryotic gene expression

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Adams, Rhys; Murphy, Kevin; Josic, Kresimir; Balázsi, G. Ábor

    2009-03-01

    Negative autoregulation is a frequent motif in gene regulatory networks, which has been studied extensively in prokaryotes. Nevertheless, some effects of negative feedback on gene expression in eukaryotic transcriptional networks remain unknown. We studied how the strength of negative feedback regulation affects the characteristics of gene expression in yeast cells carrying synthetic transcriptional cascades. We observed a drastic reduction of gene expression noise and a change in the shape of the dose-response curve. We explained these experimentally observed effects by stochastic simulations and a simple set of algebraic equations.

  17. Features of Gene Expression of Bacillus pumilus Metalloendopeptidase.

    Rudakova, N L; Sabirova, A R; Balaban, N P; Tikhonova, A O; Sharipova, M R

    2016-08-01

    Features of gene expression of the secreted Bacillus pumilus metalloendopeptidase belonging to the adamalysin/reprolysin family were investigated. In the regulatory region of the gene, we identified hypothetical binding sites for transcription factors CcpA and TnrA. We found that the expression of the metalloendopeptidase gene is controlled by mechanisms of carbon and nitrogen catabolite repression. In experiments involving nitrogen metabolism regulatory protein mutant strains, we found that the control of the metalloendopeptidase gene expression involves proteins of ammonium transport GlnK and AmtB interacting with the TnrA-regulator.

  18. Decreasing the stochasticity of mammalian gene expression by a synthetic gene circuit

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Zal, Tomasz; Balazsi, Gabor

    2012-02-01

    Gene therapy and functional genetic studies usually require precisely controlled and uniform gene expression in a population of cells for reliable level of protein production. Due to this requirement, stochastic gene expression is perceived as undesirable in these fields and ideally has to be minimized. The number of approaches for decreasing gene expression stochasticity in mammalian cells is limited. This creates an unmet need to develop new gene expression systems for this purpose. Based on earlier synthetic constructs in yeast, we developed and assessed a negative feedback-based mammalian gene circuit, with uniform and low level of stochasticity in gene expression at different levels of induction. In addition, this new synthetic construct enables highly precise gene expression control in mammalian cells, due to the linear dependence of gene expression on the inducer concentration applied to the system. This mammalian gene expression circuit has potential applicability for the development of new treatment modalities in gene therapy and research tools in functional genetics. In addition, this work creates a roadmap for moving synthetic gene circuits from microbes into mammalian cells.

  19. Genetic architecture of gene expression in the chicken

    Stanley Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The annotation of many genomes is limited, with a large proportion of identified genes lacking functional assignments. The construction of gene co-expression networks is a powerful approach that presents a way of integrating information from diverse gene expression datasets into a unified analysis which allows inferences to be drawn about the role of previously uncharacterised genes. Using this approach, we generated a condition-free gene co-expression network for the chicken using data from 1,043 publically available Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays. This data was generated from a diverse range of experiments, including different tissues and experimental conditions. Our aim was to identify gene co-expression modules and generate a tool to facilitate exploration of the functional chicken genome. Results Fifteen modules, containing between 24 and 473 genes, were identified in the condition-free network. Most of the modules showed strong functional enrichment for particular Gene Ontology categories. However, a few showed no enrichment. Transcription factor binding site enrichment was also noted. Conclusions We have demonstrated that this chicken gene co-expression network is a useful tool in gene function prediction and the identification of putative novel transcription factors and binding sites. This work highlights the relevance of this methodology for functional prediction in poorly annotated genomes such as the chicken.

  20. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  1. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  2. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-08

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  3. A riboswitch-based inducible gene expression system for mycobacteria.

    Jessica C Seeliger

    Full Text Available Research on the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb would benefit from novel tools for regulated gene expression. Here we describe the characterization and application of a synthetic riboswitch-based system, which comprises a mycobacterial promoter for transcriptional control and a riboswitch for translational control. The system was used to induce and repress heterologous protein overexpression reversibly, to create a conditional gene knockdown, and to control gene expression in a macrophage infection model. Unlike existing systems for controlling gene expression in Mtb, the riboswitch does not require the co-expression of any accessory proteins: all of the regulatory machinery is encoded by a short DNA segment directly upstream of the target gene. The inducible riboswitch platform has the potential to be a powerful general strategy for creating customized gene regulation systems in Mtb.

  4. A predictive approach to identify genes differentially expressed

    Saraiva, Erlandson F.; Louzada, Francisco; Milan, Luís A.; Meira, Silvana; Cobre, Juliana

    2012-10-01

    The main objective of gene expression data analysis is to identify genes that present significant changes in expression levels between a treatment and a control biological condition. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian approach to identify genes differentially expressed calculating credibility intervals from predictive densities which are constructed using sampled mean treatment effect from all genes in study excluding the treatment effect of genes previously identified with statistical evidence for difference. We compare our Bayesian approach with the standard ones based on the use of the t-test and modified t-tests via a simulation study, using small sample sizes which are common in gene expression data analysis. Results obtained indicate that the proposed approach performs better than standard ones, especially for cases with mean differences and increases in treatment variance in relation to control variance. We also apply the methodologies to a publicly available data set on Escherichia coli bacteria.

  5. Decoupling Linear and Nonlinear Associations of Gene Expression

    Itakura, Alan

    2013-05-01

    The FANTOM consortium has generated a large gene expression dataset of different cell lines and tissue cultures using the single-molecule sequencing technology of HeliscopeCAGE. This provides a unique opportunity to investigate novel associations between gene expression over time and different cell types. Here, we create a MatLab wrapper for a powerful and computationally intensive set of statistics known as Maximal Information Coefficient, and then calculate this statistic for a large, comprehensive dataset containing gene expression of a variety of differentiating tissues. We then distinguish between linear and nonlinear associations, and then create gene association networks. Following this analysis, we are then able to identify clusters of linear gene associations that then associate nonlinearly with other clusters of linearity, providing insight to much more complex connections between gene expression patterns than previously anticipated.

  6. Gene expression profiling of placentas affected by pre-eclampsia

    Hoegh, Anne Mette; Borup, Rehannah; Nielsen, Finn Cilius;

    2010-01-01

    Several studies point to the placenta as the primary cause of pre-eclampsia. Our objective was to identify placental genes that may contribute to the development of pre-eclampsia. RNA was purified from tissue biopsies from eleven pre-eclamptic placentas and eighteen normal controls. Messenger RNA...... expression from pooled samples was analysed by microarrays. Verification of the expression of selected genes was performed using real-time PCR. A surprisingly low number of genes (21 out of 15,000) were identified as differentially expressed. Among these were genes not previously associated with pre-eclampsia...... as bradykinin B1 receptor and a 14-3-3 protein, but also genes that have already been connected with pre-eclampsia, for example, inhibin beta A subunit and leptin. A low number of genes were repeatedly identified as differentially expressed, because they may represent the endpoint of a cascade of events...

  7. Key aspects of analyzing microarray gene-expression data.

    Chen, James J

    2007-05-01

    One major challenge with the use of microarray technology is the analysis of massive amounts of gene-expression data for various applications. This review addresses the key aspects of the microarray gene-expression data analysis for the two most common objectives: class comparison and class prediction. Class comparison mainly aims to select which genes are differentially expressed across experimental conditions. Gene selection is separated into two steps: gene ranking and assigning a significance level. Class prediction uses expression profiling analysis to develop a prediction model for patient selection, diagnostic prediction or prognostic classification. Development of a prediction model involves two components: model building and performance assessment. It also describes two additional data analysis methods: gene-class testing and multiple ordering criteria.

  8. Fundamental principles of energy consumption for gene expression

    Huang, Lifang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Yu, Jianshe; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-12-01

    How energy is consumed in gene expression is largely unknown mainly due to complexity of non-equilibrium mechanisms affecting expression levels. Here, by analyzing a representative gene model that considers complexity of gene expression, we show that negative feedback increases energy consumption but positive feedback has an opposite effect; promoter leakage always reduces energy consumption; generating more bursts needs to consume more energy; and the speed of promoter switching is at the cost of energy consumption. We also find that the relationship between energy consumption and expression noise is multi-mode, depending on both the type of feedback and the speed of promoter switching. Altogether, these results constitute fundamental principles of energy consumption for gene expression, which lay a foundation for designing biologically reasonable gene modules. In addition, we discuss possible biological implications of these principles by combining experimental facts.

  9. Medical 3D thermography system

    GRUBIŠIĆ, IVAN

    2011-01-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography determines the surface temperature of an object or human body using thermal IR measurement camera. It is an imaging technology which is contactless and completely non-invasive. These propertiesmake IR thermography a useful method of analysis that is used in various industrial applications to detect, monitor and predict irregularities in many fields from engineering to medical and biological observations. This paper presents a conceptual model of Medical 3D Thermo...

  10. Evaluating the consistency of gene sets used in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data

    Tintle Nathan L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical analyses of whole genome expression data require functional information about genes in order to yield meaningful biological conclusions. The Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG are common sources of functionally grouped gene sets. For bacteria, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide alternative, complementary sources of gene sets. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the data obtained from these resources has been performed. Results We define a series of gene set consistency metrics directly related to the most common classes of statistical analyses for gene expression data, and then perform a comprehensive analysis of 3581 Affymetrix® gene expression arrays across 17 diverse bacteria. We find that gene sets obtained from GO and KEGG demonstrate lower consistency than those obtained from the SEED and MicrobesOnline, regardless of gene set size. Conclusions Despite the widespread use of GO and KEGG gene sets in bacterial gene expression data analysis, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide more consistent sets for a wide variety of statistical analyses. Increased use of the SEED and MicrobesOnline gene sets in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data may improve statistical power and utility of expression data.

  11. Vel-IO 3D: A tool for 3D velocity model construction, optimization and time-depth conversion in 3D geological modeling workflow

    Maesano, Francesco E.; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2017-02-01

    We present Vel-IO 3D, a tool for 3D velocity model creation and time-depth conversion, as part of a workflow for 3D model building. The workflow addresses the management of large subsurface dataset, mainly seismic lines and well logs, and the construction of a 3D velocity model able to describe the variation of the velocity parameters related to strong facies and thickness variability and to high structural complexity. Although it is applicable in many geological contexts (e.g. foreland basins, large intermountain basins), it is particularly suitable in wide flat regions, where subsurface structures have no surface expression. The Vel-IO 3D tool is composed by three scripts, written in Python 2.7.11, that automate i) the 3D instantaneous velocity model building, ii) the velocity model optimization, iii) the time-depth conversion. They determine a 3D geological model that is consistent with the primary geological constraints (e.g. depth of the markers on wells). The proposed workflow and the Vel-IO 3D tool have been tested, during the EU funded Project GeoMol, by the construction of the 3D geological model of a flat region, 5700 km2 in area, located in the central part of the Po Plain. The final 3D model showed the efficiency of the workflow and Vel-IO 3D tool in the management of large amount of data both in time and depth domain. A 4 layer-cake velocity model has been applied to a several thousand (5000-13,000 m) thick succession, with 15 horizons from Triassic up to Pleistocene, complicated by a Mesozoic extensional tectonics and by buried thrusts related to Southern Alps and Northern Apennines.

  12. Gene expression profile analysis of human intervertebral disc degeneration

    Kai Chen; Dajiang Wu; Xiaodong Zhu; Haijian Ni; Xianzhao Wei; Ningfang Mao; Yang Xie; Yunfei Niu; Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate the biogenesis and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration. The gene expression profiles of 37 disc tissue samples obtained from patients with herniated discs and degenerative disc disease collected by the National Cancer Institute Cooperative Tissue Network were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes between more and less degenerated discs were identified by significant analysis of microarray. A total of 555 genes were signi...

  13. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns...... that encode reverse transcriptase-like genes, and group I introns and archaeal introns that encode homing endonuclease genes (HEGs). Although rDNA-embedded protein genes are widespread in nuclei, organelles and bacteria, there is surprisingly little information available on how these genes are expressed....... Exceptions include a handful of HEGs from group I introns. Recent studies have revealed unusual and essential roles of group I and group I-like ribozymes in the endogenous expression of HEGs. Here we discuss general aspects of rDNA-embedded protein genes and focus on HEG expression from group I introns...

  14. Binary gene induction and protein expression in individual cells

    Conolly Rory B

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic gene transcription is believed to occur in either a binary or a graded fashion. With binary induction, a transcription activator (TA regulates the probability with which a gene template is switched from the inactive to the active state without affecting the rate at which RNA molecules are produced from the template. With graded, also called rheostat-like, induction the gene template has continuously varying levels of transcriptional activity, and the TA regulates the rate of RNA production. Support for each of these two mechanisms arises primarily from experimental studies measuring reporter proteins in individual cells, rather than from direct measurement of induction events at the gene template. Methods and results In this paper, using a computational model of stochastic gene expression, we have studied the biological and experimental conditions under which a binary induction mode operating at the gene template can give rise to differentially expressed "phenotypes" (i.e., binary, hybrid or graded at the protein level. We have also investigated whether the choice of reporter genes plays a significant role in determining the observed protein expression patterns in individual cells, given the diverse properties of commonly-used reporter genes. Our simulation confirmed early findings that the lifetimes of active/inactive promoters and half-lives of downstream mRNA/protein products are important determinants of various protein expression patterns, but showed that the induction time and the sensitivity with which the expressed genes are detected are also important experimental variables. Using parameter conditions representative of reporter genes including green fluorescence protein (GFP and β-galactosidase, we also demonstrated that graded gene expression is more likely to be observed with GFP, a longer-lived protein with low detection sensitivity. Conclusion The choice of reporter genes may determine whether protein

  15. 3D silicon strip detectors

    Parzefall, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Bates, Richard [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boscardin, Maurizio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Lozano, Manuel [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Pellegrini, Giulio [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Szumlak, Tomasz [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5{mu}m spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr{sup 90}{beta}-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of

  16. Protamine stimulates bone sialoprotein gene expression.

    Zhou, Liming; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Mezawa, Masaru; Takai, Hideki; Nakayama, Yohei; Mitarai, Makoto; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2013-03-10

    Protamine is a small, arginine-rich, nuclear protein that replaces histone late in the haploid phase of spermatogenesis and is believed to be essential for sperm head condensation and DNA stabilization. Protamine has many biological activities and has roles in hematopoiesis, immune responses, the nervous system and bone metabolism. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a mineralized connective tissue-specific protein expressed in differentiated osteoblasts that appears to function in the initial mineralization of bone. Protamine (71.35 ng/ml) increased BSP mRNA levels by 6h in osteoblast-like ROS 17/2.8 cells. In a transient transfection assay, protamine (71.35 ng/ml) increased luciferase activity of the construct (-116 to +60) in ROS 17/2.8 cells and rat bone marrow stromal cells. Luciferase activities induced by protamine were blocked by protein kinase A, tyrosine kinase and ERK1/2 inhibitors. Introduction of 2 bp mutations to the luciferase constructs showed that the effects of protamine were mediated by a cAMP response element (CRE), a fibroblast growth factor 2 response element (FRE) and a homeodomain protein-binding site (HOX). Gel shift analyses showed that protamine (71.35 ng/ml) increased the nuclear protein binding to CRE, FRE and HOX. CREB, phospho-CREB, c-Fos, c-Jun, JunD and Fra2 antibodies disrupted the formation of CRE-protein complexes. Dlx5, Msx2, Runx2 and Smad1 antibodies disrupted FRE- and HOX-protein complex formations. These studies demonstrate that protamine induces BSP transcription by targeting CRE, FRE and HOX sites in the proximal promoter of the rat BSP gene. Moreover, phospho-CREB, c-Fos, c-Jun, JunD, Fra2, Dlx5, Msx2, Runx2 and Smadl transcription factors appear to be key regulators of protamine effects on BSP transcription.

