WorldWideScience

Sample records for 30s ribosome assembly

  1. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  2. Exploring assembly energetics of the 30S ribosomal subunit using an implicit solvent approach.

    Trylska, Joanna; McCammon, J Andrew; Brooks Iii, Charles L

    2005-08-10

    To explore the relationship between the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit and interactions among the constituent components, 16S RNA and proteins, relative binding free energies of the T. thermophilus 30S proteins to the 16S RNA were studied based on an implicit solvent model of electrostatic, nonpolar, and entropic contributions. The late binding proteins in our assembly map were found not to bind to the naked 16S RNA. The 5' domain early kinetic class proteins, on average, carry the highest positive charge, get buried the most upon binding to 16S RNA, and show the most favorable binding. Some proteins (S10/S14, S6/S18, S13/S19) have more stabilizing interactions while binding as dimers. Our computed assembly map resembles that of E. coli; however, the central domain path is more similar to that of A. aeolicus, a hyperthermophilic bacteria.

  3. Tagging ribosomal protein S7 allows rapid identification of mutants defective in assembly and function of 30 S subunits.

    Fredrick, K; Dunny, G M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 nucleates folding of the 16 S rRNA 3' major domain, which ultimately forms the head of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. Recent crystal structures indicate that S7 lies on the interface side of the 30 S subunit, near the tRNA binding sites of the ribosome. To map the functional surface of S7, we have tagged the protein with a Protein Kinase A recognition site and engineered alanine substitutions that target each exposed, conserved residue. We have also deleted conserved features of S7, using its structure to guide our design. By radiolabeling the tag sequence using Protein Kinase A, we are able to track the partitioning of each mutant protein into 30 S, 70 S, and polyribosome fractions in vivo. Overexpression of S7 confers a growth defect, and we observe a striking correlation between this phenotype and proficiency in 30 S subunit assembly among our collection of mutants. We find that the side chain of K35 is required for efficient assembly of S7 into 30 S subunits in vivo, whereas those of at least 17 other conserved exposed residues are not required. In addition, an S7 derivative lacking the N-terminal 17 residues causes ribosomes to accumulate on mRNA to abnormally high levels, indicating that our approach can yield interesting mutant ribosomes.

  4. Independent in vitro assembly of all three major morphological parts of the 30S ribosomal subunit of Thermus thermophilus.

    Agalarov, S C; Selivanova, O M; Zheleznyakova, E N; Zheleznaya, L A; Matvienko, N I; Spirin, A S

    1999-12-01

    Fragments of the 16S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus representing the 3' domain (nucleotides 890-1515) and the 5' domain (nucleotides 1-539) have been prepared by transcription in vitro. Incubation of these fragments with total 30S ribosomal proteins of T. thermophilus resulted in formation of specific RNPs. The particle assembled on the 3' RNA domain contained seven proteins corresponding to Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins S3, S7, S9, S10, S13, S14, and S19. All of them have previously been shown to interact with the 3' domain of the 16S RNA and to be localized in the head of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The particle formed on the 5' RNA domain contained five ribosomal proteins corresponding to E. coli proteins S4, S12, S17, S16, and S20. These proteins are known to be localized in the main part of the body of the 30S subunit. Both types of particle were compact and had sedimentation coefficients of 15.5 S and 13 S, respectively. Together with our recent demonstration of the reconstitution of the RNA particle representing the platform of the T. thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit [Agalarov, S.C., Zheleznyakova, E.N., Selivanova, O.M., Zheleznaya, L.A., Matvienko, N.I., Vasiliev, V.D. & Spirin, A.S. (1998) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 95, 999-1003], these experiments establish that all three main structural lobes of the small ribosomal subunit can be reconstituted independently of each other and prepared in the individual state.

  5. Assembly of the central domain of the 30S ribosomal subunit: roles for the primary binding ribosomal proteins S15 and S8.

    Jagannathan, Indu; Culver, Gloria M

    2003-07-01

    Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit occurs in a highly ordered and sequential manner. The ordered addition of ribosomal proteins to the growing ribonucleoprotein particle is initiated by the association of primary binding proteins. These proteins bind specifically and independently to 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Two primary binding proteins, S8 and S15, interact exclusively with the central domain of 16S rRNA. Binding of S15 to the central domain results in a conformational change in the RNA and is followed by the ordered assembly of the S6/S18 dimer, S11 and finally S21 to form the platform of the 30S subunit. In contrast, S8 is not part of this major platform assembly branch. Of the remaining central domain binding proteins, only S21 association is slightly dependent on S8. Thus, although S8 is a primary binding protein that extensively contacts the central domain, its role in assembly of this domain remains unclear. Here, we used directed hydroxyl radical probing from four unique positions on S15 to assess organization of the central domain of 16S rRNA as a consequence of S8 association. Hydroxyl radical probing of Fe(II)-S15/16S rRNA and Fe(II)-S15/S8/16S rRNA ribonucleoprotein particles reveal changes in the 16S rRNA environment of S15 upon addition of S8. These changes occur predominantly in helices 24 and 26 near previously identified S8 binding sites. These S8-dependent conformational changes are consistent with 16S rRNA folding in complete 30S subunits. Thus, while S8 binding is not absolutely required for assembly of the platform, it appears to affect significantly the 16S rRNA environment of S15 by influencing central domain organization.

  6. Assembly of the 30S subunit from Escherichia coli ribosomes occurs via two assembly domains which are initiated by S4 and S7.

    Nowotny, V; Nierhaus, K H

    1988-09-01

    A protein which initiates assembly of ribosomes is defined as a protein which binds to the respective rRNA without cooperativity (i.e., without the help of other proteins) during the onset of assembly and is essential for the formation of active ribosomal subunits. The number of proteins binding without cooperativity was determined by monitoring the reconstitution output of active particles at various inputs of 16S rRNA, in the presence of constant amounts of 30S-derived proteins (TP30): This showed that only two of the proteins of the 30S subunit are assembly-initiator proteins. These two proteins are still present on a LiCl core particle comprising 16S rRNA and 12 proteins (including minor proteins). The 12 proteins were isolated, and a series of reconstitution experiments at various levels of rRNA excess demonstrated that S4 and S7 are the initiator proteins. Pulse-chase experiments performed during the early assembly with 14C- and 3H-labeled TP30 and the determination of the 14C/3H ratio of the individual proteins within the assembled particles revealed a bilobal structure of the 30S assembly: A group of six proteins headed by S4 (namely, S4, S20, S16, S15, S6, and S18) resisted the chasing most efficiently (S4 assembly domain). None of the proteins depending on S7 during assembly were found in this group but rather in a second group with intermediate chasing stability [S7 assembly domain; consisting of S7, S9, (S8), S19, and S3]. A number of proteins could be fully chased during the early assembly and therefore represent "late assembly proteins" (S10, S5, S13, S2, S21, S1). These findings fit well with the 30S assembly map.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Studies on the ability of partially iodinated 16S RNA to participate in 30S ribosome assembly.

    Schendel, P L; Craven, G R

    1976-11-01

    Deproteinated 16S RNA was iodinated at pH 5.0 in an aqueous solution containing TlCl3 plus KI for 1-5 hours at 42 degrees C. Under these conditions 33 moles of iodine are incorporated per mole of RNA. As judged by sucrose gradient sedimentation, the iodinated RNA does not exhibit any large alteration in conformation as compared to unmodified 16S. The iodinated RNA was examined for its ability to reconstitute with total 30S proteins. Sedimentation velocity analysis reveals that the reconstituted subunit has a sedimentation constant of approximately 20S. In addition, protein analysis of particles reconstituted with 16S RNA iodinated for 5 hours indicates that proteins S2, S10, S13, S14, S15, S17, S18, S19, and S21 are no longer able to participate in the 30S assembly process and that proteins S6, S16 and S20 are present in reduced amounts. The ramifications of these results concerning protein-RNA and RNA-RNA interactions occurring in ribosome assembly are discussed.

  8. Structural insights into the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit in vivo: functional role of S5 and location of the 17S rRNA precursor sequence.

    Yang, Zhixiu; Guo, Qiang; Goto, Simon; Chen, Yuling; Li, Ningning; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yixiao; Muto, Akira; Deng, Haiteng; Himeno, Hyouta; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2014-05-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits is a highly complex process, with a tight coordination between protein assembly and rRNA maturation events, such as folding and processing of rRNA precursors, as well as modifications of selected bases. In the cell, a large number of factors are required to ensure the efficiency and fidelity of subunit production. Here we characterize the immature 30S subunits accumulated in a factor-null Escherichia coli strain (∆rsgA∆rbfA). The immature 30S subunits isolated with varying salt concentrations in the buffer system show interesting differences on both protein composition and structure. Specifically, intermediates derived under the two contrasting salt conditions (high and low) likely reflect two distinctive assembly stages, the relatively early and late stages of the 3' domain assembly, respectively. Detailed structural analysis demonstrates a mechanistic coupling between the maturation of the 5' end of the 17S rRNA and the assembly of the 30S head domain, and attributes a unique role of S5 in coordinating these two events. Furthermore, our structural results likely reveal the location of the unprocessed terminal sequences of the 17S rRNA, and suggest that the maturation events of the 17S rRNA could be employed as quality control mechanisms on subunit production and protein translation.

  9. Efficient reconstitution of functional Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits from a complete set of recombinant small subunit ribosomal proteins.

    Culver, G M; Noller, H F

    1999-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the 30S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli can be reconstituted in vitro from individually purified ribosomal proteins and 16S ribosomal RNA, which were isolated from natural 30S subunits. We have developed a 30S subunit reconstitution system that uses only recombinant ribosomal protein components. The genes encoding E. coli ribosomal proteins S2-S21 were cloned, and all twenty of the individual proteins were overexpressed and purified. Reconstitution, following standard procedures, using the complete set of recombinant proteins and purified 16S ribosomal RNA is highly inefficient. Efficient reconstitution of 30S subunits using these components requires sequential addition of proteins, following either the 30S subunit assembly map (Mizushima & Nomura, 1970, Nature 226:1214-1218; Held et al., 1974, J Biol Chem 249:3103-3111) or following the order of protein assembly predicted from in vitro assembly kinetics (Powers et al., 1993, J MoI Biol 232:362-374). In the first procedure, the proteins were divided into three groups, Group I (S4, S7, S8, S15, S17, and S20), Group II (S5, S6, S9, Sll, S12, S13, S16, S18, and S19), and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21), which were sequentially added to 16S rRNA with a 20 min incubation at 42 degrees C following the addition of each group. In the second procedure, the proteins were divided into Group I (S4, S6, S11, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S20), Group II (S7, S8, S9, S13, and S19), Group II' (S5 and S12) and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21). Similarly efficient reconstitution is observed whether the proteins are grouped according to the assembly map or according to the results of in vitro 30S subunit assembly kinetics. Although reconstitution of 30S subunits using the recombinant proteins is slightly less efficient than reconstitution using a mixture of total proteins isolated from 30S subunits, it is much more efficient than reconstitution using proteins that were individually isolated

  10. Binding of 16S rRNA to chloroplast 30S ribosomal proteins blotted on nitrocellulose.

    Rozier, C; Mache, R

    1984-10-11

    Protein-RNA associations were studied by a method using proteins blotted on a nitrocellulose sheet. This method was assayed with Escherichia Coli 30S ribosomal components. In stringent conditions (300 mM NaCl or 20 degrees C) only 9 E. coli ribosomal proteins strongly bound to the 16S rRNA: S4, S5, S7, S9, S12, S13, S14, S19, S20. 8 of these proteins have been previously found to bind independently to the 16S rRNA. The same method was applied to determine protein-RNA interactions in spinach chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunits. A set of only 7 proteins was bound to chloroplast rRNA in stringent conditions: chloroplast S6, S10, S11, S14, S15, S17 and S22. They also bound to E. coli 16S rRNA. This set includes 4 chloroplast-synthesized proteins: S6, S11, S15 and S22. The core particles obtained after treatment by LiCl of chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit contained 3 proteins (S6, S10 and S14) which are included in the set of 7 binding proteins. This set of proteins probably play a part in the early steps of the assembly of the chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit.

  11. Cross-links between ribosomal proteins of 30S subunits in 70S tight couples and in 30S subunits.

    Lambert, J M; Boileau, G; Cover, J A; Traut, R R

    1983-08-01

    Ribosome 70S tight couples and 30S subunits derived from them were modified with 2-iminothiolane under conditions where about two sulfhydryl groups per protein were added to the ribosomal particles. The 70S and 30S particles were not treated with elevated concentrations of NH4Cl, in contrast to those used in earlier studies. The modified particles were oxidized to promote disulfide bond formation. Proteins were extracted from the cross-linked particles by using conditions to preclude disulfide interchange. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were fractionated on the basis of charge by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide/urea gels at pH 5.5. The proteins from sequential slices of the urea gels were analyzed by two-dimensional diagonal polyacrylamide/sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Final identification of proteins in cross-linked complexes was made by radioiodination of the proteins, followed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide/urea gel electrophoresis. Attention was focused on cross-links between 30S proteins. We report the identification of 27 cross-linked dimers and 2 trimers of 30S proteins, all but one of which were found in both 70S ribosomes and free 30S subunits in similar yield. Seven of the cross-links, S3-S13, S13-S21, S14-S19, S7-S12, S9-S13, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21, have not been reported previously when 2-iminothiolane was used. Cross-links S3-S13, S13-S21, S7-S12, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21 are reported for the first time. The identification of the seven new cross-links is illustrated and discussed in detail. Ten of the dimers reported in the earlier studies of Sommer & Traut (1976) [Sommer, A., & Traut, R. R. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 106, 995-1015], using 30S subunits treated with high salt concentrations, were not found in the experiments reported here.

  12. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    E. Han Dao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  13. Mutations of ribosomal protein S5 suppress a defect in late-30S ribosomal subunit biogenesis caused by lack of the RbfA biogenesis factor.

    Nord, Stefan; Bhatt, Monika J; Tükenmez, Hasan; Farabaugh, Philip J; Wikström, P Mikael

    2015-08-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits requires assistance by maturation proteins that are not part of mature ribosomes. One such protein, RbfA, associates with the 30S ribosomal subunits. Loss of RbfA causes cold sensitivity and defects of the 30S subunit biogenesis and its overexpression partially suppresses the dominant cold sensitivity caused by a C23U mutation in the central pseudoknot of 16S rRNA, a structure essential for ribosome function. We have isolated suppressor mutations that restore partially the growth of an RbfA-lacking strain. Most of the strongest suppressor mutations alter one out of three distinct positions in the carboxy-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S5 (S5) in direct contact with helix 1 and helix 2 of the central pseudoknot. Their effect is to increase the translational capacity of the RbfA-lacking strain as evidenced by an increase in polysomes in the suppressed strains. Overexpression of RimP, a protein factor that along with RbfA regulates formation of the ribosome's central pseudoknot, was lethal to the RbfA-lacking strain but not to a wild-type strain and this lethality was suppressed by the alterations in S5. The S5 mutants alter translational fidelity but these changes do not explain consistently their effect on the RbfA-lacking strain. Our genetic results support a role for the region of S5 modified in the suppressors in the formation of the central pseudoknot in 16S rRNA.

  14. A purified nucleoprotein fragment of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli.

    Spitnik-Elson, P; Elson, D; Abramowitz, R

    1979-02-27

    A '13 S' nucleoprotein fragment was isolated from a nuclease digest of Escherichia coli 30-S ribosomal subunits and purified to gel electrophoretic homogeneity. It contained two polynucleotides, of about 1.1 . 10(5) and 2.5 . 10(4) daltons, which separated when the fragment was deproteinized. The major protein components were S4, S7 and S9/11, with S15, S16, S18, S19 and S20 present in reduced amount.

  15. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  16. The protein composition of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits: the effects of single protein omission.

    Buck, M A; Olah, T V; Perrault, A R; Cooperman, B S

    1991-06-01

    Using reverse phase HPLC, we have been able to quantify the protein compositions of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits, formed either with the full complement of 30S proteins in the reconstitution mix or with a single protein omitted. We denote particles formed in the latter case as SPORE (single protein omission reconstitution) particles. An important goal in 30S reconstitution studies is the formation of reconstituted subunits having uniform protein composition, preferably corresponding to one copy of each protein per reconstituted particle. Here we describe procedures involving variation of the protein:rRNA ratio that approach this goal. In SPORE particles the omission of one protein often results in the partial loss in uptake of other proteins. We also describe procedures to increase the uptake of such proteins into SPORE particles, thus enhancing the utility of the SPORE approach in defining the role of specific proteins in 30S structure and function. The losses of proteins other than the omitted protein provide a measure of protein:protein interaction within the 30S subunit. Most of these losses are predictable on the basis of other such measures. However, we do find evidence for several long-range protein:protein interactions (S6:S3, S6:S12, S10:S16, and S6:S4) that have not been described previously.

  17. The aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferases from the ArmA/Rmt family operate late in the 30S ribosomal biogenesis pathway.

    Zarubica, Tamara; Baker, Matthew R; Wright, H Tonie; Rife, Jason P

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial resistance to 4,6-type aminoglycoside antibiotics, which target the ribosome, has been traced to the ArmA/RmtA family of rRNA methyltransferases. These plasmid-encoded enzymes transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to N7 of the buried G1405 in the aminoglycoside binding site of 16S rRNA of the 30S ribosomal subunit. ArmA methylates mature 30S subunits but not 16S rRNA, 50S, or 70S ribosomal subunits or isolated Helix 44 of the 30S subunit. To more fully characterize this family of enzymes, we have investigated the substrate requirements of ArmA and to a lesser extent its ortholog RmtA. We determined the Mg+² dependence of ArmA activity toward the 30S ribosomal subunits and found that the enzyme recognizes both low Mg+² (translationally inactive) and high Mg+² (translationally active) forms of this substrate. We tested the effects of LiCl pretreatment of the 30S subunits, initiation factor 3 (IF3), and gentamicin/kasugamycin resistance methyltransferase (KsgA) on ArmA activity and determined whether in vivo derived pre-30S ribosomal subunits are ArmA methylation substrates. ArmA failed to methylate the 30S subunits generated from LiCl washes above 0.75 M, despite the apparent retention of ribosomal proteins and a fully mature 16S rRNA. From our experiments, we conclude that ArmA is most active toward the 30S ribosomal subunits that are at or very near full maturity, but that it can also recognize more than one form of the 30S subunit.

  18. Secondary structures of proteins from the 30S subunit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Dzionara, M; Robinson, S M; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1977-08-01

    The secondary structures of the proteins S4, S6, S8, S9, S12, S13, S15, S16, S18, S20 and S21 from the subunit of the E. coli ribosome were predicted according to four different methods. From the resultant diagrams indicating regions of helix, turn, extended structure and random coil, average values for the respective secondary structures could be calculated for each protein. Using the known relative distances for residues in the helical, turn and sheet or allowed random conformations, estimates are made of the maximum possible lengths of the proteins in order to correlate these with results obtained from antibody binding studies to the 30S subunit as determined by electron microscopy. The influence of amino acid changes on the predicted secondary structures of proteins from a few selected mutants was studied. The altered residues tend to be structurally conservative or to induce only minimal local changes.

  19. A computational investigation on the connection between dynamics properties of ribosomal proteins and ribosome assembly.

    Brittany Burton

    Full Text Available Assembly of the ribosome from its protein and RNA constituents has been studied extensively over the past 50 years, and experimental evidence suggests that prokaryotic ribosomal proteins undergo conformational changes during assembly. However, to date, no studies have attempted to elucidate these conformational changes. The present work utilizes computational methods to analyze protein dynamics and to investigate the linkage between dynamics and binding of these proteins during the assembly of the ribosome. Ribosomal proteins are known to be positively charged and we find the percentage of positive residues in r-proteins to be about twice that of the average protein: Lys+Arg is 18.7% for E. coli and 21.2% for T. thermophilus. Also, positive residues constitute a large proportion of RNA contacting residues: 39% for E. coli and 46% for T. thermophilus. This affirms the known importance of charge-charge interactions in the assembly of the ribosome. We studied the dynamics of three primary proteins from E. coli and T. thermophilus 30S subunits that bind early in the assembly (S15, S17, and S20 with atomic molecular dynamic simulations, followed by a study of all r-proteins using elastic network models. Molecular dynamics simulations show that solvent-exposed proteins (S15 and S17 tend to adopt more stable solution conformations than an RNA-embedded protein (S20. We also find protein residues that contact the 16S rRNA are generally more mobile in comparison with the other residues. This is because there is a larger proportion of contacting residues located in flexible loop regions. By the use of elastic network models, which are computationally more efficient, we show that this trend holds for most of the 30S r-proteins.

  20. Positions of proteins S14, S18 and S20 in the 30 S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli.

    Ramakrishnan, V; Capel, M; Kjeldgaard, M; Engelman, D M; Moore, P B

    1984-04-01

    A map of the 30 S ribosomal subunit is presented giving the positions of 15 of its 21 proteins. The components located in the map are S1, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S18 and S20.

  1. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease.

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health.

  2. A model for the interaction of the G3-subdomain of Geobacillus stearothermophilus IF2 with the 30S ribosomal subunit

    Dongre, Ramachandra; Folkers, Gert E; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Boelens, Rolf; Wienk, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial translation initiation factor IF2 complexed with GTP binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit, promotes ribosomal binding of fMet-tRNA, and favors the joining of the small and large ribosomal subunits yielding a 70S initiation complex ready to enter the translation elongation phase. Within the I

  3. Molecular interactions of ribosomal components. IV: Cooperative interactions during assembly in vitro.

    Green, M; Kurland, C G

    1973-08-01

    Cooperative interactions between different 30S ribosomal proteins during assembly in vitro are described. The site specific binding of S7 to 16S RNA is enhanced by S20; that of S16 requires S4 and S20; and S7 is required for the maximum binding of S9, S13 and S19. Some of these interactions are reflected in the protein neighborhoods of the functional ribosome, but this may not be a general rule. Finally, we suggest that the assembly cooperativety observed may not be a consequence of direct-protein interactions.

  4. A bifunctional archaeal protein that is a component of 30S ribosomal subunits and interacts with C/D box small RNAs

    Andrea Ciammaruconi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have identified a novel archaeal protein that apparently plays two distinct roles in ribosome metabolism. It is a polypeptide of about 18 kDa (termed Rbp18 that binds free cytosolic C/D box sRNAs in vivo and in vitro and behaves as a structural ribosomal protein, specifically a component of the 30S ribosomal subunit. As Rbp18 is selectively present in Crenarcheota and highly thermophilic Euryarchaeota, we propose that it serves to protect C/D box sRNAs from degradation and perhaps to stabilize thermophilic 30S subunits.

  5. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    Steffen Jakob

    Full Text Available Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA. Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  6. A ribonucleoprotein fragment of the 30 S ribosome of E. coli containing two contiguous domains of the 16 S RNA.

    Spitnik-Elson, P; Elson, D; Avital, S; Abramowitz, R

    1982-08-11

    Ribonucleoprotein fragments of the 30 S ribosome of E. coli have been prepared by limited ribonuclease digestion and mild heating of the ribosome in a constant ionic environment. One such fragment has been described previously. A second electrophoretically homogeneous fragment has now been isolated and its RNA and protein moieties have been characterized. It contains the 5' half of the 16 S RNA, encompassing domains I and II except for the extreme 5' terminus and several small gaps. Seven proteins are present: S4, S5, S6, S8, S12, S15 and S20. The RNA binding sites of five of these proteins are known, and all are RNA sequences that are present in the fragment. Published neutron scattering and immuno-electron microscopic data indicate that six of the proteins are clustered together in a cross sectional slice through the center of the subunit. After deproteinization, the RNA moiety gives two bands in gel electrophoresis, one containing domains I and II and the other, essentially only domain II. The former, although larger, migrates faster in gel electrophoresis, indicating that RNA domains I and II interact with each other in such a way as to become more compact than domain II by itself.

  7. Characterisation of RNA fragments obtained by mild nuclease digestion of 30-S ribosomal subunits from Escherichia coli.

    Rinke, J; Ross, A; Brimacombe, R

    1977-06-01

    When Escherichia coli 30-S ribosomal subunits are hydrolysed under mild conditions, two ribonucleoprotein fragments of unequal size are produced. Knowledge of the RNA sequences contained in these hydrolysis products was required for the experiments described in the preceding paper, and the RNA sub-fragments have therefore been examined by oligonucleotide analysis. Two well-defined small fragments of free RNA, produced concomitantly with the ribonucleoprotein fragments, were also analysed. The larger ribonucleoprotein fragment, containing predominantly proteins S4, S5, S8, S15, S16 (17) and S20, contains a complex mixture of RNA sub-fragments varying from about 100 to 800 nucleotides in length. All these fragments arose from the 5'-terminal 900 nucleotides of 16-S RNA, corresponding to the well-known 12-S fragment. No long-range interactions could be detected within this RNA region in these experiments. The RNA from the smaller ribonucleoprotein fragment (containing proteins S7, S9 S10, S14 and S19) has been described in detail previously, and consists of about 450 nucleotides near the 3' end of the 16-S RNA, but lacking the 3'-terminal 150 nucleotides. The two small free RNA fragments (above) partly account for these missing 150 nucleotides; both fragments arose from section A of the 16-S RNA, but section J (the 3'-terminal 50 nucleotides) was not found. This result suggests that the 3' region of 16-S RNA is not involved in stable interactions with protein.

  8. Photoinduced cross-linkage, in situ, of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal proteins to 16S rRNA: identification of cross-linked proteins and relationships between reactivity and ribosome structure.

    Gorelic, L

    1976-08-10

    The kinetics of photoinduced cross-linkage of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal proteins to the 16S-rRNA molecule in the intact Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit was studied in this report. All of the 30S ribosomal proteins become cross-linked to the 16S rRNA before changes in the sedimentation characteristics of the 30S ribosomal subunit can be detected. The proteins exhibit different reactivities in the cross-linkage reaction. One group of proteins-S3, S7-S9, S11, S12, and S15-S19-is cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by single-hit kinetics, or by photoprocesses of nonunity but low multiplicities. A second group of proteins--S1, S2, S4-S6, S10, S13, S14, and S21--is cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocesses of a complex nature. A comparison of these data with other properties of the individual 30S ribosomal proteins related to ribosome structure indicated that most of the 30S ribosomal proteins cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocesses of low multiplicities had been classified rRNA-binding proteins by nonphotochemical methods, and most of the proteins cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocesses of large multiplicities had been classified as nonbinding proteins. There were certain exceptions to these correlations. Proteins S4 and S20, both RNA-binding proteins, become cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocessses of large multiplicities, and proteins S3, S11, S12, and S18, none of which have been classified RNA-binding proteins, exhibited low multiplicities in the cross-linkage reaction. All of these exceptions could be explained in terms of limitations inherent in the photochemical methods used in this study and in other types of methods that have been used to study RNA-protein interactions in the 30S ribosomal subunit. The data presented here also suggest that labile RNA-protein cross-links are present in the uv-irradiated 30S ribosomal subunits, and that neither peptide-bond cleavage nor photoinduced modification of the charged side-chain groups in

  9. Interconversion of active and inactive 30 S ribosomal subunits is accompanied by a conformational change in the decoding region of 16 S rRNA

    Moazed, D; Van Stolk, B J; Douthwaite, S

    1986-01-01

    Zamir, Elson and their co-workers have shown that 30 S ribosomal subunits are reversibly inactivated by depletion of monovalent or divalent cations. We have re-investigated the conformation of 16 S rRNA in the active and inactive forms of the 30 S subunit, using a strategy that is designed......' regions of 16 S rRNA. The inactive form also shows significantly decreased reactivity at positions 1533 to 1538 (the Shine-Dalgarno region), in agreement with earlier findings. The principal changes in reactivity involve the universally conserved nucleotides G926, C1395, A1398 and G1401. The three purines...

  10. Function of individual 30S subunit proteins of Escherichia coli. Effect of specific immunoglobulin fragments (Fab) on activities of ribosomal decoding sites.

    Lelong, J C; Gros, D; Gros, F; Bollen, A; Maschler, R; Stöffler, G

    1974-02-01

    Specific anti-30S protein immunoglobulin G fragments (Fab) were used to determine the contribution of each of the 30S ribosomal proteins to: (1) polyphenylalanine synthesis, (2) initiation factor-dependent binding of fMet-tRNA, (3) T-factor-dependent binding of phenylalanyl-tRNA, and (4) fixation of radioactive dihydrostreptomycin. Twenty of the 21 possible antibodies (antibody against S17 excepted) were used. In conditions where all the 30S proteins were accessible to Fabs, all of these monovalent antibodies strongly inhibited polyphenylalanine synthesis in vitro. Antibodies against S4, S6, S7, S12, S15, and S16, however, showed a weaker effect.30S proteins can be classified into four categories by their contributions to the function of sites "A" and "P": class I appears nonessential for tRNA positioning at either site (S4, S7, S15, and S16); class II includes proteins whose role in initiation is critical (S2, S5, S6, S12, and S13); class III (S8, S9, S11, and S18) corresponds to proteins whose blockade prevents internal (elongation factor Tudependent) positioning; and class IV includes entities that are essential for activities of both "A" and "P" sites (S1, S3, S10, S14, S19, S20, and S21). Dihydrostreptomycin fixation to the 30S or 70S ribosomes was inhibited by antibodies against S1, S10, S11, S18, S19, S20, and S21, but only weakly by the anti-S12 (Str A protein) Fab. The significance of these results is discussed in relation to 30S protein function, heterogeneity, and topography.

  11. Hierarchical RNA Processing Is Required for Mitochondrial Ribosome Assembly

    Oliver Rackham

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of mitochondrial RNA processing and its importance for ribosome biogenesis and energy metabolism are not clear. We generated conditional knockout mice of the endoribonuclease component of the RNase P complex, MRPP3, and report that it is essential for life and that heart and skeletal-muscle-specific knockout leads to severe cardiomyopathy, indicating that its activity is non-redundant. Transcriptome-wide parallel analyses of RNA ends (PARE and RNA-seq enabled us to identify that in vivo 5′ tRNA cleavage precedes 3′ tRNA processing, and this is required for the correct biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosomal subunits. We identify that mitoribosomal biogenesis proceeds co-transcriptionally because large mitoribosomal proteins can form a subcomplex on an unprocessed RNA containing the 16S rRNA. Taken together, our data show that RNA processing links transcription to translation via assembly of the mitoribosome.

  12. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases

    Blombach, F.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major typ

  13. The Role of Disordered Ribosomal Protein Extensions in the Early Steps of Eubacterial 50 S Ribosomal Subunit Assembly

    Youri Timsit

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Although during the past decade research has shown the functional importance of disorder in proteins, many of the structural and dynamics properties of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs remain to be elucidated. This review is focused on the role of the extensions of the ribosomal proteins in the early steps of the assembly of the eubacterial 50 S subunit. The recent crystallographic structures of the ribosomal particles have revealed the picture of a complex assembly pathway that condenses the rRNA and the ribosomal proteins into active ribosomes. However, little is know about the molecular mechanisms of this process. It is thought that the long basic r-protein extensions that penetrate deeply into the subunit cores play a key role through disorder-order transitions and/or co-folding mechanisms. A current view is that such structural transitions may facilitate the proper rRNA folding. In this paper, the structures of the proteins L3, L4, L13, L20, L22 and L24 that have been experimentally found to be essential for the first steps of ribosome assembly have been compared. On the basis of their structural and dynamics properties, three categories of extensions have been identified. Each of them seems to play a distinct function. Among them, only the coil-helix transition that occurs in a phylogenetically conserved cluster of basic residues of the L20 extension appears to be strictly required for the large subunit assembly in eubacteria. The role of a helix-coil transitions in 23 S RNA folding is discussed in the light of the calcium binding protein calmodulin that shares many structural and dynamics properties with L20.

  14. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases.

    Blombach, Fabian; Brouns, Stan J J; van der Oost, John

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major type of ribosome-assembly factor in Eukaryota and Bacteria. They are thought to aid the stepwise assembly of ribosomal subunits through a 'molecular switch' mechanism that involves conformational changes in response to GTP hydrolysis. Most conserved TRAFAC GTPases are involved in ribosome assembly or other translation-associated processes. They typically interact with ribosomal subunits, but in many cases, the exact role that these GTPases play remains unclear. Previous studies almost exclusively focused on the systems of Bacteria and Eukaryota. Archaea possess several conserved TRAFAC GTPases as well, with some GTPase families being present only in the archaeo-eukaryotic lineage. In the present paper, we review the occurrence of TRAFAC GTPases with translation-associated functions in Archaea.

  15. rRNA maturation as a "quality" control step in ribosomal subunit assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S; Bulfone, S

    1997-10-31

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, newly assembled ribosomal subunits enter polyribosomes while they still contain immature rRNA. rRNA maturation requires the engagement of the subunits in protein synthesis and leads to stabilization of their structure. Maturation of pre-17 S rRNA occurs only after the newly formed 40 S ribosomal particle has entered an 80 S ribosome and participated at least in the formation of one peptide bond or in one translocation event; maturation of pre-26 S rRNA requires the presence on the 80 S particle of a peptidyl-tRNA containing at least 6 amino acids. Newly assembled particles that cannot fulfill these requirements for structural reasons are disassembled into free immature rRNA and ribosomal proteins.

  16. YsxC, an essential protein in Staphylococcus aureus crucial for ribosome assembly/stability

    García-Lara Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial growth and division requires a core set of essential proteins, several of which are still of unknown function. They are also attractive targets for the development of new antibiotics. YsxC is a member of a family of GTPases highly conserved across eubacteria with a possible ribosome associated function. Results Here, we demonstrate by the creation of a conditional lethal mutant that ysxC is apparently essential for growth in S. aureus. To begin to elucidate YsxC function, a translational fusion of YsxC to the CBP-ProteinA tag in the staphylococcal chromosome was made, enabling Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP of YsxC-interacting partners. These included the ribosomal proteins S2, S10 and L17, as well as the β' subunit of the RNA polymerase. YsxC was then shown to copurify with ribosomes as an accessory protein specifically localizing to the 50 S subunit. YsxC depletion led to a decrease in the presence of mature ribosomes, indicating a role in ribosome assembly and/or stability in S. aureus. Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that YsxC of S. aureus localizes to the ribosomes, is crucial for ribosomal stability and is apparently essential for the life of S. aureus.

  17. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 supports the assembly of functional 80S ribosomes.

    Geissler, Rene; Golbik, Ralph P; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-06-01

    The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 has suggested functions in innate immunity, mRNA translocation and translation, and it participates in the propagation of assorted viruses. Exploring initially the role of DDX3 in the life cycle of hepatitis C virus, we observed the protein to be involved in translation directed by different viral internal ribosomal entry sites. Extension of these studies revealed a general supportive role of DDX3 in translation initiation. DDX3 was found to interact in an RNA-independent manner with defined components of the translational pre-initiation complex and to specifically associate with newly assembling 80S ribosomes. DDX3 knock down and in vitro reconstitution experiments revealed a significant function of the protein in the formation of 80S translation initiation complexes. Our study implies that DDX3 assists the 60S subunit joining process to assemble functional 80S ribosomes.

  18. Modulation of Decoding Fidelity by Ribosomal Proteins S4 and S5

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 participate in the decoding and assembly processes on the ribosome and the interaction with specific antibiotic inhibitors of translation. Many of the characterized mutations affecting these proteins decrease the accuracy of translation, leading to a ribosomal-ambiguity phenotype. Structural analyses of ribosomal complexes indicate that the tRNA selection pathway involves a transition between the closed and open conformations of the 30S ribosomal subunit and requi...

  19. Ribonucleic acid-protein cross-linking within the intact Escherichia coli ribosome, utilizing ethylene glycol bis[3-(2-ketobutyraldehyde) ether], a reversible, bifunctional reagent: identification of 30S proteins.

    Brewer, L A; Noller, H F

    1983-08-30

    To obtain detailed topographical information concerning the spatial arrangement of the multitude of ribosomal proteins with respect to specific sequences in the three RNA chains of intact ribosomes, a reagent capable of covalently and reversibly joining RNA to protein has been synthesized [Brewer, L.A., Goelz, S., & Noller, H. F. (1983) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)]. This compound, ethylene glycol bis[3-(2-ketobutyraldehyde) ether] which we term "bikethoxal", possesses two reactive ends similar to kethoxal. Accordingly, it reacts selectively with guanine in single-stranded regions of nucleic acid and with arginine in protein. The cross-linking is reversible in that the arginine- and guanine-bikethoxal linkage can be disrupted by treatment with mild base, allowing identification of the linked RNA and protein components by standard techniques. Further, since the sites of kethoxal modification within the RNA sequences of intact subunits are known, the task of identifying the components of individual ribonucleoprotein complexes should be considerably simplified. About 15% of the ribosomal protein was covalently cross-linked to 16S RNA by bikethoxal under our standard reaction conditions, as monitored by comigration of 35S-labeled protein with RNA on Sepharose 4B in urea. Cross-linked 30S proteins were subsequently removed from 16S RNA by treatment with T1 ribonuclease and/or mild base cleavage of the reagent and were identified by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The major 30S proteins found in cross-linked complexes are S4, S5, S6, S7, S8, S9 (S11), S16, and S18. The minor ones are S2, S3, S12, S13, S14, S15, and S17.

  20. MPV17L2 is required for ribosome assembly in mitochondria

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Durigon, Romina; Pearce, Sarah F.; Rorbach, Joanna; Hirst, Elizabeth M.A.; Vidoni, Sara; Reyes, Aurelio; Brea-Calvo, Gloria; Minczuk, Michal; Woellhaf, Michael W.; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Holt, Ian J.; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    MPV17 is a mitochondrial protein of unknown function, and mutations in MPV17 are associated with mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) maintenance disorders. Here we investigated its most similar relative, MPV17L2, which is also annotated as a mitochondrial protein. Mitochondrial fractionation analyses demonstrate MPV17L2 is an integral inner membrane protein, like MPV17. However, unlike MPV17, MPV17L2 is dependent on mitochondrial DNA, as it is absent from ρ0 cells, and co-sediments on sucrose gradients with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and the monosome. Gene silencing of MPV17L2 results in marked decreases in the monosome and both subunits of the mitochondrial ribosome, leading to impaired protein synthesis in the mitochondria. Depletion of MPV17L2 also induces mitochondrial DNA aggregation. The DNA and ribosome phenotypes are linked, as in the absence of MPV17L2 proteins of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome are trapped in the enlarged nucleoids, in contrast to a component of the large subunit. These findings suggest MPV17L2 contributes to the biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome, uniting the two subunits to create the translationally competent monosome, and provide evidence that assembly of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome occurs at the nucleoid. PMID:24948607

  1. The localization of multiple sites on 16S RNA which are cross-linked to proteins S7 and S8 in Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits by treatment with 2-iminothiolane.

    Wower, I; Brimacombe, R

    1983-03-11

    RNA-protein cross-links were introduced into E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits by reaction with 2-iminothiolane followed by a mild ultraviolet irradiation treatment. After removal of non-reacted protein and partial nuclease digestion of the cross-linked 16S RNA-protein moiety, a number of individual cross-linked complexes could be isolated and the sites of attachment of the proteins to the RNA determined. Protein S8 was cross-linked to the RNA at three different positions, within oligo-nucleotides encompassing positions 629-633, 651-654, and (tentatively) 593-597 in the 16S sequence. Protein S7 was cross-linked within two oligonucleotides encompassing positions 1238-1240, and 1377-1378. In addition, a site at position 723-724 was observed, cross-linked to protein S19, S20 or S21.

  2. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis.

  3. The DEAD box protein Mrh4 functions in the assembly of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit.

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-11-01

    Proteins in a cell are universally synthesized by ribosomes. Mitochondria contain their own ribosomes, which specialize in the synthesis of a handful of proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation. The pathway of mitoribosomal biogenesis and factors involved are poorly characterized. An example is the DEAD box proteins, widely known to participate in the biogenesis of bacterial and cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes as either RNA helicases or RNA chaperones, whose mitochondrial counterparts remain completely unknown. Here, we have identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DEAD box protein Mrh4 as essential for large mitoribosome subunit biogenesis. Mrh4 interacts with the 21S rRNA, mitoribosome subassemblies, and fully assembled mitoribosomes. In the absence of Mrh4, the 21S rRNA is matured and forms part of a large on-pathway assembly intermediate missing proteins Mrpl16 and Mrpl39. We conclude that Mrh4 plays an essential role during the late stages of mitoribosome assembly by promoting remodeling of the 21S rRNA-protein interactions.

  4. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes--UtpA and UtpB--interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  5. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R; Kim, Kelly H; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-29

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes-UtpA and UtpB-interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  6. Organization of Mitochondrial Gene Expression in Two Distinct Ribosome-Containing Assemblies

    Kirsten Kehrein

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria contain their own genetic system that provides subunits of the complexes driving oxidative phosphorylation. A quarter of the mitochondrial proteome participates in gene expression, but how all these factors are orchestrated and spatially organized is currently unknown. Here, we established a method to purify and analyze native and intact complexes of mitochondrial ribosomes. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed extensive interactions of ribosomes with factors involved in all the steps of posttranscriptional gene expression. These interactions result in large expressosome-like assemblies that we termed mitochondrial organization of gene expression (MIOREX complexes. Superresolution microscopy revealed that most MIOREX complexes are evenly distributed throughout the mitochondrial network, whereas a subset is present as nucleoid-MIOREX complexes that unite the whole spectrum of organellar gene expression. Our work therefore provides a conceptual framework for the spatial organization of mitochondrial protein synthesis that likely developed to facilitate gene expression in the organelle.

  7. Time course of large ribosomal subunit assembly in E. coli cells overexpressing a helicase inactive DbpA protein.

    Gentry, Riley C; Childs, Jared J; Gevorkyan, Jirair; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Koculi, Eda

    2016-07-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit assembly. Previous studies have shown that when the ATPase and helicase inactive DbpA construct, R331A, is expressed in E. coli cells, a large ribosomal subunit intermediate accumulates. The large subunit intermediate migrates as a 45S particle in a sucrose gradient. Here, using a number of structural and fluorescent assays, we investigate the ribosome profiles of cells lacking wild-type DbpA and overexpressing the R331A DbpA construct. Our data show that in addition to the 45S particle previously described, 27S and 35S particles are also present in the ribosome profiles of cells overexpressing R331A DbpA. The 27S, 35S, and 45S independently convert to the 50S subunit, suggesting that ribosome assembly in the presence of R331A and the absence of wild-type DbpA occurs via multiple pathways.

  8. ppGpp negatively impacts ribosome assembly affecting growth and antimicrobial tolerance in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Corrigan, Rebecca M; Bellows, Lauren E; Wood, Alison; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-03-22

    The stringent response is a survival mechanism used by bacteria to deal with stress. It is coordinated by the nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which interact with target proteins to promote bacterial survival. Although this response has been well characterized in proteobacteria, very little is known about the effectors of this signaling system in Gram-positive species. Here, we report on the identification of seven target proteins for the stringent response nucleotides in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus We demonstrate that the GTP synthesis enzymes HprT and Gmk bind with a high affinity, leading to an inhibition of GTP production. In addition, we identified five putative GTPases--RsgA, RbgA, Era, HflX, and ObgE--as (p)ppGpp target proteins. We show that RsgA, RbgA, Era, and HflX are functional GTPases and that their activity is promoted in the presence of ribosomes but strongly inhibited by the stringent response nucleotides. By characterizing the function of RsgA in vivo, we ascertain that this protein is involved in ribosome assembly, with an rsgA deletion strain, or a strain inactivated for GTPase activity, displaying decreased growth, a decrease in the amount of mature 70S ribosomes, and an increased level of tolerance to antimicrobials. We additionally demonstrate that the interaction of ppGpp with cellular GTPases is not unique to the staphylococci, as homologs from Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis retain this ability. Taken together, this study reveals ribosome inactivation as a previously unidentified mechanism through which the stringent response functions in Gram-positive bacteria.

  9. Expression and localization of VCX/Y proteins and their possible involvement in regulation of ribosome assembly during spermatogenesis

    SHENG WEI ZOU; JIAN CHAO ZHANG; XIAO DONG ZHANG; SHI YING MIAO; SHU DONG ZONG; QI SHENG; LIN FANG WANG

    2003-01-01

    Variable Charge X/Y (VCX/Y) is a human testis-specific gene family that localized on X and Y chromo-somes. In this study, VCY protein was expressed in E. coli in the form of glutathione-S-transferase (GST)fusion protein. With the purified fusion protein as antigen, the anti-GST-VCY antibody was generated andthe localization of VCY protein in human testis was determined by immunohistochemistry. In the testisseminiferous epithelium, VCY proteins were highly expressed in nuclei of germ cells. Using propidium io-dide staining and green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag technologies, VCY and VCX-8r proteins were mainlylocalized in the nucleoli of COS7 cells. In addition, the colocalization for VCY and VCX-8r in COS7 cellswas also observed. With VCY cDNA as bait, a cDNA fragment of acidic ribosomal protein PO was obtainedusing yeast two-hybrid system. All the information above indicates that VCX/Y protein family might beinvolved in the regulation of ribosome assembly during spermatogenesis.

  10. Reading the Evolution of Compartmentalization in the Ribosome Assembly Toolbox: The YRG Protein Family

    Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J.; Reynaud, Emmanuel G.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing the transition from a single compartment bacterium to a highly compartmentalized eukaryotic cell is one of the most studied problems of evolutionary cell biology. However, timing and details of the establishment of compartmentalization are unclear and difficult to assess. Here, we propose the use of molecular markers specific to cellular compartments to set up a framework to advance the understanding of this complex intracellular process. Specifically, we use a protein family related to ribosome biogenesis, YRG (YlqF related GTPases), whose evolution is linked to the establishment of cellular compartments, leveraging the current genomic data. We analyzed orthologous proteins of the YRG family in a set of 171 proteomes for a total of 370 proteins. We identified ten YRG protein subfamilies that can be associated to six subcellular compartments (nuclear bodies, nucleolus, nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplast), and which were found in archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic proteomes. Our analysis reveals organism streamlining related events in specific taxonomic groups such as Fungi. We conclude that the YRG family could be used as a compartmentalization marker, which could help to trace the evolutionary path relating cellular compartments with ribosome biogenesis. PMID:28072865

  11. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation.

    Sohail Khoshnevis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed "helicases," their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked.

  12. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation.

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Askenasy, Isabel; Johnson, Matthew C; Dattolo, Maria D; Young-Erdos, Crystal L; Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Karbstein, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed "helicases," their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked.

  13. Ribosomal Initiation Complex Assembly within the Wild-Strain of Coxsackievirus B3 and Live-Attenuated Sabin3-like IRESes during the Initiation of Translation

    Nathalie Chamond

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 is an enterovirus of the family of Picornaviridae. The Group B coxsackieviruses include six serotypes (B1 to B6 that cause a variety of human diseases, including myocarditis, meningitis, and diabetes. Among the group B, the B3 strain is mostly studied for its cardiovirulence and its ability to cause acute and persistent infections. Translation initiation of CVB3 RNA has been shown to be mediated by a highly ordered structure of the 5’-untranslated region (5’UTR, which harbors an internal ribosome entry site (IRES. Translation initiation is a complex process in which initiator tRNA, 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits are assembled by eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs into an 80S ribosome at the initiation codon of the mRNA. We have previously addressed the question of whether the attenuating mutations of domain V of the poliovirus IRES were specific for a given genomic context or whether they could be transposed and extrapolated to a genomic related virus, i.e., CVB3 wild-type strain. In this context, we have described that Sabin3-like mutation (U473→C introduced in CVB3 genome led to a defective mutant with a serious reduction in translation efficiency. In this study, we analyzed the efficiency of formation of ribosomal initiation complexes 48S and 80S through 10%–30% and 10%–50% sucrose gradients using rabbit reticulocyte lysates (RRLs and stage-specific translation inhibitors: 5'-Guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP and Cycloheximide (CHX, respectively. We demonstrated that the interaction of 48S and 80S ribosomal complexes within the mutant CVB3 RNA was abolished compared with the wild-type RNA by ribosome assembly analysis. Taken together, it is possible that the mutant RNA was unable to interact with some trans-acting factors critical for enhanced IRES function.

  14. SrmB, a DEAD-box helicase involved in Escherichia coli ribosome assembly, is specifically targeted to 23S rRNA in vivo.

    Trubetskoy, Dmitrii; Proux, Florence; Allemand, Frédéric; Dreyfus, Marc; Iost, Isabelle

    2009-10-01

    DEAD-box proteins play specific roles in remodeling RNA or ribonucleoprotein complexes. Yet, in vitro, they generally behave as nonspecific RNA-dependent ATPases, raising the question of what determines their specificity in vivo. SrmB, one of the five Escherichia coli DEAD-box proteins, participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. Moreover, when overexpressed, it compensates for a mutation in L24, the ribosomal protein (r-protein) thought to initiate assembly. Here, using the tandem affinity purification (TAP) procedure, we show that SrmB forms a complex with r-proteins L4, L24 and a region near the 5'-end of 23S rRNA that binds these proteins. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that the stability of this complex reflects cooperative interactions of SrmB with L4, L24 and rRNA. These observations are consistent with an early role of SrmB in assembly and explain the genetic link between SrmB and L24. Besides its catalytic core, SrmB possesses a nonconserved C-terminal extension that, we show, is not essential for SrmB function and specificity. In this regard, SrmB differs from DbpA, another DEAD-box protein involved in ribosome assembly.

  15. Effect of mutations in the A site of 16 S rRNA on aminoglycoside antibiotic-ribosome interaction

    Recht, M I; Douthwaite, S; Dahlquist, K D

    1999-01-01

    Decoding of genetic information occurs upon interaction of an mRNA codon-tRNA anticodon complex with the small subunit of the ribosome. The ribosomal decoding region is associated with highly conserved sequences near the 3' end of 16 S rRNA. The decoding process is perturbed by the aminoglycoside...... of universally conserved nucleotides at 1406 to 1408 and 1494 to 1495 in the decoding region of plasmid-encoded bacterial 16 S rRNA. Phenotypic changes range from the benign effect of U1406-->A or A1408-->G substitutions, to the highly deleterious 1406G and 1495 mutations that assemble into 30 S subunits...... but are defective in forming functional ribosomes. Changes in the local conformation of the decoding region caused by these mutations were identified by chemical probing of isolated 30 S subunits. Ribosomes containing 16 S rRNA with mutations at positions 1408, 1407+1494, or 1495 had reduced affinity...

  16. The small subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome. Identification of the full complement of ribosomal proteins present.

    Cavdar Koc, E; Burkhart, W; Blackburn, K; Moseley, A; Spremulli, L L

    2001-06-01

    Identification of all the protein components of the small subunit (28 S) of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome has been achieved by carrying out proteolytic digestions of whole 28 S subunits followed by analysis of the resultant peptides by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Peptide sequence information was used to search the human EST data bases and complete coding sequences of the proteins were assembled. The human mitochondrial ribosome has 29 distinct proteins in the small subunit. Fourteen of this group of proteins are homologs of the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal proteins S2, S5, S6, S7, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S21. All of these proteins have homologs in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial ribosomes. Surprisingly, three variants of ribosomal protein S18 are found in the mammalian and D. melanogaster mitochondrial ribosomes while C. elegans has two S18 homologs. The S18 homologs tend to be more closely related to chloroplast S18s than to prokaryotic S18s. No mitochondrial homologs to prokaryotic ribosomal proteins S1, S3, S4, S8, S13, S19, and S20 could be found in the peptides obtained from the whole 28 S subunit digests or by analysis of the available data bases. The remaining 15 proteins present in mammalian mitochondrial 28 S subunits (MRP-S22 through MRP-S36) are specific to mitochondrial ribosomes. Proteins in this group have no apparent homologs in bacterial, chloroplast, archaebacterial, or cytosolic ribosomes. All but two of these proteins have a clear homolog in D. melanogaster while all but three can be found in the genome of C. elegans. Five of the mitochondrial specific ribosomal proteins have homologs in S. cerevisiae.

  17. Rrp12 and the Exportin Crm1 participate in late assembly events in the nucleolus during 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis.

