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Sample records for 300i magnetic cell

  1. Magnetic levitation of single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H. Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Ghiran, Ionita; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Cells consist of micro- and nanoscale components and materials that contribute to their fundamental magnetic and density signatures. Previous studies have claimed that magnetic levitation can only be used to measure density signatures of nonliving materials. Here, we demonstrate that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells can be levitated and that each cell has a unique levitation profile. Furthermore, our levitation platform uniquely enables ultrasensitive density measurements, imaging, and p...

  2. Rapid Characterization of Magnetic Moment of Cells for Magnetic Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Ooi, Chinchun; Earhart, Christopher M.; Wilson, Robert J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2013-01-01

    NCI-H1650 lung cancer cell lines labeled with magnetic nanoparticles via the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antigen were previously shown to be captured at high efficiencies by a microfabricated magnetic sifter. If fine control and optimization of the magnetic separation process is to be achieved, it is vital to be able to characterize the labeled cells’ magnetic moment rapidly. We have thus adapted a rapid prototyping method to obtain the saturation magnetic moment of these cells....

  3. Magnetic levitation of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Ghiran, Ionita; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-14

    Several cellular events cause permanent or transient changes in inherent magnetic and density properties of cells. Characterizing these changes in cell populations is crucial to understand cellular heterogeneity in cancer, immune response, infectious diseases, drug resistance, and evolution. Although magnetic levitation has previously been used for macroscale objects, its use in life sciences has been hindered by the inability to levitate microscale objects and by the toxicity of metal salts previously applied for levitation. Here, we use magnetic levitation principles for biological characterization and monitoring of cells and cellular events. We demonstrate that each cell type (i.e., cancer, blood, bacteria, and yeast) has a characteristic levitation profile, which we distinguish at an unprecedented resolution of 1 × 10(-4) g ⋅ mL(-1). We have identified unique differences in levitation and density blueprints between breast, esophageal, colorectal, and nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines, as well as heterogeneity within these seemingly homogenous cell populations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that changes in cellular density and levitation profiles can be monitored in real time at single-cell resolution, allowing quantification of heterogeneous temporal responses of each cell to environmental stressors. These data establish density as a powerful biomarker for investigating living systems and their responses. Thereby, our method enables rapid, density-based imaging and profiling of single cells with intriguing applications, such as label-free identification and monitoring of heterogeneous biological changes under various physiological conditions, including antibiotic or cancer treatment in personalized medicine. PMID:26124131

  4. Magnetically modified microbial cells: A new type of magnetic adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ivo; Safarik; Mirka; Safarikova

    2007-01-01

    Microbial cells, either in free or immobilized form, can be used for the preconcentration or removal of metal ions, organic and inorganic xenobiotics or biologically active compounds. Magnetic modification of these cells enables to prepare magnetic adsorbents that can be easily manipulated in difficult-to-handle samples, such as suspensions, in the presence of external magnetic field. In this review, typical examples of magnetic modifications of microbial cells are presented, as well as their possible applications for the separation of organic xenobiotics and heavy metal ions.

  5. Measurements of magnetic anisotropy in sickle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room temperature magnetic measurements in deoxigenated sickle cells showed the existence of magnetic anisotropy, Δchi=1,29 x 10-3. This effect was supposed paramagnetic and considered to be due to the iron atoms of the hemoglobin molecules which are one over the other, forming ordered chains inside the erythrocytes. Low temperature (liquid He - 4,2K) measurements of the magnetic anisotropy of sickle cells and normal red blood cells diluted in a cryoprotector was made to confirm the paramagnetic origin of the fenomena. For that purpose it was used a superconductor magnetometer coupled to a SQUID, developed in the 'Laboratorio do Estado Solido do Departamento de Fisica da PUC-RJ'. The results obtained seem to confirm the expected paramagnetic anisotropy and, furthermore, suggest the presence of magnetic interactions among the iron atoms in the sickle cells samples. (Author)

  6. Biological cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertz, Frederick; Khitun, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We report a manipulation of biological cells (erythrocytes) by magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The experiment was accomplished on the top of a micro-electromagnet consisting of two magnetic field generating contours. An electric current flowing through the contour(s) produces a non-uniform magnetic field, which is about 1.4 mT/μm in strength at 100 mA current in the vicinity of the current-carrying wire. In responses to the magnetic field, magnetic nanoparticles move towards the systems energy minima. In turn, magnetic nanoparticles drag biological cells in the same direction. We present experimental data showing cell manipulation through the control of electric current. This technique allows us to capture and move cells located in the vicinity (10-20 microns) of the current-carrying wires. One of the most interesting results shows a periodic motion of erythrocytes between the two conducting contours, whose frequency is controlled by an electric circuit. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of non-destructive cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles with micrometer-scale precision.

  7. Multistage Magnetic Separator of Cells and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Ken; Ainsworth, Mark; Daily, Bruce; Dunn, Scott; Metz, Bill; Vellinger, John; Taylor, Brock; Meador, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The multistage electromagnetic separator for purifying cells and magnetic particles (MAGSEP) is a laboratory apparatus for separating and/or purifying particles (especially biological cells) on the basis of their magnetic susceptibility and magnetophoretic mobility. Whereas a typical prior apparatus based on similar principles offers only a single stage of separation, the MAGSEP, as its full name indicates, offers multiple stages of separation; this makes it possible to refine a sample population of particles to a higher level of purity or to categorize multiple portions of the sample on the basis of magnetic susceptibility and/or magnetophoretic mobility. The MAGSEP includes a processing unit and an electronic unit coupled to a personal computer. The processing unit includes upper and lower plates, a plate-rotation system, an electromagnet, an electromagnet-translation system, and a capture-magnet assembly. The plates are bolted together through a roller bearing that allows the plates to rotate with respect to each other. An interface between the plates acts as a seal for separating fluids. A lower cuvette can be aligned with as many as 15 upper cuvette stations for fraction collection during processing. A two-phase stepping motor drives the rotation system, causing the upper plate to rotate for the collection of each fraction of the sample material. The electromagnet generates a magnetic field across the lower cuvette, while the translation system translates the electromagnet upward along the lower cuvette. The current supplied to the electromagnet, and thus the magnetic flux density at the pole face of the electromagnet, can be set at a programmed value between 0 and 1,400 gauss (0.14 T). The rate of translation can be programmed between 5 and 2,000 m/s so as to align all sample particles in the same position in the cuvette. The capture magnet can be a permanent magnet. It is mounted on an arm connected to a stepping motor. The stepping motor rotates the arm to

  8. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices.

  9. Magnetically assisted delivery of cells using a magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple analytical model is presented which enables rapid interactive prediction and control of magnetically labelled cells in an arterial bifurcation using magnetic field gradients produced by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. This model is compared against experimental results for human mononuclear cells labelled with micrometre sized superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. Experimental and theoretical results highlight the importance of cell aggregation for magnetic targeting in a strong magnetic field. These predicted aggregates are confirmed via confocal endoscopy which allows the visualization of cell aggregates and their movement inside a vascular flow model in a 9.4 T preclinical MRI scanner.

  10. Magnetically assisted delivery of cells using a magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegler, J [Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging (CABI), Department of Medicine and Institute of Child Health, University College London (UCL), London WC1E 6DD (United Kingdom); Allain, B [Centre for Medical Image Computing (CMIC) UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Cook, R J [KCL Dental Institute, Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Group, C/O Floor 17 Tower Wing, Guy' s Hospital Campus, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Lythgoe, M F [Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Pankhurst, Q A, E-mail: j.riegler@ucl.ac.uk [Davy-Faraday Research Laboratory, The Royal Institution of Great Britain, 21 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BS (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-09

    A simple analytical model is presented which enables rapid interactive prediction and control of magnetically labelled cells in an arterial bifurcation using magnetic field gradients produced by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. This model is compared against experimental results for human mononuclear cells labelled with micrometre sized superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. Experimental and theoretical results highlight the importance of cell aggregation for magnetic targeting in a strong magnetic field. These predicted aggregates are confirmed via confocal endoscopy which allows the visualization of cell aggregates and their movement inside a vascular flow model in a 9.4 T preclinical MRI scanner.

  11. Rare Cell Separation and Analysis by Magnetic Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Zborowski, Maciej; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    The separation and or isolation of rare cells using magnetic forces is commonly used and growing in use ranging from simple sample prep for further studies to a FDA approved, clinical diagnostic test. This grown is the result of both the demand to obtain homogeneous rare cells for molecular analysis and the dramatic increases in the power of permanent magnets that even allow the separation of some unlabeled cells based on intrinsic magnetic moments, such as malaria parasite-infected red blood...

  12. Micro magnetic tweezers for nanomanipulation inside live cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. de Vries; G.E. Krenn; R. van Driel; J.S. Kanger

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  13. Micro Magnetic Tweezers for Nanomanipulation Inside Live Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Anthony H.B.; Krenn, Bea E.; Driel, van Roel; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  14. The effect of an external magnetic force on cell adhesion and proliferation of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamae Toshio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the strategy for tissue regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for transplantation, it is necessary that MSCs be accumulated and kept in the target area. To accumulate MSCs effectively, we developed a novel technique for a magnetic targeting system with magnetically labeled MSCs and an external magnetic force. In this study, we examined the effect of an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs in terms of cell adhesion and proliferation. Methods Magnetically labeled MSCs were plated at the bottom of an insert under the influence of an external magnetic force for 1 hour. Then the inserts were turned upside down for between 1 and 24 hours, and the number of MSCs which had fallen from the membrane was counted. The gene expression of MSCs affected magnetic force was analyzed with microarray. In the control group, the same procedure was done without the external magnetic force. Results At 1 hour after the inserts were turned upside down, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was significantly smaller than that in the control group, indicating enhanced cell adhesion. At 24 hours, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was also significantly smaller than that in control group. In the magnetic group, integrin alpha2, alpha6, beta3 BP, intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 were upregulated. At 1, 2 and 3 weeks after incubation, there was no statistical significant difference in the numbers of MSCs in the magnetic group and control group. Conclusions The results indicate that an external magnetic force for 1 hour enhances cell adhesion of MSCs. Moreover, there is no difference in cell proliferation after using an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs.

  15. Magnetic field enhanced cell uptake efficiency of magnetic silica mesoporous nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jixi; Xia, Weiliang; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-06-01

    The advantages of using magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (M-MSNs) in biomedical applications have been widely recognized. However, poor uptake efficiency may hinder the potential of M-MSNs in many applications, such as cell tracking, drug delivery, fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. An external magnetic field may improve the cellular uptake efficiency. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of a magnetic field on the uptake of M-MSNs. We found that the internalization of M-MSNs by A549 cancer cells could be accelerated and enhanced by a magnetic field. An endocytosis study indicated that M-MSNs were internalized by A549 cells mainly through an energy-dependent pathway, namely clathrin-induced endocytosis. Transmission electron microscopy showed that M-MSNs were trafficked into lysosomes. With the help of a magnetic field, anticancer drug-loaded M-MSNs induced elevated cancer cell growth inhibition.

  16. Modeling the efficiency of a magnetic needle for collecting magnetic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Kimberly S; Adolphi, Natalie L; Bryant, H C; Lovato, Debbie M; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2014-07-01

    As new magnetic nanoparticle-based technologies are developed and new target cells are identified, there is a critical need to understand the features important for magnetic isolation of specific cells in fluids, an increasingly important tool in disease research and diagnosis. To investigate magnetic cell collection, cell-sized spherical microparticles, coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, were suspended in (1) glycerine-water solutions, chosen to approximate the range of viscosities of bone marrow, and (2) water in which 3, 5, 10 and 100% of the total suspended microspheres are coated with magnetic nanoparticles, to model collection of rare magnetic nanoparticle-coated cells from a mixture of cells in a fluid. The magnetic microspheres were collected on a magnetic needle, and we demonstrate that the collection efficiency versus time can be modeled using a simple, heuristically-derived function, with three physically-significant parameters. The function enables experimentally-obtained collection efficiencies to be scaled to extract the effective drag of the suspending medium. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the effective drag scales linearly with fluid viscosity, as expected. Surprisingly, increasing the number of non-magnetic microspheres in the suspending fluid results increases the collection of magnetic microspheres, corresponding to a decrease in the effective drag of the medium. PMID:24874577

  17. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells Using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-04-13

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting, are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. A quantitative magnetic separation technology is reported using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micropillars with gradient spacing, and the system is used to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micropillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miropillar array at larger pitches. A semi-analytical model is developed that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells are separated based on the bound quantity of 1 μm anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system is able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof-of-concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood are isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential toward a quantitative magnetic separation instrument. PMID:26890496

  18. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells Using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-04-13

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting, are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. A quantitative magnetic separation technology is reported using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micropillars with gradient spacing, and the system is used to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micropillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miropillar array at larger pitches. A semi-analytical model is developed that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells are separated based on the bound quantity of 1 μm anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system is able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof-of-concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood are isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential toward a quantitative magnetic separation instrument.

  19. Magnetic Nanowires as Materials for Cancer Cell Destruction

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2015-12-01

    Current cancer therapies are highly cytotoxic and their delivery to exclusively the affected site is poorly controlled, resulting in unavoidable and often severe side effects. In an effort to overcome such issues, magnetic nanoparticles have been recently gaining relevance in the areas of biomedical applications and therapeutics, opening pathways to alternative methods. This led to the concept of magnetic particle hyperthermia in which magnetic nano beads are heated by a high power magnetic field. The increase in temperature kills the cancer cells, which are more susceptible to heat in comparison to healthy cells. In this dissertation, the possibility to kill cancer cells with magnetic nanowires is evaluated. The idea is to exploit a magnetomechanical effect, where nanowires cause cancer cell death through vibrating in a low power magnetic field. Specifically, the magnetic nanowires effects to cells in culture and their ability to induce cancer cell death, when combined with an alternating magnetic field, was investigated. Nickel and iron nanowires of 35 nm diameter and 1 to 5 μm long were synthesized by electrodeposition into nanoporous alumina templates, which were prepared using a two-step anodization process on highly pure aluminum substrates. For the cytotoxicity studies, the nanowires were added to cancer cells in culture, varying the incubation time and the concentration. The cell-nanowire interaction was thoroughly studied at the cellular level (mitochondrial metabolic activity, cell membrane integrity and, apoptosis/necrosis assay), and optical level (transmission electron and confocal microscopy). Furthermore, to investigate their therapeutic potential, an alternating magnetic field was applied varying its intensity and frequency. After the magnetic field application, cells health was measured at the mitochondrial activity level. Cytotoxicity results shed light onto the cellular tolerance to the nanowires, which helped in establishing the appropriate

  20. Effect of Magnetic Field on L-Strain Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ulakoglu, G; Atak, C; Rzakoulieva, A; Danilov, V I; Alikamanoglu, S

    2000-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic and magnetic fields are currently being made useful in many fields, especially in medicine. In this research work, L-Strain cells which are a type of fibrosarcoma cells were exposed to a magnetic flow of 2-26 mT in periods of 1, 2, 3 and 4 minutes. The L-Strain cells, which were exposed to the magnetic field for these periods, were counted after 24 and 48 hours, when compared with the controls, it was observed that in groups of 1 and 4 minutes exposure a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the number of cells occurred. The per cent of labelling index of L-Strain cells exposed to the magnetic field for 1 and 4 minutes decreased significantly also in comparison to the controls.

  1. Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Jen

    2001-03-01

    While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when

  2. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Z

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zhongyang Liu,1,* Liangliang Huang,1,* Liang Liu,1,* Beier Luo,2,* Miaomiao Liang,3 Zhen Sun,1 Shu Zhu,1 Xin Quan,1 Yafeng Yang,1 Teng Ma,1 Jinghui Huang,1 Zhuojing Luo1 1Department of Orthopaedics, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 3Department of Neurosurgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Schwann cells (SCs are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs and a biodegradable chitosan–glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and

  3. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Torti, A.; Kostesha, Natalie;

    2011-01-01

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls...... generated in micro- and nano-structures fabricated on a chip surface can be used to handle single yeast cells labeled with magnetic beads. In detail, first we show that the proposed approach maintains the microorganism viable, as proven by monitoring the division of labeled yeast cells trapped by domain...... walls over 16 hours. Moreover, we demonstrate the controlled transport and release of individual yeast cells via displacement and annihilation of individual domain walls in micro- and nano-sized magnetic structures. These results pave the way to the implementation of magnetic devices based on domain...

  4. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d). PMID:24030442

  5. Cell death induced by AC magnetic fields and magnetic nanoparticles: current state and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goya, Gerardo F; Asín, Laura; Ibarra, M Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    This review analyses the advances in the field of magnetically induced cell death using intracellular magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Emphasis has been given to in vitro research results, discussing the action of radiofrequency (RF) waves on biological systems as well as those results of thermally induced cell death in terms of MNP cell interactions. Our main goal has been to provide a unified depiction of many recent experiments and theoretical models relevant to the effect of applied electromagnetic fields on MNPs after cellular uptake and the cytotoxicity assessment of MNPs. We have addressed the effects of RF waves used for in vitro magnetic hyperthermia on eukaryotic cells regarding physical modifications of the cellular local environment and cell viability.

  6. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  7. Magnetization of microorganism cells by sol-gel method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bo; ZHAN TianZhuo; LIAN ZhiYang; ZHANG DeYuan

    2008-01-01

    Microorganism cells could be used as templates during fabrication of magnetic or conductive microstructures in different standard shapes.In this paper,feasibility of magnetizing microorganism cells by sol-gel method,which is to coat cells of Spirulina (a type of natural micro-helical microorganism) with the ferrite (a kind of magnetic material),was discussed and investigated.Then the cell form,compo-nents and the phase structure were observed and analyzed using various tools including optical microscopy,scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dis-persive X-ray detector (EDX),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD).Results showed that spirulina cells could be coated with ferrite after the sol-gel process,with the shape of natural helixes well kept,that the components of different sampling points on the surface layer were consistent and the thickness of layer was uniform,and that the type of the surface ferrite layer formed was cubic Fe304.It was also observed that there were nano-parUcles yielded in the cells and certain deposit on the walls between cells.The kinetics of the cell magnetization technology by sol-gel was also discussed.

  8. Magnetization of microorganism cells by sol-gel method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Microorganism cells could be used as templates during fabrication of magnetic or conductive microstructures in different standard shapes. In this paper, feasibility of magnetizing microorganism cells by sol-gel method, which is to coat cells of Spirulina (a type of natural micro-helical microorganism) with the ferrite (a kind of magnetic material), was discussed and investigated. Then the cell form, components and the phase structure were observed and analyzed using various tools including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results showed that spirulina cells could be coated with ferrite after the sol-gel process, with the shape of natural helixes well kept, that the components of different sampling points on the surface layer were consistent and the thickness of layer was uniform, and that the type of the surface ferrite layer formed was cubic Fe3O4. It was also observed that there were nano-particles yielded in the cells and certain deposit on the walls between cells. The kinetics of the cell magnetization technology by sol-gel was also discussed.

  9. High gradient magnetic field microstructures for magnetophoretic cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman; Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar K

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidics has advanced magnetic blood fractionation by making integrated miniature devices possible. A ferromagnetic microstructure array that is integrated with a microfluidic channel rearranges an applied magnetic field to create a high gradient magnetic field (HGMF). By leveraging the differential magnetic susceptibilities of cell types contained in a host medium, such as paramagnetic red blood cells (RBCs) and diamagnetic white blood cells (WBCs), the resulting HGMF can be used to continuously separate them without attaching additional labels, such as magnetic beads, to them. We describe the effect of these ferromagnetic microstructure geometries have on the blood separation efficacy by numerically simulating the influence of microstructure height and pitch on the HGMF characteristics and resulting RBC separation. Visualizations of RBC trajectories provide insight into how arrays can be optimized to best separate these cells from a host fluid. Periodic microstructures are shown to moderate the applied field due to magnetic interference between the adjacent teeth of an array. Since continuous microstructures do not similarly weaken the resultant HGMF, they facilitate significantly higher RBC separation. Nevertheless, periodic arrays are more appropriate for relatively deep microchannels since, unlike continuous microstructures, their separation effectiveness is independent of depth. The results are relevant to the design of microfluidic devices that leverage HGMFs to fractionate blood by separating RBCs and WBCs. PMID:27294532

  10. Test chambers for cell culture in static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Article presents a test chamber intended to be used for in vitro cell culture in homogenous constant magnetic field with parametrically variable magnitude. We constructed test chambers with constant parameters of control homeostasis of cell culture for the different parameters of static magnetic field. The next step was the computer calculation of 2D and 3D simulation of the static magnetic field distribution in the chamber. The analysis of 2D and 3D calculations of magnetic induction in the cells' exposition plane reveals, in comparison to the detection results, the greater accuracy of 2D calculations (Figs. 9 and 10). The divergence in 2D method was 2–4% and 8 to 10% in 3D method (reaching 10% only out of the cells′ cultures margins). -- Highlights: ► We present test chamber to be used for in vitro cell culture in static magnetic field. ► The technical data of the chamber construction was presented. ► 2D versus 3D simulation of static magnetic field distribution in chamber was reported. ► We report the accuracy of 2D calculation than 3D

  11. Influence on cell death of high frequency motion of magnetic nanoparticles during magnetic hyperthermia experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallali, N.; Clerc, P.; Fourmy, D.; Gigoux, V.; Carrey, J.

    2016-07-01

    Studies with transplanted tumors in animals and clinical trials have provided the proof-of-concept of magnetic hyperthermia (MH) therapy of cancers using iron oxide nanoparticles. Interestingly, in several studies, the application of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to tumor cells having internalized and accumulated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into their lysosomes can induce cell death without detectable temperature increase. To explain these results, among other hypotheses, it was proposed that cell death could be due to the high-frequency translational motion of MNPs under the influence of the AMF gradient generated involuntarily by most inductors. Such mechanical actions of MNPs might cause cellular damages and participate in the induction of cell death under MH conditions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a setup maximizing this effect. It is composed of an anti-Helmholtz coil and two permanent magnets, which produce an AMF gradient and a superimposed static MF. We have measured the MNP heating power and treated tumor cells by a standard AMF and by an AMF gradient, on which was added or not a static magnetic field. We showed that the presence of a static magnetic field prevents MNP heating and cell death in standard MH conditions. The heating power of MNPs in an AMF gradient is weak, position-dependent, and related to the presence of a non-zero AMF. Under an AMF gradient and a static field, no MNP heating and cell death were measured. Consequently, the hypothesis that translational motions could be involved in cell death during MH experiments is ruled out by our experiments.