  17. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies.

    Chapman, Joanne R; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with β-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies.

  18. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting.

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-02-23

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling.

  19. Genome-wide patterns of Arabidopsis gene expression in nature.

    Christina L Richards

    Full Text Available Organisms in the wild are subject to multiple, fluctuating environmental factors, and it is in complex natural environments that genetic regulatory networks actually function and evolve. We assessed genome-wide gene expression patterns in the wild in two natural accessions of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and examined the nature of transcriptional variation throughout its life cycle and gene expression correlations with natural environmental fluctuations. We grew plants in a natural field environment and measured genome-wide time-series gene expression from the plant shoot every three days, spanning the seedling to reproductive stages. We find that 15,352 genes were expressed in the A. thaliana shoot in the field, and accession and flowering status (vegetative versus flowering were strong components of transcriptional variation in this plant. We identified between ∼110 and 190 time-varying gene expression clusters in the field, many of which were significantly overrepresented by genes regulated by abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. The two main principal components of vegetative shoot gene expression (PC(veg correlate to temperature and precipitation occurrence in the field. The largest PC(veg axes included thermoregulatory genes while the second major PC(veg was associated with precipitation and contained drought-responsive genes. By exposing A. thaliana to natural environments in an open field, we provide a framework for further understanding the genetic networks that are deployed in natural environments, and we connect plant molecular genetics in the laboratory to plant organismal ecology in the wild.

  20. Relating perturbation magnitude to temporal gene expression in biological systems

    Pfrender Michael E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most transcriptional activity is a result of environmental variability. This cause (environment and effect (gene expression relationship is essential to survival in any changing environment. The specific relationship between environmental perturbation and gene expression – and stability of the response – has yet to be measured in detail. We describe a method to quantitatively relate perturbation magnitude to response at the level of gene expression. We test our method using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism and osmotic stress as an environmental stress. Results Patterns of gene expression were measured in response to increasing sodium chloride concentrations (0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.2 M for sixty genes impacted by osmotic shock. Expression of these genes was quantified over five time points using reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. Magnitudes of cumulative response for specific pathways, and the set of all genes, were obtained by combining the temporal response envelopes for genes exhibiting significant changes in expression with time. A linear relationship between perturbation magnitude and response was observed for the range of concentrations studied. Conclusion This study develops a quantitative approach to describe the stability of gene response and pathways to environmental perturbation and illustrates the utility of this approach. The approach should be applicable to quantitatively evaluate the response of organisms via the magnitude of response and stability of the transcriptome to environmental change.

  1. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions b...

  2. Generation of Multilayered 3D Structures of HepG2 Cells Using a Bio-printing Technique

    Jeon, Hyeryeon; Kang, Kyojin; Park, Su A; Kim, Wan Doo; Paik, Seung Sam; Lee, Sang-Hun; Jeong, Jaemin; Choi, Dongho

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic liver disease is a major widespread cause of death, and whole liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for patients with end-stage liver diseases. However, many problems, including donor shortage, surgical complications and cost, hinder their usage. Recently, tissue-engineering technology provided a potential breakthrough for solving these problems. Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been used to mimic tissues and organs suitable for transplantation, but applications for the liver have been rare. Methods A 3D bioprinting system was used to construct 3D printed hepatic structures using alginate. HepG2 cells were cultured on these 3D structures for 3 weeks and examined by fluorescence microscopy, histology and immunohistochemistry. The expression of liver-specific markers was quantified on days 1, 7, 14, and 21. Results The cells grew well on the alginate scaffold, and liver-specific gene expression increased. The cells grew more extensively in 3D culture than two-dimensional culture and exhibited better structural aspects of the liver, indicating that the 3D bioprinting method recapitulates the liver architecture. Conclusions The 3D bioprinting of hepatic structures appears feasible. This technology may become a major tool and provide a bridge between basic science and the clinical challenges for regenerative medicine of the liver. PMID:27559001

  3. Validation of housekeeping genes for studying differential gene expression in the bovine myometrium.

    Rekawiecki, Robert; Kowalik, Magdalena K; Kotwica, Jan

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the steady-state expression of 13 selected housekeeping genes in the myometrium of cyclic and pregnant cows. Cells taken from bovine myometrium on days 1-5, 6-10, 11-16 and 17-20 of the oestrous cycle and in weeks 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12 of pregnancy were used. Reverse transcribed RNA was amplified in real-time PCR using designed primers. Reaction efficiency was determined with the Linreg programme. The geNorm and NormFinder programmes were used to select the best housekeeping genes. They calculate the expression stability factor for each used housekeeping gene with the smallest value for most stably expressed genes. According to geNorm, the most stable housekeeping genes in the myometrium were C2orf29, TPB and TUBB2B, while the least stably expressed genes were 18S RNA, HPRT1 and GAPDH. NormFinder identified the best genes in the myometrium as C2orf29, MRPL12 and TBP, while the worst genes were 18S RNA, B2M and SF3A1. Differences in stability factors between the two programmes may also indicate that the physiological status of the female, e.g. pregnancy, affects the stability of expression of housekeeping genes. The different expression stability of housekeeping genes did not affect progesterone receptor expression but it could be important if small differences in gene expression were measured between studies.

  4. BPH gene expression profile associated to prostate gland volume.

    Descazeaud, Aurelien; Rubin, Mark A; Hofer, Matthias; Setlur, Sunita; Nikolaief, Nathalie; Vacherot, Francis; Soyeux, Pascale; Kheuang, Laurence; Abbou, Claude C; Allory, Yves; de la Taille, Alexandre

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to analyze gene expression profiles in benign prostatic hyperplasia and to compare them with phenotypic properties. Thirty-seven specimens of benign prostatic hyperplasia were obtained from symptomatic patients undergoing surgery. RNA was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix Chips containing 54,000 gene expression probes. Gene expression profiles were analyzed using cluster, TreeView, and significance analysis of microarrays softwares. In an initial unsupervised analysis, our 37 samples clustered hierarchically in 2 groups of 18 and 19 samples, respectively. Five clinical parameters were statistically different between the 2 groups: in group 1 compared with group 2, patients had larger prostate glands, had higher prostate specific antigen levels, were more likely to be treated by alpha blockers, to be operated by prostatectomy, and to have major irritative symptoms. The sole independent parameter associated with this dichotome clustering, however, was the prostate gland volume. Therefore, the role of prostate volume was explored in a supervised analysis. Gene expression of prostate glands 60 mL were compared using significance analysis of microarrays and 227 genes were found differentially expressed between the 2 groups (>2 change and false discovery rate of <5%). Several specific pathways including growth factors genes, cell cycle genes, apoptose genes, inflammation genes, and androgen regulated genes, displayed major differences between small and large prostate glands.

  5. DNA microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in adipocyte differentiation

    Chunyan Yin; Yanfeng Xiao; Wei Zhang; Erdi Xu; Weihua Liu; Xiaoqing Yi; Ming Chang

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, the human liposarcoma cell line SW872 was used to identify global changes in gene expression profiles occurring during adipogenesis. We further explored some of the genes expressed during the late phase of adipocyte differentiation. These genes may play a major role in promoting excessive proliferation and accumulation of lipid droplets, which contribute to the development of obesity. By using microarray-based technology, we examined differential gene expression in early differentiated adipocytes and late differentiated adipocytes. Validated genes exhibited a ≥ 10-fold increase in the late phase of adipocyte differentiation by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with undifferentiated preadipocytes, we found that 763 genes were increased in early differentiated adipocytes, and 667 genes were increased in later differentiated adipocytes. Furthermore, 21 genes were found being expressed 10-fold higher in the late phase of adipocyte differentiation. The results were in accordance with the RT-PCR test, which validated 11 genes, namely, CIDEC, PID1, LYRM1, ADD1, PPAR2, ANGPTL4, ADIPOQ, ACOX1, FIP1L1, MAP3K2 and PEX14. Most of these genes were found being expressed in the later phase of adipocyte differentiation involved in obesity-related diseases. The findings may help to better understand the mechanism of obesity and related diseases.

  6. Using PCR to Target Misconceptions about Gene Expression

    Leslie K. Wright

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a PCR-based laboratory exercise that can be used with first- or second-year biology students to help overcome common misconceptions about gene expression. Biology students typically do not have a clear understanding of the difference between genes (DNA and gene expression (mRNA/protein and often believe that genes exist in an organism or cell only when they are expressed. This laboratory exercise allows students to carry out a PCR-based experiment designed to challenge their misunderstanding of the difference between genes and gene expression. Students first transform E. coli with an inducible GFP gene containing plasmid and observe induced and un-induced colonies. The following exercise creates cognitive dissonance when actual PCR results contradict their initial (incorrect predictions of the presence of the GFP gene in transformed cells. Field testing of this laboratory exercise resulted in learning gains on both knowledge and application questions on concepts related to genes and gene expression.

  7. Gene expression profile analysis of type 2 diabetic mouse liver.

    Fang Zhang

    Full Text Available Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases.

  8. Evaluation of helper-dependent canine adenovirus vectors in a 3D human CNS model.

    Simão, D; Pinto, C; Fernandes, P; Peddie, C J; Piersanti, S; Collinson, L M; Salinas, S; Saggio, I; Schiavo, G; Kremer, E J; Brito, C; Alves, P M

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach with enormous potential for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Viral vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) present attractive features for gene delivery strategies in the human brain, by preferentially transducing neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent brain structures, have a 30-kb cloning capacity and have low innate and induced immunogenicity in preclinical tests. For clinical translation, in-depth preclinical evaluation of efficacy and safety in a human setting is primordial. Stem cell-derived human neural cells have a great potential as complementary tools by bridging the gap between animal models, which often diverge considerably from human phenotype, and clinical trials. Herein, we explore helper-dependent CAV-2 (hd-CAV-2) efficacy and safety for gene delivery in a human stem cell-derived 3D neural in vitro model. Assessment of hd-CAV-2 vector efficacy was performed at different multiplicities of infection, by evaluating transgene expression and impact on cell viability, ultrastructural cellular organization and neuronal gene expression. Under optimized conditions, hd-CAV-2 transduction led to stable long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity. hd-CAV-2 preferentially transduced neurons, whereas human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5) showed increased tropism toward glial cells. This work demonstrates, in a physiologically relevant 3D model, that hd-CAV-2 vectors are efficient tools for gene delivery to human neurons, with stable long-term transgene expression and minimal cytotoxicity.

  9. Expression of HOX C homeobox genes in lymphoid cells.

    Lawrence, H J; Stage, K M; Mathews, C H; Detmer, K; Scibienski, R; MacKenzie, M; Migliaccio, E; Boncinelli, E; Largman, C

    1993-08-01

    The class I homeobox genes located in four clusters in mammalian genomes (HOX A, HOX B, HOX C, and HOX D) appear to play a major role in fetal development. Previous surveys of homeobox gene expression in human leukemic cell lines have shown that certain HOX A genes are expressed only in myeloid cell lines, whereas HOX B gene expression is largely restricted to cells with erythroid potential. We now report a survey of the expression patterns of 9 homeobox genes from the HOX C locus in a panel of 24 human and 7 murine leukemic cell lines. The most striking observation is the lymphoid-specific pattern of expression of HOX C4, located at the 3' end of the locus. A major transcript of 1.9 kilobases is observed in both T-cell and B-cell lines. HOX C4 expression is also detected in normal human marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes, but not in mature granulocytes or monocytes. HOX C8 is also expressed in human lymphoid cells but is expressed in other blood cell types as well. However, the HOX C8 transcript pattern is lineage specific. These data, in conjunction with earlier findings, suggest that homeobox gene expression influences lineage determination during hematopoiesis.

  10. 3D structure of muscle dihydropyridine receptor

    Montserrat Samsó

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excitation contraction coupling, the rapid and massive Ca2+ release under control of an action potential that triggers muscle contraction, takes places at specialized regions of the cell called triad junctions. There, a highly ordered supramolecular complex between the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR and the ryanodine receptor (RyR1 mediates the quasi‐instantaneous conversion from T‐tubule depolarization into Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. The DHPR has several key modules required for EC coupling: the voltage sensors and II‐III loop in the alpha1s subunit, and the beta subunit. To gain insight into their molecular organization, this review examines the most updated 3D structure of the DHPR as obtained by transmission electron microscopy and image reconstruction. Although structure determination of a heteromeric membrane protein such as the DHPR is challenging, novel technical advances in protein expression and 3D labeling facilitated this task. The 3D structure of the DHPR complex consists of a main body with five irregular corners around its perimeter encompassing the transmembrane alpha 1s subunit besides the intracellular beta subunit, an extended extracellular alpha 2 subunit, and a bulky intracellular II‐III loop. The structural definition attained at 19 Å resolution enabled docking of the atomic coordinates of structural homologs of the alpha1s and beta subunits. These structural features, together with their relative location with respect to the RyR1, are discussed in the context of the functional data.

  11. Regulatory systems for hypoxia-inducible gene expression in ischemic heart disease gene therapy.

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Minhyung

    2011-07-18

    Ischemic heart diseases are caused by narrowed coronary arteries that decrease the blood supply to the myocardium. In the ischemic myocardium, hypoxia-responsive genes are up-regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). Gene therapy for ischemic heart diseases uses genes encoding angiogenic growth factors and anti-apoptotic proteins as therapeutic genes. These genes increase blood supply into the myocardium by angiogenesis and protect cardiomyocytes from cell death. However, non-specific expression of these genes in normal tissues may be harmful, since growth factors and anti-apoptotic proteins may induce tumor growth. Therefore, tight gene regulation is required to limit gene expression to ischemic tissues, to avoid unwanted side effects. For this purpose, various gene expression strategies have been developed for ischemic-specific gene expression. Transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulatory strategies have been developed and evaluated in ischemic heart disease animal models. The regulatory systems can limit therapeutic gene expression to ischemic tissues and increase the efficiency of gene therapy. In this review, recent progresses in ischemic-specific gene expression systems are presented, and their applications to ischemic heart diseases are discussed.

  12. Gene expression in the urinary bladder: a common carcinoma in situ gene expression signature exists disregarding histopathological classification

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Andersen, Thomas Thykjær

    2004-01-01

    The presence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesions in the urinary bladder is associated with a high risk of disease progression to a muscle invasive stage. In this study, we used microarray expression profiling to examine the gene expression patterns in superficial transitional cell carcinoma (s...... urothelium and urothelium with CIS lesions from the same urinary bladder revealed that the gene expression found in sTCC with surrounding CIS is found also in CIS biopsies as well as in histologically normal samples adjacent to the CIS lesions. Furthermore, we also identified similar gene expression changes...