    Moriggi, Giulia; Nieto, Blanca; Dosil, Mercedes

    2014-12-01

    During the biogenesis of small ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes, the pre-40S particles formed in the nucleolus are rapidly transported to the cytoplasm. The mechanisms underlying the nuclear export of these particles and its coordination with other biogenesis steps are mostly unknown. Here we show that yeast Rrp12 is required for the exit of pre-40S particles to the cytoplasm and for proper maturation dynamics of upstream 90S pre-ribosomes. Due to this, in vivo elimination of Rrp12 leads to an accumulation of nucleoplasmic 90S to pre-40S transitional particles, abnormal 35S pre-rRNA processing, delayed elimination of processing byproducts, and no export of intermediate pre-40S complexes. The exportin Crm1 is also required for the same pre-ribosome maturation events that involve Rrp12. Thus, in addition to their implication in nuclear export, Rrp12 and Crm1 participate in earlier biosynthetic steps that take place in the nucleolus. Our results indicate that, in the 40S subunit synthesis pathway, the completion of early pre-40S particle assembly, the initiation of byproduct degradation and the priming for nuclear export occur in an integrated manner in late 90S pre-ribosomes.

  18. Ribosome maturation in E. coli.

    Silengo, L; Altruda, F; Dotto, G P; Lacquaniti, F; Perlo, C; Turco, E; Mangiarotti, G

    1977-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that processing of ribosomal RNA is a late event in ribosome biogenesis. The precursor form of RNA is probably necessary to speed up the assembly of ribomal proteins. Newly formed ribosomal particles which have already entered polyribosomes differ from mature ribosomes not only in their RNA content but also in their susceptibility to unfolding in low Mg concentration and to RNase attack. Final maturation of new ribosomes is probably dependent on their functioning in protein synthesis. Thus only those ribosomes which have proven to be functional may be converted into stable cellular structures.

  19. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3'-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli.

    Golovin, A V; Khayrullina, G A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, Capital A Cyrillic М

    2012-10-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA-protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA-protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV-induced RNA-protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA- protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA - protein cross-link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA-protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit.

  20. Cooperative assembly of proteins in the ribosomal GTPase centre demonstrated by their interactions with mutant 23S rRNAs

    Rosendahl, G; Douthwaite, S

    1995-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L11 binds to the region of 23S rRNA associated with the GTPase-dependent steps of protein synthesis. Nucleotides 1054-1107 within this region of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA gene were mutagenized with bisulphite. Twenty point mutations (G-->A and C-->T transitions) and nume......The ribosomal protein L11 binds to the region of 23S rRNA associated with the GTPase-dependent steps of protein synthesis. Nucleotides 1054-1107 within this region of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA gene were mutagenized with bisulphite. Twenty point mutations (G-->A and C-->T transitions...

  1. A fail-safe system for the ribosome under zinc-limiting conditions in Bacillus subtilis.

    Natori, Yousuke; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Akanuma, Genki; Kosono, Saori; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ochi, Kozo; Kawamura, Fujio

    2007-01-01

    As zinc is an essential trace metal ion for all living cells, cells elaborate a variety of strategies to cope with zinc starvation. In Bacillus subtilis, genes encoding ribosomal proteins L31 and S14 are duplicated into two types: one type contains a zinc-binding motif (RpmE or RpsN), whereas the other does not (YtiA or YhzA). We have previously shown that displacement of RpmE (L31) by YtiA from already assembled ribosomes is controlled by zinc, and this replacement could contribute to zinc mobilization under zinc-limiting conditions. We propose here that the switch between the two types of S14 has a different significance. rpsN is indispensable for growth and depletion of RpsN results in defective 30S subunits. YhzA can functionally replace RpsN to allow continued ribosome assembly under zinc-limiting conditions. Unlike YtiA, YhzA appeared in the ribosome at a slower rate consistent with incorporation into newly synthesized, rather than pre-existing ribosomes. These results raise the possibility that YhzA is involved in a fail-safe system for the de novo synthesis of ribosomes under zinc-limiting conditions.

  2. 致鹅卵黄性腹膜炎大肠杆菌30S核糖体蛋白S6的原核表达及纯化%Prokaryotic expression and purification of 30 S ribosomal protein S6 of salpingitis-peritonitis Escherichia coli isolated from layer geese

    金文杰; 张勇攀; 钱文正; 邵红霞; 钱琨; 秦爱建

    2012-01-01

    根据已发表的30S核糖体蛋白S6(RPS6)基因序列,设计合成了1对针对RPS6的特异性引物,用PCR方法从致鹅卵黄性腹膜炎大肠杆菌中扩增出RPS6基因,并将扩增的目的片段克隆至pGEM-TEasy载体中。测序正确后将RPS6基因片段克隆进表达载体pET-32a(+)中,提取pET-32a(+)-RPS6质粒,转化到大肠杆菌BL21(DE3)中,用IPTG诱导表达。结果显示,PCR产物大小为396bp,与GenBank中同源序列的相似性为99.7%。SDS-PAGE分析结果表明,构建的重组RPS6在大肠杆菌中获得了可溶性表达,分子质量约为34ku,大小与预期相一致。HisTrap FF镍柱纯化大量表达的RPS6融合蛋白(His-RPS6),证实得到了高纯度的重组蛋白,为该蛋白功能研究提供了条件。%According to the 30 S ribosomal protein S6(RPS6) gene sequence,a pair of specific primers was designed. The genomic DNA was extracted from salpingitis-peritonitis Escherichia coli strain isolated from layer geese and used as template to amplify the RPS6 gene by PCR. The RPS6 fragment was then cloned into the pGEM-T Easy vector and sequenced. The result showed that the RPS6 fragment was 396 bp. Comparing with the sequences of the RPS6 gene deposited in the GenBank,the homology was 99.7% with other E. coli. The RPS6 fragment was digested and cloned into the expression vector pET-32a (+), and then transformed into competent E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The positive recombinant pET-32a(+)- RPS6/DE3 clones were identified by double enzyme digestion and then expressed by IPTG induction. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the expressed fusion protein was 34 ku and was soluble. Using the HisTrap FF Ni2+ column,the protein His-RPS6 was purified. This recombinant protein provided basis for function research of RPS6.

  3. Modulation of decoding fidelity by ribosomal proteins S4 and S5.

    Agarwal, Deepali; Kamath, Divya; Gregory, Steven T; O'Connor, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 participate in the decoding and assembly processes on the ribosome and the interaction with specific antibiotic inhibitors of translation. Many of the characterized mutations affecting these proteins decrease the accuracy of translation, leading to a ribosomal-ambiguity phenotype. Structural analyses of ribosomal complexes indicate that the tRNA selection pathway involves a transition between the closed and open conformations of the 30S ribosomal subunit and requires disruption of the interface between the S4 and S5 proteins. In agreement with this observation, several of the mutations that promote miscoding alter residues located at the S4-S5 interface. Here, the Escherichia coli rpsD and rpsE genes encoding the S4 and S5 proteins were targeted for mutagenesis and screened for accuracy-altering mutations. While a majority of the 38 mutant proteins recovered decrease the accuracy of translation, error-restrictive mutations were also recovered; only a minority of the mutant proteins affected rRNA processing, ribosome assembly, or interactions with antibiotics. Several of the mutations affect residues at the S4-S5 interface. These include five nonsense mutations that generate C-terminal truncations of S4. These truncations are predicted to destabilize the S4-S5 interface and, consistent with the domain closure model, all have ribosomal-ambiguity phenotypes. A substantial number of the mutations alter distant locations and conceivably affect tRNA selection through indirect effects on the S4-S5 interface or by altering interactions with adjacent ribosomal proteins and 16S rRNA.

  4. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid maturation during bacterial spore germination.

    Bleyman, M; Woese, C

    1969-01-01

    All the ribosomal ribonucleic acid made during the early stages of germination of spores of Bacillus subtilis is of the "precursor" type, i.e., that type appearing in the incomplete forms of the ribosome. Shortly before the onset of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in germination, this precursor ribonucleic acid changed to the mature ribosomal ribonucleic acid characteristic of the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits.

  5. GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

    Goto, Simon; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2013-05-01

    The ribosome is an RNA- and protein-based macromolecule having multiple functional domains to facilitate protein synthesis, and it is synthesized through multiple steps including transcription, stepwise cleavages of the primary transcript, modifications of ribosomal proteins and RNAs and assemblies of ribosomal proteins with rRNAs. This process requires dozens of trans-acting factors including GTP- and ATP-binding proteins to overcome several energy-consuming steps. Despite accumulation of genetic, biochemical and structural data, the entire process of bacterial ribosome synthesis remains elusive. Here, we review GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

  6. Hold on to your friends: Dedicated chaperones of ribosomal proteins: Dedicated chaperones mediate the safe transfer of ribosomal proteins to their site of pre-ribosome incorporation.

    Pillet, Benjamin; Mitterer, Valentin; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are assembled from their components, the ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins, in a tremendously complex, multi-step process, which primarily takes place in the nuclear compartment. Therefore, most ribosomal proteins have to travel from the cytoplasm to their incorporation site on pre-ribosomes within the nucleus. However, due to their particular characteristics, such as a highly basic amino acid composition and the presence of unstructured extensions, ribosomal proteins are especially prone to aggregation and degradation in their unassembled state, hence specific mechanisms must operate to ensure their safe delivery. Recent studies have uncovered a group of proteins, termed dedicated chaperones, specialized in accompanying and guarding individual ribosomal proteins. In this essay, we review how these dedicated chaperones utilize different folds to interact with their ribosomal protein clients and how they ensure their soluble expression and interconnect their intracellular transport with their efficient assembly into pre-ribosomes.

  7. A functional interaction between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 within the bacterial ribosome.

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt an interaction that had been detected between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 in the crystal structure of the bacterial 30 S subunit. This interaction, which is located in the E site, connects the head of the 30 S subunit to the platform and is involved in the formation of the exit channel through which passes the 30 S-bound messenger RNA. Neither mutations in S7 nor mutations in S11 prevented the incorporation of the proteins into the 30 S subunits but they perturbed the function of the ribosome. In vivo assays showed that ribosomes with either mutated S7 or S11 were altered in the control of translational fidelity, having an increased capacity for frameshifting, readthrough of a nonsense codon and codon misreading. Toeprinting and filter-binding assays showed that 30 S subunits with either mutated S7 or S11 have an enhanced capacity to bind mRNA. The effects of the S7 and S11 mutations can be related to an increased flexibility of the head of the 30 S, to an opening of the mRNA exit channel and to a perturbation of the proposed allosteric coupling between the A and E sites. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S7 and S11 interact in a functional manner and support the notion that protein-protein interactions contribute to the dynamics of the ribosome.

  8. Effect of neomycin and protein S1 on the binding of streptomycin to the ribosome.

    Grisé-Miron, L; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1982-04-01

    The binding of [3H]dihydrostreptomycin to the 70-S ribosome or to the 30-S subunit has been investigated in the presence of neomycin by the Millipore filtration or the equilibrium dialysis procedure. It was observed that dihydrostreptomycin binds equally well to the 30-S subunit and the 70-S ribosome, and that neomycin stimulates the binding of dihydrostreptomycin to the ribosome by increasing the association constant and not by creating new binding sites. Specific removal of protein S1 from the 30-S subunit neither affected the binding of dihydrostreptomycin to the ribosome nor the stimulation of dihydrostreptomycin binding by neomycin.

  9. Suppression of a cold-sensitive mutation in ribosomal protein S5 reveals a role for RimJ in ribosome biogenesis.

    Roy-Chaudhuri, Biswajoy; Kirthi, Narayanaswamy; Kelley, Teresa; Culver, Gloria M

    2008-06-01

    A specific mutation of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S5, in which glycine is changed to aspartate at position 28 [S5(G28D)], results in cold sensitivity and defects in ribosome biogenesis and translational fidelity. In an attempt to understand the roles of S5 in these essential cellular functions, we selected extragenic suppressors and identified rimJ as a high-copy suppressor of the cold-sensitive phenotype associated with the S5(G28D) mutation. Our studies indicate that RimJ overexpression suppresses the growth defects, anomalous ribosome profiles and mRNA misreading exhibited by the S5(G28D) mutant strain. Although previously characterized as the N-acetyltransferase of S5, our data indicate that RimJ, when devoid of acetyltransferase activity, can suppress S5(G28D) defects thus indicating that the suppression activity of RimJ is not dependent on its acetyltransferase activity. Additionally, RimJ appears to associate with pre-30S subunits indicating that it acts on the ribonucleoprotein particle. These findings suggest that RimJ has evolved dual functionality; it functions in r-protein acetylation and as a ribosome assembly factor in E. coli.

  10. Interdependence of Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12 controls nucleolar localization and assembly of the PeBoW complex required for maturation of the 60S ribosomal subunit.

    Rohrmoser, Michaela; Hölzel, Michael; Grimm, Thomas; Malamoussi, Anastassia; Harasim, Thomas; Orban, Mathias; Pfisterer, Iris; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Eick, Dirk

    2007-05-01

    The PeBoW complex is essential for cell proliferation and maturation of the large ribosomal subunit in mammalian cells. Here we examined the role of PeBoW-specific proteins Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12 in complex assembly and stability, nucleolar transport, and pre-ribosome association. Recombinant expression of the three subunits is sufficient for complex formation. The stability of all three subunits strongly increases upon incorporation into the complex. Only overexpression of Bop1 inhibits cell proliferation and rRNA processing, and its negative effects could be rescued by coexpression of WDR12, but not Pes1. Elevated levels of Bop1 induce Bop1/WDR12 and Bop1/Pes1 subcomplexes. Knockdown of Bop1 abolishes the copurification of Pes1 with WDR12, demonstrating Bop1 as the integral component of the complex. Overexpressed Bop1 substitutes for endogenous Bop1 in PeBoW complex assembly, leading to the instability of endogenous Bop1. Finally, indirect immunofluorescence, cell fractionation, and sucrose gradient centrifugation experiments indicate that transport of Bop1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleolus is Pes1 dependent, while Pes1 can migrate to the nucleolus and bind to preribosomal particles independently of Bop1. We conclude that the assembly and integrity of the PeBoW complex are highly sensitive to changes in Bop1 protein levels.

  11. The nucleolus and transcription of ribosomal genes.

    Raska, Ivan; Koberna, Karel; Malínský, Jan; Fidlerová, Helena; Masata, Martin

    2004-10-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly dynamic, steady-state nucleolar process that involves synthesis and maturation of rRNA, its transient interactions with non-ribosomal proteins and RNPs and assembly with ribosomal proteins. In the few years of the 21st century, an exciting progress in the molecular understanding of rRNA and ribosome biogenesis has taken place. In this review, we discuss the recent results on the regulation of rRNA synthesis in relation to the functional organization of the nucleolus, and put an emphasis on the situation encountered in mammalian somatic cells.

  12. Mapping the interaction of SmpB with ribosomes by footprinting of ribosomal RNA

    Ivanova, Natalia; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Bouakaz, Elli; Ehrenberg, Måns; Schiavone, Lovisa Holmberg

    2005-01-01

    In trans-translation transfer messenger RNA (tmRNA) and small protein B (SmpB) rescue ribosomes stalled on truncated or in other ways problematic mRNAs. SmpB promotes the binding of tmRNA to the ribosome but there is uncertainty about the number of participating SmpB molecules as well as their ribosomal location. Here, the interaction of SmpB with ribosomal subunits and ribosomes was studied by isolation of SmpB containing complexes followed by chemical modification of ribosomal RNA with dimethyl sulfate, kethoxal and hydroxyl radicals. The results show that SmpB binds 30S and 50S subunits with 1:1 molar ratios and the 70S ribosome with 2:1 molar ratio. SmpB-footprints are similar on subunits and the ribosome. In the 30S subunit, SmpB footprints nucleotides that are in the vicinity of the P-site facing the E-site, and in the 50S subunit SmpB footprints nucleotides that are located below the L7/L12 stalk in the 3D structure of the ribosome. Based on these results, we suggest a mechanism where two molecules of SmpB interact with tmRNA and the ribosome during trans-translation. The first SmpB molecule binds near the factor-binding site on the 50S subunit helping tmRNA accommodation on the ribosome, whereas the second SmpB molecule may functionally substitute for a missing anticodon stem–loop in tmRNA during later steps of trans-translation. PMID:15972795

  13. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    Son, Ora [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghan [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yun-jeong [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Young [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hee-Jong, E-mail: heejkoh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Choong-Ill, E-mail: ccheon@sookmyung.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  14. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3’-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli

    Golovin, A.V.; Khayrullina, G.A.; Kraal, B.; Kopylov, А.М.

    2012-01-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA–protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA–protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV–induced RNA–protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA– protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA – protein cross–link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA–protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit. PMID:23346381

  15. Structure of ERA in Complex with the 3 End of 16s rRNBA Implications for Ribosome Biogenesis

    Tu, C.; Zhou, X; Tropea, J; Austin, B; Waugh, D; Court, D; Ji, X

    2009-01-01

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the 1531AUCACCUCCUUA1542 sequence at the 3? end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  16. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua; (NCI)

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  17. Methylation of ribosomal protein S10 by protein-arginine methyltransferase 5 regulates ribosome biogenesis.

    Ren, Jinqi; Wang, Yaqing; Liang, Yuheng; Zhang, Yongqing; Bao, Shilai; Xu, Zhiheng

    2010-04-23

    Modulation of ribosomal assembly is a fine tuning mechanism for cell number and organ size control. Many ribosomal proteins undergo post-translational modification, but their exact roles remain elusive. Here, we report that ribosomal protein s10 (RPS10) is a novel substrate of an oncoprotein, protein-arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). We show that PRMT5 interacts with RPS10 and catalyzes its methylation at the Arg(158) and Arg(160) residues. The methylation of RPS10 at Arg(158) and Arg(160) plays a role in the proper assembly of ribosomes, protein synthesis, and optimal cell proliferation. The RPS10-R158K/R160K mutant is not efficiently assembled into ribosomes and is unstable and prone to degradation by the proteasomal pathway. In nucleoli, RPS10 interacts with nucleophosmin/B23 and is predominantly concentrated in the granular component region, which is required for ribosome assembly. The RPS10 methylation mutant interacts weakly with nucleophosmin/B23 and fails to concentrate in the granular component region. Our results suggest that PRMT5 is likely to regulate cell proliferation through the methylation of ribosome proteins, and thus reveal a novel mechanism for PRMT5 in tumorigenesis.

  18. A recent intermezzo at the Ribosome Club.

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Liljas, Anders; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2017-03-19

    Two sets of ribosome structures have recently led to two different interpretations of what limits the accuracy of codon translation by transfer RNAs. In this review, inspired by this intermezzo at the Ribosome Club, we briefly discuss accuracy amplification by energy driven proofreading and its implementation in genetic code translation. We further discuss general ways by which the monitoring bases of 16S rRNA may enhance the ultimate accuracy (d-values) and how the codon translation accuracy is reduced by the actions of Mg(2+) ions and the presence of error inducing aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that complete freezing-in of cognate-like tautomeric states of ribosome-bound nucleotide bases in transfer RNA or messenger RNA is not compatible with recent experiments on initial codon selection by transfer RNA in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP. From these considerations, we suggest that the sets of 30S subunit structures from the Ramakrishnan group and 70S structures from the Yusupov/Yusupova group may, after all, reflect two sides of the same coin and how the structurally based intermezzo at the Ribosome Club may be resolved simply by taking the dynamic aspects of ribosome function into account.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  19. Affinity of ribosomal protein S8 from mesophilic and (hyper)thermophilic archaea and bacteria for 16S rRNA correlates with the growth temperatures of the organisms.

    Gruber, Thomas; Köhrer, Caroline; Lung, Birgit; Shcherbakov, Dmitri; Piendl, Wolfgang

    2003-08-14

    The ribosomal protein S8 plays a pivotal role in the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Using filter binding assays, S8 proteins from mesophilic, and (hyper)thermophilic species of the archaeal genus Methanococcus and from the bacteria Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus were tested for their affinity to their specific 16S rRNA target site. S8 proteins from hyperthermophiles exhibit a 100-fold and S8 from thermophiles exhibit a 10-fold higher affinity than their mesophilic counterparts. Thus, there is a striking correlation of affinity of S8 proteins for their specific RNA binding site and the optimal growth temperatures of the respective organisms. The stability of individual rRNA-protein complexes might modulate the stability of the ribosome, providing a maximum of thermostability and flexibility at the growth temperature of the organism.

  20. Molecular morphology of ribosomes. Iodination of Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins with solid-state lactoperoxidase.

    Michalski, C J; Sells, B H

    1975-03-17

    Using either soluble or solid-state lactoperoxidase, a comparison was made between the enzymic iodination of ribosomal proteins iodinated as 30-S and 50-S subunits or as 70-S monosomes. Proteins S7, S11 and S12 of the 30-S subunit and proteins L2, L11, L26 and L28 of the 50-S subunit were labelled to a greater extent in isolated particles than in the 70-S ribosome. In contrast, proteins S4, S19 and S20 were labelled to a lesser extent in the isolated subunit. No significant differences were observed in the iodination patterns of ribosomes iodinated in the presence of soluble lactoperoxidase and those iodinated in the presence of lactoperoxidase bound to Sepharose 4B. It is suggested that the 30-S subunit undergoes a conformational change during its association with the 50-S subunit to form a 70-S monosome. Implications from results obtained with solid-state lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination of ribosomal proteins are also discussed.

  1. The ribosomal genes of Mycoplasma capricolum.

    Muto, A; Hori, H; Sawada, M; Kawauchi, Y; Iwami, M; Yamao, F; Osawa, S

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA from Mycoplasma capricolum is more similar to that of the gram-positive bacteria than that of the gram-negative bacteria. The presence of two copies of rRNA genes in M. capricolum genome has been demonstrated. The two different rRNA gene clusters have been cloned in E. coli plasmid vectors and analyzed for the rRNA gene organizations, demonstrating that the gene arrangement is in the order of 16S, 23S, and 5S rDNA. The ribosomes of M. capricolum contain about 30 species of proteins in 50S and 20 in 30S subunits. The number and size of the ribosomal proteins are not significantly different from those of other eubacterial ribosomes.

  2. In vitro synthesis of ribosomal proteins directed by Escherichia coli DNA.

    Kaltschmidt, E; Kahan, L; Nomura, M

    1974-02-01

    In vitro synthesis of a number of E. coli 30S ribosomal proteins has been demonstrated in a cell-free system consisting of ribosomes, initiation factors, RNA polymerase, a fraction containing soluble enzymes and factors, and E. coli DNA. DNA-dependent synthesis of the following 30S proteins has been demonstrated: S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S13, S14, S16, S19, and S20.

  3. [Topography of ribosomal proteins: reconsideration of of protein map of small ribosomal subunit].

    Spirin, A S; Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Kommer, A

    1996-11-01

    Exposure of proteins on the surface of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli was studied by the hot tritium bombardment technique. Eight of 21 proteins of the 30 S subunit (S3, S8, S10, S12, S15, S16, S17, and S19) had virtually no groups exposed on the surface of the particle, i.e., they were mainly hidden inside. Seven proteins (S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21) were all well exposed on the surface of the particle, thus being outside proteins. The remaining proteins (S2, S6, S9 and/or S11, S13, and S14) were partially exposed. On the basis of these results a reconcilement of the three-dimensional protein map of the small ribosomal subunit has been done and corrected model is proposed.

  4. Architecture of the E.coli 70S ribosome

    Burkhardt, N.; Diedrich, G.; Nierhaus, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    The 70S ribosome from E.coli was analysed by neutron scattering focusing on the shape and the internal protein-RNA-distribution of the complex. Measurements on selectively deuterated 70S particles and free 30S and 50S subunits applying conventional contrast variation and proton-spin contrast...

  5. Initial bridges between two ribosomal subunits are formed within 9.4 milliseconds, as studied by time-resolved cryo-EM.

    Shaikh, Tanvir R; Yassin, Aymen S; Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Meng, Xing; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wagenknecht, Terence; Agrawal, Rajendra K

    2014-07-08

    Association of the two ribosomal subunits during the process of translation initiation is a crucial step of protein synthesis. The two subunits (30S and 50S) of the bacterial 70S ribosome are held together by 12 dynamic bridges involving RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. The process of bridge formation, such as whether all these bridges are formed simultaneously or in a sequential order, is poorly understood. To understand such processes, we have developed and implemented a class of microfluidic devices that mix two components to completion within 0.4 ms and spray the mixture in the form of microdroplets onto an electron microscopy grid, yielding a minimum reaction time of 9.4 ms before cryofixation. Using these devices, we have obtained cryo-EM data corresponding to reaction times of 9.4 and 43 ms and have determined 3D structures of ribosomal subunit association intermediates. Molecular analyses of the cryo-EM maps reveal that eight intersubunit bridges (bridges B1a, B1b, B2a, B2b, B3, B7a, B7b, and B8) form within 9.4 ms, whereas the remaining four bridges (bridges B2c, B4, B5, and B6) take longer than 43 ms to form, suggesting that bridges are formed in a stepwise fashion. Our approach can be used to characterize sequences of various dynamic functional events on complex macromolecular assemblies such as ribosomes.

  6. Isolation, crystallization, and investigation of ribosomal protein S8 complexed with specific fragments of rRNA of bacterial or archaeal origin.

    Tishchenko, S V; Vassilieva, J M; Platonova, O B; Serganov, A A; Fomenkova, N P; Mudrik, E S; Piendl, W; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B; Garber, M B

    2001-09-01

    The core ribosomal protein S8 binds to the central domain of 16S rRNA independently of other ribosomal proteins and is required for assembling the 30S subunit. It has been shown with E. coli ribosomes that a short rRNA fragment restricted by nucleotides 588-602 and 636-651 is sufficient for strong and specific protein S8 binding. In this work, we studied the complexes formed by ribosomal protein S8 from Thermus thermophilus and Methanococcus jannaschii with short rRNA fragments isolated from the same organisms. The dissociation constants of the complexes of protein S8 with rRNA fragments were determined. Based on the results of binding experiments, rRNA fragments of different length were designed and synthesized in preparative amounts in vitro using T7 RNA-polymerase. Stable S8-RNA complexes were crystallized. Crystals were obtained both for homologous bacterial and archaeal complexes and for hybrid complexes of archaeal protein with bacterial rRNA. Crystals of the complex of protein S8 from M. jannaschii with the 37-nucleotide rRNA fragment from the same organism suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained.

  7. Effects of magnesium ions on ribosomes: a fluorescence study.

    Bonincontro, A; Briganti, G; Giansanti, A; Pedone, F; Risuleo, G

    1993-07-18

    Fluorescence intensity measurements of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in suspensions of 30S and 50S subunits, of 70S ribosomal particles and of protein-free extracted rRNA are presented. Changes in the intercalation of EB reflect changes in conformation and degree of exposure of rRNA. The effect of removal of magnesium ions on the binding of EB is compared in protein-free rRNA and in ribosomal particles by a Scatchard plot analysis. In free ribosomal RNA the number of bound EBs do not depend on magnesium content, only the association constant is affected. In intact 70S particles and both in the separated 50S and 30S subunits the presence of magnesium greatly reduces binding of EB and no saturation of the fluorescence intensity with rRNA concentration is observed, preventing a Scatchard plot analysis. Removal of magnesium restores a strong EB intercalation. Then magnesium ions induce a conformational change in the 70S particles as well as in the separated subunits. The different behavior of the free-rRNA and of the ribosomal particles indicates that ribosomal proteins are relevant to the structural changes induced by magnesium ions. The comparison of the number of excluded sites and of the association constant in the 30S, 50S subunits and in the 70S particles indicates that even without Mg2+ ions the two subunits still interact, at variance with the commonly shared opinion that subunits dissociation takes place at low magnesium concentration.

  8. Protein-protein interactions within late pre-40S ribosomes.

    Melody G Campbell

    Full Text Available Ribosome assembly in eukaryotic organisms requires more than 200 assembly factors to facilitate and coordinate rRNA transcription, processing, and folding with the binding of the ribosomal proteins. Many of these assembly factors bind and dissociate at defined times giving rise to discrete assembly intermediates, some of which have been partially characterized with regards to their protein and RNA composition. Here, we have analyzed the protein-protein interactions between the seven assembly factors bound to late cytoplasmic pre-40S ribosomes using recombinant proteins in binding assays. Our data show that these factors form two modules: one comprising Enp1 and the export adaptor Ltv1 near the beak structure, and the second comprising the kinase Rio2, the nuclease Nob1, and a regulatory RNA binding protein Dim2/Pno1 on the front of the head. The GTPase-like Tsr1 and the universally conserved methylase Dim1 are also peripherally connected to this second module. Additionally, in an effort to further define the locations for these essential proteins, we have analyzed the interactions between these assembly factors and six ribosomal proteins: Rps0, Rps3, Rps5, Rps14, Rps15 and Rps29. Together, these results and previous RNA-protein crosslinking data allow us to propose a model for the binding sites of these seven assembly factors. Furthermore, our data show that the essential kinase Rio2 is located at the center of the pre-ribosomal particle and interacts, directly or indirectly, with every other assembly factor, as well as three ribosomal proteins required for cytoplasmic 40S maturation. These data suggest that Rio2 could play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic maturation steps.

  9. Crystal Structures of EF-G-Ribosome Complexes Trapped in Intermediate States of Translocation

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F. [UCSC

    2013-11-12

    Translocation of messenger and transfer RNA (mRNA and tRNA) through the ribosome is a crucial step in protein synthesis, whose mechanism is not yet understood. The crystal structures of three Thermus ribosome-tRNA-mRNA–EF-G complexes trapped with β,γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDPNP) or fusidic acid reveal conformational changes occurring during intermediate states of translocation, including large-scale rotation of the 30S subunit head and body. In all complexes, the tRNA acceptor ends occupy the 50S subunit E site, while their anticodon stem loops move with the head of the 30S subunit to positions between the P and E sites, forming chimeric intermediate states. Two universally conserved bases of 16S ribosomal RNA that intercalate between bases of the mRNA may act as “pawls” of a translocational ratchet. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ribosomal translocation.

  10. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech;

    2003-01-01

    The ribosomal "stalk" structure is a distinct lateral protuberance located on the large ribosomal subunit in prokaryotic, as well as in eukaryotic cells. In eukaryotes, this ribosomal structure is composed of the acidic ribosomal P proteins, forming two hetero-dimers (P1/P2) attached......-proteins that are not actively transported into the nucleus; moreover, this might imply that the "stalk" constituents are assembled onto the ribosomal particle at the very last step of ribosomal maturation, which takes part in the cell cytoplasm....

  11. The structure of Aquifex aeolicus ribosomal protein S8 reveals a unique subdomain that contributes to an extremely tight association with 16S rRNA.

    Menichelli, Elena; Edgcomb, Stephen P; Recht, Michael I; Williamson, James R

    2012-01-20

    The assembly of ribonucleoprotein complexes occurs under a broad range of conditions, but the principles that promote assembly and allow function at high temperature are poorly understood. The ribosomal protein S8 from Aquifex aeolicus (AS8) is unique in that there is a 41-residue insertion in the consensus S8 sequence. In addition, AS8 exhibits an unusually high affinity for the 16S ribosomal RNA, characterized by a picomolar dissociation constant that is approximately 26,000-fold tighter than the equivalent interaction from Escherichia coli. Deletion analysis demonstrated that binding to the minimal site on helix 21 occurred at the same nanomolar affinity found for other bacterial species. The additional affinity required the presence of a three-helix junction between helices 20, 21, and 22. The crystal structure of AS8 was solved, revealing the helix-loop-helix geometry of the unique AS8 insertion region, while the core of the molecule is conserved with known S8 structures. The AS8 structure was modeled onto the structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit from E. coli, suggesting the possibility that the unique subdomain provides additional backbone and side-chain contacts between the protein and an unpaired base within the three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22. Point mutations in the protein insertion subdomain resulted in a significantly reduced RNA binding affinity with respect to wild-type AS8. These results indicate that the AS8-specific subdomain provides additional interactions with the three-way junction that contribute to the extremely tight binding to ribosomal RNA.

  12. [Study of the mRNA-binding region of ribosomes at different steps of translation. II. Affinity modification of Escherichia coli ribosomes by benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 in the 70S initiation complex].

    Babkina, G T; Karpova, G G; Matasova, N B; Berzin', V M; Gren, E Ia

    1985-01-01

    2',3'-O-(4-[N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-methylamino]) benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 was used for identification of the proteins in the region of the mRNA-binding centre of E. coli ribosomes. This derivative alkylated ribosomes (preferentially 30S ribosomal) with high efficiency within the 70S initiation complex. In both 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits proteins and rRNA were modified. Specificity of the alkylation of ribosomal proteins and rRNA with the reagent was proved by the inhibitory action of AUGU6. Using the method of two-dimensional electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel the proteins S4, S12, S13, S14, S15, S18, S19 and S20/L26 which are labelled by the analog of mRNA were identified.

  13. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    Tamar Auerbach-Nevo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  14. Archaeal MBF1 binds to 30S and 70S ribosomes via its helix-turn-helix domain

    Blombach, F.; Launay, H.; Snijders, A.P.; Zorraquino, V.; Wu, H.; Koning, de B.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Ettema, T.J.; Camilloni, C.; Cavalli, A.; Vendruscolo, M.; Dickman, M.J.; Cabrita, L.D.; Teana, La A.; Benelli, D.; Londei, P.; Christodoulou, J.; Oost, van der J.

    2014-01-01

    MBF1 (multi-protein bridging factor 1) is a protein containing a conserved HTH (helix–turn–helix) domain in both eukaryotes and archaea. Eukaryotic MBF1 has been reported to function as a transcriptional co-activator that physically bridges transcription regulators with the core transcription initia

  15. Are there proteins between the ribosomal subunits? Hot tritium bombardment experiments.

    Yusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-03-03

    The hot tritium bombardment technique [(1976) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 228, 1237-1238] was used for studying the surface localization of ribosomal proteins on Escherichia coli ribosomes. The degree of tritium labeling of proteins was considered as a measure of their exposure (surface localization). Proteins S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27 were shown to be the most exposed on the ribosome surface. The sets of exposed ribosomal proteins on the surface of 70 S ribosomes, on the one hand, and the surfaces of 50 S and 30 S ribosomal subunits in the dissociated state, on the other, were compared. It was found that the dissociation of ribosomes into subunits did not result in exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. The conclusion was drawn that proteins are absent from the contacting surfaces of the ribosomal subunits.

  16. Mechanism of recycling of post-termination ribosomal complexes in eubacteria: a new role of initiation factor 3

    Anuradha Seshadri; Umesh Varshney

    2006-06-01

    Ribosome recycling is a process which dissociates the post-termination complexes (post-TC) consisting of mRNA-bound ribosomes harbouring deacylated tRNA(s). Ribosome recycling factor (RRF), and elongation factor G (EFG) participate in this crucial process to free the ribosomal subunits for a new round of translation. We discuss the overall pathway of ribosome recycling in eubacteria with especial reference to the important role of the initiation factor 3 (IF3) in this process. Depending on the step(s) at which IF3 function is implicated, three models have been proposed. In model 1, RRF and EFG dissociate the post-TCs into the 50S and 30S subunits, mRNA and tRNA(s). In this model, IF3, which binds to the 30S subunit, merely keeps the dissociated subunits apart by its anti-association activity. In model 2, RRF and EFG separate the 50S subunit from the post-TC. IF3 then dissociates the remaining complex of mRNA, tRNA and the 30S subunit, and keeps the ribosomal subunits apart from each other. However, in model 3, both the genetic and biochemical evidence support a more active role for IF3 even at the step of dissociation of the post-TC by RRF and EFG into the 50S and 30S subunits.

  17. Aggregation of Ribosomal Protein S6 at Nucleolus Is Cell Cycle-Controlled and Its Function in Pre-rRNA Processing Is Phosphorylation Dependent.

    Zhang, Duo; Chen, Hui-Peng; Duan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Li-Hua; Shao, Yong; Chen, Ke-Yan; Wang, You-Liang; Lan, Feng-Hua; Hu, Xian-Wen

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) has long been regarded as one of the primary r-proteins that functions in the early stage of 40S subunit assembly, but its actual role is still obscure. The correct forming of 18S rRNA is a key step in the nuclear synthesis of 40S subunit. In this study, we demonstrate that rpS6 participates in the processing of 30S pre-rRNA to 18S rRNA only when its C-terminal five serines are phosphorylated, however, the process of entering the nucleus and then targeting the nucleolus does not dependent its phosphorylation. Remarkably, we also find that the aggregation of rpS6 at the nucleolus correlates to the phasing of cell cycle, beginning to concentrate in the nucleolus at later S phase and disaggregate at M phase. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1649-1657, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mapping contacts of the S12-S7 intercistronic region of str operon mRNA with ribosomal protein S7 of E. coli.

    Golovin, Andrey; Spiridonova, Vera; Kopylov, Alexei

    2006-10-30

    In E. coli, S7 initiates 30S ribosome assembly by binding to 16S rRNA. It also regulates translation of the S12 and S7 cistrons of the 'streptomycin' operon transcript by binding to the S12-S7 intercistronic region. Here, we describe the contacts of N-terminally His(6)-tagged S7 with this region as mapped by UV-induced cross-linking. The cross-links are located at U(-34), U(-35), quite distant from the start codons of the two cistrons. In order to explain the mechanism of translational repression of S12-S7, we consider a possible conformational rearrangement of the intercistronic RNA structure induced by S7 binding.

  19. Characterization of the domains of E. coli initiation factor IF2 responsible for recognition of the ribosome

    Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Egebjerg Kristensen, Janni;

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the interactions between the ribosome and the domains of Escherichia coli translation initiation factor 2, using an in vitro ribosomal binding assay with wild-type forms, N- and C-terminal truncated forms of IF2 as well as isolated structural domains. A deletion mutant of the factor...... consisting of the two N-terminal domains of IF2, binds to both 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits as well as to 70S ribosomes. Furthermore, a truncated form of IF2, lacking the two N-terminal domains, binds to 30S ribosomal subunits in the presence of IF1. In addition, this N-terminal deletion mutant IF2 possess...... a low but significant affinity for the 70S ribosome which is increased by addition of IF1. The isolated C-terminal domain of IF2 has no intrinsic affinity for the ribosome nor does the deletion of this domain from IF2 affect the ribosomal binding capability of IF2. We conclude that the N-terminus of IF2...

  20. Isolation of Moraxella bovis ribosomes and their subsequent use in a vaccine against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Pugh, G W; Phillips, M; McDonald, T J; Kopecky, K E

    1981-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether a Moraxella bovis ribosomal vaccine would protect calves from infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). Each of 16 calves were given 2 inoculations 21 days apart. Twenty-one days after the 2nd inoculation, 8 of the calves were challenge exposed with a homologous strain culture and 8 calves were challenge exposed to a heterologous strain culture of M bovis. Sedimentation velocity analysis of the ribosomes used in this study indicated that they were mostly 30S and 50S subunits. Chemical assays indicated that the ribosomes were composed of 64% to 65% RNA and 35% to 36% protein. The cesium chloride buoyant density of the ribosomes was 1.62 g/ml. Ribosomes used as antigen gave 1 line of precipitation in a gel-diffusion precipitin test with hyperimmune serum against the whole-cell antigen of the homologous strain of M bovis. The eyes of all the experimentally exposed calves became infected and all calves developed clinical signs of either unilateral or bilateral IBK. None of the sera of the vaccinated calves had detectable precipitins against the ribosomal antigen at the time they were challenge exposed, but most of the sera had precipitins against whole-cell and pilus antigens. The results indicate that M bovis ribosomes, although similar to other bacterial ribosomes, did not protect cattle against IBK.

  1. [Affinity modification of Escherichia coli ribosomes with photoactivated analogs of mRNA].

    Gimautdinova, O I; Zenkova, M A; Karpova, G G; Podust, L M

    1984-01-01

    Oligoribonucleotide derivatives containing the photoactivated arylazidogroup at 5'-end of the oligonucleotide fragment [2-(N-2,4-dinitro-5-azidophenyl) aminoethyl] phosphamides of the oligoribonucleotides, azido-NH (CH2)2NHpN (pN) n-1, were prepared. It was demonstrated that azido-NH(CH2)2NHpA(pA)4 and azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU)3 stimulate the binding of the codonspecific aminoacyl-tRNA with ribosome. After irradiation of the ternary complex ribosome-azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU) n-1 X tRNA with UV-light (lambda greater than 350 nm) covalent binding of the reagent to ribosome occurs. Up to 10% of the reagent, bound in the ternary complex with ribosome, is cross-linked with the ribosomal proteins of 30S and 50S subunits. The ribosomal RNA are not modified by azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU) n-1. The proteins of 30S and 50S subunits, modified with azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU) n-1 with n = 4,7 and 8, were identified. It is shown that proteins of 30S subunits S3, S4, S9, S11, S12, S14, S17, S19, S20 undergo modification. The proteins of 50S subunits L2, L13, L16, L27, L32, L33 are modified. The set of the modified proteins essentially depends on the length of the oligonucleotide part of the reagent and on occupancy of ribosome A-site by a molecule of tRNA.

  2. Structural Dynamics of the Ribosome

    Korostelev, Andrei; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.; Noller, Harry F.

    2008-01-01

    Protein synthesis is inherently a dynamic process, requiring both small- and large-scale movements of tRNA and mRNA. It has long been suspected that these movements might be coupled to conformational changes in the ribosome, and in its RNA moieties in particular. Recently, the nature of ribosome structural dynamics has begun to emerge from a combination of approaches, most notably cryo-EM, X-ray crystallography and FRET. Ribosome movement occurs both on a grand scale, as in the intersubunit r...

  3. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome.

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-05-26

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through "molecular synapses", ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the "sensory-proteins" innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the "inter-proteins" interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing.

  4. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-05-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing.

  5. The structure of the archaebacterial ribosomal protein S7 and its possible interaction with 16S rRNA.

    Hosaka, H; Yao, M; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-11-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 is one of the ubiquitous components of the small subunit of the ribosome. It is a 16S rRNA-binding protein positioned close to the exit of the tRNA, and it plays a role in initiating assembly of the head of the 30S subunit. Previous structural analyses of eubacterial S7 have shown that it has a stable alpha-helix core and a flexible beta-arm. Unlike these eubacterial proteins, archaebacterial or eukaryotic S7 has an N-terminal extension of approximately 60 residues. The crystal structure of S7 from archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhoS7) has been determined at 2.1 A resolution. The final model of PhoS7 consists of six major alpha-helices, a short 3(10)-helix and two beta-stands. The major part (residues 18-45) of the N-terminal extension of PhoS7 reinforces the alpha-helical core by well-extended hydrophobic interactions, while the other part (residues 46-63) is not visible in the crystal and is possibly fixed only by interacting with 16S rRNA. These differences in the N-terminal extension as well as in the insertion (between alpha1 and alpha2) of the archaebacterial S7 structure from eubacterial S7 are such that they do not necessitate a major change in the structure of the currently available eubacterial 16S rRNA. Some of the inserted chains might pass through gaps formed by helices of the 16S rRNA.

  6. A protein inventory of human ribosome biogenesis reveals an essential function of exportin 5 in 60S subunit export.

    Wild, Thomas; Horvath, Peter; Wyler, Emanuel; Widmann, Barbara; Badertscher, Lukas; Zemp, Ivo; Kozak, Karol; Csucs, Gabor; Lund, Elsebet; Kutay, Ulrike

    2010-10-26

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes is a complex, multistep process so far mostly studied in yeast. In S. cerevisiae, more than 200 factors including ribosomal proteins and trans-acting factors are required for the ordered assembly of 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. To date, only few human homologs of these yeast ribosome synthesis factors have been characterized. Here, we used a systematic RNA interference (RNAi) approach to analyze the contribution of 464 candidate factors to ribosomal subunit biogenesis in human cells. The screen was based on visual readouts, using inducible, fluorescent ribosomal proteins as reporters. By performing computer-based image analysis utilizing supervised machine-learning techniques, we obtained evidence for a functional link of 153 human proteins to ribosome synthesis. Our data show that core features of ribosome assembly are conserved from yeast to human, but differences exist for instance with respect to 60S subunit export. Unexpectedly, our RNAi screen uncovered a requirement for the export receptor Exportin 5 (Exp5) in nuclear export of 60S subunits in human cells. We show that Exp5, like the known 60S exportin Crm1, binds to pre-60S particles in a RanGTP-dependent manner. Interference with either Exp5 or Crm1 function blocks 60S export in both human cells and frog oocytes, whereas 40S export is compromised only upon inhibition of Crm1. Thus, 60S subunit export is dependent on at least two RanGTP-binding exportins in vertebrate cells.

  7. [Mg2+ ions affect the structure of the central domain of the 18S rRNA in the vicinity of the ribosomal protein S13 binding site].

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2013-01-01

    It is known that Mg2+ ions at high concentrations stabilize the structure of the 16S rRNA in a conformation favorable for binding to the ribosomal proteins in the course of the eubacterial 30S ribosomal subunits assembly in vitro. Effect of Mg2+ on the formation of the 18S rRNA structure at the 40S subunit assembly remains poorly explored. In this paper, we show that the sequentional increase of the Mg2+ concentration from 0.5 mM to 20 mM leads to a significant decrease of the affinity of recombinant human ribosomal protein S13 (rpS13e) to a RNA transcript corresponding to the central domain fragment of the 18S rRNA (18SCD). The regions near the rpS13e binding site in 18SCD (including the nucleotides of helices H20 and H22), whose availabilities to hydroxyl radicals were dependent on the Mg2+ concentration, were determined. It was found that increase of the concentrations of Mg2+ results in the enhanced accessibilities of nucleotides G933-C937 and C1006-A1009 in helix H22 and reduces those of nucleotides A1023, A1024, and A1028-S1026 in the helix H20. Comparison of the results obtained with the crystallographic data on the structure of the central domain of 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit led to conclusion that increase of Mg2+ concentrations results in the reorientation of helices H20 and H24 relatively helices H22 and H23 to form a structure, in which these helices are positioned the same way as in 40S subunits. Hence, saturation of the central domain of 18S rRNA with coordinated Mg2+ ions causes the same changes in its structure as rpS13e binding does, and leads to decreasing of this domain affinity to the protein.

  8. Key Intermediates in Ribosome Recycling Visualized by Time-Resolved Cryoelectron Microscopy.

    Fu, Ziao; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Borg, Anneli; Sun, Ming; Chen, Bo; Grassucci, Robert A; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2016-12-06

    Upon encountering a stop codon on mRNA, polypeptide synthesis on the ribosome is terminated by release factors, and the ribosome complex, still bound with mRNA and P-site-bound tRNA (post-termination complex, PostTC), is split into ribosomal subunits, ready for a new round of translational initiation. Separation of post-termination ribosomes into subunits, or "ribosome recycling," is promoted by the joint action of ribosome-recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis-dependent manner. Here we used a mixing-spraying-based method of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to visualize the short-lived intermediates of the recycling process. The two complexes that contain (1) both RRF and EF-G bound to the PostTC or (2) deacylated tRNA bound to the 30S subunit are of particular interest. Our observations of the native form of these complexes demonstrate the strong potential of time-resolved cryo-EM for visualizing previously unobservable transient structures.

  9. Deletions in a ribosomal protein-coding gene are associated with tigecycline resistance in Enterococcus faecium.

    Niebel, Marc; Quick, Joshua; Prieto, Ana Maria Guzman; Hill, Robert L R; Pike, Rachel; Huber, Damon; David, Miruna; Hornsey, Michael; Wareham, David; Oppenheim, Beryl; Woodford, Neil; van Schaik, Willem; Loman, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium is an emerging nosocomial pathogen associated with antibiotic therapy in the hospital environment. Whole-genome sequences were determined for three pairs of related, consecutively collected E. faecium clinical isolates to determine putative mechanisms of resistance to tigecycline. The first isolates (1S, 2S and 3S) in each of the three pairs were sensitive to tigecycline [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.125 mg/L]. Following tigecycline therapy, the second isolate in each pair demonstrated increased resistance to tigecycline. Two isolates (1R and 2R) were resistant (MIC of 8 mg/L) and one isolate (3I) demonstrated reduced susceptibility (MIC of 0.5 mg/L). Mutations distinguishing each pair of sensitive and resistant isolates were determined through alignment to a reference genome and variant detection. In addition, a de novo assembly of each isolate genome was constructed to confirm mutations. A total of 16 mutations in eleven coding sequences were determined. Mutations in the rpsJ gene, which encodes a structural protein forming part of the 30S ribosomal subunit, were detected in each of the pairs. Mutations were in regions proximal to the predicted tigecycline-binding site. Predicted amino acid substitutions were detected in 1R and 3I. The resistant strains were additionally associated with deletions of 15 nucleotides (2R) and 3 nucleotides (1R). This study confirms that amino acid substitutions in rpsJ contribute towards reduced susceptibility to tigecycline and suggests that deletions may be required for tigecycline resistance in E. faecium.

  10. Evolution of the holozoan ribosome biogenesis regulon

    Brown, Seth J; Cole, Michael D; Erives, Albert J

    2008-01-01

    Background The ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) genes encode a highly-conserved eukaryotic set of nucleolar proteins involved in rRNA transcription, assembly, processing, and export from the nucleus. While the mode of regulation of this suite of genes has been studied in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, how this gene set is coordinately regulated in the larger and more complex metazoan genomes is not understood. Results Here we present genome-wide analyses indicating that a distinct mode of RiBi regulation co-evolved with the E(CG)-binding, Myc:Max bHLH heterodimer complex in a stem-holozoan, the ancestor of both Metazoa and Choanoflagellata, the protozoan group most closely related to animals. These results show that this mode of regulation, characterized by an E(CG)-bearing core-promoter, is specific to almost all of the known genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in these genomes. Interestingly, this holozoan RiBi promoter signature is absent in nematode genomes, which have not only secondarily lost Myc but are marked by invariant cell lineages typically producing small body plans of 1000 somatic cells. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of 10 fungal genomes shows that this holozoan signature in RiBi genes is not found in hemiascomycete fungi, which evolved their own unique regulatory signature for the RiBi regulon. Conclusion These results indicate that a Myc regulon, which is activated in proliferating cells during normal development as well as during tumor progression, has primordial roots in the evolution of an inducible growth regime in a protozoan ancestor of animals. Furthermore, by comparing divergent bHLH repertoires, we conclude that regulation by Myc but not by other bHLH genes is responsible for the evolutionary maintenance of E(CG) sites across the RiBi suite of genes. PMID:18816399

  11. Evolution of the holozoan ribosome biogenesis regulon

    Cole Michael D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ribosome biogenesis (RiBi genes encode a highly-conserved eukaryotic set of nucleolar proteins involved in rRNA transcription, assembly, processing, and export from the nucleus. While the mode of regulation of this suite of genes has been studied in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, how this gene set is coordinately regulated in the larger and more complex metazoan genomes is not understood. Results Here we present genome-wide analyses indicating that a distinct mode of RiBi regulation co-evolved with the E(CG-binding, Myc:Max bHLH heterodimer complex in a stem-holozoan, the ancestor of both Metazoa and Choanoflagellata, the protozoan group most closely related to animals. These results show that this mode of regulation, characterized by an E(CG-bearing core-promoter, is specific to almost all of the known genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in these genomes. Interestingly, this holozoan RiBi promoter signature is absent in nematode genomes, which have not only secondarily lost Myc but are marked by invariant cell lineages typically producing small body plans of 1000 somatic cells. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of 10 fungal genomes shows that this holozoan signature in RiBi genes is not found in hemiascomycete fungi, which evolved their own unique regulatory signature for the RiBi regulon. Conclusion These results indicate that a Myc regulon, which is activated in proliferating cells during normal development as well as during tumor progression, has primordial roots in the evolution of an inducible growth regime in a protozoan ancestor of animals. Furthermore, by comparing divergent bHLH repertoires, we conclude that regulation by Myc but not by other bHLH genes is responsible for the evolutionary maintenance of E(CG sites across the RiBi suite of genes.

  12. Reconstitution of functional eukaryotic ribosomes from Dictyostelium discoideum ribosomal proteins and RNA.

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S

    1997-08-08

    40 and 60 S ribosomal subunits have been reconstituted in vitro from purified ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. The functionality of the reconstituted ribosomes was demonstrated in in vitro mRNA-directed protein synthesis. The reassembly proceeded well with immature precursors of ribosomal RNA but poorly if at all with mature cytoplasmic RNA species. Reassembly also required a preparation of small nuclear RNA(s), acting as morphopoietic factor(s).

  13. Direct interaction of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S1 with protein S2 in Escherichia coli.

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1-106; S1(106)) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1(106) affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α(2)) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions.