  12. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rümenapp, Christine, E-mail: ruemenapp@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Mannherz, Hans Georg [Abteilung für Anatomie und Molekulare Embryologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T{sub 2} relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 10{sup 7} cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Instant magnetic labeling of tumor cells by ultrasound in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic labeling of living cells creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications. Here we describe an instantly cell magnetic labeling method based on ultrasound. We present a detailed study on the ultrasound performance of a simple and efficient labeling protocol for H-22 cells in vitro. High frequency focus ultrasound was investigated as an alternative method to achieve instant cell labeling with the magnetic particles without the need for adjunct agents or initiating cell cultures. Mean diameter of 168 nm dextran-T40 coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were prepared by means of classical coprecipitation in solution in our laboratory. H-22 tumor cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.37 MHz for up to 120 s in the presence of SPIOs. The cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles was detected by prussion blue staining. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. At 2 W power and 60 s ultrasound exposure in presence of 410 μg/ml SPIOs, H-22 cell labeling efficiency reached 69.4±6.3% and the labeled cells exhibited an iron content of 10.38±2.43 pg per cell. Furthermore, 95.2±3.2% cells remained viable. The results indicated that the ultrasound protocol could be potentially applied to label cells with large-sized magnetic particles. We also calculated the shear stress at the 2 W power and 1.37 MHz used in experiments. The results showed that the shear stress threshold for ultrasonically induced H-22 cell reparable sonoporation was 697 Pa. These findings provide a quantitative guidance in designing ultrasound protocols for cell labeling. - Highlights: → High frequency focus ultrasound can be used as a safe method for instant magnetic labeling of cells. → 8-16 times increased efficiency can be gained by ultrasound versus that by transfection agents. → Calculation of shear stress around cells provide a quantitative design for ultrasound protocols.

  14. On-chip Magnetic Separation and Cell Encapsulation in Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A.; Byvank, T.; Bharde, A.; Miller, B. L.; Chalmers, J. J.; Sooryakumar, R.; Chang, W.-J.; Bashir, R.

    2012-02-01

    The demand for high-throughput single cell assays is gaining importance because of the heterogeneity of many cell suspensions, even after significant initial sorting. These suspensions may display cell-to-cell variability at the gene expression level that could impact single cell functional genomics, cancer, stem-cell research and drug screening. The on-chip monitoring of individual cells in an isolated environment could prevent cross-contamination, provide high recovery yield and ability to study biological traits at a single cell level These advantages of on-chip biological experiments contrast to conventional methods, which require bulk samples that provide only averaged information on cell metabolism. We report on a device that integrates microfluidic technology with a magnetic tweezers array to combine the functionality of separation and encapsulation of objects such as immunomagnetically labeled cells or magnetic beads into pico-liter droplets on the same chip. The ability to control the separation throughput that is independent of the hydrodynamic droplet generation rate allows the encapsulation efficiency to be optimized. The device can potentially be integrated with on-chip labeling and/or bio-detection to become a powerful single-cell analysis device.

  15. Magnetic antibody-linked nanomatchmakers for therapeutic cell targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Shen, Deliang; Hensley, M Taylor; Middleton, Ryan; Sun, Baiming; Liu, Weixin; De Couto, Geoffrey; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising strategy for therapeutic cardiac regeneration, but current therapies are limited by inefficient interaction between potentially beneficial cells (either exogenously transplanted or endogenously recruited) and the injured tissue. Here we apply targeted nanomedicine to achieve in vivo cell-mediated tissue repair, imaging and localized enrichment without cellular transplantation. Iron nanoparticles are conjugated with two types of antibodies (one against antigens on therapeutic cells and the other directed at injured cells) to produce magnetic bifunctional cell engager (MagBICE). The antibodies link the therapeutic cells to the injured cells, whereas the iron core of MagBICE enables physical enrichment and imaging. We treat acute myocardial infarction by targeting exogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells (expressing CD45) or endogenous CD34-positive cells to injured cardiomyocytes (expressing myosin light chain. Targeting can be further enhanced by magnetic attraction, leading to augmented functional benefits. MagBICE represents a generalizable platform technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:25205020

  16. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays.

  17. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays. PMID:26606460

  18. Fundamentals and Application of Magnetic Particles in Cell Isolation and Enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Shashi K. Murthy; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on...

  19. Quantification of Non-Specific Binding of Magnetic Micro and Nano particles using Cell Tracking Velocimetry: Implication for magnetic cell separation and detection

    OpenAIRE

    Chalmers, J. J.; Xiong, Y; X. Jin; Shao, M.; Tong, X; Farag, S.; Zborowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The maturation of magnetic cell separation technology places increasing demands on magnetic cell separation performance. While a number of factors can cause suboptimal performance, one of the major challenges can be non-specific binding of magnetic nano or micro particles to non-targeted cells. Depending on the type of separation, this non-specific binding can have a negative effect on the final purity, the recovery of the targeted cells, or both. In this work, we quantitatively demonstrate t...

  20. Dipolar Rings of Microscopic Ellipsoids: Magnetic Manipulation and Cell Entrapment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Pedrero, Fernando; Cebers, Andrejs; Tierno, Pietro

    2016-09-01

    We study the formation and the dynamics of dipolar rings composed by microscopic ferromagnetic ellipsoids, which self-assemble in water by switching the direction of the applied field. We show how to manipulate these fragile structures and control their shape via the application of external static and oscillating magnetic fields. We introduce a theoretical framework which describes the ring deformation under an applied field, allowing us to understand the underlying physical mechanism. Our microscopic rings are finally used to capture, entrap, and later release a biological cell via a magnetic command, i.e., performing a simple operation which can be implemented in other microfluidic devices which make use of ferromagnetic particles.

  1. Magnetic levitating polymeric nano/microparticular substrates for three-dimensional tumor cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woong Ryeol; Oh, Kyung Taek; Park, So Young; Yoo, Na Young; Ahn, Yong Sik; Lee, Don Haeng; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Deok-Keun; Cha, Kyung-Hoi; Lee, Eun Seong

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we describe magnetic cell levitation models using conventional polymeric microparticles or nanoparticles as a substrate for the three-dimensional tumor cell culture. When the magnetic force originating from the ring-shaped magnets overcame the gravitational force, the magnetic field-levitated KB tumor cells adhered to the surface area of magnetic iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4))-encapsulated nano/microparticles and concentrated clusters of levitated cells, ultimately developing tumor cells to tumor spheroids. These simple cell culture models may prove useful for the screening of anticancer drugs and their formulations.

  2. Magnetic levitating polymeric nano/microparticular substrates for three-dimensional tumor cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woong Ryeol; Oh, Kyung Taek; Park, So Young; Yoo, Na Young; Ahn, Yong Sik; Lee, Don Haeng; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Deok-Keun; Cha, Kyung-Hoi; Lee, Eun Seong

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we describe magnetic cell levitation models using conventional polymeric microparticles or nanoparticles as a substrate for the three-dimensional tumor cell culture. When the magnetic force originating from the ring-shaped magnets overcame the gravitational force, the magnetic field-levitated KB tumor cells adhered to the surface area of magnetic iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4))-encapsulated nano/microparticles and concentrated clusters of levitated cells, ultimately developing tumor cells to tumor spheroids. These simple cell culture models may prove useful for the screening of anticancer drugs and their formulations. PMID:21420837

  3. Cell Targeting and Magnetically Induced Hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Etienne; Hardel, Lucile; Vasseur, Sébastien

    With the recent development of efficient and reproducible methods for synthesis, stable aqueous dispersions of individual particles can be prepared, in which the particle sizes can be accurately adjusted from a few nanometers to a few tens of nanometers [1]. Provided that their physical and chemical surface properties can be suitably adapted, these objects are small enough to circulate within the human body without risk of causing an embolus, since the finest capillaries (those of the lungs) have a minimal internal diameter of 5 μm. They can also escape from the blood compartment by windows of diameter around 100 nm in certain epithelia with permeability defects, such as those located in tumours and centers of infection, whereby they may then accumulate in such tissues. Furthermore, the smallest particles can migrate from the cardiovascular system into the lymph system. Finally, under the right conditions, they can enter cells and their various compartments. They should quickly become indispensable in the field of biological labelling, image contrast enhancement, the delivery of active principles, and the treatment of many different pathologies, by virtue of their novel physical properties [2, 3].

  4. Advanced cell therapies: targeting, tracking and actuation of cells with magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John J; Patrick, P Stephen; Yu, Yichao; Lythgoe, Mark F; Kalber, Tammy L

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine would greatly benefit from a new platform technology that enabled measurable, controllable and targeting of stem cells to a site of disease or injury in the body. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles offer attractive possibilities in biomedicine and can be incorporated into cells, affording a safe and reliable means of tagging. This review describes three current and emerging methods to enhance regenerative medicine using magnetic particles to guide therapeutic cells to a target organ; track the cells using MRI and assess their spatial localization with high precision and influence the behavior of the cell using magnetic actuation. This approach is complementary to the systemic injection of cell therapies, thus expanding the horizon of stem cell therapeutics.

  5. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-01

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm. PMID:24651941

  6. Non-chemotoxic induction of cancer cell death using magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we show that magnetic nanowires with weak magnetic fields and low frequencies can induce cell death via a mechanism that does not involve heat production. We incubated colon cancer cells with two concentrations (2.4 and 12 μg/mL) of nickel nanowires that were 35 nm in diameter and exposed the cells and nanowires to an alternating magnetic field (0.5 mT and 1 Hz or 1 kHz) for 10 or 30 minutes. This low-power field exerted a force on the magnetic nanowires, causing a mechanical disturbance to the cells. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the nanostructures were internalized into the cells within 1 hour of incubation. Cell viability studies showed that the magnetic field and the nanowires separately had minor deleterious effects on the cells; however, when combined, the magnetic field and nanowires caused the cell viability values to drop by up to 39%, depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the concentration of the nanowires. Cell membrane leakage experiments indicated membrane leakage of 20%, suggesting that cell death mechanisms induced by the nanowires and magnetic field involve some cell membrane rupture. Results suggest that magnetic nanowires can kill cancer cells. The proposed process requires simple and low-cost equipment with exposure to only very weak magnetic fields for short time periods. © 2015 Contreras et al.

  7. Low-magnetization magnetic microcapsules: A synergistic theranostic platform for remote cancer cells therapy and imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2014-04-02

    Multifunctional magnetic microcapsules (MMCs) for the combined cancer cells hyperthermia and chemotherapy in addition to MR imaging are successfully developed. A classical layer-by-layer technique of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes (poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(4-styrene sulfonate sodium) (PSS)) is used as it affords great controllability over the preparation together with enhanced loading of the chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin, DOX) in the microcapsules. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIOs) nanoparticles are layered in the system to afford MMC1 (one SPIOs layer) and MMC2 (two SPIOs layers). Most interestingly, MMC1 and MMC2 show efficient hyperthermia cell death and controlled DOX release although their magnetic saturation value falls below 2.5 emu g-1, which is lower than the 7-22 emu g-1 reported to be the minimum value needed for biomedical applications. Moreover, MMCs are pH responsive where a pH 5.5 (often reported for cancer cells) combined with hyperthermia increases DOX release predictably. Both systems prove viable when used as T2 contrast agents for MR imaging in HeLa cells with high biocompatibility. Thus, MMCs hold a great promise to be used commercially as a theranostic platform as they are controllably prepared, reproducibly enhanced, and serve as drug delivery, hyperthermia, and MRI contrast agents at the same time.

  8. Magnetic separation of particles and cells in ferrofluid flow through a straight microchannel using two offset magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jian; Deng, Yanxiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921 (United States); Vedantam, Pallavi; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong [Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0314 (United States); Xuan, Xiangchun, E-mail: xcxuan@clemson.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The separation of particles and cells is critical in many chemical and biological applications. This work presents a simple idea for utilizing a pair of permanent magnets to continuously separate diamagnetic particles and cells in ferrofluid flow through a straight microchannel. The first magnet is placed close to the microchannel for focusing the particle mixture to a single stream without the use of a sheath flow. The second magnet, which is offset from the first magnet and placed farther from the channel, is to displace the aligned particles to dissimilar flow paths for a continuous sorting. This idea is first demonstrated through the separation of 3 μm- and 10 μm-diameter polystyrene particles, where the effects of flow speed and magnet distance are both examined. The experimental data are found to fit well with the predictions of an analytical model. Furthermore, a continuous separation of live yeast cells from 10 μm polystyrene particles is implemented in the same device. - Highlights: • We develop a simple diamagnetic particle and cell separation technique in ferrofluids. • Two offset magnets are used to achieve a sheath-free continuous separation in a straight microchannel. • The technique is demonstrated through the magnetic separation of polystyrene particles and yeast cells. • The effects of ferrofluid speed and magnet-channel distance are examined on particle separation. • The predictions from an analytical model agree with the experimental data quantitatively.

  9. Biomedical Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles: Delivering Genes and Remote Control of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for biomedical applications was first proposed in the 1920s as a way to measure the rehological properties of the cell's cytoplasm. Since that time, magnetic micro- and nanoparticle synthesis, coating and bio-functionalization have advanced significantly, as have the applications for these particles. Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles are now used in a variety of biomedical techniques such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement, gene transfection, immno-assay and cell sorting. More recently, magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used to investigate and manipulate cellular processes both in vitro and in vivo. This talk will focus on magnetic nanoparticle targeting to and actuation of cell surface receptors to control cell signaling cascades to control cell behavior. This technology has applications in disease therapy, cell engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of magnetic nanoparticles and oscillating magnet arrays for enhanced gene delivery will also be discussed.

  10. Effects of Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia Induced by An Alternative Magnetic Field on Human Carcinoma A549 Cell in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing WANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH is a method of heat therapy using nanometer techniques and hyperthermia. It has the advantage of high specificity of targeting. The aim of this study is to detect the effects of MFH induced by an alternating magnetic field on human being carcinoma A549 cells in vitro. Methods A human adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was cultured with various concentrations of ferroferric oxide (Fe3O4 magnetic fluid (1.5-6.0 mg/mL and exposed to an alternative magnetic field (AMF for 30 min. And then the optical density (OD of viable cell, cytotocixity index, growth curve of cells, morphologic changes of cell, cell cycle and aposptosis were measured. Results The proliferation of the A549 cells were remarkably inhibited, the OD value of viable cells decreased and cytotoxity index (CI increased; Apoptosis of the A549 cells were observed to have cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, margination, unclear fragmentation and intact cell membrane by light and electron microscopy; The cells were inhibited in the stage S. Conclusion MFH induced by AMF could inhibit the proliferation, which promotes apoptosis and arrest at S stage of the A549 cells.

  11. Fundamentals and application of magnetic particles in cell isolation and enrichment: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell-separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell-separation systems. (review article)

  12. Preparation of Immuno-magnetic Beads and Their Separation & Detection to Ovary Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The organic monomer-molecule with nanometer magnetic powder by means of reforming the surface of nanometer magnetic powder have been synthesized.Magnetic beads in diameter of 2μm or so are obtained by controlling conditions.Ovary cancer cells of ascites are separated and ovary cancer cells of blood are detected by using immuno-magnetic beads linked with ovary cancer cell mono-antibodies.Results show that the specificity is 85%,sensitivity is 87%,accuracy is 84%,cells acquiring purity is 90%,cells activity is 92% and detection sensitivity is 25×10-7.

  13. GEMPIC: Geometric ElectroMagnetic Particle-In-Cell Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Michael; Morrison, Philip J; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel framework for Finite Element Particle-in-Cell methods based on the discretization of the underlying Hamiltonian structure of the Vlasov-Maxwell system. We derive a semi-discrete Poisson bracket, which satisfies the Jacobi identity , and apply Hamiltonian splitting schemes for time integration. Techniques from Finite Element Exterior Calculus ensure conservation of the divergence of the magnetic field and Gauss' law as well as stability of the field solver. The resulting methods are gauge-invariant, feature exact charge conservation and show excellent long-time energy and momentum behavior.

  14. Non-chemotoxic induction of cancer cell death using magnetic nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Contreras MF

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maria F Contreras,1 Rachid Sougrat,2 Amir Zaher,3 Timothy Ravasi,1,3 Jürgen Kosel3 1Division of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering, 2Advanced Nanofabrication Imaging and Characterization, 3Division of Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: In this paper, we show that magnetic nanowires with weak magnetic fields and low frequencies can induce cell death via a mechanism that does not involve heat production. We incubated colon cancer cells with two concentrations (2.4 and 12 µg/mL of nickel nanowires that were 35 nm in diameter and exposed the cells and nanowires to an alternating magnetic field (0.5 mT and 1 Hz or 1 kHz for 10 or 30 minutes. This low-power field exerted a force on the magnetic nanowires, causing a mechanical disturbance to the cells. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the nanostructures were internalized into the cells within 1 hour of incubation. Cell viability studies showed that the magnetic field and the nanowires separately had minor deleterious effects on the cells; however, when combined, the magnetic field and nanowires caused the cell viability values to drop by up to 39%, depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the concentration of the nanowires. Cell membrane leakage experiments indicated membrane leakage of 20%, suggesting that cell death mechanisms induced by the nanowires and magnetic field involve some cell membrane rupture. Results suggest that magnetic nanowires can kill cancer cells. The proposed process requires simple and low-cost equipment with exposure to only very weak magnetic fields for short time periods. Keywords: cell death induction, low frequency alternating magnetic field, nanomedicine, nanowire internalization, nickel nanowires

  15. Removal of malaria-infected red blood cells using magnetic cell separators: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongho; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F; Gandini, Alberto

    2012-02-15

    High gradient magnetic field separators have been widely used in a variety of biological applications. Recently, the use of magnetic separators to remove malaria-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) from blood circulation in patients with severe malaria has been proposed in a dialysis-like treatment. The capture efficiency of this process depends on many interrelated design variables and constraints such as magnetic pole array pitch, chamber height, and flow rate. In this paper, we model the malaria-infected RBCs (pRBCs) as paramagnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid. Trajectories of the infected cells are numerically calculated inside a micro-channel exposed to a periodic magnetic field gradient. First-order stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the trajectory of particles under periodic magnetic fields due to an array of wires are solved numerically using the 1(st) -5(th) order adaptive step Runge-Kutta solver. The numerical experiments show that in order to achieve a capture efficiency of 99% for the pRBCs it is required to have a longer length than 80 mm; this implies that in principle, using optimization techniques the length could be adjusted, i.e., shortened to achieve 99% capture efficiency of the pRBCs. PMID:22345827

  16. Addressing of LnCaP Cell Using Magnetic Particles Assisted Impedimetric Microelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dung Thi Xuan; Tran, Trong Binh; Nguyen, Phuong-Diem; Min, Junhong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we provide a facile, effective technique for a simple isolation and enrichment of low metastatic prostate tumor cell LNCaP using biocompatible, magnetic particles asissted impedimetric sensing system. Hydrophobic cell membrane anchors (BAM) were generated onto magnetic particles which diameters vary from 50 nm to 5 μm and were used to capture LNCaP cells from the suspension. Finally, magnetic particle-LNCaP complex were addressed onto the surface of the interdigitated microelectrode (IDM). Cell viability was monitored by our laboratory developed-technique Electrical Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS). The results reavealed that 50 nm-magnetic particles showed best performance in terms of cell separation and cell viability. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the direct addressing of LNCaP cell on the surface and enhances better understanding of cell behavior for cancer management in the near future. PMID:27455737

  17. Addressing of LnCaP Cell Using Magnetic Particles Assisted Impedimetric Microelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dung Thi Xuan; Tran, Trong Binh; Nguyen, Phuong-Diem; Min, Junhong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we provide a facile, effective technique for a simple isolation and enrichment of low metastatic prostate tumor cell LNCaP using biocompatible, magnetic particles asissted impedimetric sensing system. Hydrophobic cell membrane anchors (BAM) were generated onto magnetic particles which diameters vary from 50 nm to 5 μm and were used to capture LNCaP cells from the suspension. Finally, magnetic particle-LNCaP complex were addressed onto the surface of the interdigitated microelectrode (IDM). Cell viability was monitored by our laboratory developed-technique Electrical Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS). The results reavealed that 50 nm-magnetic particles showed best performance in terms of cell separation and cell viability. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the direct addressing of LNCaP cell on the surface and enhances better understanding of cell behavior for cancer management in the near future.

  18. Magnetic targeting of iron-oxide-labeled fluorescent hepatoma cells to the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luciani, Alain [Universite Rene Descartes, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie, EA 4062, Paris (France); Imagerie Medicale, Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil cedex (France); Wilhelm, Claire; Gazeau, Florence [Universite Paris Diderot, Batiment Condorcet, Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes, CNRS-UMR 7057, Paris Cedex (France); Bruneval, Patrick [Anatomopathologie, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Cunin, Patrick [Unite de Recherche Clinique, Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil cedex (France); Autret, Gwennhael; Clement, Olivier [Universite Rene Descartes, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie, EA 4062, Paris (France); Rahmouni, Alain [Imagerie Medicale, Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil cedex (France)

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an external magnet field can induce preferential trafficking of magnetically labeled Huh7 hepatoma cells to the liver following liver cell transplantation. Huh7 hepatoma cells were labeled with anionic magnetic nanoparticles (AMNP) and tagged with a fluorescent membrane marker (PKH67). Iron-uptake was measured by magnetophoresis. Twenty C57Bl6 mice received an intrasplenic injection of 2 x 10{sup 6} labeled cells. An external magnet (0.29 T; 25 T/m) was placed over the liver of 13 randomly selected animals (magnet group), while the remaining 7 animals served as controls. MRI (1.5 T) and confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) were performed 10 days post-transplantation. The presence and location of labeled cells within the livers were compared in the magnet group and controls, and confronted with histological analysis representing the standard of reference. Mean iron content per cell was 6 pg. Based on histology, labeled cells were more frequently present within recipient livers in the magnet group (p < 0.01) where their distribution was preferentially peri-vascular (p<0.05). MRI and CFM gave similar results for the overall detection of transplanted cells (kappa=0.828) and for the identification of peri-vascular cells (kappa=0.78). Application of an external magnet can modify the trafficking of transplanted cells, especially by promoting the formation of perivascular aggregates. (orig.)