  13. Efficient expression of the yeast metallothionein gene in Escherichia coli

    Berka, T.; Shatzman, A.; Zimmerman, J.; Strickler, J.; Rosenberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The yeast metallothionein gene CUP1 was cloned into a bacterial expression system to achieve efficient, controlled expression of the stable, unprocessed protein product. The Escherichia coli-synthesized yeast metallothionein bound copper, cadmium, zinc, indicating that the protein was functional. Furthermore, E. coli cells expressing CUP1 acquired a new, inducible ability to selectively sequester heavy metal ions from the growth medium.

  14. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  15. Transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1 affects the expression of porcine Klotho (KL gene

    Yan Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Klotho (KL, originally discovered as an aging suppressor, is a membrane protein that shares sequence similarity with the β-glucosidase enzymes. Recent reports showed Klotho might play a role in adipocyte maturation and systemic glucose metabolism. However, little is known about the transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of porcine KL gene. Deletion fragment analysis identified KL-D2 (−418 bp to −3 bp as the porcine KL core promoter. MARC0022311SNP (A or G in KL intron 1 was detected in Landrace × DIV pigs using the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The pGL-D2-A and pGL-D2-G were constructed with KL-D2 and the intron fragment of different alleles and relative luciferase activity of pGL3-D2-G was significantly higher than that of pGL3-D2-A in the PK cells and ST cells. This was possibly the result of a change in KL binding ability with transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1, which was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA and chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP. Moreover, OCT-1 regulated endogenous KL expression by RNA interference experiments. Our study indicates SNP MARC0022311 affects porcine KL expression by regulating its promoter activity via OCT-1.

  16. Regulation of gene expression by Goodwin's loop with many genes

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a simple analysis of a long Goodwin's loop containing many genes. The genes form a closed series. The rate of transcription of any gene is up or down regulated by theprotein product of the preceding gene. We describe the loop with a system of ordinary differential equations of order s. Oscillatory solutions of the system are possible at the odd number of repressions and any number of inductions if the product of all Hill's coefficients, related to both repressions and inductions, is larger than:

  17. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    Yahui Liu

    Full Text Available The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition.

  18. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition.

  19. Selection and validation of reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in Erythroxylum coca

    2013-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR is a powerful technique for the investigation of comparative gene expression, but its accuracy and reliability depend on the reference genes used as internal standards. Only genes that show a high level of expression stability are suitable for use as reference genes, and these must be identified on a case-by-case basis. Erythroxylum coca produces and accumulates high amounts of the pharmacologically active tropane alkaloid cocaine (especially in the leaves), and is ...

  20. A hammerhead ribozyme inhibits ADE1 gene expression in yeast.

    Ferbeyre, G; Bratty, J; Chen, H; Cedergren, R

    1995-03-21

    To study factors that affect in vivo ribozyme (Rz) activity, a model system has been devised in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on the inhibition of ADE1 gene expression. This gene was chosen because Rz action can be evaluated visually by the Red phenotype produced when the activity of the gene product is inhibited. Different plasmid constructs allowed the expression of the Rz either in cis or in trans with respect to ADE1. Rz-related inhibition of ADE1 expression was correlated with a Red phenotype and a diminution of ADE1 mRNA levels only when the Rz gene was linked 5' to ADE1. The presence of the expected 3' cleavage fragment was demonstrated using a technique combining RNA ligation and PCR. This yeast system and detection technique are suited to the investigation of general factors affecting Rz-catalyzed inhibition of gene expression under in vivo conditions.

  1. Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer

    FROILAN G. DESTREZA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is for the BSHRM Students of Batangas State University (BatStateU ARASOF for the researchers believe that the Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer would be helpful in their degree program especially on making creative, artistic, personalized and decorative chocolate designs. The researchers used the Prototyping model as procedural method for the successful development and implementation of the hardware and software. This method has five phases which are the following: quick plan, quick design, prototype construction, delivery and feedback and communication. This study was evaluated by the BSHRM Students and the assessment of the respondents regarding the software and hardware application are all excellent in terms of Accuracy, Effecitveness, Efficiency, Maintainability, Reliability and User-friendliness. Also, the overall level of acceptability of the design project as evaluated by the respondents is excellent. With regard to the observation about the best raw material to use in 3D printing, the chocolate is good to use as the printed material is slightly distorted,durable and very easy to prepare; the icing is also good to use as the printed material is not distorted and is very durable but consumes time to prepare; the flour is not good as the printed material is distorted, not durable but it is easy to prepare. The computation of the economic viability level of 3d printer with reference to ROI is 37.14%. The recommendation of the researchers in the design project are as follows: adding a cooling system so that the raw material will be more durable, development of a more simplified version and improving the extrusion process wherein the user do not need to stop the printing process just to replace the empty syringe with a new one.

  2. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  3. Gene expression profiles of Nitrosomonas europaea, an obligate chemolitotroph

    Daniel J Arp

    2005-06-15

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic lithoautotrophic bacterium that uses ammonia (NH3) as its energy source. As a nitrifier, it is an important participant in the nitrogen cycle, which can also influence the carbon cycle. The focus of this work was to explore the genetic structure and mechanisms underlying the lithoautotrophic growth style of N. europaea. Whole genome gene expression. The gene expression profile of cells in exponential growth and during starvation was analyzed using microarrays. During growth, 98% of the genes increased in expression at least two fold compared to starvation conditions. In growing cells, approximately 30% of the genes were expressed eight fold higher, Approximately 10% were expressed more than 15 fold higher. Approximately 3% (91 genes) were expressed to more than 20 fold of their levels in starved cells. Carbon fixation gene expression. N. europaea fixes carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle via a type I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). This study showed that transcription of cbb genes was up-regulated when the carbon source was limited, while amo, hao and other energy harvesting related genes were down-regulated. Iron related gene expression. Because N. europaea has a relatively high content of hemes, sufficient Fe must be available in the medium for it to grow. The genome revealed that approximately 5% of the coding genes in N. europaea are dedicated to Fe transport and assimilation. Nonetheless, with the exception of citrate biosynthesis genes, N. europaea lacks genes for siderophore production. The Fe requirements for growth and the expression of the putative membrane siderophore receptors were determined. The N. europaea genome has over 100 putative genes ({approx}5% of the coding genes) related to Fe uptake and its siderophore receptors could be grouped phylogenetically in four clusters. Fe related genes, such as a number of TonB-dependent Fe-siderophore receptors for ferrichrome and

  4. Gene expression profiles of Nitrosomonas europaea, an obligate chemolitotroph

    Daniel J. Arp

    2005-05-25

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic lithoautotrophic bacterium that uses ammonia (NH3) as its energy source. As a nitrifier, it is an important participant in the nitrogen cycle, which can also influence the carbon cycle. The focus of this work was to explore the genetic structure and mechanisms underlying the lithoautotrophic growth style of N. europaea. Whole genome gene expression: The gene expression profile of cells in exponential growth and during starvation was analyzed using microarrays. During growth, 98% of the genes increased in expression at least two fold compared to starvation conditions. In growing cells, approximately 30% of the genes were expressed eight fold higher, Approximately 10% were expressed more than 15 fold higher. Approximately 3% (91 genes) were expressed to more than 20 fold of their levels in starved cells. Carbon fixation gene expression: N. europaea fixes carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle via a type I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). This study showed that transcription of cbb genes was up-regulated when the carbon source was limited, while amo, hao and other energy harvesting related genes were down-regulated. Iron related gene expression: Because N. europaea has a relatively high content of hemes, sufficient Fe must be available in the medium for it to grow. The genome revealed that approximately 5% of the coding genes in N. europaea are dedicated to Fe transport and assimilation. Nonetheless, with the exception of citrate biosynthesis genes, N. europaea lacks genes for siderophore production. The Fe requirements for growth and the expression of the putative membrane siderophore receptors were determined. The N. europaea genome has over 100 putative genes ({approx}5% of the coding genes) related to Fe uptake and its siderophore receptors could be grouped phylogenetically in four clusters. Fe related genes, such as a number of TonB-dependent Fe-siderophore receptors for ferrichrome and

  5. Detecting microRNA activity from gene expression data

    Madden, Stephen F

    2010-05-18

    Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA) of protein coding genes. They control gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing mRNA degradation. A number of computational techniques have been developed to identify the targets of miRNAs. In this study we used predicted miRNA-gene interactions to analyse mRNA gene expression microarray data to predict miRNAs associated with particular diseases or conditions. Results Here we combine correspondence analysis, between group analysis and co-inertia analysis (CIA) to determine which miRNAs are associated with differences in gene expression levels in microarray data sets. Using a database of miRNA target predictions from TargetScan, TargetScanS, PicTar4way PicTar5way, and miRanda and combining these data with gene expression levels from sets of microarrays, this method produces a ranked list of miRNAs associated with a specified split in samples. We applied this to three different microarray datasets, a papillary thyroid carcinoma dataset, an in-house dataset of lipopolysaccharide treated mouse macrophages, and a multi-tissue dataset. In each case we were able to identified miRNAs of biological importance. Conclusions We describe a technique to integrate gene expression data and miRNA target predictions from multiple sources.

  6. Detecting microRNA activity from gene expression data.

    Madden, Stephen F

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA) of protein coding genes. They control gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing mRNA degradation. A number of computational techniques have been developed to identify the targets of miRNAs. In this study we used predicted miRNA-gene interactions to analyse mRNA gene expression microarray data to predict miRNAs associated with particular diseases or conditions. RESULTS: Here we combine correspondence analysis, between group analysis and co-inertia analysis (CIA) to determine which miRNAs are associated with differences in gene expression levels in microarray data sets. Using a database of miRNA target predictions from TargetScan, TargetScanS, PicTar4way PicTar5way, and miRanda and combining these data with gene expression levels from sets of microarrays, this method produces a ranked list of miRNAs associated with a specified split in samples. We applied this to three different microarray datasets, a papillary thyroid carcinoma dataset, an in-house dataset of lipopolysaccharide treated mouse macrophages, and a multi-tissue dataset. In each case we were able to identified miRNAs of biological importance. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a technique to integrate gene expression data and miRNA target predictions from multiple sources.

  7. Identification of reference genes in human myelomonocytic cells for gene expression studies in altered gravity.

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Unverdorben, Felix; Buttron, Isabell; Lauber, Beatrice; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes ("housekeeping genes") are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity.

  8. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Emond Mary

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marfan syndrome (MFS is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value -6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status. An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater.

  9. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Yao, Zizhen; Jaeger, Jochen C; Ruzzo, Walter L; Morale, Cecile Z; Emond, Mary; Francke, Uta; Milewicz, Dianna M; Schwartz, Stephen M; Mulvihill, Eileen R

    2007-01-01

    Background Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value < 3 × 10-6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status). An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater. PMID:17850668

  10. Immune response gene expression increases in the aging murine hippocampus.

    Terao, Akira; Apte-Deshpande, Anjali; Dousman, Linda; Morairty, Stephen; Eynon, Barrett P; Kilduff, Thomas S; Freund, Yvonne R

    2002-11-01

    Using GeneChips, basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gene expression was examined in the hippocampus of 3-, 12-, 18- and 24-month-old male C57BL/6 mice to identify genes whose altered expression could influence hippocampal function in advanced age. Gene elements that changed with age were selected with a t-statistic and specific expression patterns were confirmed with real-time quantitative PCR. Basal expression of 128 gene elements clearly changed with age in the hippocampus. Fourteen gene elements showed increased expression with age and these increases were validated after LPS stimulation. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) TL region and thymic shared antigen (TSA-1) gene expression increased, suggesting T cell activation in the hippocampus with age. Cytokine (interleukin (IL)-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) and chemokine (macrophage chemotactic protein-1) expression increased sharply in 24-month-old mice. These findings are in contrast to a decrease in the peripheral immune response, documented by decreased T cell proliferation and decreased ratios of naive to memory T cells. Age-related increases in inflammatory potential in the brain may contribute to neurodegenerative diseases of the aged.

  11. How 3-D Movies Work

    吕铁雄

    2011-01-01

    难度:★★★★☆词数:450 建议阅读时间:8分钟 Most people see out of two eyes. This is a basic fact of humanity,but it’s what makes possible the illusion of depth(纵深幻觉) that 3-D movies create. Human eyes are spaced about two inches apart, meaning that each eye gives the brain a slightly different perspective(透视感)on the same object. The brain then uses this variance to quickly determine an object’s distance.

  12. Virtual 3-D Facial Reconstruction

    Martin Paul Evison

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial reconstructions in archaeology allow empathy with people who lived in the past and enjoy considerable popularity with the public. It is a common misconception that facial reconstruction will produce an exact likeness; a resemblance is the best that can be hoped for. Research at Sheffield University is aimed at the development of a computer system for facial reconstruction that will be accurate, rapid, repeatable, accessible and flexible. This research is described and prototypical 3-D facial reconstructions are presented. Interpolation models simulating obesity, ageing and ethnic affiliation are also described. Some strengths and weaknesses in the models, and their potential for application in archaeology are discussed.

  13. The gsdf gene locus harbors evolutionary conserved and clustered genes preferentially expressed in fish previtellogenic oocytes.

    Gautier, Aude; Le Gac, Florence; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques

    2011-02-01

    The gonadal soma-derived factor (GSDF) belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and is conserved in teleostean fish species. Gsdf is specifically expressed in the gonads, and gene expression is restricted to the granulosa and Sertoli cells in trout and medaka. The gsdf gene expression is correlated to early testis differentiation in medaka and was shown to stimulate primordial germ cell and spermatogonia proliferation in trout. In the present study, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment conserved among vertebrates although no gsdf-related gene is detected on the corresponding genomic region in tetrapods. We demonstrate using quantitative RT-PCR that most of the genes localized in the synteny are specifically expressed in medaka gonads. Gsdf is the only gene of the synteny with a much higher expression in the testis compared to the ovary. In contrast, gene expression pattern analysis of the gsdf surrounding genes (nup54, aff1, klhl8, sdad1, and ptpn13) indicates that these genes are preferentially expressed in the female gonads. The tissue distribution of these genes is highly similar in medaka and zebrafish, two teleostean species that have diverged more than 110 million years ago. The cellular localization of these genes was determined in medaka gonads using the whole-mount in situ hybridization technique. We confirm that gsdf gene expression is restricted to Sertoli and granulosa cells in contact with the premeiotic and meiotic cells. The nup54 gene is expressed in spermatocytes and previtellogenic oocytes. Transcripts corresponding to the ovary-specific genes (aff1, klhl8, and sdad1) are detected only in previtellogenic oocytes. No expression was detected in the gonocytes in 10 dpf embryos. In conclusion, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment harboring evolutionary conserved genes in vertebrates. These genes are preferentially expressed in previtelloogenic oocytes, and thus, they

  14. Applications of Little's Law to stochastic models of gene expression

    Elgart, Vlad; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2010-01-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variations in protein levels across a population of cells. To explain this variability, different sources of mRNA fluctuations ('Poisson' and 'Telegraph' processes) have been proposed in stochastic models of gene expression. Both Poisson and Telegraph scenario models explain experimental observations of noise in protein levels in terms of 'bursts' of protein expression. Correspondingly, there is considerable interest in establishing relations between burst and steady-state protein distributions for general stochastic models of gene expression. In this work, we address this issue by considering a mapping between stochastic models of gene expression and problems of interest in queueing theory. By applying a general theorem from queueing theory, Little's Law, we derive exact relations which connect burst and steady-state distribution means for models with arbitrary waiting-time distributions for arrival and degradation of mRNAs and proteins. The de...