  14. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  15. Ribosomal targets for antibiotic drug discovery

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Feldman, Michael Brian; Wang, Leyi; Doudna Cate, James H.; Pulk, Arto; Altman, Roger B.; Wasserman, Michael R

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to methods to identify molecules that binds in the neomycin binding pocket of a bacterial ribosome using structures of an intact bacterial ribosome that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined by x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit (P/E) site. Additionally, the invention relates to various assays, including single-molecule assay for ribosome recycling, and methods to identify compounds that interfere with ribosomal function by detecting newly identified intermediate FRET states using known and novel FRET pairs on the ribosome. The invention also provides vectors and compositions with an N-terminally tagged S13 protein.

  16. THE 30-S CHAIR STAND TEST AND HABITUAL MOBILITY PREDICT REHABILITATION NEEDS AFTER ACUTE ADMISSION

    Hansen Bruun, Inge; Nørgaard, Birgitte; Maribo, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    as elderly might be confused or unrealistic about their physical abilities. The 30-s Chair Stand Test (30s-CST) has not been validated in ED, but is used at community level for this purpose. The De Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) has been validated for acute patients. Our study evaluated if a 30s-CST-score ≤8...... patients were assessed on admission and one month after. Predictors for later functional decline were analysed in logistics regression models. Results: 117 patients were included. The baseline predictors were: Female gender: (OR 1.6); using assistive device (OR 4.6); reduced ability to climb a stairway (OR...... with habitual mobility....

  17. A Possible Role of the Full-Length Nascent Protein in Post-Translational Ribosome Recycling

    Das, Debasis; Samanta, Dibyendu; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Basu, Arunima; Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Jaydip; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Das Gupta, Chanchal

    2017-01-01

    Each cycle of translation initiation in bacterial cell requires free 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits originating from the post-translational dissociation of 70S ribosome from the previous cycle. Literature shows stable dissociation of 70S from model post-termination complexes by the concerted action of Ribosome Recycling Factor (RRF) and Elongation Factor G (EF-G) that interact with the rRNA bridge B2a/B2b joining 50S to 30S. In such experimental models, the role of full-length nascent protein was never considered seriously. We observed relatively slow release of full-length nascent protein from 50Sof post translation ribosome, and in that process, its toe prints on the rRNA in vivo and in in vitro translation with E.coli S30 extract. We reported earlier that a number of chemically unfolded proteins like bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lysozyme, ovalbumin etc., when added to free 70Sin lieu of the full length nascent proteins, also interact with identical RNA regions of the 23S rRNA. Interestingly the rRNA nucleotides that slow down release of the C-terminus of full-length unfolded protein were found in close proximity to the B2a/B2b bridge. It indicated a potentially important chemical reaction conserved throughout the evolution. Here we set out to probe that conserved role of unfolded protein conformation in splitting the free or post-termination 70S. How both the RRF-EFG dependent and the plausible nascent protein–EFG dependent ribosome recycling pathways might be relevant in bacteria is discussed here. PMID:28099529

  18. Etudes structurales du ribosome de Staphylococcus aureus

    Khusainov, Iskander

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a large cellular machinery that performs the protein synthesis in every living cell. Therefore, the ribosome is one of the major targets of naturally produced antibiotics, which can kill bacterial cells by blocking protein synthesis. However, some bacteria are resistant to these antibiotics due to small modifications of their ribosomes. Among them, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a severe pathogen that causes numerous infections in humans. The crystal structures of comple...

  19. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 is involved in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Zhang, Junxiang; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Lyi, Sangbom M; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Zhang, Lugang; Li, Li

    2016-04-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins are essential components of protein synthesis machinery and have diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid ribosomal proteins lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood, and the functions of some individual plastid ribosomal proteins remain unknown. To identify genes responsible for chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized a mutant that exhibited pale yellow inner leaves with a reduced growth rate in Arabidopsis. The mutant (rps5) contained a missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5), which caused a dramatically reduced abundance of chloroplast 16S rRNA and seriously impaired 16S rRNA processing to affect ribosome function and plastid translation. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the rps5 mutation suppressed the expression of a large number of core components involved in photosystems I and II as well as many plastid ribosomal proteins. Unexpectedly, a number of proteins associated with cold stress responses were greatly decreased in rps5, and overexpression of the plastid RPS5 improved plant cold stress tolerance. Our results indicate that RPS5 is an important constituent of the plastid 30S subunit and affects proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold stress responses to mediate plant growth and development.

  20. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

  1. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016.

  2. Pseudouridines and pseudouridine synthases of the ribosome.

    Ofengand, J; Malhotra, A; Remme, J; Gutgsell, N S; Del Campo, M; Jean-Charles, S; Peil, L; Kaya, Y

    2001-01-01

    psi are ubiquitous in ribosomal RNA. Eubacteria, Archaea, and eukaryotes all contain psi, although their number varies widely, with eukaryotes having the most. The small ribosomal subunit can apparently do without psi in some organisms, even though others have as many as 40 or more. Large subunits appear to need at least one psi but can have up to 50-60. psi is made by a set of site-specific enzymes in eubacteria, and in eukaryotes by a single enzyme complexed with auxiliary proteins and specificity-conferring guide RNAs. The mechanism is not known in Archaea, but based on an analysis of the kinds of psi synthases found in sequenced archaeal genomes, it is likely to involve use of guide RNAs. All psi synthases can be classified into one of four related groups, virtually all of which have a conserved aspartate residue in a conserved sequence motif. The aspartate is essential for psi formation in all twelve synthases examined so far. When the need for psi in E. coli was examined, the only synthase whose absence caused a major decrease in growth rate under normal conditions was RluD, the synthase that makes psi 1911, psi 1915, and psi 1917 in the helix 69 end-loop. This growth defect was the result of a major failure in assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. The defect could be prevented by supplying the rluD structural gene in trans, and also by providing a point mutant gene that made a synthase unable to make psi. Therefore, the RluD synthase protein appears to be directly involved in 50S subunit assembly, possibly as an RNA chaperone, and this activity is independent of its ability to form psi. This result is not without precedent. Depletion of PET56, a 2'-O-methyltransferase specific for G2251 (E. coli numbering) in yeast mitochondria virtually blocks 50S subunit assembly and mitochondrial function (Sirum-Connolly et al. 1995), but the methylation activity of the enzyme is not required (T. Mason, pers. comm.). The absence of FtsJ, a heat shock protein that makes

  3. Biphasic character of ribosomal translocation and non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics of translation.

    Xie, Ping

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the kinetics of mRNA translocation in the wild-type (WT) Escherichia coli ribosome, which is composed of a small 30S and large 50S subunit, and the ribosomes with mutations to some intersubunit bridges such as B1a, B4, B7a, and B8. The theoretical results reproduce well the available in vitro experimental data on the biphasic kinetics of the forward mRNA translocation catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) hydrolyzing GTP, which can be best fit by the sum of two exponentials, and the monophasic kinetics of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation in the absence of the elongation factor, which can be best fit by a single-exponential function, in both the WT and mutant ribosomes. We show that both the mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the slow phase for the forward mRNA translocation and that in the rate of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation result from a reduction in the intrinsic energy barrier to resist the rotational movements between the two subunits, giving the same degree of increase in the two rates. The mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the fast phase for the forward mRNA translocation results mainly from the increase in the rate of the ribosomal unlocking, a conformational change in the ribosome that widens the mRNA channel for the mRNA translocation to take place, which could be partly due to the effect of the mutation on the intrasubunit 30S head rotation. Moreover, we study the translation rate of the WT and mutant ribosomes. It is shown that the translation rate versus the concentration of EF-G-GTP does not follow the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics, which is in sharp contrast to the general property of other enzymes that the rate of the enzymatic reaction versus the concentration of a substrate follows the MM kinetics. The physical origin of this non-MM kinetics for the ribosome is revealed.

  4. TINDAKAN NEGARA TERKAIT PERISTIWA G30S: STUDI MAKNA GADAMERIAN PADA PESELAMAT

    Hamdan Tri Atmaja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to gain knowledge of a deep understanding of the state action related to the G30S event. The research method used was a qualitative research approach initiated by Gadamer's hermeneutics. The results showed that state action against survivors were to arrest, investigate, and imprison them to the island of Buru (for men survivors and Plantungan (for women survivors. The G30S event, by survivors, was interpreted as a story of the assassination of the generals by Indonesian Communist Party (PKI, as well as the form of a political conspiracy for Sukarno’s power within ideological background. Investigation and arrest were interpreted by them as an act of unwarranted, political scapegoat, and a form of abuse against them. While prison life, for survivors, was as a form of forced labor, punishment to stigmatize and isolate women Keywords: State Action, the G30S event, Meaning, and Survivor.   Tulisan ini mendeskripsikan secara mendalam tindakan negara terkait peristiwa G30S. Metode penelitian yang digunakan adalah penelitian kualitatif dengan pendekatan hermeneutika yang digagas Gadamer. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan tindakan negara terhadap peselamat adalah melakukan penangkapan, pemeriksaan, dan penahanan serta memenjarakan mereka ke pulau Buru (untuk peselamat laki-laki dan Plantungan (untuk peselamat perempuan. Peristiwa G30S oleh peselamat dimaknai sebagai kisah pembunuhan para jendral oleh PKI, bentuk konspirasi politik memperebutkan kekuasaan Soekarno dengan latar belakang ideologi. Pemeriksaan dan penangkapan dimaknai peselamat sebagai tindakan tidak beralasan, politik kambing hitam, dan sebagai bentuk kesewenang-wenangan terhadap peselamat. Kehidupan penjara dimaknai peselamat sebagai bentuk kerja paksa, hukuman dengan menstigmatisasi dan mengisolasi kaum perempuan. Kata kunci: Tindakan Negara, Peristiwa G30S, Makna, dan  Peselamat.      

  5. The other lives of ribosomal proteins

    Bhavsar Rital B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the fact that ribosomal proteins are the constituents of an organelle that is present in every cell, they show a surprising level of regulation, and several of them have also been shown to have other extra-ribosomal functions, such in replication, transcription, splicing or even ageing. This review provides a comprehensive summary of these important aspects.

  6. Specific interaction between EF-G and RRF and its implication for GTP-dependent ribosome splitting into subunits

    Gao, Ning; Zavialov, Andrey V.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Summary After termination of protein synthesis, the bacterial ribosome is split into its 30S and 50S subunits by the action of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-hydrolysis dependent manner. Based on a previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) study of ribosomal complexes, we have proposed that the binding of EF-G to an RRF containing post-termination ribosome triggers an inter-domain rotation of RRF, which destabilizes two strong intersubunit bridges (B2a and B3) and, ultimately, separates the two subunits. Here, we present a 9 Å (FSC at 0.5 cutoff) cryo-EM map of a 50S EFG GDPNP RRF complex and a quasi-atomic model derived from it, showing the interaction between EF-G and RRF on the 50S subunit in the presence of the non-cleavable GTP analogue GDPNP. The detailed information in this model and a comparative analysis of EF-G structures in various nucleotide- and ribosome-bound states show how rotation of the RRF head domain may be triggered by various domains of EF-G. For validation of our structural model, all known mutations in EF-G and RRF that relate to ribosome recycling have been taken into account. More importantly, our results indicate a substantial conformational change in the Switch I region of EF-G, suggesting that a conformational signal transduction mechanism, similar to that employed in tRNA translocation on the ribosome by EF-G, translates a large-scale movement of EF-G’s domain IV, induced by GTP hydrolysis, into the domain rotation of RRF that eventually splits the ribosome into subunits. PMID:17996252

  7. Complementary roles of initiation factor 1 and ribosome recycling factor in 70S ribosome splitting

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Antoun, Ayman; Lovmar, Martin; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that ribosomes containing a messenger RNA (mRNA) with a strong Shine–Dalgarno sequence are rapidly split into subunits by initiation factors 1 (IF1) and 3 (IF3), but slowly split by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G). Post-termination-like (PTL) ribosomes containing mRNA and a P-site-bound deacylated transfer RNA (tRNA) are split very rapidly by RRF and EF-G, but extremely slowly by IF1 and IF3. Vacant ribosomes are split by RRF/EF-G much more slowly than PTL ribosomes and by IF1/IF3 much more slowly than mRNA-containing ribosomes. These observations reveal complementary splitting of different ribosomal complexes by IF1/IF3 and RRF/EF-G, and suggest the existence of two major pathways for ribosome splitting into subunits in the living cell. We show that the identity of the deacylated tRNA in the PTL ribosome strongly affects the rate by which it is split by RRF/EF-G and that IF3 is involved in the mechanism of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 but not by RRF/EF-G. With support from our experimental data, we discuss the principally different mechanisms of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 and by RRF/EF-G. PMID:18497739

  8. THE 30-S CHAIR STAND TEST AND HABITUAL MOBILITY PREDICT REHABILITATION NEEDS AFTER ACUTE ADMISSION

    Hansen Bruun, Inge; Nørgaard, Birgitte; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    . The objectives were 1: What risk factors support the 30s-CST identifying elderly with rehabilitation needs? 2: Does the De Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) add additional predictive value? Methods/Analysis In this prospective cohort study elderly (65+years) admitted to the ED at weekdays with medical complaints...... were included if oriented in time and place, able to sit on a chair and have a 30s-CST–score ≤ 8. Baseline data were collected within the first 48 hours of admission and the 30s-CST again one month after admission. All risk factors are identified in the literature. The 30s-CST is used at community...... were analyzed in logistics regression models. Results: A loss of 39 patients means that 117 were included in the analysis. The baseline predictors for rehabilitation needs were: Female gender: (OR 1.6); using assistive device (OR 4.6); reduced ability to climb a stairway (OR 2.8); no physical activity...

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis 135 ribosomal protein.

    Jesuino, Rosália S A; Pereira, Maristela; Felipe, M Sueli S; Azevedo, Maristella O; Soares, Célia M A

    2004-06-01

    A 630 bp cDNA encoding an L35 ribosomal protein of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, designated as Pbl35, was cloned from a yeast expression library. Pbl35 encodes a polypeptide of 125 amino acids, with a predicted molecular mass of 14.5 kDa and a pI of 11.0. The deduced PbL35 shows significant conservation in respect to other described ribosomal L35 proteins from eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Motifs of ribosomal proteins are present in PbL35, including a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) that could be related to the protein addressing to the nucleolus for the ribosomal assembly. The mRNA for PbL35, about 700 nucleotides in length, is expressed at a high level in P. brasiliensis. The PbL35 and the deduced amino acid sequence constitute the first description of a ribosomal protein in P. brasiliensis. The cDNA was deposited in GenBank under accession number AF416509.

  10. Error-prone and error-restrictive mutations affecting ribosomal protein S12.

    Agarwal, Deepali; Gregory, Steven T; O'Connor, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S12 plays a pivotal role in decoding functions on the ribosome. X-ray crystallographic analyses of ribosomal complexes have revealed that S12 is involved in the inspection of codon-anticodon pairings in the ribosomal A site, as well as in the succeeding domain rearrangements of the 30S subunit that are essential for accommodation of aminoacyl-tRNA. A role for S12 in tRNA selection is also well supported by classical genetic analyses; mutations affecting S12 are readily isolated in bacteria and organelles, since specific alterations in S12 confer resistance to the error-inducing antibiotic streptomycin, and the ribosomes from many such streptomycin-resistant S12 mutants display decreased levels of miscoding. However, substitutions that confer resistance to streptomycin likely represent a very distinct class of all possible S12 mutants. Until recently, the technical difficulties in generating random, unselectable mutations in essential genes in complex operons have generally precluded the analysis of other classes of S12 alterations. Using a recombineering approach, we have targeted the Escherichia coli rpsL gene, encoding S12, for random mutagenesis and screened the resulting mutants for effects on decoding fidelity. We have recovered over 40 different substitutions located throughout the S12 protein that alter the accuracy of translation without substantially affecting the sensitivity to streptomycin. Moreover, this collection includes mutants that promote miscoding, as well as those that restrict decoding errors. These results affirm the importance of S12 in decoding processes and indicate that alterations in this essential protein can have diverse effects on the accuracy of decoding.

  11. Is The Ribosome Targeted By Adaptive Mutations

    Jimenez Fernandez, Alicia; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    degree of evolutionary conservation of the cellular MMSM tend to support this view. However, under certain selective conditions the machinery itself may be targeted by adaptive mutations, which result in fitness-increasing phenotypic changes. Here we investigate and characterize the role of ribosomal...... mutations in adaptive evolution. Methods: Several mutations in ribosomal genes have been identified in the genome analysis of nearly 700 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from infected cystic fibrosis patients. Among these mutations we have repeatedly identified insertions, deletions and substitutions...... in specific ribosomal genes. The bacterial phenotypes of the mutated strains will be investigated. Results: Preliminary assays show that mutant strains have reduced growth rate and an altered antibiotic resistance pattern. The selection for mutations in ribosomal protein genes is partly explainable...

  12. The circadian clock coordinates ribosome biogenesis.

    Céline Jouffe

    Full Text Available Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis.

  13. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae

    Chenjing Shang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins.

  14. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-08-22

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins.

  15. Potential extra-ribosomal functions of ribosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Lu, Hui; Zhu, Yi-Fei; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Rong; Jia, Zhengping

    2015-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs), are essential components of the ribosomes, the molecular machines that turn mRNA blueprints into proteins, as they serve to stabilize the structure of the rRNA, thus improving protein biosynthesis. In addition, growing evidence suggests that RPs can function in other cellular roles. In the present review, we summarize several potential extra-ribosomal functions of RPs in ribosomal biogenesis, transcription activity, translation process, DNA repair, replicative life span, adhesive growth, and morphological transformation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the future in-depth studies are needed to identify these novel secondary functions of RPs in S. cerevisiae.

  16. Distribution of dwell times of a ribosome: effects of infidelity, kinetic proofreading and ribosome crowding.

    Sharma, Ajeet K; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-04-01

    Ribosome is a molecular machine that polymerizes a protein where the sequence of the amino acid residues, the monomers of the protein, is dictated by the sequence of codons (triplets of nucleotides) on a messenger RNA (mRNA) that serves as the template. The ribosome is a molecular motor that utilizes the template mRNA strand also as the track. Thus, in each step the ribosome moves forward by one codon and, simultaneously, elongates the protein by one amino acid. We present a theoretical model that captures most of the main steps in the mechanochemical cycle of a ribosome. The stochastic movement of the ribosome consists of an alternating sequence of pause and translocation; the sum of the durations of a pause and the following translocation is the time of dwell of the ribosome at the corresponding codon. We derive the analytical expression for the distribution of the dwell times of a ribosome in our model. Wherever experimental data are available, our theoretical predictions are consistent with those results. We suggest appropriate experiments to test the new predictions of our model, particularly the effects of the quality control mechanism of the ribosome and that of their crowding on the mRNA track.

  17. Structural diversity in bacterial ribosomes: mycobacterial 70S ribosome structure reveals novel features.

    Manidip Shasmal

    Full Text Available Here we present analysis of a 3D cryo-EM map of the 70S ribosome from Mycobacterium smegmatis, a saprophytic cousin of the etiological agent of tuberculosis in humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In comparison with the 3D structures of other prokaryotic ribosomes, the density map of the M. smegmatis 70S ribosome reveals unique structural features and their relative orientations in the ribosome. Dramatic changes in the periphery due to additional rRNA segments and extra domains of some of the peripheral ribosomal proteins like S3, S5, S16, L17, L25, are evident. One of the most notable features appears in the large subunit near L1 stalk as a long helical structure next to helix 54 of the 23S rRNA. The sharp upper end of this structure is located in the vicinity of the mRNA exit channel. Although the M. smegmatis 70S ribosome possesses conserved core structure of bacterial ribosome, the new structural features, unveiled in this study, demonstrates diversity in the 3D architecture of bacterial ribosomes. We postulate that the prominent helical structure related to the 23S rRNA actively participates in the mechanisms of translation in mycobacteria.

  18. Structural and Functional Studies of Ribosome-inactivating Proteins and Ribosomal RNA

    LIU Wangyi; ZHANG Jinsong; LIU Renshui; HE Wenjun; LING Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ A plant's ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a group of toxic proteins. Theoretically, they can be employed as a tool enzyme in the exploration of the structure and function of the ribosomal RNA; in practical application, they can be used as an insecticide in agriculture, for preparation of immuno-toxic protein to kill cancer cells or against viral infection in medicine.

  19. Single mutations introduced in the essential ribosomal proteins L3 and S10 cause a sporulation defect in Bacillus subtilis.

    Akanuma, Genki; Suzuki, Shota; Yano, Koichi; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Natori, Yousuke; Namba, Eri; Watanabe, Kazuya; Tagami, Kazumi; Takeda, Takuya; Iizuka, Yuka; Kobayashi, Ako; Ishizuka, Morio; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Fujio

    2013-01-01

    We introduced single mutations into the rplC and rpsJ genes, which encode the essential ribosomal proteins L3 (RplC) and S10 (RpsJ), respectively, and are located in the S10 gene cluster of the gram-positive, endospore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, and examined whether these mutations affected their growth rate, sporulation, competence development and 70S ribosome formation. Mutant cells harboring the G52D mutation in the L3 ribosomal protein, which is located at the peptidyl transferase center of 50S, accumulated 30S subunit at 45°C, probably due to a defect in 50S formation, and exhibited a reduction in the sporulation frequency at high temperature. On the other hand, mutant cells harboring the H56R mutation in the S10 protein, which is located near the aminoacyl-tRNA site of 30S, showed severe growth defect and deficiency in spore formation, and also exhibited significant delay in competence development.

  20. Influence of magnesium and polyamines on the reactivity of individual ribosomal subunit proteins to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination.

    Michalski, C J; Boyle, S M; Sells, B H

    1979-03-01

    30S and 50S subunits, in the presence of either 20 mM Mg2+ or 6 mM Mg2+ and 5mM spermidine plus 25 mM putrescine, were observed to completely associate to form 70S monosomes as monitored by sucrose gradient sedimentation. Subunits maintained under the above ionic conditions were compared with 30S and 50S particles at low (6 mM) magnesium concentration with respect to the reactivity of individual ribosomal proteins to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. Altered reactivity to enzymatic iodination of ribosomal proteins S4, S9, S10, S14, S17, S19, and S20 in the small subunit of ribosomal proteins, L2, L9, L11, L27, and L30 in the large subunit following incubation with high magnesium or magnesium and polyamines suggests that a conformation change in both subunits accompanies the formation of 70S monosomes. The results further demonstrate that the effect of Mg2+ on subunit conformation is mimicked when polyamines are substituted for magnesium necessary for subunit association.

  1. The ribosome can prevent aggregation of partially folded protein intermediates: studies using the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Bani Kumar Pathak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular chaperones that support de novo folding of proteins under non stress condition are classified as chaperone 'foldases' that are distinct from chaperone' holdases' that provide high affinity binding platform for unfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation specifically under stress conditions. Ribosome, the cellular protein synthesis machine can act as a foldase chaperone that can bind unfolded proteins and release them in folding competent state. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC located in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli ribosome (bDV RNA is the chaperoning center of the ribosome. It has been proposed that via specific interactions between the RNA and refolding proteins, the chaperone provides information for the correct folding of unfolded polypeptide chains. RESULTS: We demonstrate using Escherichia coli ribosome and variants of its domain V RNA that the ribosome can bind to partially folded intermediates of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCAII and lysozyme and suppress aggregation during their refolding. Using mutants of domain V RNA we demonstrate that the time for which the chaperone retains the bound protein is an important factor in determining its ability to suppress aggregation and/or support reactivation of protein. CONCLUSION: The ribosome can behave like a 'holdase' chaperone and has the ability to bind and hold back partially folded intermediate states of proteins from participating in the aggregation process. Since the ribosome is an essential organelle that is present in large numbers in all living cells, this ability of the ribosome provides an energetically inexpensive way to suppress cellular aggregation. Further, this ability of the ribosome might also be crucial in the context that the ribosome is one of the first chaperones to be encountered by a large nascent polypeptide chains that have a tendency to form partially folded intermediates immediately following their synthesis.

  2. Functional Importance of Mobile Ribosomal Proteins.

    Chang, Kai-Chun; Wen, Jin-Der; Yang, Lee-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although the dynamic motions and peptidyl transferase activity seem to be embedded in the rRNAs, the ribosome contains more than 50 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), whose functions remain largely elusive. Also, the precise forms of some of these r-proteins, as being part of the ribosome, are not structurally solved due to their high flexibility, which hinders the efforts in their functional elucidation. Owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule techniques, and theoretical modeling, much has been learned about the dynamics of these r-proteins. Surprisingly, allosteric regulations have been found in between spatially separated components as distant as those in the opposite sides of the ribosome. Here, we focus on the functional roles and intricate regulations of the mobile L1 and L12 stalks and L9 and S1 proteins. Conformational flexibility also enables versatile functions for r-proteins beyond translation. The arrangement of r-proteins may be under evolutionary pressure that fine-tunes mass distributions for optimal structural dynamics and catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  3. Induction of ribosomal subunits misassembly by antisense RNAs to control cell growth.

    Mangiarotti, G

    2000-08-25

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits starting from free ribosomal RNA and protein of Dictyostelium discoideum was induced in vitro in the presence of several oligoribonucleotides complementary to defined sequences of ribosomal RNA. The reconstituted particles had a full complement of ribosomal proteins, but did not function in an in vitro protein synthesis system and were disassembled following interaction with mRNA. The same result was obtained in vivo by fusing the oligodeossiribonucleotides coding for the selected oligoribonucleotides to the promoter of the gene coding for contact site A protein. This gene is expressed only in the first part of development. Transfected growing cells, transferred in developing buffer in the presence of pulses of cAMP, accumulated significant amounts of the oligoribonucleotides. When retransferred to the growth medium, they grew progressively more slowly, until their doubling time doubled, apparently due to the availability of a limiting amount of functional ribosomes. To avoid disassembly of misassembled subunits (G. Mangiarotti et al., 1997, J. Biol. Chem. 272, 27818-27822), two oligoribonucleotides complementary to sequences present at the 5' ends of pre-17S and pre-26S RNAs were also induced to accumulate during early development with the same technique. When transfected cells were retransferred to the growth medium, their rate of growth declined rapidly to zero and cells died, apparently because they were unable to disassemble misassembled ribosomal subunits and avoid their entry into polyribosomes. This technique to perturb protein synthesis, arrest cell growth, and cause cell suicide will be tested in abnormally growing animal cells.

  4. rRNA maturation in yeast cells depleted of large ribosomal subunit proteins.

    Gisela Pöll

    Full Text Available The structural constituents of the large eukaryotic ribosomal subunit are 3 ribosomal RNAs, namely the 25S, 5.8S and 5S rRNA and about 46 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins. They assemble and mature in a highly dynamic process that involves more than 150 proteins and 70 small RNAs. Ribosome biogenesis starts in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm and is completed after nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation of the subunits in the cytoplasm. In this work we created 26 yeast strains, each of which conditionally expresses one of the large ribosomal subunit (LSU proteins. In vivo depletion of the analysed LSU r-proteins was lethal and led to destabilisation and degradation of the LSU and/or its precursors. Detailed steady state and metabolic pulse labelling analyses of rRNA precursors in these mutant strains showed that LSU r-proteins can be grouped according to their requirement for efficient progression of different steps of large ribosomal subunit maturation. Comparative analyses of the observed phenotypes and the nature of r-protein-rRNA interactions as predicted by current atomic LSU structure models led us to discuss working hypotheses on i how individual r-proteins control the productive processing of the major 5' end of 5.8S rRNA precursors by exonucleases Rat1p and Xrn1p, and ii the nature of structural characteristics of nascent LSUs that are required for cytoplasmic accumulation of nascent subunits but are nonessential for most of the nuclear LSU pre-rRNA processing events.

  5. Global shape mimicry of tRNA within a viral internal ribosome entry site mediates translational reading frame selection.

    Au, Hilda H; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Ren, Qian; Burke, Jordan E; Lee, Seonghoon; Butcher, Samuel E; Jan, Eric

    2015-11-24

    The dicistrovirus intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IRES) adopts a triple-pseudoknotted RNA structure and occupies the core ribosomal E, P, and A sites to directly recruit the ribosome and initiate translation at a non-AUG codon. A subset of dicistrovirus IRESs directs translation in the 0 and +1 frames to produce the viral structural proteins and a +1 overlapping open reading frame called ORFx, respectively. Here we show that specific mutations of two unpaired adenosines located at the core of the three-helical junction of the honey bee dicistrovirus Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) IRES PKI domain can uncouple 0 and +1 frame translation, suggesting that the structure adopts distinct conformations that contribute to 0 or +1 frame translation. Using a reconstituted translation system, we show that ribosomes assembled on mutant IRESs that direct exclusive 0 or +1 frame translation lack reading frame fidelity. Finally, a nuclear magnetic resonance/small-angle X-ray scattering hybrid approach reveals that the PKI domain of the IAPV IRES adopts an RNA structure that resembles a complete tRNA. The tRNA shape-mimicry enables the viral IRES to gain access to the ribosome tRNA-binding sites and form intermolecular contacts with the ribosome that are necessary for initiating IRES translation in a specific reading frame.

  6. Zfrp8/PDCD2 Interacts with RpS2 Connecting Ribosome Maturation and Gene-Specific Translation.

    Svetlana Minakhina

    Full Text Available Zfrp8/PDCD2 is a highly conserved protein essential for stem cell maintenance in both flies and mammals. It is also required in fast proliferating cells such as cancer cells. Our previous studies suggested that Zfrp8 functions in the formation of mRNP (mRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes and also controls RNA of select Transposable Elements (TEs. Here we show that in Zfrp8/PDCD2 knock down (KD ovaries, specific mRNAs and TE transcripts show increased nuclear accumulation. We also show that Zfrp8/PDCD2 interacts with the (40S small ribosomal subunit through direct interaction with RpS2 (uS5. By studying the distribution of endogenous and transgenic fluorescently tagged ribosomal proteins we demonstrate that Zfrp8/PDCD2 regulates the cytoplasmic levels of components of the small (40S ribosomal subunit, but does not control nuclear/nucleolar localization of ribosomal proteins. Our results suggest that Zfrp8/PDCD2 functions at late stages of ribosome assembly and may regulate the binding of specific mRNA-RNPs to the small ribosomal subunit ultimately controlling their cytoplasmic localization and translation.

  7. Does power indicate capacity? 30-s Wingate anaerobic test vs. maximal accumulated O2 deficit.

    Minahan, C; Chia, M; Inbar, O

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between anaerobic power and capacity. Seven men and seven women performed a 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power, mean power, and the fatigue index. Subjects also cycled at a work rate predicted to elicit 120 % of peak oxygen uptake to exhaustion to determine the maximal accumulated O (2) deficit. Peak power and the maximal accumulated O (2) deficit were significantly correlated (r = 0.782, p = 0.001). However, when the absolute difference in exercise values between groups (men and women) was held constant using a partial correlation, the relationship diminished (r = 0.531, p = 0.062). In contrast, we observed a significant correlation between fatigue index and the maximal accumulated O (2) deficit when controlling for gender (r = - 0.597, p = 0.024) and the relationship remained significant when values were expressed relative to active muscle mass. A higher anaerobic power does not indicate a greater anaerobic capacity. Furthermore, we suggest that the ability to maintain power output during a 30-s cycle sprint is related to anaerobic capacity.

  8. Distribution of dwell times of a ribosome: effects of infidelity, kinetic proofreading and ribosome crowding

    Sharma, Ajeet K

    2010-01-01

    Ribosome is a molecular machine that polymerizes a protein where the sequence of the amino acid subunits of the protein is dictated by the sequence of codons (triplets of nucleotide subunits) on a messenger RNA (mRNA) that serves as the template. The ribosome is a molecular motor that utilizes the template mRNA strand also as the track. Thus, in each step the ribosome moves forward by one codon and, simultaneously, elongates the protein by one amino acid. We present a theoretical model that captures most of the main steps in the mechano-chemical cycle of a ribosome. The stochastic movement of the ribosome consists of an alternating sequence of pause and translocation; the sum of the durations of a pause and the following translocation is defined as the time of dwell of the ribosome at the corresponding codon. We present an analytical calculation of the distribution of the dwell times of a ribosome in our model. Our theoretical prediction is consistent with the experimental results reported in the literature.

  9. Ribosomal RNA pseudouridines and pseudouridine synthases.

    Ofengand, James

    2002-03-01

    Pseudouridines are found in virtually all ribosomal RNAs but their function is unknown. There are four to eight times more pseudouridines in eukaryotes than in eubacteria. Mapping 19 Haloarcula marismortui pseudouridines on the three-dimensional 50S subunit does not show clustering. In bacteria, specific enzymes choose the site of pseudouridine formation. In eukaryotes, and probably also in archaea, selection and modification is done by a guide RNA-protein complex. No unique specific role for ribosomal pseudouridines has been identified. We propose that pseudouridine's function is as a molecular glue to stabilize required RNA conformations that would otherwise be too flexible.

  10. The effect of aminoacyl- or peptidyl-tRNA at the A-site on the arrangement of deacylated tRNA at the ribosomal P-site.

    Babkina, G T; Bausk, E V; Graifer, D M; Karpova, G G; Matasova, N B

    1984-05-21

    Photoreactive derivatives of E. coli tRNAPhe bearing arylazido groups on guanine residues (azido-tRNA) were used for affinity labelling of E. coli ribosomes in the region of the P-site when the A-site was either free or occupied by aminoacyl- or peptidyl-tRNA. Corresponding complexes of azido-tRNA with ribosomes and poly(U) were obtained both nonenzymatically and with the use of elongation factors. UV-irradiation of the complexes resulted in labelling of ribosomal proteins (preferentially of 30 S subunit). Proteins S9 and S21 were labelled only when the A-site was free; S14 - only when it was occupied; S11, S13, S19 - in both cases; S5, S7, S12, S20 - in some states.

  11. Studies on structural stability of thermophilic Sulfolobus acidocaldarius ribosomes.

    Yangala, Kalavathi; Suryanarayana, Tangirala

    2007-02-01

    Structural stability of thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius ribosomes, with respect their susceptibility to pancreatic RNase A and stability to temperature (deltaTm), on treatment with various stabilizing (polyamines) and destabilizing (sulfhydryl and intercalating) agents were studied and compared with mesophilic E. coli ribosomes, to understand the structural differences between thermophilic and mesophilic ribosomes. Thermophilic archaeal ribosomes and their subunits were 10-times less susceptible to pancreatic RNase A, compared to mesophilic ribosomes, showing the presence of strong and compact structural organization in them. Thermophilic ribosomes treated with destabilizing agents, such as sulfhydryl reagents [5,5'-Dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid), N-ethylmaleimide and p-hydroxymercurybenzoate) and intercalating agents (ethidium bromide, EtBr) showed higher stability to RNase A, compared to similarly treated mesophilic ribosomes, indicating the unavailability of thiol-reactive groups and the presence of strong solvent inaccessible inner core. Higher stability of thermophilic ribosomes compared to mesophilic ribosomes to unfolding agents like urea further supported the presence of strong inner core particle. Thermophilic ribosomes treated with intercalating agents, such as EtBr were less susceptible to RNase A, though they bound to more reagent, showing the rigidity or resilience of their macromolecular structure to alterations caused by destabilizing agents. Overall, these results indicated that factors such as presence of strong solvent inaccessible inner core and rigidity of ribosome macromolecular structure contributed stability of thermophilic ribosomes to RNase A and other destabilizing agents, when compared to mesophilic ribosomes.

  12. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  13. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20420.001 PMID:28220755

  14. Two-neutron knockout from neutron-deficient $^{34}$Ar, $^{30}$S, and $^{26}$Si

    Yoneda, K; Brown, B A; Campbell, C M; Cook, J M; Cottle, P D; Davies, A D; Dinca, D C; Gade, A; Glasmacher, T; Hansen, P G; Hoagland, T; Kemper, K W; Lecouey, J L; Müller, W F; Obertelli, A; Reynolds, R R; Terry, J R; Tostevin, J A; Zwahlen, H

    2006-01-01

    Two-neutron knockout reactions from nuclei in the proximity of the proton dripline have been studied using intermediate-energy beams of neutron-deficient $^{34}$Ar, $^{30}$S, and $^{26}$Si. The inclusive cross sections, and also the partial cross sections for the population of individual bound final states of the $^{32}$Ar, $^{28}$S and $^{24}$Si knockout residues, have been determined using the combination of particle and $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. Similar to the two-proton knockout mechanism on the neutron-rich side of the nuclear chart, these two-neutron removal reactions from already neutron-deficient nuclei are also shown to be consistent with a direct reaction mechanism.

  15. Reverse Translocation of tRNA in the Ribosome

    2006-01-01

    A widely held view is that directional movement of tRNA in the ribosome is determined by an intrinsic mechanism and driven thermodynamically by transpeptidation. Here, we show that, in certain ribosomal complexes, the pretranslocation (PRE) state is thermodynamically favored over the posttranslocation (POST) state. Spontaneous and efficient conversion from the POST to PRE state is observed when EF-G is depleted from ribosomes in the POST state or when tRNA is added to the E site of ribosomes ...

  16. Ribosome evolution: Emergence of peptide synthesis machinery

    Koji Tamura

    2011-12-01

    Proteins, the main players in current biological systems, are produced on ribosomes by sequential amide bond (peptide bond) formations between amino-acid-bearing tRNAs. The ribosome is an exquisite super-complex of RNA-proteins, containing more than 50 proteins and at least 3 kinds of RNAs. The combination of a variety of side chains of amino acids (typically 20 kinds with some exceptions) confers proteins with extraordinary structure and functions. The origin of peptide bond formation and the ribosome is crucial to the understanding of life itself. In this article, a possible evolutionary pathway to peptide bond formation machinery (proto-ribosome) will be discussed, with a special focus on the RNA minihelix (primordial form of modern tRNA) as a starting molecule. Combining the present data with recent experimental data, we can infer that the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) evolved from a primitive system in the RNA world comprising tRNA-like molecules formed by duplication of minihelix-like small RNA.

  17. Control of Ribosome Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    Molin, Søren; Meyenburg, K. von; Måløe, O.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of ribosome synthesis and accumulation in Escherichia coli during the transition after an energy source shift-down was analyzed. The shift was imposed on cultures of stringent and relaxed strains growing in glucose minimal medium by the addition of the glucose analogue {alpha...

  18. Crystal structure of eukaryotic ribosome and its complexes with inhibitors.

    Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-03-19

    A high-resolution structure of the eukaryotic ribosome has been determined and has led to increased interest in studying protein biosynthesis and regulation of biosynthesis in cells. The functional complexes of the ribosome crystals obtained from bacteria and yeast have permitted researchers to identify the precise residue positions in different states of ribosome function. This knowledge, together with electron microscopy studies, enhances our understanding of how basic ribosome processes, including mRNA decoding, peptide bond formation, mRNA, and tRNA translocation and cotranslational transport of the nascent peptide, are regulated. In this review, we discuss the crystal structure of the entire 80S ribosome from yeast, which reveals its eukaryotic-specific features, and application of X-ray crystallography of the 80S ribosome for investigation of the binding mode for distinct compounds known to inhibit or modulate the protein-translation function of the ribosome. We also refer to a challenging aspect of the structural study of ribosomes, from higher eukaryotes, where the structures of major distinctive features of higher eukaryote ribosome-the high-eukaryote-specific long ribosomal RNA segments (about 1MDa)-remain unresolved. Presently, the structures of the major part of these high-eukaryotic expansion ribosomal RNA segments still remain unresolved.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  19. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Effect of mescaline on the stability of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Datta, R K; Ghosh, J J

    1970-05-01

    1. During the action of mescaline sulphate on goat brain-cortex slices the ribosomal particles become susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein, RNA, acidsoluble nucleotides and ninhydrin-positive materials, resulting in loss of ribosomal enzyme activities. 2. Ribosomes of the mescaline-treated cortex slices undergo rapid degradation in the presence of trypsin and ribonuclease. 3. Mescaline does not alter the chemical and nucleotide compositions or the u.v.-absorption characteristics of ribosomal particles, however.

  20. A new model for the three-dimensional folding of Escherichia coli 16 S ribosomal RNA. II. The RNA-protein interaction data.

    Mueller, F; Brimacombe, R

    1997-08-29

    The map of the mass centres of the 21 proteins from the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal subunit, as determined by neutron scattering, was fitted to a cryoelectron microscopic (cryo-EM) model at a resolution of 20 A of 70 S ribosomes in the pre-translocational state, carrying tRNA molecules at the A and P sites. The fit to the 30 S moiety of the 70 S particles was accomplished with the help of the well-known distribution of the ribosomal proteins in the head, body and side lobe regions of the 30 S subunit, as determined by immuno electron microscopy (IEM). Most of the protein mass centres were found to lie close to the surface (or even outside) of the cryo-EM contour of the 30 S subunit, supporting the idea that the ribosomal proteins are arranged peripherally around the rRNA. The ribosomal protein distribution was then compared with the corresponding model for the 16 S rRNA, fitted to the same EM contour (described in an accompanying paper), in order to analyse the mutual compatibility of the arrangement of proteins and rRNA in terms of the available RNA-protein interaction data. The information taken into account included the hydroxyl radical and base foot-printing data from Noller's laboratory, and our own in situ cross-linking results. Proteins S1 and S14 were not considered, due to the lack of RNA-protein data. Among the 19 proteins analysed, 12 (namely S2, S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S15, S17 and S21) showed a fit to the rRNA model that varied from being excellent to at least acceptable. Of the remaining 7, S3 and S13 showed a rather poor fit, as did S18 (which is considered in combination with S6 in the foot-printing experiments). S16 was difficult to evaluate, as the foot-print data for this protein cover a large area of the rRNA. S19 and S20 showed a bad fit in terms of the neutron map, but their foot-print and cross-link sites were clustered into compact groups in the rRNA model in those regions of the 30 S subunit where these proteins have

  1. The structure of SAV1646 from Staphylococcus aureus belonging to a new `ribosome-associated' subfamily of bacterial proteins.

    Chirgadze, Yuri N; Clarke, Teresa E; Romanov, Vladimir; Kisselman, Gera; Wu-Brown, Jean; Soloveychik, Maria; Chan, Tiffany S Y; Gordon, Roni D; Battaile, Kevin P; Pai, Emil F; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y

    2015-02-01

    The crystal structure of the SAV1646 protein from the pathogenic microorganism Staphylococcus aureus has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution. The 106-amino-acid protein forms a two-layer sandwich with α/β topology. The protein molecules associate as dimers in the crystal and in solution, with the monomers related by a pseudo-twofold rotation axis. A sequence-homology search identified the protein as a member of a new subfamily of yet uncharacterized bacterial `ribosome-associated' proteins with at least 13 members to date. A detailed analysis of the crystal protein structure along with the genomic structure of the operon containing the sav1646 gene allowed a tentative functional model of this protein to be proposed. The SAV1646 dimer is assumed to form a complex with ribosomal proteins L21 and L27 which could help to complete the assembly of the large subunit of the ribosome.

  2. Association of a multi-synthetase complex with translating ribosomes in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    Raina, Medha; Elgamal, Sara; Santangelo, Thomas J;

    2012-01-01

    that components of the archaeal protein synthesis machinery associate into macromolecular assemblies in vivo and provide the potential to increase translation efficiency by limiting substrate diffusion away from the ribosome, thus facilitating rapid recycling of tRNAs. STRUCTURED SUMMARY OF PROTEIN INTERACTIONS...... with several other factors involved in protein synthesis, suggesting that MSCs may interact directly with translating ribosomes. In support of this hypothesis, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) activities of the MSC were enriched in isolated T. kodakarensis polysome fractions. These data indicate......)-triphosphatase 205, thiamine monophosphate kinase 179, pyruvate formate lyase family activating protein 298, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (mevanolate), N(2), N(2)-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 145, N2, N2-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 170, putative 5-methylcytosine restriction...

  3. Translation regulation via nascent polypeptide-mediated ribosome stalling.

    Wilson, Daniel N; Arenz, Stefan; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-04-01

    As the nascent polypeptide chain is being synthesized, it passes through a tunnel within the large ribosomal subunit. Interaction between the nascent polypeptide chain and the ribosomal tunnel can modulate the translation rate and induce translational stalling to regulate gene expression. In this article, we highlight recent structural insights into how the nascent polypeptide chain, either alone or in cooperation with co-factors, can interact with components of the ribosomal tunnel to regulate translation via inactivating the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome and inducing ribosome stalling.

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other.

  5. GTPases and the origin of the ribosome

    Smith Temple F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to trace the evolution of the ribosome through the evolution of the universal P-loop GTPases that are involved with the ribosome in translation and with the attachment of the ribosome to the membrane. The GTPases involved in translation in Bacteria/Archaea are the elongation factors EFTu/EF1, the initiation factors IF2/aeIF5b + aeIF2, and the elongation factors EFG/EF2. All of these GTPases also contain the OB fold also found in the non GTPase IF1 involved in initiation. The GTPase involved in the signal recognition particle in most Bacteria and Archaea is SRP54. Results 1 The Elongation Factors of the Archaea based on structural considerations of the domains have the following evolutionary path: EF1→ aeIF2 → EF2. The evolution of the aeIF5b was a later event; 2 the Elongation Factors of the Bacteria based on the topological considerations of the GTPase domain have a similar evolutionary path: EFTu→ IF→2→EFG. These evolutionary sequences reflect the evolution of the LSU followed by the SSU to form the ribosome; 3 the OB-fold IF1 is a mimic of an ancient tRNA minihelix. Conclusion The evolution of translational GTPases of both the Archaea and Bacteria point to the evolution of the ribosome. The elongation factors, EFTu/EF1, began as a Ras-like GTPase bringing the activated minihelix tRNA to the Large Subunit Unit. The initiation factors and elongation factor would then have evolved from the EFTu/EF1 as the small subunit was added to the evolving ribosome. The SRP has an SRP54 GTPase and a specific RNA fold in its RNA component similar to the PTC. We consider the SRP to be a remnant of an ancient form of an LSU bound to a membrane. Reviewers This article was reviewed by George Fox, Leonid Mirny and Chris Sander.

  6. History of the ribosome and the origin of translation

    Petrov, Anton S.; Gulen, Burak; Norris, Ashlyn M.; Kovacs, Nicholas A.; Lanier, Kathryn A.; Fox, George E.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Wartell, Roger M.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2015-01-01

    We present a molecular-level model for the origin and evolution of the translation system, using a 3D comparative method. In this model, the ribosome evolved by accretion, recursively adding expansion segments, iteratively growing, subsuming, and freezing the rRNA. Functions of expansion segments in the ancestral ribosome are assigned by correspondence with their functions in the extant ribosome. The model explains the evolution of the large ribosomal subunit, the small ribosomal subunit, tRNA, and mRNA. Prokaryotic ribosomes evolved in six phases, sequentially acquiring capabilities for RNA folding, catalysis, subunit association, correlated evolution, decoding, energy-driven translocation, and surface proteinization. Two additional phases exclusive to eukaryotes led to tentacle-like rRNA expansions. In this model, ribosomal proteinization was a driving force for the broad adoption of proteins in other biological processes. The exit tunnel was clearly a central theme of all phases of ribosomal evolution and was continuously extended and rigidified. In the primitive noncoding ribosome, proto-mRNA and the small ribosomal subunit acted as cofactors, positioning the activated ends of tRNAs within the peptidyl transferase center. This association linked the evolution of the large and small ribosomal subunits, proto-mRNA, and tRNA. PMID:26621738

  7. [Mutual effect of human ribosomal proteins S5 and S16 on their binding with 18S rRNA fragment 1203-1236/1521-1698].

    Ian'shina, D D; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2009-01-01

    Human ribosomal proteins S5 and S16 are homologues of prokaryotic ribosomal proteins S7p and S9p, respectively, that according to X-ray crystallography data on the Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit contact the 3'-terminal 16S rRNA region formed by helices H28-H30 and H38-H43. In the present work we report studying mutual effect of human ribosomal proteins S5 and S16 on their binding with RNA transcript corresponding to the region 1203-1236/1521-1698 of the 18S rRNA (helices H28-30 and H41-43), which is homologous to thel6S rRNA region known to contain binding site of S7p and part of binding site of S9p. It was shown that simultaneous binding of ribosomal proteins S5 and S16 with this RNA transcript causes conformational changes in it stabilizing the complex by involvement of new parts of the RNA that interact with neither S5 nor S16 in the respective binary complexes.

  8. Knockdown of ribosomal protein S7 causes developmental abnormalities via p53 dependent and independent pathways in zebrafish.

    Duan, Juan; Ba, Qian; Wang, Ziliang; Hao, Miao; Li, Xiaoguang; Hu, Pingting; Zhang, Deyi; Zhang, Ruiwen; Wang, Hui

    2011-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs), structural components of the ribosome involved in protein synthesis, are of significant importance in all organisms. Previous studies have suggested that some RPs may have other functions in addition to assembly of the ribosome. The small ribosomal subunits RPS7, has been reported to modulate the mdm2-p53 interaction. To further investigate the biological functions of RPS7, we used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MO) to specifically knockdown RPS7 in zebrafish. In RPS7-deficient embryos, p53 was activated, and its downstream target genes and biological events were induced, including apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Hematopoiesis was also impaired seriously in RPS7-deficient embryos, which was confirmed by the hemoglobin O-dianisidine staining of blood cells, and the expression of scl, gata1 and α-E1 globin were abnormal. The matrix metalloproteinase (mmp) family genes were also activated in RPS7 morphants, indicating that improper cell migration might also cause development defects. Furthermore, simultaneously knockdown of the p53 protein by co-injecting a p53 MO could partially reverse the abnormal phenotype in the morphants. These results strengthen the hypothesis that specific ribosomal proteins regulate p53 and that their deficiency affects hematopoiesis. Moreover, our data implicate that RPS7 is a regulator of matrix metalloproteinase (mmp) family in zebrafish system. These specific functions of RPS7 may provide helpful clues to study the roles of RPs in human disease.

  9. Sequence assembly

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  10. Tertiary interactions within the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    Kosolapov, Andrey; Deutsch, Carol

    2009-04-01

    Although tertiary folding of whole protein domains is prohibited by the cramped dimensions of the ribosomal tunnel, dynamic tertiary interactions may permit folding of small elementary units within the tunnel. To probe this possibility, we used a beta-hairpin and an alpha-helical hairpin from the cytosolic N terminus of a voltage-gated potassium channel and determined a probability of folding for each at defined locations inside and outside the tunnel. Minimalist tertiary structures can form near the exit port of the tunnel, a region that provides an entropic window for initial exploration of local peptide conformations. Tertiary subdomains of the nascent peptide fold sequentially, but not independently, during translation. These studies offer an approach for diagnosing the molecular basis for folding defects that lead to protein malfunction and provide insight into the role of the ribosome during early potassium channel biogenesis.

  11. Multiple ribosomal proteins are expressed at high levels in developing zebrafish endoderm and are required for normal exocrine pancreas development.

    Provost, Elayne; Weier, Christopher A; Leach, Steven D

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal protein L (rpl) genes are essential for assembly of the 60S subunit of the eukaryotic ribosome and may also carry out additional extra-ribosomal functions. We have identified a common expression pattern for rpl genes in developing zebrafish larvae. After initially widespread expression in early embryos, the expression of multiple rpl genes becomes increasingly restricted to the endoderm. With respect to the pancreas, rpl genes are highly expressed in ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitors at 48 hpf, suggesting possible functional roles in pancreatic morphogenesis and/or differentiation. Utilizing two available mutant lines, rpl23a(hi2582) and rpl6(hi3655b), we found that ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitors fail to properly expand in embryos homozygous for either of these genes. In addition to these durable homozygous phenotypes, we also demonstrated recoverable delays in ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitor expansion in rpl23a(hi2582) and rpl6(hi3655b) heterozygotes. Disruptions in ribosome assembly are generally understood to initiate a p53-dependent cellular stress response. However, concomitant p53 knockdown was unable to rescue normal pancreatic progenitor expansion in either rpl23a(hi2582) or rpl6(hi3655b) mutant embryos, suggesting required and p53-independent roles for rpl23a and rpl6 in pancreas development.

  12. [Study of the photoaffinity modification of Escherichia coli ribosomes near the donor tRNA-binding center].