  19. Harvesting of Dunaliella tertiolecta cells by magnetic filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousakis, Emmanouil; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2015-04-01

    The rising cost and reduced reserves of fossil fuels have enhanced the interest for finding alterative energy sources. Microalgae are considered to be the only sustainable option in biodiesel production for two key points. The energy yield from microalgae is much higher than that of oil producing crops, and the cultivation of algae it is not antagonistic with food supply chain. Because of the small size of microalgae and the dilute nature of algal cultures, the harvesting cost of microalgae is so far a limiting step for the scale up of microalgal biofuel production. It is estimated that the algal harvesting cost is at least 20-30% of the total biomass production cost. Traditional methods, which have been employed for the recovery of microalgal biomass, include centrifugation, gravity separation, filtration, flocculation, and flotation. Alternative approaches, other than conventional methods, capable of processing large cultures volume at a low cost, and reducing effluent toxicity are essential for microalgal biomass production. Magnetic separation is a promising technology and has been applied for algal removal in the mid of 1970s. The aim of this study was to investigate the harvesting of microalgae cells using magnetic microparticles (MPs). Dunaliella tertiolecta was selected as a representative for marine microalgae. The cultivation of microalgae was conducted under continuous artificial light, in 20 L flasks. Iron oxide microparticles were prepared by microwave irradiation of FeSO4 7H2O in an alkaline solution. Samples were taken at different operation intervals to conduct harvesting studies. Batch and flow-through experiments were conducted in order to investigate the effect of the magnetic material on microalgae removal. Algal removal in flow through experiments ranged from 70 to 85% depending on the initial MPs concentration even at very short hydraulic retention times (i.e. 2 min). In batch tests, algal removal was up to 97% at MPs concentration of 490 mg/L.

  20. Cryopreservation of periodontal ligament cells with magnetic field for tooth banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, M; Kamada, H; Kawata, T; Koseki, H; Abedini, S; Kojima, S; Motokawa, M; Fujita, T; Ohtani, J; Tsuka, N; Matsuda, Y; Sunagawa, H; Hernandes, R A M; Ohwada, N; Tanne, K

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a long-term tooth cryopreservation method that can be used for tooth autotransplantation. Human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells were frozen in 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) using a programmed freezer with a magnetic field. Cells were cryopreserved for 7 days at -150 degrees C. Immediately after thawing, the number of surviving cells was counted and the cells were cultured; cultured cells were examined after 48 h. Results indicated that a 0.01 mT of a magnetic field, a 15-min hold-time, and a plunging temperature of -30 degrees C led to the greatest survival rate of PDL cells. Based on these findings, whole teeth were cryopreserved under the same conditions for 1 year. The organ culture revealed that the PDL cells of cryopreserved tooth with a magnetic field could proliferate as much as a fresh tooth, although the cells did not appear in the cryopreserved tooth without a magnetic field. Histological examination and the transmission electron microscopic image of cryopreserved tooth with a magnetic field did not show any destruction of cryopreserved cells. In contrast, severe cell damage was seen in cells frozen without a magnetic field. These results indicated that a magnetic field programmed freezer is available for tooth cryopreservation.

  1. EFFECTS OF CARBOXYMETHLY DEXTRAN MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES CARRIER SYSTEM ASSOCIATED WITH EXTERNAL MAGNETIC FIELDS ON KILLING TUMOR CELLS AND GENE TRANSFECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zheng-guo; ZHOU Si-wei; LIU Ji-hong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the preparation of the carboxymethly dextran iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (CDMN) and the effects of CDMN carrier system associated with external magnetic fields on killing tumor cells and gene transfection in vitro. Methods: Epirubicin-CDMN (EPI-CDMN) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmid-CDMN (GFP-CDMN) were prepared by the oxidation-reduction procedure and their characters were detected, respectively. The effects of EPI-CDMN associated with external pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) (10 mT) on killing human bladder cancer BIU-87 cells were studied by MTT assay and Annexin-V/PI double-labeled flow cytometry technique, respectively. And the transfection efficiency of GFP when CDMN were used as gene carrier associated with the external magnetic fields was evaluated under fluorescence microscope in vitro. Results: The diameter of EPI-CDMN and GFP-CDMN were about 8~10 nm and 5~9 nm, respectively, and saturation magnetization were 0.22 emu/g and 0.26 emu/g, respectively. EPI-CDMN associated with PEMFs could significantly inhibit the proliferation of BIU-87 cells and induce cells apoptosis, the growth inhibitory rate and apoptosis rate were (21.82(3.18)% and (16.79(3.37)%, respectively. The transfection efficiency of GFP-CDMN combined with PEMFs was significant higher than that of GFP-CDMN without PEMFs [(45.70(4.32)% vs (35.85(2.16)%, P<0.05]. Conclusion: It seemed that EPI-CDMN associated with external magnetic fields could significantly killed human bladder cancer BIU-87 cells and CDMN could effectively transfer GFP gene into tumors cells with the help of external magnetic fields which provided experimental basis for the magnetic targeting therapy of tumor.

  2. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creanga, D E; Nadejde, C; Curecheriu, L [' Al. I. Cuza' University, Faculty of Physics, 11A Blvd. Carol I, Iasi (Romania)], E-mail: dorinacreanga@yahoo.com; Culea, M [' Babes Bolyai' University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Oancea, S [University of Veterinary Medicine ' I. Ionescu de la Brad' , Iasi (Romania); Racuciu, M [' Lucian Blaga' University, Sibiu (Romania)

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm{sup -1} or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  3. Experimental studies on ultralow frequency pulsed gradient magnetic field inducing apoptosis of cancer cell and inhibiting growth of cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾繁清; 郑从义; 张新晨; 李宗山; 李朝阳; 王川婴; 张新松; 黄晓玲; 张沪生

    2002-01-01

    The morphology characteristics of cell apoptosis of the malignant tumour cells in magnetic field-treated mouse was observed for the first time. The apoptotic cancer cell contracted, became rounder and divorced from adjacent cells; the heterochromatin condensed and coagulated together along the inner side of the nuclear membrane; the endoplasmic reticulums(ER) expanded and fused with the cellular membrane; many apoptotic bodies which were packed by the cellular membrane appeared and were devoured by some lymphocytes and plasma. Apoptosis of cancer cells was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated in situ nick end labeling(TUNEL). It was found that the number of apoptosis cancer cells of the sample treated by the magnetic field is more than that of the control sample. The growth of malignant tumour in mice was inhibited and the ability of immune cell to dissolve cancer cells was improved by ultralow frequency(ULF) pulsed gradient magnetic field; the nuclei DNA contents decreased, indicating that magnetic field can block DNA replication and inhibit mitosis of cancer cells. It was suggested that magnetic field could inhibit the metabolism of cancer cell, lower its malignancy, and restrain its rapid and heteromorphic growth. Since ULF pulsed gradient magnetic field can induce apoptosis of cancer cells and inhibit the growth of malignant tumour, it could be used as a new method to treat cancer.

  4. Rotational magnetic pulses enhance the magnetofection efficiency in vitro in adherent and suspension cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahmani, Ch., E-mail: dahmani@tum.de [Institute of Energy Conversion Technology, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Mykhaylyk, O. [Institute of Experimental Oncology and Therapy Research, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich (Germany); Helling, Fl. [Institute of Electrical Energy Supply, Universität der Bundeswehr, Munich (Germany); Götz, St. [Institute of Energy Conversion Technology, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Weyh, Th. [Institute of Electrical Energy Supply, Universität der Bundeswehr, Munich (Germany); Herzog, H.-G. [Institute of Energy Conversion Technology, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Plank, Ch. [Institute of Experimental Oncology and Therapy Research, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The association of magnetic nanoparticles with gene delivery vectors in combination with the use of gradient magnetic fields (magnetofection) enables improved and synchronised gene delivery to cells. In this paper, we report a system comprising rotating permanent magnets to generate defined magnetic field pulses with frequencies from 2.66 to 133 Hz and a field amplitude of 190 or 310 mT at the location of the cells. Low-frequency pulses of 2.66–10 Hz with a magnetic flux density of 190 mT were applied to the examined cells for 30–120 s after magnetofection. These pulses resulted in a 1.5–1.9-fold enhancement in the transfection efficiency compared with magnetofection with only a static magnetic field in both adherent and suspension cells. The magnetic field amplitudes of 190 and 310 mT had similar effects on the transfection efficacy. No increase in the percentage of transgene-expressing suspension cells and no cytotoxic effects (based on the results of the MTT assay) were observed after applying alternating magnetic fields. - Highlights: ► We developed a magnetic system capable of generating defined magnetic pulses based on permanent magnets. ► The main advantage of the system is the lack of heat-induced fluctuations in the working parameters. ► Our system succeeded in enhancing the transfection of adherent human lung epithelial cells and human suspension cells. ► The enhancement in the transfection efficiency compared with static magnetic field is due to the magnetic field pulses. ► The approach could be used as a complementary method for drug targeting.

  5. Isolation and manipulation of living adherent cells by micromolded magnetic rafts

    OpenAIRE

    Gach, Philip C.; Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    A new strategy for magnetically manipulating and isolating adherent cells with extremely high post-collection purity and viability is reported. Micromolded magnetic elements (termed microrafts) were fabricated in an array format and used as culture surfaces and carriers for living, adherent cells. A poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) polymer containing well dispersed magnetic nanoparticles was developed for creating the microstructures by molding. Nanoparticles of γFe2O3 at concentrations up to 1%...

  6. Apoptosis selectively induced in BEL-7402 cells by folic acid-modified magnetic nanoparticles combined with 100 Hz magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen J

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Jian Wen,1 Shulian Jiang,1 Zhiqiang Chen,1 Wei Zhao,1 Yongxiang Yi,1 Ruili Yang,1 Baoan Chen2 1Second Affiliated Hospital of Southeast University, 2Department of Hematology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China Objective: To explore the effect of folic acid-modified magnetic nanoparticles (FA-MNPs combined with a 100 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF on the apoptosis of liver cancer BEL-7402 cells. Materials and methods: MNPs (20 nm were prepared by coprecipitation, and then folic acid was coated onto MNPs to prepare FA-MNPs. BEL-7402 cells and HL7702 cells were selected as liver cancer cells and normal liver cells, respectively. The ELF-EMF was generated from a solenoid coil. Cellular uptake of NPs was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate cell inhibition. Apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry. Statistical analyses were performed using two-way analysis of variance. Results: FA-MNPs combined with a 100 Hz magnetic field significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced higher apoptosis compared to either the ELF-EMF alone or FA-MNPs alone. FA-MNPs showed a better apoptosis effect and higher iron uptake in BEL-7402 cells compared to in HL7702 cells. On the basis of the ELF-EMF, higher doses of FA-MNPs brought higher apoptosis and higher iron uptake in either BEL-7402 cells or HL7702 cells. Conclusion: These results suggest that FA-MNPs may induce apoptosis in a cellular iron uptake-dependent manner when combined with an ELF-EMF in BEL-7402 cells.Keywords: extremely low-frequency magnetic field, magnetic nanoparticle, apoptosis, liver cancer, folic acid

  7. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  8. Use of magnetic forces to promote stem cell aggregation during differentiation, and cartilage tissue modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, D; Frasca, G; Le Visage, C; Gazeau, F; Luciani, N; Wilhelm, C

    2013-05-14

    Magnetic forces induce cell condensation necessary for stem cell differentiation into cartilage and elicit the formation of a tissue-like structure: Magnetically driven fusion of aggregates assembled by micromagnets results in the formation of a continuous tissue layer containing abundant cartilage matrix. PMID:23526452

  9. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  10. Application of magnetic poly(styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres for immunomagnetic separation of bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, T.-H.; Chang, J.-Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan (China); Lee, W.-C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chmwcl@ccu.edu.tw

    2009-05-15

    Surface-functionalized magnetic poly(styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) (PS-GMA) microspheres were prepared and coupled with Sca-1 antibody for cell selection from murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNCs). Biotinylated Sca-1 antibody could be directly coupled to avidin-bound magnetic microspheres. Alternatively, oxidized goat anti-mouse antibody was covalently bound onto the amino group-containing magnetic microspheres in a site-directed manner, and the resultant conjugate was coupled with non-modified Sca-1 antibody. Using the indirect antibody-bound magnetic microspheres, the purity of isolated Sca-1{sup +} cells increased with bead-to-cell ratio. Using a bead-to-cell ratio of 10 beads/cell, a purity of 85% Sca-1{sup +} cells corresponding to a 17-fold enrichment was achieved.

  11. Application of magnetic poly(styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres for immunomagnetic separation of bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface-functionalized magnetic poly(styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) (PS-GMA) microspheres were prepared and coupled with Sca-1 antibody for cell selection from murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNCs). Biotinylated Sca-1 antibody could be directly coupled to avidin-bound magnetic microspheres. Alternatively, oxidized goat anti-mouse antibody was covalently bound onto the amino group-containing magnetic microspheres in a site-directed manner, and the resultant conjugate was coupled with non-modified Sca-1 antibody. Using the indirect antibody-bound magnetic microspheres, the purity of isolated Sca-1+ cells increased with bead-to-cell ratio. Using a bead-to-cell ratio of 10 beads/cell, a purity of 85% Sca-1+ cells corresponding to a 17-fold enrichment was achieved.

  12. Application of magnetic poly(styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres for immunomagnetic separation of bone marrow cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ting-Hao; Chang, Jing-Yi; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2009-05-01

    Surface-functionalized magnetic poly(styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) (PS-GMA) microspheres were prepared and coupled with Sca-1 antibody for cell selection from murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNCs). Biotinylated Sca-1 antibody could be directly coupled to avidin-bound magnetic microspheres. Alternatively, oxidized goat anti-mouse antibody was covalently bound onto the amino group-containing magnetic microspheres in a site-directed manner, and the resultant conjugate was coupled with non-modified Sca-1 antibody. Using the indirect antibody-bound magnetic microspheres, the purity of isolated Sca-1 + cells increased with bead-to-cell ratio. Using a bead-to-cell ratio of 10 beads/cell, a purity of 85% Sca-1 + cells corresponding to a 17-fold enrichment was achieved.

  13. Application of Cell Penetrating Peptide in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LIU; You-Min GUO; Jun-Le YANG; Peng WANG; Lin-Yu ZHAO; Nian SHEN; Si-Cen WANG; Xiao-Juan GUO; Qi-Fei WU

    2006-01-01

    Tracking the distribution and differentiation of stem cells by high-resolution imaging techniques would have significant clinical and research implications. In this study, a model cell-penetrating peptide was used to carry gadolinium particles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs).MSCs were isolated from rat bone marrow and identified by osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cellpenetrating peptide labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) and gadolinium was synthesized by a solid-phase peptide synthesis method. Fluorescein imaging analysis confirmed that this new peptide could internalize into the cytoplasm and nucleus at room temperature, 4℃ and 37℃. Gadolinium were efficiently internalized into mesenchymal stem cells by the peptide in a time or concentration-dependent manner,resulting in intercellular shortening of longitudinal relaxation enhancements, which were obviously detected by 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometric analysis showed that the intercellular contrast medium incorporation did not affect cell viability at the tested concentrations. The in vitro experiment results suggested that the new constructed peptides could be a vector for tracking MSCs.

  14. Magnetic Labelling of Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Iron-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles as Tool for Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Iafisco, Michele; Adamiano, Alessio; Ghetti, Martina; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Tampieri, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles offer several opportunities in nanomedicine and magnetic cell targeting. They are considered to be an extremely promising approach for the translation of cell-based therapies from the laboratory to clinical studies. In fact, after injection, the magnetic labeled cells could be driven by a static magnetic field and localized to the target site where they can perform their specific role. In this study, innovative iron-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (FeHA NPs) were tested with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as tools for cell therapy. Results showed that FeHA NPs could represent higher cell viability in'respect to commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at four different concentrations ranging from 10 μg/ml up to 200 μg/ml and would also upregulate an early marker involved in commitment and differentiation of MSCs. Moreover, FeHA NPs were uptaken without negatively affecting the cell behavior and their ultrastructure. Thus obtained magnetic cells were easily guided by application of a static magnetic field. This work demonstrates the promising opportunities of FeHA NPs in MSCs labeling due to the unique features of fast degradation and very low iron content of FeHA NPs compared to SPIONs. Likewise, due to the intrinsic properties of FeHA NPs, this approach could be simply transferred to different cell types as an effective magnetic carrier of drugs, growth factors, miRNA, etc., offering favorable prospects in nanomedicine.

  15. Characterization of Rat Hair Follicle Stem Cells Selected by Vario Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, α6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of α6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by α6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34bri cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34dim cells. CD34bri cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34dim cells. Furthermore, CD34bri cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS

  16. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma opening switch with external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations are performed to study the effects of an external magnetic field on coaxial plasma opening switch (POS). The simulation results show that POS opening performance can be significantly improved only when external longitudinal magnetic field coils are placed at the cathode side, and an additional azimuthal magnetic field is effective whether the central electrode is of positive or negative polarity. Voltage multiplication coefficient K rises with the additional magnetic field increasing till the electron current is completely magnetically insulated during the opening of POS

  17. Process optimization and biocompatibility of cell carriers suitable for automated magnetic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, I; Piana, C; Howitz, S; Wegener, T; Fiedler, S; Zwanzig, M; Schmitt, D; Daum, N; Meier, K; Lehr, C M; Batista, U; Zemljic, S; Messerschmidt, J; Franzke, J; Wirth, M; Gabor, F

    2012-03-01

    There is increasing demand for automated cell reprogramming in the fields of cell biology, biotechnology and the biomedical sciences. Microfluidic-based platforms that provide unattended manipulation of adherent cells promise to be an appropriate basis for cell manipulation. In this study we developed a magnetically driven cell carrier to serve as a vehicle within an in vitro environment. To elucidate the impact of the carrier on cells, biocompatibility was estimated using the human adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. Besides evaluation of the quality of the magnetic carriers by field emission scanning electron microscopy, the rate of adherence, proliferation and differentiation of Caco-2 cells grown on the carriers was quantified. Moreover, the morphology of the cells was monitored by immunofluorescent staining. Early generations of the cell carrier suffered from release of cytotoxic nickel from the magnetic cushion. Biocompatibility was achieved by complete encapsulation of the nickel bulk within galvanic gold. The insulation process had to be developed stepwise and was controlled by parallel monitoring of the cell viability. The final carrier generation proved to be a proper support for cell manipulation, allowing proliferation of Caco-2 cells equal to that on glass or polystyrene as a reference for up to 10 days. Functional differentiation was enhanced by more than 30% compared with the reference. A flat, ferromagnetic and fully biocompatible carrier for cell manipulation was developed for application in microfluidic systems. Beyond that, this study offers advice for the development of magnetic cell carriers and the estimation of their biocompatibility.

  18. An effective strategy of magnetic stem cell delivery for spinal cord injury therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukmachev, Dmitry; Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Babic, Michal; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal channel showed a good correlation with the calculated distribution of magnetic forces exerted onto the transplanted cells. The results suggest that focused targeting and fast delivery of stem cells can be achieved using the proposed non-invasive magnetic system. With future implementation the proposed targeting and delivery strategy bears advantages for the treatment of disease requiring fast stem cell transplantation.Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal

  19. Increasing magnetite contents of polymeric magnetic particles dramatically improves labeling of neural stem cell transplant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher F; Rai, Ahmad; Sneddon, Gregor; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Polyak, Boris; Chari, Divya M

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic cells to sites of injury/disease in the central nervous system is a key goal for the translation of clinical cell transplantation therapies. Recently, 'magnetic cell localization strategies' have emerged as a promising and safe approach for targeted delivery of magnetic particle (MP) labeled stem cells to pathology sites. For neuroregenerative applications, this approach is limited by the lack of available neurocompatible MPs, and low cell labeling achieved in neural stem/precursor populations. We demonstrate that high magnetite content, self-sedimenting polymeric MPs [unfunctionalized poly(lactic acid) coated, without a transfecting component] achieve efficient labeling (≥90%) of primary neural stem cells (NSCs)-a 'hard-to-label' transplant population of major clinical relevance. Our protocols showed high safety with respect to key stem cell regenerative parameters. Critically, labeled cells were effectively localized in an in vitro flow system by magnetic force highlighting the translational potential of the methods used.

  20. External magnetic field effect on bifacial silicon solar cell''s electric power and conversion efficiencyExternal magnetic field effect on bifacial silicon solar cell''s electric power and conversion efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    ZERBO, ISSA; ZOUNGRANA, MARTIAL; SOURABIE, IDRISSA; Ouedraogo, Adama; ZOUMA, BERNARD; BATHIEBO, DIEUDONNE JOSEPH

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a modelling study of external magnetic field effect on a bifacial silicon solar cell's electric power and conversion efficiency. After the resolution of the magnetotransport equation and continuity equation of excess minority carriers, we calculate the photocurrent density and the photovoltage and then we deduce the solar cell's electric power before discussing the influence of the magnetic field on those electrical parameters. Using the electric power curves...

  1. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chih Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs, and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability.

  2. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M.; Pankiewicz, R.; Zalas, M.; Stampor, W.

    2016-07-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism.

  3. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M.; Pankiewicz, R.; Zalas, M.; Stampor, W.

    2016-01-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism. PMID:27440452

  4. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M; Pankiewicz, R; Zalas, M; Stampor, W

    2016-01-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism. PMID:27440452

  5. Cell behaviors on magnetic electrospun poly-D, L-lactide nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Long; Yang, Guang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Li, Jinrong; Ding, Shan [School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhou, Shaobing, E-mail: shaobingzhou@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that magnetic fields have an influence on cell behaviors, but the effects are still not very clear since the magnetic field's type, intensity and exposure time are different. In this study, a static magnetic field (SMF) in moderate intensity (10 mT) was employed to investigate its effect on osteoblast and 3T3 fibroblast cell behaviors cultured respectively with magnetic polymer nanofiber mats. The magnetic mats composed of random oriented or aligned polymer nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning the mixed solution of poly-D, L-lactide (PLA) and iron oxide nanoparticles. The fiber morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the nanoparticle distribution in fiber matrix was measured with transmission electron microscope (TEM). Mechanical properties of nanofiber mats are studied by uniaxial tensile test. The results showed the nanofibers loaded with magnetic nanoparticles displayed excellent magnetic responsibility and biodegradability. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis demonstrated that the osteoblast proliferation of all fiber mats stimulated with or without SMF was increased with the increase of the culturing days. Furthermore, in the horizontal SMFs, cell orientation tended to deviate from nanofiber orientation to field direction while the nanofiber orientation is perpendicular to the field direction, while the horizonal direction of SMFs could also direct the cell growth orientation. The magnetic nanofiber mats provide a potential platform to explore the cell behaviors under the stimulation of external magnetic field. - Highlights: • The random oriented and aligned magnetic electrospun nanofibers were prepared. • The nanofibers displayed excellent magnetic responsibility and biodegradability. • The horizonal direction of SMFs could also direct the cell growth orientation.