  15. Lab-specific gene expression signatures in pluripotent stem cells.

    Newman, Aaron M; Cooper, James B

    2010-08-06

    Pluripotent stem cells derived from both embryonic and reprogrammed somatic cells have significant potential for human regenerative medicine. Despite similarities in developmental potential, however, several groups have found fundamental differences between embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced-pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines that may have important implications for iPSC-based medical therapies. Using an unsupervised clustering algorithm, we further studied the genetic homogeneity of iPSC and ESC lines by reanalyzing microarray gene expression data from seven different laboratories. Unexpectedly, this analysis revealed a strong correlation between gene expression signatures and specific laboratories in both ESC and iPSC lines. Nearly one-third of the genes with lab-specific expression signatures are also differentially expressed between ESCs and iPSCs. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that in vitro microenvironmental context differentially impacts the gene expression signatures of both iPSCs and ESCs.

  16. Novel redox nanomedicine improves gene expression of polyion complex vector

    Kazuko Toh, Toru Yoshitomi, Yutaka Ikeda and Yukio Nagasaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has generated worldwide attention as a new medical technology. While non-viral gene vectors are promising candidates as gene carriers, they have several issues such as toxicity and low transfection efficiency. We have hypothesized that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS affects gene expression in polyplex supported gene delivery systems. The effect of ROS on the gene expression of polyplex was evaluated using a nitroxide radical-containing nanoparticle (RNP as an ROS scavenger. When polyethyleneimine (PEI/pGL3 or PEI alone was added to the HeLa cells, ROS levels increased significantly. In contrast, when (PEI/pGL3 or PEI was added with RNP, the ROS levels were suppressed. The luciferase expression was increased by the treatment with RNP in a dose-dependent manner and the cellular uptake of pDNA was also increased. Inflammatory cytokines play an important role in ROS generation in vivo. In particular, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α caused intracellular ROS generation in HeLa cells and decreased gene expression. RNP treatment suppressed ROS production even in the presence of TNF-α and increased gene expression. This anti-inflammatory property of RNP suggests that it may be used as an effective adjuvant for non-viral gene delivery systems.

  17. Novel redox nanomedicine improves gene expression of polyion complex vector

    Toh, Kazuko; Yoshitomi, Toru; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy has generated worldwide attention as a new medical technology. While non-viral gene vectors are promising candidates as gene carriers, they have several issues such as toxicity and low transfection efficiency. We have hypothesized that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) affects gene expression in polyplex supported gene delivery systems. The effect of ROS on the gene expression of polyplex was evaluated using a nitroxide radical-containing nanoparticle (RNP) as an ROS scavenger. When polyethyleneimine (PEI)/pGL3 or PEI alone was added to the HeLa cells, ROS levels increased significantly. In contrast, when (PEI)/pGL3 or PEI was added with RNP, the ROS levels were suppressed. The luciferase expression was increased by the treatment with RNP in a dose-dependent manner and the cellular uptake of pDNA was also increased. Inflammatory cytokines play an important role in ROS generation in vivo. In particular, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α caused intracellular ROS generation in HeLa cells and decreased gene expression. RNP treatment suppressed ROS production even in the presence of TNF-α and increased gene expression. This anti-inflammatory property of RNP suggests that it may be used as an effective adjuvant for non-viral gene delivery systems.

  18. Design and Implementation of Visual Dynamic Display Software of Gene Expression Based on GTK

    JIANG Wei; MENG Fanjiang; LI Yong; YU Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The paper presented an implement method for a dynamic gene expression display software based on the GTK. This method established the dynamic presentation system of gene expression which according to gene expression data from gene chip hybridize at different time, adopted a linearity combination model and Pearson correlation coefficient algorithm. The system described the gene expression changes in graphic form, the gene expression changes with time and the changes in characteristics of the gene expression, also the changes in relations of the gene expression and regulation relationships among genes. The system also provided an integrated platform for analysis on gene chips data, especially for the research on the network of gene regulation.

  19. Molecular subsets in the gene expression signatures of scleroderma skin.

    Ausra Milano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scleroderma is a clinically heterogeneous disease with a complex phenotype. The disease is characterized by vascular dysfunction, tissue fibrosis, internal organ dysfunction, and immune dysfunction resulting in autoantibody production. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the genome-wide patterns of gene expression with DNA microarrays in skin biopsies from distinct scleroderma subsets including 17 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc, 7 patients with SSc with limited scleroderma (lSSc, 3 patients with morphea, and 6 healthy controls. 61 skin biopsies were analyzed in a total of 75 microarray hybridizations. Analysis by hierarchical clustering demonstrates nearly identical patterns of gene expression in 17 out of 22 of the forearm and back skin pairs of SSc patients. Using this property of the gene expression, we selected a set of 'intrinsic' genes and analyzed the inherent data-driven groupings. Distinct patterns of gene expression separate patients with dSSc from those with lSSc and both are easily distinguished from normal controls. Our data show three distinct patient groups among the patients with dSSc and two groups among patients with lSSc. Each group can be distinguished by unique gene expression signatures indicative of proliferating cells, immune infiltrates and a fibrotic program. The intrinsic groups are statistically significant (p<0.001 and each has been mapped to clinical covariates of modified Rodnan skin score, interstitial lung disease, gastrointestinal involvement, digital ulcers, Raynaud's phenomenon and disease duration. We report a 177-gene signature that is associated with severity of skin disease in dSSc. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Genome-wide gene expression profiling of skin biopsies demonstrates that the heterogeneity in scleroderma can be measured quantitatively with DNA microarrays. The diversity in gene expression demonstrates multiple distinct gene expression programs

  20. Gene expression profiling reveals multiple toxicity endpoints induced by hepatotoxicants

    Huang Qihong; Jin Xidong; Gaillard, Elias T.; Knight, Brian L.; Pack, Franklin D.; Stoltz, James H.; Jayadev, Supriya; Blanchard, Kerry T

    2004-05-18

    Microarray technology continues to gain increased acceptance in the drug development process, particularly at the stage of toxicology and safety assessment. In the current study, microarrays were used to investigate gene expression changes associated with hepatotoxicity, the most commonly reported clinical liability with pharmaceutical agents. Acetaminophen, methotrexate, methapyrilene, furan and phenytoin were used as benchmark compounds capable of inducing specific but different types of hepatotoxicity. The goal of the work was to define gene expression profiles capable of distinguishing the different subtypes of hepatotoxicity. Sprague-Dawley rats were orally dosed with acetaminophen (single dose, 4500 mg/kg for 6, 24 and 72 h), methotrexate (1 mg/kg per day for 1, 7 and 14 days), methapyrilene (100 mg/kg per day for 3 and 7 days), furan (40 mg/kg per day for 1, 3, 7 and 14 days) or phenytoin (300 mg/kg per day for 14 days). Hepatic gene expression was assessed using toxicology-specific gene arrays containing 684 target genes or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Principal component analysis (PCA) of gene expression data was able to provide a clear distinction of each compound, suggesting that gene expression data can be used to discern different hepatotoxic agents and toxicity endpoints. Gene expression data were applied to the multiplicity-adjusted permutation test and significantly changed genes were categorized and correlated to hepatotoxic endpoints. Repression of enzymes involved in lipid oxidation (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, medium chain, enoyl CoA hydratase, very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase) were associated with microvesicular lipidosis. Likewise, subsets of genes associated with hepatotocellular necrosis, inflammation, hepatitis, bile duct hyperplasia and fibrosis have been identified. The current study illustrates that expression profiling can be used to: (1) distinguish different hepatotoxic endpoints; (2) predict the development of toxic endpoints; and

  1. Spatial gene expression quantification in changing morphologies

    Botman, D.

    2016-01-01

    In systems biology, an organisms’ behavior is explained from the interactions among individual components such as genes and proteins. With few exceptions, interactions among genes and proteins are not measured directly and are therefore inferred from the observed output of a biological system. A net

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Clostridium botulinum under Heat Shock Stress

    Wan-dong Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During growth, C. botulinum is always exposed to different environmental changes, such as temperature increase, nutrient deprivation, and pH change; however, its corresponding global transcriptional profile is uncharacterized. This study is the first description of the genome-wide gene expression profile of C. botulinum in response to heat shock stress. Under heat stress (temperature shift from 37°C to 45°C over a period of 15 min, 176 C. botulinum ATCC 3502 genes were differentially expressed. The response included overexpression of heat shock protein genes (dnaK operon, groESL, hsp20, and htpG and downregulation of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes (valS, queA, tyrR, and gatAB and ribosomal and cell division protein genes (ftsZ and ftsH. In parallel, several transcriptional regulators (marR, merR, and ompR families were induced, suggesting their involvement in reshuffling of the gene expression profile. In addition, many ABC transporters (oligopeptide transport system, energy production and conversion related genes (glpA and hupL, cell wall and membrane biogenesis related genes (fabZ, fabF, and fabG, flagella-associated genes (flhA, flhM, flhJ, flhS, and motAB, and hypothetical genes also showed changed expression patterns, indicating that they may play important roles in survival under high temperatures.

  3. Gene expression profile of esophageal cancer in North East India by cDNA microarray analysis

    Indranil Chattopadhyay; Sujala Kapur; Joydeep Purkayastha; Rupkumar Phukan; Amal Kataki; Jagadish Mahanta; Sunita Saxena

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To identify alterations in genes and molecular functional pathways in esophageal cancer in a high incidence region of India where there is a widespread use of tobacco and betel quid with fermented areca nuts.METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from tumor and matched normal tissue of 16 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Pooled tumor tissue RNA was labeled with Cy3-dUTP and pooled normal tissue RNA was labeled with Cy5-dUTP by direct labeling method.The labeled probes were hybridized with human 10K cDNA chip and expression profiles were analyzed by Genespring GX V 7.3 (Silicon Genetics).RESULTS: Nine hundred twenty three genes were differentially expressed. Of these, 611 genes were upregulated and 312 genes were downregulated. Using stringent criteria (P ≤ 0.05 and ≥ 1.5 fold change),127 differentially expressed genes (87 upregulated and 40 downregulated) were identified in tumor tissue. On the basis of Gene Ontology, four different molecular functional pathways (MAPK pathway,G-protein coupled receptor family, ion transport activity,and serine or threonine kinase activity) were most significantly upregulated and six different molecular functional pathways (structural constituent of ribosome,endopeptidase inhibitor activity, structural constituent of cytoskeleton, antioxidant activity, acyl group transferase activity, eukaryotic translation elongation factor activity)were most significantly downregulated.CONCLUSION: Several genes that showed alterations in our study have also been reported from a high incidence area of esophageal cancer in China. This indicates that molecular profiles of esophageal cancer in these two different geographic locations are highly consistent.

  4. Exploring valid reference genes for gene expression studies in Brachypodium distachyon by real-time PCR

    Xiang Fengning

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wild grass species Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium hereafter is emerging as a new model system for grass crop genomics research and biofuel grass biology. A draft nuclear genome sequence is expected to be publicly available in the near future; an explosion of gene expression studies will undoubtedly follow. Therefore, stable reference genes are necessary to normalize the gene expression data. Results A systematic exploration of suitable reference genes in Brachypodium is presented here. Nine reference gene candidates were chosen, and their gene sequences were obtained from the Brachypodium expressed sequence tag (EST databases. Their expression levels were examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR using 21 different Brachypodium plant samples, including those from different plant tissues and grown under various growth conditions. Effects of plant growth hormones were also visualized in the assays. The expression stability of the candidate genes was evaluated using two analysis software packages, geNorm and NormFinder. In conclusion, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 18 gene (UBC18 was validated as a suitable reference gene across all the plant samples examined. While the expression of the polyubiquitin genes (Ubi4 and Ubi10 was most stable in different plant tissues and growth hormone-treated plant samples, the expression of the S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase gene (SamDC ranked was most stable in plants grown under various environmental stresses. Conclusion This study identified the reference genes that are most suitable for normalizing the gene expression data in Brachypodium. These reference genes will be particularly useful when stress-responsive genes are analyzed in order to produce transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced stress resistance.

  5. 一种基于MPEG-4的三维人脸表情动画算法%A 3D facial expression animation system based on MPEG-4

    於俊; 汪增福

    2011-01-01

    面向模型基人脸视频编解码领域,提出了一种基于MPEG-4的三维人脸表情动画算法.首先对编码端发送视频的首帧图像,利用Adaboost+Camshift+AAM(active appearance model算法检测人脸和定位特征点,接着特定化一个简洁人脸通用网格模型得到FDP(facial definition parameter);对于得到的FDP,解码端先用其特定化一个精细人脸通用网格模型,然后基于肌肉模型和参数模型相结合的方式来生成人脸表情动画,同时对人脸功能区进行划分.实验表明,该算法在FAP(facial animation parameter)流的驱动下可以生成真实感较强的三维人脸表情动画.%In view of the model based coding/decoding area, a 3D facial expression animation system based on MPEG-4 was proposed. The coder obtained FDPs (facial definition parameter) through face adaptation of a simple universal triangular model with Adaboost + Camshift + AAM algorithm for face detection and feature localization in the first frame. Then the decoder adapted a complex universal triangular model using these FDPs, Finally the algorithm produced facial animation combining the parameterized model and muscle model. A facial action area split scheme was also proposed. Experiment results confirm that this system can produce realistic facial expression animation with FAP (facial animation parameter) flow.

  6. A longitudinal study of gene expression in healthy individuals

    Tessier Michel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of gene expression in venous blood either as a pharmacodynamic marker in clinical trials of drugs or as a diagnostic test requires knowledge of the variability in expression over time in healthy volunteers. Here we defined a normal range of gene expression over 6 months in the blood of four cohorts of healthy men and women who were stratified by age (22–55 years and > 55 years and gender. Methods Eleven immunomodulatory genes likely to play important roles in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and infection in addition to four genes typically used as reference genes were examined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, as well as the full genome as represented by Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Results Gene expression levels as assessed by qRT-PCR and microarray were relatively stable over time with ~2% of genes as measured by microarray showing intra-subject differences over time periods longer than one month. Fifteen genes varied by gender. The eleven genes examined by qRT-PCR remained within a limited dynamic range for all individuals. Specifically, for the seven most stably expressed genes (CXCL1, HMOX1, IL1RN, IL1B, IL6R, PTGS2, and TNF, 95% of all samples profiled fell within 1.5–2.5 Ct, the equivalent of a 4- to 6-fold dynamic range. Two subjects who experienced severe adverse events of cancer and anemia, had microarray gene expression profiles that were distinct from normal while subjects who experienced an infection had only slightly elevated levels of inflammatory markers. Conclusion This study defines the range and variability of gene expression in healthy men and women over a six-month period. These parameters can be used to estimate the number of subjects needed to observe significant differences from normal gene expression in clinical studies. A set of genes that varied by gender was also identified as were a set of genes with elevated

  7. 3D medical thermography device

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  8. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  9. 3D printed bionic ears.

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  10. Control of alphavirus-based gene expression using engineered riboswitches.