    Bausk, E V; Graĭfer, D M; Karpova, G G

    1985-01-01

    Affinity labelling of E. coli ribosomes near the donor tRNA-binding (P) site was studied with the use of photoreactive derivatives of tRNAPhe bearing arylazidogroups on N7 atoms of guanine residues (azido-tRNA). UV-irradiation of complexes 70S ribosome.poly(U).azido- tRNA(P-site) and 70S ribosome.poly(U).azido-tRNA(P-site).Phe- tRNAPhe(A-site) resulted in covalent attachment of azido-tRNA to ribosomes, both subunits being labelled. In both cases modification extent of 30S subunit was two-fold than that of the 50S one. It was shown that when the A-site was free the azido-tRNA located in P-site labelled proteins S9, S11, S12, S13, S21 and L14, L27, L31. Azido-tRNA located in P-site when the A-site was occupied with Phe-tRNAPhe labelled proteins S11, S12, S13, S14, S19, L32/L33 and possibly L23, L25. From the comparison of the sets of proteins labelled when A-site was free or occupied a conclusion was drawn that aminoacyl-tRNA located in ribosomal A-site affects the arrangement of deacylated tRNA in P-site. Data obtained allow to propose that proteins S5, S19, S20 and L24, L33 interact with guanine residues important for the tRNA tertiary structure formation.

  13. Streptomycin binds to the decoding center of 16 S ribosomal RNA.

    Spickler, C; Brunelle, M N; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1997-10-31

    Streptomycin, an error-inducing aminoglycoside antibiotic, binds to a single site on the small ribosomal subunit of bacteria, but this site has not yet been defined precisely. Here, we demonstrate that streptomycin binds to E. coli 16 S rRNA in the absence of ribosomal proteins, and protects a set of bases in the decoding region against dimethyl sulfate attack. The binding studies were performed in a high ionic strength buffer containing 20 mM Mg2+. The pattern of protection in the decoding region was similar to that observed when streptomycin binds to the 30 S subunit. However, streptomycin also protects the 915 region of 16 S rRNA within the 30 S subunit, whereas it did not protect the 915 region of the naked 16 S rRNA. The interaction of streptomycin with 16 S rRNA was further defined by using two fragments that correspond to the 3' minor domain of 16 S rRNA and to the decoding analog, a portion of this domain encompassing the decoding center. In the presence of streptomycin, the pattern of protection against dimethyl sulfate attack for the two fragments was similar to that seen with the full-length 16 S rRNA. This indicates that the 3' minor domain as well as the decoding analog contain the recognition signals for the binding of streptomycin. However, streptomycin could not bind to the decoding analog in the absence of Mg2+. This contrasts with neomycin, another error-inducing aminoglycoside antibiotic, that binds to the decoding analog in the absence of Mg2+, but not at 20 mM Mg2+. Our results suggest that both neomycin and streptomycin interact with the decoding center, but recognize alternative conformations of this region.

  14. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Plants Inhibiting Viruses

    Inderdeep Kaur; R C Gupta; Munish Puri

    2011-01-01

    Many plants contain ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with N-glycosidase activity,which depurinate large ribosomal RNA and arrest protein synthesis.RIPs so far tested inhibit replication of mRNA as well as DNA viruses and these proteins,isolated from plants,are found to be effective against a broad range of viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),hepatitis B virus (HBV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV).Most of the research work related to RIPs has been focused on antiviral activity against HIV; however,the exact mechanism of antiviral activity is still not clear.The mechanism of antiviral activity was thought to follow inactivation of the host cell ribosome,leading to inhibition of viral protein translation and host cell death.Enzymatic activity of RIPs is not hmited to depurination of the large rRNA,in addition they can depurinate viral DNA as well as RNA.Recently,Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ clinical trials have demonstrated the potential use of RIPs for treating patients with HIV disease.The aim of this review is to focus on various RIPs from plants associated with anti-HIV activity.

  15. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    Nichols, C. E. [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lockyer, M. [Arrow Therapeutics Ltd, Britannia House, Trinity Street, Borough, London SE1 1DA (United Kingdom); Charles, I. G. [The Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, The Cruciform Building, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hawkins, A. R. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Stammers, D. K., E-mail: daves@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs.

  16. PPARA intron polymorphism associated with power performance in 30-s anaerobic Wingate Test.

    Miroslav Petr

    Full Text Available To date, polymorphisms in several genes have been associated with a strength/power performance including alpha 3 actinin, ciliary neurotrophic factor, vitamin D receptor, or angiotensin I converting enzyme, underlining the importance of genetic component of the multifactorial strength/power-related phenotypes. The single nucleotide variation in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha gene (PPARA intron 7 G/C (rs4253778; g.46630634G>C has been repeatedly found to play a significant role in response to different types of physical activity. We investigated the effect of PPARA intron 7 G/C polymorphism specifically on anaerobic power output in a group of 77 elite male Czech ice hockey players (18-36 y. We determined the relative peak power per body weight (Pmax.kg(-1 and relative peak power per fat free mass (W.kg(-1FFM during the 30-second Wingate Test (WT30 on bicycle ergometer (Monark 894E Peak bike, MONARK, Sweden. All WT30s were performed during the hockey season. Overall genotype frequencies were 50.6% GG homozygotes, 40.3% CG heterozygotes, and 9.1% CC homozygotes. We found statistically significant differences in Pmax.kg(-1 and marginally significant differences in Pmax.kg(-1FFM values in WT30 between carriers and non-carriers for C allele (14.6 ± 0.2 vs. 13.9 ± 0.3 W.kg(-1 and 15.8 ± 0.2 vs. 15.2 ± 0.3 W.kg(-1FFM, P = 0.036 and 0.12, respectively. Furthermore, Pmax.kg(-1FFM strongly positively correlated with the body weight only in individuals with GG genotypes (R = 0.55; p<0.001. Our results indicate that PPARA 7C carriers exhibited higher speed strength measures in WT30. We hypothesize that C allele carriers within the cohort of trained individuals may possess a metabolic advantage towards anaerobic metabolism.

  17. Phosphorylation of acidic ribosomal proteins from rabbit reticulocytes by a ribosome-associated casein kinase

    Issinger, O G

    1977-01-01

    Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacryl......Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  18. The ribosomal protein Rpl22 controls ribosome composition by directly repressing expression of its own paralog, Rpl22l1.

    Monique N O'Leary

    Full Text Available Most yeast ribosomal protein genes are duplicated and their characterization has led to hypotheses regarding the existence of specialized ribosomes with different subunit composition or specifically-tailored functions. In yeast, ribosomal protein genes are generally duplicated and evidence has emerged that paralogs might have specific roles. Unlike yeast, most mammalian ribosomal proteins are thought to be encoded by a single gene copy, raising the possibility that heterogenous populations of ribosomes are unique to yeast. Here, we examine the roles of the mammalian Rpl22, finding that Rpl22(-/- mice have only subtle phenotypes with no significant translation defects. We find that in the Rpl22(-/- mouse there is a compensatory increase in Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1 expression and incorporation into ribosomes. Consistent with the hypothesis that either ribosomal protein can support translation, knockdown of Rpl22l1 impairs growth of cells lacking Rpl22. Mechanistically, Rpl22 regulates Rpl22l1 directly by binding to an internal hairpin structure and repressing its expression. We propose that ribosome specificity may exist in mammals, providing evidence that one ribosomal protein can influence composition of the ribosome by regulating its own paralog.

  19. The structure and function of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    Wilson, Daniel N; Doudna Cate, Jamie H

    2012-05-01

    Structures of the bacterial ribosome have provided a framework for understanding universal mechanisms of protein synthesis. However, the eukaryotic ribosome is much larger than it is in bacteria, and its activity is fundamentally different in many key ways. Recent cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions and X-ray crystal structures of eukaryotic ribosomes and ribosomal subunits now provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore mechanisms of eukaryotic translation and its regulation in atomic detail. This review describes the X-ray crystal structures of the Tetrahymena thermophila 40S and 60S subunits and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 80S ribosome, as well as cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of translating yeast and plant 80S ribosomes. Mechanistic questions about translation in eukaryotes that will require additional structural insights to be resolved are also presented.

  20. Deletion of the RluD pseudouridine synthase promotes SsrA peptide tagging of ribosomal protein S7.

    Schaub, Ryan E; Hayes, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    RluD catalyses formation of three pseudouridine residues within helix 69 of the 50S ribosome subunit. Helix 69 makes important contacts with the decoding centre on the 30S subunit and deletion of rluD was recently shown to interfere with translation termination in Escherichia coli. Here, we show that deletion of rluD increases tmRNA activity on ribosomes undergoing release factor 2 (RF2)-mediated termination at UGA stop codons. Strikingly, tmRNA-mediated SsrA peptide tagging of two proteins, ribosomal protein S7 and LacI, was dramatically increased in ΔrluD cells. S7 tagging was due to a unique C-terminal peptide extension found in E. coli K-12 strains. Introduction of the rpsG gene (encoding S7) from an E. coli B strain abrogated S7 tagging in the ΔrluD background, and partially complemented the mutant's slow-growth phenotype. Additionally, exchange of the K-12 prfB gene (encoding RF2) with the B strain allele greatly reduced tagging in ΔrluD cells. In contrast to E. coli K-12 cells, deletion of rluD in an E. coli B strain resulted in no growth phenotype. These findings indicate that the originally observed rluD phenotypes result from synthetic interactions with rpsG and prfB alleles found within E. coli K-12 strains.

  1. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  2. Architecture of the Rix1-Rea1 checkpoint machinery during pre-60S-ribosome remodeling.

    Barrio-Garcia, Clara; Thoms, Matthias; Flemming, Dirk; Kater, Lukas; Berninghausen, Otto; Baßler, Jochen; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis is catalyzed by ∼200 assembly factors, which facilitate efficient production of mature ribosomes. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleoplasmic pre-60S particle containing the dynein-related 550-kDa Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase and the Rix1 subcomplex. This particle differs from its preceding state, the early Arx1 particle, by two massive structural rearrangements: an ∼180° rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein complex and the central protuberance (CP) rRNA helices, and the removal of the 'foot' structure from the 3' end of the 5.8S rRNA. Progression from the Arx1 to the Rix1 particle was blocked by mutational perturbation of the Rix1-Rea1 interaction but not by a dominant-lethal Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase-ring mutant. After remodeling, the Rix1 subcomplex and Rea1 become suitably positioned to sense correct structural maturation of the CP, which allows unidirectional progression toward mature ribosomes.

  3. Chaos and Hyperchaos in a Model of Ribosome Autocatalytic Synthesis

    Likhoshvai, Vitaly A.; Vladislav V. Kogai; Fadeev, Stanislav I.; Khlebodarova, Tamara M.

    2016-01-01

    Any vital activities of the cell are based on the ribosomes, which not only provide the basic machinery for the synthesis of all proteins necessary for cell functioning during growth and division, but for biogenesis itself. From this point of view, ribosomes are self-replicating and autocatalytic structures. In current work we present an elementary model in which the autocatalytic synthesis of ribosomal RNA and proteins, as well as enzymes ensuring their degradation are described with two mon...

  4. The architecture of mammalian ribosomal protein promoters

    Perry Robert P

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian ribosomes contain 79 different proteins encoded by widely scattered single copy genes. Coordinate expression of these genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels is required to ensure a roughly equimolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins. To date, detailed studies of only a very few ribosomal protein (rp promoters have been made. To elucidate the general features of rp promoter architecture, I made a detailed sequence comparison of the promoter regions of the entire set of orthologous human and mouse rp genes. Results A striking evolutionarily conserved feature of most rp genes is the separation by an intron of the sequences involved in transcriptional and translational regulation from the sequences with protein encoding function. Another conserved feature is the polypyrimidine initiator, which conforms to the consensus (Y2C+1TY(T2(Y3. At least 60 % of the rp promoters contain a largely conserved TATA box or A/T-rich motif, which should theoretically have TBP-binding capability. A remarkably high proportion of the promoters contain conserved binding sites for transcription factors that were previously implicated in rp gene expression, namely upstream GABP and Sp1 sites and downstream YY1 sites. Over 80 % of human and mouse rp genes contain a transposable element residue within 900 bp of 5' flanking sequence; very little sequence identity between human and mouse orthologues was evident more than 200 bp upstream of the transcriptional start point. Conclusions This analysis has provided some valuable insights into the general architecture of mammalian rp promoters and has identified parameters that might coordinately regulate the transcriptional activity of certain subsets of rp genes.

  5. Developmental Trajectories of Marijuana Use among Men: Examining Linkages with Criminal Behavior and Psychopathic Features into the Mid-30s

    Pardini, Dustin; Bechtold, Jordan; Loeber, Rolf; White, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Examine whether young men who chronically use marijuana are at risk for engaging in drug-related and non-drug-related criminal offending and exhibiting psychopathic personality features in their mid-30s. Methods Patterns of marijuana use were delineated in a sample of predominately Black and White young men from adolescence to the mid-20s using latent class growth curve analysis. Self-report and official records of criminal offending and psychopathic personality features were assessed in the mid-30s. Analyses controlled for multiple factors indicative of a preexisting antisocial lifestyle and co-occurring use of other substances and tested for moderation by race. Results Four latent marijuana trajectory groups were identified: chronic high, adolescence-limited, late increasing, and low/nonusers. Relative to low/nonusers, chronic high and late increasing marijuana users exhibited more adult psychopathic features and were more likely to engage in drug-related offending during their mid-30s. Adolescence-limited users were similar to low/nonusers in terms of psychopathic features but were more likely to be arrested for drug-related crimes. No trajectory group differences were found for violence or theft, and the group differences were not moderated by race. Conclusions Young men who engage in chronic marijuana use from adolescence into their 20s are at increased risk for exhibiting psychopathic features, dealing drugs, and enduring drug-related legal problems in their mid-30s relative to men who remain abstinent or use infrequently. PMID:26568641

  6. Alterations in the ribosomal machinery in cancer and hematologic disorders

    Shenoy Niraj

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ribosomes are essential components of the protein translation machinery and are composed of more than 80 unique large and small ribosomal proteins. Recent studies show that in addition to their roles in protein translation, ribosomal proteins are also involved in extra-ribosomal functions of DNA repair, apoptosis and cellular homeostasis. Consequently, alterations in the synthesis or functioning of ribosomal proteins can lead to various hematologic disorders. These include congenital anemias such as Diamond Blackfan anemia and Shwachman Diamond syndrome; both of which are associated with mutations in various ribosomal genes. Acquired uniallelic deletion of RPS14 gene has also been shown to lead to the 5q syndrome, a distinct subset of MDS associated with macrocytic anemia. Recent evidence shows that specific ribosomal proteins are overexpressed in liver, colon, prostate and other tumors. Ribosomal protein overexpression can promote tumorigenesis by interactions with the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and also by direct effects on various oncogenes. These data point to a broad role of ribosome protein alterations in hematologic and oncologic diseases.

  7. Structural and functional topography of the human ribosome

    Dmitri Graifer; Galina Karpova

    2012-01-01

    This review covers data on the structural organization of functional sites in the human ribosome,namely,the messenger RNA binding center,the binding site of the hepatitis C virus RNA internal ribosome entry site,and the peptidyl transferase center.The data summarized here have been obtained primarily by means of a site-directed crosslinking approach with application of the analogs of the respective ribosomal ligands bearing cross-linkers at the designed positions.These data are discussed taking into consideration available structural data on ribosomes from various kingdoms obtained with the use of cryo-electron microscopy,X-ray crystallography,and other approaches.

  8. Ribosome recycling: An essential process of protein synthesis.

    Kiel, Michael C; Kaji, Hideko; Kaji, Akira

    2007-01-01

    A preponderance of textbooks outlines cellular protein synthesis (translation) in three basic steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. However, researchers in the field of translation accept that a vital fourth step exists; this fourth step is called ribosome recycling. Ribosome recycling occurs after the nascent polypeptide has been released during the termination step. Despite the release of the polypeptide, ribosomes remain bound to the mRNA and tRNA. It is only during the fourth step of translation that ribosomes are ultimately released from the mRNA, split into subunits, and are free to bind new mRNA, thus the term "ribosome recycling." This step is essential to the viability of cells. In bacteria, it is catalyzed by two proteins, elongation factor G and ribosome recycling factor, a near perfect structural mimic of tRNA. Eukaryotic organelles such as mitochondria and chloroplasts possess ribosome recycling factor and elongation factor G homologues, but the nature of ribosome recycling in eukaryotic cytoplasm is still under investigation. In this review, the discovery of ribosome recycling and the basic mechanisms involved are discussed so that textbook writers and teachers can include this vital step, which is just as important as the three conventional steps, in sections dealing with protein synthesis.

  9. Complete kinetic mechanism for recycling of the bacterial ribosome.

    Borg, Anneli; Pavlov, Michael; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2016-01-01

    How EF-G and RRF act together to split a post-termination ribosomal complex into its subunits has remained obscure. Here, using stopped-flow experiments with Rayleigh light scattering detection and quench-flow experiments with radio-detection of GTP hydrolysis, we have clarified the kinetic mechanism of ribosome recycling and obtained precise estimates of its kinetic parameters. Ribosome splitting requires that EF-G binds to an already RRF-containing ribosome. EF-G binding to RRF-free ribosomes induces futile rounds of GTP hydrolysis and inhibits ribosome splitting, implying that while RRF is purely an activator of recycling, EF-G acts as both activator and competitive inhibitor of RRF in recycling of the post-termination ribosome. The ribosome splitting rate and the number of GTPs consumed per splitting event depend strongly on the free concentrations of EF-G and RRF. The maximal recycling rate, here estimated as 25 sec(-1), is approached at very high concentrations of EF-G and RRF with RRF in high excess over EF-G. The present in vitro results, suggesting an in vivo ribosome recycling rate of ∼5 sec(-1), are discussed in the perspective of rapidly growing bacterial cells.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ribosomal RNA: a key to phylogeny

    Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    As molecular phylogeny increasingly shapes our understanding of organismal relationships, no molecule has been applied to more questions than have ribosomal RNAs. We review this role of the rRNAs and some of the insights that have been gained from them. We also offer some of the practical considerations in extracting the phylogenetic information from the sequences. Finally, we stress the importance of comparing results from multiple molecules, both as a method for testing the overall reliability of the organismal phylogeny and as a method for more broadly exploring the history of the genome.

  12. Epistasis analysis of 16S rRNA ram mutations helps define the conformational dynamics of the ribosome that influence decoding.

    Ying, Lanqing; Fredrick, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    The ribosome actively participates in decoding, with a tRNA-dependent rearrangement of the 30S A site playing a key role. Ribosomal ambiguity (ram) mutations have mapped not only to the A site but also to the h12/S4/S5 region and intersubunit bridge B8, implicating other conformational changes such as 30S shoulder rotation and B8 disruption in the mechanism of decoding. Recent crystallographic data have revealed that mutation G299A in helix h12 allosterically promotes B8 disruption, raising the question of whether G299A and/or other ram mutations act mainly via B8. Here, we compared the effects of each of several ram mutations in the absence and presence of mutation h8Δ2, which effectively takes out bridge B8. The data obtained suggest that a subset of mutations including G299A act in part via B8 but predominantly through another mechanism. We also found that G299A in h12 and G347U in h14 each stabilize tRNA in the A site. Collectively, these data support a model in which rearrangement of the 30S A site, inward shoulder rotation, and bridge B8 disruption are loosely coupled events, all of which promote progression along the productive pathway toward peptide bond formation.

  13. Proton scattering from unstable nuclei {sup 20}O, {sup 30}S, {sup 34}Ar: experimental study and models; Diffusion de protons sur les noyaux instables {sup 20}O, {sup 30}S, {sup 34}Ar: etude experimentale et developpement de modeles

    Khan, Elias [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS - IN2P3, Universite Paris - Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2000-01-28

    Elastic and inelastic proton scattering from the unstable nuclei {sup 20}O, {sup 30}S and {sup 34}Ar were measured in inverse kinematics at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds. Secondary beams of {sup 20}O at 43 MeV/A, {sup 30}S at 53 MeV/A and {sup 34}Ar at 47 MeV/A impinged on a (CH{sub 2}){sub n} target. Recoiling protons were detected in the silicon strip array MUST. Energies and angular distributions of the first 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} states were measured. A phenomenological analysis yields values of the deformation parameters {beta}{sub 2} and {beta}{sub 3} of 0.55 (6) and 0.35 (5) for {sup 20}O, 0.32 (3) and 0.22 (4) for {sup 30}S, 0.27 (2) and 0.39 (3) for {sup 34}Ar, respectively, and allows the extraction of the ratio of neutron to proton transition matrix elements (M{sub n}/M{sub p})/(N/Z) for 2{sup +} states: 2.35 (37) for {sup 20}O, 0.93 (20) for {sup 30}S and 1.35 (28) for {sup 34}Ar. Therefore the proton rich nuclei {sup 30}S and {sup 34}Ar show a 2{sup +} excitation of isoscalar character whereas the excitation of {sup 20}O is of isovector character. In order to perform a microscopic analysis of the data, we have developed a QRPA model, using three Skyrme interaction: SIII, SG2, SLy4. This model reproduces measured B(EL) values for the oxygen, sulfur and argon isotopic chains, whereas RPA calculations, which do not take pairing into account, underestimate these values. In the case of the QRPA model the energies of the first 2{sup +} state are overestimated by about 1 MeV, but the evolution along the isotopic chains is well reproduced. (M{sub n}/M{sub p})/(N/Z) ratios for the first 2{sup +} state deduced from the microscopic analysis using QRPA are 1.98 for {sup 20}O, 1.05 for {sup 30}S and 1.00 for {sup 34}Ar, in agreement with the conclusions of the phenomenological analysis. However important discrepancies are observed between the two types of analysis for other isotopes, in particular neutron rich argon and sulfur nuclei. (author)

  14. An investigation of ribosomal protein L10 gene in autism spectrum disorders

    Rastam Maria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are severe neurodevelopmental disorders with the male:female ratio of 4:1, implying the contribution of X chromosome genetic factors to the susceptibility of ASD. The ribosomal protein L10 (RPL10 gene, located on chromosome Xq28, codes for a key protein in assembling large ribosomal subunit and protein synthesis. Two non-synonymous mutations of RPL10, L206M and H213Q, were identified in four boys with ASD. Moreover, functional studies of mutant RPL10 in yeast exhibited aberrant ribosomal profiles. These results provided a novel aspect of disease mechanisms for autism – aberrant processes of ribosome biosynthesis and translation. To confirm these initial findings, we re-sequenced RPL10 exons and quantified mRNA transcript level of RPL10 in our samples. Methods 141 individuals with ASD were recruited in this study. All RPL10 exons and flanking junctions were sequenced. Furthermore, mRNA transcript level of RPL10 was quantified in B lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCL of 48 patients and 27 controls using the method of SYBR Green quantitative PCR. Two sets of primer pairs were used to quantify the mRNA expression level of RPL10: RPL10-A and RPL10-B. Results No non-synonymous mutations were detected in our cohort. Male controls showed similar transcript level of RPL10 compared with female controls (RPL10-A, U = 81, P = 0.7; RPL10-B, U = 61.5, P = 0.2. We did not observe any significant difference in RPL10 transcript levels between cases and controls (RPL10-A, U = 531, P = 0.2; RPL10-B, U = 607.5, P = 0.7. Conclusion Our results suggest that RPL10 has no major effect on the susceptibility to ASD.

  15. BASIC: A Simple and Accurate Modular DNA Assembly Method.

    Storch, Marko; Casini, Arturo; Mackrow, Ben; Ellis, Tom; Baldwin, Geoff S

    2017-01-01

    Biopart Assembly Standard for Idempotent Cloning (BASIC) is a simple, accurate, and robust DNA assembly method. The method is based on linker-mediated DNA assembly and provides highly accurate DNA assembly with 99 % correct assemblies for four parts and 90 % correct assemblies for seven parts [1]. The BASIC standard defines a single entry vector for all parts flanked by the same prefix and suffix sequences and its idempotent nature means that the assembled construct is returned in the same format. Once a part has been adapted into the BASIC format it can be placed at any position within a BASIC assembly without the need for reformatting. This allows laboratories to grow comprehensive and universal part libraries and to share them efficiently. The modularity within the BASIC framework is further extended by the possibility of encoding ribosomal binding sites (RBS) and peptide linker sequences directly on the linkers used for assembly. This makes BASIC a highly versatile library construction method for combinatorial part assembly including the construction of promoter, RBS, gene variant, and protein-tag libraries. In comparison with other DNA assembly standards and methods, BASIC offers a simple robust protocol; it relies on a single entry vector, provides for easy hierarchical assembly, and is highly accurate for up to seven parts per assembly round [2].

  16. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of ribosomal proteins coded in S10 and spc operons rapidly classified the Sphingomonadaceae as alkylphenol polyethoxylate-degrading bacteria from the environment.

    Hotta, Yudai; Sato, Hiroaki; Hosoda, Akifumi; Tamura, Hiroto

    2012-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) using ribosomal subunit proteins coded in the S10-spc-alpha operon as biomarkers was applied for the classification of the Sphingomonadaceae from the environment. To construct a ribosomal protein database, S10-spc-alpha operon of type strains of the Sphingomonadaceae and their related alkylphenol polyethoxylate (APEO(n) )-degrading bacteria were sequenced using specific primers designed based on nucleotide sequences of genome-sequenced strains. The observed MALDI mass spectra of intact cells were compared with the theoretical mass of the constructed ribosomal protein database. The nine selected biomarkers coded in the S10-spc-alpha operon, L18, L22, L24, L29, L30, S08, S14, S17, and S19, could successfully distinguish the Sphingopyxis terrae NBRC 15098(T) and APEO(n) -degrading bacteria strain BSN20, despite only one base difference in the 16S rRNA gene sequence. This method, named the S10-GERMS (S10-spc-alpha operon gene-encoded ribosomal protein mass spectrum) method, is a significantly useful tool for bacterial discrimination of the Sphingomonadaceae at the strain level and can detect and monitor the main APEO(n) -degrading bacteria in the environment.

  17. Interaction of pleuromutilin derivatives with the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center

    Long, K. S.; Hansen, L. K.; Jakobsen, L.;

    2006-01-01

    Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that is used in veterinary medicine. The recently published crystal structure of a tiamulin-50S ribosomal subunit complex provides detailed information about how this drug targets the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. To promote rational design...

  18. An intron in a ribosomal protein gene from Tetrahymena

    Nielsen, Henrik; Andreasen, Per Hove; Dreisig, Hanne

    1986-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a single copy gene encoding a ribosomal protein from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The gene product was identified as ribosomal protein S25 by comparison of the migration in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels of the protein synthesized by translation in vitro...

  19. Ribosome-stalk biogenesis is coupled with recruitment of nuclear-export factor to the nascent 60S subunit.

    Sarkar, Anshuk; Pech, Markus; Thoms, Matthias; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear export of preribosomal subunits is a key step during eukaryotic ribosome formation. To efficiently pass through the FG-repeat meshwork of the nuclear pore complex, the large pre-60S subunit requires several export factors. Here we describe the mechanism of recruitment of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA-export receptor Mex67-Mtr2 to the pre-60S subunit at the proper time. Mex67-Mtr2 binds at the premature ribosomal-stalk region, which later during translation serves as a binding platform for translational GTPases on the mature ribosome. The assembly factor Mrt4, a structural homolog of cytoplasmic-stalk protein P0, masks this site, thus preventing untimely recruitment of Mex67-Mtr2 to nuclear pre-60S particles. Subsequently, Yvh1 triggers Mrt4 release in the nucleus, thereby creating a narrow time window for Mex67-Mtr2 association at this site and facilitating nuclear export of the large subunit. Thus, a spatiotemporal mark on the ribosomal stalk controls the recruitment of an RNA-export receptor to the nascent 60S subunit.

  20. Selection of scFvs specific for the HepG2 cell line using ribosome display

    Lei Zhou; Wei-Ping Mao; Juan Fen; Hong-Yun Liu; Chuan-Jing Wei; Wen-Xiu Li; Feng-Yun Zhou

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a ribosome display library of single chain variable fragments (scFvs) associated with hepatocarcinoma and screen such a library for hepatocarcinoma-binding scFvs. mRNA was isolated from the spleens of mice immunized with hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. Heavy and k chain genes (VH and k) were amplified separately by RT-PCR, and an anti-HepG2 VH/k chain ribosome display library was constructed by assembling VH and k into the VH/k chain with a specially constructed linker by SOE-PCR. The VH/k chain library was transcribed and translated in vitro using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. In order to isolate specific scFvs, recognizing HepG2 negative selection on a normal hepatocyte line WRL-68 was carried out before three rounds of positive selection on HepG2. After three rounds of panning, cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that one of the scFvs had high affinity for the HepG2 cell and lower affinity for the WRL-68 cell. In this study, we successfully constructed a native ribosome display library. Such a library would prove useful for direct intact cell panning using ribosome display technology. The selected scFv had a potential value for hepatocarcinoma treatment.

  1. Characterization of the optical constants and dispersion parameters of chalcogenide Te40Se30S30 thin film: thickness effect

    Abd-Elrahman, M. I.; Hafiz, M. M.; Qasem, Ammar; Abdel-Rahim, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Chalcogenide Te40Se30S30 thin films of different thickness (100-450 nm) are prepared by thermal evaporation of the Te40Se30S30 bulk. X-ray examination of the film shows some prominent peaks relate to crystalline phases indicating the crystallization process. The calculated particles of crystals from the X-ray diffraction peaks are found to be from 11 to 26 nm. As the thickness increases, the transmittance decreases and the reflectance increases. This could be attributed to the increment of the absorption of photons as more states will be available for absorbance in the case of thicker films. The decrease in the direct band gap with thickness is accompanied with an increase in energy of localized states. The obtained data for the refractive index could be fit to the dispersion model based on the single oscillator equation. The single-oscillator energy decreases, while the dispersion energy increases as the thickness increases.

  2. Translation with frameshifting of ribosome along mRNA transcript

    Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Translation is an important process for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to produce necessary proteins for cell growth. Numerious experiments have been performed to explore the translational properties. Diverse models have also been developed to determine the biochemical mechanism of translation. However, to simplify the majority of the existing models, the frameshifting of ribosome along the mRNA transcript is neglected, which actually occurs in real cells and has been extensively experimentally studied. The frameshifting of ribosome evidently influences the efficiency and speed of translation, considering that the peptide chains synthesized by shifted ribosomes will not fold into functional proteins and will degrade rapidly. In this study, a theoretical model is presented to describe the translational process based on the model for totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. In this model, the frameshifting of the ribosome along the mRNA transcript and the attachment/detachment of the ribosome to/from the ...

  3. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway.

    Jack, Carmen V; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions.

  4. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency.

    Mailliot, Justine; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-05-22

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a "WT-like" configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome.

  5. Traffic of interacting ribosomes on mRNA during protein synthesis: effects of chemo-mechanics of individual ribosomes

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2006-01-01

    Many {\\it ribosomes} simultaneously move on the same messenger RNA (mRNA), each synthesizing a protein. In contrast to the earlier models, here {\\it we develope a ``unified'' theoretical model} that not only incorporates the {\\it mutual exclusions} of the interacting ribosomes, but also describes explicitly the mechano-chemistry of each of these individual cyclic machines during protein synthesis. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, we analyze the rates of protein synthesis and the spatio-temporal oraganization of the ribosomes in this model. We also predict how these properties would change with the changes in the rates of the various chemo-mechanical processes in each ribosome. Finally, we illustrate the power of this model by making experimentally testable predictions on the rates of protein synthesis and the density profiles of the ribosomes on some mRNAs in {\\it E-coli}.

  6. An extra-ribosomal function of ribosomal protein L13a in macrophage resolves inflammation

    Poddar, Darshana; Basu, Abhijit; Baldwin, William; Kondratov, Roman V; Barik, Sailen; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is an obligatory attempt of the immune system to protect the host from infections. However, unregulated synthesis of pro-inflammatory products can have detrimental effects. Although mechanisms that lead to inflammation are well appreciated, those that restrain it are not adequately understood. Creating macrophage-specific L13a-knockout (KO) mice here we report that depletion of ribosomal protein L13a abrogates the endogenous translation control of several chemokines in macrophages. Upon LPS-induced endotoxemia these animals displayed symptoms of severe inflammation caused by widespread infiltration of macrophages in major organs causing tissue injury and reduced survival rates. Macrophages from these KO animals show unregulated expression of several chemokines e.g. CXCL13, CCL22, CCL8 and CCR3. These macrophages failed to show L13a-dependent RNA binding complex formation on target mRNAs. In addition, increased polyribosomal abundance of these mRNAs shows a defect in translation control in the macrophages. Thus, our studies provide the first evidence of an essential extra-ribosomal function of ribosomal protein L13a in resolving physiological inflammation in a mammalian host. PMID:23460747

  7. Horizontal gene transfer of zinc and non-zinc forms of bacterial ribosomal protein S4

    Luthey-Schulten Zaida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The universal ribosomal protein S4 is essential for the initiation of small subunit ribosomal assembly and translational accuracy. Being part of the information processing machinery of the cell, the gene for S4 is generally thought of as being inherited vertically and has been used in concatenated gene phylogenies. Here we report the evolution of ribosomal protein S4 in relation to a broad sharing of zinc/non-zinc forms of the gene and study the scope of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of S4 during bacterial evolution. Results In this study we present the complex evolutionary history of ribosomal protein S4 using 660 bacterial genomes from 16 major bacterial phyla. According to conserved characteristics in the sequences, S4 can be classified into C+ (zinc-binding and C- (zinc-free variants, with 26 genomes (mainly from the class Clostridia containing genes for both. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of the S4 sequences was incongruent with the standard bacterial phylogeny, indicating a departure from strict vertical inheritance. Further analysis using the genome content near the S4 genes, which are usually located in a conserved gene cluster, showed not only that HGT of the C- gene had occurred at various stages of bacterial evolution, but also that both the C- and C+ genes were present before the individual phyla diverged. To explain the latter, we theorize that a gene pool existed early in bacterial evolution from which bacteria could sample S4 gene variants, according to environmental conditions. The distribution of the C+/- variants for seven other zinc-binding ribosomal proteins in these 660 bacterial genomes is consistent with that seen for S4 and may shed light on the evolutionary pressures involved. Conclusion The complex history presented for "core" protein S4 suggests the existence of a gene pool before the emergence of bacterial lineages and reflects the pervasive nature of HGT in subsequent bacterial evolution

  8. Crystal structure of the 80S yeast ribosome.

    Jenner, Lasse; Melnikov, Sergey; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Ben-Shem, Adam; Iskakova, Madina; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2012-12-01

    The first X-ray structure of the eukaryotic ribosome at 3.0Å resolution was determined using ribosomes isolated and crystallized from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Ben-Shem A, Garreau de Loubresse N, Melnikov S, Jenner L, Yusupova G, Yusupov M: The structure of the eukaryotic ribosome at 3.0 A resolution. Science 2011, 334:1524-1529). This accomplishment was possible due to progress in yeast ribosome biochemistry as well as recent advances in crystallographic methods developed for structure determination of prokaryotic ribosomes isolated from Thermus thermophilus and Escherichia coli. In this review we will focus on the development of isolation procedures that allowed structure determination (both cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography) to be successful for the yeast S. cerevisiae. Additionally we will introduce a new nomenclature that facilitates comparison of ribosomes from different species and kingdoms of life. Finally we will discuss the impact of the yeast 80S ribosome crystal structure on perspectives for future investigations.

  9. Conservation of ribosomal protein gene ordering in 16 complete genomes

    王宁; 陈润生; 王永雄

    2000-01-01

    The organization of ribosomal proteins in 16 prokaryotic genomes was studied as an example of comparative genome analyses of gene systems. Hypothetical ribosomal protein-containing operons were constructed. These operons also contained putative genes and other non-ribosomal genes. The correspondences among these genes across different organisms were clarified by sequence homology computations. In this way a cross tabulation of 70 ribosomal proteins genes was constructed. On average, these were organized into 9-14 operons in each genome. There were also 25 non-ribosomal or putative genes in these mainly ribosomal protein operons. Hence the table contains 95 genes in total. It was found that: (i) the conservation of the block of about 20 r-proteins in the L3 and L4 operons across almost the entire eubacteria and ar-chaebacteria is remarkable; (ii) some operons only belong to eubacteria or archaebacte-ria; (iii) although the ribosomal protein operons are highly conserved within domain, there are fine variat

  10. Conservation of ribosomal protein gene ordering in 16 complete genomes

    2000-01-01

    The organization of ribosomal proteins in 16 prokaryotic genomes was studied as an example of comparative genome analyses of gene systems. Hypothetical ribosomal protein-containing operons were constructed. These operons also contained putative genes and other non-ribosomal genes. The correspondences among these genes across different organisms were clarified by sequence homology computations. In this way a cross tabulation of 70 ribosomal proteins genes was constructed. On average, these were organized into 9-14 operons in each genome. There were also 25 non-ribosomal or putative genes in these mainly ribosomal protein operons. Hence the table contains 95 genes in total. It was found that: (i) the conservation of the block of about 20 r-proteins in the L3 and L4 operons across almost the entire eubacteria and archaebacteria is remarkable; (ii) some operons only belong to eubacteria or archaebacteria; (iii) although the ribosomal protein operons are highly conserved within domain, there are fine variations in some operons across different organisms within each domain, and these variations are informative on the evolutionary relations among the organisms. This method provides a new potential for studying the origin and evolution of old species.

  11. Structural Studies of RNA Helicases Involved in Eukaryotic Pre-mRNA Splicing, Ribosome Biogenesis, and Translation Initiation

    He, Yangzi

    -rRNA. It is nucleolytically cleaved and chemically modified to generate mature rRNAs, which assemble with ribosomal proteins to form the ribosome. Prp43 is required for the processing of the 18S rRNA. Using X-ray crystallography, I determined a high resolution structure of Prp43 bound to ADP, the first structure of a DEAH...... initiation factor (eIF)4A, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, as well as ancillary factors eIF4B and eIF4G. In higher eukaryotes, scanning of mRNAs containing stable secondary structures in the 5’ UTR furthermore requires DHX29, another DEAH/RHA helicase. I participated in characterizing the synergistic activation...

  12. Sabot assembly

    Bzorgi, Fariborz

    2016-11-08

    A sabot assembly includes a projectile and a housing dimensioned and configured for receiving the projectile. An air pressure cavity having a cavity diameter is disposed between a front end and a rear end of the housing. Air intake nozzles are in fluid communication with the air pressure cavity and each has a nozzle diameter less than the cavity diameter. In operation, air flows through the plurality of air intake nozzles and into the air pressure cavity upon firing of the projectile from a gun barrel to pressurize the air pressure cavity for assisting in separation of the housing from the projectile upon the sabot assembly exiting the gun barrel.

  13. Ribosome-targeting antibiotics and mechanisms of bacterial resistance.

    Wilson, Daniel N

    2014-01-01

    The ribosome is one of the main antibiotic targets in the bacterial cell. Crystal structures of naturally produced antibiotics and their semi-synthetic derivatives bound to ribosomal particles have provided unparalleled insight into their mechanisms of action, and they are also facilitating the design of more effective antibiotics for targeting multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this Review, I discuss the recent structural insights into the mechanism of action of ribosome-targeting antibiotics and the molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance, in addition to the approaches that are being pursued for the production of improved drugs that inhibit bacterial protein synthesis.

  14. The sequential addition of ribosomal proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    Todorov, I T; Noll, F; Hadjiolov, A A

    1983-03-15

    Nucleolar '80-S' and '40-S' preribosomes (containing 45-S and 21-S pre-rRNA, respectively), as well as cytoplasmic ribosomes, were isolated from Friend erythroleukemia cells. The presence of structural ribosomal proteins in the isolated particles was studied by using antisera against individual rat liver small ribosomal subunit proteins. The analysis is based on the established crossreactivity between rat and mouse ribosomes [F. Noll and H. Bielka (1970) Mol. Gen. Genet. 106, 106-113]. The identification of the proteins was achieved by two independent immunological techniques: the passive haemagglutination test and the enzyme immunoassay of electrophoretically fractionated proteins, blotted on nitrocellulose. All 17 proteins tested are present in cytoplasmic ribosomes. A large number of proteins (S3a, S6, S7, S8, S11, S14, S18, S20, S23/24 and S25) are present in the '80-S' preribosome. Only two proteins (S3 and S21) are added during the formation of the '40-S' preribosome in the nucleolus. Four proteins (S2, S19, S26 and S29) are added at later, possibly extranucleolar, stages of ribosome formation. The results obtained provide evidence for the sequential addition of proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

  15. Note on the shelf break upwelling off the southeast coast of Brazil (lat. 26º30'S

    Afrânio Rubens de Mesquita

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available A western margin frontal zone is described, from measurements of temperature, salinity and currents, in a section taken with R/V "Prof. W. Besnard" in December 1980, crossing the shelf break border at latitude 26º30'S. The analyses of the sections showed consistently the occurrence of an ascension of the T and S isolines over the shelf break. Simultaneous current measurements showed a surface eddy structure with clockwise circulation and anti-clockwise circulation having a common stem over the break characterizing a shelf break upwelling.

  16. Expression of a small (p)ppGpp synthetase, YwaC, in the (p)ppGpp(0) mutant of Bacillus subtilis triggers YvyD-dependent dimerization of ribosome.

    Tagami, Kazumi; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Kazo, Yuka; Maehashi, Marie; Suzuki, Shota; Namba, Eri; Hoshiya, Masahiro; Hanai, Ryo; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Morimoto, Takuya; Ogasawara, Naotake; Kageyama, Yasushi; Ara, Katsutoshi; Ozaki, Katsuya; Yoshida, Masaki; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Kawamura, Fujio

    2012-06-01

    To elucidate the biological functions of small (p)ppGpp synthetases YjbM and YwaC of Bacillus subtilis, we constructed RIK1059 and RIK1066 strains carrying isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) inducible yjbM and ywaC genes, respectively, in the ΔrelA ΔyjbM ΔywaC triple mutant background. While the uninduced and IPTG-induced RIK1059 cells grew similarly in LB medium, the growth of RIK1066 cells was arrested following the addition of IPTG during the early exponential growth phase. Induction of YwaC expression by IPTG also severely decreased the intracellular GTP level and drastically altered the transcriptional profile in RIK1066 cells. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation analysis of the ribosomal fractions prepared from the IPTG-induced RIK1066 cells revealed three peaks corresponding to 30S, 50S, and 70S ribosome particles, and also an extra peak. Electron microscope studies revealed that the extra peak fraction contained dimers of 70S ribosomes, which were similar to the Escherichia coli 100S ribosomes. Proteomic analysis revealed that the 70S dimer contained an extra protein, YvyD, in addition to those found in the 70S ribosome. Accordingly, strain resulting from the disruption of the yvyD gene in the RIK1066 cells was unable to form 70S dimers following IPTG induction, indicating that YvyD is required for the formation of these dimers in B. subtilis.

  17. Structural features of the tmRNA-ribosome interaction.

    Bugaeva, Elizaveta Y; Surkov, Serhiy; Golovin, Andrey V; Ofverstedt, Lars-Göran; Skoglund, Ulf; Isaksson, Leif A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Shpanchenko, Olga V; Dontsova, Olga A

    2009-12-01

    Trans-translation is a process which switches the synthesis of a polypeptide chain encoded by a nonstop messenger RNA to the mRNA-like domain of a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). It is used in bacterial cells for rescuing the ribosomes arrested during translation of damaged mRNA and directing this mRNA and the product polypeptide for degradation. The molecular basis of this process is not well understood. Earlier, we developed an approach that allowed isolation of tmRNA-ribosomal complexes arrested at a desired step of tmRNA passage through the ribosome. We have here exploited it to examine the tmRNA structure using chemical probing and cryo-electron microscopy tomography. Computer modeling has been used to develop a model for spatial organization of the tmRNA inside the ribosome at different stages of trans-translation.

  18. Structural features of the tmRNA–ribosome interaction

    Bugaeva, Elizaveta Y.; Surkov, Serhiy; Golovin, Andrey V.; Öfverstedt, Lars-Göran; Skoglund, Ulf; Isaksson, Leif A.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Shpanchenko, Olga V.; Dontsova, Olga A.

    2009-01-01

    Trans-translation is a process which switches the synthesis of a polypeptide chain encoded by a nonstop messenger RNA to the mRNA-like domain of a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). It is used in bacterial cells for rescuing the ribosomes arrested during translation of damaged mRNA and directing this mRNA and the product polypeptide for degradation. The molecular basis of this process is not well understood. Earlier, we developed an approach that allowed isolation of tmRNA–ribosomal complexes arrested at a desired step of tmRNA passage through the ribosome. We have here exploited it to examine the tmRNA structure using chemical probing and cryo-electron microscopy tomography. Computer modeling has been used to develop a model for spatial organization of the tmRNA inside the ribosome at different stages of trans-translation. PMID:19861420

  19. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  20. Heterogeneity in men's marijuana use in the 20s: adolescent antecedents and consequences in the 30s.

    Washburn, Isaac J; Capaldi, Deborah M

    2015-02-01

    Adolescent psychopathology is commonly connected to marijuana use. How changes in these adolescent antecedents and in adolescent marijuana use are connected to patterns of marijuana use in the 20s is little understood. Another issue not clearly understood is psychopathology in the 30s as predicted by marijuana use in the 20s. This study sought to examine these two issues and the associations with marijuana disorder diagnoses using a longitudinal data set of 205 men with essentially annual reports. Individual psychopathology and family characteristics from the men's adolescence were used to predict their patterns of marijuana use across their 20s, and aspects of the men's psychopathology in their mid-30s were predicted from these patterns. Three patterns of marijuana use in the 20s were identified using growth mixture modeling and were associated with diagnoses of marijuana disorders at age 26 years. Parental marijuana use predicted chronic use for the men in adulthood. Patterns of marijuana use in the 20s predicted antisocial behavior and deviant peer association at age 36 years (controlling for adolescent levels of the outcomes by residualization). These findings indicate that differential patterns of marijuana use in early adulthood are associated with psychopathology toward midlife.

  1. Improvement and efficient display of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins on M13 phages and ribosomes.

    Pacheco, Sabino; Cantón, Emiliano; Zuñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Pecorari, Frédéric; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces insecticidal proteins that have been used worldwide in the control of insect-pests in crops and vectors of human diseases. However, different insect species are poorly controlled by the available Bt toxins or have evolved resistance to these toxins. Evolution of Bt toxicity could provide novel toxins to control insect pests. To this aim, efficient display systems to select toxins with increased binding to insect membranes or midgut proteins involved in toxicity are likely to be helpful. Here we describe two display systems, phage display and ribosome display, that allow the efficient display of two non-structurally related Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa. Improved display of Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa on M13 phages was achieved by changing the commonly used peptide leader sequence of the coat pIII-fusion protein, that relies on the Sec translocation pathway, for a peptide leader sequence that relies on the signal recognition particle pathway (SRP) and by using a modified M13 helper phage (Phaberge) that has an amber mutation in its pIII genomic sequence and preferentially assembles using the pIII-fusion protein. Also, both Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa were efficiently displayed on ribosomes, which could allow the construction of large libraries of variants. Furthermore, Cry1Ac or Cyt1Aa displayed on M13 phages or ribosomes were specifically selected from a mixture of both toxins depending on which antigen was immobilized for binding selection. These improved systems may allow the selection of Cry toxin variants with improved insecticidal activities that could counter insect resistances.

  2. Fluorescently labeled ribosomes as a tool for analyzing antibiotic binding.

    Llano-Sotelo, Beatriz; Hickerson, Robyn P; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F; Mankin, Alexander S

    2009-08-01

    Measuring the binding of antibiotics and other small-molecular-weight ligands to the 2.5 MDa ribosome often presents formidable challenges. Here, we describe a general method for studying binding of ligands to ribosomes that carry a site-specific fluorescent label covalently attached to one of the ribosomal proteins. As a proof of principle, an environment-sensitive fluorescent group was placed at several specific sites within the ribosomal protein S12. Small ribosomal subunits were reconstituted from native 16S rRNA, individually purified small subunit proteins, and fluorescently labeled S12. The fluorescence characteristics of the reconstituted subunits were affected by several antibiotics, including streptomycin and neomycin, which bind in the vicinity of protein S12. The equilibrium dissociation constants of the drugs obtained using a conventional fluorometer were in good agreement with those observed using previously published methods and with measurements based on the use of radiolabeled streptomycin. The newly developed method is rapid and sensitive, and can be used for determining thermodynamic and kinetic binding characteristics of antibiotics and other small ribosomal ligands. The method can readily be adapted for use in high-throughput screening assays.

  3. Dump assembly

    Goldmann, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough.

  4. General Assembly

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  5. Affinity labelling of Escherichia coli ribosomes with a benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 within initiation and pretranslocational complexes.

    Babkina, G T; Veniaminova, A G; Vladimirov, S N; Karpova, G G; Yamkovoy, V I; Berzin, V A; Gren, E J; Cielens, I E

    1986-07-01

    Affinity labelling of E. coli ribosomes with the 2',3'-O-[4-(N-2-chloroethyl)-N-methylamino]benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 was studied within the initiation complex (complex I) obtained by using fMet-tRNAMetf and initiation factors and within the pretranslocational complex (complex II) obtained by treatment of complex I with the ternary complex Phe-tRNAPhe.GTP.EF-Tu. Both proteins and rRNA of 30 S as well as 50 S subunits were found to be labelled. Sets of proteins labelled within complexes I and II differ considerably. Within complex II, proteins S13 and L10 were labelled preferentially. On the other hand, within complex I, multiple modification is observed (proteins S4, S12, S13, S14, S15, S18, S19, S20/L26 were found to be alkylated) despite the single fixation of a template in the ribosome by interaction of the AUG codon with fMet-tRNAMetf.

  6. A mutation in the 530 loop of Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA causes resistance to streptomycin.

    Melançon, P; Lemieux, C; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1988-10-25

    Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce an A to C transversion at position 523 in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Escherichia coli rrnB operon cloned in plasmid pKK3535. E. coli cells transformed with the mutated plasmid were resistant to streptomycin. The mutated ribosomes isolated from these cells were not stimulated by streptomycin to misread the message in a poly(U)-directed assay. They were also restrictive to the stimulation of misreading by other error-promoting related aminoglycoside antibiotics such as neomycin, kanamycin or gentamicin, which do not compete for the streptomycin binding site. The 530 loop where the mutation in the 16S rRNA is located has been mapped at the external surface of the 30S subunit, and is therefore distal from the streptomycin binding site at the subunit interface. Our results support the conclusion that the mutation at position 523 in the 16S rRNA does not interfere with the binding of streptomycin, but prevents the drug from inducing conformational changes in the 530 loop which account for its miscoding effect. Since this effect primarily results from a perturbation of the translational proofreading control, our results also provide evidence that the 530 loop of the 16S rRNA is involved in this accuracy control.

  7. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene clusters and decoding the natural product

    MANGAL SINGH; SANDEEP CHAUDHARY; DIPTI SAREEN

    2017-03-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are themajor multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically importantantibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an NRPS activates a different amino or aryl acid,followed by their condensation to synthesize a linear or cyclic natural product. The studies on NRPS domains, theknowledge of their gene cluster architecture and tailoring enzymes have helped in the in silico genetic screening of theever-expanding sequenced microbial genomic data for the identification of novel NRPS/PKS clusters and thusdeciphering novel non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs). Adenylation domain is an integral part of the NRPSs and is thesubstrate selecting unit for the final assembled NRP. In some cases, it also requires a small protein, the MbtHhomolog, for its optimum activity. The presence of putative adenylation domain and MbtH homologs in a sequencedgenome can help identify the novel secondary metabolite producers. The role of the adenylation domain in the NRPSgene clusters and its characterization as a tool for the discovery of novel cryptic NRPS gene clusters are discussed.

  8. The Proximity of Ribosomal Protein Genes to oriC Enhances Vibrio cholerae Fitness in the Absence of Multifork Replication

    Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Timmermans, Michaël

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent works suggest that bacterial gene order links chromosome structure to cell homeostasis. Comparative genomics showed that, in fast-growing bacteria, ribosomal protein genes (RP) locate near the replication origin (oriC). We recently showed that Vibrio cholerae employs this positional bias as a growth optimization strategy: under fast-growth conditions, multifork replication increases RP dosage and expression. However, RP location may provide advantages in a dosage-independent manner: for example, the physical proximity of the many ribosomal components, in the context of a crowded cytoplasm, may favor ribosome biogenesis. To uncover putative dosage-independent effects, we studied isogenic V. cholerae derivatives in which the major RP locus, S10-spc-α (S10), was relocated to alternative genomic positions. When bacteria grew fast, bacterial fitness was reduced according to the S10 relative distance to oriC. The growth of wild-type V. cholerae could not be improved by additional copies of the locus, suggesting a physiologically optimized genomic location. Slow growth is expected to uncouple RP position from dosage, since multifork replication does not occur. Under these conditions, we detected a fitness impairment when S10 was far from oriC. Deep sequencing followed by marker frequency analysis in the absence of multifork replication revealed an up to 30% S10 dosage reduction associated with its relocation that closely correlated with fitness alterations. Hence, the impact of S10 location goes beyond a growth optimization strategy during feast periods. RP location may be important during the whole life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:28246358

  9. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of macromolecular assemblies

    Cheng, Kimberley

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to study the structure of three macromolecular assemblies: the two hemocyanin isoforms from Rapana thomasiana, the Pyrococcus furiosus chaperonin, and the ribosome from Escherichia coli. Hemocyanins are large respiratory proteins in arthropods and molluscs. Most molluscan hemocyanins exist as two distinct isoforms composed of related polypeptides. In most species the two isoforms differ in terms of their oligomeric st...