  6. Light-Addressable Electrodeposition of Magnetically-Guided Cells Encapsulated in Alginate Hydrogels for Three-Dimensional Cell Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hao Huang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a light-addressable electrolytic system used to perform an electrodeposition of magnetically-guided cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogels using a digital micromirror device (DMD for three-dimensional cell patterning. In this system, the magnetically-labeled cells were first manipulated into a specific arrangement by changing the orientation of the magnetic field, and then a patterned light illumination was projected onto a photoconductive substrate serving as a photo-anode to cause gelation of calcium alginate through sol-gel transition. By controlling the illumination pattern on the DMD, we first successfully produced cell-encapsulated multilayer alginate hydrogels with different shapes and sizes in each layer via performing multiplexed micropatterning. By combining the magnetically-labeled cells, light-addressable electrodeposition, and orientation of the magnetic fields, we have successfully demonstrated to fabricate two layers of the cell-encapsulated alginate hydrogels, where cells in each layer can be manipulated into cross-directional arrangements that mimic natural tissue. Our proposed method provides a programmable method for the spatiotemporally controllable assembly of cell populations into three-dimensional cell patterning and could have a wide range of biological applications in tissue engineering, toxicology, and drug discovery.

  7. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on apoptosis and cell cycle induced by wogonin in Raji cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang XM

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Lei Wang1,2,*, Haijun Zhang1,2,*, Baoan Chen1,2, Guohua Xia1,2, Shuai Wang1,2, Jian Cheng1,2, Zeye Shao1,2, Chong Gao1,2, Wen Bao1,2, Liang Tian1,2, Yanyan Ren1,2, Peipei Xu1,2, Xiaohui Cai1,2, Ran Liu1,2, Xuemei Wang3 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, 2Faculty of Oncology, Medical School, 3State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Laboratory, Southeast University, Nanjing, China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Traditional Chinese medicine is gradually becoming a new source of anticancer drugs. One such example is wogonin, which is cytotoxic to various cancer cell lines in vitro. However, due to its low water solubility, wogonin is restricted to clinical administration. Recently, the application of drug-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs to increase water solubility of the drug and to enhance its chemotherapeutic efficiency has attracted much attention. In this study, wogonin was conjugated with the drug delivery system of MNPs by mechanical absorption polymerization to fabricate wogonin-loaded MNPs. It was demonstrated that MNPs could strengthen wogonin-induced cell inhibition, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in Raji cells by methylthiazol tetrazolium assay, flow cytometer assay, and nuclear 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of these phenomena were explored by western blot, in which the protein levels of caspase 8 and caspase 3 were increased significantly while those of survivin and cyclin E were decreased significantly in wogonin-MNPs group. These findings suggest that the combination of wogonin and MNPs provides a promising strategy for lymphoma therapy.Keywords: wogonin, magnetic nanoparticles, Raji cell, apoptosis, cell cycle, caspase 8, caspase 3, survivin, cyclin E

  8. Remote Actuation of Magnetic Nanoparticles For Cancer Cell Selective Treatment Through Cytoskeletal Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Alyssa M; Williams, Philise N; Pothayee, Nikorn; Pothayee, Nipon; Zhang, Rui; Vishwasrao, Hemant M; Golovin, Yuri I; Riffle, Judy S; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Motion of micron and sub-micron size magnetic particles in alternating magnetic fields can activate mechanosensitive cellular functions or physically destruct cancer cells. However, such effects are usually observed with relatively large magnetic particles (>250 nm) that would be difficult if at all possible to deliver to remote sites in the body to treat disease. Here we show a completely new mechanism of selective toxicity of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) of 7 to 8 nm in diameter to cancer cells. These particles are coated by block copolymers, which facilitates their entry into the cells and clustering in the lysosomes, where they are then magneto-mechanically actuated by remotely applied alternating current (AC) magnetic fields of very low frequency (50 Hz). Such fields and treatments are safe for surrounding tissues but produce cytoskeletal disruption and subsequent death of cancer cells while leaving healthy cells intact. PMID:27644858

  9. Effects of gradient magnetic force and diamagnetic torque on formation of osteoclast-like giant cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaka, M [Department of Medical System Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ikehata, M [Railway Technology Institute, 2-8-38 Hikari-cho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan); Hirota, N [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengenl-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: iwasaka@faculty.chiba-u.jp, E-mail: iwasaka-m@umin.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    In bone tissue, two kinds of cells, osteoblast (OB) and osteoclast (OC), contribute to remodeling of bone. In the present study, a co-culture system of bone-forming cell (OB) and -dissolving cell (OC) was incubated in static magnetic fields of horizontal 14 T and vertical gradient 10 T. Effect of two kinds of magnetic fields was an inhibition of OC formation. Three kinds of mechanisms, magnetic orientation of OB, diamagnetic torque force acting on OC, and possible reduction of earth's gravity were discussed.

  10. Effects of gradient magnetic force and diamagnetic torque on formation of osteoclast-like giant cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ikehata, M.; Hirota, N.

    2009-03-01

    In bone tissue, two kinds of cells, osteoblast (OB) and osteoclast (OC), contribute to remodeling of bone. In the present study, a co-culture system of bone-forming cell (OB) and -dissolving cell (OC) was incubated in static magnetic fields of horizontal 14 T and vertical gradient 10 T. Effect of two kinds of magnetic fields was an inhibition of OC formation. Three kinds of mechanisms, magnetic orientation of OB, diamagnetic torque force acting on OC, and possible reduction of earth's gravity were discussed.

  11. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, Bruce E.; Kidder, Louis S; Williams, Philip C.; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-01-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentia...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance im-aging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance imaging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  14. One Step Quick Detection of Cancer Cell Surface Marker by Integrated NiFe-based Magnetic Biosensing Cell Cultural Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenchen Bao; Lei Chen; Tao Wang; Chong Lei; Furong Tian; Daxiang Cui; Yong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    RGD peptides has been used to detect cell surface integrin and direct clinical effective therapeutic drug selection. Herein we report that a quick one step detection of cell surface marker that was realized by a specially designed NiFe-based magnetic biosensing cell chip combined with functionalized magnetic nanoparti-cles. Magnetic nanoparticles with 20-30 nm in diameter were prepared by coprecipitation and modified with RGD-4C, and the resultant RGD-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were used for targeting cancer cells cul-tured on the NiFe-based magnetic biosensing chip and distinguish the amount of cell surface receptor-integrin. Cell lines such as Calu3, Hela, A549, CaFbr, HEK293 and HUVEC exhibiting different integrin expression were chosen as test samples. Calu3, Hela, HEK293 and HUVEC cells were successfully identified. This approach has advantages in the qualitative screening test. Compared with traditional method, it is fast, sensitive, low cost, easy-operative, and needs very little human intervention. The novel method has great potential in applications such as fast clinical cell surface marker detection, and diagnosis of early cancer, and can be easily extended to other biomedical applications based on molecular recognition.

  15. Cell and membrane lipid analysis by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in five breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moyec, L; Tatoud, R; Eugène, M; Gauvillé, C; Primot, I; Charlemagne, D; Calvo, F

    1992-10-01

    The lipid composition of five human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, ZR-75-1, SKBR3 and MDA-MB231) was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in whole cells and membrane-enriched fractions. The proportions of the three main lipid resonances in 1D spectra were different for each cell line. These resonances included mobile methyl and methylene functions from fatty acids of triglycerides and phospholipids and N-trimethyl from choline of phospholipids. T47D and ZR-75-1 cells presented a high methylene/methyl ratio (6.02 +/- 0.35 and 6.28 +/- 0.90). This ratio was significantly lower for SKBR3, MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 cells (2.76 +/- 0.22, 2.27 +/- 0.57 and 1.39 +/- 0.39). The N-trimethyl/methyl ratio was high for MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 cells (1.38 +/- 0.54 and 0.86 +/- 0.32), but lower for MCF-7, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells (0.49 +/- 0.11, 0.16 +/- 0.07 and 0.07 +/- 0.03). 2D COSY spectra confirmed these different proportions in mobile lipids. From 1D spectra obtained on membrane preparations, T47D and ZR-75-1 were the only cell lines to retain a signal from mobile methylene functions. These differences might be related to the heterogeneity found for several parameters of these cells (tumorigenicity, growth rate, hormone receptors); an extended number of cases from fresh samples might enable clinical correlations. PMID:1329906

  16. Boost Converter with Three-State Switching Cell and Integrated Magnetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimczak, Pawel; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    Fuel cell systems often require high voltage gain and dc-dc step-up converter is a critical part. Scope of this paper is integration of inductor and transformer on a single core. Usage of integrated magnetics improves utilization of magnetic core and thus size and weight of the converter may...

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of microbial cells using magnetic focus enhanced lateral flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wen; Cho, Il-Hoon; Zhou, Zhongwu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    We report on an improved lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) sensor with a magnetic focus for ultrasensitive naked-eye detection of pathogenic microorganisms at a near single cell limit without any pre-enrichment steps, by allowing the magnetic probes to focus the labelled pathogens to the target zone of the LF strip.

  19. [Determination of the nucleic acids in pig embryonic kidney cells by magnetic cytaphoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikov, V M; Maksimova, E V

    1989-01-01

    Gallocyanine-chrome alum-stained pig embryonic kidney cells have paramagnetic properties. They move under the influence of gradient magnetic field (magnetophoresis). The velocity of magnetophoresis is proportional to the content of nucleic acids in cells. This allows to estimate the content of nucleic acids per cell dry weight by magnetophoresis and analytical centrifugation. PMID:2473104

  20. Microwave-synthesized magnetic chitosan microparticles for the immobilization of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarik, Ivo; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Maderova, Zdenka; Baldikova, Eva; Horska, Katerina; Safarikova, Mirka

    2015-01-01

    An extremely simple procedure has been developed for the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells on magnetic chitosan microparticles. The magnetic carrier was prepared using an inexpensive, simple, rapid, one-pot process, based on the microwave irradiation of chitosan and ferrous sulphate at high pH. Immobilized yeast cells have been used for sucrose hydrolysis, hydrogen peroxide decomposition and the adsorption of selected dyes. PMID:24753015

  1. Can Lucifer Yellow Indicate Correct Permeability of Biological Cell Membrane under An Electric and Magnetic Field?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Pourmirjafari Firoozabadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of external magnetic and electric fields, in the range of electroporation and magnetoporation, on Lucifer Yellow (LY fluorescence in the absence of cells is studied. Electric-field-induced quenching and magnetic field-induced increase are observed for fluorescence intensity of LY. Regard to the fact that the variation of field-induced fluorescence, even in the absence of cells, can be observed, the application of LY, as a marker, is debatable in electroporation and magnetoporation techniques.

  2. Magnetic trapping with simultaneous photoacoustic detection of molecularly targeted rare circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been widely used in molecular imaging to detect diseased cells by targeting them with nanoparticle-based contrast agents. However, the sensitivity and specificity are easily degraded because contrast agent signals can be masked by the background. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging uses a new type of multifunctional composite particle combining an optically absorptive gold nanorod core and magnetic nanospheres, which can potentially accumulate and concentrate targeted cells while simultaneously enhancing their specific contrast compared to background signals. In this study, HeLa cells molecularly targeted using nanocomposites with folic acid mimicking targeted rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were circulated at a 6 ml/min flow rate for trapping and imaging studies. Preliminary results show that the cells accumulate rapidly in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system. The sensitivity of the current system can reach up to 1 cell/ml in clear water. By manipulating the trapped cells magnetically, the specificity of detecting cells in highly absorptive ink solution can be enhanced with 16.98 dB background suppression by applying motion filtering on PA signals to remove unwanted background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results appear promising for future preclinical studies on a small animal model and ultimate clinical detection of rare CTCs in the vasculature.

  3. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Crustal Magnetic Anomalies: Magnetic Cusp Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-01-01

    As the solar wind is incident upon the lunar surface, it will occasionally encounter lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields. These magnetic fields are small-scale, highly non-dipolar, have strengths up to hundreds of nanotesla, and typically interact with the solar wind in a kinetic fashion. Simulations, theoretical analyses, and spacecraft observations have shown that crustal fields can reflect solar wind protons via a combination of magnetic and electrostatic reflection; however, analyses of surface properties have suggested that protons may still access the lunar surface in the cusp regions of crustal magnetic fields. In this first report from a planned series of studies, we use a 1 1/2-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code to model the self-consistent interaction between the solar wind, the cusp regions of lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields, and the lunar surface. We describe the self-consistent electrostatic environment within crustal cusp regions and discuss the implications of this work for the role that crustal fields may play regulating space weathering of the lunar surface via proton bombardment.

  4. Geometrically pinned magnetic domain wall for multi-bit per cell storage memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, M. Al; Sbiaa, R.

    2016-06-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetic switching or controlled motion of domain walls (DWs) by an external magnetic field or a spin-polarized current. Controlling the position of DW is essential for defining the state/information in a magnetic memory. During the process of nanowire fabrication, creating an off-set of two parts of the device could help to pin DW at a precise position. Micromagnetic simulation conducted on in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows the effectiveness of the proposed design for pinning DW at the nanoconstriction region. The critical current for moving DW from one state to the other is strongly dependent on nanoconstricted region (width and length) and the magnetic properties of the material. The DW speed which is essential for fast writing of the data could reach values in the range of hundreds m/s. Furthermore, evidence of multi-bit per cell memory is demonstrated via a magnetic nanowire with more than one constriction.

  5. Sliced Magnetic Polyacrylamide Hydrogel with Cell-Adhesive Microarray Interface: A Novel Multicellular Spheroid Culturing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ke; Zhou, Naizhen; Li, Yang; Ma, Siyu; Guo, Zhaobin; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qiying; Sun, Jianfei; Zhang, Tianzhu; Gu, Ning

    2016-06-22

    Cell-adhesive properties are of great significance to materials serving as extracellular matrix mimics. Appropriate cell-adhesive property of material interface can balance the cell-matrix interaction and cell-cell interaction and can promote cells to form 3D structures. Herein, a novel magnetic polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel fabricated via combining magnetostatic field induced magnetic nanoparticles assembly and hydrogel gelation was applied as a multicellular spheroids culturing platform. When cultured on the cell-adhesive microarray interface of sliced magnetic hydrogel, normal and tumor cells from different cell lines could rapidly form multicellular spheroids spontaneously. Furthermore, cells which could only form loose cell aggregates in a classic 3D cell culture model (such as hanging drop system) were able to be promoted to form multicellular spheroids on this platform. In the light of its simplicity in fabricating as well as its effectiveness in promoting formation of multicellular spheroids which was considered as a prevailing tool in the study of the microenvironmental regulation of tumor cell physiology and therapeutic problems, this composite material holds promise in anticancer drugs or hyperthermia therapy evaluation in vitro in the future. PMID:27258682

  6. Intracellular Delivery by Shape Anisotropic Magnetic Particle-Induced Cell Membrane Cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chien; Lee, Ji-Ann; Tung, Kuan-Wen; Zhou, Jessica; Teitell, Michael A; Yeh, J Andrew; Chiou, Pei Yu

    2016-08-01

    Introducing functional macromolecules into a variety of living cells is challenging but important for biology research and cell-based therapies. We report a novel cell delivery platform based on rotating shape anisotropic magnetic particles (SAMPs), which make very small cuts on cell membranes for macromolecule delivery with high efficiency and high survivability. SAMP delivery is performed by placing commercially available nickel powder onto cells grown in standard cell culture dishes. Application of a uniform magnetic field causes the magnetic particles to rotate because of mechanical torques induced by shape anisotropic magnetization. Cells touching these rotating particles are nicked, which generates transient membrane pores that enable the delivery of macromolecules into the cytosol of cells. Calcein dye, 3 and 40 kDa dextran polymers, a green fluorescence protein (GFP) plasmid, siRNA, and an enzyme (β-lactamase) were successfully delivered into HeLa cells, primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs), and mouse cortical neurons that can be difficult to transfect. The SAMP approach offers several advantages, including easy implementation, low cost, high throughput, and efficient delivery of a broad range of macromolecules. Collectively, SAMP delivery has great potential for a broad range of academic and industrial applications. PMID:26882924

  7. Enhanced reduction in cell viability by hyperthermia induced by magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor L Rodríguez-Luccioni

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Héctor L Rodríguez-Luccioni, Magda Latorre-Esteves, Janet Méndez-Vega, Orlando Soto, Ana R Rodríguez, Carlos Rinaldi, Madeline Torres-LugoDepartment of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez 00681, Puerto RicoAbstract: Colloidal suspensions of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are known to dissipate energy when exposed to an oscillating magnetic field. Such energy dissipation can be employed to locally raise temperature inside a tumor between 41°C and 45°C (hyperthermia to promote cell death, a treatment known as magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH. This work seeks to quantify differences between MFH and hot-water hyperthermia (HWH in terms of reduction in cell viability using two cancer cell culture models, Caco-2 (human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma and MCF-7 (human breast cancer. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method and functionalized with adsorbed carboxymethyl dextran. Cytotoxicity studies indicated that in the absence of an oscillating magnetic field, cell viability was not affected at concentrations of up to 0.6 mg iron oxide/mL. MFH resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability when exposed to a magnetic field for 120 minutes and allowed to rest for 48 hours, compared with similar field applications, but with shorter resting time. The results presented here suggest that MFH most likely induces apoptosis in both cell types. When compared with HWH, MFH produced a significant reduction in cell viability, and these effects appear to be cell-type related.Keywords: magnetic fluid hyperthermia, carboxymethyl dextran magnetite, cell death, apoptosis

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  9. Effects of AC magnetic field and carboxymethyldextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles on mice peritoneal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portable apparatus was developed to perform magnetohyperthermia (MHT) assays. In order to investigate its efficiency on cell lysis, biological effects of the AC magnetic field exposure after carboxymethyldextran-coated magnetite-nanoparticles (CMDC) treatment were investigated. Phagocyte capacity, cell viability, and morphology data evidenced that the CMDC sample and the apparatus are useful to further investigate MHT in cancer therapy

  10. Effects of AC magnetic field and carboxymethyldextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles on mice peritoneal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Guedes, Maria Helena [Depto de Genetica e Morfologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Sadeghiani, Neda [Depto de Genetica e Morfologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Lima Guedes Peixoto, Danielle [Depto de Genetica e Morfologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Poubel Coelho, Julia [Depto de Genetica e Morfologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Santos Barbosa, Luzirlane [Depto de Genetica e Morfologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Bentes Azevedo, Ricardo [Depto de Genetica e Morfologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Kueckelhaus, Selma [Depto de Genetica e Morfologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Brasilia, Area de Morfologia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Silva, Maria de Fatima da [Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Morais, Paulo Cesar [Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Guerrero Marques Lacava, Zulmira [Depto de Genetica e Morfologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: zulmira@unb.br

    2005-05-15

    A portable apparatus was developed to perform magnetohyperthermia (MHT) assays. In order to investigate its efficiency on cell lysis, biological effects of the AC magnetic field exposure after carboxymethyldextran-coated magnetite-nanoparticles (CMDC) treatment were investigated. Phagocyte capacity, cell viability, and morphology data evidenced that the CMDC sample and the apparatus are useful to further investigate MHT in cancer therapy.

  11. A magnetic nanoparticle-based multiple-gene delivery system for transfection of porcine kidney cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic nanoparticles are promising candidates for gene delivery into mammalian somatic cells and may be useful for reproductive cloning using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique. However, limited investigations of their potential applications in animal genetics and breeding, particularly multiple-gene delivery by magnetofection, have been performed. Here, we developed a stable, targetable and convenient system for delivering multiple genes into the nuclei of porcine somatic cells using magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as gene carriers. After surface modification by polyethylenimine, the spherical magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles showed strong binding affinity for DNA plasmids expressing the genes encoding a green (DNAGFP or red (DNADsRed fluorescent protein. At weight ratios of DNAGFP or DNADsRed to magnetic nanoparticles lower than or equal to 10∶1 or 5∶1, respectively, the DNA molecules were completely bound by the magnetic nanoparticles. Atomic force microscopy analyses confirmed binding of the spherical magnetic nanoparticles to stretched DNA strands up to several hundred nanometers in length. As a result, stable and efficient co-expression of GFP and DsRed in porcine kidney PK-15 cells was achieved by magnetofection. The results presented here demonstrate the potential application of magnetic nanoparticles as an attractive delivery system for animal genetics and breeding studies.

  12. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Them, Kolja; Salamon, J.; Szwargulski, P.; Sequeira, S.; Kaul, M. G.; Lange, C.; Ittrich, H.; Knopp, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter.

  13. Moissanite anvil cell design for giga-pascal nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. 1H, 23Na, 27Al, 69Ga, and 71Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio

  14. Moissanite anvil cell design for giga-pascal nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Thomas; Herzig, Tobias; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. 1H, 23Na, 27Al, 69Ga, and 71Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Combined Effects of 50 Hz Magnetic Field and Magnetic Nanoparticles on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of PC12 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Hong Li; WANG Chao; LI Yue; LU Yan; WANG Ping Ping; PAN Wei Dong; SONG Tao

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate the bioeffects of extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field (MF) (50 Hz, 400μT) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays on PC12 cells. MethodsMNPs modified by SiO2 (MNP-SiO2) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering and hysteresis loop measurement.PC12 cells were administrated with MNP-SiO2 with or without MF exposure for 48 h. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were evaluated with MTT assay and annexin V-FITC/PI staining, respectively. The morphology and uptake of MNP-SiO2 were determined by TEM. MF simulation was performed by Ansoft Maxwell based on the finite element method. ResultsMNP-SiO2 were identified as~20nm (diameter) ferromagnetic particles. MNP-SiO2reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. MF also reduced cell viability with increasing concentrations of MNP-SiO2. MNP-SiO2 alone did not cause apoptosis in PC12 cells; instead, the proportion of apoptotic cells increased significantly under MF exposure and increasing doses of MNP-SiO2. MNP-SiO2 could be ingested andthen cause a slight change in cellmorphology. ConclusionCombined exposure of MF and MNP-SiO2 resulted in remarkable cytotoxicity and increased apoptosis in PC12 cells. The results suggested that MF exposure couldstrengthen the MF of MNPs, which may enhance the bioeffects of ELF MF.