    Bell, Christie L; Yu, Dong; Smolke, Christina D; Geall, Andrew J; Beard, Clayton W; Mason, Peter W

    2015-09-01

    Alphavirus-based replicons are a promising nucleic acid vaccine platform characterized by robust gene expression and immune responses. To further explore their use in vaccination, replicons were engineered to allow conditional control over their gene expression. Riboswitches, comprising a ribozyme actuator and RNA aptamer sensor, were engineered into the replicon 3' UTR. Binding of ligand to aptamer modulates ribozyme activity and, therefore, gene expression. Expression from DNA-launched and VRP-packaged replicons containing riboswitches was successfully regulated, achieving a 47-fold change in expression and modulation of the resulting type I interferon response. Moreover, we developed a novel control architecture where riboswitches were integrated into the 3' and 5' UTR of the subgenomic RNA region of the TC-83 virus, leading to an 1160-fold regulation of viral replication. Our studies demonstrate that the use of riboswitches for control of RNA replicon expression and viral replication holds promise for development of novel and safer vaccination strategies.

  11. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Marie Morimoto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease.

  12. Scaling of gene expression with transcription-factor fugacity.

    Weinert, Franz M; Brewster, Robert C; Rydenfelt, Mattias; Phillips, Rob; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-12-19

    The proteins associated with gene regulation are often shared between multiple pathways simultaneously. By way of contrast, models in regulatory biology often assume these pathways act independently. We demonstrate a framework for calculating the change in gene expression for the interacting case by decoupling repressor occupancy across the cell from the gene of interest by way of a chemical potential. The details of the interacting regulatory architecture are encompassed in an effective concentration, and thus, a single scaling function describes a collection of gene expression data from diverse regulatory situations and collapses it onto a single master curve.

  13. Prediction of Tumor Outcome Based on Gene Expression Data

    Liu Juan; Hitoshi Iba

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression microarray data can be used to classify tumor types. We proposed a new procedure to classify human tumor samples based on microarray gene expressions by using a hybrid supervised learning method called MOEA+WV (Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm+Weighted Voting). MOEA is used to search for a relatively few subsets of informative genes from the high-dimensional gene space, and WV is used as a classification tool. This new method has been applied to predicate the subtypes of lymphoma and outcomes of medulloblastoma. The results are relatively accurate and meaningful compared to those from other methods.

  14. Scaling of Gene Expression with Transcription-Factor Fugacity

    Weinert, Franz M.; Brewster, Robert C.; Rydenfelt, Mattias; Phillips, Rob; Kegel, Willem K.

    2015-01-01

    The proteins associated with gene regulation are often shared between multiple pathways simultaneously. By way of contrast, models in regulatory biology often assume these pathways act independently. We demonstrate a framework for calculating the change in gene expression for the interacting case by decoupling repressor occupancy across the cell from the gene of interest by way of a chemical potential. The details of the interacting regulatory architecture are encompassed in an effective concentration, and thus, a single scaling function describes a collection of gene expression data from diverse regulatory situations and collapses it onto a single master curve. PMID:25554908

  15. Gene Expression Network Reconstruction by LEP Method Using Microarray Data

    Na You

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression network reconstruction using microarray data is widely studied aiming to investigate the behavior of a gene cluster simultaneously. Under the Gaussian assumption, the conditional dependence between genes in the network is fully described by the partial correlation coefficient matrix. Due to the high dimensionality and sparsity, we utilize the LEP method to estimate it in this paper. Compared to the existing methods, the LEP reaches the highest PPV with the sensitivity controlled at the satisfactory level. A set of gene expression data from the HapMap project is analyzed for illustration.

  16. Reference genes for gene expression studies in wheat flag leaves grown under different farming conditions

    Cordeiro Raposo Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internal control genes with highly uniform expression throughout the experimental conditions are required for accurate gene expression analysis as no universal reference genes exists. In this study, the expression stability of 24 candidate genes from Triticum aestivum cv. Cubus flag leaves grown under organic and conventional farming systems was evaluated in two locations in order to select suitable genes that can be used for normalization of real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR reactions. The genes were selected among the most common used reference genes as well as genes encoding proteins involved in several metabolic pathways. Findings Individual genes displayed different expression rates across all samples assayed. Applying geNorm, a set of three potential reference genes were suitable for normalization of RT-qPCR reactions in winter wheat flag leaves cv. Cubus: TaFNRII (ferredoxin-NADP(H oxidoreductase; AJ457980.1, ACT2 (actin 2; TC234027, and rrn26 (a putative homologue to RNA 26S gene; AL827977.1. In addition of these three genes that were also top-ranked by NormFinder, two extra genes: CYP18-2 (Cyclophilin A, AY456122.1 and TaWIN1 (14-3-3 like protein, AB042193 were most consistently stably expressed. Furthermore, we showed that TaFNRII, ACT2, and CYP18-2 are suitable for gene expression normalization in other two winter wheat varieties (Tommi and Centenaire grown under three treatments (organic, conventional and no nitrogen and a different environment than the one tested with cv. Cubus. Conclusions This study provides a new set of reference genes which should improve the accuracy of gene expression analyses when using wheat flag leaves as those related to the improvement of nitrogen use efficiency for cereal production.

  17. Identification of Reference Genes in Human Myelomonocytic Cells for Gene Expression Studies in Altered Gravity

    Cora S. Thiel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes (“housekeeping genes” are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1 which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity.

  18. SIGNATURE: A workbench for gene expression signature analysis

    Chang Jeffrey T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological phenotype of a cell, such as a characteristic visual image or behavior, reflects activities derived from the expression of collections of genes. As such, an ability to measure the expression of these genes provides an opportunity to develop more precise and varied sets of phenotypes. However, to use this approach requires computational methods that are difficult to implement and apply, and thus there is a critical need for intelligent software tools that can reduce the technical burden of the analysis. Tools for gene expression analyses are unusually difficult to implement in a user-friendly way because their application requires a combination of biological data curation, statistical computational methods, and database expertise. Results We have developed SIGNATURE, a web-based resource that simplifies gene expression signature analysis by providing software, data, and protocols to perform the analysis successfully. This resource uses Bayesian methods for processing gene expression data coupled with a curated database of gene expression signatures, all carried out within a GenePattern web interface for easy use and access. Conclusions SIGNATURE is available for public use at http://genepattern.genome.duke.edu/signature/.

  19. Imputing Gene Expression in Uncollected Tissues Within and Beyond GTEx

    Wang, Jiebiao; Gamazon, Eric R.; Pierce, Brandon L.; Stranger, Barbara E.; Im, Hae Kyung; Gibbons, Robert D.; Cox, Nancy J.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Chen, Lin S.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression and its regulation can vary substantially across tissue types. In order to generate knowledge about gene expression in human tissues, the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) program has collected transcriptome data in a wide variety of tissue types from post-mortem donors. However, many tissue types are difficult to access and are not collected in every GTEx individual. Furthermore, in non-GTEx studies, the accessibility of certain tissue types greatly limits the feasibility and scale of studies of multi-tissue expression. In this work, we developed multi-tissue imputation methods to impute gene expression in uncollected or inaccessible tissues. Via simulation studies, we showed that the proposed methods outperform existing imputation methods in multi-tissue expression imputation and that incorporating imputed expression data can improve power to detect phenotype-expression correlations. By analyzing data from nine selected tissue types in the GTEx pilot project, we demonstrated that harnessing expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) and tissue-tissue expression-level correlations can aid imputation of transcriptome data from uncollected GTEx tissues. More importantly, we showed that by using GTEx data as a reference, one can impute expression levels in inaccessible tissues in non-GTEx expression studies. PMID:27040689

  20. 3D biometrics systems and applications

    Zhang, David

    2013-01-01

    Includes discussions on popular 3D imaging technologies, combines them with biometric applications, and then presents real 3D biometric systems Introduces many efficient 3D feature extraction, matching, and fusion algorithms Techniques presented have been supported by experimental results using various 3D biometric classifications

  1. 3D Cadastral Data Model Based on Conformal Geometry Algebra

    Ji-yi Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D cadastral data models that are based on Euclidean geometry (EG are incapable of providing a unified representation of geometry and topological relations for 3D spatial units in a cadastral database. This lack of unification causes problems such as complex expression structure and inefficiency in the updating of 3D cadastral objects. The inability of current cadastral data models to express cadastral objects in a unified manner can be attributed to the different expressions of dimensional objects. Because the hierarchical Grassmann structure corresponds to the hierarchical structure of dimensions in conformal geometric algebra (CGA, geometric objects in different dimensions can be constructed by outer products in a unified expression form, which enables the direct extension of two-dimensional (2D spatial representations to 3D spatial representations. The multivector structure in CGA can be employed to organize and store different dimensional objects in a multidimensional and unified manner. With the advantages of CGA in multidimensional expressions, a new 3D cadastral data model that is based on CGA is proposed in this paper. The geometries and topological relations of 3D spatial units can be represented in a unified form within the multivector structure. Detailed methods for 3D cadastral data model design based on CGA and data organization in CGA are introduced. The new cadastral data model is tested and analyzed with experimental data. The results indicate that the geometry and topological relations of 3D cadastral objects can be represented in a multidimensional manner with an intuitive topological structure and a unified dimensional expression.

  2. Differentially Expressed Genes and Signature Pathways of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Jennifer S Myers

    Full Text Available Genomic technologies including microarrays and next-generation sequencing have enabled the generation of molecular signatures of prostate cancer. Lists of differentially expressed genes between malignant and non-malignant states are thought to be fertile sources of putative prostate cancer biomarkers. However such lists of differentially expressed genes can be highly variable for multiple reasons. As such, looking at differential expression in the context of gene sets and pathways has been more robust. Using next-generation genome sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, differential gene expression between age- and stage- matched human prostate tumors and non-malignant samples was assessed and used to craft a pathway signature of prostate cancer. Up- and down-regulated genes were assigned to pathways composed of curated groups of related genes from multiple databases. The significance of these pathways was then evaluated according to the number of differentially expressed genes found in the pathway and their position within the pathway using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis. The "transforming growth factor-beta signaling" and "Ran regulation of mitotic spindle formation" pathways were strongly associated with prostate cancer. Several other significant pathways confirm reported findings from microarray data that suggest actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell cycle, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and calcium signaling are also altered in prostate cancer. Thus we have demonstrated feasibility of pathway analysis and identified an underexplored area (Ran for investigation in prostate cancer pathogenesis.

  3. Ion channel gene expression predicts survival in glioma patients.

    Wang, Rong; Gurguis, Christopher I; Gu, Wanjun; Ko, Eun A; Lim, Inja; Bang, Hyoweon; Zhou, Tong; Ko, Jae-Hong

    2015-08-03

    Ion channels are important regulators in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. The malfunction and/or aberrant expression of ion channels may disrupt these important biological processes and influence cancer progression. In this study, we investigate the expression pattern of ion channel genes in glioma. We designate 18 ion channel genes that are differentially expressed in high-grade glioma as a prognostic molecular signature. This ion channel gene expression based signature predicts glioma outcome in three independent validation cohorts. Interestingly, 16 of these 18 genes were down-regulated in high-grade glioma. This signature is independent of traditional clinical, molecular, and histological factors. Resampling tests indicate that the prognostic power of the signature outperforms random gene sets selected from human genome in all the validation cohorts. More importantly, this signature performs better than the random gene signatures selected from glioma-associated genes in two out of three validation datasets. This study implicates ion channels in brain cancer, thus expanding on knowledge of their roles in other cancers. Individualized profiling of ion channel gene expression serves as a superior and independent prognostic tool for glioma patients.

  4. A sequence-based approach to identify reference genes for gene expression analysis

    Chari Raj

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important consideration when analyzing both microarray and quantitative PCR expression data is the selection of appropriate genes as endogenous controls or reference genes. This step is especially critical when identifying genes differentially expressed between datasets. Moreover, reference genes suitable in one context (e.g. lung cancer may not be suitable in another (e.g. breast cancer. Currently, the main approach to identify reference genes involves the mining of expression microarray data for highly expressed and relatively constant transcripts across a sample set. A caveat here is the requirement for transcript normalization prior to analysis, and measurements obtained are relative, not absolute. Alternatively, as sequencing-based technologies provide digital quantitative output, absolute quantification ensues, and reference gene identification becomes more accurate. Methods Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE profiles of non-malignant and malignant lung samples were compared using a permutation test to identify the most stably expressed genes across all samples. Subsequently, the specificity of the reference genes was evaluated across multiple tissue types, their constancy of expression was assessed using quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR, and their impact on differential expression analysis of microarray data was evaluated. Results We show that (i conventional references genes such as ACTB and GAPDH are highly variable between cancerous and non-cancerous samples, (ii reference genes identified for lung cancer do not perform well for other cancer types (breast and brain, (iii reference genes identified through SAGE show low variability using qPCR in a different cohort of samples, and (iv normalization of a lung cancer gene expression microarray dataset with or without our reference genes, yields different results for differential gene expression and subsequent analyses. Specifically, key established pathways in lung

  5. Estradiol-induced gene expression in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    Bowman, C.J.; Kroll, K.J.; Gross, T.G.; Denslow, N.D.

    2002-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) and estrogen receptor (ER) gene expression levels were measured in largemouth bass to evaluate the activation of the ER-mediated pathway by estradiol (E2). Single injections of E2 ranging from 0.0005 to 5 mg/kg up-regulated plasma Vtg in a dose-dependent manner. Vtg and ER mRNAs were measured using partial cDNA sequences corresponding to the C-terminal domain for Vtg and the ligand-binding domain of ER?? sequences. After acute E2-exposures (2 mg/kg), Vtg and ER mRNAs and plasma Vtg levels peaked after 2 days. The rate of ER mRNA accumulation peaked 36-42 h earlier than Vtg mRNA. The expression window for ER defines the primary response to E2 in largemouth bass and that for Vtg a delayed primary response. The specific effect of E2 on other estrogen-regulated genes was tested during these same time windows using differential display RT-PCR. Specific up-regulated genes that are expressed in the same time window as Vtg were ERp72 (a membrane-bound disulfide isomerase) and a gene with homology to an expressed gene identified in zebrafish. Genes that were expressed in a pattern that mimics the ER include the gene for zona radiata protein ZP2, and a gene with homology to an expressed gene found in winter flounder. One gene for fibrinogen ?? was down-regulated and an unidentified gene was transiently up-regulated after 12 h of exposure and returned to basal levels by 48 h. Taken together these studies indicate that the acute molecular response to E2 involves a complex network of responses over time. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression of a Carrot Antifreeze Protein Gene in Escherichia coli

    Ma Xinyu; Shen Xin; Lu Cunfu

    2003-01-01

    The recombinant expression vectorpET43. lb-AFP, which contains full encoding region of a carrot 36 kD antifreeze protein (AFP) gene was constructed. The recombinant was transformed into expression host carrying T7 RNA polymerase gene (DE3 lysogen) and induced by 1 mmol. L-1 IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside) to express 110 kD polypeptide of AFP fusion protein.The analysis of product solubility revealed that pET43. 1b-AFP was predominately soluble, and the expressed amount reached the maximum after the IPTG treatment for 3 h.