  10. Cyclisation mechanisms in the biosynthesis of ribosomally synthesised and post-translationally modified peptides

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ribosomally synthesised and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a large class of natural products that are remarkably chemically diverse given an intrinsic requirement to be assembled from proteinogenic amino acids. The vast chemical space occupied by RiPPs means that they possess a wide variety of biological activities, and the class includes antibiotics, co-factors, signalling molecules, anticancer and anti-HIV compounds, and toxins. A considerable amount of RiPP chemical diversity is generated from cyclisation reactions, and the current mechanistic understanding of these reactions will be discussed here. These cyclisations involve a diverse array of chemical reactions, including 1,4-nucleophilic additions, [4 + 2] cycloadditions, ATP-dependent heterocyclisation to form thiazolines or oxazolines, and radical-mediated reactions between unactivated carbons. Future prospects for RiPP pathway discovery and characterisation will also be highlighted. PMID:27559376

  11. Role of the ribosome-associated protein PY in the cold-shock response of Escherichia coli

    Di Pietro, Fabio; Brandi, Anna; Dzeladini, Nadire; Fabbretti, Attilio; Carzaniga, Thomas; Piersimoni, Lolita; Pon, Cynthia L; Giuliodori, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Protein Y (PY) is an Escherichia coli cold-shock protein which has been proposed to be responsible for the repression of bulk protein synthesis during cold adaptation. Here, we present in vivo and in vitro data which clarify the role of PY and its mechanism of action. Deletion of yfiA, the gene encoding protein PY, demonstrates that this protein is dispensable for cold adaptation and is not responsible for the shutdown of bulk protein synthesis at the onset of the stress, although it is able to partially inhibit translation. In vitro assays reveal that the extent of PY inhibition changes with different mRNAs and that this inhibition is related to the capacity of PY of binding 30S subunits with a fairly strong association constant, thus stimulating the formation of 70S monomers. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that PY competes with the other ribosomal ligands for the binding to the 30S subunits. Overall these results suggest an alternative model to explain PY function during cold shock and to reconcile the inhibition caused by PY with the active translation observed for some mRNAs during cold shock. PMID:23420694

  12. Automatic evaluation of the 30-s chair stand test using inertial/magnetic-based technology in an older prefrail population.

    Millor, Nora; Lecumberri, Pablo; Gomez, Marisol; Martinez-Ramirez, Alicia; Rodriguez-Manas, Leocadio; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco José; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inertial measures of the 30-s chair stand test using modern body-fixed motion sensors. Polynomial data fitting was used to correct the drift effect in the position estimation. Thereafter, the three most important test cycles phases ("impulse," "stand up," and "sit down") were characterized and automatically analyzed. Automated test control is provided, making it possible for researchers without engineering knowledge to run the test. A collection of meaningful data based on kinematic variables is selected for further research. The proposed methodology for data analysis is a feasible tool for use in clinical settings. This method may not only improve rehabilitation therapies but also identify people at risk for falls more accurately than simply evaluating the number of cycles.

  13. KONDISI SOSIAL EKONOMI BURUH PABRIK GULA SRAGI KABUPATEN PEKALONGAN PASCA G 30 S TAHUN 1965-1998

    Ilin Suryantono

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence of labor in the sugar industry was once used as a political tool during the conflict in 1965 and became the party that is often neglected in the subsequent period between the years 1965-1998. On the one hand, sugar factory was one of plantation sectors having crucial position as one of development achievement of the new order government, because it increased income. It is an irony to see that workers having a vital role for the development of the country's economy but rather their fate are often not addressed by the state. Fundamental problems that later emerged in the life of labor is poverty, but the truth of this argument needs to be proved through research in order to obtain accurate answers. Keywords: Labor, sugar factory, event G 30 S     Keberadaan buruh di pabrik gula menjadi salah satu alat politik pada tahun 1965 dan menjadi tersisih pada masa berikutnya pada tahun 1965-1998. Di satu sisi, pabrik gula menjadi salah satu sektor perkebunan yang memiliki posisi penting sebagai salah satu capaian pembangunan pada masa pemerintahan Orde Baru, karena posisinya penting dalam meningkatkan pemasukan dalam negeri. Hal ini sangat ironi ketika melihat peran pekerja yang memiliki posisi penting dalam pembangunan ekonomi, tetapi sering kali tidak diperhatikan oleh pemerintah. Permasalahan utama yang muncul dalam kehidupan buruh adalah kemiskinan, tetapi permasalahan ini membutuhkan pembuktian melalui penelitian untuk menemukan jawaban yang tepat.   Kata kunci: buruh, pabrik gula, peristiwa G 30 S  

  14. Single-step rapid assembly of DNA origami nanostructures for addressable nanoscale bioreactors

    Fu, Yanming; Zeng, Dongdong; Chao, Jie;

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembled DNA origami nanostructures have shown great promise for bottom-up construction of complex objects with nanoscale addressability. Here we show that DNA origami-based 1D nanoribbons and nanotubes are one-pot assembled with controllable sizes and nanoscale addressability with high speed...... (within only 10-20 min), exhibiting extraordinarily high cooperativity that is often observed in assembly of natural molecular machines in cells (e.g. ribosome). By exploiting the high specificity of DNA-based self-assembly, we can precisely anchor proteins on these DNA origami nanostructures with sub-10...

  15. Assembling consumption

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  16. An indigenous posttranscriptional modification in the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center confers resistance to an array of protein synthesis inhibitors

    Toh, Seok-Ming; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    A number of nucleotide residues in ribosomal RNA undergo specific posttranscriptional modification. The roles of most modifications are unclear, but their clustering in the functionally-important regions of rRNA suggest that they might either directly affect the activity or assembly of the ribosome or modulate its interactions with ligands. Of the 25 modified nucleotides in E. coli 23S rRNA, 14 are located in the peptidyl transferase center, the main antibiotic target in the large ribosomal subunit. Since nucleotide modifications have been closely associated with both antibiotic sensitivity and antibiotic resistance, the loss of some of these posttranscriptional modifications may affect the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics. We investigated the antibiotic sensitivity of E. coli cells in which the genes of eight rRNA modifying enzymes targeting the PTC were individually inactivated. The lack of pseudouridine at position 2504 of 23S rRNA was found to significantly increase the susceptibility of bacteria to peptidyl transferase inhibitors. Therefore, this indigenous posttranscriptional modification may have evolved as an intrinsic resistance mechanism protecting bacteria against natural antibiotics. PMID:18554609

  17. General Assembly

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  18. General Assembly

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  19. General assembly

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  20. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins influences subunit association and translation of poly (U) in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Mikulík, Karel; Bobek, Jan; Ziková, Alice; Smětáková, Magdalena; Bezoušková, Silvie

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of phosphorylated proteins in ribosomes of Streptomyces coelicolor was investigated. Little is known about which biological functions these posttranslational modifications might fulfil. A protein kinase associated with ribosomes phosphorylated six ribosomal proteins of the small subunit (S3, S4, S12, S13, S14 and S18) and seven ribosomal proteins of the large subunit (L2, L3, L7/L12, L16, L17, L23 and L27). The ribosomal proteins were phosphorylated mainly on the Ser/Thr residues. Phosphorylation of the ribosomal proteins influences ribosomal subunits association. Ribosomes with phosphorylated proteins were used to examine poly (U) translation activity. Phosphorylation induced about 50% decrease in polyphenylalanine synthesis. After preincubation of ribosomes with alkaline phosphatase the activity of ribosomes was greatly restored. Small differences were observed between phosphorylated and unphosphorylated ribosomes in the kinetic parameters of the binding of Phe-tRNA to the A-site of poly (U) programmed ribosomes, suggesting that the initial binding of Phe-tRNA is not significantly affected by phosphorylation. On contrary, the rate of peptidyl transferase was about two-fold lower than that in unphosphorylated ribosomes. The data presented demonstrate that phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins affects critical steps of protein synthesis.

  1. Chemotherapeutic drugs inhibit ribosome biogenesis at various levels.

    Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Harasim, Thomas; Rohrmoser, Michaela; Malamoussi, Anastassia; Orban, Mathias; Kellner, Markus; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hölzel, Michael; Eick, Dirk

    2010-04-16

    Drugs for cancer therapy belong to different categories of chemical substances. The cellular targets for the therapeutic efficacy are often not unambiguously identified. Here, we describe the process of ribosome biogenesis as a target of a large variety of chemotherapeutic drugs. We determined the inhibitory concentration of 36 chemotherapeutic drugs for transcription and processing of ribosomal RNA by in vivo labeling experiments. Inhibitory drug concentrations were correlated to the loss of nucleolar integrity. The synergism of drugs inhibiting ribosomal RNA synthesis at different levels was studied. Drugs inhibited ribosomal RNA synthesis either at the level of (i) rRNA transcription (e.g. oxaliplatin, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, methotrexate), (ii) early rRNA processing (e.g. camptothecin, flavopiridol, roscovitine), or (iii) late rRNA processing (e.g. 5-fluorouracil, MG-132, homoharringtonine). Blockage of rRNA transcription or early rRNA processing steps caused nucleolar disintegration, whereas blockage of late rRNA processing steps left the nucleolus intact. Flavopiridol and 5-fluorouracil showed a strong synergism for inhibition of rRNA processing. We conclude that inhibition of ribosome biogenesis by chemotherapeutic drugs potentially may contribute to the efficacy of therapeutic regimens.

  2. Stochastic kinetics of ribosomes: single motor properties and collective behavior

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish; Ramakrishnan, T V

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of protein molecules in a cell are carried out by ribosomes. A ribosome can be regarded as a molecular motor which utilizes the input chemical energy to move on a messenger RNA (mRNA) track that also serves as a template for the polymerization of the corresponding protein. The forward movement, however, is characterized by an alternating sequence of translocation and pause. Using a quantitative model, which captures the mechanochemical cycle of an individual ribosome, we derive an {\\it exact} analytical expression for the distribution of its dwell times at the successive positions on the mRNA track. Inverse of the average dwell time satisfies a ``Michaelis-Menten-like'' equation and is consistent with the general formula for the average velocity of a molecular motor with an unbranched mechano-chemical cycle. Extending this formula appropriately, we also derive the exact force-velocity relation for a ribosome. Often many ribosomes simultaneously move on the same mRNA track, while each synthesizes a c...

  3. Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and human mitochondrial diseases%线粒体核糖体蛋白与人类线粒体疾病

    赵一婷

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosome) have experienced a series of structure recombination during the long period of evolution.Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes lack several major RNA stem structures of bacterial ribosomes but they are rich in mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs).All MRPs are synthesized in cytoplasm and imported into the mitochondrial matrix,where they assemble with the two mtDNA-encoded rRNAs.In addition to tRNA and rRNA,mitochondrial DNA also encodes 13 proteins for the inner mitochondrial membrane respiratory chain complex.The mitoribosome is responsible for the synthesis of these 13 proteins.Thus,mutations or defects of MRPs or other translation tools can cause mitochondrial diseases.%哺乳动物线粒体核糖体(mitochondrial ribosome,mitoribosome)在漫长的进化阶段经过一系列的结构重组,rRNA比例降低,新增了部分线粒体核糖体蛋白(mitochondrial ribosomal proteins,MRPs),成为蛋白含量最丰富的核糖体.所有MRPs均为核基因编码,在细胞质中合成,再转运到线粒体,与线粒体基因(mitochondrial DNA,mtDNA)编码的两种rRNA结合.mtDNA除编码tRNA和rRNA外,还编码组成线粒体呼吸链复合体的13种蛋白质.由于线粒体核糖体负责翻译这13种蛋白,MRPs和其他翻译工具的突变和缺陷可造成线粒体的相关疾病.

  4. Composition and structure of the 80S ribosome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: 80S ribosomes are conserved in plants and animals.

    Manuell, Andrea L; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Haynes, Paul A; Milligan, Ronald A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2005-08-12

    We have conducted a proteomic analysis of the 80S cytosolic ribosome from the eukaryotic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and accompany this with a cryo-electron microscopy structure of the ribosome. Proteins homologous to all but one rat 40S subunit protein, including a homolog of RACK1, and all but three rat 60S subunit proteins were identified as components of the C. reinhardtii ribosome. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) evidence and annotation of the completed C. reinhardtii genome identified genes for each of the four proteins not identified by proteomic analysis, showing that algae potentially have a complete set of orthologs to mammalian 80S ribosomal proteins. Presented at 25A, the algal 80S ribosome is very similar in structure to the yeast 80S ribosome, with only minor distinguishable differences. These data show that, although separated by billions of years of evolution, cytosolic ribosomes from photosynthetic organisms are highly conserved with their yeast and animal counterparts.

  5. Metagenome mining reveals polytheonamides as posttranslationally modified ribosomal peptides.

    Freeman, Michael F; Gurgui, Cristian; Helf, Maximilian J; Morinaka, Brandon I; Uria, Agustinus R; Oldham, Neil J; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Piel, Jörn

    2012-10-19

    It is held as a paradigm that ribosomally synthesized peptides and proteins contain only l-amino acids. We demonstrate a ribosomal origin of the marine sponge-derived polytheonamides, exceptionally potent, giant natural-product toxins. Isolation of the biosynthetic genes from the sponge metagenome revealed a bacterial gene architecture. Only six candidate enzymes were identified for 48 posttranslational modifications, including 18 epimerizations and 17 methylations of nonactivated carbon centers. Three enzymes were functionally validated, which showed that a radical S-adenosylmethionine enzyme is responsible for the unidirectional epimerization of multiple and different amino acids. Collectively, these complex alterations create toxins that function as unimolecular minimalistic ion channels with near-femtomolar activity. This study broadens the biosynthetic scope of ribosomal systems and creates new opportunities for peptide and protein bioengineering.

  6. Cinnamomin-A Versatile Type Ⅱ Ribosome-inactivating Protein

    Hong XU; Wang-Yi LIU

    2004-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins(RIPs)are a group of toxic proteins that can specifically act on the universally conserved sarcin/ricin domain(S/R domain)of the largest RNA in ribosome and thus irreversibly inactivate ribosome for protein synthesis.Cinnamomin is a multifunctional type Ⅱ RIP isolated in our laboratory from the mature seeds of the camphor tree.This protein has been extensively studied with regard to its purification,characteristics,structure and function,genetic expression,enzymatic mechanism,physiological role in seed cell and toxicity to cancer cells and insect larvae.The research results of cinnamomin obtained in our laboratory are summarized in this review.Understanding of cinnamomin and the relative new proteins will help expand our knowledge of RIPs and may accelerate theoretical study and the development of their potential applications.

  7. Posttranslational Modifications of Ribosomal Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Nesterchuk, M V; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2011-04-01

    А number of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coliundergo posttranslational modifications. Six ribosomal proteins are methylated (S11, L3, L11, L7/L12, L16, and L33), three proteins are acetylated (S5, S18, and L7), and protein S12 is methylthiolated. Extra amino acid residues are added to protein S6. С-terminal amino acid residues are partially removed from protein L31. The functional significance of these modifications has remained unclear. These modifications are not vital to the cells, and it is likely that they have regulatory functions. This paper reviews all the known posttranslational modifications of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coli. Certain enzymes responsible for the modifications and mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are also discussed.

  8. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  9. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D. (Florida)

    2016-11-11

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein–protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  10. Mapping the non-standardized biases of ribosome profiling.

    Bartholomäus, Alexander; Del Campo, Cristian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome profiling is a new emerging technology that uses massively parallel amplification of ribosome-protected fragments and next-generation sequencing to monitor translation in vivo with codon resolution. Studies using this approach provide insightful views on the regulation of translation on a global cell-wide level. In this review, we compare different experimental set-ups and current protocols for sequencing data analysis. Specifically, we review the pitfalls at some experimental steps and highlight the importance of standardized protocol for sample preparation and data processing pipeline, at least for mapping and normalization.

  11. Family Planning and Preconception Health Among Men in Their Mid-30s: Developing Indicators and Describing Need.

    Casey, Frances E; Sonenstein, Freya L; Astone, Nan M; Pleck, Joseph H; Dariotis, Jacinda K; Marcell, Arik V

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Healthy People 2020 call for improvements in meeting men's reproductive health needs but little is known about the proportion of men in need. This study describes men aged 35 to 39 in need of family planning and preconception care, demographic correlates of these needs, and contraception use among men in need of family planning. Using data from Wave 4 (2008-2010) of the National Survey of Adolescent Males, men were classified in need of family planning and preconception care if they reported sex with a female in the last year and believed that they and their partner were fecund; the former included men who were neither intentionally pregnant nor intending future children and the latter included men intending future children. Men were classified as being in need of both if they reported multiple sex partners in the past year. About 40% of men aged 35 to 39 were in need of family planning and about 33% in need of preconception care with 12% in need of both. Current partner's age, current union type, and sexually transmitted infection health risk differentiated men in need of family planning and preconception care (all ps planning reported none of the time current partner hormonal use (55%) or condom use (52%) during the past year. This study identified that many men in their mid-30s are in need of family planning or preconception care.

  12. On the optical properties of wedge-shaped thin films of Ag-photodoped As 30S 70 glass

    Márquez, E.; Ramirez-Malo, J. B.; Fernández-Peña, J.; Jiménez-Garay, R.; Ewen, P. J. S.; Owen, A. E.

    1993-07-01

    Thin films of a-As 30S 70 prepared by thermal evaporation were photodoped with Ag. The optical transmission was measured over the 0.3 to 2.0 μm spectral region in order to derive the refractive index and absorption coefficient of these Ag-photodoped chalcogenide films. Furthermore, the analytical expressions proposed by Swanepoel, enabling the calculation of the optical constants of a thin film with non-uniform thickness, have successfully been applied. In addition, thickness measurements made by a surface-profiling stylus were also carried out to cross-check the results corresponding to the envelope method. On the other hand, the dispersion of n was discussed in terms of the single-oscillator Wemple and DiDomencio model. Finally, the value of the optical band gap decreased from 2.47 eV in the case of the undoped films down to 1.91 eV in the almost saturated Ag-photodoped films. It is plausible that the decrease in Eoptg by the incorporation of Ag arises from the smaller binding energy of Ag-S and As-As bonds compared to that of As-S bonds.

  13. Phosphorylation of acidic ribosomal proteins by ribosome-associated protein kinases of ``Saccharomyces cerevisiae`` and ``Schizosaccharomyces pombe``

    Jakubowicz, T.; Cytrynska, M.; Kowalczyk, W.; Gasior, E. [Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej, Lublin (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Two proteins of 13 kDa and 38 kDa, the components of 60S ribosomal subunits, were identified as phosphorylation substrates for protein tightly associated with ``S. cerevisiae`` and ``Schizosaccharomyces pombe`` ribosomes. An enzyme with properties of multifunctional casein kinase II was detected in ribosome preparations from both yeast species. In S. cerevisiae another protein kinase with high substrate specificity toward those proteins was also identified. By using isoelectric focusing, the protein band of 13 kDa from ``S. cerevisiae`` and ``S. pombe`` was resolved respectively into three and four major forms of different charge. The same protein forms were phosphorylated in the in vivo {sup 32}P-labelling experiments. (author). 33 refs, 6 figs.

  14. Mutation in mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7) causes congenital sensorineural deafness, progressive hepatic and renal failure and lactic acidemia.

    Menezes, Minal J; Guo, Yiran; Zhang, Jianguo; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Thorburn, David R; Li, Jiankang; Dong, Daoyuan; Li, Zhijun; Glessner, Joseph; Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M; Alexander, Stephen I; Arbuckle, Susan; Kirwan, Paul; Keating, Brendan J; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christodoulou, John

    2015-04-15

    Functional defects of the mitochondrial translation machinery, as a result of mutations in nuclear-encoded genes, have been associated with combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies. We report siblings with congenital sensorineural deafness and lactic acidemia in association with combined respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies of complexes I, III and IV observed in fibroblasts and liver. One of the siblings had a more severe phenotype showing progressive hepatic and renal failure. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7), a c.550A>G transition that encodes a substitution of valine for a highly conserved methionine (p.Met184Val) in both affected siblings. MRPS7 is a 12S ribosomal RNA-binding subunit of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit, and is required for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Pulse labeling of mitochondrial protein synthesis products revealed impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis in patient fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7 in patient fibroblasts rescued complexes I and IV activities, demonstrating the deleterious effect of the mutation on RC function. Moreover, reduced 12S rRNA transcript levels observed in the patient's fibroblasts were also restored to normal levels by exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7. Our data demonstrate the pathogenicity of the identified MRPS7 mutation as a novel cause of mitochondrial RC dysfunction, congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive hepatic and renal failure.

  15. Establishing Rps6 hemizygous mice as a model for studying how ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency impairs erythropoiesis

    2011-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan Anemia(DBA) is a congenital hypoproliferative macrocytic anemia; 5q-syndrome myelodysplastic syndrome(MDS) is an acquired hypoproliferative macrocytic anemia. Their common erythroid phenotype reflects a shared pathophysiology -- haploinsufficiency of one of many ribosomal proteins and somatic deletion of one allele of the ribosomal protein S14 gene, respectively. Although these abnormalities lead to defective ribosome biogenesis, why ribosomal protein hemizygosity results in ...

  16. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  17. mRNA pseudoknot structures can act as ribosomal roadblocks

    Hansen, Jesper Tholstrup; Oddershede, Lene Broeng; Sørensen, Michael Askvad

    2012-01-01

    Several viruses utilize programmed ribosomal frameshifting mediated by mRNA pseudoknots in combination with a slippery sequence to produce a well defined stochiometric ratio of the upstream encoded to the downstream-encoded protein. A correlation between the mechanical strength of mRNA pseudoknot...

  18. The Database of Ribosomal Cross-links: an update.

    Baranov, P V; Kubarenko, A V; Gurvich, O L; Shamolina, T A; Brimacombe, R

    1999-01-01

    The Database of Ribosomal Cross-links (DRC) was created in 1997. Here we describe new data incorporated into this database and several new features of the DRC. The DRC is freely available via World Wide Web at http://visitweb.com/database/ or http://www. mpimg-berlin-dahlem.mpg.de/ approximately ag_ribo/ag_brimacombe/drc/

  19. Reverse translocation of tRNA in the ribosome.

    Shoji, Shinichiro; Walker, Sarah E; Fredrick, Kurt

    2006-12-28

    A widely held view is that directional movement of tRNA in the ribosome is determined by an intrinsic mechanism and driven thermodynamically by transpeptidation. Here, we show that, in certain ribosomal complexes, the pretranslocation (PRE) state is thermodynamically favored over the posttranslocation (POST) state. Spontaneous and efficient conversion from the POST to PRE state is observed when EF-G is depleted from ribosomes in the POST state or when tRNA is added to the E site of ribosomes containing P-site tRNA. In the latter assay, the rate of tRNA movement is increased by streptomycin and neomycin, decreased by tetracycline, and not affected by the acylation state of the tRNA. In one case, we provide evidence that complex conversion occurs by reverse translocation (i.e., direct movement of the tRNAs from the E and P sites to the P and A sites, respectively). These findings have important implications for the energetics of translocation.

  20. Differential expression of ribosomal proteins in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Rinker, Elizabeth B; Dueber, Julie C; Qualtieri, Julianne; Tedesco, Jason; Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations of ribosomal biogenesis have been implicated in several congenital bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Recent studies have identified haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in the acquired bone marrow disease isolated 5q minus syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the expression of various proteins comprising the ribosomal subunits and other proteins enzymatically involved in the synthesis of the ribosome has not been explored in non-5q minus MDS. Furthermore, differences in the effects of these expression alterations among myeloid, erythroid and megakaryocyte lineages have not been well elucidated. We examined the expression of several proteins related to ribosomal biogenesis in bone marrow biopsy specimens from patients with MDS (5q minus patients excluded) and controls with no known myeloid disease. Specifically, we found that there is overexpression of RPS24, DKC1 and SBDS in MDS. This overexpression is in contrast to the haploinsufficiency identified in the congenital bone marrow failure syndromes and in acquired 5q minus MDS. Potential mechanisms for these differences and aetiology for these findings in MDS are discussed.

  1. Structure based hypothesis of a mitochondrial ribosome rescue mechanism

    Huynen Martijn A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background mtRF1 is a vertebrate mitochondrial protein with an unknown function that arose from a duplication of the mitochondrial release factor mtRF1a. To elucidate the function of mtRF1, we determined the positions that are conserved among mtRF1 sequences but that are different in their mtRF1a paralogs. We subsequently modeled the 3D structure of mtRF1a and mtRF1 bound to the ribosome, highlighting the structural implications of these differences to derive a hypothesis for the function of mtRF1. Results Our model predicts, in agreement with the experimental data, that the 3D structure of mtRF1a allows it to recognize the stop codons UAA and UAG in the A-site of the ribosome. In contrast, we show that mtRF1 likely can only bind the ribosome when the A-site is devoid of mRNA. Furthermore, while mtRF1a will adopt its catalytic conformation, in which it functions as a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase in the ribosome, only upon binding of a stop codon in the A-site, mtRF1 appears specifically adapted to assume this extended, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolyzing conformation in the absence of mRNA in the A-site. Conclusions We predict that mtRF1 specifically recognizes ribosomes with an empty A-site and is able to function as a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase in those situations. Stalled ribosomes with empty A-sites that still contain a tRNA bound to a peptide chain can result from the translation of truncated, stop-codon less mRNAs. We hypothesize that mtRF1 recycles such stalled ribosomes, performing a function that is analogous to that of tmRNA in bacteria. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Eugene Koonin, Prof. Knud H. Nierhaus (nominated by Dr. Sarah Teichmann and Dr. Shamil Sunyaev.

  2. Structural dynamics of the yeast Shwachman-Diamond syndrome protein (Sdo1) on the ribosome and its implication in the 60S subunit maturation.

    Ma, Chengying; Yan, Kaige; Tan, Dan; Li, Ningning; Zhang, Yixiao; Yuan, Yi; Li, Zhifei; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2016-03-01

    The human Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in a highly conserved ribosome assembly factor SBDS. The functional role of SBDS is to cooperate with another assembly factor, elongation factor 1-like (Efl1), to promote the release of eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6) from the late-stage cytoplasmic 60S precursors. In the present work, we characterized, both biochemically and structurally, the interaction between the 60S subunit and SBDS protein (Sdo1p) from yeast. Our data show that Sdo1p interacts tightly with the mature 60S subunit in vitro through its domain I and II, and is capable of bridging two 60S subunits to form a stable 2:2 dimer. Structural analysis indicates that Sdo1p bind to the ribosomal P-site, in the proximity of uL16 and uL5, and with direct contact to H69 and H38. The dynamic nature of Sdo1p on the 60S subunit, together with its strategic binding position, suggests a surveillance role of Sdo1p in monitoring the conformational maturation of the ribosomal P-site. Altogether, our data support a conformational signal-relay cascade during late-stage 60S maturation, involving uL16, Sdo1p, and Efl1p, which interrogates the functional P-site to control the departure of the anti-association factor eIF6.

  3. Structural dynamics of the yeast Shwachman-Diamond syndrome protein (Sdo1 on the ribosome and its implication in the 60S subunit maturation

    Chengying Ma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in a highly conserved ribosome assembly factor SBDS. The functional role of SBDS is to cooperate with another assembly factor, elongation factor 1-like (Efl1, to promote the release of eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6 from the late-stage cytoplasmic 60S precursors. In the present work, we characterized, both biochemically and structurally, the interaction between the 60S subunit and SBDS protein (Sdo1p from yeast. Our data show that Sdo1p interacts tightly with the mature 60S subunit in vitro through its domain I and II, and is capable of bridging two 60S subunits to form a stable 2:2 dimer. Structural analysis indicates that Sdo1p bind to the ribosomal P-site, in the proximity of uL16 and uL5, and with direct contact to H69 and H38. The dynamic nature of Sdo1p on the 60S subunit, together with its strategic binding position, suggests a surveillance role of Sdo1p in monitoring the conformational maturation of the ribosomal P-site. Altogether, our data support a conformational signal-relay cascade during late-stage 60S maturation, involving uL16, Sdo1p, and Efl1p, which interrogates the functional P-site to control the departure of the anti-association factor eIF6.

  4. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition.

  5. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple β-Amino Acids.

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of β-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various β-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple β-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened β-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple β-amino acids. The experiments of single β-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 β-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested β-amino acids (βhGly, l-βhAla, l-βhGln, l-βhPhg, l-βhMet, and d-βhPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-βhLeu, l-βhIle, l-βhAsn, l-βhPhe, l-βhLys, d-βhAla, and d-βhLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other β-amino acids (l-βhPro, l-βhTrp, and l-βhGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using β-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive β-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the β-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two β-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of β-amino acids at multiple positions.

  6. Structures of human SRP72 complexes provide insights into SRP RNA remodeling and ribosome interaction

    Becker, Matthias M. M.; Lapouge, Karine; Segnitz, Bernd; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2017-01-01

    Co-translational protein targeting and membrane protein insertion is a fundamental process and depends on the signal recognition particle (SRP). In mammals, SRP is composed of the SRP RNA crucial for SRP assembly and function and six proteins. The two largest proteins SRP68 and SRP72 form a heterodimer and bind to a regulatory site of the SRP RNA. Despite their essential roles in the SRP pathway, structural information has been available only for the SRP68 RNA-binding domain (RBD). Here we present the crystal structures of the SRP68 protein-binding domain (PBD) in complex with SRP72-PBD and of the SRP72-RBD bound to the SRP S domain (SRP RNA, SRP19 and SRP68) detailing all interactions of SRP72 within SRP. The SRP72-PBD is a tetratricopeptide repeat, which binds an extended linear motif of SRP68 with high affinity. The SRP72-RBD is a flexible peptide crawling along the 5e- and 5f-loops of SRP RNA. A conserved tryptophan inserts into the 5e-loop forming a novel type of RNA kink-turn stabilized by a potassium ion, which we define as K+-turn. In addition, SRP72-RBD remodels the 5f-loop involved in ribosome binding and visualizes SRP RNA plasticity. Docking of the S domain structure into cryo-electron microscopy density maps reveals multiple contact sites between SRP68/72 and the ribosome, and explains the role of SRP72 in the SRP pathway. PMID:27899666

  7. A single missense mutation in a coiled-coil domain of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S2 confers a thermosensitive phenotype that can be suppressed by ribosomal protein S1.

    Aseev, Leonid V; Chugunov, Anton O; Efremov, Roman G; Boni, Irina V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S2 is an essential component of translation machinery, and its viable mutated variants conferring distinct phenotypes serve as a valuable tool in studying the role of S2 in translation regulation. One of a few available rpsB mutants, rpsB1, shows thermosensitivity and ensures enhanced expression of leaderless mRNAs. In this study, we identified the nature of the rpsB1 mutation. Sequencing of the rpsB1 allele revealed a G-to-A transition in the part of the rpsB gene which encodes a coiled-coil domain of S2. The resulting E132K substitution resides in a highly conserved site, TKKE, a so-called N-terminal capping box, at the beginning of the second alpha helix. The protruding coiled-coil domain of S2 is known to provide binding with 16S rRNA in the head of the 30S subunit and, in addition, to interact with a key mRNA binding protein, S1. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a detrimental impact of the E132K mutation on the coiled-coil structure and thereby on the interactions between S2 and 16S rRNA, providing a clue for the thermosensitivity of the rpsB1 mutant. Using a strain producing a leaderless lacZ transcript from the chromosomal lac promoter, we demonstrated that not only the rpsB1 mutation generating S2/S1-deficient ribosomes but also the rpsA::IS10 mutation leading to partial deficiency in S1 alone increased translation efficiency of the leaderless mRNA by about 10-fold. Moderate overexpression of S1 relieved all these effects and, moreover, suppressed the thermosensitive phenotype of rpsB1, indicating the role of S1 as an extragenic suppressor of the E132K mutation.

  8. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Effect of mescaline on the hydrogen-bonded structure of ribonucleic acid of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Datta, R K; Ghosh, J J

    1970-05-01

    1. The action of mescaline sulphate on the hydrogen-bonded structure of the RNA constituent of ribosomes of goat brain-cortex slices was studied by using the hyperchromic effect of heating and formaldehyde reaction. 2. The ribosomal total RNA species of the mescaline-treated brain-cortex slices have a smaller proportion of hydrogen-bonded structure than the ribosomal RNA species of the untreated brain-cortex slices. 3. Mescaline also appears to have affected this lowering of hydrogen-bonded structure of the ribosomal 28S RNA of brain-cortex tissue.

  9. Structural variation of the ribosomal gene cluster within the class Insecta

    Mukha, D.V.; Sidorenko, A.P.; Lazebnaya, I.V. [Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    General estimation of ribosomal DNA variation within the class Insecta is presented. It is shown that, using blot-hybridization, one can detect differences in the structure of the ribosomal gene cluster not only between genera within an order, but also between species within a genera, including sibling species. Structure of the ribosomal gene cluster of the Coccinellidae family (ladybirds) is analyzed. It is shown that cloned highly conservative regions of ribosomal DNA of Tetrahymena pyriformis can be used as probes for analyzing ribosomal genes in insects. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Ribosomal oxygenases are structurally conserved from prokaryotes to humans.

    Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Sekirnik, Rok; Brissett, Nigel C; Krojer, Tobias; Ho, Chia-Hua; Ng, Stanley S; Clifton, Ian J; Ge, Wei; Kershaw, Nadia J; Fox, Gavin C; Muniz, Joao R C; Vollmar, Melanie; Phillips, Claire; Pilka, Ewa S; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; von Delft, Frank; Oppermann, Udo; McDonough, Michael A; Doherty, Aidan J; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-06-19

    2-Oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases have important roles in the regulation of gene expression via demethylation of N-methylated chromatin components and in the hydroxylation of transcription factors and splicing factor proteins. Recently, 2OG-dependent oxygenases that catalyse hydroxylation of transfer RNA and ribosomal proteins have been shown to be important in translation relating to cellular growth, TH17-cell differentiation and translational accuracy. The finding that ribosomal oxygenases (ROXs) occur in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans raises questions as to their structural and evolutionary relationships. In Escherichia coli, YcfD catalyses arginine hydroxylation in the ribosomal protein L16; in humans, MYC-induced nuclear antigen (MINA53; also known as MINA) and nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) catalyse histidine hydroxylation in the ribosomal proteins RPL27A and RPL8, respectively. The functional assignments of ROXs open therapeutic possibilities via either ROX inhibition or targeting of differentially modified ribosomes. Despite differences in the residue and protein selectivities of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ROXs, comparison of the crystal structures of E. coli YcfD and Rhodothermus marinus YcfD with those of human MINA53 and NO66 reveals highly conserved folds and novel dimerization modes defining a new structural subfamily of 2OG-dependent oxygenases. ROX structures with and without their substrates support their functional assignments as hydroxylases but not demethylases, and reveal how the subfamily has evolved to catalyse the hydroxylation of different residue side chains of ribosomal proteins. Comparison of ROX crystal structures with those of other JmjC-domain-containing hydroxylases, including the hypoxia-inducible factor asparaginyl hydroxylase FIH and histone N(ε)-methyl lysine demethylases, identifies branch points in 2OG-dependent oxygenase evolution and distinguishes between JmjC-containing hydroxylases and demethylases

  11. Probe tip heating assembly

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  12. In vivo labelling of functional ribosomes reveals spatial regulation during starvation in Podospora anserina

    Silar Philippe

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, in eukaryotes, ribosomal protein expression is known to be regulated at the transcriptional and/or translational levels. But other forms of regulation may be possible. Results Here, we report the successful tagging of functional ribosomal particles with a S7-GFP chimaeric protein, making it possible to observe in vivo ribosome dynamics in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. Microscopic observations revealed a novel kind of ribosomal protein regulation during the passage between cell growth and stationary phases, with a transient accumulation of ribosomal proteins and/or ribosome subunits in the nucleus, possibly the nucleolus, being observed at the beginning of stationary phase. Conclusion Nuclear sequestration can be another level of ribosomal protein regulation in eukaryotic cells.This may contribute to the regulation of cell growth and division.

  13. Cloning a cDNA Encoding Ribosomal Protein S25 from Amaranthus cruentus L.%籽粒苋(Amaranthus cruentus L.)核糖体蛋白S25基因(cDNA)的克隆及其表达分析

    徐芳秀; 江树业; 等

    2001-01-01

    @@ Ribosomes, the agents of protein synthesis, consist of roughly equal amounts of RNA (rRNA) and protein (r-protein). Knowledge of the ribosome and its function mainly comes from the extensive work on 70S bacterial ribosomes. There are 21 proteins in the small (30S) subunit and 30 in the large (50S) subunit in E. coil ri bosomes. The 80S eukaryotic ribosomes are more com plex than the bacterial ones and contain at least 30 pro teins in the small (40S) subunit and 40 in the large (60 S) subunit. These r-proteins are named S1 to S30 and L1 to L40 according to whether they arise from the small or large subunit, and to their mobility in gels. In plants, several ribosomal protein genes and/or cDNAs have been isolated, such as the small subunit proteins S 11, S13, S14, S16, and S19 and the large subunit proteins L2, L7, L17, and L27. Here we report the r-protein S25 cDNA, Arps25, from Amaranthus cruentus L.

  14. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  15. Proton and $\\gamma$- partial widths of astrophysically important states of $^{30}$S studied by the $\\beta$-delayed decay of $^{31}$Ar

    Koldste, G T; Borge, M J G; Briz, J A; Carmona-Gallardo, M; Fraile, L M; Fynbo, H O U; Giovinazzo, J; Johansen, J G; Jokinen, A; Jonson, B; Kurturkian-Nieto, T; Kusk, J H; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Pesudo, V; Picado, E; Riisager, K; Saastamoinen, A; Tengblad, O; Thomas, J -C; Van de Walle, J

    2013-01-01

    Resonances just above the proton threshold in $^{30}$S affect the $^{29}$P$(p,\\gamma)^{30}$S reaction under astrophysical conditions. The ($p,\\gamma$)-reaction rate is currently determined indirectly and depends on the properties of the relevant resonances. We present here a method for finding the ratio between the proton- and $\\gamma$- partial widths of resonances in $^{30}$S. The widths are determined from the $\\beta -2p$ and $\\beta -p-\\gamma$-decay of $^{31}$Ar, which is produced at ISOLDE, CERN. Experimental limits on the ratio between the proton- and $\\gamma$- partial widths for astrophysical relevant levels in $^{30}$S have been found for the first time. A level at 4689.2(24)keV is identified in the $\\gamma$-spectrum, and an upper limit on the $\\Gamma_{p}/\\Gamma_{\\gamma}$ ratio of 0.26 (95% C.L.) is found. In the two-proton spectrum two levels at 5227(3)keV and 5847(4)keV are identified. These levels were previously seen to $\\gamma$-decay and upper limits on the $\\Gamma_{\\gamma}/\\Gamma_{p}$ ratio of 0.5...

  16. Pactamycin binding site on archaebacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.G.

    1987-01-27

    The presence of a photoreactive acetophenone group in the protein synthesis inhibitor pactamycin and the possibility of obtaining active iodinated derivatives that retain full biological activity allow the antibiotic binding site on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus ribosomes to be photoaffinity labeled. Four major labeled proteins have been identified in the yeast ribosomes, i.e., YS10, YS18, YS21/24, and YS30, while proteins AL1a, AS10/L8, AS18/20, and AS21/22 appeared as radioactive spots in S. solfataricus. There seems to be a correlation between some of the proteins labeled in yeast and those previously reported in Escherichia coli indicating that the pactamycin binding sites of both species, which are in the small subunit close to the initiation factors and mRNA binding sites, must have similar characteristics.

  17. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns...... that encode reverse transcriptase-like genes, and group I introns and archaeal introns that encode homing endonuclease genes (HEGs). Although rDNA-embedded protein genes are widespread in nuclei, organelles and bacteria, there is surprisingly little information available on how these genes are expressed....... Exceptions include a handful of HEGs from group I introns. Recent studies have revealed unusual and essential roles of group I and group I-like ribozymes in the endogenous expression of HEGs. Here we discuss general aspects of rDNA-embedded protein genes and focus on HEG expression from group I introns...

  18. Electrostatics in the ribosomal tunnel modulate chain elongation rates.

    Lu, Jianli; Deutsch, Carol

    2008-12-05

    Electrostatic potentials along the ribosomal exit tunnel are nonuniform and negative. The significance of electrostatics in the tunnel remains relatively uninvestigated, yet they are likely to play a role in translation and secondary folding of nascent peptides. To probe the role of nascent peptide charges in ribosome function, we used a molecular tape measure that was engineered to contain different numbers of charged amino acids localized to known regions of the tunnel and measured chain elongation rates. Positively charged arginine or lysine sequences produce transient arrest (pausing) before the nascent peptide is fully elongated. The rate of conversion from transiently arrested to full-length nascent peptide is faster for peptides containing neutral or negatively charged residues than for those containing positively charged residues. We provide experimental evidence that extraribosomal mechanisms do not account for this charge-specific pausing. We conclude that pausing is due to charge-specific interactions between the tunnel and the nascent peptide.

  19. Transcription Factor Substitution during the Evolution of Fungal Ribosome Regulation

    Hogues, Hervé; Lavoie, Hugo; Sellam, Adnane; Mangos, Maria; Roemer, Terry; Purisima, Enrico; Nantel, André; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    Coordinated ribosomal protein (RP) gene expression is crucial for cellular viability, but the transcriptional network controlling this regulon has only been well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used whole-genome transcriptional and location profiling to establish that, in Candida albicans, the RP regulon is controlled by the Myb domain protein Tbf1 working in conjunction with Cbf1. These two factors bind both the promoters of RP genes and the rDNA locus; Tbf1 acti...

  20. The European database on small subunit ribosomal RNA

    Wuyts, Jan; Van de Peer, Yves; Winkelmans, Tina; De Wachter, Rupert

    2002-01-01

    The European database on SSU rRNA can be consulted via the World WideWeb at http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ and compiles all complete or nearly complete small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences. Sequences are provided in aligned format. The alignment takes into account the secondary structure information derived by comparative sequence analysis of thousands of sequences. Additional information such as literature references, taxonomy, secondary structure models and nucleotide variability maps, is also...

  1. A relaxed mutant with an altered ribosomal protein L11.

    Parker, J; Watson, R J; Friesen, J D

    1976-02-27

    Relaxed mutants of Escherichia coli have been isolated which have an altered electrophoretic mobility of ribosomal protein L11. It can be shown that reversion to stringency in one of these mutants occurs simultaneously with a reversion of L11 protein to tis normal mobility. The L11 structural gene, rplK, maping near rif, is carried by the bacteriophage lambdacI857S7drifd18, and is most likely identical with relC.

  2. The Cyanobacterial Ribosomal-Associated Protein LrtA Is Involved in Post-Stress Survival in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Carla V Galmozzi

    Full Text Available A light-repressed transcript encodes the LrtA protein in cyanobacteria. We show that half-life of lrtA transcript from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is higher in dark-treated cells as compared to light-grown cells, suggesting post-transcriptional control of lrtA expression. The lrtA 5´ untranslated leader region is involved in that darkness-dependent regulation. We also found that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 LrtA is a ribosome-associated protein present in both 30S and 70S ribosomal particles. In order to investigate the function of this protein we have constructed a deletion mutant of the lrtA gene. Cells lacking LrtA (∆lrtA had significantly lower amount of 70S particles and a greater amount of 30S and 50S particles, suggesting a role of LrtA in stabilizing 70S particles. Synechocystis strains with different amounts of LrtA protein: wild-type, ∆lrtA, and LrtAS (overexpressing lrtA showed no differences in their growth rate under standard laboratory conditions. However, a clear LrtA dose-dependent effect was observed in the presence of the antibiotic tylosin, being the LrtAS strains the most sensitive. Similar results were obtained under hyperosmotic stress caused by sorbitol. Conversely, after prolonged periods of starvation, ∆lrtA strains were delayed in their growth with respect to the wild-type and the LrtAS strains. A positive role of LrtA protein in post-stress survival is proposed.

  3. The Cyanobacterial Ribosomal-Associated Protein LrtA Is Involved in Post-Stress Survival in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Galmozzi, Carla V.; Florencio, Francisco J.; Muro-Pastor, M. Isabel

    2016-01-01

    A light-repressed transcript encodes the LrtA protein in cyanobacteria. We show that half-life of lrtA transcript from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is higher in dark-treated cells as compared to light-grown cells, suggesting post-transcriptional control of lrtA expression. The lrtA 5´ untranslated leader region is involved in that darkness-dependent regulation. We also found that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 LrtA is a ribosome-associated protein present in both 30S and 70S ribosomal particles. In order to investigate the function of this protein we have constructed a deletion mutant of the lrtA gene. Cells lacking LrtA (∆lrtA) had significantly lower amount of 70S particles and a greater amount of 30S and 50S particles, suggesting a role of LrtA in stabilizing 70S particles. Synechocystis strains with different amounts of LrtA protein: wild-type, ∆lrtA, and LrtAS (overexpressing lrtA) showed no differences in their growth rate under standard laboratory conditions. However, a clear LrtA dose-dependent effect was observed in the presence of the antibiotic tylosin, being the LrtAS strains the most sensitive. Similar results were obtained under hyperosmotic stress caused by sorbitol. Conversely, after prolonged periods of starvation, ∆lrtA strains were delayed in their growth with respect to the wild-type and the LrtAS strains. A positive role of LrtA protein in post-stress survival is proposed. PMID:27442126

  4. Photoaffinity labeling of the pactamycin binding site on eubacterial ribosomes

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1985-07-02

    Pactamycin, an inhibitor of the initial steps of protein synthesis, has an acetophenone group in its chemical structure that makes the drug a potentially photoreactive molecule. In addition, the presence of a phenolic residue makes it easily susceptible to radioactive labeling. Through iodination, one radioactive derivative of pactamycin has been obtained with biological activities similar to the unmodified drug when tested on in vivo and cell-free systems. With the use of (/sup 125/I)iodopactamycin, ribosomes of Escherichia coli have been photolabeled under conditions that preserve the activity of the particles and guarantee the specificity of the binding sites. Under these conditions, RNA is preferentially labeled when free, small ribosomal subunits are photolabeled, but proteins are the main target in the whole ribosome. This indicates that an important conformational change takes place in the binding site on association of the two subunits. The major labeled proteins are S2, S4, S18, S21, and L13. These proteins in the pactamycin binding site are probably related to the initiation step of protein synthesis.

  5. On ribosome load, codon bias and protein abundance.

    Stefan Klumpp

    Full Text Available Different codons encoding the same amino acid are not used equally in protein-coding sequences. In bacteria, there is a bias towards codons with high translation rates. This bias is most pronounced in highly expressed proteins, but a recent study of synthetic GFP-coding sequences did not find a correlation between codon usage and GFP expression, suggesting that such correlation in natural sequences is not a simple property of translational mechanisms. Here, we investigate the effect of evolutionary forces on codon usage. The relation between codon bias and protein abundance is quantitatively analyzed based on the hypothesis that codon bias evolved to ensure the efficient usage of ribosomes, a precious commodity for fast growing cells. An explicit fitness landscape is formulated based on bacterial growth laws to relate protein abundance and ribosomal load. The model leads to a quantitative relation between codon bias and protein abundance, which accounts for a substantial part of the observed bias for E. coli. Moreover, by providing an evolutionary link, the ribosome load model resolves the apparent conflict between the observed relation of protein abundance and codon bias in natural sequences and the lack of such dependence in a synthetic gfp library. Finally, we show that the relation between codon usage and protein abundance can be used to predict protein abundance from genomic sequence data alone without adjustable parameters.

  6. The localization of ribosomal DNA in Sciaridae (Diptera: Nematocera) reassessed.

    Madalena, Christiane Rodriguez Gutierrez; Amabis, José Mariano; Stocker, Ann Jacob; Gorab, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The chromosomal localization of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was studied in polytene and diploid tissues of four sciarid species, Trichosia pubescens, Rhynchosciara americana, R. milleri and Schwenkfeldina sp. While hybridization to mitotic chromosomes showed the existence of a single rDNA locus, ribosomal probes hybridized to more than one polytene chromosome region in all the species analyzed as a result of micronucleolar attachment to specific chromosome sites. Micronucleoli are small, round bodies containing transcriptionally active, probably extrachromosomal rDNA. In T. pubescens the rDNA is predominantly localized in chromosome sections X-10 and X-8. In R. americana the rDNA is frequently found associated with centromeric heterochromatin of the chromosomes X, C, B and A, and also with sections X-1 and B-13. Ribosomal probes in R. milleri hybridized with high frequency to pericentric and telomeric regions of its polytene complement. Schwfenkfeldina sp. displays a remarkably unusual distribution of rDNA in polytene nuclei, characterized by the attachment of micronucleoli to many chromosome regions. The results showed that micronucleoli preferentially associate with intercalary or terminal heterochromatin of all sciarid flies analyzed and, depending on the species, are attached to a few (Trichosia), moderate (Rhynchosciara) or a large (Schwenkfeldina sp.) number of polytene chromosome sites.

  7. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Role of sperimidine in counteracting the destabilizing effect of mescaline of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Datta, R K; Antopol, W; Ghosh, J J

    1971-11-01

    1. The effect of spermidine on the mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes was studied by adding spermidine during the treatment of goat brain-cortex slices with mescaline. 2. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices removed a portion of the endogenous spermidine from ribosomes and this removal was significantly prevented when spermidine was present during mescaline treatment. 3. Spermidine present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices counteracted, to some extent, the destabilizing effect of mescaline on ribosomes with respect to heat denaturation. 4. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices made ribosomes more susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein and RNA, and resulting in loss of ribosomal enzymic activities. However, spermidine present during mescaline treatment counteracted moderately the mescaline-induced ribosomal susceptibility to breakdown and ribosomal loss of enzymic activities. 5. Ribosomes of mescaline-treated cortex slices were rapidly degraded by ribonuclease and trypsin. However, if spermidine was present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices the rates of degradation diminished.

  8. Phosphorylation in vivo of non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal particles of Krebs II mouse ascites-tumour cells

    Schuck, J; Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Four non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal subunits with mol.wts. of 110 000, 84 000, 68 000 and 26 000 were phosphorylated in vivo when ascites cells were incubated in the presence of [32P]Pi. The 110 000-, 84 000- and 26 000-dalton proteins are identical with phosphorylated products...

  9. Organellar genome, nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit, and microsatellites isolated from a small-scale of 454 GS FLX sequencing on two mosses.

    Liu, Yang; Forrest, Laura L; Bainard, Jillian D; Budke, Jessica M; Goffinet, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Recent innovations in high-throughput DNA sequencing methodology (next generation sequencing technologies [NGS]) allow for the generation of large amounts of high quality data that may be particularly critical for resolving ambiguous relationships such as those resulting from rapid radiations. Application of NGS technology to bryology is limited to assembling entire nuclear or organellar genomes of selected exemplars of major lineages (e.g., classes). Here we outline how organellar genomes and the entire nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat can be obtained from minimal amounts of moss tissue via small-scale 454 GS FLX sequencing. We sampled two Funariaceae species, Funaria hygrometrica and Entosthodon obtusus, and assembled nearly complete organellar genomes and the whole nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit (18S-ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-26S-IGS1-5S-IGS2) for both taxa. Sequence data from these species were compared to sequences from another Funariaceae species, Physcomitrella patens, revealing low overall degrees of divergence of the organellar genomes and nrDNA genes with substitutions spread rather evenly across their length, and high divergence within the external spacers of the nrDNA repeat. Furthermore, we detected numerous microsatellites among the 454 assemblies. This study demonstrates that NGS methodology can be applied to mosses to target large genomic regions and identify microsatellites.

  10. Genomics of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 512 clone highlights the role of RamR and ribosomal S10 protein mutations in conferring tigecycline resistance.