  16. Design features of the solenoid magnets for the central cell of the MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 14 superconducting solenoid magnets which form the central cell of the MFTF-B are being designed and fabricated by General Dynamics for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each solenoid coil has a mean diameter of five meters and contains 600 turns of a proven conductor type. Structural loading resulting from credible fault events, cooldown and warmup requirements, and manufacturing processes consistent with other MFTF-B magnets have been considered in the selection of 304 LN as the structural material for the magnet. The solenoid magnets are connected by 24 intercoil beams and 20 solid struts which resist the longitudinal seismic and electromagnetic attractive forces and by 24 hanger/side supports which react magnet dead weight and seismic loads. A modular arrangement of two solenoid coils within a vacuum vessel segment allow for sequential checkout and installation

  17. The magnetic field of Betelgeuse: a local dynamo from giant convection cells?

    CERN Document Server

    Auriere, M; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Perrin, G; Petit, P; Roudier, T

    2010-01-01

    Betelgeuse is an M supergiant with a complex and extended atmosphere, which also harbors spots and giant granules at its surface. A possible magnetic field could contribute to the mass loss and to the heating of the outer atmosphere. We observed Betelgeuse, to directly study and infer the nature of its magnetic field. We used the new-generation spectropolarimeter NARVAL and the least square deconvolution (LSD) method to detect circular polarization within the photospheric absorption lines of Betelgeuse. We have unambiguously detected a weak Stokes V signal in the spectral lines of Betelgeuse, and measured the related surface-averaged longitudinal magnetic field Bl at 6 different epochs over one month. The detected longitudinal field is about one Gauss and is apparently increasing on the time scale of our observations. This work presents the first direct detection of the magnetic field of Betelgeuse. This magnetic field may be associated to the giant convection cells that could enable a "local dynamo:.

  18. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Y; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure–field–temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  19. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, A.; Silevitch, D. M.; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  20. Magnetic Enrichment of Dendritic Cell Vaccine in Lymph Node with Fluorescent-Magnetic Nanoparticles Enhanced Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Honglin; Qian, Yuan; Dai, Yanfeng; Qiao, Sha; Huang, Chuan; Lu, Lisen; Luo, Qingming; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration to the lymph node is a key component of DC-based immunotherapy. However, the DC homing rate to the lymphoid tissues is poor, thus hindering the DC-mediated activation of antigen-specific T cells. Here, we developed a system using fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (α-AP-fmNPs; loaded with antigen peptide, iron oxide nanoparticles, and indocyanine green) in combination with magnetic pull force (MPF) to successfully manipulate DC migration in vitro and in vivo. α-AP-fmNPs endowed DCs with MPF-responsiveness, antigen presentation, and simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging detectability. We showed for the first time that α-AP-fmNP-loaded DCs were sensitive to MPF, and their migration efficiency could be dramatically improved both in vitro and in vivo through MPF treatment. Due to the enhanced migration of DCs, MPF treatment significantly augmented antitumor efficacy of the nanoparticle-loaded DCs. Therefore, we have developed a biocompatible approach with which to improve the homing efficiency of DCs and subsequent anti-tumor efficacy, and track their migration by multi-modality imaging, with great potential applications for DC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Bruce E; Kidder, Louis S; Williams, Philip C; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-11-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed.

  2. Magnetic micro-manipulations to probe the local physical properties of porous scaffolds and to confine stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Damien; Fayol, Delphine; Le Visage, Catherine; Frasca, Guillaume; Brulé, Séverine; Ménager, Christine; Gazeau, Florence; Letourneur, Didier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2010-03-01

    The in vitro generation of engineered tissue constructs involves the seeding of cells into porous scaffolds. Ongoing challenges are to design scaffolds to meet biochemical and mechanical requirements and to optimize cell seeding in the constructs. In this context, we have developed a simple method based on a magnetic tweezer set-up to manipulate, probe, and position magnetic objects inside a porous scaffold. The magnetic force acting on magnetic objects of various sizes serves as a control parameter to retrieve the local viscosity of the scaffolds internal channels as well as the stiffness of the scaffolds pores. Labeling of human stem cells with iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles makes it possible to perform the same type of measurement with cells as probes and evaluate their own microenvironment. For 18 microm diameter magnetic beads or magnetically labeled stem cells of similar diameter, the viscosity was equivalently equal to 20 mPa s in average. This apparent viscosity was then found to increase with the magnetic probes sizes. The stiffness probed with 100 microm magnetic beads was found in the 50 Pa range, and was lowered by a factor 5 when probed with cells aggregates. The magnetic forces were also successfully applied to the stem cells to enhance the cell seeding process and impose a well defined spatial organization into the scaffold. PMID:19932922

  3. Endothelialization of Magnetic Graft Materials using SPION-labeled Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Brant R.; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Harbuzariu, Adriana; McIntosh, Malcolm; Harburn, J. Jonathan; Parakka, Anthony; Kalra, Manju; Holmes, David; Simari, Robert D.; Sandhu, Gurpreet S.

    2010-12-01

    Seeding vascular grafts with autologous endothelial cells (EC) has been shown to improve in vivo patency, but high cost and development time have prevented widespread clinical use. A technique for loading EC with superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanospheres (SPIONs) was recently described. SPION-loaded EC experience magnetic attractive forces in the presence of sufficient magnetic field gradients. Using a multi-factorial design of experiments approach, the quantity and spatial distribution of magnetizable metal particles within a poly (ether urethane) matrix were systematically varied to produce unique material specimens. Specimens were seeded with SPION-loaded ECs, and cell coverage was quantified at various post-seeding time intervals using micrographic image analysis. The effects of changing design parameters on cell capture and sustained cell viability on magnetic substrates were statistically examined. Magnetized ferrites and samarium cobalt demonstrated cell capture, though cytotoxicity prevented sustained cell growth. Cobalt chromium substrates showed effective cell capture and growth to near complete confluence for up to one month.

  4. Mechanical anisotropy and adaptation of metastatic cells probed by magnetic microbeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Shi, Yanhui; Jhiang, Sissy M.; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2010-02-01

    Metastatic cells have the ability to break through the basal lamina, enter the blood vessels, circulate through the vasculature, exit at distant sites, and form secondary tumors. This multi-step process, therefore, clearly indicates the inherent ability of metastatic cells to sense, process, and adapt to the mechanical forces in different surrounding environments. We describe a magnetic probing device that is useful in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells along arbitrary two-dimensional directions. Magnetic force, with the advantages of biocompatibility and specificity, was produced by magnetic poles placed in an octupole configuration and applied to fibronectin-coated magnetic microbeads attached on cell membrane. Cell deformation in response to the applied force was then recorded through the displacement of the microbeads. The motion of the beads was measured by computer processing the video images acquired by a high-speed CMOS camera. Rotating force vectors with constant magnitude while pointing to directions of all 360 degrees were applied to study the mechanical anisotropy of metastatic breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. The temporal changes in magnitude and directionality of the cellular responses were then analyzed to investigate the cellular adaptation to force stimulation. This probing technology thus has the potential to provide us a better understanding of the mechano-signatures of cells.

  5. MULTILEVEL (3D) MICROFLUIDIC TECHNOLOGY FOR AN INNOVATIVE MAGNETIC CELL SEPARATION PLATFORM

    OpenAIRE

    Fouet, Marc; Cargou, Sébastien; Courson, Rémi; Blatché, Charline; Montrose, A.; Reybier, K; Gué, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new concept of devices, which by combining 3D fluid engineering and localized mag-netic actuation enables the full integration of a cell tagging and magnetic separation device. We used a low cost, commercially available dry film (EMS Inc, Ohio, USA) that fits microfluidic requirements and gives the possibility to build easily 3D microfluidic structures. The labelling of blood monocytes with su-perparamagnetic particles was performed "up stream" with the aim of a microparticle...

  6. MRI of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells in hepatic failure model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyu; Ri; Son; Se; Young; Chung; Hyo-Cheol; Kim; Hoe; Suk; Kim; Seung; Hong; Choi; Jeong; Min; Lee; Woo; Kyung; Moon

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To track intravascularly transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an experimental rabbit model of hepatic failure.METHODS:Human MSCs labeled with FDA-approved SPIO particles (Feridex) were transplanted via the mes-enteric vein into rabbits (n=16) with carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic failure.Magnetic resonance (MR) examinations were performed with a 3.0 T clinical scanner immediately before and 2 h and 1,...

  7. Microfluidic sorting and multimodal typing of cancer cells in self-assembled magnetic arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Saias, Laure; Psychari, Eleni; Minc, Nicolas; Simon, Damien; Bidard, François-Clément; Mathiot, Claire; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Fraisier, Vincent; Salamero, Jean; Saada, Véronique; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    We propose a unique method for cell sorting, “Ephesia,” using columns of biofunctionalized superparamagnetic beads self-assembled in a microfluidic channel onto an array of magnetic traps prepared by microcontact printing. It combines the advantages of microfluidic cell sorting, notably the application of a well controlled, flow-activated interaction between cells and beads, and those of immunomagnetic sorting, notably the use of batch-prepared, well characterized antibody-bearing beads. On c...

  8. Investigation of potential fluctuating intra-unit cell magnetic order in cuprates by muon spin relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, A.; Akintola, K.; Potma, M.; Ishikado, M.; Eisaki, H.; Hardy, W.N.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R; Sonier, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    We report low temperature muon spin relaxation (muSR) measurements of the high-transition-temperature (Tc) cuprate superconductors Bi{2+x}Sr{2-x}CaCu2O{8+\\delta} and YBa2Cu3O6.57, aimed at detecting the mysterious intra-unit cell (IUC) magnetic order that has been observed by spin polarized neutron scattering in the pseudogap phase of four different cuprate families. A lack of confirmation by local magnetic probe methods has raised the possibility that the magnetic order fluctuates slowly eno...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  12. Quantum dots incorporated magnetic nanoparticles for imaging colon carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Dong, Jinhua; Yui, Megumi; Kato, Tatsuya; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y

    2013-01-01

    Background Engineered multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) have made a tremendous impact on the biomedical sciences, with advances in imaging, sensing and bioseparation. In particular, the combination of optical and magnetic responses through a single particle system allows us to serve as novel multimodal molecular imaging contrast agents in clinical settings. Despite of essential medical imaging modalities and of significant clinical application, only few nanocomposites have been developed wi...

  13. Sterilization of Escherichia coli cells by the application of pulsed magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei; QU Jiu-hui; PENG Yong-zhen

    2004-01-01

    The inactivation of microorganisms by pulsed magnetic field was studied. It was improved that theapplication of electromagnetic pulses evidently causes a lethal effect on E. coli cells suspended in phosphate buffersolution Na2 HPO4 / NaH2 PO4 (0.334/0.867 mmol/L). Experimental results indicated that the survivability( N/N0; whereN0 and N are the number of cells survived per milliliter before and after electromagnetic pulses application,respectively) of E. coli decreased with magnetic field intensity B and treatment time t. It was also found that themedium temperatures, the frequencies of pulse f, and the initial bacterial cell concentrations have determinateinfluences in destruction of E. coli cells by the application of magnetic pulses. The application of an magneticintensity B = 160 mT at pulses frequency f = 62 kHz and treatment time t = 16 h result in a considerable destructionlevels of E. coli cells ( N/N0 = 10-4 ). Possible mechanisms involved in sterilization of the magnetic field treatmentwere discussed. In order to shorten the treatment time, many groups of parallel inductive coil were used. Thepracticability test showed that the treatment time was shortened to 4 h with the application of three groups of parallelcoil when the survivability of E. coli cells was less than 0.01%; and the power consumption was about 0.2 kWh/m3 .

  14. Magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and cellulose particles for MRI-based cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Michael K; Thakral, Durga; Shapiro, Erik M

    2011-06-01

    Biodegradable, superparamagnetic microparticles and nanoparticles of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose were designed, fabricated, and characterized for magnetic cell labeling. Monodisperse nanocrystals of magnetite were incorporated into microparticles and nanoparticles of PLGA and cellulose with high efficiency using an oil-in-water single emulsion technique. Superparamagnetic cores had high magnetization (72.1 emu/g). The resulting polymeric particles had smooth surface morphology and high magnetite content (43.3 wt % for PLGA and 69.6 wt % for cellulose). While PLGA and cellulose nanoparticles displayed highest r 2* values per millimole of iron (399 sec(-1) mM(-1) for cellulose and 505 sec(-1) mM(-1) for PLGA), micron-sized PLGA particles had a much higher r 2* per particle than either. After incubation for a month in citrate buffer (pH 5.5), magnetic PLGA particles lost close to 50% of their initial r 2* molar relaxivity, while magnetic cellulose particles remained intact, preserving over 85% of their initial r 2* molar relaxivity. Lastly, mesenchymal stem cells and human breast adenocarcinoma cells were magnetically labeled using these particles with no detectable cytotoxicity. These particles are ideally suited for noninvasive cell tracking in vivo via MRI and due to their vastly different degradation properties, offer unique potential for dedicated use for either short (PLGA-based particles) or long-term (cellulose-based particles) experiments. PMID:21404328

  15. Combination of hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy on mesenchymal stem cell line treated with chloroaluminum phthalocyanine magnetic-nanoemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Leonardo B.; Primo, Fernando L.; Pinto, Marcelo R.; Morais, Paulo C.; Tedesco, Antonio C.

    2015-04-01

    The present study reports on the preparation and the cell viability assay of two nanoemulsions loaded with magnetic nanoparticle and chloroaluminum phthalocyanine. The preparations contain equal amount of chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (0.05 mg/mL) but different contents of magnetic nanoparticle (0.15×1013 or 1.50×1013 particle/mL). The human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line was used as the model to assess the cell viability and this type of cell can be used as a model to mimic cancer stem cells. The cell viability assays were performed in isolated as well as under combined magnetic hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. We found from the cell viability assay that under the hyperthermia treatment (1 MHz and 40 Oe magnetic field amplitude) the cell viability reduction was about 10%, regardless the magnetic nanoparticle content within the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation. However, cell viability reduction of about 50% and 60% were found while applying the photodynamic therapy treatment using the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation containing 0.15×1013 or 1.50×1013 magnetic particle/mL, respectively. Finally, an average reduction in cell viability of about 66% was found while combining the hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments.

  16. Contribution of a 300 kHz alternating magnetic field on magnetic hyperthermia treatment of HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowen; Chen, Youping; Huang, Changshuo; Wang, Xufei; Zhao, Linyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tang, Jintian

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the relative contributions of temperature and a 300 kHz alternating magnetic field (AMF) on magnetic hyperthermia treatment (MHT). Our system consisted of an induction coil, which generated AMF by electric current flow, and a newly developed, temperature-controlled circulating water-jacketed glass bottle placed inside the coil. The AMF generator operated at a frequency of 300 kHz with variable field strength ranging from 0 to 11 mT. Four treatment conditions were employed: (A) control (37 °C, 0 mT), (B) AMF exposure (37 °C, 11 mT), (C) hyperthermia (46 °C, 0 mT), and (D) hyperthermia plus AMF exposure (46 °C, 11 mT) for 30 min. Cell viability and apoptotic death rate were estimated. The relative contributions or interactions of hyperthermia (46 °C) and AMF (11 mT) on MHT were evaluated using 2 × 2 factorial experiment analysis. Group A was statistically different (P < 0.05) from each of the other treatments. The observed effects on both cell viability and apoptotic cell death were influenced by temperature (97.36% and 92.15%, respectively), AMF (1.78% and 4.99%, respectively), and the interactions between temperature and AMF (0.25% and 2.36%, respectively). Thus, the effect of hyperthermia was significant. Also, AMF exposure itself might play a role in MHT, although these observations were made in vitro. These findings suggest a possible presence of an AMF effect during clinical magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:23059525

  17. Application of a Halbach magnetic array for long-range cell and particle separations in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joo H.; Driscoll, Harry; Super, Michael; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we describe a versatile application of a planar Halbach permanent magnet array for an efficient long-range magnetic separation of living cells and microparticles over distances up to 30 mm. A Halbach array was constructed from rectangular bar magnets using 3D-printed holders and compared to a conventional alternating array of identical magnets. We theoretically predicted the superiority of the Halbach array for a long-range magnetic separation and then experimentally validated that the Halbach configuration outperforms the alternating array for isolating magnetic microparticles or microparticle-bound bacterial cells at longer distances. Magnetophoretic velocities (ymag) of magnetic particles (7.9 μm diameter) induced by the Halbach array in a microfluidic device were significantly higher and extended over a larger area than those induced by the alternating magnet array (ymag = 178 versus 0 μm/s at 10 mm, respectively). When applied to 50 ml tubes (˜30 mm diameter), the Halbach array removed >95% of Staphylococcus aureus bacterial cells bound with 1 μm magnetic particles compared to ˜70% removed using the alternating array. In addition, the Halbach array enabled manipulation of 1 μm magnetic beads in a deep 96-well plate for ELISA applications, which was not possible with the conventional magnet arrays. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of the Halbach array for the future design of devices for high-throughput magnetic separations of cells, molecules, and toxins.

  18. In vitro feasibility study of the use of a magnetic electrospun chitosan nanofiber composite for hyperthermia treatment of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ta-Chun; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Jui-Che

    2012-07-01

    Hyperthermia has been reported to be an effective cancer treatment modality, as tumor cells are more temperature-sensitive than their normal counterparts. Since the ambient temperature can be increased by placing magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field it has become of interest to incorporate these magnetic nanoparticles into biodegradable nanofibers for possible endoscopic hyperthermia treatment of malignant tumors. In this preliminary investigation we have explored various characteristics of biodegradable electrospun chitosan nanofibers containing magnetic nanoparticles prepared by different methods. These methods included: (1) E-CHS-Fe(3)O(4), with electrospun chitosan nanofibers directly immersed in a magnetic nanoparticle solution; (2) E-CHS-Fe(2+), with the electrospun chitosan nanofibers initially immersed in Fe(+2)/Fe(+3) solution, followed by chemical co-precipitation of the magnetic nanoparticles. The morphology and crystalline phase of the magnetic electrospun nanofiber matrices were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. The magnetic characteristics were measured using a superconducting quantum interference device. The heating properties of these magnetic electrospun nanofiber matrices in an alternating magnetic field were investigated at a frequency of 750 kHz and magnetic intensity of 6.4 kW. In vitro cell incubation experiments indicated that these magnetic electrospun nanofiber matrices are non-cytotoxic and can effectively reduce tumor cell proliferation upon application of a magnetic field.

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  3. Kinetic of magnetic nanoparticles uptake evaluated by morphometry of mice peritoneal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of magnetic fluids (MFs) has led to a wide range of new biomedical applications. Nevertheless, few studies have examined the kinetics of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) internalization by phagocytes. In this study, we present morphometry as a method to quantify the cell surface covered by MNPs. The maximum cell surface covered by MNPs aggregates was 32.5% (8.5 min), 18.3% (24.1 min), and 18.0% (20.2 min) in DMSA, citric acid and dextran-coated MNPs, respectively. We concluded that the phagocytosis process of MNPs is strongly dependent upon the coating species

  4. Magnetic field effects on viscous fingering of a ferrofluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herreman, Wietze [Laboratoire Louis Neel, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Molho, Pierre [Laboratoire Louis Neel, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: molho@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Neveu, Sophie [LI2C, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2005-03-15

    We have studied the effects of a magnetic field on viscous fingering when a ferrofluid is pushed in a more viscous liquid in a circular Hele-Shaw cell. The main effect of the magnetic field, as already known, is to stabilize interfaces parallel to the field and to destabilize interfaces normal to the field. Depending on the growth regime (quasi static, fingering, dendritic growth), which depends on parameters like the cell thickness and oil viscosity, the combination of field effect and anisotropy is analyzed through the various observed patterns.

  5. Invert sugar formation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells encapsulated in magnetically responsive alginate microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarik, Ivo; Sabatkova, Zdenka; Safarikova, Mirka

    2009-05-01

    Invert sugar (an equimolar mixture of glucose and fructose prepared by sucrose hydrolysis) is a very important food component. We have prepared magnetically responsive alginate microbeads containing entrapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and magnetite microparticles which can be easily separated in an appropriate magnetic separator. The microbeads (typical diameter between 50 and 100 μm) were prepared using the water-in-oil emulsification process. The prepared microbeads containing yeast cells with invertase activity enabled efficient sucrose conversion. The biocatalyst was quite stable; the same catalytic activity was observed after one month storage at 4 °C and the microbeads could be used at least six times.

  6. Invert sugar formation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells encapsulated in magnetically responsive alginate microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safarik, Ivo [Department of Biomagnetic Techniques, Institute of Systems Biology and Ecology, Academy of Sciences, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 31, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)], E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com; Sabatkova, Zdenka; Safarikova, Mirka [Department of Biomagnetic Techniques, Institute of Systems Biology and Ecology, Academy of Sciences, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2009-05-15

    Invert sugar (an equimolar mixture of glucose and fructose prepared by sucrose hydrolysis) is a very important food component. We have prepared magnetically responsive alginate microbeads containing entrapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and magnetite microparticles which can be easily separated in an appropriate magnetic separator. The microbeads (typical diameter between 50 and 100 {mu}m) were prepared using the water-in-oil emulsification process. The prepared microbeads containing yeast cells with invertase activity enabled efficient sucrose conversion. The biocatalyst was quite stable; the same catalytic activity was observed after one month storage at 4 deg. C and the microbeads could be used at least six times.

  7. Contribution of a 300 kHz alternating magnetic field on magnetic hyperthermia treatment of HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowen; Chen, Youping; Huang, Changshuo; Wang, Xufei; Zhao, Linyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tang, Jintian

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the relative contributions of temperature and a 300 kHz alternating magnetic field (AMF) on magnetic hyperthermia treatment (MHT). Our system consisted of an induction coil, which generated AMF by electric current flow, and a newly developed, temperature-controlled circulating water-jacketed glass bottle placed inside the coil. The AMF generator operated at a frequency of 300 kHz with variable field strength ranging from 0 to 11 mT. Four treatment conditions were employed: (A) control (37 °C, 0 mT), (B) AMF exposure (37 °C, 11 mT), (C) hyperthermia (46 °C, 0 mT), and (D) hyperthermia plus AMF exposure (46 °C, 11 mT) for 30 min. Cell viability and apoptotic death rate were estimated. The relative contributions or interactions of hyperthermia (46 °C) and AMF (11 mT) on MHT were evaluated using 2 × 2 factorial experiment analysis. Group A was statistically different (P magnetic hyperthermia.

  8. The effects of functional magnetic nanotubes with incorporated nerve growth factor in neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Jining; Chen Linfeng; Varadan, Vijay K [Nanomaterials and Nanotubes Research Laboratory, College of Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Yancey, Justin; Srivatsan, Malathi [Department of Biological Sciences, Arkansas State University, State University, AR 72467 (United States)], E-mail: jxie@uark.edu, E-mail: msrivatsan@astate.edu

    2008-03-12

    In this in vitro study the efficiency of magnetic nanotubes to bind with nerve growth factor (NGF) and the ability of NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes to release the bound NGF are investigated using rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). It is found that functional magnetic nanotubes with NGF incorporation enabled the differentiation of PC12 cells into neurons exhibiting growth cones and neurite outgrowth. Microscope observations show that filopodia extending from neuron growth cones were in close proximity to the NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes, at times appearing to extend towards or into them. These results show that magnetic nanotubes can be used as a delivery vehicle for NGF and thus may be exploited in attempts to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease with neurotrophins. Further neurite outgrowth can be controlled by manipulating magnetic nanotubes with external magnetic fields, thus helping in directed regeneration.