  7. THE GENE EXPRESSION PROFILE OF HIGHLY METASTATIC HUMAN OVARIAN CANCER CELL LINE BY GENE CHIP

    吕桂泉; 许沈华; 牟瀚舟; 朱赤红; 羊正炎; 高永良; 楼洪坤; 刘祥麟; 杨文; 程勇

    2001-01-01

    To study the gene expression of high metastatic human ovarian carcinoma cell line (HO-8910PM) and to screen for novel metastasis- associated genes by cDNA microarray. Methods: The cDNA was retro-transcribed from equal quantity mRNA derived from tissues of highly metastatic ovarian carcinoma cell line and normal ovarian, and was labeled with Cy5 and Cy3 fluorescence as probes. The mixed probes were hybridized with BioDoor 4096 double dot human whole gene chip. The chip was scanned by scanArray 3000 laser scanner. The acquired image was analyzed by ImaGene 3.0 software. Results: By applying the cDNA microarray we found: A total of 323 genes whose expression level were 3 times higher or lower in HO-8910PM cell than normal ovarian epithelium cell were screened out, with 71 higher and 252 lower respectively. Among these 10 were new genes. 67 genes showed expression difference bigger than 6 times between HO-8910PM cell and normal ovarian epithelium cell, among these genes 12 were higher, 55 lower, and two new genes were found. Conclusion: cDNA microarray technique is effective in screening the differentially expressed genes between human ovarian cancer cell line (HO-8910PM) and normal ovarian epithelium cell. Using the cDNA microarray to analyze of human ovarian cancer cell line gene expression profile difference will help the gene diagnosis, treatment and protection.

  8. Identification of optimal housekeeping genes for examination of gene expression in bovine corpus luteum.

    Rekawiecki, Robert; Rutkowska, Joanna; Kotwica, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The selection of proper housekeeping genes for studies requiring genes expression normalization is an important step in the appropriate interpretation of results. The expression of housekeeping genes is regulated by many factors including age, gender, type of tissue or disease. The aim of the study was to identify optimal housekeeping genes in the corpus luteum obtained from cyclic or pregnant cows. The mRNA expression of thirteen housekeeping genes: C2orf29, SUZ12, TBP, TUBB2B, ZNF131, HPRT1, 18s RNA, GAPDH, SF3A1, SDHA, MRPL12, B2M and ACTB was measured by Real-time PCR. Range of cycle threshold (C(t)) values of the tested genes varied between 12 and 30 cycles, and 18s RNA had the highest coefficient of variation, whereas C2orf29 had the smallest coefficient. GeNorm software demonstrated C2orf29 and TBP as the most stable and 18s RNA and B2M as the most unstable housekeeping genes. Using the proposed cut-off value (0.15), no more than two of the best GeNorm housekeeping genes are proposed to be used in studies requiring gene expression normalization. NormFinder software demonstrated C2orf29 and SUZ12 as the best and 18s RNA and B2M as the worst housekeeping genes. The study indicates that selection of housekeeping genes may essentially affect the quality of the gene expression results.

  9. Gene Expression Measurement Module (GEMM) - A Fully Automated, Miniaturized Instrument for Measuring Gene Expression in Space

    Pohorille, Andrew; Peyvan, Kia; Karouia, Fathi; Ricco, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The capability to measure gene expression on board spacecraft opens the door to a large number of high-value experiments on the influence of the space environment on biological systems. For example, measurements of gene expression will help us to understand adaptation of terrestrial life to conditions beyond the planet of origin, identify deleterious effects of the space environment on a wide range of organisms from microbes to humans, develop effective countermeasures against these effects, and determine the metabolic bases of microbial pathogenicity and drug resistance. These and other applications hold significant potential for discoveries in space biology, biotechnology, and medicine. Supported by funding from the NASA Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development Program, we are developing a fully automated, miniaturized, integrated fluidic system for small spacecraft capable of in-situ measurement of expression of several hundreds of microbial genes from multiple samples. The instrument will be capable of (1) lysing cell walls of bacteria sampled from cultures grown in space, (2) extracting and purifying RNA released from cells, (3) hybridizing the RNA on a microarray and (4) providing readout of the microarray signal, all in a single microfluidics cartridge. The device is suitable for deployment on nanosatellite platforms developed by NASA Ames' Small Spacecraft Division. To meet space and other technical constraints imposed by these platforms, a number of technical innovations are being implemented. The integration and end-to-end technological and biological validation of the instrument are carried out using as a model the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus, known for its remarkable metabolic diversity and resilience to adverse conditions. Each step in the measurement process-lysis, nucleic acid extraction, purification, and hybridization to an array-is assessed through comparison of the results obtained using the instrument with

  10. Gene expression profile differences in gastric cancer, pericancerous epithelium and normal gastric mucosa by gene chip

    Chuan-Ding Yu; Shen-Hua Xu; Hang-Zhou Mou; Zhi-Ming Jiang; Chi-Hong Zhu; Xiang-Lin Liu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the difference of gene expression in gastric cancer (T), pericancerous epithelium (P) and normal tissue of gastric mucosa (C), and to screen an associated novel gene in early gastric carcinogenesis by oligonudeotide microarray.METHODS: U133A (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) gene chip was used to detect the gene expression profile difference in T, P and C, respectively. Bioinformatics was used to analyze the detected results.RESULTS: When gastric cancer was compared with normal gastric mucosa, 766 genes were found, with a difference of more than four times in expression levels. Of the 766 genes,530 were up-regulated (Signal Log Ratio [SLR]>2), and 236 were down-regulated (SLR<-2). When pericancerous epithelium was compared with normal gastric mucosa, 64genes were found, with a difference of more than four times in expression levels. Of the 64 genes, 50 were up-regulated (SLR>2), and 14 were down-regulated (SLR<-2). Compared with normal gastric mucosa, a total of 143 genes with a difference in expression levels (more than four times, either in cancer or in pericancerous epithelium) were found in gastric cancer (T) and pericancerous epithelium (P). Of the 143 genes, 108 were up-regulated (SLR>2), and 35were down-regulated (SLR<-2).CONCLUSION: To apply a gene chip could find 143 genes associated with the genes of gastric cancer in pericancerous epithelium, although there were no pathological changes in the tissue slices. More interesting, six genes of pericancerous epithelium were up-regulated in comparison with genes of gastric cancer and three genes were down-regulated in comparison with genes of gastric cancer. It is suggested that these genes may be related to the carcinogenesis and development of early gastric cancer.

  11. Risk analysis of colorectal cancer incidence by gene expression analysis

    Shangkuan, Wei-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Che; Chang, Yu-Tien; Jian, Chen-En; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chen, Kang-Hua; Liu, Ya-Fang; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Chou, Hsiu-Ling; Yao, Chung-Tay

    2017-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading cancers worldwide. Several studies have performed microarray data analyses for cancer classification and prognostic analyses. Microarray assays also enable the identification of gene signatures for molecular characterization and treatment prediction. Objective Microarray gene expression data from the online Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database were used to to distinguish colorectal cancer from normal colon tissue samples. Methods We collected microarray data from the GEO database to establish colorectal cancer microarray gene expression datasets for a combined analysis. Using the Prediction Analysis for Microarrays (PAM) method and the GSEA MSigDB resource, we analyzed the 14,698 genes that were identified through an examination of their expression values between normal and tumor tissues. Results Ten genes (ABCG2, AQP8, SPIB, CA7, CLDN8, SCNN1B, SLC30A10, CD177, PADI2, and TGFBI) were found to be good indicators of the candidate genes that correlate with CRC. From these selected genes, an average of six significant genes were obtained using the PAM method, with an accuracy rate of 95%. The results demonstrate the potential of utilizing a model with the PAM method for data mining. After a detailed review of the published reports, the results confirmed that the screened candidate genes are good indicators for cancer risk analysis using the PAM method. Conclusions Six genes were selected with 95% accuracy to effectively classify normal and colorectal cancer tissues. We hope that these results will provide the basis for new research projects in clinical practice that aim to rapidly assess colorectal cancer risk using microarray gene expression analysis. PMID:28229027

  12. Identification of Haemophilus ducreyi genes expressed during human infection.

    Bauer, Margaret E; Fortney, Kate R; Harrison, Alistair; Janowicz, Diane M; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2008-04-01

    To identify Haemophilus ducreyi transcripts that are expressed during human infection, we used selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) with RNA isolated from pustules obtained from three volunteers infected with H. ducreyi, and with RNA isolated from broth-grown bacteria used to infect volunteers. With SCOTS, competitive hybridization of tissue-derived and broth-derived sequences identifies genes that may be preferentially expressed in vivo. Among the three tissue specimens, we identified 531 genes expressed in vivo. Southern blot analysis of 60 genes from each tissue showed that 87 % of the identified genes hybridized better with cDNA derived from tissue specimens than with cDNA derived from broth-grown bacteria. RT-PCR on nine additional pustules confirmed in vivo expression of 10 of 11 selected genes in other volunteers. Of the 531 genes, 139 were identified in at least two volunteers. These 139 genes fell into several functional categories, including biosynthesis and metabolism, regulation, and cellular processes, such as transcription, translation, cell division, DNA replication and repair, and transport. Detection of genes involved in anaerobic and aerobic respiration indicated that H. ducreyi likely encounters both microenvironments within the pustule. Other genes detected suggest an increase in DNA damage and stress in vivo. Genes involved in virulence in other bacterial pathogens and 32 genes encoding hypothetical proteins were identified, and may represent novel virulence factors. We identified three genes, lspA1, lspA2 and tadA, known to be required for virulence in humans. This is the first study to broadly define transcripts expressed by H. ducreyi in humans.

  13. Clinicopathologic and gene expression parameters predict liver cancer prognosis

    Hao Ke

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC varies following surgical resection and the large variation remains largely unexplained. Studies have revealed the ability of clinicopathologic parameters and gene expression to predict HCC prognosis. However, there has been little systematic effort to compare the performance of these two types of predictors or combine them in a comprehensive model. Methods Tumor and adjacent non-tumor liver tissues were collected from 272 ethnic Chinese HCC patients who received curative surgery. We combined clinicopathologic parameters and gene expression data (from both tissue types in predicting HCC prognosis. Cross-validation and independent studies were employed to assess prediction. Results HCC prognosis was significantly associated with six clinicopathologic parameters, which can partition the patients into good- and poor-prognosis groups. Within each group, gene expression data further divide patients into distinct prognostic subgroups. Our predictive genes significantly overlap with previously published gene sets predictive of prognosis. Moreover, the predictive genes were enriched for genes that underwent normal-to-tumor gene network transformation. Previously documented liver eSNPs underlying the HCC predictive gene signatures were enriched for SNPs that associated with HCC prognosis, providing support that these genes are involved in key processes of tumorigenesis. Conclusion When applied individually, clinicopathologic parameters and gene expression offered similar predictive power for HCC prognosis. In contrast, a combination of the two types of data dramatically improved the power to predict HCC prognosis. Our results also provided a framework for understanding the impact of gene expression on the processes of tumorigenesis and clinical outcome.

  14. 3-D force-balanced magnetospheric configurations

    S. Zaharia

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of plasma pressure is essential for many physics applications in the magnetosphere, such as computing magnetospheric currents and deriving mag-netosphere-ionosphere coupling. A thorough knowledge of the 3-D pressure distribution has, however, eluded the community, as most in situ pressure observations are either in the ionosphere or the equatorial region of the magnetosphere. With the assumption of pressure isotropy there have been attempts to obtain the pressure at different locations,by either (a mapping observed data (e.g. in the ionosphere along the field lines of an empirical magnetospheric field model, or (b computing a pressure profile in the equatorial plane (in 2-D or along the Sun-Earth axis (in 1-D that is in force balance with the magnetic stresses of an empirical model. However, the pressure distributions obtained through these methods are not in force balance with the empirical magnetic field at all locations. In order to find a global 3-D plasma pressure distribution in force balance with the magnetospheric magnetic field, we have developed the MAG-3-D code that solves the 3-D force balance equation ${vec J} times {vec B} = nabla P$ computationally. Our calculation is performed in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials as ${vec B} = nabla psi times nabla alpha$. The pressure distribution, $P = P(psi, alpha$, is prescribed in the equatorial plane and is based on satellite measurements. In addition, computational boundary conditions for ψ surfaces are imposed using empirical field models

  15. Lestaurtinib inhibits histone phosphorylation and androgen-dependent gene expression in prostate cancer cells.

    Jens Köhler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epigenetics is defined as heritable changes in gene expression that are not based on changes in the DNA sequence. Posttranslational modification of histone proteins is a major mechanism of epigenetic regulation. The kinase PRK1 (protein kinase C related kinase 1, also known as PKN1 phosphorylates histone H3 at threonine 11 and is involved in the regulation of androgen receptor signalling. Thus, it has been identified as a novel drug target but little is known about PRK1 inhibitors and consequences of its inhibition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Using a focused library screening approach, we identified the clinical candidate lestaurtinib (also known as CEP-701 as a new inhibitor of PRK1. Based on a generated 3D model of the PRK1 kinase using the homolog PKC-theta (protein kinase c theta protein as a template, the key interaction of lestaurtinib with PRK1 was analyzed by means of molecular docking studies. Furthermore, the effects on histone H3 threonine phosphorylation and androgen-dependent gene expression was evaluated in prostate cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lestaurtinib inhibits PRK1 very potently in vitro and in vivo. Applied to cell culture it inhibits histone H3 threonine phosphorylation and androgen-dependent gene expression, a feature that has not been known yet. Thus our findings have implication both for understanding of the clinical activity of lestaurtinib as well as for future PRK1 inhibitors.

  16. A role for gene duplication and natural variation of gene expression in the evolution of metabolism.

    Daniel J Kliebenstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most eukaryotic genomes have undergone whole genome duplications during their evolutionary history. Recent studies have shown that the function of these duplicated genes can diverge from the ancestral gene via neo- or sub-functionalization within single genotypes. An additional possibility is that gene duplicates may also undergo partitioning of function among different genotypes of a species leading to genetic differentiation. Finally, the ability of gene duplicates to diverge may be limited by their biological function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test these hypotheses, I estimated the impact of gene duplication and metabolic function upon intraspecific gene expression variation of segmental and tandem duplicated genes within Arabidopsis thaliana. In all instances, the younger tandem duplicated genes showed higher intraspecific gene expression variation than the average Arabidopsis gene. Surprisingly, the older segmental duplicates also showed evidence of elevated intraspecific gene expression variation albeit typically lower than for the tandem duplicates. The specific biological function of the gene as defined by metabolic pathway also modulated the level of intraspecific gene expression variation. The major energy metabolism and biosynthetic pathways showed decreased variation, suggesting that they are constrained in their ability to accumulate gene expression variation. In contrast, a major herbivory defense pathway showed significantly elevated intraspecific variation suggesting that it may be under pressure to maintain and/or generate diversity in response to fluctuating insect herbivory pressures. CONCLUSION: These data show that intraspecific variation in gene expression is facilitated by an interaction of gene duplication and biological activity. Further, this plays a role in controlling diversity of plant metabolism.

  17. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  18. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder

    Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Berk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Munkholm K, Vinberg M, Berk M, Kessing LV. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder: a systematic review. Bipolar Disord 2012: 14: 684-696. © 2012 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Objective:  Alterations in gene expression in bipolar disorder...... vulnerability pathways. This review therefore evaluated the evidence for whether gene expression in bipolar disorder is state or trait related. Methods:  A systematic review, using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guideline for reporting systematic reviews, based...... on comprehensive database searches for studies on gene expression in patients with bipolar disorder in specific mood states, was conducted. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and The Cochrane Library, supplemented by manually searching reference lists from retrieved publications. Results:  A total of 17...