    Villa, Laura; Feudi, Claudia; Fortini, Daniela; García-Fernández, Aurora; Carattoli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Full genome sequences were determined for five Klebsiella pneumoniae strains belonging to the sequence type 512 (ST512) clone, producing KPC-3. Three strains were resistant to tigecycline, one showed an intermediate phenotype, and one was susceptible. Comparative analysis performed using the genome of the susceptible strain as a reference sequence identified genetic differences possibly associated with resistance to tigecycline. Results demonstrated that mutations in the ramR gene occurred in two of the three sequenced strains. Mutations in RamR were previously demonstrated to cause overexpression of the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and were implicated in tigecycline resistance in K. pneumoniae. The third strain showed a mutation located at the vertex of a very well conserved loop in the S10 ribosomal protein, which is located in close proximity to the tigecycline target site in the 30S ribosomal subunit. This mutation was previously shown to be associated with tetracycline resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A PCR-based approach was devised to amplify the potential resistance mechanisms identified by genomics and applied to two additional ST512 strains showing resistance to tigecycline, allowing us to identify mutations in the ramR gene.

  11. The conserved Bud20 zinc finger protein is a new component of the ribosomal 60S subunit export machinery.

    Bassler, Jochen; Klein, Isabella; Schmidt, Claudia; Kallas, Martina; Thomson, Emma; Wagner, Maria Anna; Bradatsch, Bettina; Rechberger, Gerald; Strohmaier, Heimo; Hurt, Ed; Bergler, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    The nuclear export of the preribosomal 60S (pre-60S) subunit is coordinated with late steps in ribosome assembly. Here, we show that Bud20, a conserved C(2)H(2)-type zinc finger protein, is an unrecognized shuttling factor required for the efficient export of pre-60S subunits. Bud20 associates with late pre-60S particles in the nucleoplasm and accompanies them into the cytoplasm, where it is released through the action of the Drg1 AAA-ATPase. Cytoplasmic Bud20 is then reimported via a Kap123-dependent pathway. The deletion of Bud20 induces a strong pre-60S export defect and causes synthetic lethality when combined with mutant alleles of known pre-60S subunit export factors. The function of Bud20 in ribosome export depends on a short conserved N-terminal sequence, as we observed that mutations or the deletion of this motif impaired 60S subunit export and generated the genetic link to other pre-60S export factors. We suggest that the shuttling Bud20 is recruited to the nascent 60S subunit via its central zinc finger rRNA binding domain to facilitate the subsequent nuclear export of the preribosome employing its N-terminal extension.

  12. Ribosome-dependent ATPase interacts with conserved membrane protein in Escherichia coli to modulate protein synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Mohan Babu

    Full Text Available Elongation factor RbbA is required for ATP-dependent deacyl-tRNA release presumably after each peptide bond formation; however, there is no information about the cellular role. Proteomic analysis in Escherichia coli revealed that RbbA reciprocally co-purified with a conserved inner membrane protein of unknown function, YhjD. Both proteins are also physically associated with the 30S ribosome and with members of the lipopolysaccharide transport machinery. Genome-wide genetic screens of rbbA and yhjD deletion mutants revealed aggravating genetic interactions with mutants deficient in the electron transport chain. Cells lacking both rbbA and yhjD exhibited reduced cell division, respiration and global protein synthesis as well as increased sensitivity to antibiotics targeting the ETC and the accuracy of protein synthesis. Our results suggest that RbbA appears to function together with YhjD as part of a regulatory network that impacts bacterial oxidative phosphorylation and translation efficiency.

  13. Spanning high-dimensional expression space using ribosome-binding site combinatorics.

    Zelcbuch, Lior; Antonovsky, Niv; Bar-Even, Arren; Levin-Karp, Ayelet; Barenholz, Uri; Dayagi, Michal; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Flamholz, Avi; Noor, Elad; Amram, Shira; Brandis, Alexander; Bareia, Tasneem; Yofe, Ido; Jubran, Halim; Milo, Ron

    2013-05-01

    Protein levels are a dominant factor shaping natural and synthetic biological systems. Although proper functioning of metabolic pathways relies on precise control of enzyme levels, the experimental ability to balance the levels of many genes in parallel is a major outstanding challenge. Here, we introduce a rapid and modular method to span the expression space of several proteins in parallel. By combinatorially pairing genes with a compact set of ribosome-binding sites, we modulate protein abundance by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate our strategy by using a synthetic operon containing fluorescent proteins to span a 3D color space. Using the same approach, we modulate a recombinant carotenoid biosynthesis pathway in Escherichia coli to reveal a diversity of phenotypes, each characterized by a distinct carotenoid accumulation profile. In a single combinatorial assembly, we achieve a yield of the industrially valuable compound astaxanthin 4-fold higher than previously reported. The methodology presented here provides an efficient tool for exploring a high-dimensional expression space to locate desirable phenotypes.

  14. In vivo analysis of internal ribosome entry at the Hairless locus by genome engineering in Drosophila.

    Smylla, Thomas K; Preiss, Anette; Maier, Dieter

    2016-10-07

    Cell communication in metazoans requires the highly conserved Notch signaling pathway, which is subjected to strict regulation of both activation and silencing. In Drosophila melanogaster, silencing involves the assembly of a repressor complex by Hairless (H) on Notch target gene promoters. We previously found an in-frame internal ribosome entry site in the full length H transcript resulting in two H protein isoforms (H(p120) and H(p150)). Hence, H may repress Notch signalling activity in situations where cap-dependent translation is inhibited. Here we demonstrate the in vivo importance of both H isoforms for proper fly development. To this end, we replaced the endogenous H locus by constructs specifically affecting translation of either H(p150) or H(p120) isoforms using genome engineering. Our findings indicate the functional relevance of both H proteins. Based on bristle phenotypes, the predominant isoform H(p150) appears to be of particular importance. In contrast, growth regulation and venation of the wing require the concomitant activity of both isoforms. Finally, the IRES dependent production of H(p120) during mitosis was verified in vivo. Together our data confirm IRES mediated translation of H protein in vivo, supporting strict regulation of Notch in different cellular settings.

  15. Senescent changes in the ribosomes of animal cells in vivo and in vitro

    Miquel, J.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines RNA-ribosomal changes observed in protozoa and fixed postmitotic cells, as well as the characteristics of intermitotic cells. Attention is given to a discussion of the implications of the reported ribosomal changes as to the senescent deterioration of protein synthesis and physiological functions. A survey of the literature suggests that, while the data on ribosomal change in dividing cells both in vivo and in vitro are inconclusive, there is strong histological and biochemical evidence in favor of some degree of quantitative ribosomal loss in fixed postmitotic cells. Since these decreases in ribosomes are demonstrated in differential cells from nematodes, insects and mammals, they may represent a universal manifestation of cytoplasmic senescence in certain types of fixed postmitotic animal cells. The observed variability in ribosomal loss for cells belonging to the same type suggests that this involution phenomenon is rather related to the wear and tear suffered by a particular cell.

  16. The fail-safe system to rescue the stalled ribosomes in Escherichia coli.

    Abo, Tatsuhiko; Chadani, Yuhei

    2014-01-01

    Translation terminates at stop codon. Without stop codon, ribosome cannot terminate translation properly and reaches and stalls at the 3'-end of the mRNA lacking stop codon. Bacterial tmRNA-mediated trans-translation releases such stalled ribosome and targets the protein product to degradation by adding specific "degradation tag." Recently two alternative ribosome rescue factors, ArfA (YhdL) and ArfB (YaeJ), have been found in Escherichia coli. These three ribosome rescue systems are different each other in terms of molecular mechanism of ribosome rescue and their activity, but they are mutually related and co-operate to maintain the translation system in shape. This suggests the biological significance of ribosome rescue.

  17. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna (Cornell); (UCB); (Duke)

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  18. Proteomic characterization of the small subunit of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast ribosome: identification of a novel S1 domain-containing protein and unusually large orthologs of bacterial S2, S3, and S5.

    Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Prieto, Susana; Beligni, María Verónica; Haynes, Paul A; McDonald, W Hayes; Yates, John R; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2002-11-01

    To understand how chloroplast mRNAs are translated into functional proteins, a detailed understanding of all of the components of chloroplast translation is needed. To this end, we performed a proteomic analysis of the plastid ribosomal proteins in the small subunit of the chloroplast ribosome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Twenty proteins were identified, including orthologs of Escherichia coli S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S9, S10, S12, S13, S14, S15, S16, S17, S18, S19, S20, and S21 and a homolog of spinach plastid-specific ribosomal protein-3 (PSRP-3). In addition, a novel S1 domain-containing protein, PSRP-7, was identified. Among the identified proteins, S2 (57 kD), S3 (76 kD), and S5 (84 kD) are prominently larger than their E. coli or spinach counterparts, containing N-terminal extensions (S2 and S5) or insertion sequence (S3). Structural predictions based on the crystal structure of the bacterial 30S subunit suggest that the additional domains of S2, S3, and S5 are located adjacent to each other on the solvent side near the binding site of the S1 protein. These additional domains may interact with the S1 protein and PSRP-7 to function in aspects of mRNA recognition and translation initiation that are unique to the Chlamydomonas chloroplast.

  19. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  20. Binding of helix-threading peptides to E. coli 16S ribosomal RNA and inhibition of the S15-16S complex.

    Gooch, Barry D; Krishnamurthy, Malathy; Shadid, Mohammad; Beal, Peter A

    2005-12-01

    Helix-threading peptides (HTPs) constitute a new class of small molecules that bind selectively to duplex RNA structures adjacent to helix defects and project peptide functionality into the dissimilar duplex grooves. To further explore and develop the capabilities of the HTP design for binding RNA selectively, we identified helix 22 of the prokaryotic ribosomal RNA 16S as a target. This helix is a component of the binding site for the ribosomal protein S15. In addition, the S15-16S RNA interaction is important for the ordered assembly of the bacterial ribosome. Here we present the synthesis and characterization of helix-threading peptides that bind selectively to helix 22 of E. coli 16S RNA. These compounds bind helix 22 by threading intercalation placing the N termini in the minor groove and the C termini in the major groove. Binding is dependent on the presence of a highly conserved purine-rich internal loop in the RNA, whereas removal of the loop minimally affects binding of the classical intercalators ethidium bromide and methidiumpropyl-EDTAFe (MPEFe). Moreover, binding selectivity translates into selective inhibition of formation of the S15-16S complex.

  1. tmRNA-SmpB: a journey to the centre of the bacterial ribosome.

    Weis, Félix; Bron, Patrick; Giudice, Emmanuel; Rolland, Jean-Paul; Thomas, Daniel; Felden, Brice; Gillet, Reynald

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Ribosomes mediate protein synthesis by decoding the information carried by messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and catalysing peptide bond formation between amino acids. When bacterial ribosomes stall on incomplete messages, the trans-translation quality control mechanism is activated by the transfer-messenger RNA bound to small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB ribonucleoprotein complex). Trans-translation liberates the stalled ribosomes and triggers degradation of the incomplete proteins. He...

  2. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  3. Rates of synthesis and degradation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Mangiarotti, G; Altruda, F; Lodish, H F

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) continued during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum concurrently with extensive turnover of ribosomes synthesized during both growth and developmental stages. We show here that the rate of synthesis of 26S and 17S ribosomal RNA during differentiation was less than 15% of that in growing cells, and by the time of sorocarp formation only about 25% of the cellular ribosomes had been synthesized during differentiation. Ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were utilized in messenger RNA translation to the same extent; about 50% of each class were on polyribosomes. Ribosome degradation is apparently an all-or-nothing process, since virtually all 80S monosomes present in developing cells could be incorporated into polysomes when growth conditions were restored. By several criteria, ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were functionally indistinguishable. Our data, together with previously published information on changes in the messenger RNA population during differentiation, indicate that synthesis of new ribosomes is not necessary for translation of developmentally regulated messenger RNA. We also establish that the overall rate of messenger RNA synthesis during differentiation is less than 15% of that in growing cells.

  4. Two Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins act as RNases for specific classes of mRNAs.

    Mangiarotti, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 leads to the stabilization of pre-spore specific mRNAs during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The purification of S6 kinase has allowed the identification of protein S11 as the mRNase specific for pre-spore mRNAs. Methylation of ribosomal protein S31 leads to the destabilization of ribosomal protein mRNAs. The purification of S31 methyltransferase has allowed the identification of protein S29 as the mRNAse specific for ribosomal protein mRNAs.

  5. Generation of monoclonal antibodies for the assessment of protein purification by recombinant ribosomal coupling

    Kristensen, Janni; Sperling-Petersen, Hans Uffe; Mortensen, Kim Kusk;

    2005-01-01

    We recently described a conceptually novel method for the purification of recombinant proteins with a propensity to form inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. Recombinant proteins were covalently coupled to the E. coli ribosome by fusing them to ribosomal protein 23 (rpL23...... Sepharose affinity chromatography. The purified antibodies were used to evaluate the separation of ribosomes from GFP, streptavidin, murine interleukin-6, a phagedisplay antibody and yeast elongation factor 1A by centrifugation, when ribosomes with covalently coupled target protein were cleaved at specific...

  6. Ligation-free ribosome profiling of cell type-specific translation in the brain.

    Hornstein, Nicholas; Torres, Daniela; Das Sharma, Sohani; Tang, Guomei; Canoll, Peter; Sims, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome profiling has emerged as a powerful tool for genome-wide measurements of translation, but library construction requires multiple ligation steps and remains cumbersome relative to more conventional deep-sequencing experiments. We report a new, ligation-free approach to ribosome profiling that does not require ligation. Library construction for ligation-free ribosome profiling can be completed in one day with as little as 1 ng of purified RNA footprints. We apply ligation-free ribosome profiling to mouse brain tissue to identify new patterns of cell type-specific translation and test its ability to identify translational targets of mTOR signaling in the brain.

  7. Immunohistochemical evidence for an association of ribosomes with microfilaments in 3T3 fibroblasts.

    Hesketh, J E; Horne, Z; Campbell, G P

    1991-02-01

    Ribosome distribution in cultured fibroblasts was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies which recognize the 60S ribosomal subunit. After treatment of cells with buffer containing 25mM KCl and 0.05% Nonidet-P40 immunostained material was present in punctate patterns and linear arrays consistent with some ribosomes being associated with the cytoskeleton. Treatment of the cells with 130mM KCl caused loss of both the beaded lines of immunostaining and micro-filaments. Double immunostaining showed ribosomes to be closely associated with microfilaments.

  8. Modeling of ribosome dynamics on a ds-mRNA under an external load

    Shakiba, Bahareh; Dayeri, Maryam; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid

    2016-07-01

    Protein molecules in cells are synthesized by macromolecular machines called ribosomes. According to the recent experimental data, we reduce the complexity of the ribosome and propose a model to express its activity in six main states. Using our model, we study the translation rate in different biological relevant situations in the presence of external force and the translation through the RNA double stranded region in the absence or presence of the external force. In the present study, we give a quantitative theory for translation rate and show that the ribosome behaves more like a Brownian Ratchet motor. Our findings could shed some light on understanding behaviors of the ribosome in biological conditions.

  9. Modeling of Ribosome Dynamics on a ds-mRNA under an External Load

    Shakiba, Bahareh; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    Protein molecules in cells are synthesized by macromolecular machines called ribosomes. According to recent experimental data, we reduce the complexity of the ribosome and propose a model to express its activity in six main states. Using our model, we study the translation rate in different biological relevant situations in the presence of external force, and translation through the RNA double stranded region in the absence or presence of the external force. In the present study, we give a quantitative theory for translation rate and show that the ribosome behaves more like a Brownian Ratchet motor. Our findings could shed some light on understanding behaviors of the ribosome in biological conditions.

  10. Methylation of yeast ribosomal protein S2 is elevated during stationary phase growth conditions.

    Ladror, Daniel T; Frey, Brian L; Scalf, Mark; Levenstein, Mark E; Artymiuk, Jacklyn M; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-03-14

    Ribosomes, as the center of protein translation in the cell, require careful regulation via multiple pathways. While regulation of ribosomal synthesis and function has been widely studied on the transcriptional and translational "levels," the biological roles of ribosomal post-translational modifications (PTMs) are largely not understood. Here, we explore this matter by using quantitative mass spectrometry to compare the prevalence of ribosomal methylation and acetylation for yeast in the log phase and the stationary phase of growth. We find that of the 27 modified peptides identified, two peptides experience statistically significant changes in abundance: a 1.9-fold decrease in methylation for k(Me)VSGFKDEVLETV of ribosomal protein S1B (RPS1B), and a 10-fold increase in dimethylation for r(DiMe)GGFGGR of ribosomal protein S2 (RPS2). While the biological role of RPS1B methylation has largely been unexplored, RPS2 methylation is a modification known to have a role in processing and export of ribosomal RNA. This suggests that yeast in the stationary phase increase methylation of RPS2 in order to regulate ribosomal synthesis. These results demonstrate the utility of mass spectrometry for quantifying dynamic changes in ribosomal PTMs.

  11. Expanding the Entamoeba Universe: New Hosts Yield Novel Ribosomal Lineages.

    Jacob, Alison S; Busby, Eloise J; Levy, Abigail D; Komm, Natasha; Clark, C Graham

    2016-01-01

    Removing the requirement for cell culture has led to a substantial increase in the number of lineages of Entamoeba recognized as distinct. Surveying the range of potential host species for this parasite genus has barely been started and it is clear that additional sampling of the same host in different locations often identifies additional diversity. In this study, using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, we identify four new lineages of Entamoeba, including the first report of Entamoeba from an elephant, and extend the host range of some previously described lineages. In addition, examination of microbiome data from a number of host animals suggests that substantial Entamoeba diversity remains to be uncovered.

  12. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  13. Ribosome-inactivating lectins with polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity.

    Battelli, M G; Barbieri, L; Bolognesi, A; Buonamici, L; Valbonesi, P; Polito, L; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Stirpe, F

    1997-05-26

    Lectins from Aegopodium podagraria (APA), Bryonia dioica (BDA), Galanthus nivalis (GNA), Iris hybrid (IRA) and Sambucus nigra (SNAI), and a new lectin-related protein from Sambucus nigra (SNLRP) were studied to ascertain whether they had the properties of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP). IRA and SNLRP inhibited protein synthesis by a cell-free system and, at much higher concentrations, by cells and had polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity, thus behaving like non-toxic type 2 (two chain) RIP. APA and SNAI had much less activity, and BDA and GNA did not inhibit protein synthesis.

  14. Soldering in electronics assembly

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  15. Cryo-EM structure of the archaeal 50S ribosomal subunit in complex with initiation factor 6 and implications for ribosome evolution

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka;

    2012-01-01

    Translation of mRNA into proteins by the ribosome is universally conserved in all cellular life. The composition and complexity of the translation machinery differ markedly between the three domains of life. Organisms from the domain Archaea show an intermediate level of complexity, sharing sever......, the molecular binding of IF6 on the ribosome is conserved between eukaryotes and archaea. The structure also provides a snapshot of the reductive evolution of the archaeal ribosome and offers new insights into the evolution of the translation system in archaea....

  16. Nucleotide sequence of a crustacean 18S ribosomal RNA gene and secondary structure of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs.

    Nelles, L; Fang, B L; Volckaert, G; Vandenberghe, A; De Wachter, R

    1984-12-11

    The primary structure of the gene for 18 S rRNA of the crustacean Artemia salina was determined. The sequence has been aligned with 13 other small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of eukaryotic, archaebacterial, eubacterial, chloroplastic and plant mitochondrial origin. Secondary structure models for these RNAs were derived on the basis of previously proposed models and additional comparative evidence found in the alignment. Although there is a general similarity in the secondary structure models for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the evidence seems to indicate a different topology in a central area of the structures.

  17. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  18. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  19. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  20. Riboproteomics of the hepatitis C virus internal ribosomal entry site.

    Lu, Henry; Li, Weiqun; Noble, William Stafford; Payan, Donald; Anderson, D C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein translation is mediated by a cis-acting RNA, an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES), located in the 5' nontranslated region of the viral RNA. To examine proteins bound to the IRES, which could include proteins important for its function as well as potential drug targets, we used shotgun peptide sequencing to identify proteins in quadruplicate protein affinity extracts of lysed Huh7 cells, obtained using a biotinylated IRES. Twenty-six proteins bound the HCV IRES but not a reversed complementary sequence RNA or vector RNA controls. These included five ribosomal subunits, nine eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunits, and novel interacting proteins such as the cytoskeletal-related proteins actin, FHOS (formin homologue overexpressed in spleen) and MIP-T3 (microtubule interacting protein that associates with TRAF3). Other novel HCV IRES-binding proteins included UNR (upstream of N-ras), UNR-interacting protein, and the RNA-binding proteins PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) mRNA binding protein and Ewing sarcoma breakpoint 1 region protein EWS. A large set of additional proteins bound both the HCV IRES and a reversed complementary IRES sequence control, including the known HCV interactors PTB (polypyrimidine tract binding protein), the La autoantigen, and nucleolin. The discovery of these novel HCV IRES-binding proteins suggests links between IRES biology and the cytoskeleton, signal transduction, and other cellular functions.

  1. A protein interaction map of the kalimantacin biosynthesis assembly line

    Birgit Uytterhoeven

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial secondary metabolite kalimantacin is produced by a hybrid polyketide/ non-ribosomal peptide system in Pseudomonas fluorescens BCCM_ID9359. In this study, the kalimantacin biosynthesis gene cluster is analyzed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, creating a protein-protein interaction map of the entire assembly line. In total, 28 potential interactions were identified, of which 13 could be confirmed further. These interactions include the dimerization of ketosynthase domains, a link between assembly line modules 9 and 10, and a specific interaction between the trans-acting enoyl reductase BatK and the carrier proteins of modules 8 and 10. These interactions reveal fundamental insight into the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.This study is the first to reveal interactions in a complete biosynthetic pathway. Similar future studies could build a strong basis for engineering strategies in such clusters.

  2. Effects of electroacupuncture on the expression of p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase and ribosomal protein S6 in the hippocampus of rats with vascular dementia

    Yanzhen Zhu; Xuan Wang; Xiaobao Ye; Changhua Gao; Wei Wang

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism underlying electroacupuncture therapy for vascular dementia through electroacupuncture at the acupoints of Baihui (DU20), Dazhui (DU14), and bilateral Shenshu (BL23) in a rat model of vascular dementia produced by bilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion. Morris water maze test showed that electroacupuncture improved the learning ability of vascular dementia rats. Western blot assay revealed that the expression of p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase and ribosomal protein S6 in vascular dementia rats was significantly increased after electroacupuncture, compared with the model group that was not treated with acupuncture. The average escape latency was also shortened after electroacupuncture, and escape strategies in the spatial probe test improved from edge and random searches, to linear and trending swim pathways. The experimental findings indicate that electroacupuncture improves learning and memory ability by up-regulating expression of p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase and ribosomal protein S6 in the hippocampus of vascular dementia rats.

  3. Implementation of communication-mediating domains for non-ribosomal peptide production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Siewers, Verena; San-Bento, Rita; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has in several cases been proven to be a suitable host for the production of natural products and was recently exploited for the production of non-ribosomal peptides. Synthesis of non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) is mediated by NRP synthetases (NRPSs), modular enzymes, which...

  4. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Western Carolina University, 111 Memorial Drive, Cullowhee, NC 28723 (United States); Van Dyke, Michael W., E-mail: mvandyke@email.wcu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Western Carolina University, 111 Memorial Drive, Cullowhee, NC 28723 (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  5. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  6. A Conserved Proline Switch on the Ribosome Facilitates the Recruitment and Binding of trGTPases

    2012-01-01

    The process of protein synthesis in vivo is a highly complex and orderly system, which is dependent on the ribosome as factory, mRNA as a template, the amino acid as raw materials, the GTP for energy. Ri- bosomal protein synthesis is a continuous dynamics process, which involves not only the ribosome itself, but also involves the synergy of translation factors.

  7. N(α)-Acetylation of yeast ribosomal proteins and its effect on protein synthesis.

    Kamita, Masahiro; Kimura, Yayoi; Ino, Yoko; Kamp, Roza M; Polevoda, Bogdan; Sherman, Fred; Hirano, Hisashi

    2011-04-01

    N(α)-Acetyltransferases (NATs) cause the N(α)-acetylation of the majority of eukaryotic proteins during their translation, although the functions of this modification have been largely unexplored. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), four NATs have been identified: NatA, NatB, NatC, and NatD. In this study, the N(α)-acetylation status of ribosomal protein was analyzed using NAT mutants combined with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 60 ribosomal proteins were identified, of which 17 were N(α)-acetylated by NatA, and two by NatB. The N(α)-acetylation of two of these, S17 and L23, by NatA was not previously observed. Furthermore, we tested the effect of ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation on protein synthesis using the purified ribosomes from each NAT mutant. It was found that the protein synthesis activities of ribosomes from NatA and NatB mutants were decreased by 27% and 23%, respectively, as compared to that of the normal strain. Furthermore, we have shown that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation by NatA influences translational fidelity in the presence of paromomycin. These results suggest that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation is necessary to maintain the ribosome's protein synthesis function.

  8. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  9. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we

  10. Ribosome-induced changes in elongation factor Tu conformation control GTP hydrolysis

    Villa, Elizabeth; Sengupta, Jayati; Trabuco, Leonard G.

    2009-01-01

    In translation, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) molecules deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs to the mRNA-programmed ribosome. The GTPase activity of EF-Tu is triggered by ribosome-induced conformational changes of the factor that play a pivotal role in the selection of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. We present a...

  11. The location of protein S8 and surrounding elements of 16S rRNA in the 70S ribosome from combined use of directed hydroxyl radical probing and X-ray crystallography.

    Lancaster, L; Culver, G M; Yusupova, G Z; Cate, J H; Yusupov, M M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S8, which is essential for the assembly of the central domain of 16S rRNA, is one of the most thoroughly studied RNA-binding proteins. To map its surrounding RNA in the ribosome, we carried out directed hydroxyl radical probing of 16S rRNA using Fe(II) tethered to nine different positions on the surface of protein S8 in 70S ribosomes. Hydroxyl radical-induced cleavage was observed near the classical S8-binding site in the 620 stem, and flanking the other S8-footprinted regions of the central domain at the three-helix junction near position 650 and the 825 and 860 stems. In addition, cleavage near the 5' terminus of 16S rRNA, in the 300 region of its 5' domain, and in the 1070 region of its 3'-major domain provide information about the proximity to S8 of RNA elements not directly involved in its binding. These data, along with previous footprinting and crosslinking results, allowed positioning of protein S8 and its surrounding RNA elements in a 7.8-A map of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. The resulting model is in close agreement with the extensive body of data from previous studies using protein-protein and protein-RNA crosslinking, chemical and enzymatic footprinting, and genetics.

  12. The structure of the eukaryotic ribosome at 3.0 Å resolution.

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Melnikov, Sergey; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2011-12-16

    Ribosomes translate genetic information encoded by messenger RNA into proteins. Many aspects of translation and its regulation are specific to eukaryotes, whose ribosomes are much larger and intricate than their bacterial counterparts. We report the crystal structure of the 80S ribosome from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae--including nearly all ribosomal RNA bases and protein side chains as well as an additional protein, Stm1--at a resolution of 3.0 angstroms. This atomic model reveals the architecture of eukaryote-specific elements and their interaction with the universally conserved core, and describes all eukaryote-specific bridges between the two ribosomal subunits. It forms the structural framework for the design and analysis of experiments that explore the eukaryotic translation apparatus and the evolutionary forces that shaped it.

  13. Correlation between mechanical strength of messenger RNA pseudoknots and ribosomal frameshifting

    Hansen, Thomas Møller; Reihani, S Nader S; Oddershede, Lene B;

    2007-01-01

    " that predicts some physical barrier is needed to force the ribosome into the -1 frame. Also, our findings support the recent observation made by cryoelectron microscopy that mechanical interaction between a ribosome and a pseudoknot causes a deformation of the A-site tRNA. The result has implications...... for the understanding of genetic regulation, reading frame maintenance, tRNA movement, and unwinding of mRNA secondary structures by ribosomes.......Programmed ribosomal frameshifting is often used by viral pathogens including HIV. Slippery sequences present in some mRNAs cause the ribosome to shift reading frame. The resulting protein is thus encoded by one reading frame upstream from the slippery sequence and by another reading frame...

  14. Traffic of interacting ribosomes: effects of single-machine mechano-chemistry on protein synthesis

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2006-01-01

    Many ribosomes simultaneously move on the same messenger RNA (mRNA), each synthesizing a protein. Earlier models of ribosome traffic represent each ribosome by a ``self-propelled particle'' and capture the dynamics by an extension of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. In contrast, here we develope a ``unified'' theoretical model that not only incorporates the mutual exclusions of the interacting ribosomes, but also describes explicitly the mechano-chemistry of each of these individual cyclic machines during protein synthesis. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, we analyze this model and illustrate its power by making experimentally testable predictions on the rate of protein synthesis and the density profile of the ribosomes on some mRNAs in E-Coli.

  15. Ribosome collisions and Translation efficiency: Optimization by codon usage and mRNA destabilization

    Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Individual mRNAs are translated by multiple ribosomes that initiate translation with an interval of a few seconds. The ribosome speed is codon dependent, and ribosome queuing has been suggested to explain specific data for translation of some mRNAs in vivo. By modeling the stochastic translation...... process as a traffic problem, we here analyze conditions and consequences of collisions and queuing. The model allowed us to determine the on-rate (0.8 to 1.1 initiations/s) and the time (1 s) the preceding ribosome occludes initiation for Escherichia coli lacZ mRNA in vivo. We find that ribosome...... collisions and queues are inevitable consequences of a stochastic translation mechanism that reduce the translation efficiency substantially on natural mRNAs. The cells minimize collisions by having its mRNAs being unstable and by a highly selected codon usage in the start of the mRNA. The cost of m...

  16. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  17. Target Assembly Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  18. Preparation of Biologically Active Arabidopsis Ribosomes and Comparison with Yeast Ribosomes for Binding to a tRNA-Mimic that Enhances Translation of Plant Plus-Strand RNA Viruses

    Vera Aleksey Stupina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of biologically active cell components from multicellular eukaryotic organisms often poses difficult challenges such as low yields and inability to retain the integrity and functionality of the purified compound. We previously identified a cap-independent translation enhancer (3’CITE in the 3’UTR of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV that structurally mimics a tRNA and binds to yeast 80S ribosomes and 60S subunits in the P-site. Yeast ribosomes were used for these studies due to the lack of methods for isolation of plant ribosomes with high yields and integrity. To carry out studies with more natural components, a simple and efficient procedure has been developed for the isolation of large quantities of high quality ribosomes and ribosomal subunits from Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts prepared from seed-derived callus tissue. Attempts to isolate high quality ribosomes from wheat germ, bean sprouts and evacuolated protoplasts were unsuccessful. Addition of purified Arabidopsis 80S plant ribosomes to ribosome-depleted wheat germ lysates resulted in a greater than 1200-fold enhancement in in vitro translation of a luciferase reporter construct. The TCV 3’CITE bound to ribosomes with a 3 to 7-fold higher efficiency when using plant 80S ribosomes compared with yeast ribosomes, indicating that this viral translational enhancer is adapted to interact more efficiently with host plant ribosomes.

  19. Ribosomal proteins L11 and L10.(L12)4 and the antibiotic thiostrepton interact with overlapping regions of the 23 S rRNA backbone in the ribosomal GTPase centre

    Rosendahl, G; Douthwaite, S

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli ribosomal protein (r-protein) L11 and its binding site on 23 S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) are associated with ribosomal hydrolysis of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP). We have used hydroxyl radical footprinting to map the contacts between L11 and the backbone riboses in 23 S rRNA, a...

  20. The emerging roles of ribosome biogenesis in craniofacial development

    Adam P Ross

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are a transient, migratory cell population, which originates during neurulation at the neural folds and contributes to the majority of tissues, including the mesenchymal structures of the craniofacial skeleton. The deregulation of the complex developmental processes that guide migration, proliferation, and differentiation of neural crest cells may result in a wide range of pathological conditions grouped together as neurocristopathies. Recently, due to their multipotent properties neural crest stem cells have received considerable attention as a possible source for stem cell based regenerative therapies. This exciting prospect underlines the need to further explore the developmental programs that guide neural crest cell differentiation. This review explores the particular importance of ribosome biogenesis defects in this context since a specific interface between ribosomopathies and neurocristopathies exists as evidenced by disorders such as Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome and Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

  1. A stochastic model of translation with -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    Bailey, Brenae L.; Visscher, Koen; Watkins, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Many viruses produce multiple proteins from a single mRNA sequence by encoding overlapping genes. One mechanism to decode both genes, which reside in alternate reading frames, is -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting. Although recognized for over 25 years, the molecular and physical mechanism of -1 frameshifting remains poorly understood. We have developed a mathematical model that treats mRNA translation and associated -1 frameshifting as a stochastic process in which the transition probabilities are based on the energetics of local molecular interactions. The model predicts both the location and efficiency of -1 frameshift events in HIV-1. Moreover, we compute -1 frameshift efficiencies upon mutations in the viral mRNA sequence and variations in relative tRNA abundances, predictions that are directly testable in experiment.

  2. Ribosomal protein gene knockdown causes developmental defects in zebrafish.

    Tamayo Uechi

    Full Text Available The ribosomal proteins (RPs form the majority of cellular proteins and are mandatory for cellular growth. RP genes have been linked, either directly or indirectly, to various diseases in humans. Mutations in RP genes are also associated with tissue-specific phenotypes, suggesting a possible role in organ development during early embryogenesis. However, it is not yet known how mutations in a particular RP gene result in specific cellular changes, or how RP genes might contribute to human diseases. The development of animal models with defects in RP genes will be essential for studying these questions. In this study, we knocked down 21 RP genes in zebrafish by using morpholino antisense oligos to inhibit their translation. Of these 21, knockdown of 19 RPs resulted in the development of morphants with obvious deformities. Although mutations in RP genes, like other housekeeping genes, would be expected to result in nonspecific developmental defects with widespread phenotypes, we found that knockdown of some RP genes resulted in phenotypes specific to each gene, with varying degrees of abnormality in the brain, body trunk, eyes, and ears at about 25 hours post fertilization. We focused further on the organogenesis of the brain. Each knocked-down gene that affected the morphogenesis of the brain produced a different pattern of abnormality. Among the 7 RP genes whose knockdown produced severe brain phenotypes, 3 human orthologs are located within chromosomal regions that have been linked to brain-associated diseases, suggesting a possible involvement of RP genes in brain or neurological diseases. The RP gene knockdown system developed in this study could be a powerful tool for studying the roles of ribosomes in human diseases.

  3. Cross-species functionality of pararetroviral elements driving ribosome shunting.

    Mikhail M Pooggin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV belong to distinct genera of pararetroviruses infecting dicot and monocot plants, respectively. In both viruses, polycistronic translation of pregenomic (pg RNA is initiated by shunting ribosomes that bypass a large region of the pgRNA leader with several short (sORFs and a stable stem-loop structure. The shunt requires translation of a 5'-proximal sORF terminating near the stem. In CaMV, mutations knocking out this sORF nearly abolish shunting and virus viability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that two distant regions of the CaMV leader that form a minimal shunt configuration comprising the sORF, a bottom part of the stem, and a shunt landing sequence can be replaced by heterologous sequences that form a structurally similar configuration in RTBV without any dramatic effect on shunt-mediated translation and CaMV infectivity. The CaMV-RTBV chimeric leader sequence was largely stable over five viral passages in turnip plants: a few alterations that did eventually occur in the virus progenies are indicative of fine tuning of the chimeric sequence during adaptation to a new host. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate cross-species functionality of pararetroviral cis-elements driving ribosome shunting and evolutionary conservation of the shunt mechanism. We are grateful to Matthias Müller and Sandra Pauli for technical assistance. This work was initiated at Friedrich Miescher Institute (Basel, Switzerland. We thank Prof. Thomas Boller for hosting the group at the Institute of Botany.

  4. Development of a long-pulse (30-s), high-energy (120-keV) ion source for neutral-beam applications

    Tsai, C.C.; Barber, G.C.; Blue, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Multimegawatt neutral beams of hydrogen or deuterium atoms are needed for fusion machine applications such as MFTB-B, TFTR-U, DIII-U, and FED (INTOR or ETR). For these applications, a duoPIGatron ion source is being developed to produce high-brightness deuterium beams at a beam energy of approx. 120 keV for pulse lengths up to 30 s. A long-pulse plasma generator with active water cooling has been operated at an arc level of 1200 A with 30-s pulse durations. The plasma density and uniformity are sufficient for supplying a 60-A beam of hydrogen ions to a 13- by 43-cm accelerator. A 10- by 25-cm tetrode accelerator has been operated to form 120-keV hydrogen ion beams. Using the two-dimensional (2-D) ion extraction code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a 13- by 43-cm tetrode accelerator has been designed and is being fabricated. The aperture shapes of accelerator grids are optimized for 120-keV beam energy.

  5. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  6. Extending reference assembly models

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz;

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  7. Assembly of primary cilia

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Veland, Iben R; Schrøder, Jacob M

    2008-01-01

    in primary cilia assembly or function have been associated with a panoply of disorders and diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, left-right asymmetry defects, hydrocephalus, and Bardet Biedl Syndrome. Here we provide an up-to-date review focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly...

  8. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI.

    Kitts, Paul A; Church, Deanna M; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-04

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site.

  9. Self-assembled nanostructures

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  10. Constrained space camera assembly

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  11. Ribosomal studies on the 70S ribosome of E.coli by means of neutron scattering; Strukturuntersuchungen am 70S-Ribosom von E.coli unter Anwendung von Neutronenstreuung

    Burkhardt, N. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    1997-12-31

    Ribosomes are ribonucleo-protein complexes, which catalyse proteinbiosynthesis in all living organisms. Currently, most of the structural models of the prokaryotic 70S ribosome rely on electron microscopy and describe mainly the outer shape of the particle. Neutron scattering can provide information on the internal structure of the ribosome. Parts of the structure can be contrasted for neutrons by means of an isotopic exchange of the naturally occurring hydrogen ({sup 1}H) for deuterium ({sup 2}H), allowing direct measurements in situ. Specifically deuterium-labeled ribosomes (E. coli) were prepared and analysed with neutron scattering. The biochemical methods were established and combined to a generally applicable preparation system. This allows labeling of all ribosomal components in any combination. A systematic analysis of the protein and RNA phases resulted in the development of a new model for the 70S ribosome. This model describes not only the outer shape of the particle, but displays also an experimentally determined internal protein-RNA distribution and the border of subunits for the first time (four-phase model; resolution: 50A). Models of the 70S ribosome from other studies were evaluated and ranked according to consistency with the measured scattering data. Applying a new neutron scattering technique of particular sensitivity, the proton-spin contrast-variation, single proteins could be measured and localized. The positions of the proteins S6 and S10 were determined, providing the first coordinates of protein mass centers within the 70S ribosome. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ribosomen sind Ribonukleinsaeure-Protein Komplexe, die in allen lebenden Organismen die Proteinbiosynthese katalysieren. Strukturmodelle fuer das prokaryontische 70S-Ribosom beruhen derzeit vorwiegend auf elektronenmikroskopischen Untersuchungen und beschreiben im wesentlichen die aeussere Oberflaeche des Partikels. Informationen ueber die innere Struktur des Ribosoms koennen Messungen mit

  12. Impaired Telomere Maintenance and Decreased Canonical WNT Signaling but Normal Ribosome Biogenesis in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from X-Linked Dyskeratosis Congenita Patients.

    Bai-Wei Gu

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DC is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by the presence of short telomeres at presentation. Mutations in ten different genes, whose products are involved in the telomere maintenance pathway, have been shown to cause DC. The X-linked form is the most common form of the disease and is caused by mutations in the gene DKC1, encoding the protein dyskerin. Dyskerin is required for the assembly and stability of telomerase and is also involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA processing where it converts specific uridines to pseudouridine. DC is thought to result from failure to maintain tissues, like blood, that are renewed by stem cell activity, but research into pathogenic mechanisms has been hampered by the difficulty of obtaining stem cells from patients. We reasoned that induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells from X-linked DC patients may provide information about the mechanisms involved. Here we describe the production of iPS cells from DC patients with DKC1 mutations Q31E, A353V and ΔL37. In addition we constructed "corrected" lines with a copy of the wild type dyskerin cDNA expressed from the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. We show that in iPS cells with DKC1 mutations telomere maintenance is compromised with short telomere lengths and decreased telomerase activity. The degree to which telomere lengths are affected by expression of telomerase during reprograming, or with ectopic expression of wild type dyskerin, is variable. The recurrent mutation A353V shows the most severe effect on telomere maintenance. A353V cells but not Q31E or ΔL37 cells, are refractory to correction by expression of wild type DKC1 cDNA. Because dyskerin is involved in both telomere maintenance and ribosome biogenesis it has been postulated that defective ribosome biogenesis and translation may contribute to the disease phenotype. Evidence from mouse and zebra fish models has supported the involvement of ribosome biogenesis but primary cells

  13. tmRNA-SmpB: a journey to the centre of the bacterial ribosome.

    Weis, Félix; Bron, Patrick; Giudice, Emmanuel; Rolland, Jean-Paul; Thomas, Daniel; Felden, Brice; Gillet, Reynald

    2010-11-17

    Ribosomes mediate protein synthesis by decoding the information carried by messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and catalysing peptide bond formation between amino acids. When bacterial ribosomes stall on incomplete messages, the trans-translation quality control mechanism is activated by the transfer-messenger RNA bound to small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB ribonucleoprotein complex). Trans-translation liberates the stalled ribosomes and triggers degradation of the incomplete proteins. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy structures of tmRNA-SmpB accommodated or translocated into stalled ribosomes. Two atomic models for each state are proposed. This study reveals how tmRNA-SmpB crosses the ribosome and how, as the problematic mRNA is ejected, the tmRNA resume codon is placed onto the ribosomal decoding site by new contacts between SmpB and the nucleotides upstream of the tag-encoding sequence. This provides a structural basis for the transit of the large tmRNA-SmpB complex through the ribosome and for the means by which the tmRNA internal frame is set for translation to resume.

  14. Translation by polysome: theory of ribosome profile on a single mRNA transcript

    Sharma, Ajeet K

    2011-01-01

    The process of polymerizing a protein by a ribosome, using a messenger RNA (mRNA) as the corresponding template, is called {\\it translation}. Ribosome may be regarded as a molecular motor for which the mRNA template serves also as the track. Often several ribosomes may translate the same (mRNA) simultaneously. The ribosomes bound simultaneously to a single mRNA transcript are the members of a polyribosome (or, simply, {\\it polysome}). Experimentally measured {\\it polysome profile} gives the distribution of polysome {\\it sizes}. Recently a breakthrough in determining the instantaneous {\\it positions} of the ribosomes on a given mRNA track has been achieved and the technique is called {\\it ribosome profiling} \\cite{ingolia10,guo10}. Motivated by the success of these techniques, we have studied the spatio-temporal organization of ribosomes by extending a theoretical model that we have reported elsewhere \\cite{sharma11}. This extended version of our model incorporates not only (i) mechano-chemical cycle of indivi...

  15. The human Shwachman-Diamond syndrome protein, SBDS, associates with ribosomal RNA.

    Ganapathi, Karthik A; Austin, Karyn M; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha; Malsch, Maggie M; Reed, Robin; Shimamura, Akiko

    2007-09-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, exocrine pancreatic dysfunction, and leukemia predisposition. Mutations in the SBDS gene are identified in most patients with SDS. SBDS encodes a highly conserved protein of unknown function. Data from SBDS orthologs suggest that SBDS may play a role in ribosome biogenesis or RNA processing. Human SBDS is enriched in the nucleolus, the major cellular site of ribosome biogenesis. Here we report that SBDS nucleolar localization is dependent on active rRNA transcription. Cells from patients with SDS or Diamond-Blackfan anemia are hypersensitive to low doses of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of rRNA transcription. The addition of wild-type SBDS complements the actinomycin D hypersensitivity of SDS patient cells. SBDS migrates together with the 60S large ribosomal subunit in sucrose gradients and coprecipitates with 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Loss of SBDS is not associated with a discrete block in rRNA maturation or with decreased levels of the 60S ribosomal subunit. SBDS forms a protein complex with nucleophosmin, a multifunctional protein implicated in ribosome biogenesis and leukemogenesis. Our studies support the addition of SDS to the growing list of human bone marrow failure syndromes involving the ribosome.

  16. Understanding Biases in Ribosome Profiling Experiments Reveals Signatures of Translation Dynamics in Yeast.

    Jeffrey A Hussmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome profiling produces snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes on messenger RNAs. These snapshots can be used to make inferences about translation dynamics. Recent ribosome profiling studies in yeast, however, have reached contradictory conclusions regarding the average translation rate of each codon. Some experiments have used cycloheximide (CHX to stabilize ribosomes before measuring their positions, and these studies all counterintuitively report a weak negative correlation between the translation rate of a codon and the abundance of its cognate tRNA. In contrast, some experiments performed without CHX report strong positive correlations. To explain this contradiction, we identify unexpected patterns in ribosome density downstream of each type of codon in experiments that use CHX. These patterns are evidence that elongation continues to occur in the presence of CHX but with dramatically altered codon-specific elongation rates. The measured positions of ribosomes in these experiments therefore do not reflect the amounts of time ribosomes spend at each position in vivo. These results suggest that conclusions from experiments in yeast using CHX may need reexamination. In particular, we show that in all such experiments, codons decoded by less abundant tRNAs were in fact being translated more slowly before the addition of CHX disrupted these dynamics.

  17. Repressed synthesis of ribosomal proteins generates protein-specific cell cycle and morphological phenotypes.

    Thapa, Mamata; Bommakanti, Ananth; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Gregory, Brian; Samsel, Leigh; Zengel, Janice M; Lindahl, Lasse

    2013-12-01

    The biogenesis of ribosomes is coordinated with cell growth and proliferation. Distortion of the coordinated synthesis of ribosomal components affects not only ribosome formation, but also cell fate. However, the connection between ribosome biogenesis and cell fate is not well understood. To establish a model system for inquiries into these processes, we systematically analyzed cell cycle progression, cell morphology, and bud site selection after repression of 54 individual ribosomal protein (r-protein) genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repression of nine 60S r-protein genes results in arrest in the G2/M phase, whereas repression of nine other 60S and 22 40S r-protein genes causes arrest in the G1 phase. Furthermore, bud morphology changes after repression of some r-protein genes. For example, very elongated buds form after repression of seven 60S r-protein genes. These genes overlap with, but are not identical to, those causing the G2/M cell cycle phenotype. Finally, repression of most r-protein genes results in changed sites of bud formation. Strikingly, the r-proteins whose repression generates similar effects on cell cycle progression cluster in the ribosome physical structure, suggesting that different topological areas of the precursor and/or mature ribosome are mechanistically connected to separate aspects of the cell cycle.

  18. Human Cells Require Non-stop Ribosome Rescue Activity in Mitochondria.

    Heather A Feaga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use trans-translation and the alternative rescue factors ArfA (P36675 and ArfB (Q9A8Y3 to hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on ribosomes that stall near the 3' end of an mRNA during protein synthesis. The eukaryotic protein ICT1 (Q14197 is homologous to ArfB. In vitro ribosome rescue assays of human ICT1 and Caulobacter crescentus ArfB showed that these proteins have the same activity and substrate specificity. Both ArfB and ICT1 hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on nonstop ribosomes or ribosomes stalled with ≤6 nucleotides extending past the A site, but are unable to hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA when the mRNA extends ≥14 nucleotides past the A site. ICT1 provided sufficient ribosome rescue activity to support viability in C. crescentus cells that lacked both trans-translation and ArfB. Likewise, expression of ArfB protected human cells from death when ICT1 was silenced with siRNA. These data indicate that ArfB and ICT1 are functionally interchangeable, and demonstrate that ICT1 is a ribosome rescue factor. Because ICT1 is essential in human cells, these results suggest that ribosome rescue activity in mitochondria is required in humans.

  19. A Numbers Game: Ribosome Densities, Bacterial Growth, and Antibiotic-Mediated Stasis and Death

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Perrot, Véronique; Weiss, Howard; Ovesepian, Armen; Baquero, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We postulate that the inhibition of growth and low rates of mortality of bacteria exposed to ribosome-binding antibiotics deemed bacteriostatic can be attributed almost uniquely to these drugs reducing the number of ribosomes contributing to protein synthesis, i.e., the number of effective ribosomes. We tested this hypothesis with Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 and constructs that had been deleted for 1 to 6 of the 7 rRNA (rrn) operons. In the absence of antibiotics, constructs with fewer rrn operons have lower maximum growth rates and longer lag phases than those with more ribosomal operons. In the presence of the ribosome-binding “bacteriostatic” antibiotics tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and azithromycin, E. coli strains with 1 and 2 rrn operons are killed at a substantially higher rate than those with more rrn operons. This increase in the susceptibility of E. coli with fewer rrn operons to killing by ribosome-targeting bacteriostatic antibiotics is not reflected in their greater sensitivity to killing by the bactericidal antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which does not target ribosomes, but also to killing by gentamicin, which does. Finally, when such strains are exposed to these ribosome-targeting bacteriostatic antibiotics, the time before these bacteria start to grow again when the drugs are removed, referred to as the post-antibiotic effect (PAE), is markedly greater for constructs with fewer rrn operons than for those with more rrn operons. We interpret the results of these other experiments reported here as support for the hypothesis that the reduction in the effective number of ribosomes due to binding to these structures provides a sufficient explanation for the action of bacteriostatic antibiotics that target these structures. PMID:28174311

  20. Impact of P-Site tRNA and antibiotics on ribosome mediated protein folding: studies using the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Surojit Mondal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ribosome, which acts as a platform for mRNA encoded polypeptide synthesis, is also capable of assisting in folding of polypeptide chains. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC that catalyzes peptide bond formation resides in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome. Proper positioning of the 3' -CCA ends of the A- and P-site tRNAs via specific interactions with the nucleotides of the PTC are crucial for peptidyl transferase activity. This RNA domain is also the center for ribosomal chaperoning activity. The unfolded polypeptide chains interact with the specific nucleotides of the PTC and are released in a folding competent form. In vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to this domain (bDV RNA also displays chaperoning activity. RESULTS: The present study explores the effects of tRNAs, antibiotics that are A- and P-site PTC substrate analogs (puromycin and blasticidin and macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin and josamycin on the chaperoning ability of the E. coli ribosome and bDV RNA. Our studies using mRNA programmed ribosomes show that a tRNA positioned at the P-site effectively inhibits the ribosome's chaperoning function. We also show that the antibiotic blasticidin (that mimics the interaction between 3'-CCA end of P/P-site tRNA with the PTC is more effective in inhibiting ribosome and bDV RNA chaperoning ability than either puromycin or the macrolide antibiotics. Mutational studies of the bDV RNA could identify the nucleotides U2585 and G2252 (both of which interact with P-site tRNA to be important for its chaperoning ability. CONCLUSION: Both protein synthesis and their proper folding are crucial for maintenance of a functional cellular proteome. The PTC of the ribosome is attributed with both these abilities. The silencing of the chaperoning ability of the ribosome in the presence of P-site bound tRNA might be a way to segregate these two important functions.

  1. Dynamic nanoparticle assemblies.

    Wang, Libing; Xu, Liguang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2012-11-20

    Although nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are at the beginning of their development, their unique geometrical shapes and media-responsive optical, electronic, and magnetic properties have attracted significant interest. Nanoscale assembly bridges multiple levels of hierarchy of materials: individual nanoparticles, discrete molecule-like or virus-like nanoscale agglomerates, microscale devices, and macroscale materials. The capacity to self-assemble can greatly facilitate the integration of nanotechnology with other technologies and, in particular, with microscale fabrication. In this Account, we describe developments in the emerging field of dynamic NP assemblies, which are spontaneously form superstructures containing more than two inorganic nanoscale particles that display the ability to change their geometrical, physical, chemical, and other attributes. In many ways, dynamic assemblies can represent a bottleneck in the "bottom-up" fabrication of NP-based devices because they can produce a much greater variety of assemblies, but they also provide a convenient tool for variation of geometries and dimensions of nanoparticle assemblies. Superstructures of NPs (and those held together by similar intrinsic forces)are classified into two groups: Class 1 where media and external fields can alter shape, conformation, and order of stable super structures with a nearly constant number of NPs or Class 2 where the total number of NPs changes, while the organizational motif in the final superstructure remains the same. The future development of successful dynamic assemblies requires understanding the equilibrium in dynamic NP systems. The dynamic nature of Class 1 assemblies is associated with the equilibrium between different conformations of a superstructure and is comparable to the isomerization in classical chemistry. Class 2 assemblies involve the formation or breakage of linkages between the NPs, which is analogous to the classical chemical equilibrium for the formation of

  2. Crystal Structure of Hypusine-Containing Translation Factor eIF5A Bound to a Rotated Eukaryotic Ribosome.

    Melnikov, Sergey; Mailliot, Justine; Shin, Byung-Sik; Rigger, Lukas; Yusupova, Gulnara; Micura, Ronald; Dever, Thomas E; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-09-11

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A promotes protein synthesis by resolving polyproline-induced ribosomal stalling. Here, we report a 3.25-Å resolution crystal structure of eIF5A bound to the yeast 80S ribosome. The structure reveals a previously unseen conformation of an eIF5A-ribosome complex and highlights a possible functional link between conformational changes of the ribosome during protein synthesis and the eIF5A-ribosome association.