  9. MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  10. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Pingping; YIN Ruochun; CHEN Zhiyou; WU Lifang; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation.The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0,1,3,5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1,3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla.The seeds were germinated at 23℃ after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field.The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method.The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN),chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs.Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups,a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome,triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla,respectively.The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration,but no linear relationship was observed.Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  11. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T

  12. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  13. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in tumor cell lines research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRS can be used non-invasively to study the several trace metabolites and energy metabolism in vivo. By quantitatively analyzing the compounds changes we could detect abnormal metabolism in tumor and its surrounding tissue, and estimate tumor infiltration in vivo and vitro. In recent years, MRS has been applied in cell line research and is becoming a promising method. In this article we summarized the applications of MRS in cell lines in studying diagnosis, treatment, and tumor mechanisms. (authors)

  14. Managing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation and cellular uptake: a precondition for efficient stem-cell differentiation and MRI tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Delphine; Luciani, Nathalie; Lartigue, Lenaic; Gazeau, Florence; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-02-01

    The labeling of stem cells with iron oxide nanoparticles is increasingly used to enable MRI cell tracking and magnetic cell manipulation, stimulating the fields of tissue engineering and cell therapy. However, the impact of magnetic labeling on stem-cell differentiation is still controversial. One compromising factor for successful differentiation may arise from early interactions of nanoparticles with cells during the labeling procedure. It is hypothesized that the lack of control over nanoparticle colloidal stability in biological media may lead to undesirable nanoparticle localization, overestimation of cellular uptake, misleading MRI cell tracking, and further impairment of differentiation. Herein a method is described for labeling mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), in which the physical state of citrate-coated nanoparticles (dispersed versus aggregated) can be kinetically tuned through electrostatic and magnetic triggers, as monitored by diffusion light scattering in the extracellular medium and by optical and electronic microscopy in cells. A set of statistical cell-by-cell measurements (flow cytometry, single-cell magnetophoresis, and high-resolution MRI cellular detection) is used to independently quantify the nanoparticle cell uptake and the effects of nanoparticle aggregation. Such aggregation confounds MRI cell detection as well as global iron quantification and has adverse effects on chondrogenetic differentiation. Magnetic labeling conditions with perfectly stable nanoparticles-suitable for obtaining differentiation-capable magnetic stem cells for use in cell therapy-are subsequently identified. PMID:23184893

  15. Multi-bits memory cell using degenerated magnetic states in a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Akio; Yakushiji, Kay; Konoto, Makoto; Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-02-01

    We newly developed a magnetic memory cell having multi-bit function. The memory cell composed of a perpendicularly magnetized magnetic tunnel junction (MB-pMTJ) and a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer. The multi-bit function is realized by combining the freedom of states of the magnetic free layer and that in the antiferromagnetically coupled reference layer. The structure of the reference layer is (FeB/Ta/[Co/Pt]3)/Ru/([Co/Pt]6); the top and the bottom layers are coupled through Ru layer where the reference layer has two degrees of freedom of a head-to-head and a bottom-to-bottom magnetic configuration. A four-state memory cell is realized by combination of both degrees of freedom. The states in the reference layer however is hardly detected by the total resistance of MB-pMTJ, because the magnetoresistance effect in the reference layer is negligibly small. That implies that the resistance values for the different states in the reference layer are degenerated. On the other hand, the two different states in the reference layer bring different stray fields to the free layer, which generate two different minor loop with different switching fields. Therefore, the magnetic states in the reference layer can be differentiated by the two-step reading, before and after applying the appropriately pulsed magnetic field which can identify the initial state in the reference layer. This method is similar to distinguishing different magnetic states in an in-plane magnetized spin-valve element. We demonstrated that four different states in the MB-pMTJ can be distinguished by the two-step read-out. The important feature of the two-step reading is a practically large operation margins (large resistance change in reading) which is equal to that of a single MTJ. Even though the two-step reading is a destructive method by which 50% of the magnetic state is changed, this MB-pMTJ is promising for high density non-volatile memory cell with a minor cost of operation speed.

  16. Performance of a magnetically stabilized bed reactor with immobilized yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, V; Hristov, J; Dobreva, E; al-Hassan, Z; Penchev, I

    1996-05-01

    This paper is focused on the possibility to apply the magnetic stabilization technique in bioprocessing. The feasibility of a continuous ethanol fermentation process with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in a magnetically stabilized bed (MSB) was demonstrated. The fermentation processes were carried out in an external magnetic field, transverse to the fluid flow. The flexibility to change the bed expansion owing to the independent change of the fluid flow and the field intensity (the "magnetization FIRST" mode) permitted the creation of fixed beds with different particle arrangements, which affected the bed porosity, the effective fluid-particle contact area, and the mass transfer processes on the particle-fluid interface. As a result, higher ethanol concentration, ethanol production, and glucose uptake rates than in conventional packed bed reactor were reached.

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  18. An efficient method of sorting liver stem cells by using immuno-magnetic microbeads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fei He; Yin-Kun Liu; Dong-Mei Gao; Jun Chen; Peng-Yuan Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To develop a method to isolate liver stem cells fast and efficiently.METHODS: Fetal mouse liver cells were characterized by cell surface antigens (c-Kit and CD45/TER119) using flow cytometry. The candidate liver stem cells were sorted by using immuno-magnetic microbeads and identified by clone-forming culture, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence assays.RESULTS: The c-Kit-(CD45/TER119)-cell population with 97.9% of purity were purified by immuno-magnetic microbeads at one time. The yield of this separation was about 6% of the total sorting cells and the cell viability was above 98%. When cultured in vitro these cells had high clone-forming and self-renewing ability and expressed markers of hepatocytes and bile duct cells.Functionally mature hepatocytes were observed after 21 d of culture.CONCLUSION: This method offers an excellent tool for the enrichment of liver stem cells with high purity and viability, which could be used for further studies. It is fast, efficient, simple and not expensive.

  19. Binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles on latex beads and yeast cells studied by magnetorelaxometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion exchange mediated binding of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) to modified latex spheres and yeast cells was quantified using magnetorelaxometry. By fitting subsequently recorded relaxation curves, the kinetics of the binding reactions was extracted. The signal of MNP with weak ion exchanger groups bound to latex and yeast cells scales linearly with the concentration of latex beads or yeast cells whereas that of MNP with strong ion exchanger groups is proportional to the square root of concentration. The binding of the latter leads to a much stronger aggregation of yeast cells than the former MNP

  20. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J. E-mail: masdingj@nus.edu.sg; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y.M

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38{+-}0.06 compared to 1.91{+-}0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  1. Splenic red pulp macrophages are intrinsically superparamagnetic and contaminate magnetic cell isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Lars; Klein, Marika; Spasova, Marina; Elsukova, Anna; Wiedwald, Ulf; Welz, Meike; Knolle, Percy; Farle, Michael; Limmer, Andreas; Kurts, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A main function of splenic red pulp macrophages is the degradation of damaged or aged erythrocytes. Here we show that these macrophages accumulate ferrimagnetic iron oxides that render them intrinsically superparamagnetic. Consequently, these cells routinely contaminate splenic cell isolates obtained with the use of MCS, a technique that has been widely used in immunological research for decades. These contaminations can profoundly alter experimental results. In mice deficient for the transcription factor SpiC, which lack red pulp macrophages, liver Kupffer cells take over the task of erythrocyte degradation and become superparamagnetic. We describe a simple additional magnetic separation step that avoids this problem and substantially improves purity of magnetic cell isolates from the spleen. PMID:26260698

  2. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Lee, Eui-Suk; Kim, Mi-joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Hae-Hyoung LEE; Park, Kyung-Ran; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and polycaprolactone (PCL), and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human...

  3. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 35 D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Grüttner, Cordula [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Warnemünde, D-18115 Rostock (Germany); Kühn, Jens-Peter [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald University Medical Center, D-17475 Greifswald (Germany); Frerich, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.frerich@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 35 D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time. - Highlights: • Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) were labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles influenced the adipogenic differentiation of ASC. • Labeled cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and implanted in SCID mice. • Nanoparticle-labeled cells were visualized in vivo using T2-weighted sequences. • Volume of collagen scaffolds was decreased over time after implantation.

  4. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time. - Highlights: • Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) were labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles influenced the adipogenic differentiation of ASC. • Labeled cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and implanted in SCID mice. • Nanoparticle-labeled cells were visualized in vivo using T2-weighted sequences. • Volume of collagen scaffolds was decreased over time after implantation

  5. Combination of hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy on mesenchymal stem cell line treated with chloroaluminum phthalocyanine magnetic-nanoemulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Leonardo B. de [Departamento de Química, Centro de Nanotecnologia e Engenharia Tecidual, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Departamento de Genética, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14049-900 (Brazil); Primo, Fernando L. [Departamento de Química, Centro de Nanotecnologia e Engenharia Tecidual, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Nanophoton Company, SUPERA Innovation and Technology Park, Av. Doutora Nadir de Aguiar, 1805, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, P 14056-680 (Brazil); Pinto, Marcelo R. [Departamento de Química, Laboratório de Enzimologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Morais, Paulo C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); and others

    2015-04-15

    The present study reports on the preparation and the cell viability assay of two nanoemulsions loaded with magnetic nanoparticle and chloroaluminum phthalocyanine. The preparations contain equal amount of chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (0.05 mg/mL) but different contents of magnetic nanoparticle (0.15×10{sup 13} or 1.50×10{sup 13} particle/mL). The human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line was used as the model to assess the cell viability and this type of cell can be used as a model to mimic cancer stem cells. The cell viability assays were performed in isolated as well as under combined magnetic hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. We found from the cell viability assay that under the hyperthermia treatment (1 MHz and 40 Oe magnetic field amplitude) the cell viability reduction was about 10%, regardless the magnetic nanoparticle content within the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation. However, cell viability reduction of about 50% and 60% were found while applying the photodynamic therapy treatment using the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation containing 0.15×10{sup 13} or 1.50×10{sup 13} magnetic particle/mL, respectively. Finally, an average reduction in cell viability of about 66% was found while combining the hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. - Highlights: • Current protocols in nanotechnology allow for biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles being associated with photosensitizer photoactive drugs, which could lead to perfectly controlled drug release. • The combination of the HPT and PDT therapies can be useful to develop further protocols for both advanced in vitro and in vivo assays. • Magnetic nanodevices associated with therapies have led to the decreased of proliferation of cell population that provides a favorable environment for tumor progression.

  6. Imaging Microwave and DC Magnetic Fields in a Vapor-Cell Rb Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Bandi, Thejesh; Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp; Mileti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental measurement of the DC and microwave magnetic field distributions inside a recently-developed compact magnetron-type microwave cavity, mounted inside the physics package of a high-performance vapor-cell atomic frequency standard. Images of the microwave field distribution with sub-100 $\\mu$m lateral spatial resolution are obtained by pulsed optical-microwave Rabi measurements, using the Rb atoms inside the cell as field probes and detecting with a CCD camera. Asymmetries observed in the microwave field images can be attributed to the precise practical realization of the cavity and the Rb vapor cell. Similar spatially-resolved images of the DC magnetic field distribution are obtained by Ramsey-type measurements. The T2 relaxation time in the Rb vapor cell is found to be position dependent, and correlates with the gradient of the DC magnetic field. The presented method is highly useful for experimental in-situ characterization of DC magnetic fields and resonant microwave structures,...

  7. Silver nanocrystals sensitize magnetic-nanoparticle-mediated thermo-induced killing of cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianke Liu; Fang Ni; Jianchao Zhang; Xiaoli Jiang; Xiang Lu; Zhirui Guo; Ruizhi Xu

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can heat up tumor tissues and induce killing of cancer cells under external AC magnetic field. However, magnetic nanoparticles hyperthermia (MNPH) requires high concentration of MNPs that are injected into the tumor in order to obtain clinically needed thermal dose because of the complicated heat transfer in v/vo and the limited heat quality of MNPs. To cut down the dose of MNPs and enhance the effect of this Nanotherapy, we prepared silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different sizes and investigated the effects of these AgNPs on cancer cells in MNPH treatment. It was found that AgNPs could enhance thermo-sensitivity of glioma cells and this effect was size dependent. AgNPs could induce cell cycles arrested in G2/M phase and enhanced the apoptosis rate of cancer cells after hyperthermia. In glioma bearing rats model, MNPH combined with AgNPs could enhance Bax expression in cancer cells. Our results suggested that AgNPs could be a potential thermo-sensitizer and could be further developed for the design of Ag nanostructurebased thermal seeds for MNPH therapy.

  8. Hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children - imaging findings of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yingyan; Qiao, Zhongwei; Gong, Ying; Yang, Haowei; Li, Guoping; Pa, Mier [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Xia, Chunmei [Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Physiology and Pathophysiology Department, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-15

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease that occurs mainly in children, and hepatic involvement is generally a poor prognostic factor. To describe CT and MRI findings of hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children, especially the abnormal bile duct manifestation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Thirteen children (seven boys, six girls; mean age 28.9 months) were diagnosed with disseminated Langerhans cell histiocytosis. They underwent CT (n = 5) or MRI (n = 4), or CT and MRI examinations (n = 4) to evaluate the liver involvement. Periportal abnormalities presented as band-like or nodular lesions on CT and MRI in all 13 children. The hepatic parenchymal lesions were found in the peripheral regions of the liver in seven children, including multiple nodules on MRI (n = 6), and cystic-like lesions on CT and MRI (n = 3). In 11 of the 13 children the dilatations of the bile ducts were observed on CT and MRI. Eight of the 13 children underwent MR cholangiopancreatography, which demonstrated stenoses or segmental stenoses with slight dilatation of the central bile ducts, including the common hepatic duct and its first-order branches. The peripheral bile ducts in these children showed segmental dilatations and stenoses. Stenosis of the central bile ducts revealed by MR cholangiopancreatography was the most significant finding of liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children. (orig.)

  9. Hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children - imaging findings of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease that occurs mainly in children, and hepatic involvement is generally a poor prognostic factor. To describe CT and MRI findings of hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children, especially the abnormal bile duct manifestation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Thirteen children (seven boys, six girls; mean age 28.9 months) were diagnosed with disseminated Langerhans cell histiocytosis. They underwent CT (n = 5) or MRI (n = 4), or CT and MRI examinations (n = 4) to evaluate the liver involvement. Periportal abnormalities presented as band-like or nodular lesions on CT and MRI in all 13 children. The hepatic parenchymal lesions were found in the peripheral regions of the liver in seven children, including multiple nodules on MRI (n = 6), and cystic-like lesions on CT and MRI (n = 3). In 11 of the 13 children the dilatations of the bile ducts were observed on CT and MRI. Eight of the 13 children underwent MR cholangiopancreatography, which demonstrated stenoses or segmental stenoses with slight dilatation of the central bile ducts, including the common hepatic duct and its first-order branches. The peripheral bile ducts in these children showed segmental dilatations and stenoses. Stenosis of the central bile ducts revealed by MR cholangiopancreatography was the most significant finding of liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children. (orig.)

  10. Towards The Generation of Functionalized Magnetic Nanowires to Target Leukemic Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Alsharif, Nouf

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, magnetic nanowires (NWs) have been widely used for their therapeutic potential in biomedical applications. The use of iron (Fe) NWs combines two important properties, biocompatibility and remote manipulation by magnetic fields. In addition the NWs can be coated and functionalized to target cells of interest and, upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field, have been shown to induce cell death on several types of adherent cells, including several cancer cell types. For suspension cells, however, using these NWs has been much less effective primarily due to the free-floating nature of the cells minimizing the interaction between them and the NWs. Leukemic cells express higher levels of the cell surface marker CD44 (Braumüller, Gansauge, Ramadani, & Gansauge, 2000), compared to normal blood cells. The goal of this study was to functionalize Fe NWs with a specific monoclonal antibody towards CD44 in order to target leukemic cells (HL-60 cells). This approach is expected to increase the probability of a specific binding to occur between HL-60 cells and Fe NWs. Fe NWs were fabricated with an average diameter of 30-40 nm and a length around 3-4 μm. Then, they were coated with both 3-Aminopropyl-triethoxysilane and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in order to conjugate them with an anti-CD44 antibody (i.e. anti-CD44-iron NWs). The antibody interacts with the amine group in the BSA via the 1-Ethyl-3-3-dimethylaminopropyl-carbodiimide and N-Hydroxysuccinimide coupling. The NWs functionalization was confirmed using a number of approaches including: infrared spectroscopy, Nanodrop to measure the concentration of CD44 antibody, as well as fluorescent-labeled secondary antibody staining to detect the primary CD44 antibody. To confirm that the anti-CD44-iron NWs and bare Fe NWs, in the absence of a magnetic field, were not toxic to HL-60 cells, cytotoxicity assays using XTT (2,3-Bis-2-Methoxy-4-Nitro-5-Sulfophenyl-2H-Tetrazolium-5-Carboxanilide) were performed and

  11. Static magnetic fields aggravate the effects of ionizing radiation on cell cycle progression in bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Amir Sabet; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Ghanati, Faezeh; Heshmati, Emran; Tavasoli, Zeinab; Jahromi, Azadeh Manoochehri

    2010-02-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of static magnetic fields (SMF) on the progression of cell cycle as a monitor of presumptive genotoxicity of these fields, the effects of a 15 mT SMF on cell cycle progression in rat bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) were examined. The cells were divided into two groups. One group encountered SMF alone for 5h continuously but the other group exposed with X ray before treatment with SMF. The population of cells did not show any significant difference in the first group but the second group that was exposed with acute radiation before encountering SMF showed a significant increase in the number of cells in G(2)/M phase. So SMF has intensified the effects of X ray, where SMF alone, did not had any detectable influence on cell cycle. These findings suggest that magnetic fields (MF) play their role by increasing the effects of genotoxic agents and because of the greater concentration of free radicals in the presence of radical pair producers, this effect is better detectable. PMID:19926297

  12. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation for evaluating efficacy/toxicity of photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Luis G.; Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Souza, Glauco; Killian, Thomas C.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    We used three dimensional cell cultures (3D) based on the magnetic levitation method (MLM) to evaluate cytotoxicity of photodynamic therapy (PDT). First, we decorated Hep G2 and MDA-MB-321 cells with NanoShuttle by introducing it in the media and incubated overnight. Next day, we transferred the cells to a 6-well plate and placed a magnetic driver on the top of the plate to start levitation. We monitored the formation of the 3D cell culture by optical microscopy and after four days, we added the photosensitizer Photogem (PG) in the culture media in concentrations of 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25μg/ml. We incubated them for 24 hours, after that we washed the cultures with PBS and added fresh media. Samples were then illuminated for 600s using a 630nm LED-based device, generating light intensities of 30 mW/cm2 in a total light fluence of 18 J/cm2. Following the illumination, we added fresh media, and 30 hours later, the 3D structures were broken using a pipettor and the cells seeded in 96 well plates, 105 cells per well, with a magnetic drive placed on the bottom of the plate to create cell culture dots. After 24 hours, we used a MTT assay to evaluate PDT cytotoxicity. The PDT effect, evaluated by the half maximal effective concentration (EC50), in MDA-MB-231 cells (EC50 =3.14 μg/ml) is more aggressive compared to the effect of PDT in Hep G2 cells (EC50 = 7.48 μg/ml). It suggests that the cell culture structure and its interaction facilitated the PG uptake and consequently elevated the Photodynamic effect for MDA-MB-231.

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  17. Tracking of iron-labeled human neural stem cells by magnetic resonance imaging in cell replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milagros Ramos-Gmez; Alberto Martnez-Serrano

    2016-01-01

    Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) derived from the ventral mesencephalon are powerful research tools and candidates for cell therapies in Parkinson’s disease. However, their clinical translation has not been fully realized due, in part, to the limited ability to track stem cell regional localization and survival over long periods of time afterin vivo transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging provides an excellent non-invasive method to study the fate of transplanted cellsin vivo. For magnetic resonance imaging cell tracking, cells need to be labeled with a contrast agent, such as magnetic nanoparticles, at a concentration high enough to be easily detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Grafting of human neural stem cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles allows cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging without impairment of cell survival, prolif-eration, self-renewal, and multipotency. However, the results reviewed here suggest that in long term grafting, activated microglia and macrophages could contribute to magnetic resonance imaging signal by engulifng dead labeled cells or iron nanoparticles dispersed freely in the brain parenchyma over time.

  18. Biotechnological promises of Fe-filled CNTs for cell shepherding and magnetic fluid hyperthermia applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineux, Florent; Marega, Riccardo; Stopin, Antoine; La Torre, Alessandro; Garcia, Yann; Devlin, Eamonn; Michiels, Carine; N. Khlobystov, Andrei; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-12-01

    Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (Fe@CNTs) recently emerged as an effective class of hybrid nanoparticles for biotechnological applications, such as magnetic cell sorting and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Aiming at studying the effects of both the Fe loading and the magnetocrystalline characteristics in these applications, we describe herein the preparation of Fe@CNTs containing different Fe phases that, upon functionalization with the antibody Cetuximab (Ctxb), allow the targeting of cancer cells. Our experimental findings reveal that an optimal Ctxb/Fe weight ratio of 1.2 is needed for efficient magnetic cell shepherding, whereas enhanced MFH-induced mortality (70 vs. 15%) can be reached with hybrids enriched in the coercive Fe3C phase. These results suggest that a synergistic effect between the Ab loading and the Fe distribution in each nanotube exists, for which the maximum shepherding and hyperthermia effects are observed when higher densities of Fe@CNTs featuring the more coercive phase are interfaced with the cells.Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (Fe@CNTs) recently emerged as an effective class of hybrid nanoparticles for biotechnological applications, such as magnetic cell sorting and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Aiming at studying the effects of both the Fe loading and the magnetocrystalline characteristics in these applications, we describe herein the preparation of Fe@CNTs containing different Fe phases that, upon functionalization with the antibody Cetuximab (Ctxb), allow the targeting of cancer cells. Our experimental findings reveal that an optimal Ctxb/Fe weight ratio of 1.2 is needed for efficient magnetic cell shepherding, whereas enhanced MFH-induced mortality (70 vs. 15%) can be reached with hybrids enriched in the coercive Fe3C phase. These results suggest that a synergistic effect between the Ab loading and the Fe distribution in each nanotube exists, for which the maximum shepherding and hyperthermia effects are observed when higher densities of Fe

  19. Immunocapture of CD133-positive cells from human cancer cell lines by using monodisperse magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres containing amino groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-based macroporous microspheres with an average particle size of 4.2 μm were prepared using a modified multi-step swelling polymerization method and by introducing amino functionality on their surfaces. Antibody molecules were oxidized on their carbohydrate moieties and bound to the amino-containing magnetic microspheres via a site-directed procedure. CD133-positive cells could be effectively captured from human cancer cell lines (HepG2, HCT116, MCF7, and IMR-32) by using magnetic microspheres conjugated to an anti-human CD133 antibody. After further culture, the immunocaptured CD133-expressing cells from IMR-32 proliferated and gradually detached from the magnetic microspheres. Flow-cytometric analysis confirmed the enrichment of CD133-expressing cells by using the antibody-bound magnetic microspheres. Such microspheres suitable for immunocapture are very promising for cancer diagnosis because the CD133-expressing cells in cancer cell lines have been suggested to be cancer stem cells. - Highlights: • Multi-step swelling polymerization produced poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres. • Anti-human CD133 antibodies were bound to the amino-containing magnetic microspheres. • CD133-positive cells were effectively captured from human cancer cell lines. • Immunocaptured CD133-expressing cells proliferated and were detached from microspheres. • Enrichment of CD133-expressing cells was confirmed by flow-cytometric analysis

  20. An Assessment of Gadonanotubes as Magnetic Nanolabels for Improved Stem Cell Detection and Retention in Cardiomyoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lesa A.