  19. Differential Expression of Salinity Resistance Gene on Cotton

    2008-01-01

    Salinity resistance and differential gene expression associated with salinity in cotton germplasm were studied,because of the large scale area of salinity in China,and its significant negative effects on

  20. ROUGH SET BASED CLUSTERING OF GENE EXPRESSION DATA: A SURVEY

    J.JEBA EMILYN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technology has now made it possible to simultaneously monitor the expression levels of thousands of genes during important biological processes and across collections of related samples. But the high dimensionality property of gene expression data makes it difficult to be analyzed. Lot of clustering algorithms are available for clustering. In this paper we first briefly introduce the concepts of microarray technology and discuss the basic elements of clustering on gene expression data. Then we introduce rough clustering and itsadvantage over strict and fuzzy clustering is explored. We also explain why rough clustering is preferred over other conventional methods by presenting a survey on few clustering algorithms based on rough set theory for gene expression data. We conclude by stating that this area proves to be potential research field for the researchcommunity.

  1. 3D cell culture to determine in vitro biocompatibility of bioactive glass in association with chitosan.

    Bédouin, Y; Pellen Mussi, P; Tricot-Doleux, S; Chauvel-Lebret, D; Auroy, P; Ravalec, X; Oudadesse, H; Perez, F

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the in vitro biocompatibility of a composite biomaterial composed of 46S6 bioactive glass in association with chitosan (CH) by using 3D osteoblast culture of SaOS2. The 46S6 and CH composite (46S6-CH) forms small hydroxyapatite crystals on its surface after only three days immersion in the simulated body fluid. For 2D osteoblast culture, a significant increase in cell proliferation was observed after three days of contact with 46S6 or 46S6-CH-immersed media. After six days, 46S6-CH led to a significant increase in cell proliferation (128%) compared with pure 46S6 (113%) and pure CH (122%). For 3D osteoblast culture, after six days of culture, there was an increase in gene expression of markers of the early osteoblastic differentiation (RUNX2, ALP, COL1A1). Geometric structures corresponding to small apatite clusters were observed by SEM on the surface of the spheroids cultivated with 46S6 or 46S6-CH-immersed media. We showed different cellular responses depending on the 2D and 3D cell culture model. The induction of osteoblast differentiation in the 3D cell culture explained the differences of cell proliferation in contact with 46S6, CH or 46S6-CH-immersed media. This study confirmed that the 3D cell culture model is a very promising tool for in vitro biological evaluation of bone substitutes' properties.

  2. The effects of mycoplasma contamination upon the ability to form bioengineered 3D kidney cysts.

    Teresa M DesRochers

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma contamination of cell cultures is a pervasive, often undiagnosed and ignored problem in many laboratories that can result in reduced cell proliferation and changes in gene expression. Unless contamination is specifically suspected, it is often undetected in two dimensional (2D cultures and the resulting effects of mycoplasma contamination are rarely appreciated and can lead to incorrect conclusions. Three dimensional (3D tissue cultures are increasingly utilized to explore tissue development and phenotype. However, 3D cultures are more complex than 2D cell cultures and require a more controlled cellular environment in order to generate structures necessary to mimic in vivo responses and are often maintained for longer time periods. Changes to the microenvironment are assumed to have a more extreme effect upon the success of 3D tissue cultures than 2D cell cultures, but the effects of mycoplasma have not been studied. To test this hypothesis, we grew 2D cell cultures and 3D tissues from pig kidney epithelial cells (LLC-PK1 that were contaminated with mycoplasma and the same stock of cells after mycoplasma removal. We did not observe an effect of mycoplasma contamination on proliferation in 2D monolayer cell culture. However, cyst formation in 3D tissues was altered, with effects upon the number, size and structure of cysts formed. These data serve to reinforce the necessity of testing cell stocks for mycoplasma contamination.

  3. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  4. A gene expression atlas of a bicoid-depleted Drosophila embryo reveals early canalization of cell fate.

    Staller, Max V; Fowlkes, Charless C; Bragdon, Meghan D J; Wunderlich, Zeba; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2015-02-01

    In developing embryos, gene regulatory networks drive cells towards discrete terminal fates, a process called canalization. We studied the behavior of the anterior-posterior segmentation network in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by depleting a key maternal input, bicoid (bcd), and measuring gene expression patterns of the network at cellular resolution. This method results in a gene expression atlas containing the levels of mRNA or protein expression of 13 core patterning genes over six time points for every cell of the blastoderm embryo. This is the first cellular resolution dataset of a genetically perturbed Drosophila embryo that captures all cells in 3D. We describe the technical developments required to build this atlas and how the method can be employed and extended by others. We also analyze this novel dataset to characterize the degree and timing of cell fate canalization in the segmentation network. We find that in two layers of this gene regulatory network, following depletion of bcd, individual cells rapidly canalize towards normal cell fates. This result supports the hypothesis that the segmentation network directly canalizes cell fate, rather than an alternative hypothesis whereby cells are initially mis-specified and later eliminated by apoptosis. Our gene expression atlas provides a high resolution picture of a classic perturbation and will enable further computational modeling of canalization and gene regulation in this transcriptional network.

  5. Altered gene expression profiles in mouse tetraploid blastocysts.

    Park, Mi-Ryung; Hwang, Kyu-Chan; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Song, Hyuk; Oh, Jae-Wook; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it was demonstrated that tetraploid-derived blastocyst embryos had very few Oct4-positive cells at the mid-blastocyst stage and that the inner cell mass at biomarkers Oct4, Sox2 and Klf4 was expressed at less than 10% of the level observed in diploid blastocysts. In contrast, trophectoderm-related gene transcripts showed an approximately 10 to 40% increase. Of 32,996 individual mouse genes evaluated by microarray, 50 genes were differentially expressed between tetraploid or diploid and parthenote embryos at the blastocyst stage (Ptetraploid-derived blastocysts, whereas 22 were more highly downregulated. However, some genes involved in receptor activity, cell adhesion molecule, calcium ion binding, protein biosynthesis, redox processes, transport, and transcription showed a significant decrease or increase in gene expression in the tetraploid-derived blastocyst embryos. Thus, microarray analysis can be used as a tool to screen for underlying defects responsible for the development of tetraploid-derived embryos.

  6. Super-paramagnetic clustering of yeast gene expression profiles

    Getz, G; Domany, E; Zhang, M Q

    2000-01-01

    High-density DNA arrays, used to monitor gene expression at a genomic scale, have produced vast amounts of information which require the development of efficient computational methods to analyze them. The important first step is to extract the fundamental patterns of gene expression inherent in the data. This paper describes the application of a novel clustering algorithm, Super-Paramagnetic Clustering (SPC) to analysis of gene expression profiles that were generated recently during a study of the yeast cell cycle. SPC was used to organize genes into biologically relevant clusters that are suggestive for their co-regulation. Some of the advantages of SPC are its robustness against noise and initialization, a clear signature of cluster formation and splitting, and an unsupervised self-organized determination of the number of clusters at each resolution. Our analysis revealed interesting correlated behavior of several groups of genes which has not been previously identified.

  7. Super-paramagnetic clustering of yeast gene expression profiles

    Getz, G.; Levine, E.; Domany, E.; Zhang, M. Q.

    2000-04-01

    High-density DNA arrays, used to monitor gene expression at a genomic scale, have produced vast amounts of information which require the development of efficient computational methods to analyze them. The important first step is to extract the fundamental patterns of gene expression inherent in the data. This paper describes the application of a novel clustering algorithm, super-paramagnetic clustering (SPC) to analysis of gene expression profiles that were generated recently during a study of the yeast cell cycle. SPC was used to organize genes into biologically relevant clusters that are suggestive for their co-regulation. Some of the advantages of SPC are its robustness against noise and initialization, a clear signature of cluster formation and splitting, and an unsupervised self-organized determination of the number of clusters at each resolution. Our analysis revealed interesting correlated behavior of several groups of genes which has not been previously identified.

  8. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    Jenny Emnéus

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements.

  9. Gene expression profiling of soft and firm Atlantic salmon fillet.

    Thomas Larsson

    Full Text Available Texture of salmon fillets is an important quality trait for consumer acceptance as well as for the suitability for processing. In the present work we measured fillet firmness in a population of farmed Atlantic salmon with known pedigree and investigated the relationship between this trait and gene expression. Transcriptomic analyses performed with a 21 K oligonucleotide microarray revealed strong correlations between firmness and a large number of genes. Highly similar expression profiles were observed in several functional groups. Positive regression was found between firmness and genes encoding proteasome components (41 genes and mitochondrial proteins (129 genes, proteins involved in stress responses (12 genes, and lipid metabolism (30 genes. Coefficients of determination (R(2 were in the range of 0.64-0.74. A weaker though highly significant negative regression was seen in sugar metabolism (26 genes, R(2 = 0.66 and myofiber proteins (42 genes, R(2 = 0.54. Among individual genes that showed a strong association with firmness, there were extracellular matrix proteins (negative correlation, immune genes, and intracellular proteases (positive correlation. Several genes can be regarded as candidate markers of flesh quality (coiled-coil transcriptional coactivator b, AMP deaminase 3, and oligopeptide transporter 15 though their functional roles are unclear. To conclude, fillet firmness of Atlantic salmon depends largely on metabolic properties of the skeletal muscle; where aerobic metabolism using lipids as fuel, and the rapid removal of damaged proteins, appear to play a major role.

  10. Identification of therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease via differentially expressed gene and weighted gene co-expression network analyses.

    Jia, Yujie; Nie, Kun; Li, Jing; Liang, Xinyue; Zhang, Xuezhu

    2016-11-01

    In order to investigate the pathogenic targets and associated biological process of Alzheimer's disease in the present study, mRNA expression profiles (GSE28146) and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles (GSE16759) were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. In GSE28146, eight control samples, and Alzheimer's disease samples comprising seven incipient, eight moderate, seven severe Alzheimer's disease samples, were included. The Affy package in R was used for background correction and normalization of the raw microarray data. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially expressed miRNAs were identified using the Limma package. In addition, mRNAs were clustered using weighted gene correlation network analysis, and modules found to be significantly associated with the stages of Alzheimer's disease were screened out. The Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery was used to perform Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses. The target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were identified using the miRWalk database. Compared with the control samples, 175,59 genes and 90 DEGs were identified in the incipient, moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease samples, respectively. A module, which contained 1,592 genes was found to be closely associated with the stage of Alzheimer's disease and biological processes. In addition, pathways associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurological diseases were found to be enriched in those genes. A total of 139 overlapped genes were identified between those genes and the DEGs in the three groups. From the miRNA expression profiles, 189 miRNAs were found differentially expressed in the samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease and 1,647 target genes were obtained. In addition, five overlapped genes were identified between those 1,647 target genes and the 139 genes, and these genes may be important pathogenic targets for Alzheimer

  11. Identifying suitable reference genes for gene expression analysis in developing skeletal muscle in pigs

    Guanglin Niu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The selection of suitable reference genes is crucial to accurately evaluate and normalize the relative expression level of target genes for gene function analysis. However, commonly used reference genes have variable expression levels in developing skeletal muscle. There are few reports that systematically evaluate the expression stability of reference genes across prenatal and postnatal developing skeletal muscle in mammals. Here, we used quantitative PCR to examine the expression levels of 15 candidate reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, RNF7, RHOA, RPS18, RPL32, PPIA, H3F3, API5, B2M, AP1S1, DRAP1, TBP, WSB, and VAPB in porcine skeletal muscle at 26 different developmental stages (15 prenatal and 11 postnatal periods. We evaluated gene expression stability using the computer algorithms geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. Our results indicated that GAPDH and ACTB had the greatest variability among the candidate genes across prenatal and postnatal stages of skeletal muscle development. RPS18, API5, and VAPB had stable expression levels in prenatal stages, whereas API5, RPS18, RPL32, and H3F3 had stable expression levels in postnatal stages. API5 and H3F3 expression levels had the greatest stability in all tested prenatal and postnatal stages, and were the most appropriate reference genes for gene expression normalization in developing skeletal muscle. Our data provide valuable information for gene expression analysis during different stages of skeletal muscle development in mammals. This information can provide a valuable guide for the analysis of human diseases.

  12. Identifying suitable reference genes for gene expression analysis in developing skeletal muscle in pigs.

    Niu, Guanglin; Yang, Yalan; Zhang, YuanYuan; Hua, Chaoju; Wang, Zishuai; Tang, Zhonglin; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    The selection of suitable reference genes is crucial to accurately evaluate and normalize the relative expression level of target genes for gene function analysis. However, commonly used reference genes have variable expression levels in developing skeletal muscle. There are few reports that systematically evaluate the expression stability of reference genes across prenatal and postnatal developing skeletal muscle in mammals. Here, we used quantitative PCR to examine the expression levels of 15 candidate reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, RNF7, RHOA, RPS18, RPL32, PPIA, H3F3, API5, B2M, AP1S1, DRAP1, TBP, WSB, and VAPB) in porcine skeletal muscle at 26 different developmental stages (15 prenatal and 11 postnatal periods). We evaluated gene expression stability using the computer algorithms geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. Our results indicated that GAPDH and ACTB had the greatest variability among the candidate genes across prenatal and postnatal stages of skeletal muscle development. RPS18, API5, and VAPB had stable expression levels in prenatal stages, whereas API5, RPS18, RPL32, and H3F3 had stable expression levels in postnatal stages. API5 and H3F3 expression levels had the greatest stability in all tested prenatal and postnatal stages, and were the most appropriate reference genes for gene expression normalization in developing skeletal muscle. Our data provide valuable information for gene expression analysis during different stages of skeletal muscle development in mammals. This information can provide a valuable guide for the analysis of human diseases.

  13. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    2009-01-01

    of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through. The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave. This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron. High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these structures, but their orientation and

  14. Effects of environmental enrichment on gene expression in the brain

    Rampon, Claire; Jiang, Cecilia H.; Dong, Helin; Tang, Ya-Ping; Lockhart, David J; Schultz, Peter G.; Joe Z Tsien; Hu, Yinghe

    2000-01-01

    An enriched environment is known to promote structural changes in the brain and to enhance learning and memory performance in rodents [Hebb, D. O. (1947) Am. Psychol. 2, 306–307]. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying these experience-dependent cognitive changes, we have used high-density oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze gene expression in the brain. Expression of a large number of genes changes in response to enrichment training, many of w...

  15. Biasogram: visualization of confounding technical bias in gene expression data

    Krzystanek, Marcin; Szallasi, Zoltan Imre; Eklund, Aron Charles

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of clinical cohorts can be used to identify genes that are correlated with a clinical variable of interest such as patient outcome or response to a particular drug. However, expression measurements are susceptible to technical bias caused by variation in extraneous factor...... have been driven by a confounding technical variable. This approach can be used as a quality control step to identify data sets that are likely to yield false positive results....

  16. A Compendium of Canine Normal Tissue Gene Expression

    Joseph Briggs; Melissa Paoloni; Qing-Rong Chen; Xinyu Wen; Javed Khan; Chand Khanna

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our understanding of disease is increasingly informed by changes in gene expression between normal and abnormal tissues. The release of the canine genome sequence in 2005 provided an opportunity to better understand human health and disease using the dog as clinically relevant model. Accordingly, we now present the first genome-wide, canine normal tissue gene expression compendium with corresponding human cross-species analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Affymetrix platf...