  3. High-resolution microscopy of active ribosomal genes and key members of the rRNA processing machinery inside nucleolus-like bodies of fully-grown mouse oocytes.

    Shishova, Kseniya V; Khodarovich, Yuriy M; Lavrentyeva, Elena A; Zatsepina, Olga V

    2015-10-01

    Nucleolus-like bodies (NLBs) of fully-grown (germinal vesicle, GV) mammalian oocytes are traditionally considered as morphologically distinct entities, which, unlike normal nucleoli, contain transcribed ribosomal genes (rDNA) solely at their surface. In the current study, we for the first time showed that active ribosomal genes are present not only on the surface but also inside NLBs of the NSN-type oocytes. The "internal" rRNA synthesis was evidenced by cytoplasmic microinjections of BrUTP as precursor and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with a probe to the short-lived 5'ETS segment of the 47S pre-rRNA. We further showed that in the NLB mass of NSN-oocytes, distribution of active rDNA, RNA polymerase I (UBF) and rRNA processing (fibrillarin) protein factors, U3 snoRNA, pre-rRNAs and 18S/28S rRNAs is remarkably similar to that in somatic nucleoli capable to make pre-ribosomes. Overall, these observations support the occurrence of rDNA transcription, rRNA processing and pre-ribosome assembly in the NSN-type NLBs and so that their functional similarity to normal nucleoli. Unlike the NSN-type NLBs, the NLBs of more mature SN-oocytes do not contain transcribed rRNA genes, U3 snoRNA, pre-rRNAs, 18S and 28S rRNAs. These results favor the idea that in a process of transformation of NSN-oocytes to SN-oocytes, NLBs cease to produce pre-ribosomes and, moreover, lose their rRNAs. We also concluded that a denaturing fixative 70% ethanol used in the study to fix oocytes could be more appropriate for light microscopy analysis of nucleolar RNAs and proteins in mammalian fully-grown oocytes than a commonly used cross-linking aldehyde fixative, formalin.

  4. Interaction of the antibiotics clindamycin and lincomycin with Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA

    Douthwaite, S

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of the antibiotics clindamycin and lincomycin with Escherichia coli ribosomes has been compared by chemical footprinting. The protection afforded by both drugs is limited to the peptidyl transferase loop of 23S rRNA. Under conditions of stoichiometric binding at 1 mM drug concentration...... of the two drugs for the ribosome, estimated by footprinting, is approximately the same, giving Kdiss values of 5 microM for lincomycin and 8 microM for clindamycin. The results show that in vitro the drugs are equally potent in blocking their ribosomal target site. Their inhibitory effects on peptide bond...

  5. Interaction of ribosomal proteins S5, S6, S11, S12, S18 and S21 with 16 S rRNA.

    Stern, S; Powers, T; Changchien, L M; Noller, H F

    1988-06-20

    We have examined the effects of assembly of ribosomal proteins S5, S6, S11, S12, S18 and S21 on the reactivities of residues in 16 S rRNA towards chemical probes. The results show that S6, S18 and S11 interact with the 690-720 and 790 loop regions of 16 S rRNA in a highly co-operative manner, that is consistent with the previously defined assembly map relationships among these proteins. The results also indicate that these proteins, one of which (S18) has previously been implicated as a component of the ribosomal P-site, interact with residues near some of the recently defined P-site (class II tRNA protection) nucleotides in 16 S rRNA. In addition, assembly of protein S12 has been found to result in the protection of residues in both the 530 stem/loop and the 900 stem regions; the latter group is closely juxtaposed to a segment of 16 S rRNA recently shown to be protected from chemical probes by streptomycin. Interestingly, both S5 and S12 appear to protect, to differing degrees, a well-defined set of residues in the 900 stem/loop and 5'-terminal regions. These observations are discussed in terms of the effects of S5 and S12 on streptomycin binding, and in terms of the class III tRNA protection found in the 900 stem of 16 S rRNA. Altogether these results show that many of the small subunit proteins, which have previously been shown to be functionally important, appear to be associated with functionally implicated segments of 16 S rRNA.

  6. Modular assembled space telescope

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Budinoff, Jason; MacEwen, Howard; Matthews, Gary; Postman, Marc

    2013-09-01

    We present a new approach to building a modular segmented space telescope that greatly leverages the heritage of the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope. The modular design in which mirror segments are assembled into identical panels allows for economies of scale and for efficient space assembly that make a 20-m aperture approach cost effective. This assembly approach can leverage NASA's future capabilities and has the power to excite the public's imagination. We discuss the science drivers, basic architecture, technology, and leveraged NASA infrastructure, concluding with a proposed plan for going forward.

  7. DC source assemblies

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  8. Mechanisms for ribotoxin-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage

    He, Kaiyu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhou, Hui-Ren [Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The Type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a ribotoxic mycotoxin known to contaminate cereal-based foods, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage in the macrophage via p38-directed activation of caspases. Here we employed the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage model to test the hypothesis that this rRNA cleavage pathway is similarly induced by other ribotoxins. Capillary electrophoresis confirmed that the antibiotic anisomycin (≥ 25 ng/ml), the macrocylic trichothecene satratoxin G (SG) (≥ 10 ng/ml) and ribosome-inactivating protein ricin (≥ 300 ng/ml) induced 18s and 28s rRNA fragmentation patterns identical to that observed for DON. Also, as found for DON, inhibition of p38, double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR) and hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) suppressed MAPK anisomycin-induced rRNA cleavage, while, in contrast, their inhibition did not affect SG- and ricin-induced rRNA fragmentation. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-μ and pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK suppressed rRNA cleavage induced by anisomycin, SG and ricin, indicating that these ribotoxins shared with DON a conserved downstream pathway. Activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 concurrently with apoptosis further suggested that rRNA cleavage occurred in parallel with both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of programmed cell death. When specific inhibitors of cathepsins L and B (lysosomal cysteine cathepsins active at cytosolic neutral pH) were tested, only the former impaired anisomycin-, SG-, ricin- and DON-induced rRNA cleavage. Taken together, the data suggest that (1) all four ribotoxins induced p53-dependent rRNA cleavage via activation of cathepsin L and caspase 3, and (2) activation of p53 by DON and anisomycin involved p38 whereas SG and ricin activated p53 by an alternative mechanism. Highlights: ► Deoxynivalenol (DON) anisomycin, satratoxin G (SG) and ricin are ribotoxins. ► Ribotoxins induce 18s and 28s rRNA cleavage in the RAW 264.7 macrophage model. ► Ribotoxins induce rRNA cleavage via

  9. Ribosomal protein genes are overexpressed in colorectal cancer: isolation of a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein.

    Pogue-Geile, K; Geiser, J R; Shu, M; Miller, C; Wool, I G; Meisler, A I; Pipas, J M

    1991-08-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein from a normal human colon cDNA library. The clone was identified as one of many that detected genes whose level of expression was increased in adenocarcinoma of the colon relative to normal colonic mucosa. Increased levels of the S3 transcript were present in the tumors of all eight patients examined. Moreover, the S3 mRNA was also more abundant in 7 of 10 adenomatous polyps, the presumed precursor of carcinoma. Additional studies demonstrated that increased levels of mRNAs encoding several other ribosomal proteins, including S6, S8, S12, L5, and P0, were present in colorectal tumors and polyps. These results suggest that there is increased synthesis of ribosomes in colorectal tumors and that this increase is an early event in colon neoplasia.

  10. Designing Assemblies Of Plates

    Williams, F. W.; Kennedy, D.; Butler, R.; Aston, G.; Anderson, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    VICONOPT calculates vibrations and instabilities of assemblies of prismatic plates. Designed for efficient, accurate analysis of buckling and vibration, and for optimum design of panels of composite materials. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  11. Analysis of the protein-protein interactions between the human acidic ribosomal P-proteins: evaluation by the two hybrid system

    Tchórzewski, M; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O;

    2000-01-01

    The surface acidic ribosomal proteins (P-proteins), together with ribosomal core protein P0 form a multimeric lateral protuberance on the 60 S ribosomal subunit. This structure, also called stalk, is important for efficient translational activity of the ribosome. In order to shed more light on th...

  12. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  13. Changes in ribosomal proteins in wheat embryos in the course of grain development and maturation

    Stanisław Weidner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found, by comparing the densitometric profiles of ribosomal proteins of wheat embryos in milk and full grain ripeness, that in the process of development and ripening of caryopses the percentual proportion of low molecular weight proteins increases at the cost of those of high molecular weight. This concerns both acidic and basic proteins. In electrophoretic separation of ribosomal proteins from embryos of fully ripe seeds by the method of two-dimensional electrophoresis the appearance of three new low molecular weight proteins - an acidic one and two basic ones - was observed. These proteins were not found in the embryos of caryopses of milk ripeness. These results indicate that with development and ripening of wheat caryopses new low molecular weight ribosomal proteins are built into the ribosomes in the embryo. These changes are both quantitative and qualitative.

  14. Proteomic profiling of the mitochondrial ribosome identifies Atp25 as a composite mitochondrial precursor protein.

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Sommer, Frederik; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-10-15

    Whereas the structure and function of cytosolic ribosomes are well characterized, we only have a limited understanding of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. Using SILAC-based proteomic profiling, we identified 13 proteins that cofractionated with the mitochondrial ribosome, most of which play a role in translation or ribosomal biogenesis. One of these proteins is a homologue of the bacterial ribosome-silencing factor (Rsf). This protein is generated from the composite precursor protein Atp25 upon internal cleavage by the matrix processing peptidase MPP, and in this respect, it differs from all other characterized mitochondrial proteins of baker's yeast. We observed that cytosolic expression of Rsf, but not of noncleaved Atp25 protein, is toxic. Our results suggest that eukaryotic cells face the challenge of avoiding negative interference from the biogenesis of their two distinct translation machineries.

  15. Structure of the 70S ribosome from human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

    Khusainov, Iskander; Vicens, Quentin; Bochler, Anthony; Grosse, François; Myasnikov, Alexander; Ménétret, Jean-François; Chicher, Johana; Marzi, Stefano; Romby, Pascale; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat; Hashem, Yaser

    2016-12-01

    Comparative structural studies of ribosomes from various organisms keep offering exciting insights on how species-specific or environment-related structural features of ribosomes may impact translation specificity and its regulation. Although the importance of such features may be less obvious within more closely related organisms, their existence could account for vital yet species-specific mechanisms of translation regulation that would involve stalling, cell survival and antibiotic resistance. Here, we present the first full 70S ribosome structure from Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium, solved by cryo-electron microscopy. Comparative analysis with other known bacterial ribosomes pinpoints several unique features specific to S. aureus around a conserved core, at both the protein and the RNA levels. Our work provides the structural basis for the many studies aiming at understanding translation regulation in S. aureus and for designing drugs against this often multi-resistant pathogen.

  16. Ribosomal mutations cause p53-mediated dark skin and pleiotropic effects.

    McGowan, Kelly A; Li, Jun Z; Park, Christopher Y; Beaudry, Veronica; Tabor, Holly K; Sabnis, Amit J; Zhang, Weibin; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Myers, Richard M; Attardi, Laura D; Barsh, Gregory S

    2008-08-01

    Mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins cause the Minute phenotype in Drosophila and mice, and Diamond-Blackfan syndrome in humans. Here we report two mouse dark skin (Dsk) loci caused by mutations in Rps19 (ribosomal protein S19) and Rps20 (ribosomal protein S20). We identify a common pathophysiologic program in which p53 stabilization stimulates Kit ligand expression, and, consequently, epidermal melanocytosis via a paracrine mechanism. Accumulation of p53 also causes reduced body size and erythrocyte count. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for the diverse collection of phenotypes that accompany reduced dosage of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, and have implications for understanding normal human variation and human disease.

  17. Choreography of molecular movements during ribosome progression along mRNA.

    Belardinelli, Riccardo; Sharma, Heena; Caliskan, Neva; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2016-04-01

    During translation elongation, ribosome translocation along an mRNA entails rotations of the ribosomal subunits, swiveling motions of the small subunit (SSU) head and stepwise movements of the tRNAs together with the mRNA. Here, we reconstructed the choreography of the collective motions of the Escherichia coli ribosome during translocation promoted by elongation factor EF-G, by recording the fluorescence signatures of nine different reporters placed on both ribosomal subunits, tRNA and mRNA. We captured an early forward swiveling of the SSU head taking place while the SSU body rotates in the opposite, clockwise direction. Backward swiveling of the SSU head starts upon tRNA translocation and continues until the post-translocation state is reached. This work places structures of translocation intermediates along a time axis and unravels principles of the motions of macromolecular machines.

  18. Fusidic acid targets elongation factor G in several stages of translocation on the bacterial ribosome.

    Borg, Anneli; Holm, Mikael; Shiroyama, Ikue; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Pavlov, Michael; Sanyal, Suparna; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-02-06

    The antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) targets elongation factor G (EF-G) and inhibits ribosomal peptide elongation and ribosome recycling, but deeper mechanistic aspects of FA action have remained unknown. Using quench flow and stopped flow experiments in a biochemical system for protein synthesis and taking advantage of separate time scales for inhibited (10 s) and uninhibited (100 ms) elongation cycles, a detailed kinetic model of FA action was obtained. FA targets EF-G at an early stage in the translocation process (I), which proceeds unhindered by the presence of the drug to a later stage (II), where the ribosome stalls. Stalling may also occur at a third stage of translocation (III), just before release of EF-G from the post-translocation ribosome. We show that FA is a strong elongation inhibitor (K50% ≈ 1 μm), discuss the identity of the FA targeted states, and place existing cryo-EM and crystal structures in their functional context.

  19. RNA self-assembly and RNA nanotechnology.

    Grabow, Wade W; Jaeger, Luc

    2014-06-17

    as the ribosome, large ribozymes, and riboswitches. Thus, the next step in synthetic RNA design will involve new ways to implement these same types of dynamic and responsive architectures into nanostructures functioning as real nanomachines in and outside the cell. RNA nanotechnology will likely garner broader utility and influence with a greater focus on the interplay between thermodynamic and kinetic influences on RNA self-assembly and using natural RNAs as guiding principles.

  20. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-04-16

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well.

  1. Divergent paralogues of ribosomal DNA in eucalypts (Myrtaceae).

    Bayly, Michael J; Ladiges, Pauline Y

    2007-07-01

    The presence of divergent paralogues of nuclear ribosomal DNA, from the 18S-5.8S-26S cistron, is reported in members of Eucalyptus subg. Eucalyptus. These paralogues, which include non-functional pseudogenes, probably diverged prior to the differentiation of species groups in subg. Eucalyptus. When compared with presumably functional sequences, the pseudogenes show greater sequence variation between species, particularly in the 5.8S gene. They are also characterised by reduced GC content, associated with a reduced number of CpG and CpNpG methylation sites, and an increase in the inferred number of methylation-induced substitutions. Some pseudogenes also lack motifs that are usually conserved in plants, both in ITS1 and the 5.8S gene. Two main lineages of pseudogenes are identified, one isolated from a group of western Australian species, one from a group of eastern Australian species. It is not clear whether these two lineages of pseudogenes are orthologous, or represent independent divergences from functional sequence types. The presence of divergent rDNA paralogues highlights the need for caution when interpreting eucalypt phylogenies based on ITS sequences.

  2. A quantitative SMRT cell sequencing method for ribosomal amplicons.

    Jones, Bethan M; Kustka, Adam B

    2017-04-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies continue to provide unprecedented opportunities to characterize microbial communities. For example, the Pacific Biosciences Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) platform has emerged as a unique approach harnessing DNA polymerase activity to sequence template molecules, enabling long reads at low costs. With the aim to simultaneously classify and enumerate in situ microbial populations, we developed a quantitative SMRT (qSMRT) approach that involves the addition of exogenous standards to quantify ribosomal amplicons derived from environmental samples. The V7-9 regions of 18S SSU rDNA were targeted and quantified from protistan community samples collected in the Ross Sea during the Austral summer of 2011. We used three standards of different length and optimized conditions to obtain accurate quantitative retrieval across the range of expected amplicon sizes, a necessary criterion for analyzing taxonomically diverse 18S rDNA molecules from natural environments. The ability to concurrently identify and quantify microorganisms in their natural environment makes qSMRT a powerful, rapid and cost-effective approach for defining ecosystem diversity and function.

  3. Ribosomal DNA evolution and phylogeny in Aloe (Asphodelaceae).

    Adams, S P; Leitch, I J; Bennett, M D; Chase, M W; Leitch, A R

    2000-11-01

    All Aloe taxa (∼400 species) share a conserved bimodal karyotype with a basic genome of four large and three small submetacentric/acrocentric chromosomes. We investigated the physical organization of 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to 13 Aloe species. The organization was compared with a phylogenetic tree of 28 species (including the 13 used for FISH) constructed by sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA. The phylogeny showed little divergence within Aloe, although distinct, well-supported clades were found. FISH analysis of 5S rDNA distribution showed a similar interstitial location on a large chromosome in all species examined. In contrast, the distribution of 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA was variable, with differences in number, location, and size of loci found between species. Nevertheless, within well-supported clades, all species had the same organizational patterns. Thus, despite the striking stability of karyotype structure and location of 5S rDNA, the distribution of 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA is not so constrained and has clearly changed during Aloe speciation.

  4. Current meter data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean (30 N to 30 S) from 03 November 1992 - 05 December 1992 (NODC Accession 9600018)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean (30 N to 30 S) from November 3, 1992 to...

  5. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 16 April 1984 - 01 October 1985 (NODC Accession 8700147)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from April 16, 1984 to October 1, 1985. Data were...

  6. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 01 May 1987 to 05 May 1987 (NODC Accession 9000211)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 01 May 1987 to 06 August 1988. Data were submitted...

  7. Wind and temperature data from current meter in the TOGA - Pacific Ocean (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS), 28 May 1994 to 21 March 1995 (NODC Accession 9800041)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind and temperature data were collected using current meter in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean (30 N to 30 S) from May 28, 1994 to March 21, 1995. Data were submitted...

  8. Physical, meteorological, and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS from the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) project from 01 January 1988 to 31 December 1988 (NODC Accession 8900241)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 01 January 1988 to 31 December 1988. Data...

  9. Current meter components and other data from fixed platforms from TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 12 December 1986 to 28 March 1991 (NODC Accession 9200261)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter components data were collected from fixed platforms from the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 12 December 1986 to 28 March 1991. Data were...

  10. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the TOGA area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) project from 27 December 1980 - 26 June 1986 (NODC Accession 9400011)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from December 27, 1980 to June 26, 1986. Data were...

  11. What do we know about ribosomal RNA methylation in Escherichia coli?

    Sergeeva, O V; Bogdanov, A A; Sergiev, P V

    2015-10-01

    A ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein that performs the synthesis of proteins. Ribosomal RNA of all organisms includes a number of modified nucleotides, such as base or ribose methylated and pseudouridines. Methylated nucleotides are highly conserved in bacteria and some even universally. In this review we discuss available data on a set of modification sites in the most studied bacteria, Escherichia coli. While most rRNA modification enzymes are known for this organism, the function of the modified nucleotides is rarely identified.

  12. The Expression of Antibiotic Resistance Methyltransferase Correlates with mRNA Stability Independently of Ribosome Stalling.

    Dzyubak, Ekaterina; Yap, M N

    2016-12-01

    Members of the Erm methyltransferase family modify 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome and render cross-resistance to macrolides and multiple distantly related antibiotics. Previous studies have shown that the expression of erm is activated when a macrolide-bound ribosome stalls the translation of the leader peptide preceding the cotranscribed erm Ribosome stalling is thought to destabilize the inhibitory stem-loop mRNA structure and exposes the erm Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence for translational initiation. Paradoxically, mutations that abolish ribosome stalling are routinely found in hyper-resistant clinical isolates; however, the significance of the stalling-dead leader sequence is largely unknown. Here, we show that nonsense mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus ErmB leader peptide (ErmBL) lead to high basal and induced expression of downstream ErmB in the absence or presence of macrolide concomitantly with elevated ribosome methylation and resistance. The overexpression of ErmB is associated with the reduced turnover of the ermBL-ermB transcript, and the macrolide appears to mitigate mRNA cleavage at a site immediately downstream of the ermBL SD sequence. The stabilizing effect of antibiotics on mRNA is not limited to ermBL-ermB; cationic antibiotics representing a ribosome-stalling inducer and a noninducer increase the half-life of specific transcripts. These data unveil a new layer of ermB regulation and imply that ErmBL translation or ribosome stalling serves as a "tuner" to suppress aberrant production of ErmB because methylated ribosome may impose a fitness cost on the bacterium as a result of misregulated translation.

  13. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L.; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary (2°) structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we employ single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem loop or pseudoknot mRNA 2° structures. Downstream ...

  14. Structure of the 70S ribosome from human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus

    Khusainov, Iskander; Vicens, Quentin; Bochler, Anthony; Grosse, François; Myasnikov, Alexander; Ménétret, Jean-François; Chicher, Johana; Marzi, Stefano; Romby, Pascale; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat; Hashem, Yaser

    2016-01-01

    Comparative structural studies of ribosomes from various organisms keep offering exciting insights on how species-specific or environment-related structural features of ribosomes may impact translation specificity and its regulation. Although the importance of such features may be less obvious within more closely related organisms, their existence could account for vital yet species-specific mechanisms of translation regulation that would involve stalling, cell survival and antibiotic resista...

  15. Human nucleolus organizers on nonhomologous chromosomes can share the same ribosomal gene variants.

    Krystal, M; D'Eustachio, P; Ruddle, F H; Arnheim, N

    1981-01-01

    The distributions of three human ribosomal gene polymorphisms among individual chromosomes containing nucleolus organizers were analyzed by using mouse--human hybrid cells. Different nucleolus organizers can contain the same variant, suggesting the occurrence of genetic exchanges among ribosomal gene clusters on nonhomologous chromosomes. Such exchanges appear to occur less frequently in mice. This difference is discussed in terms of the nucleolar organization and chromosomal location of ribo...

  16. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  17. Ribosome-induced tuning of GTP hydrolysis by a translational GTPase.

    Maracci, Cristina; Peske, Frank; Dannies, Ev; Pohl, Corinna; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-10-07

    GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), a translational GTPase that delivers aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosome, plays a crucial role in decoding and translational fidelity. The basic reaction mechanism and the way the ribosome contributes to catalysis are a matter of debate. Here we use mutational analysis in combination with measurements of rate/pH profiles, kinetic solvent isotope effects, and ion dependence of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu off and on the ribosome to dissect the reaction mechanism. Our data suggest that--contrary to current models--the reaction in free EF-Tu follows a pathway that does not involve the critical residue H84 in the switch II region. Binding to the ribosome without a cognate codon in the A site has little effect on the GTPase mechanism. In contrast, upon cognate codon recognition, the ribosome induces a rearrangement of EF-Tu that renders GTP hydrolysis sensitive to mutations of Asp21 and His84 and insensitive to K(+) ions. We suggest that Asp21 and His84 provide a network of interactions that stabilize the positions of the γ-phosphate and the nucleophilic water, respectively, and thus play an indirect catalytic role in the GTPase mechanism on the ribosome.

  18. Structure of the hypusinylated eukaryotic translation factor eIF-5A bound to the ribosome.

    Schmidt, Christian; Becker, Thomas; Heuer, André; Braunger, Katharina; Shanmuganathan, Vivekanandan; Pech, Markus; Berninghausen, Otto; Wilson, Daniel N; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-02-29

    During protein synthesis, ribosomes become stalled on polyproline-containing sequences, unless they are rescued in archaea and eukaryotes by the initiation factor 5A (a/eIF-5A) and in bacteria by the homologous protein EF-P. While a structure of EF-P bound to the 70S ribosome exists, structural insight into eIF-5A on the 80S ribosome has been lacking. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of eIF-5A bound to the yeast 80S ribosome at 3.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the unique and functionally essential post-translational hypusine modification reaches toward the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome, where the hypusine moiety contacts A76 of the CCA-end of the P-site tRNA. These findings would support a model whereby eIF-5A stimulates peptide bond formation on polyproline-stalled ribosomes by stabilizing and orienting the CCA-end of the P-tRNA, rather than by directly contributing to the catalysis.

  19. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    Feng, Yingang, E-mail: fengyg@qibebt.ac.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Song, Xiaxia [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lin, Jinzhong [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Xuan, Jinsong [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cui, Qiu [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Wang, Jinfeng [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  20. Telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats are chromosomal targets of the bloom syndrome DNA helicase

    Paric Enesa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is one of the most cancer-predisposing disorders and is characterized by genomic instability and a high frequency of sister chromatid exchange. The disorder is caused by loss of function of a 3' to 5' RecQ DNA helicase, BLM. The exact role of BLM in maintaining genomic integrity is not known but the helicase has been found to associate with several DNA repair complexes and some DNA replication foci. Results Chromatin immunoprecipitation of BLM complexes recovered telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats. The N-terminus of BLM, required for NB localization, is the same as the telomere association domain of BLM. The C-terminus is required for ribosomal DNA localization. BLM localizes primarily to the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA repeat where replication forks initiate. Bloom syndrome cells expressing the deletion alleles lacking the ribosomal DNA and telomere association domains have altered cell cycle populations with increased S or G2/M cells relative to normal. Conclusion These results identify telomere and ribosomal DNA repeated sequence elements as chromosomal targets for the BLM DNA helicase during the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. BLM is localized in nuclear bodies when it associates with telomeric repeats in both telomerase positive and negative cells. The BLM DNA helicase participates in genomic stability at ribosomal DNA repeats and telomeres.

  1. Ribosomal accretion, apriorism and the phylogenetic method: a response to Petrov and Williams.

    Caetano-Anollés, Derek; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Historical (ideographic) and non-historical (nomothetic) studies of ribosomal accretion appear to arrive at diametrically opposite conclusions. Phylogenetic analysis of thousands of RNA molecules and protein structures in hundreds of genomes supports the structural origin of the ribosome in RNA decoding and ribosomal mechanics. Predictions from extant features in a handful of rRNA structural models of the large ribosomal subunit support its origin in protein biosynthesis. In recent correspondence, one of us reported that correcting dismissals of conflicting data and avoiding unwarranted assumptions of the nomothetic method reconciled conclusions. In response, Petrov and Williams dismissed our arguments claiming we did not understand their algorithmic model of ribosomal apical growth. Instead, they controverted the historical approach. Here we show that their objections to the phylogenetic method are unjustified, that their algorithm subjectively guarantees back-in-time molecular deconstructions toward the protein biosynthetic core, and that processes of ribosomal growth are much more complex. We prompt abandoning apriorism, decreasing ad hoc hypotheses and integrating historical and non-historical scientific methods.

  2. Ribosomal accretion, apriorism and the phylogenetic method: A response to Petrov and Williams

    Derek eCaetano-Anollés

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Historical (ideographic and non-historical (nomothetic studies of ribosomal accretion appear to arrive at diametrically opposite conclusions. Phylogenetic analysis of thousands of RNA molecules and protein structures in hundreds of genomes supports the structural origin of the ribosome in RNA decoding and ribosomal mechanics. Predictions from extant features in a handful of rRNA structural models of the large ribosomal subunit support its origin in protein biosynthesis. In recent correspondence, one of us reported that correcting dismissals of conflicting data and avoiding unwarranted assumptions of the nomethetic method reconciled conclusions. In response, Petrov and Williams dismissed our arguments claiming we did not understand their ‘BS’ algorithmic model of ribosomal apical growth. Instead, they controverted the historical approach. Here we show that their objections to the phylogenetic method are unjustified, that the BS algorithm subjectively guarantees back-in-time molecular deconstructions towards the protein biosynthetic core, and that processes of ribosomal growth are much more complex. We prompt abandoning apriorism, decreasing ad hoc hypotheses and integrating historical and non-historical scientific methods.

  3. The 5S RNP Couples p53 Homeostasis to Ribosome Biogenesis and Nucleolar Stress

    Katherine E. Sloan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Several proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors regulate the production of ribosomes. Ribosome biogenesis is a major consumer of cellular energy, and defects result in p53 activation via repression of mouse double minute 2 (MDM2 homolog by the ribosomal proteins RPL5 and RPL11. Here, we report that RPL5 and RPL11 regulate p53 from the context of a ribosomal subcomplex, the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP. We provide evidence that the third component of this complex, the 5S rRNA, is critical for p53 regulation. In addition, we show that the 5S RNP is essential for the activation of p53 by p14ARF, a protein that is activated by oncogene overexpression. Our data show that the abundance of the 5S RNP, and therefore p53 levels, is determined by factors regulating 5S complex formation and ribosome integration, including the tumor suppressor PICT1. The 5S RNP therefore emerges as the critical coordinator of signaling pathways that couple cell proliferation with ribosome production.

  4. Self-Assembly of Nanocomponents into Composite Structures: Derivation and Simulation of Langevin Equations

    Pankavich, Stephen; Miao, Yinglong; Ortoleva, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on ...

  5. Novel accurate bacterial discrimination by MALDI-time-of-flight MS based on ribosomal proteins coding in S10-spc-alpha operon at strain level S10-GERMS.

    Tamura, Hiroto; Hotta, Yudai; Sato, Hiroaki

    2013-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is one of the most widely used mass-based approaches for bacterial identification and classification because of the simple sample preparation and extremely rapid analysis within a few minutes. To establish the accurate MALDI-TOF MS bacterial discrimination method at strain level, the ribosomal subunit proteins coded in the S10-spc-alpha operon, which encodes half of the ribosomal subunit protein and is highly conserved in eubacterial genomes, were selected as reliable biomarkers. This method, named the S10-GERMS method, revealed that the strains of genus Pseudomonas were successfully identified and discriminated at species and strain levels, respectively; therefore, the S10-GERMS method was further applied to discriminate the pathovar of P. syringae. The eight selected biomarkers (L24, L30, S10, S12, S14, S16, S17, and S19) suggested the rapid discrimination of P. syringae at the strain (pathovar) level. The S10-GERMS method appears to be a powerful tool for rapid and reliable bacterial discrimination and successful phylogenetic characterization. In this article, an overview of the utilization of results from the S10-GERMS method is presented, highlighting the characterization of the Lactobacillus casei group and discrimination of the bacteria of genera Bacillus and Sphingopyxis despite only two and one base difference in the 16S rRNA gene sequence, respectively.

  6. Novel Accurate Bacterial Discrimination by MALDI-Time-of-Flight MS Based on Ribosomal Proteins Coding in S10-spc-alpha Operon at Strain Level S10-GERMS

    Tamura, Hiroto; Hotta, Yudai; Sato, Hiroaki

    2013-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is one of the most widely used mass-based approaches for bacterial identification and classification because of the simple sample preparation and extremely rapid analysis within a few minutes. To establish the accurate MALDI-TOF MS bacterial discrimination method at strain level, the ribosomal subunit proteins coded in the S 10-spc-alpha operon, which encodes half of the ribosomal subunit protein and is highly conserved in eubacterial genomes, were selected as reliable biomarkers. This method, named the S10-GERMS method, revealed that the strains of genus Pseudomonas were successfully identified and discriminated at species and strain levels, respectively; therefore, the S10-GERMS method was further applied to discriminate the pathovar of P. syringae. The eight selected biomarkers (L24, L30, S10, S12, S14, S16, S17, and S19) suggested the rapid discrimination of P. syringae at the strain (pathovar) level. The S10-GERMS method appears to be a powerful tool for rapid and reliable bacterial discrimination and successful phylogenetic characterization. In this article, an overview of the utilization of results from the S10-GERMS method is presented, highlighting the characterization of the Lactobacillus casei group and discrimination of the bacteria of genera Bacillus and Sphingopyxis despite only two and one base difference in the 16S rRNA gene sequence, respectively.

  7. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  8. Dicer is associated with ribosomal DNA chromatin in mammalian cells.

    Lasse Sinkkonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA silencing is a common term for pathways utilizing small RNAs as sequence-specific guides to repress gene expression. Components of the RNA silencing machinery are involved in different aspects of chromatin function in numerous organisms. However, association of RNA silencing with chromatin in mammalian cells remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunostaining of mitotic chromosomes with antibodies visualizing either endogenous or ectopically expressed Dicer in mammalian cells revealed association of the protein with ribosomal DNA (rDNA repeats. Chromatin immunoprecipitations and bisulfite sequencing experiments indicated that Dicer is associated with transcribed regions of both active and silenced genes in rDNA arrays of interphase chromosomes. Metabolic labeling of the mouse embryonic stem (ES cells lacking Dicer did not reveal apparent defect in rRNA biogenesis though pre-rRNA synthesis in these cells was decreased, likely as a consequence of their slower growth caused by the loss of miRNAs. We analyzed in detail chromatin structure of rDNA but did not find any epigenetic changes at rDNA loci in Dicer(-/- ES cells. Instead, we found that rDNA methylation is rather low in primary tissues, contrasting with rDNA methylation patterns in transformed cell lines. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that Dicer, a key component of RNA silencing pathways, can be detected in association with rDNA chromatin in mammalian cells. The role of this particular localization of Dicer is not readily apparent since the enzyme is associated with rDNA genes regardless of their transcriptional activity. However, localization of Dicer to the transcribed region suggests that transcription may contribute to the Dicer deposition at rDNA chromatin. We hypothesize that Dicer functions in maintaining integrity of rDNA arrays.

  9. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy.

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knock-in mice expressing nonphosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knock-in mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knock-in mice compared with their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild-type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knock-in mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knock-in and wild-type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knock-in mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild-type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knock-in mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth.

  10. Patterns and regulation of ribosomal RNA transcription in Borrelia burgdorferi

    Schwartz Ira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Borrelia burgdorferi contains one 16S and two tandem sets of 23S-5S ribosomal (r RNA genes whose patterns of transcription and regulation are unknown but are likely to be critical for survival and persistence in its hosts. Results RT-PCR of B. burgdorferi N40 and B31 revealed three rRNA region transcripts: 16S rRNA-alanine transfer RNA (tRNAAla; tRNAIle; and both sets of 23S-5S rRNA. At 34°C, there were no differences in growth rate or in accumulation of total protein, DNA and RNA in B31 cultured in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK-H whether rabbit serum was present or not. At 23°C, B31 grew more slowly in serum-containing BSK-H than at 34°C. DNA per cell was higher in cells in exponential as compared to stationary phase at either temperature; protein per cell was similar at both temperatures in both phases. Similar amounts of rRNA were produced in exponential phase at both temperatures, and rRNA was down-regulated in stationary phase at either temperature. Interestingly, a relBbu deletion mutant unable to generate (pppGpp did not down-regulate rRNA at transition to stationary phase in serum-containing BSK-H at 34°C, similar to the relaxed phenotype of E. coli relA mutants. Conclusions We conclude that rRNA transcription in B. burgdorferi is complex and regulated both by growth phase and by the stringent response but not by temperature-modulated growth rate.

  11. A [Cu]rious Ribosomal Profiling Pattern Leads to the Discovery of Ribosomal Frameshifting in the Synthesis of a Copper Chaperone.

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Baranov, Pavel V

    2017-01-19

    In many bacteria, separate genes encode a copper binding chaperone and a copper efflux pump, but in some the chaperone encoding gene has been elusive. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Meydan et al. (2017) report that ribosomes translating the ORF that encodes the copper pump frequently frameshift and terminate to produce the copper chaperone.

  12. Changes in force production and stroke parameters of trained able-bodied and unilateral arm-amputee female swimmers during a 30 s tethered front-crawl swim.

    Lee, Casey Jane; Sanders, Ross H; Payton, Carl J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined changes in the propulsive force and stroke parameters of arm-amputee and able-bodied swimmers during tethered swimming. Eighteen well-trained female swimmers (nine unilateral arm amputees and nine able-bodied) were videotaped performing maximal-effort 30 s front-crawl swims, while attached to a load cell mounted on a pool wall. Tether force, stroke rate, stroke phase durations and inter-arm angle were quantified. The able-bodied group produced significantly higher mean and maximum tether forces than the amputee group. The mean of the intra-cyclic force peaks was very similar for both groups. Mean and maximum tether force had significant negative associations with 100 m swim time, for both groups. Both groups exhibited a similar fatigue index (relative decrease in tether force) during the test, but the amputees had a significantly greater stroke rate decline. A significant positive association between stroke rate decline and fatigue index was obtained for the able-bodied group only. Inter-arm angle and relative phase durations did not change significantly during the test for either group, except the recovery phase duration of the arm amputees, which decreased significantly. This study's results can contribute to the development of a more evidence-based classification system for swimmers with a disability.

  13. Lithium- and boron-bearing brines in the Central Andes: exploring hydrofacies on the eastern Puna plateau between 23° and 23°30'S

    Steinmetz, R. L. López

    2016-04-01

    Internally drained basins of the Andean Plateau are lithium- and boron-bearing systems. The exploration of ionic facies and parental links in a playa lake located in the eastern Puna (23°-23°30'S) was assessed by hydrochemical determinations of residual brines, feed waters and solutions from weathered rocks. Residual brines have been characterized by the Cl- (SO4 =)/Na+ (K+) ratio. Residual brines from the playa lake contain up to 450 mg/l of boron and up to 125 mg/l of lithium, and the Las Burras River supplies the most concentrated boron (20 mg/l) and lithium (3.75 mg/l) inflows of the basin. The hydro-geochemical assessment allowed for the identification of three simultaneous sources of boron: (1) inflow originating from granitic areas of the Aguilar and Tusaquillas ranges; (2) weathering of the Ordovician basement; and (3) boron-rich water from the Las Burras River. Most of the lithium input of the basin is likely generated by present geothermal sources rather than by weathering and leaching of ignimbrites and plutonic rocks. However, XRD analyses of playa lake sediments revealed the presence of lithian micas of clastic origin, including taeniolite and eucriptite. This study is the first to document these rare Li-micas from the Puna basin. Thus, both residual brines and lithian micas contribute to the total Li content in the studied hydrologic system.

  14. Lithium- and boron-bearing brines in the Central Andes: exploring hydrofacies on the eastern Puna plateau between 23° and 23°30'S

    Steinmetz, R. L. López

    2017-01-01

    Internally drained basins of the Andean Plateau are lithium- and boron-bearing systems. The exploration of ionic facies and parental links in a playa lake located in the eastern Puna (23°-23°30'S) was assessed by hydrochemical determinations of residual brines, feed waters and solutions from weathered rocks. Residual brines have been characterized by the Cl- (SO4 =)/Na+ (K+) ratio. Residual brines from the playa lake contain up to 450 mg/l of boron and up to 125 mg/l of lithium, and the Las Burras River supplies the most concentrated boron (20 mg/l) and lithium (3.75 mg/l) inflows of the basin. The hydro-geochemical assessment allowed for the identification of three simultaneous sources of boron: (1) inflow originating from granitic areas of the Aguilar and Tusaquillas ranges; (2) weathering of the Ordovician basement; and (3) boron-rich water from the Las Burras River. Most of the lithium input of the basin is likely generated by present geothermal sources rather than by weathering and leaching of ignimbrites and plutonic rocks. However, XRD analyses of playa lake sediments revealed the presence of lithian micas of clastic origin, including taeniolite and eucriptite. This study is the first to document these rare Li-micas from the Puna basin. Thus, both residual brines and lithian micas contribute to the total Li content in the studied hydrologic system.

  15. In vitro kinetochore assembly

    Miell, Matthew D D; Straight, Aaron F

    2016-01-01

    The kinetochore is the primary site of interaction between chromosomes and microtubules of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. The kinetochore is a complex of more than 100 proteins that transiently assemble during mitosis at a single defined region on each chromosome, known as the centromere. Kinetochore assembly and activity must be tightly regulated to ensure proper microtubule interaction and faithful chromosome segregation because perturbation of kinetochores often results in aneuploidy and cell lethality. As such, cell free and reconstituted systems to analyze kinetochore formation and function are invaluable in probing the biochemical activities of kinetochores. In vitro approaches to studying kinetochores have enabled the manipulation of kinetochore protein structure, function, interactions and regulation that are not possible in cells. Here we outline a cell-free approach for the assembly of centromeres and recruitment of functional kinetochores that enables their manipulation and analysis. PMID:27193846

  16. Assembling Sustainable Territories

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The authors show how certification assembles ‘sustainable’ territories through a complex layering of regulatory authority in which both government and nongovernment entities claim rule-making authority, sometimes working together, sometimes in parallel, sometimes competitively. It is argued...... that territorialisation is accomplished not just through (re)defining bounded space, but more broadly through the assembling of four elements: space, subjects, objects, and expertise. Four case studies of sustainability certification in seafood are analyzed to show that ‘green gabbing’ is not necessarily the central...... dynamic in assembling sustainable territories, and that certification always involves state agencies in determining how the key elements that comprise it are defined. Whereas some state agencies have been suspicious of sustainability certification, others have embraced it or even used it to extend...

  17. Power module assembly

    Campbell, Jeremy B [Torrance, CA; Newson, Steve [Redondo Beach, CA

    2011-11-15

    A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

  18. Blade attachment assembly

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  19. Integrated magnetic transformer assembly

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an integrated magnetics transformer assembly comprising a first magnetically permeable core forming a first substantially closed magnetic flux path and a second magnetically permeable core forming a second substantially closed magnetic flux path. A first input...... inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the first magnetically permeable core and a second input inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the second magnetically permeable core. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly further comprises a first output......-winding of the first output inductor winding and the first half-winding of the second output inductor winding are configured to produce aligned, i.e. in the same direction, magnetic fluxes through the first substantially closed magnetic flux path. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly is well- suited for use...

  20. Self assembling proteins

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  1. Low inductance connector assembly

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann; Carlson, Douglas S

    2013-07-09

    A busbar connector assembly for coupling first and second terminals on a two-terminal device to first and second contacts on a power module is provided. The first terminal resides proximate the first contact and the second terminal resides proximate the second contact. The assembly comprises a first bridge having a first end configured to be electrically coupled to the first terminal, and a second end configured to be electrically coupled to the second contact, and a second bridge substantially overlapping the first bridge and having a first end electrically coupled to the first contact, and a second end electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  2. Spontaneous crowding of ribosomes and proteins inside vesicles: a possible mechanism for the origin of cell metabolism.

    Pereira de Souza, Tereza; Steiniger, Frank; Stano, Pasquale; Fahr, Alfred; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2011-10-17

    One of the open questions in the origin of life is the spontaneous formation of primitive cell-like compartments from free molecules in solution and membranes. "Metabolism-first" and "replicator-first" theories claim that early catalytic cycles first evolved in solution, and became encapsulated inside lipid vesicles later on. "Compartment-first" theories suggest that metabolism progressively occurred inside compartments. Both views have some weaknesses: the low probability of co-entrapment of several compounds inside the same compartment, and the need to control nutrient uptake and waste release, respectively. By using lipid vesicles as early-cell models, we show that ribosomes, proteins and lipids spontaneously self-organise into cell-like compartments to achieve high internal concentrations, even when starting from dilute solutions. These findings suggest that the assembly of cell-like compartments, despite its low probability of occurrence, is indeed a physically realistic process. The spontaneous achievement of high local concentration might provide a rational account for the origin of primitive cellular metabolism.

  3. Ribosome-based protein folding systems are structurally divergent but functionally universal across biological kingdoms.

    Ito, Koreaki

    2005-07-01

    In bacteria, Trigger factor (TF) is the first chaperone that interacts with nascent polypeptides as soon as they emerge from the exit tunnel of the ribosome. TF binds to the ribosomal protein L23 located next to the tunnel exit of the large subunit, with which it forms a cradle-like space embracing the polypeptide exit region. It cooperates with the DnaK Hsp70 chaperone system to ensure correct folding of a number of newly translated cytosolic proteins in Escherichia coli. Whereas TF is exclusively found in prokaryotes and chloroplasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a eukaryotic microorganism, has a three-member Hsp70-J protein complex, Ssb-Ssz-Zuo, which could act as a ribosome-associated folding facilitator. In the work reported in this volume of Molecular Microbiology, Rauch et al. (2005, Mol Microbiol, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2005.04690.x) examined the functional similarity of the ribosome-associated chaperones in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In spite of the fact that TF and the Hsp70-based triad are structurally unrelated, TF can bind to the yeast ribosome via Rpl25 (the L23 counterpart) and can substitute for some, but not all, of the functions assigned to Ssb-Ssz-Zuo in yeast. The functional conservation of the ribosome-associated chaperones without structural similarity is remarkable and suggests that during evolution nature has employed a common design but divergent components to facilitate folding of polypeptides as they emerge from the ribosomal exit, a fundamental process required for the efficient expression of genetic information.

  4. The yeast Tsa1 peroxiredoxin is a ribosome-associated antioxidant.

    Trotter, Eleanor W; Rand, Jonathan D; Vickerstaff, Jill; Grant, Chris M

    2008-05-15

    The yeast Tsa1 peroxiredoxin, like other 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, has dual activities as a peroxidase and as a molecular chaperone. Its peroxidase function predominates in lower-molecular-mass forms, whereas a super-chaperone form predominates in high-molecular-mass complexes. Loss of TSA1 results in aggregation of ribosomal proteins, indicating that Tsa1 functions to maintain the integrity of the translation apparatus. In the present study we report that Tsa1 functions as an antioxidant on actively translating ribosomes. Its peroxidase activity is required for ribosomal function, since mutation of the peroxidatic cysteine residue, which inactivates peroxidase but not chaperone activity, results in sensitivity to translation inhibitors. The peroxidatic cysteine residue is also required for a shift from ribosomes to its high-molecular-mass form in response to peroxide stress. Thus Tsa1 appears to function predominantly as an antioxidant in protecting both the cytosol and actively translating ribosomes against endogenous ROS (reactive oxygen species), but shifts towards its chaperone function in response to oxidative stress conditions. Analysis of the distribution of Tsa1 in thioredoxin system mutants revealed that the ribosome-associated form of Tsa1 is increased in mutants lacking thioredoxin reductase (trr1) and thioredoxins (trx1 trx2) in parallel with the general increase in total Tsa1 levels which is observed in these mutants. In the present study we show that deregulation of Tsa1 in the trr1 mutant specifically promotes translation defects including hypersensitivity to translation inhibitors, increased translational error-rates and ribosomal protein aggregation. These results have important implications for the role of peroxiredoxins in stress and growth control, since peroxiredoxins are likely to be deregulated in a similar manner during many different disease states.

  5. Chloramphenicol induction of cat-86 requires ribosome stalling at a specific site in the leader.

    Alexieva, Z; Duvall, E J; Ambulos, N P; Kim, U J; Lovett, P S

    1988-05-01

    The plasmid gene cat-86 specifies chloramphenicol-inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in Bacillus subtilis. Induction by the antibiotic is primarily due to activation of the translation of cat-86-encoded mRNA. It has been suggested that the inducer stalls ribosomes at a discrete location in the leader region of cat-86 mRNA, which causes the destabilization of a downstream RNA secondary structure that normally sequesters the cat-86 ribosome binding site. It is the destabilization of this RNA secondary structure that permits translation of the cat-86 coding sequence. In the present report, we show that ribosomes that were stalled in the cat-86 leader by starvation of host cells for the amino acid specified by leader codon 6 induced gene expression to a level above that detected when cells were starved for the amino acids specified by leader codons 7 and 8. Starvation for amino acids specified by leader codons 3, 4, or 5 failed to activate cat-86 expression. These results indicate that the stalled ribosome that is most active in cat-86 induction has its aminoacyl site occupied by leader codon 6. To determine if chloramphenicol also stalled ribosomes in the cat-86 regulatory leader such that the aminoacyl site was occupied by codon 6, we separately changed leader codons 3, 4, 5, and 6 to the translation termination (ochre) codon TAA. Each of the mutated genes was tested for its ability to be induced by chloramphenicol. The results show that replacement of leader codons 3, 4, or 5 by the ochre codon blocked induction, whereas replacement of leader codon 6 by the ochre codon permitted induction. Collectively, these observations lead to the conclusion that cat-86 induction requires ribosome stalling in leader mRNA, and they identify leader codon 6 as the codon most likely to be occupied by the aminoacyl site of a stalled ribosome that is active in the induction.

  6. An RNA-binding complex involved in ribosome biogenesis contains a protein with homology to tRNA CCA-adding enzyme.

    Jinzhong Lin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of proteins and small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with eukaryotic ribosomal RNAs to direct their modification and processing and the assembly of ribosomal proteins. Utp22 and Rrp7, two interacting proteins with no recognizable domain, are components of the 90S preribosome or the small subunit processome that conducts early processing of 18S rRNA. Here, we determine the cocrystal structure of Utp22 and Rrp7 complex at 1.97 Å resolution and the NMR structure of a C-terminal fragment of Rrp7, which is not visible in the crystal structure. The structure reveals that Utp22 surprisingly resembles a dimeric class I tRNA CCA-adding enzyme yet with degenerate active sites, raising an interesting evolutionary connection between tRNA and rRNA processing machineries. Rrp7 binds extensively to Utp22 using a deviant RNA recognition motif and an extended linker. Functional sites on the two proteins were identified by structure-based mutagenesis in yeast. We show that Rrp7 contains a flexible RNA-binding C-terminal tail that is essential for association with preribosomes. RNA-protein crosslinking shows that Rrp7 binds at the central domain of 18S rRNA and shares a neighborhood with two processing H/ACA snoRNAs snR30 and snR10. Depletion of snR30 prevents the stable assembly of Rrp7 into preribosomes. Our results provide insight into the evolutionary origin and functional context of Utp22 and Rrp7.

  7. An Interactive Assembly Process Planner

    廖华飞; 张林鍹; 肖田元; 曾理; 古月

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and performance of the virtual assembly support system (VASS), a new system that can provide designers and assembly process engineers with a simulation and visualization environment where they can evaluate the assemblability/disassemblability of products, and thereby use a computer to intuitively create assembly plans and interactively generate assembly process charts. Subassembly planning and assembly priority reasoning techniques were utilized to find heuristic information to improve the efficiency of assembly process planning. Tool planning was implemented to consider tool requirements in the product design stage. New methods were developed to reduce the computation amount involved in interference checking. As an important feature of the VASS, human interaction was integrated into the whole process of assembly process planning, extending the power of computer reasoning by including human expertise, resulting in better assembly plans and better designs.

  8. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  9. A Method for Designing Assembly Tolerance Networks of Mechanical Assemblies

    Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing mechanical assemblies, assembly tolerance design is an important issue which must be seriously considered by designers. Assembly tolerances reflect functional requirements of assembling, which can be used to control assembling qualities and production costs. This paper proposes a new method for designing assembly tolerance networks of mechanical assemblies. The method establishes the assembly structure tree model of an assembly based on its product structure tree model. On this basis, assembly information model and assembly relation model are set up based on polychromatic sets (PS theory. According to the two models, the systems of location relation equations and interference relation equations are established. Then, using methods of topologically related surfaces (TTRS theory and variational geometric constraints (VGC theory, three VGC reasoning matrices are constructed. According to corresponding relations between VGCs and assembly tolerance types, the reasoning matrices of tolerance types are also established by using contour matrices of PS. Finally, an exemplary product is used to construct its assembly tolerance networks and meanwhile to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. The pleuromutilin drugs tiamulin and valnemulin bind to the RNA at the peptidyl transferase centre on the ribosome

    Poulsen, S M; Karlsson, M; Johansson, L B;

    2001-01-01

    The pleuromutilin antibiotic derivatives, tiamulin and valnemulin, inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The action and binding site of tiamulin and valnemulin was further characterized on Escherichia coli ribosomes. It was revealed that these drugs are st...... results that tiamulin and valnemulin interact with the rRNA in the peptidyl transferase slot on the ribosomes in which they prevent the correct positioning of the CCA-ends of tRNAs for peptide transfer....