    In this work, gadolinium-based carbon nanocapsules are developed as a novel nanotechnology that addresses the shortcomings of current diagnostic and therapeutic methods of stem cell-based cardiomyoplasty. With cardiovascular disease (CVD) responsible for approximately 30% of deaths worldwide, the growing need for improved cardiomyoplasty has spurred efforts in nanomedicine to develop innovative techniques to enhance the therapeutic retention and diagnostic tracking of transplanted cells. Having previously been demonstrated as a high-performance T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, Gadonanotubes (GNTs) are shown for the first time to intracellularly label pig bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Without the use of a transfection agent, micromolar concentrations of GNTs deliver up to 109 Gd3+ ions per cell, allowing for MSCs to be visualized in a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner. The cellular response to the intracellular incorporation of GNTs is also assessed, revealing that GNTs do not compromise the viability, differentiation potential, or phenotype characteristics of the MSCs. However, it is also found that GNT-labeled MSCs exhibit a decreased response to select cell adhesion proteins and experience a nonapoptotic, non-proliferative cell cycle arrest, from which the cells recover 48 h after GNT internalization. In tandem with developing GNTs as a new stem cell diagnostic agent, this current work also explores for the first time the therapeutic application of the magnetically-active GNTs as a magnetic facilitator to increase the retention of transplanted stem cells during cardiomyoplasty. In vitro flow chamber assays, ex vivo perfusion experiments, and in vivo porcine injection procedures all demonstrate the increased magnetic-assisted retention of GNT-labeled MSCs in the presence of an external magnetic field. These studies prove that GNTs are a powerful 'theranostic' agent that provides a novel platform to simultaneously monitor

  1. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J.; Grüttner, Cordula; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Frerich, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time.

  2. Microfluidic synthesis of microfibers for magnetic-responsive controlled drug release and cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    Full Text Available This study demonstrated the fabrication of alginate microfibers using a modular microfluidic system for magnetic-responsive controlled drug release and cell culture. A novel two-dimensional fluid-focusing technique with multi-inlets and junctions was used to spatiotemporally control the continuous laminar flow of alginate solutions. The diameter of the manufactured microfibers, which ranged from 211 µm to 364 µm, could be well controlled by changing the flow rate of the continuous phase. While the model drug, diclofenac, was encapsulated into microfibers, the drug release profile exhibited the characteristic of a proper and steady release. Furthermore, the diclofenac release kinetics from the magnetic iron oxide-loaded microfibers could be controlled externally, allowing for a rapid drug release by applying a magnetic force. In addition, the successful culture of glioblastoma multiforme cells in the microfibers demonstrated a good structural integrity and environment to grow cells that could be applied in drug screening for targeting cancer cells. The proposed microfluidic system has the advantages of ease of fabrication, simplicity, and a fast and low-cost process that is capable of generating functional microfibers with the potential for biomedical applications, such as drug controlled release and cell culture.

  3. Cell Wall Regeneration by Protoplasts in the Weak Combined Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedukha, Olena; Bogatina, Nina; Kordyum, Elizabeth; Ovcharenko, Yu.; Vorobyeva, T.

    2008-06-01

    Role of gravity on growth of high plants has been studied for many years, but many questions on biogenesis of plant cell wall are investigated insufficiently, and require new experiments. We have studied regeneration of cell wall in the fused and separate protoplasts of tobacco and soyabean in the presence of the weak, alternating magnetic field that consisted of frequency of 32 Hz (for Ca2+ ; F=40 μT) or 75 Hz (for Mg2+; F=60 μT) in side μ-metal shield. We discovered that the combined magnetic field that was adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ or Mg2+ is changed the rate of cell wall regeneration. Light and confocal laser microscopy were used for the investigations.

  4. A tunable cancer cell filter using magnetic beads: cellular and fluid dynamic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Bance, Simon; Exl, Lukas; Reichel, Franz; Oezelt, Harald; Schrefl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In the field of biomedicine magnetic beads are used for drug delivery and to treat hyperthermia. Here we propose to use self-organized bead structures to isolate circulating tumor cells using lab-on-chip technologies. Typically blood flows past microposts functionalized with antibodies for circulating tumor cells. Creating these microposts with interacting magnetic beads makes it possible to tune the geometry in size, position and shape. We develop a simulation tool that combines micromagnetics, discrete particle dynamics and fluid dynamics, in order to design micropost arrays made of interacting beads. For the simulation of blood flow we use the Lattice-Boltzmann method with immersed elastic blood cell models. Parallelization distributes large fluid and particle dynamic simulations over available resources to reduce overall calculation time.

  5. Effects of magnetic field configuration on rf sputtering for CdS/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Shao, M.; Fischer, A.; Grecu, D.; Jayamaha, U.; Contreras-Puente, G.; Bohn, R.G. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The authors report studies of solar cells prepared by rf planar magnetron sputtering in which the films were deposited using magnetic field structures ranging from approximately balanced to strongly unbalanced in the type II configuration. For films grown with the unbalanced configurations, they find much stronger photoluminescence and much better cell performance than for the balanced configuration. The CdTe films show differences in electrical performance depending on magnetic field as well. These effects are interpreted as arising from the enhanced electron and ion bombardment of the film growth interface for the unbalanced magnetrons. Using two unbalanced magnetrons the authors have fabricated an all-rf-sputtered cell with NREL-verified efficiency of 11.6% at air mass 1.5 illumination.

  6. Effect of weak static magnetic fields on the development of cultured skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surma, Sergei V; Belostotskaya, Galina B; Shchegolev, Boris F; Stefanov, Vasily E

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effect produced on the development and functional activity of skeletal muscle cells from newborn Wistar rats in primary culture by weak static magnetic fields (WSMF; 60-400 µT) with a high capacity of penetrating the biological media. To reduce the impact of external magnetic fields, cells were cultured at 37 °C in a multilayered shielding chamber with the attenuation coefficient equal to 160. WSMF inside the chamber was created by a circular permanent magnet. We found that the application of WSMF with the magnetic field strength only a few times that of the geomagnetic field can accelerate the development of skeletal muscle cells, resulting in the formation of multinuclear hypertrophied myotubes. WSMF was shown to induce 1.5- to 3.5-fold rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i due to the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through ryanodine receptors (RyR), which increases in the maturation of myotubes. We also found that fully differentiated myotubes at late stages of development were less sensitive to WSMF, manifesting a gradual decrease in the frequency of contractions. However, myotubes at the stage when electromechanical coupling was forming dramatically reduced the frequency of contractions during the first minutes of their exposure to WSMF.

  7. Tracking stem cells in tissue-engineered organs using magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachani, Roxanne; Lowdell, Mark; Birchall, Martin; Thanh, NguyêN. Thi Kim

    2013-11-01

    The use of human stem cells (SCs) in tissue engineering holds promise in revolutionising the treatment of numerous diseases. There is a pressing need to comprehend the distribution, movement and role of SCs once implanted onto scaffolds. Nanotechnology has provided a platform to investigate this through the development of inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs can be used to label and track SCs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since this clinically available imaging modality has high spatial resolution. In this review, we highlight recent applications of iron oxide and gadolinium based MNPs in SC labelling and MRI; and offer novel considerations for their future development.

  8. Optimization of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells for Culture: The Removal of Corneal Stromal Fibroblast Contamination Using Magnetic Cell Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. L. Peh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The culture of human corneal endothelial cells (CECs is critical for the development of suitable graft alternative on biodegradable material, specifically for endothelial keratoplasty, which can potentially alleviate the global shortage of transplant-grade donor corneas available. However, the propagation of slow proliferative CECs in vitro can be hindered by rapid growing stromal corneal fibroblasts (CSFs that may be coisolated in some cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a strategy using magnetic cell separation (MACS technique to deplete the contaminating CSFs from CEC cultures using antifibroblast magnetic microbeads. Separated “labeled” and “flow-through” cell fractions were collected separately, cultured, and morphologically assessed. Cells from the “flow-through” fraction displayed compact polygonal morphology and expressed Na+/K+ATPase indicative of corneal endothelial cells, whilst cells from the “labeled” fraction were mostly elongated and fibroblastic. A separation efficacy of 96.88% was observed. Hence, MACS technique can be useful in the depletion of contaminating CSFs from within a culture of CECs.

  9. Hyperthermic potentiation of cisplatin by magnetic nanoparticle heaters is correlated with an increase in cell membrane fluidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Berrios MP

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Merlis P Alvarez-Berríos, Amalchi Castillo, Janet Mendéz, Orlando Soto, Carlos Rinaldi, Madeline Torres-LugoDepartment of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto RicoAbstract: Magnetic fluid hyperthermia as a cancer treatment method is an attractive alternative to other forms of hyperthermia. It is based on the heat released by magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field. Recent studies have shown that magnetic fluid hyperthermia-treated cells respond significantly better to chemotherapeutic treatment compared with cells treated with hot water hyperthermia under the same temperature conditions. We hypothesized that this synergistic effect is due to an additional stress on the cellular membrane, independent of the thermal heat dose effect that is induced by nanoparticles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. This would result in an increase in Cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (II (cDDP, cisplatin uptake via passive transport. To test this hypothesis, we exposed cDDP-treated cells to extracellular copper in order to hinder the human cell copper transporter (hCTR1-mediated active transport of cDDP. This, in turn, can increase the passive transport of the drug through the cell membrane. Our results did not show statistically significant differences in surviving fractions for cells treated concomitantly with magnetic fluid hyperthermia and cDDP, in the presence or absence of copper. Nonetheless, significant copper-dependent variations in cell survival were observed for samples treated with combined cDDP and hot water hyperthermia. These results correlated with platinum uptake studies, which showed that cells treated with magnetic fluid hyperthermia had higher platinum uptake than cells treated with hot water hyperthermia. Changes in membrane fluidity were tested through fluorescence anisotropy measurements using trimethylamine-diphenylhexatriene. Additional uptake studies were conducted with

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  12. Using magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate dendritic cell-based vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Ferguson

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy with antigen-loaded dendritic cell-based vaccines can induce clinical responses in some patients, but further optimization is required to unlock the full potential of this strategy in the clinic. Optimization is dependent on being able to monitor the cellular events that take place once the dendritic cells have been injected in vivo, and to establish whether antigen-specific immune responses to the tumour have been induced. Here we describe the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a simple, non-invasive approach to evaluate vaccine success. By loading the dendritic cells with highly magnetic iron nanoparticles it is possible to assess whether the injected cells drain to the lymph nodes. It is also possible to establish whether an antigen-specific response is initiated by assessing migration of successive rounds of antigen-loaded dendritic cells; in the face of a successfully primed cytotoxic response, the bulk of antigen-loaded cells are eradicated on-route to the node, whereas cells without antigen can reach the node unchecked. It is also possible to verify the induction of a vaccine-induced response by simply monitoring increases in draining lymph node size as a consequence of vaccine-induced lymphocyte trapping, which is an antigen-specific response that becomes more pronounced with repeated vaccination. Overall, these MRI techniques can provide useful early feedback on vaccination strategies, and could also be used in decision making to select responders from non-responders early in therapy.

  13. MPQ-cytometry: a magnetism-based method for quantification of nanoparticle-cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipunova, V. O.; Nikitin, M. P.; Nikitin, P. I.; Deyev, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method called MPQ-cytometry is developed, which measures the integral non-linear response produced by magnetically labeled nanoparticles in a cell sample with an original magnetic particle quantification (MPQ) technique. MPQ-cytometry provides a sensitivity limit 0.33 ng of nanoparticles and is devoid of a background signal present in many label-based assays. Each measurement takes only a few seconds, and no complicated sample preparation or data processing is required. The capabilities of the method have been demonstrated by quantification of interactions of iron oxide nanoparticles with eukaryotic cells. The total amount of targeted nanoparticles that specifically recognized the HER2/neu oncomarker on the human cancer cell surface was successfully measured, the specificity of interaction permitting the detection of HER2/neu positive cells in a cell mixture. Moreover, it has been shown that MPQ-cytometry analysis of a HER2/neu-specific iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with six cell lines of different tissue origins quantitatively reflects the HER2/neu status of the cells. High correlation of MPQ-cytometry data with those obtained by three other commonly used in molecular and cell biology methods supports consideration of this method as a prospective alternative for both quantifying cell-bound nanoparticles and estimating the expression level of cell surface antigens. The proposed method does not require expensive sophisticated equipment or highly skilled personnel and it can be easily applied for rapid diagnostics, especially under field conditions.Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method

  14. Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    The long term evolution of large domain Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated following observations that show two possible outcomes for collisionless reconnection: towards a Petschek-like configuration (Gosling 2007) or towards multiple X points (Eriksson et al. 2014). In the simulations presented here and described in [Innocenti2015*], a mixed scenario develops. At earlier time, plasmoids are emitted, disrupting the formation of Petschek-like structures. Later, an almost stationary monster plasmoid forms, preventing the emission of other plasmoids. A situation reminding of Petschek's switch-off then ensues. Switch-off is obtained through a slow shock / rotational discontinuity (SS/RD) compound structure, with the rotation discontinuity downstreamthe slow shock. Two external slow shocks located in correspondence of the separatrices reduce the in plane tangential component of the magnetic field, but not to zero. Two transitions reminding of rotational discontinuities in the internal part of the exhausts then perform the final switch-off. Both the slow shocks and the rotational discontinuities are characterized as such through the analysis of their Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. A moderate guide field is used to suppress the development of the firehose instability in the exhaust that prevented switch off in [Liu2012]. Compound SS/RD structures, with the RD located downstream the SS, have been observed in both the solar wind and the magnetosphere in Wind and Geotail data respectively [Whang1998, Whang2004]. Ion trajectiories across the SS/RD structure are followed and the kinetic origin of the SS/RD structure is investigated. * Innocenti, Goldman, Newman, Markidis, Lapenta, Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in collisionless magnetic reconnection, accepted in Astrophysical Journal Letters, 2015 Acknowledgements: NERSC, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of

  15. High Current Planar Magnetics for High Efficiency Bidirectional DC-DC Converters for Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittini, Riccardo; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency is one of the main concerns during the design phase of switch mode power supply. Planar magnetics based on PCB windings have the potential to reduce the magnetic manufacturing cost however, one of their main drawbacks comes from their low filling factor and high stray capacitance....... This paper presents an analysis of different planar windings configurations focusing on dc and ac resistances in order to achieve highly efficiency in dc-dc converters. The analysis considers different copper thicknesses form 70 μm up to 1500 μm (extreme copper PCB) taking into account manufacturing...... complexity and challenges. The analysis is focused on a high current inductor for a dc-dc converter for fuel cell applications and it is based on FEM simulations. Analysis and results are verified on a 6 kW dc-dc isolated full bridge boost converter prototype based on fully planar magnetics achieving a peak...

  16. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    KAUST Repository

    Martínez-Banderas, Aldo Isaac

    2016-10-24

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects.

  17. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyong-Hoon; Nam, Ki Chang; Malkinski, Leszek; Choi, Eun Ha; Jung, Jin-Seung; Park, Bong Joo

    2016-09-06

    In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe₂O₄-HPs-FAs) of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm) were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe₂O₄) particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS), which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP), and folic acid (FA) molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe₂O₄ particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe₂O₄ nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism.

  18. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyong-Hoon; Nam, Ki Chang; Malkinski, Leszek; Choi, Eun Ha; Jung, Jin-Seung; Park, Bong Joo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe₂O₄-HPs-FAs) of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm) were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe₂O₄) particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS), which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP), and folic acid (FA) molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe₂O₄ particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe₂O₄ nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism. PMID:27607999

  19. Isolation of cells for selective treatment and analysis using a magnetic microfluidic chip

    KAUST Repository

    Yassine, O.

    2014-05-01

    This study describes the development and testing of a magnetic microfluidic chip (MMC) for trapping and isolating cells tagged with superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) in a microfluidic environment for selective treatment and analysis. The trapping and isolation are done in two separate steps; first, the trapping of the tagged cells in a main channel is achieved by soft ferromagnetic disks and second, the transportation of the cells into side chambers for isolation is executed by tapered conductive paths made of Gold (Au). Numerical simulations were performed to analyze the magnetic flux and force distributions of the disks and conducting paths, for trapping and transporting SPBs. The MMC was fabricated using standard microfabrication processes. Experiments were performed with E. coli (K12 strand) tagged with 2.8 μm SPBs. The results showed that E. coli can be separated from a sample solution by trapping them at the disk sites, and then isolated into chambers by transporting them along the tapered conducting paths. Once the E. coli was trapped inside the side chambers, two selective treatments were performed. In one chamber, a solution with minimal nutrition content was added and, in another chamber, a solution with essential nutrition was added. The results showed that the growth of bacteria cultured in the second chamber containing nutrient was significantly higher, demonstrating that the E. coli was not affected by the magnetically driven transportation and the feasibility of performing different treatments on selectively isolated cells on a single microfluidic platform.

  20. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Banderas, Aldo Isaac; Aires, Antonio; Teran, Francisco J.; Perez, Jose Efrain; Cadenas, Jael F.; Alsharif, Nouf; Ravasi, Timothy; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects. PMID:27775082

  1. Design of microfluidic channels for magnetic separation of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Martin, Andrea Blue; Gandini, Alberto; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.

    2016-01-01

    This study is motivated by the development of a blood cell filtration device for removal of malaria-infected, parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs). The blood was modeled as a multi-component fluid using the computational fluid dynamics discrete element method (CFD-DEM), wherein plasma was treated as a Newtonian fluid and the red blood cells (RBCs) were modeled as soft-sphere solid particles which move under the influence of drag, collisions with other RBCs, and a magnetic force. The CFD-DEM model was first validated by a comparison with experimental data from Han et al. 2006 (Han and Frazier 2006) involving a microfluidic magnetophoretic separator for paramagnetic deoxygenated blood cells. The computational model was then applied to a parametric study of a parallel-plate separator having hematocrit of 40% with a 10% of the RBCs as pRBCs. Specifically, we investigated the hypothesis of introducing an upstream constriction to the channel to divert the magnetic cells within the near-wall layer where the magnetic force is greatest. Simulations compared the efficacy of various geometries upon the stratification efficiency of the pRBCs. For a channel with nominal height of 100 µm, the addition of an upstream constriction of 80% improved the proportion of pRBCs retained adjacent to the magnetic wall (separation efficiency) by almost 2 fold, from 26% to 49%. Further addition of a downstream diffuser reduced remixing, hence improved separation efficiency to 72%. The constriction introduced a greater pressure drop (from 17 to 495 Pa), which should be considered when scaling-up this design for a clinical-sized system. Overall, the advantages of this design include its ability to accommodate physiological hematocrit and high throughput – which is critical for clinical implementation as a blood-filtration system.