  17. Freedom of expression: cell-type-specific gene profiling.

    Otsuki, Leo; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate and behavior are results of differential gene regulation, making techniques to profile gene expression in specific cell types highly desirable. Many methods now enable investigation at the DNA, RNA and protein level. This review introduces the most recent and popular techniques, and discusses key issues influencing the choice between these such as ease, cost and applicability of information gained. Interdisciplinary collaborations will no doubt contribute further advances, including not just in single cell type but single-cell expression profiling.

  18. Gene expression signature in peripheral blood detects thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    Yulei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA is usually asymptomatic and associated with high mortality. Adverse clinical outcome of TAA is preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. We hypothesized that gene expression patterns in peripheral blood cells may correlate with TAA disease status. Our goal was to identify a distinct gene expression signature in peripheral blood that may identify individuals at risk for TAA. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Whole genome gene expression profiles from 94 peripheral blood samples (collected from 58 individuals with TAA and 36 controls were analyzed. Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM identified potential signature genes characterizing TAA vs. normal, ascending vs. descending TAA, and sporadic vs. familial TAA. Using a training set containing 36 TAA patients and 25 controls, a 41-gene classification model was constructed for detecting TAA status and an overall accuracy of 78+/-6% was achieved. Testing this classifier on an independent validation set containing 22 TAA samples and 11 controls yielded an overall classification accuracy of 78%. These 41 classifier genes were further validated by TaqMan real-time PCR assays. Classification based on the TaqMan data replicated the microarray results and achieved 80% classification accuracy on the testing set. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified informative gene expression signatures in peripheral blood cells that can characterize TAA status and subtypes of TAA. Moreover, a 41-gene classifier based on expression signature can identify TAA patients with high accuracy. The transcriptional programs in peripheral blood leading to the identification of these markers also provide insights into the mechanism of development of aortic aneurysms and highlight potential targets for therapeutic intervention. The classifier genes identified in this study, and validated by TaqMan real-time PCR, define a set of promising potential

  19. Gene Expression Profiling during Pregnancy in Rat Brain Tissue.

    Mann, Phyllis E

    2014-03-04

    The neurophysiological changes that occur during pregnancy in the female mammal have led to the coining of the phrases "expectant brain" and "maternal brain". Although much is known of the hormonal changes during pregnancy, alterations in neurotransmitter gene expression have not been well-studied. We examined gene expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) during pregnancy based on the fact that this nucleus not only modulates the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy but is also involved in the development of maternal behavior. This study was designed to identify genes that are differentially expressed between mid- and late-pregnancy in order to determine which genes may be associated with the onset and display of maternal behavior and the development of the maternal brain. A commercially available PCR array containing 84 neurotransmitter receptor and regulator genes (RT2 Profiler PCR array) was used. Brains were harvested from rats on days 12 and 21 of gestation, frozen, and micropunched to obtain the VMH. Total RNA was extracted, cDNA prepared, and SYBR Green qPCR was performed. In the VMH, expression of five genes were reduced on day 21 of gestation compared to day 12 (Chrna6, Drd5, Gabrr2, Prokr2, and Ppyr1) whereas Chat, Chrm5, Drd4, Gabra5, Gabrg2, LOC289606, Nmu5r2, and Npy5r expression was elevated. Five genes were chosen to be validated in an additional experiment based on their known involvement in maternal behavior onset. This experiment confirmed that gene expression for both the CCK-A receptor and the GABAAR γ2 receptor increases at the end of pregnancy. In general, these results identify genes possibly involved in the establishment of the maternal brain in rats and indicate possible new genes to be investigated.

  20. Gene Expression Profiling during Pregnancy in Rat Brain Tissue

    Phyllis E. Mann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The neurophysiological changes that occur during pregnancy in the female mammal have led to the coining of the phrases “expectant brain” and “maternal brain”. Although much is known of the hormonal changes during pregnancy, alterations in neurotransmitter gene expression have not been well-studied. We examined gene expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH during pregnancy based on the fact that this nucleus not only modulates the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy but is also involved in the development of maternal behavior. This study was designed to identify genes that are differentially expressed between mid- and late-pregnancy in order to determine which genes may be associated with the onset and display of maternal behavior and the development of the maternal brain. A commercially available PCR array containing 84 neurotransmitter receptor and regulator genes (RT2 Profiler PCR array was used. Brains were harvested from rats on days 12 and 21 of gestation, frozen, and micropunched to obtain the VMH. Total RNA was extracted, cDNA prepared, and SYBR Green qPCR was performed. In the VMH, expression of five genes were reduced on day 21 of gestation compared to day 12 (Chrna6, Drd5, Gabrr2, Prokr2, and Ppyr1 whereas Chat, Chrm5, Drd4, Gabra5, Gabrg2, LOC289606, Nmu5r2, and Npy5r expression was elevated. Five genes were chosen to be validated in an additional experiment based on their known involvement in maternal behavior onset. This experiment confirmed that gene expression for both the CCK-A receptor and the GABAAR γ2 receptor increases at the end of pregnancy. In general, these results identify genes possibly involved in the establishment of the maternal brain in rats and indicate possible new genes to be investigated.

  1. [Gene expression profile of spinal ventral horn in ALS].

    Yamamoto, Masahiko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2007-10-01

    The causative pathomechanism of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is not clearly understood. Using microarray technology combined with laser-captured microdissection, gene expression profiles of degenerating spinal motor neurons as well as spinal ventral horn from autopsied patients with sporadic ALS were examined. Spinal motor neurons showed a distinct gene expression profile from the whole spinal ventral horn. Three percent of genes examined were significantly downregulated, and 1% were upregulated in motor neurons. In contrast with motor neurons, the total spinal ventral horn homogenates demonstrated 0.7% and 0.2% significant upregulation and downregulation of gene expression, respectively. Downregulated genes in motor neurons included those associated with cytoskeleton/axonal transport, transcription and cell surface antigens/receptors, such as dynactin 1 (DCTN1) and early growth response 3 (EGR3). In particular, DCTN1 was markedly downregulated in most residual motor neurons prior to the accumulation of pNF-H and ubiquitylated protein. Promoters for cell death pathway, death receptor 5 (DR5), cyclins C (CCNC) and A1 (CCNA), and caspases were upregulated, whereas cell death inhibitors, acetyl-CoA transporter (ACATN) and NF-kappaB (NFKB) were also upregulated. In terms of spinal ventral horn, the expression of genes related to cell surface antigens/receptors, transcription and cell adhesion/ECM were increased. The gene expression resulting in neurodegenerative and neuroprotective changes were both present in spinal motor neurons and ventral horn. Moreover, Inflammation-related genes, such as belonging to the cytokine family were not, however, significantly upregulated in either motor neurons or ventral horn. The sequence of motor neuron-specific gene expression changes from early DCTN1 downregulation to late CCNC upregulation in sporadic ALS can provide direct information on the genes leading to neurodegeneration and neuronal death, and are helpful

  2. Digital Gene Expression Profiling to Explore Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Terpenoid Biosynthesis during Fruit Development in Litsea cubeba.

    Gao, Ming; Lin, Liyuan; Chen, Yicun; Wang, Yangdong

    2016-09-20

    Mountain pepper (Litseacubeba (Lour.) Pers.) (Lauraceae) is an important industrial crop as an ingredient in cosmetics, pesticides, food additives and potential biofuels. These properties are attributed to monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. However, there is still no integrated model describing differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in terpenoid biosynthesis during the fruit development of L. cubeba. Here, we performed digital gene expression (DGE) using the Illumina NGS platform to evaluated changes in gene expression during fruit development in L. cubeba. DGE generated expression data for approximately 19354 genes. Fruit at 60 days after flowering (DAF) served as the control, and a total of 415, 1255, 449 and 811 up-regulated genes and 505, 1351, 1823 and 1850 down-regulated genes were identified at 75, 90, 105 and 135 DAF, respectively. Pathway analysis revealed 26 genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis pathways. Three DEGs had continued increasing or declining trends during the fruit development. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) results of five differentially expressed genes were consistent with those obtained from Illumina sequencing. These results provide a comprehensive molecular biology background for research on fruit development, and information that should aid in metabolic engineering to increase the yields of L. cubeba essential oil.

  3. A Rough Set based Gene Expression Clustering Algorithm

    J. J. Emilyn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Microarray technology helps in monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes across collections of related samples. Approach: The main goal in the analysis of large and heterogeneous gene expression datasets was to identify groups of genes that get expressed in a set of experimental conditions. Results: Several clustering techniques have been proposed for identifying gene signatures and to understand their role and many of them have been applied to gene expression data, but with partial success. The main aim of this work was to develop a clustering algorithm that would successfully indentify gene patterns. The proposed novel clustering technique (RCGED provides an efficient way of finding the hidden and unique gene expression patterns. It overcomes the restriction of one object being placed in only one cluster. Conclusion/Recommendations: The proposed algorithm is termed intelligent because it automatically determines the optimum number of clusters. The proposed algorithm was experimented with colon cancer dataset and the results were compared with Rough Fuzzy K Means algorithm.

  4. Relating Perturbation Magnitude to Temporal Gene Expression in Biological Systems

    Callister, Stephen J.; Parnell, John J.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Hashsham, Syed

    2009-03-19

    A method to quantitatively relate stress to response at the level of gene expression is described using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. Stress was defined as the magnitude of perturbation and strain was defined as the magnitude of cumulative response in terms of gene expression. Expression patterns of sixty genes previously reported to be significantly impacted by osmotic shock or belonging to the high-osmotic glycerol, glycerolipid metabolism, and glycolysis pathways were determined following perturbations of increasing sodium chloride concentrations (0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, and 1.4 M). Expression of these genes was quantified temporally using reverse transcriptase real time polymerase chain reaction. The magnitude of cumulative response was obtained by calculating the total moment of area of the temporal response envelope for all the 60 genes, either together or for the set of genes related to each pathway. A non-linear relationship between stress and response was observed for the range of stress studied. This study examines a quantitative approach to quantify the strain at the level of gene expression to relate stress to strain in biological systems. The approach should be generally applicable to quantitatively evaluate the response of organisms to environmental change.

  5. Paternal irradiation perturbs the expression of circadian genes in offspring

    Gomes, Andre M.G.F.; Barber, Ruth C.; Dubrova, Yuri E., E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We have analysed gene expression in the offspring of irradiated male mice. • CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice were used in our study. • The pattern of gene expression was established in four tissues. • Expression of genes in involved in rhythmic process/circadian rhythm is compromised. • Our data may explain the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability. - Abstract: The circadian system represents a complex network which influences the timing of many biological processes. Recent studies have established that circadian alterations play an important role in the susceptibility to many human diseases, including cancer. Here we report that paternal irradiation in mice significantly affects the expression of genes involved in rhythmic processes in their first-generation offspring. Using microarrays, the patterns of gene expression were established for brain, kidney, liver and spleen samples from the non-exposed offspring of irradiated CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice. The most over-represented categories among the genes differentially expressed in the offspring of control and irradiated males were those involved in rhythmic process, circadian rhythm and DNA-dependent regulation of transcription. The results of our study therefore provide a plausible explanation for the transgenerational effects of paternal irradiation, including increased transgenerational carcinogenesis described in other studies.

  6. Using GenePattern for Gene Expression Analysis

    Kuehn, Heidi; Liberzon, Arthur; Reich, Michael; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2013-01-01

    The abundance of genomic data now available in biomedical research has stimulated the development of sophisticated statistical methods for interpreting the data, and of special visualization tools for displaying the results in a concise and meaningful manner. However, biologists often find these methods and tools difficult to understand and use correctly. GenePattern is a freely available software package that addresses this issue by providing more than 100 analysis and visualization tools for genomic research in a comprehensive user-friendly environment for users at all levels of computational experience and sophistication. This unit demonstrates how to prepare and analyze microarray data in GenePattern. PMID:18551415

  7. Paralogous Genes as a Tool to Study the Regulation of Gene Expression

    Hoffmann, Robert D

    The genomes of plants are marked by reoccurring events of whole-genome duplication. These events are major contributors to speciation and provide the genetic material for organisms to evolve ever greater complexity. Duplicated genes, referred to as paralogs, may be retained because they acquired...... new functions, or their gene products are in a dosage balance. Regulatory DNA elements - some of which are conserved across species and hence called conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs) - that control expression of duplicated genes are thus under similar purifying selection. In the present study, I...... have performed in-depth analyses of paralogous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, their expression profile, their sequence conservation, and their functions, in order to investigate the relationship between gene expression and retention of paralogous genes. Paralogs with lower expression than...

  8. Gene expression profiling of chicken intestinal host responses

    Hemert, van S.

    2007-01-01

    Chicken lines differ in genetic disease susceptibility. The scope of the research described in this thesis was to identify genes involved in genetic disease resistance in the chicken intestine. Therefore gene expression in the jejunum was investigated using a microarray approach. An intestine specif

  9. 3D fluorescence spectral data interpolation by using IDW.

    He, Qinghang; Zhang, Zhenxi; Yi, Chao

    2008-12-01

    Because measured precision of some spectral instruments such as fluorescence spectrometer HITACHI F-4500 cannot reach the requirement of spectral analytical technique, and measured data is finite, which causes some three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence spectral data missed. The fact of missing data can result in errors in interpretations of 3D fluorescence spectral data. This paper takes ethanol solution (volume percentage phi(beta)=0.400) 3D fluorescence spectral data for example, applies inverse distance weighting (IDW) to 3D fluorescence spectral data interpolation. The results prove that the more details of 3D fluorescence spectra are expressed well by using IDW in contrast to that of original 3D fluorescence spectra. To evaluate the effectiveness of interpolation by using IDW, this paper compares standard deviation, coefficient of variation, and the mean, median, maximum and minimum values of original ethanol solution (phi(beta)=0.400) 3D fluorescence spectral data and that of the interpolated, whose results suggest that the interpolation of the 3D fluorescence spectra data by using IDW is exact.

  10. Relationships between PROMPT and gene expression

    Llinares, Marta Lloret; Mapendano, Christophe K; Martlev, Lasse H;

    2015-01-01

    Most mammalian protein-coding gene promoters are divergent, yielding promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs) in the reverse direction from their conventionally produced mRNAs. PROMPTs are rapidly degraded by the RNA exosome rendering a general function of these molecules elusive. Yet, levels...... of certain PROMPTs are altered in stress conditions, like the DNA damage response (DDR), suggesting a possible regulatory role for at least a subset of these molecules. Here we manipulate PROMPT levels by either exosome depletion or UV treatment and analyze possible effects on their neighboring genes...

  11. The Medicago truncatula gene expression atlas web server

    Tang Yuhong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legumes (Leguminosae or Fabaceae play a major role in agriculture. Transcriptomics studies in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula, are instrumental in helping to formulate hypotheses about the role of legume genes. With the rapid growth of publically available Affymetrix GeneChip Medicago Genome Array GeneChip data from a great range of tissues, cell types, growth conditions, and stress treatments, the legume research community desires an effective bioinformatics system to aid efforts to interpret the Medicago genome through functional genomics. We developed the Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA web server for this purpose. Description The Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA web server