  11. Translational regulation via L11: Molecular switches on the ribosome turned on and off by thiostrepton and micrococcin

    M Harms, J.; Wilson, D. N.; Schluenzen, F.; Connell, S. R.; Stachelhaus, T.; Zaborowska, Z.; Spahn, C. M. T.; Fucini, P.

    2008-01-01

    The thiopeptide class of antibiotics targets the GTPase-associated center (GAC) of the ribosome to inhibit translation factor function. Using X-ray crystallography, we have determined the binding sites of thiostrepton (Thio), nosiheptide (Nosi), and micrococcin (Micro), on the Deinococcus radiodurans large ribosomal subunit. The thiopeptides, by binding within a cleft located between the ribosomal protein L11 and helices 43 and 44 of the 23S rRNA, overlap with the position of domain V of EF-G...

  12. Maize rayado fino virus capsid proteins assemble into virus-like particles in Escherichia coli.

    Hammond, Rosemarie W; Hammond, John

    2010-02-01

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV; genus Marafivirus; family Tymoviridae) is an isometric plant virus of 30 nm containing two components: empty shells and complete virus particles (encapsidating the 6.3 kb genomic RNA). Both particles are composed of two serologically related, carboxy co-terminal, coat proteins (CP) of apparent molecular mass 21-22 kDa (CP2) and 24-28 kDa (CP1) in a molar ratio of 3:1, respectively; CP1 contains a 37 amino acid amino terminal extension of CP2. In our study, expression of CP1 or CP2 in Escherichia coli resulted in assembly of each capsid protein into virus-like particles (VLPs), appearing in electron microscopy as stain-permeable (CP2) or stain-impermeable particles (CP1). CP1 VLPs encapsidated bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA, but not CP mRNA, while CP2 VLPs encapsidated neither CP mRNA nor 16S ribosomal RNA. Expression of CP1 and CP2 in E. coli using a co-expression vector resulted in the assembly of VLPs which were stain-impermeable and encapsidated CP mRNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal 37 amino acid residues of CP1, although not required for particle formation, may be involved in the assembly of complete virions and that the presence of both CP1 and CP2 in the particle is required for specific encapsidation of MRFV CP mRNA.

  13. Metaphase Spindle Assembly

    Tarun M. Kapoor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A microtubule-based bipolar spindle is required for error-free chromosome segregation during cell division. In this review I discuss the molecular mechanisms required for the assembly of this dynamic micrometer-scale structure in animal cells.

  14. Dump valve assembly

    Owen, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    A dump valve assembly comprising a body having a bore defined by a tapered wall and a truncated spherical valve member adapted to seat along a spherical surface portion thereof against said tapered wall. Means are provided for pivoting said valve member between a closed position engagable with said tapered wall and an open position disengaged therefrom.

  15. Ordinary General Assembly

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may require t...

  16. Ordinary General Assembly

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly ma...

  17. Ordinary General Assembly

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may r...

  18. Supramolecular Assemblies in Photosynthesis

    Wrachtrup, J.; Tietz, C.; Jelezko, F.; Gerken, U.; Schuler, S.; Götze, B.; Volkmer, A.

    2002-10-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus contains a wealth of supramolecular assemblies that are optimized for charge and energy transfer. Various techniques have been applied to investigate these functions that rely on the electronic interaction among pigment molecules. In this contribution we will present single-molecule studies of pigment protein complexes. They reveal new information about electronic interactions between chlorophyll molecules in light harvesting complexes.

  19. Turbomachine blade assembly

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-11-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system comprising a turbomachine blade assembly having a blade portion, a shank portion, and a mounting portion, wherein the blade portion, the shank portion, and the mounting portion comprise a first plurality of plies extending from a tip of the airfoil to a base of the dovetail.

  20. America's Assembly Line

    Nye, David Edwin

    A social history of the assembly line, invented in 1913. Both praised as a boon to consumers and as a curse for workers, it has been satirized, imitated, and celebrated for 100 years. It has inspired fiction, comedy, cafeteria layouts, and suburban housing. It transformed industrial labor...

  1. Industrial Assembly Cases

    Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Buch, Jacob Pørksen; Iversen, Thorbjørn Mosekjær;

    This technical report presents 13 different industrial assembly tasks, which are composed of 70 different operations. The report is written to provide an overview and do as such not contain product specific information such as object weights, dimensions etc. The operations are classified into a set...

  2. Assembling Sustainable Territories

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    that territorialisation is accomplished not just through (re)defining bounded space, but more broadly through the assembling of four elements: space, subjects, objects, and expertise. Four case studies of sustainability certification in seafood are analyzed to show that ‘green gabbing’ is not necessarily the central...

  3. Properties of the ribosomes of antibiotic producers: effects thiostrepton and micrococcin on the organisms which produce them.

    Dixon, P G; Beven, J E; Cundliffe, E

    1975-06-01

    Ribosomes of Streptomyces azureus, which produces thiostrepton, are resistant to thiostrepton by virtue of being unable to bind the antibiotic. These ribosomes are also resistant to a number of other antibiotics (the thiostrepton group) which may share a common ribosomal binding site and a common mode of action with thiostrepton. Conversely, Bacillus pumilis and a strain of micrococcus, which produce the (probably identical) antibiotics micrococcin P and micrococcin, respectively, possess ribosomes which are susceptible to these antibiotics in vitro, although the organisms themselves are resistant.

  4. Haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in 5q− syndrome is associated with deregulation of ribosomal- and translation-related genes

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Perry, Janet; Malcovati, Luca; Della Porta, Matteo G; Jädersten, Martin; Killick, Sally; Fidler, Carrie; Cazzola, Mario; Wainscoat, James S; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated haploinsufficiency of the ribosomal gene RPS14, which is required for the maturation of 40S ribosomal subunits and maps to the commonly deleted region, in the 5q− syndrome. Patients with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA) show haploinsufficiency of the closely related ribosomal protein RPS19, and show a consequent downregulation of multiple ribosomal- and translation-related genes. By analogy with DBA, we have investigated the expression profiles of a large group of ribosomal- and translation-related genes in the CD34+ cells of 15 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with 5q− syndrome, 18 MDS patients with refractory anaemia (RA) and a normal karyotype, and 17 healthy controls. In this three-way comparison, 55 of 579 ribosomal- and translation-related probe sets were found to be significantly differentially expressed, with approximately 90% of these showing lower expression levels in the 5q− syndrome patient group. Using hierarchical clustering, patients with the 5q− syndrome could be separated both from other patients with RA and healthy controls solely on the basis of the deregulated expression of ribosomal- and translation-related genes. Patients with the 5q− syndrome have a defect in the expression of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and in the control of translation, suggesting that the 5q− syndrome represents a disorder of aberrant ribosome biogenesis. PMID:18477045

  5. Characterization of ribosomal DNA (rDNA in Drosophila arizonae

    Francisco Javier Tovar

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal DNA (rDNA is a multigenic family composed of one or more clusters of repeating units (RU. Each unit consists of highly conserved sequences codifying 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes intercalated with poorly conserved regulatory sequences between species. In this work, we analyzed the rDNA of Drosophila arizonae, a member of the mulleri complex (Repleta group. Using genomic restriction patterns, cloning and mapping of some representative rDNA fragments, we were able to construct a representative restriction map. RU in this species are 13.5-14 kb long, restriction sites are completely conserved compared with other drosophilids and the rDNA has an R1 retrotransposable element in some RU. We were unable to detect R2 elements in this species.O DNA ribossômico (rDNA é uma família multigênica composta de um ou mais aglomerados de unidades de repetição (RU. Cada unidade consiste de seqüências altamente conservadas que codificam os rRNAs 18S, 5.8S e 28S, intercaladas com seqüências regulatórias pouco conservadas entre as espécies. Neste trabalho analisamos o rDNA de Drosophila arizonae, um membro do complexo mulleri (grupo Repleta. Usando padrões de restrição genômicos, clonagem e mapeamento de alguns fragmentos de rDNA representativos, estabelecemos um mapa de restrição do rDNA representativo desta espécie. Neste drosofilídeo, a RU tem um tamanho médio de 13.5-14 kb e os sítios de restrição estão completamente conservados com relação a outras drosófilas. Além disto, este rDNA possui um elemento transponível tipo R1 presente em algumas unidades. Neste trabalho não tivemos evidências da presença de elementos R2 no rDNA desta espécie.

  6. CTCF regulates the local epigenetic state of ribosomal DNA repeats

    van de Nobelen Suzanne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CCCTC binding factor (CTCF is a highly conserved zinc finger protein, which is involved in chromatin organization, local histone modifications, and RNA polymerase II-mediated gene transcription. CTCF may act by binding tightly to DNA and recruiting other proteins to mediate its various functions in the nucleus. To further explore the role of this essential factor, we used a mass spectrometry-based approach to screen for novel CTCF-interacting partners. Results Using biotinylated CTCF as bait, we identified upstream binding factor (UBF and multiple other components of the RNA polymerase I complex as potential CTCF-interacting partners. Interestingly, CTCFL, the testis-specific paralog of CTCF, also binds UBF. The interaction between CTCF(L and UBF is direct, and requires the zinc finger domain of CTCF(L and the high mobility group (HMG-box 1 and dimerization domain of UBF. Because UBF is involved in RNA polymerase I-mediated ribosomal (rRNA transcription, we analyzed CTCF binding to the rDNA repeat. We found that CTCF bound to a site upstream of the rDNA spacer promoter and preferred non-methylated over methylated rDNA. DNA binding by CTCF in turn stimulated binding of UBF. Absence of CTCF in cultured cells resulted in decreased association of UBF with rDNA and in nucleolar fusion. Furthermore, lack of CTCF led to reduced binding of RNA polymerase I and variant histone H2A.Z near the rDNA spacer promoter, a loss of specific histone modifications, and diminished transcription of non-coding RNA from the spacer promoter. Conclusions UBF is the first common interaction partner of CTCF and CTCFL, suggesting a role for these proteins in chromatin organization of the rDNA repeats. We propose that CTCF affects RNA polymerase I-mediated events globally by controlling nucleolar number, and locally by regulating chromatin at the rDNA spacer promoter, similar to RNA polymerase II promoters. CTCF may load UBF onto rDNA, thereby forming

  7. Transcriptional effects of polyamines on ribosomal proteins and on polyamine-synthesizing enzymes in Escherichia coli.

    Huang, S C; Panagiotidis, C A; Canellakis, E S

    1990-05-01

    We find that the transcription of various ribosomal proteins can be differentially affected by polyamines and by changes in growth rates. Using strain MG1655 of Escherichia coli K-12 (F-, lambda-), we have determined the effects of polyamines and changes in growth rate on the transcription of several ribosomal genes and the polyamine-synthesizing enzymes ornithine decarboxylase (L-ornithine carboxy-lyase; EC 4.1.1.17) and arginine decarboxylase (L-arginine carboxylyase; EC 4.1.1.19). Ribosomal proteins S20 and L34 can be differentiated from the other ribosomal proteins studied; the transcription of S20 and L34 is especially sensitive to polyamines and less sensitive to changes in growth rates. In contrast, the transcription of S10, S15, S19, L2, L4, L20, L22, and L23 is insensitive to polyamines although it is particularly sensitive to changes in growth rates. Like S20 and L34, the transcription of ornithine decarboxylase and arginine decarboxylase is especially sensitive to polyamines. Polyamines specifically enhance the transcription of ribosomal proteins S20 and L34, and decrease that of ornithine decarboxylase and arginine decarboxylase. It is evident that polyamines can exert both positive and negative regulation of gene expression in E. coli that can be differentiated from the effects caused by changes in growth rates.

  8. Cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs are frequently bound to and degraded at ribosomes in human cells.

    Carlevaro-Fita, Joana; Rahim, Anisa; Guigó, Roderic; Vardy, Leah A; Johnson, Rory

    2016-06-01

    Recent footprinting studies have made the surprising observation that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) physically interact with ribosomes. However, these findings remain controversial, and the overall proportion of cytoplasmic lncRNAs involved is unknown. Here we make a global, absolute estimate of the cytoplasmic and ribosome-associated population of stringently filtered lncRNAs in a human cell line using polysome profiling coupled to spike-in normalized microarray analysis. Fifty-four percent of expressed lncRNAs are detected in the cytoplasm. The majority of these (70%) have >50% of their cytoplasmic copies associated with polysomal fractions. These interactions are lost upon disruption of ribosomes by puromycin. Polysomal lncRNAs are distinguished by a number of 5' mRNA-like features, including capping and 5'UTR length. On the other hand, nonpolysomal "free cytoplasmic" lncRNAs have more conserved promoters and a wider range of expression across cell types. Exons of polysomal lncRNAs are depleted of endogenous retroviral insertions, suggesting a role for repetitive elements in lncRNA localization. Finally, we show that blocking of ribosomal elongation results in stabilization of many associated lncRNAs. Together these findings suggest that the ribosome is the default destination for the majority of cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs and may play a role in their degradation.

  9. Ribosomal RNA and protein transcripts persist in the cysts of Entamoeba invadens.

    Ojha, Sandeep; Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2014-06-01

    In most organisms rDNA transcription ceases under conditions of growth stress. However, we have earlier shown that pre-rRNA accumulates during encystation in Entamoeba invadens. We labeled newly-synthesized rRNA during encystation, with [methyl-(3)H] methionine in the presence of chitinase to enable uptake of isotope. Incorporation rate reduced after 24h, and then increased to reach levels comparable with normal cells. The label was rapidly chased to the ribosomal pellet in dividing cells, while at late stages of encystation the ratio of counts going to the pellet dropped 3-fold. The transcript levels of selected ribosomal protein genes also went down initially but went up again at later stages of encystation. This suggested that rRNA and ribosomal protein transcription may be coordinately regulated. Our data shows that encysting E. invadens cells accumulate transcripts of both the RNA and protein components of the ribosome, which may ensure rapid synthesis of new ribosomes when growth resumes.

  10. Diamond Blackfan Anemia at the Crossroad between Ribosome Biogenesis and Heme Metabolism

    Deborah Chiabrando

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA is a rare, pure red-cell aplasia that presents during infancy. Approximately 40% of cases are associated with other congenital defects, particularly malformations of the upper limb or craniofacial region. Mutations in the gene coding for the ribosomal protein RPS19 have been identified in 25% of patients with DBA, with resulting impairment of 18S rRNA processing and 40S ribosomal subunit formation. Moreover, mutations in other ribosomal protein coding genes account for about 25% of other DBA cases. Recently, the analysis of mice from which the gene coding for the heme exporter Feline Leukemia Virus subgroup C Receptor (FLVCR1 is deleted suggested that this gene may be involved in the pathogenesis of DBA. FLVCR1-null mice show a phenotype resembling that of DBA patients, including erythroid failure and malformations. Interestingly, some DBA patients have disease linkage to chromosome 1q31, where FLVCR1 is mapped. Moreover, it has been reported that cells from DBA patients express alternatively spliced isoforms of FLVCR1 which encode non-functional proteins. Herein, we review the known roles of RPS19 and FLVCR1 in ribosome function and heme metabolism respectively, and discuss how the deficiency of a ribosomal protein or of a heme exporter may result in the same phenotype.

  11. Ribosomal analysis of rapid rates of protein synthesis in the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri.

    Pace, Douglas A; Maxson, Robert; Manahan, Donal T

    2010-02-01

    Previous research has shown that developing stages of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri have high rates of protein synthesis that are comparable to those of similar species living in much warmer waters. Direct measurements of the biosynthetic capacities of isolated ribosomes have not been reported for marine organisms living in the extreme-cold environment of Antarctica. Such measurements are required for a mechanistic understanding of how the critical and highly complex processes involved in protein synthesis are regulated in animals living in the coldest marine environment on Earth (< -1 degrees C). We tested the hypothesis that high rates of protein synthesis in the cold are a direct result of high biosynthetic capacities of ribosomes engaged in protein synthesis. Our results show that the rate at which ribosomes manufacture proteins (i.e., the peptide elongation rate) at -1 degrees C is surprisingly similar to rates measured in other sea urchin species at temperatures that are over 15 degrees C warmer. Average peptide elongation rates for a range of developmental stages of the Antarctic sea urchin were 0.36 codons s(-1) (+/- 0.05, SE). On the basis of subcellular rate determinations of ribosomal activity, we calculated stage-specific rates of protein synthesis for blastulae and gastrulae to be 3.7 and 6.5 ng protein h(-1), respectively. These findings support the conclusion that the high rates of biosynthesis previously reported for the Antarctic sea urchin are an outcome of high ribosomal activities.

  12. The Circadian Clock Modulates Global Daily Cycles of mRNA Ribosome Loading.

    Missra, Anamika; Ernest, Ben; Lohoff, Tim; Jia, Qidong; Satterlee, James; Ke, Kenneth; von Arnim, Albrecht G

    2015-09-01

    Circadian control of gene expression is well characterized at the transcriptional level, but little is known about diel or circadian control of translation. Genome-wide translation state profiling of mRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown in long day was performed to estimate ribosome loading per mRNA. The experiments revealed extensive translational regulation of key biological processes. Notably, translation of mRNAs for ribosomal proteins and mitochondrial respiration peaked at night. Central clock mRNAs are among those subject to fluctuations in ribosome loading. There was no consistent phase relationship between peak translation states and peak transcript levels. The overlay of distinct transcriptional and translational cycles can be expected to alter the waveform of the protein synthesis rate. Plants that constitutively overexpress the clock gene CCA1 showed phase shifts in peak translation, with a 6-h delay from midnight to dawn or from noon to evening being particularly common. Moreover, cycles of ribosome loading that were detected under continuous light in the wild type collapsed in the CCA1 overexpressor. Finally, at the transcript level, the CCA1-ox strain adopted a global pattern of transcript abundance that was broadly correlated with the light-dark environment. Altogether, these data demonstrate that gene-specific diel cycles of ribosome loading are controlled in part by the circadian clock.

  13. Top-down assembly design using assembly features

    石万凯; DENEUX; Dominique; 等

    2002-01-01

    The primary task of top-down assembly desig is to define a product's detailed physical description satisfying its functional requirements identified during the functional design phase.The implementation of this design process requires two things,that is ,product functional representation and a general assembly model.Product functions are not only the formulation of a customer's needs,but also the input data of assembly design.A general assembly model is to support the evolving process of the elaboration of a product structure.The assembly feature of extended concept is taken as a functional carrier,which is a generic relation among assembly-modeled entities.The model of assembly features describes the link between product functions and form features of parts.On the basis of this link,the propagation of design modifications is discussed so as to preserve the functionality and the coherence of the assembly model.The formal model of assembly design process describes the top-down process of creating an assembly model.This formal model is represented by the combination of assembly feature operations,the assembly model and the evaluation process.A design case study is conducted to verify the applicability of the presented approaches.

  14. Optical Space Telescope Assembly Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Space Telescope Assembly (OSTA) task is to demonstrate the technology readiness of assembling large space telescopes on orbit in 2015. This task is an...

  15. X-Ray Assembler Data

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  16. Structural insights into species-specific features of the ribosome from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

    Eyal, Zohar; Matzov, Donna; Krupkin, Miri; Wekselman, Itai; Paukner, Susanne; Zimmerman, Ella; Rozenberg, Haim; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2015-10-27

    The emergence of bacterial multidrug resistance to antibiotics threatens to cause regression to the preantibiotic era. Here we present the crystal structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Staphylococcus aureus, a versatile Gram-positive aggressive pathogen, and its complexes with the known antibiotics linezolid and telithromycin, as well as with a new, highly potent pleuromutilin derivative, BC-3205. These crystal structures shed light on specific structural motifs of the S. aureus ribosome and the binding modes of the aforementioned antibiotics. Moreover, by analyzing the ribosome structure and comparing it with those of nonpathogenic bacterial models, we identified some unique internal and peripheral structural motifs that may be potential candidates for improving known antibiotics and for use in the design of selective antibiotic drugs against S. aureus.

  17. Active and passive immunization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa ribosomal vaccines and antisera in the burned rat model.

    Lieberman, M M; Walker, H L; Ayala, E; Chapa, I

    1986-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa ribosomal vaccines were tested for their ability to protect rats subjected to a 20% total body surface burn against the lethal effects of infection with homologous organisms. When administered prior to burning, the vaccines provided 100% protection. When administered postburning, the vaccine from one strain also provided 100% protection when the time interval between vaccination and infection was 3 days. When this time interval was reduced to 1 or 2 days, approximately 50% protection was obtained with the same vaccine. The vaccine from a second strain tested provided about 50% protection with a 3-day time interval. In addition, passive immunization using antiserum to a ribosomal vaccine was also demonstrated to be effective in protecting burned and infected rats, especially when multiple doses of antiserum were used. In this case, 80% protection was obtained (with no protection observed using multiple doses of normal serum). Finally, a comparison of ribosomal and lipopolysaccharide vaccines and antisera was also performed.

  18. SRY interacts with ribosomal proteins S7 and L13a in nuclear speckles.

    Sato, Youichi; Yano, Shojiro; Ewis, Ashraf A; Nakahori, Yutaka

    2011-05-01

    The SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome) is essential for male development; however, the molecular mechanism by which the SRY induces testis development is still unclear. To elucidate the mechanism of testis development, we identified SRY-interacting proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system. We found two ribosomal proteins, RPS7 (ribosomal protein S7) and RPL13a (ribosomal protein L13a) that interact with the HMG (high-mobility group) box domain of SRY. Furthermore, we confirmed the intracellular distributions of RPS7, RPL13a and SRY and found that the three proteins were co-expressed in COS1 cells. SRY, RPS7 and RPL13a were co-localized in nuclear speckles. These findings suggest that SRY plays an important role in activities associated with nuclear speckles via an unknown mechanism.

  19. Distinct response of yeast ribosomes to a miscoding event during translation.

    Eyler, Daniel E; Green, Rachel

    2011-05-01

    Numerous mechanisms have evolved to control the accuracy of translation, including a recently discovered retrospective quality control mechanism in bacteria. This quality control mechanism is sensitive to perturbations in the codon:anticodon interaction in the P site of the ribosome that trigger a dramatic loss of fidelity in subsequent tRNA and release factor selection events in the A site. These events ultimately lead to premature termination of translation in response to an initial miscoding error. In this work, we extend our investigations of this mechanism to an in vitro reconstituted Saccharomyces cerevisiae translation system. We report that yeast ribosomes do not respond to mismatches in the P site by loss of fidelity in subsequent substrate recognition events. We conclude that retrospective editing, as initially characterized in Escherichia coli, does not occur in S. cerevisiae. These results highlight potential mechanistic differences in the functional core of highly conserved ribosomes.

  20. The antibiotic thiostrepton inhibits a functional transition within protein L11 at the ribosomal GTPase centre

    Porse, B T; Leviev, I; Mankin, A S

    1998-01-01

    A newly identified class of highly thiostrepton-resistant mutants of the archaeon Halobacterium halobium carry a missense mutation at codon 18 within the gene encoding ribosomal protein L11. In the mutant proteins, a proline, conserved in archaea and bacteria, is converted to either serine or thr....... This putative inhibitory mechanism of thiostrepton is critically dependent on proline 18/22. Moreover, the absence of this proline from eukaryotic protein L11 sequences would account for the high thiostrepton resistance of eukaryotic ribosomes.......A newly identified class of highly thiostrepton-resistant mutants of the archaeon Halobacterium halobium carry a missense mutation at codon 18 within the gene encoding ribosomal protein L11. In the mutant proteins, a proline, conserved in archaea and bacteria, is converted to either serine...

  1. High resolution structure of the large ribosomal subunit from a Mesophilic Eubacterium

    Harms, Joerg; Schluenzen, Frank; Zarivach, Raz; Bashan, Anat; Gat, Sharon; Agmon, Ilana; Bartels, Heike; Franceschi, Francois; Yonath, Ada (Weizmann Inst Israel); (Mac Planck Germany); (Max Planck Germany)

    2009-10-07

    We describe the high resolution structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans (D50S), a gram-positive mesophile suitable for binding of antibiotics and functionally relevant ligands. The over-all structure of D50S is similar to that from the archae bacterium Haloarcula marismortui (H50S); however, a detailed comparison revealed significant differences, for example, in the orientation of nucleotides in peptidyl transferase center and in the structures of many ribosomal proteins. Analysis of ribosomal features involved in dynamic aspects of protein biosynthesis that are partially or fully disordered in H50S revealed the conformations of intersubunit bridges in unbound subunits, suggesting how they may change upon subunit association and how movements of the L1-stalk may facilitate the exit of tRNA.

  2. Efeito da intensidade do exercício de corrida intermitente 30s:15s no tempo de manutenção no ou próximo do VO2max Effect of intensity of intermittent running exercise 30s:15s at the time maintenance at or near VO2max

    Rafael Alves de Aguiar; Jardel Schlickmann; Tiago Turnes; Fabrizio Caputo

    2013-01-01

    O presente estudo comparou o tempo mantido acima de 90% (t90VO2max) e de 95% VO2max (t95VO2max) em três diferentes intensidades de exercício. Após a realização de um teste incremental para determinar o VO2max, oito estudantes de educação física ativos (23 ± 3 anos) executaram três sessões de exercícios intermitentes (100, 110 e 120% da velocidade do VO2max (vVO2max)) com razão esforço:recuperação de 30s:15s. O t95VO2max foi significantemente maior em 110%vVO2max (EI110%) (218,1 ± 81,6 s) quan...

  3. Efeito da intensidade do exercício de corrida intermitente 30s:15s no tempo de manutenção no ou próximo do VO2max Effect of intensity of intermittent running exercise 30s:15s at the time maintenance at or near VO2max

    Rafael Alves de Aguiar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo comparou o tempo mantido acima de 90% (t90VO2max e de 95% VO2max (t95VO2max em três diferentes intensidades de exercício. Após a realização de um teste incremental para determinar o VO2max, oito estudantes de educação física ativos (23 ± 3 anos executaram três sessões de exercícios intermitentes (100, 110 e 120% da velocidade do VO2max (vVO2max com razão esforço:recuperação de 30s:15s. O t95VO2max foi significantemente maior em 110%vVO2max (EI110% (218,1 ± 81,6 s quando comparado a 100%vVO2max (EI100% (91,9 ± 75,2s e a 120%vVO2max (EI120% (126,3 ± 29,4 s, porém sem diferença entre EI100% e EI120%. O t90VO2max somente apresentou diferença significante entre EI110% e EI120%. Portanto, conclui-se que durante exercício intermitente com razão 30s:15s, a intensidade de 110%vVO2max apresenta-se mais adequada para manter o VO2 próximo ou no VO2max por um tempo maior.The present study compared the time maintained above 90% (t90VO2max or 95% VO2max (t95VO2max in three different exercise intensities. After performing an incremental test to determine VO2max, eight physical education active students (23 ± 3 years performed three intermittent exercise sessions (100, 110 e 120% velocity of VO2max (vVO2max with ratio effort:recovery of 30s:15s. The t95%VO2max was significantly higher at 110%vVO2max (EI110% (218.1 ± 81.6s compared to 100% vVO2max (EI100% (91.9 ± 75.2s and 120%vVO2max (EI120% (126.3 ± 29.4s, but without differences between EI100% and EI120%. The t90%vVO2max was significantly different only between EI110% and 120%. Therefore, we conclude that during intermittent exercise with ratio 30s:15s, the intensity of 110%vVO2max appears more appropriate to maintain VO2max for a longer time.

  4. Preparation of ribosome-free membranes from rat liver microsomes by means of lithium chloride

    Scott-Burden, T.; Hawtrey, A. O.

    1969-01-01

    1. Treatment of washed rat liver microsomes in a medium containing 0·12m-sucrose, 12·5mm-potassium chloride, 2·5mm-magnesium chloride and 25mm-tris–hydrochloric acid buffer, pH7·6, with 2m-lithium chloride at 5° for 16hr. leads to the formation of membranes free of ribosomes and ribosomal subunits. 2. Confirmation of the absence of ribosomes from lithium chloride-prepared membranes was obtained by treatment of the membranes with sodium deoxycholate, followed by sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, which showed the complete absence of ribosomes. 3. Treatment of membranes with phenol, followed by sucrose-density-gradient analysis of the isolated RNA, showed the presence of a small amount of 4s material. Repetition of the phenol extraction procedure in the presence of liver cell sap as a ribonuclease inhibitor again showed the presence of only 4s material. The 4s RNA was shown to be transfer RNA by the fact that it had the same capacity for accepting 14C-labelled amino acids as isolated transfer RNA from rat liver pH5 enzyme. 4. Analysis showed that microsomes and membranes possessed similar glucose 6-phosphatase, NADH–2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol reductase, NADH–neo-tetrazolium reductase, NADH–cytochrome c reductase and ribonuclease activities. 5. 3H-labelled ribosomal RNA binds to membranes. However, isolation of the bound RNA by the phenol extraction procedure, followed by sucrose-density-gradient analysis, shows the RNA to be degraded to 7s material. Very little breakdown of 3H-labelled ribosomal RNA bound to membranes occurs if the binding and isolation are carried out in the presence of liver cell sap. ImagesPLATE 1 PMID:4311814

  5. Stepwise binding of tylosin and erythromycin to Escherichia coli ribosomes, characterized by kinetic and footprinting analysis.

    Petropoulos, Alexandros D; Kouvela, Ekaterini C; Dinos, George P; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L

    2008-02-22

    Erythromycin and tylosin are 14- and 16-membered lactone ring macrolides, respectively. The current work shows by means of kinetic and chemical footprinting analysis that both antibiotics bind to Escherichia coli ribosomes in a two-step process. The first step established rapidly, involves a low-affinity binding site placed at the entrance of the exit tunnel in the large ribosomal subunit, where macrolides bind primarily through their hydrophobic portions. Subsequently, slow conformational changes mediated by the antibiotic hydrophilic portion push the drugs deeper into the tunnel, in a high-affinity site. Compared with erythromycin, tylosin shifts to the high-affinity site more rapidly, due to the interaction of the mycinose sugar of the drug with the loop of H35 in domain II of 23 S rRNA. Consistently, mutations of nucleosides U2609 and U754 implicated in the high-affinity site reduce the shift of tylosin to this site and destabilize, respectively, the final drug-ribosome complex. The weak interaction between tylosin and the ribosome is Mg2+ independent, unlike the tight binding. In contrast, both interactions between erythromycin and the ribosome are reduced by increasing concentrations of Mg2+ ions. Polyamines attenuate erythromycin affinity for the ribosome at both sequential steps of binding. In contrast, polyamines facilitate the initial binding of tylosin, but exert a detrimental, more pronounced, effect on the drug accommodation at its final position. Our results emphasize the role of the particular interactions that side chains of tylosin and erythromycin establish with 23 S rRNA, which govern the exact binding process of each drug and its response to the ionic environment.

  6. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation.

    Little, Richard H; Grenga, Lucia; Saalbach, Gerhard; Howat, Alexandra M; Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Trampari, Eleftheria; Malone, Jacob G

    2016-02-01

    Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG). Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome.

  7. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION. IV. DISTORTION OF RIBOSOMAL PATTERNS OF FIBROBLASTS IN SCURVY.

    ROSS, R; BENDITT, E P

    1964-08-01

    The changes in scorbutic wounds following the administration of ascorbic acid have been investigated using the techniques of electron microscopy, histochemistry, and autoradioggraphy. Particular attention has been paid to the changes seen in the endoplasmic reticulum of the fibroblasts and to the identity of the extracellular filamentous material characteristic of scorbutic wounds. Seven-day-old wounds in scorbutic guinea pigs were examined prior to and from one to 72 hours following the administration of vitamin C. Fibroblasts from wounds of normal animals demonstrate a characteristic configuration of the ribosomes of the endoplasmic reticulum which is suggested to be analogous to polyribosomes described in cells synthesizing protein such as the reticulocyte. Tangential views of the membranes of the ergastoplasm show the ribosomes to be grouped in paired rows which take both straight and curved paths. This configuration is lost in scurvy and can be seen to begin to reappear as early as 4 hours after giving ascorbic acid. With increasing time, the morphology of the ribosomal aggregates approximates that seen in normal cells, so that by 24 hours their reorientation is complete. It is suggested that one of the disturbances in scurvy may relate to an alteration either in messenger RNA, in the ability of the ribosomes to relate to the messenger, or in the membranes of the ergastoplasm. In addition, the lack of formation of hydroxyamino acids necessary for completing collagen synthesis may be related to the architecture of the ribosomal aggregates. Extracellular collagen fibrils appear concomitant with the restoration of ribosomal and ergastoplasmic morphology as early as 12 hours after administration of ascorbic acid, with complete disappearance of the scorbutic extracellular material within 24 hours. Observations of this scorbutic material do not support the concept that it is a collagen precursor.

  8. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation.

    Richard H Little

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG. Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome.

  9. Low inductance busbar assembly

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann

    2010-09-21

    A busbar assembly for electrically coupling first and second busbars to first and second contacts, respectively, on a power module is provided. The assembly comprises a first terminal integrally formed with the first busbar, a second terminal integrally formed with the second busbar and overlapping the first terminal, a first bridge electrode having a first tab electrically coupled to the first terminal and overlapping the first and second terminals, and a second tab electrically coupled to the first contact, a second bridge electrode having a third tab electrically coupled to the second terminal, and overlapping the first and second terminals and the first tab, and a fourth tab electrically coupled to the second contact, and a fastener configured to couple the first tab to the first terminal, and the third tab to the second terminal.

  10. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    Nerea Irigoyen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV, are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global "snap-shot" of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59, a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the

  11. Translational Maintenance of Frame: Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Altered -1 Ribosomal Frameshifting Efficiences

    Dinman, J D; Wickner, R B

    1994-01-01

    A special site on the (+) strand of the L-A dsRNA virus induces about 2% of ribosomes translating the gag open reading frame to execute a -1 frameshift and thus produce the viral gag-pol fusion protein. Using constructs in which a -1 ribosomal frameshift at this site was necessary for expression of lacZ we isolated chromosomal mutants in which the efficiency of frameshifting was increased. These mutants comprise eight genes, named mof (maintenance of frame). The mof1-1, mof2-1, mof4-1, mof5-1...

  12. Inhibition of protein synthesis on the ribosome by tildipirosin compared with other veterinary macrolides.

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site.

  13. Resistance to Linezolid Caused by Modifications at Its Binding Site on the Ribosome

    Long, Katherine S.; Vester, Birte

    2012-01-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic in clinical use for the treatment of serious infections of resistant Gram-positive bacteria. It inhibits protein synthesis by binding to the peptidyl transferase center on the ribosome. Almost all known resistance mechanisms involve small alterations...... of 23S rRNA has for some time been established as a linezolid resistance mechanism. Although ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 are located further away from the bound drug, mutations in specific regions of these proteins are increasingly being associated with linezolid resistance. However, very little...... of a new generation of oxazolidinones that show improved properties against the known resistance mechanisms....

  14. Variation in the ribosome interacting loop of the Sec61α from Giardia lamblia.

    Sinha, Abhishek; Ray, Atrayee; Ganguly, Sandipan; Ghosh Dastidar, Shubhra; Sarkar, Srimonti

    2015-09-30

    The interaction between the ribosome and the endoplasmic reticulum-located Sec61 protein translocon is mediated through an arginine residue of Sec61α, which is conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic orthologues characterized to date. Using in silico approaches we report that instead of arginine, this ribosome-interaction function is most likely discharged by a lysine residue in the protist Giardia lamblia. This functional substitution of the R with a K in GlSec61α may have taken place to accommodate a G-rich rRNA.

  15. Acidic ribosomal proteins and histone H3 from Leishmania present a high rate of divergence

    Ysabel Montoya

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Another additional peculiarity in Leishmania will be discussed about of the amino acid divergence rate of three structural proteins: acidic ribosomal P1 and P2b proteins, and histone H3 by using multiple sequence alignment and dendrograms. These structural proteins present a high rate of divergence regarding to their homologous protein in Trypanosoma cruzi. At this regard, L. (V. peruviana P1 and T. cruzi P1 showed 57.4% of divergence rate. Likewise, L. (V. braziliensis histone H3 and acidic ribosomal P2 protein exhibited 31.8% and 41.7% respectively of rate of divergence in comparison with their homologous in T. cruzi.

  16. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  17. OH Module Assembly Stand

    Bolan, P.J.; /Fermilab

    1990-10-16

    There is an OR module assembly stand in use at IB4. This design has been approved by safety, as presented by Mike Foley, and has been successfully used. Another one is needed at the D-zero assembly building, but some modifications need to be made. This report will show that the new modified design is at least as strong, if not stronger, than the older IB4 design in every aspect. Since the weight distribution of the OR modules on the sling is indeterminate, this report compares three cases of support for the entire assembly: the lowest two beams only, the lowest four beams only, and all six beams. In each of these cases, the new design is stronger than the old design in maximum allowable weight. The ability of the the cradle to support the weight is also shown. For all of the failure conditions except for two, the cradle is stronger than the beams that it supports. In the two excepted situations, the calculated limit of the cradle is less than the beams it supports. This is because no credit is taken for the sling and strongback, which in reality will relieve much of the horizontal load.

  18. IAHS Third Scientific Assembly

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) convened its Third Scientific Assembly in Baltimore, Md., May 10-19, 1989. The Assembly was attended by about 450 scientists and engineers. The attendance was highest from the U.S., as could be expected; 37 were from Canada; 22 each, Netherlands and United Kingdom; 14, Italy; 12, China; 10, Federal Republic of Germany; 8 each from France, the Republic of South Africa, and Switzerland; 7, Austria; 6 each, Finland and Japan; others were scattered among the remainder of 48 countries total.one of the cosponsors and also handled business matters for the Assembly. Other cosponsors included the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (IAMAP), United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and U.K. Overseas Development Authority (ODA). U.S. federal agencies serving as cosponsors included the Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, National Weather Service, Department of Agriculture, Department of State, and U.S. Geological Survey.

  19. Ordinary General Assembly

    Association du personnel

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Modifications to the statutes of the association Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda...

  20. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  1. Extraction of ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from soil for studying the diversity of the indigenous bacterial community

    Duarte, G.F.; Rosado, A.S.; Keijzer-Wolters, A.C.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the indirect (cell extraction followed by nucleic acid extraction) isolation of bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and genomic DNA from soil was developed. The protocol allowed for the rapid parallel extraction of genomic DNA as well as small and large ribosomal subunit RNA from four soils

  2. Genes Involved in Human Ribosome Biogenesis areTranscriptionally Upregulated in Colorectal Cancer

    Mansilla, Francisco; Lamy, Philippe; Ørntoft, Torben Falck;

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p<10-3) when compared to normal mucosa. Overexpression was independent of microsate...... of rRNA processing genes points towards a coordinated process enabling the overproduction of matured ribosomal structures....

  3. Influence of hyperthermia on the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 from human skin fibroblasts and meningioma cells

    Richter, W W; Zang, K D; Issinger, O G

    1983-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts and meningioma cells, derived from primary cultures of the same patients have been used to study the influence of hyperthermia on (i) cell morphology and (ii) phosphorylation pattern of ribosomal and ribosome-associated proteins. Incubation of tumour cells and fibroblasts up to 7 h...

  4. The functional half-life of an mRNA depends on the ribosome spacing in an early coding region

    Pedersen, Margit; Nissen, Søren; Mitarai, Namiko;

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial mRNAs are translated by closely spaced ribosomes and degraded from the 5'-end, with half-lives of around 2 min at 37 °C in most cases. Ribosome-free or "naked" mRNA is known to be readily degraded, but the initial event that inactivates the mRNA functionally has not been fully described...

  5. Identification of the methyltransferase targeting C2499 in Deinococcus radiodurans 23S ribosomal RNA

    Nielsen, Julie Mundus; Flyvbjerg, Karen Freund; Kirpekar, Finn

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans-like all other organisms-introduces nucleotide modifications into its ribosomal RNA. We have previously found that the bacterium contains a Carbon-5 methylation on cytidine 2499 of its 23S ribosomal RNA, which is so far the only modified version of cytidine 2...

  6. Genome-wide analysis of thylakoid-bound ribosomes in maize reveals principles of cotranslational targeting to the thylakoid membrane.

    Zoschke, Reimo; Barkan, Alice

    2015-03-31

    Chloroplast genomes encode ∼ 37 proteins that integrate into the thylakoid membrane. The mechanisms that target these proteins to the membrane are largely unexplored. We used ribosome profiling to provide a comprehensive, high-resolution map of ribosome positions on chloroplast mRNAs in separated membrane and soluble fractions in maize seedlings. The results show that translation invariably initiates off the thylakoid membrane and that ribosomes synthesizing a subset of membrane proteins subsequently become attached to the membrane in a nuclease-resistant fashion. The transition from soluble to membrane-attached ribosomes occurs shortly after the first transmembrane segment in the nascent peptide has emerged from the ribosome. Membrane proteins whose translation terminates before emergence of a transmembrane segment are translated in the stroma and targeted to the membrane posttranslationally. These results indicate that the first transmembrane segment generally comprises the signal that links ribosomes to thylakoid membranes for cotranslational integration. The sole exception is cytochrome f, whose cleavable N-terminal cpSecA-dependent signal sequence engages the thylakoid membrane cotranslationally. The distinct behavior of ribosomes synthesizing the inner envelope protein CemA indicates that sorting signals for the thylakoid and envelope membranes are distinguished cotranslationally. In addition, the fractionation behavior of ribosomes in polycistronic transcription units encoding both membrane and soluble proteins adds to the evidence that the removal of upstream ORFs by RNA processing is not typically required for the translation of internal genes in polycistronic chloroplast mRNAs.

  7. Mechanism of fusidic acid inhibition of RRF- and EF-G-dependent splitting of the bacterial post-termination ribosome.

    Borg, Anneli; Pavlov, Michael; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2016-04-20

    The antibiotic drug fusidic acid (FA) is commonly used in the clinic against gram-positive bacterial infections. FA targets ribosome-bound elongation factor G (EF-G), a translational GTPase that accelerates both messenger RNA (mRNA) translocation and ribosome recycling. How FA inhibits translocation was recently clarified, but FA inhibition of ribosome recycling by EF-G and ribosome recycling factor (RRF) has remained obscure. Here we use fast kinetics techniques to estimate mean times of ribosome splitting and the stoichiometry of GTP hydrolysis by EF-G at varying concentrations of FA, EF-G and RRF. These mean times together with previous data on uninhibited ribosome recycling were used to clarify the mechanism of FA inhibition of ribosome splitting. The biochemical data on FA inhibition of translocation and recycling were used to model the growth inhibitory effect of FA on bacterial populations. We conclude that FA inhibition of translocation provides the dominant cause of bacterial growth reduction, but that FA inhibition of ribosome recycling may contribute significantly to FA-induced expression of short regulatory open reading frames, like those involved in FA resistance.

  8. Randomized BioBrick assembly: a novel DNA assembly method for randomizing and optimizing genetic circuits and metabolic pathways.

    Sleight, Sean C; Sauro, Herbert M

    2013-09-20

    The optimization of genetic circuits and metabolic pathways often involves constructing various iterations of the same construct or using directed evolution to achieve the desired function. Alternatively, a method that randomizes individual parts in the same assembly reaction could be used for optimization by allowing for the ability to screen large numbers of individual clones expressing randomized circuits or pathways for optimal function. Here we describe a new assembly method to randomize genetic circuits and metabolic pathways from modular DNA fragments derived from PCR-amplified BioBricks. As a proof-of-principle for this method, we successfully assembled CMY (Cyan-Magenta-Yellow) three-gene circuits using Gibson Assembly that express CFP, RFP, and YFP with independently randomized promoters, ribosome binding sites, transcriptional terminators, and all parts randomized simultaneously. Sequencing results from 24 CMY circuits with various parts randomized show that 20/24 circuits are distinct and expression varies over a 200-fold range above background levels. We then adapted this method to randomize the same parts with enzyme coding sequences from the lycopene biosynthesis pathway instead of fluorescent proteins, designed to independently express each enzyme in the pathway from a different promoter. Lycopene production is improved using this randomization method by about 30% relative to the highest polycistronic-expressing pathway. These results demonstrate the potential of generating nearly 20,000 unique circuit or pathway combinations when three parts are permutated at each position in a three-gene circuit or pathway, and the methodology can likely be adapted to other circuits and pathways to maximize products of interest.

  9. Reconstruction of ribosomal RNA genes from metagenomic data.

    Lu Fan

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of environmental DNA (metagenomics has a great potential for describing the 16S rRNA gene diversity of microbial communities. However current approaches using this 16S rRNA gene information to describe community diversity suffer from low taxonomic resolution or chimera problems. Here we describe a new strategy that involves stringent assembly and data filtering to reconstruct full-length 16S rRNA genes from metagenomicpyrosequencing data. Simulations showed that reconstructed 16S rRNA genes provided a true picture of the community diversity, had minimal rates of chimera formation and gave taxonomic resolution down to genus level. The strategy was furthermore compared to PCR-based methods to determine the microbial diversity in two marine sponges. This showed that about 30% of the abundant phylotypes reconstructed from metagenomic data failed to be amplified by PCR. Our approach is readily applicable to existing metagenomic datasets and is expected to lead to the discovery of new microbial phylotypes.

  10. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 24 May 1988 to 26 May 1989 (NODC Accession 9100207)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 24 May 1988 to 26 May 1989. Data were submitted by...

  11. RNA gymnastics in mammalian signal recognition particle assembly.

    Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2014-01-01

    More than one third of the cellular proteome is destined for incorporation into cell membranes or export from the cell. In all domains of life, the signal recognition particle (SRP) delivers these proteins to the membrane and protein traffic falls apart without SRP logistics. With the aid of a topogenic transport signal, SRP retrieves its cargo right at the ribosome, from where they are sorted to the translocation channel. Mammalian SRP is a ribonucleoprotein complex consisting of an SRP RNA of 300 nucleotides and 6 proteins bound to it. Assembly occurs in a hierarchical manner mainly in the nucleolus and only SRP54, which recognizes the signal sequence and regulates the targeting process, is added as the last component in the cytosol. Here we present an update on recent insights in the structure, function and dynamics of SRP RNA in SRP assembly with focus on the S domain, and present SRP as an example for the complex biogenesis of a rather small ribonucleoprotein particle.

  12. Selection of single chain variable fragments specific for the human-inducible costimulator using ribosome display.

    Pan, Yangbin; Mao, Weiping; Liu, Xuanxuan; Xu, Chong; He, Zhijuan; Wang, Wenqian; Yan, Hao

    2012-11-01

    We applied a ribosome display technique to a mouse single chain variable fragment (scFv) library to select scFvs specific for the inducible costimulator (ICOS). mRNA was isolated from the spleens of BALB/c mice immunized with ICOS protein. Heavy and κ chain genes (VH and κ) were amplified separately by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and the anti-ICOS VH/κ chain ribosome display library was constructed with a special flexible linker by overlap extension PCR. The VH/κ chain library was transcribed and translated in vitro using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. Then, antibody-ribosome-mRNA complexes were produced and panned against ICOS protein under appropriate conditions. However, in order to isolate specific scFvs for ICOS, negative selection using CD28 was carried out before three rounds of positive selection on ICOS. After three rounds of panning, the selected scFv DNAs were cloned into pET43.1a and detected by SDS-PAGE. Then, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that we successfully constructed a native ribosome display library, and among seven clones, clone 5 had the highest affinity for the ICOS and low for the CD28. Anti-ICOS scFvs are assessed for binding specificity and affinity and may provide the potential for development of the humanized and acute and chronic allograft rejection.

  13. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A;

    2014-01-01

    recruitment of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein 1 (NBS1), a central regulator of DNA damage responses, into the nucleoli. We further identify TCOF1 (also known as Treacle), a nucleolar factor implicated in ribosome biogenesis and mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, as an interaction partner of NBS1...

  14. Specific structural probing of plasmid-coded ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli

    Aagaard, C; Rosendahl, G; Dam, M

    1991-01-01

    The preferred method for construction and in vivo expression of mutagenised Escherichia coli ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) is via high copy number plasmids. Transcription of wild-type rRNA from the seven chromosomal rrn operons in strains harbouring plasmid-coded mutant rRNAs leads to a heterogeneous...

  15. Routine ribosomal PCR and DNA sequencing for detection and identification of bacteria

    Kemp, Michael; Jensen, Kristine H; Dargis, Rimtas

    2010-01-01

    Detection and identification of bacteria by PCR and DNA sequencing from clinical sample material has been introduced as a diagnostic routine analysis during the last 5-10 years. Assays analyzing ribosomal genes have been found to be particularly useful. The technique has identified unusual bacter...

  16. The Potential of Targeting Ribosome Biogenesis in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    Shunfei Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overall survival for patients with ovarian cancer (OC has shown little improvement for decades meaning new therapeutic options are critical. OC comprises multiple histological subtypes, of which the most common and aggressive subtype is high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC. HGSOC is characterized by genomic structural variations with relatively few recurrent somatic mutations or dominantly acting oncogenes that can be targeted for the development of novel therapies. However, deregulation of pathways controlling homologous recombination (HR and ribosome biogenesis has been observed in a high proportion of HGSOC, raising the possibility that targeting these basic cellular processes may provide improved patient outcomes. The poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitor olaparib has been approved to treat women with defects in HR due to germline BRCA mutations. Recent evidence demonstrated the efficacy of targeting ribosome biogenesis with the specific inhibitor of ribosomal RNA synthesis, CX-5461 in v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC-driven haematological and prostate cancers. CX-5461 has now progressed to a phase I clinical trial in patients with haematological malignancies and phase I/II trial in breast cancer. Here we review the currently available targeted therapies for HGSOC and discuss the potential of targeting ribosome biogenesis as a novel therapeutic approach against HGSOC.

  17. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures.

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2013-05-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem-loop or pseudoknot mRNA secondary structures. Downstream stem-loops containing 100% GC base pairs decrease the rates of both tRNA translocation within the ribosome and deacylated tRNA dissociation from the ribosomal exit site (E site). Downstream stem-loops or pseudoknots containing both GC and AU pairs also decrease the rate of tRNA dissociation, but they have little effect on tRNA translocation rate. Thus, somewhat unexpectedly, unfolding of mRNA secondary structures is more closely coupled to E-site tRNA dissociation than to tRNA translocation.

  18. Phylogeny of Anophelinae (Diptera: Culicidae) Based on Nuclear Ribosomal and Mitochondrial DNA Sequences

    2002-01-01

    combining data from nuclear protein-encoding enes for phylogenetic analyses of Noctuoidea (Insecta: Lepidoptera ). Systematic Biology, 49, 202 224. Nixon... Systematic Entomology (2002) 27, 361 382 Phylogeny of Anophelinae (Diptera: Culicidae) based on nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences...Entomologia M•dica, Departamento de Epidemiologia, Faculdade de Safide Pfiblica, Universidade de S•o Paulo, Brazil, -• Department of Systematic

  19. Virtual Ribosome - a comprehensive DNA translation tool with support for integration of sequence feature annotation

    Wernersson, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Virtual Ribosome is a DNA translation tool with two areas of focus. ( i) Providing a strong translation tool in its own right, with an integrated ORF finder, full support for the IUPAC degenerate DNA alphabet and all translation tables defined by the NCBI taxonomy group, including the use...

  20. Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Bmsl-like Is Essential for Liver Development in Zebrafish

    Yong Wang; Yue Luo; Yunhan Hong; Jinrong Peng; Lijan Lo

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in the nucleolus requires numerous nucleolar proteins and small non-coding RNAs.Among them is ribosome biogenesis factor Bmsl,which is highly conserved from yeast to human.In yeast,Bmsl initiates ribosome biogenesis through recruiting Rcll to pre-ribosomes.However,little is known about the biological function of Bmsl in vertebrates.Here we report that Bmsl plays an essential role in zebrafish liver development.We identified a zebrafish bmsllsq163 mutant which carries a T to A mutation in the gene bmsl-like (bmsll).This mutation results in L152 to Q152 substitution in a GTPase motif in Bmsll.Surprisingly,bmsllsq163 mutation confers hypoplasia specifically in the liver,exocrine pancreas and intestine after 3 days post-fertilization (dpf).Consistent with the bmsllsq163 mutant phenotypes,whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) on wild type embryos showed that bmsll transcripts are abundant in the entire digestive tract and its accessory organs.Immunostaining for phospho-Histone 3 (P-H3) and TUNEL assay revealed that impairment of hepatoblast proliferation rather than cell apoptosis is one of the consequences of bmsllsq163 giving rise to an underdeveloped liver.Therefore,our findings demonstrate that Bmsll is necessary for zebrafish liver development.