  2. Statistical approach for the culture conditions optimization of magnetotactic bacteria for magnetic cells production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wenbing; Yu Longjiang; Zhou Pengpeng

    2006-01-01

    The culture of Magnetospirillum magneticum WM-1 depends on several control factors that have great effect on the magnetic cells concentration. Investigation into the optimal culture conditions needs a large number of experiments. So it is desirable to minimize the number of experiments and maximize the information gained from them. The orthogonal design of experiments and mathematical statistical method are considered as effective methods to optimize the culture condition of magnetotactic bacteria WM-1 for high magnetic cells concentration. The effects of the four factors, such as pH value of medium, oxygen concentration of gas phase in the serum bottle, C:C (mtartaric acid: msuccinic acid) ratio and NaNO3 concentration, are simultaneously investigated by only sixteen experiments through the orthogonal design L16(44) method. The optimal culture condition is obtained. At the optimal culture condition ( pH 7.0, an oxygen concentration 4.0%, C: C (mtartaric acid:msuccinic acid) ratio 1:2 and NaNO3 100 mg l-1), the magnetic cells concentration is promoted to 6.5×107 cells ml-1, approximately 8.3% higher than that under the initial conditions. The pH value of medium is a very important factor for magnetic cells concentration. It can be proved that the orthogonal design of experiment is of 90% confidence. Ferric iron uptake follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Km of 2.5 μM and a Vmax of 0.83 min-1.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles in primary neural cell cultures are mainly taken up by microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinkernelle Josephine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs offer a large range of applications in life sciences. Applications in neurosciences are one focus of interest. Unfortunately, not all groups have access to nanoparticles or the possibility to develop and produce them for their applications. Hence, they have to focus on commercially available particles. Little is known about the uptake of nanoparticles in primary cells. Previously studies mostly reported cellular uptake in cell lines. Here we present a systematic study on the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs by primary cells of the nervous system. Results We assessed the internalization in different cell types with confocal and electron microscopy. The analysis confirmed the uptake of MNPs in the cells, probably with endocytotic mechanisms. Furthermore, we compared the uptake in PC12 cells, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line, which is often used as a neuronal cell model, with primary neuronal cells. It was found that the percentage of PC12 cells loaded with MNPs was significantly higher than for neurons. Uptake studies in primary mixed neuronal/glial cultures revealed predominant uptake of MNPs by microglia and an increase in their number. The number of astroglia and oligodendroglia which incorporated MNPs was lower and stable. Primary mixed Schwann cell/fibroblast cultures showed similar MNP uptake of both cell types, but the Schwann cell number decreased after MNP incubation. Organotypic co-cultures of spinal cord slices and peripheral nerve grafts resembled the results of the dispersed primary cell cultures. Conclusions The commercial MNPs used activated microglial phagocytosis in both disperse and organotypic culture systems. It can be assumed that in vivo application would induce immune system reactivity, too. Because of this, their usefulness for in vivo neuroscientific implementations can be questioned. Future studies will need to overcome this issue with the use of cell

  4. Multifunctional nanoprobe for cancer cell targeting and simultaneous fluorescence/magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhenzhen; Wu, Yafeng; Zhao, Yuewu; Mi, Li; Wang, Jintao; Wang, Jimin; Zhao, Jinjin; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Anran; Li, Ying; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2016-09-28

    Multifunctional nanoprobes with distinctive magnetic and fluorescent properties are highly useful in accurate and early cancer diagnosis. In this study, nanoparticles of Fe3O4 core with fluorescent SiO2 shell (MFS) are synthesized by a facile improved Stöber method. These nanoparticles owning a significant core-shell structure exhibit good dispersion, stable fluorescence, low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. TLS11a aptamer (Apt1), a specific membrane protein for human liver cancer cells which could be internalized into cells, is conjugated to the MFS nanoparticles through the formation of amide bond working as a target-specific moiety. The attached TLS11a aptamers on nanoparticles are very stable and can't be hydrolyzed by DNA hydrolytic enzyme in vivo. Both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging show significant uptake of aptamer conjugated nanoprobe by HepG2 cells compared to 4T1, SGC-7901 and MCF-7 cells. In addition, with the increasing concentration of the nanoprobe, T2-weighted MRI images of the as-treated HepG2 cells are significantly negatively enhanced, indicating that a high magnetic field gradient is generated by MFS-Apt1 which has been specifically captured by HepG2 cells. The relaxivity of nanoprobe is calculated to be 11.5 mg(-1)s(-1). The MR imaging of tumor-bearing nude mouse is also confirmed. The proposed multifunctional nanoprobe with the size of sub-100 nm has the potential to provide real-time imaging in early liver cancer cell diagnosis. PMID:27619098

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N M; Morgan, M L; Almarzouqi, S J; Lee, A G

    2016-05-01

    PurposeGiant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic vasculitis that affects medium-to-large-caliber arteries. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential as involvement of the ophthalmic artery or its branches may cause blindness. Radiographic findings may be variable and non-specific leading to delay in diagnosis. We conducted a review of the literature on neuroimaging findings in GCA and present a retrospective case series from tertiary-care ophthalmic referral centers of three patients with significant neuroimaging findings in biopsy-proven GCA.MethodsRetrospective case series of biopsy-proven GCA cases with neuroimaging findings at the Department of Ophthalmology, Blanton Eye Institute, Houston Methodist Hospital between 2010-2015 were included in this study. Literature search was conducted using Google Scholar and Medline search engines between the years 1970 and 2015.ResultsWe report findings of optic nerve enhancement, optic nerve sheath enhancement, and the first description in the English-language ophthalmic literature, to our knowledge, of chiasmal enhancement in biopsy-proven GCA. We describe four main categories of neuroimaging findings that may be seen in GCA from our series and from past cases in the literature.DiscussionIt is essential that clinicians be aware of the possible radiographic findings in GCA. Appropriate and prompt treatment should not be delayed based upon these findings. PMID:26915748

  6. A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays for cell isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tao; Su, Qianhua; Yang, Zhaochu; Zhang, Yulong; Egeland, Eirik B.; Gu, Dan D.; Calabrese, Paolo; Kapiris, Matteo J.; Karlsen, Frank; Minh, Nhut T.; Wang, K.; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays has been developed and demonstrated, which can merely employ one independent lab-on-chip to realize cell isolation. The simulation, design, microfabrication and test for the new electromagnetic micro separator were executed. The simulation results of the electromagnetic field in the separator show that special soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays can amplify and redistribute the electromagnetic field generated by the micro-coils. The separator can be equipped with a strong magnetic field to isolate the target cells with a considerably low input current. The micro separator was fabricated by micro-processing technology. An electroplating bath was hired to deposit NiCo/NiFe to fabricate the micro-pillar arrays. An experimental system was set up to verify the function of the micro separator by isolating the lymphocytes, in which the human whole blood mixed with Dynabeads® FlowComp Flexi and monoclonal antibody MHCD2704 was used as the sample. The results show that the electromagnetic micro separator with an extremely low input current can recognize and capture the target lymphocytes with a high efficiency, the separation ratio reaching more than 90% at a lower flow rate. For the electromagnetic micro separator, there is no external magnetizing field required, and there is no extra cooling system because there is less Joule heat generated due to the lower current. The magnetic separator is totally reusable, and it can be used to separate cells or proteins with common antigens.

  7. In vitro studies of magnetically enhanced transfection in COS-7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, D.; Tay, C.Y.; Tan, L.P. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Preiser, P.R. [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Ramanujan, R.V., E-mail: Ramanujan@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2011-10-10

    In the magnetically enhanced gene delivery technique, DNA complexed with polymer coated aggregated magnetic nanoparticles (AMNPs) is used for effecting transfection. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between transfection efficiency and the physical characteristics of the polymer coated AMNPs. In vitro studies of transfection efficiency in COS-7 cells were carried out using pEGFP-N1 and pMIR-REPORT complexed polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. PEI coated AMNPs (PEI-AMNPs) with average individual particle diameters in the range of 8 nm to 30 nm were studied and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffractometry, thermal gravimetric analysis and photon correlation spectroscopy methods. PEI-A8MNP and PEI-A30MNP yielded higher transfection efficiency compared to commercial polyMAG particles as well as PEI of equivalent molar ratio of nitrogen/phosphorous (N/P ratio). The transfection efficiency was related to the physical characteristics of the PEI-AMNPs and its complexes: transfection efficiency was strongly positively correlated with saturation magnetization (Ms) and susceptibility ({chi}), strongly negatively correlated with N/P ratio, moderately positively correlated to zeta potential and moderately negatively correlated to hydrodynamic diameter of the complex. PEI-A8MNP and PEI-A30MNP possessing higher Ms, {chi}, lower N/P ratio and smaller complex size exhibited higher transfection efficiency compared to PEI-A16MNP which have weaker magnetic properties, higher N/P ratio and larger complex size. We have demonstrated that optimization of the physical properties of PEI-AMNPs is needed to maximize transfection efficiency. - Research highlights: {yields}The transfection efficiency in magnetically enhanced gene delivery was studied. {yields}Transfection efficiency was strongly positively correlated to magnetic properties. {yields}Transfection efficiency was strongly

  8. In vitro studies of magnetically enhanced transfection in COS-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the magnetically enhanced gene delivery technique, DNA complexed with polymer coated aggregated magnetic nanoparticles (AMNPs) is used for effecting transfection. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between transfection efficiency and the physical characteristics of the polymer coated AMNPs. In vitro studies of transfection efficiency in COS-7 cells were carried out using pEGFP-N1 and pMIR-REPORT complexed polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. PEI coated AMNPs (PEI-AMNPs) with average individual particle diameters in the range of 8 nm to 30 nm were studied and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffractometry, thermal gravimetric analysis and photon correlation spectroscopy methods. PEI-A8MNP and PEI-A30MNP yielded higher transfection efficiency compared to commercial polyMAG particles as well as PEI of equivalent molar ratio of nitrogen/phosphorous (N/P ratio). The transfection efficiency was related to the physical characteristics of the PEI-AMNPs and its complexes: transfection efficiency was strongly positively correlated with saturation magnetization (Ms) and susceptibility (χ), strongly negatively correlated with N/P ratio, moderately positively correlated to zeta potential and moderately negatively correlated to hydrodynamic diameter of the complex. PEI-A8MNP and PEI-A30MNP possessing higher Ms, χ, lower N/P ratio and smaller complex size exhibited higher transfection efficiency compared to PEI-A16MNP which have weaker magnetic properties, higher N/P ratio and larger complex size. We have demonstrated that optimization of the physical properties of PEI-AMNPs is needed to maximize transfection efficiency. - Research highlights: →The transfection efficiency in magnetically enhanced gene delivery was studied. →Transfection efficiency was strongly positively correlated to magnetic properties. →Transfection efficiency was strongly negatively correlated with

  9. The Effect of Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles on Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Chen, Xiangjian; Gu, Chunrong; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Jindan; Bian, Zhiping; Yang, Di; Gu, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Recently, magnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide (Fe3O4, γ-Fe2O3) have shown an increasing number of applications in the field of biomedicine, but some questions have been raised about the potential impact of these nanoparticles on the environment and human health. In this work, the three types of magnetic nanoparticles (DMSA-Fe2O3, APTS-Fe2O3, and GLU-Fe2O3) with the same crystal structure, magnetic properties, and size distribution was designed, prepared, and characterized by transmission electronic microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, zeta potential analyzer, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy. Then, we have investigated the effect of the three types of magnetic nanoparticles (DMSA-Fe2O3, APTS-Fe2O3, and GLU-Fe2O3) on smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Cellular uptake of nanoparticles by SMC displays the dose, the incubation time and surface property dependent patterns. Through the thin section TEM images, we observe that DMSA-Fe2O3 is incorporated into the lysosome of SMCs. The magnetic nanoparticles have no inflammation impact, but decrease the viability of SMCs. The other questions about metabolism and other impacts will be the next subject of further studies.

  10. Antibody-free magnetic cell sorting of genetically modified primary human CD4+ T cells by one-step streptavidin affinity purification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Matheson

    Full Text Available Existing methods for phenotypic selection of genetically modified mammalian cells suffer disadvantages of time, cost and scalability and, where antibodies are used to bind exogenous cell surface markers for magnetic selection, typically yield cells coated with antibody-antigen complexes and beads. To overcome these limitations we have developed a method termed Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting in which the 38 amino acid Streptavidin Binding Peptide (SBP is displayed at the cell surface by the truncated Low Affinity Nerve Growth Receptor (LNGFRF and used as an affinity tag for one-step selection with streptavidin-conjugated magnetic beads. Cells are released through competition with the naturally occurring vitamin biotin, free of either beads or antibody-antigen complexes and ready for culture or use in downstream applications. Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting is a rapid, cost-effective, scalable method of magnetic selection applicable to either viral transduction or transient transfection of cell lines or primary cells. We have optimised the system for enrichment of primary human CD4+ T cells expressing shRNAs and exogenous genes of interest to purities of >99%, and used it to isolate cells following Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing.

  11. Modular design for narrow scintillating cells with MRS photodiodes in strong magnetic field for ILC detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Schellpffer, J.; Zutshi, V.

    2006-08-01

    The experimental results for the narrow scintillating elements with effective area about 20 cm 2 are reported. The elements were formed from the single piece of scintillator and were read out via wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers with the Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor (MRS) photodiodes on both ends of each fiber. The count rates were obtained using radioactive source 90Sr, with threshold at about three photoelectrons in each channel and quad coincidences (double coincidences between sensors on each fiber and double coincidences between two neighboring fibers). The formation of the cells from the piece of scintillator by using grooves is discussed, and their performances were tested using the radioactive source by measuring the photomutiplier current using the same WLS fiber. Because effective cell area can be readily enlarged or reduced, this module may be used as an active element for calorimeter or muon system for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector. Experimental verification of the performance of the MRS photodiode in a strong magnetic field of 9 T, and the impact a magnet quench at 9.5 T are reported. The measurement method used is described. The results confirm the expectations that the MRS photodiode is insensitive to a strong magnetic field and therefore applicable to calorimetry in the presence of magnetic field. The overall result is of high importance for large multi-channel systems.

  12. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene therapies. In particular, we found that these engineered AD-MSCs retained their innate ability to proliferate, differentiate, and, most importantly, home to tumors, making them ideal cellular carriers. Moreover, exposure of the engineered AD-MSCS to mild magnetic hyperthermia resulted in the selective expression of TRAIL from the engineered AD-MSCs and, as a result, induced significant ovarian cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ishioka, Yukichi; Hirai, Takao; Ozawa, Shusuke; Tachibana, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2009-08-15

    We have previously shown significant potentiation of Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, along with decreased microtubules-associated protein-2 (MAP2) expression, in hippocampal neurons cultured under static magnetism without cell death. In this study, we investigated the effects of static magnetism on the functionality of neural progenitor cells endowed to proliferate for self-replication and differentiate into neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial lineages. Neural progenitor cells were isolated from embryonic rat neocortex and hippocampus, followed by culture under static magnetism at 100 mT and subsequent determination of the number of cells immunoreactive for a marker protein of particular progeny lineages. Static magnetism not only significantly decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells without affecting cell viability, but also promoted differentiation into cells immunoreactive for MAP2 with a concomitant decrease in that for an astroglial marker, irrespective of the presence of differentiation inducers. In neural progenitors cultured under static magnetism, a significant increase was seen in mRNA expression of several activator-type proneural genes, such as Mash1, Math1, and Math3, together with decreased mRNA expression of the repressor type Hes5. These results suggest that sustained static magnetism could suppress proliferation for self-renewal and facilitate differentiation into neurons through promoted expression of activator-type proneural genes by progenitor cells in fetal rat brain.

  14. Application in the Ethanol Fermentation of Immobilized Yeast Cells in Matrix of Alginate/Magnetic Nanoparticles, on Chitosan-Magnetite Microparticles and Cellulose-coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, Viara; Hristov, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were entrapped in matrix of alginate and magnetic nanoparticles and covalently immobilized on magnetite-containing chitosan and cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles with covalently immobilized thermostable {\\alpha}-amylase and chitosan particles with immobilized glucoamylase were also prepared. The immobilized cells and enzymes were applied in column reactors - 1/for simultaneous corn starch saccharification with the immobilized glucoamylase and production of ethanol with the entrapped or covalently immobilized yeast cells, 2/ for separate ethanol fermentation of the starch hydrolysates with the fixed yeasts. Hydrolysis of corn starch with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase and glucoamylase, and separate hydrolysis with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase were also examined. In the first reactor the ethanol yield reached approx. 91% of the theoretical; the yield was approx. 86% in the second. The ethanol fermentation was affected by the typ...

  15. Multifunctional magnetic-hollow gold nanospheres for bimodal cancer cell imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ling-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Quan; An, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Kai; Qin, Meng-Yao; Fang, Bi-Yun; Li, Cheng; Xuan, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Ma, Zhi-Ya

    2015-08-01

    Multifunctional nanocomposites combining imaging and therapeutic functions have great potential for cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we developed a novel theranostic agent based on hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO). Taking advantage of the excellent magnetic properties of SPIO and strong near-infrared (NIR) absorption property of HGNs, such nanocomposites were applied to targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of cancer cells. In vitro results demonstrated they displayed significant contrast enhancement for T2-weighted MRI and strong PAI signal enhancement. Simultaneously, the nanocomposites exhibited a high photothermal effect under the irradiation of the near-infrared laser and can be used as efficient photothermal therapy (PTT) agents for selective killing of cancer cells. All these results indicated that such nanocomposites combined with MRI-PAI and PTT functionality can have great potential for effective cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell in vitro labeling by hybrid fluorescent magnetic polymeric particles for application in cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supokawej, Aungkura; Nimsanor, Natakarn; Sanvoranart, Tanwarat; Kaewsaneha, Chariya; Hongeng, Suradej; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Jangpatarapongsa, Kulachart

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cell that contains multi-differentiation and proliferative properties and that shows high treatment implications for many clinical problems. The outcome of stem cell transplantation is still limited due to many factors, especially their survival and their interaction with the microenvironment after transplantation. Molecular imaging is a challenging technique that has been used to overcome this limitation and is based on the concept of labeling cells with tractable, visible, and non-toxic materials to track the cells after transplantation. In this study, magnetic polymeric nanoparticles (MPNPs) were used to directly label Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs). After labeling, the growth rate and the viability of the MSCs as well as the time of exposure were determined. The 3D images of WJ-MSCs labeled with MPNPs for 24 h were created using confocal microscopy. The results showed that, after incubation with fluorescent MPNPs for over 8 h, the growth rate and cell viability of the WJ-MSCs was similar to those of the control. Three-dimensional imaging revealed that the fluorescent MPNPs could infiltrate into the cells and spread into the cytoplasm, which suggests that the synthesized fluorescent MPNPs could possibly label MSCs for cell tracking study and be further developed for in vivo applications. PMID:25893425

  17. Cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Celda-Muñoz, Bernardo; Esteve-Moya, Vicent; Sancho-Bielsa, Francisco; Villa Sanz, Rosa; Fernández Ledesma, Luis José; Berganzo Ruiz, Javier

    2010-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance and other imaging techniques, in which the culture microchamber is encapsulated and housed inside a chip. The microchamber and the device are easy for the user to handle, allowing same to be handled or repositioned without requiring complex mounting operations. In addition, the invention allows cultures to be studied for long periods, great...

  18. Model experiments for immunomagnetic elimination of leukemic cells from human bone marrow. Presentation of a novel magnetic separation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhn, B; Häfer, R; Müller, A; Andrä, W; Danan, H; Zintl, F

    1991-11-01

    Optimal conditions for removing leukemic cells from human bone marrow with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and magnetic immunobeads were investigated. Monodisperse 3 microns polystyrene microspheres containing magnetite were coated with affinity-purified rabbit antimouse IgG at 4 degrees C, pH 9.6 for 18 h. SKW-3 cells (T-CLL cell line) were marked with the supravital DNA stain Hoechst 33342, seeded into normal human bone marrow, and then incubated with the mAb CD1, CD6, and CD8 at 4 degrees C for 30 min. In preliminary experiments REH cells (cALL cells) and mouse anti-REH cell antibodies were used to find the most favorable conditions for the binding of magnetic beads to tumor cells. Optimal formation of cell-bead rosettes was achieved by rotating beads and tumor cells together at room temperature at a concentration of 1 x 10(7) cells/ml, a bead: tumor cell ratio of 100:1 and an incubation time of one hour. The novel magnetic separation apparatus consists of three polystyrene chambers connected by silicone rubber tubing. The chambers contain four steel inserts each equipped with 32 nickel wires, which are magnetized by permanent magnets in such a way that the inhomogeneous high gradient magnetic field could be established within the cell suspension containing the cells to be depleted. The fluid flow was established by a peristaltic pump. At a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min and a field strength of 160 kA/m, no beads could be detected in the purged marrow. A cocktail of the three mAb was more effective than any single antibody in forming bead-cell rosettes. Two sequential purging cycles were superior to one. The marrow recovered was highly viable as assessed by trypan blue dye exclusion and by growth of CFU-GM. PMID:1786986

  19. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Mun Yun

    Full Text Available Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs and polycaprolactone (PCL, and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin, and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3 and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering.

  20. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-cheol

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and polycaprolactone (PCL), and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt) supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin), and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3) and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering. PMID:26382272

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  4. Observation of single neutral atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; He Jun; Qiu Ying; Yang Bao-Dong; Zhao Jiang-Yan; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2008-01-01

    Single caesium atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap have been identified. The trapping of individual atoms is marked by the steps in fluorescence signal corresponding to the capture or loss of single atoms. The typical magnetic gradient is about 29 mT/cm, which evidently reduces the capture rate of magneto-optical trap.

  5. Microfluidic sorting and multimodal typing of cancer cells in self-assembled magnetic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Saias, Laure; Psychari, Eleni; Minc, Nicolas; Simon, Damien; Bidard, François-Clément; Mathiot, Claire; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Fraisier, Vincent; Salamero, Jean; Saada, Véronique; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    We propose a unique method for cell sorting, “Ephesia,” using columns of biofunctionalized superparamagnetic beads self-assembled in a microfluidic channel onto an array of magnetic traps prepared by microcontact printing. It combines the advantages of microfluidic cell sorting, notably the application of a well controlled, flow-activated interaction between cells and beads, and those of immunomagnetic sorting, notably the use of batch-prepared, well characterized antibody-bearing beads. On cell lines mixtures, we demonstrated a capture yield better than 94%, and the possibility to cultivate in situ the captured cells. A second series of experiments involved clinical samples—blood, pleural effusion, and fine needle aspirates— issued from healthy donors and patients with B-cell hematological malignant tumors (leukemia and lymphoma). The immunophenotype and morphology of B-lymphocytes were analyzed directly in the microfluidic chamber, and compared with conventional flow cytometry and visual cytology data, in a blind test. Immunophenotyping results using Ephesia were fully consistent with those obtained by flow cytometry. We obtained in situ high resolution confocal three-dimensional images of the cell nuclei, showing intranuclear details consistent with conventional cytological staining. Ephesia thus provides a powerful approach to cell capture and typing allowing fully automated high resolution and quantitative immunophenotyping and morphological analysis. It requires at least 10 times smaller sample volume and cell numbers than cytometry, potentially increasing the range of indications and the success rate of microbiopsy-based diagnosis, and reducing analysis time and cost. PMID:20679245

  6. Microfluidic sorting and multimodal typing of cancer cells in self-assembled magnetic arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Saias, Laure; Psychari, Eleni; Minc, Nicolas; Simon, Damien; Bidard, François-Clément; Mathiot, Claire; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Fraisier, Vincent; Salamero, Jean; Saada, Véronique; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2010-08-17

    We propose a unique method for cell sorting, "Ephesia," using columns of biofunctionalized superparamagnetic beads self-assembled in a microfluidic channel onto an array of magnetic traps prepared by microcontact printing. It combines the advantages of microfluidic cell sorting, notably the application of a well controlled, flow-activated interaction between cells and beads, and those of immunomagnetic sorting, notably the use of batch-prepared, well characterized antibody-bearing beads. On cell lines mixtures, we demonstrated a capture yield better than 94%, and the possibility to cultivate in situ the captured cells. A second series of experiments involved clinical samples--blood, pleural effusion, and fine needle aspirates--issued from healthy donors and patients with B-cell hematological malignant tumors (leukemia and lymphoma). The immunophenotype and morphology of B-lymphocytes were analyzed directly in the microfluidic chamber, and compared with conventional flow cytometry and visual cytology data, in a blind test. Immunophenotyping results using Ephesia were fully consistent with those obtained by flow cytometry. We obtained in situ high resolution confocal three-dimensional images of the cell nuclei, showing intranuclear details consistent with conventional cytological staining. Ephesia thus provides a powerful approach to cell capture and typing allowing fully automated high resolution and quantitative immunophenotyping and morphological analysis. It requires at least 10 times smaller sample volume and cell numbers than cytometry, potentially increasing the range of indications and the success rate of microbiopsy-based diagnosis, and reducing analysis time and cost. PMID:20679245

  7. Magnetic fingerprints of rolling cells for quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisbeck, Mathias; Helou, Michael Johannes; Richter, Lukas; Kappes, Barbara; Friedrich, Oliver; Hayden, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, flow cytometry has had a profound impact on preclinical and clinical applications requiring single cell function information for counting, sub-typing and quantification of epitope expression. At the same time, the workflow complexity and high costs of such optical systems still limit flow cytometry applications to specialized laboratories. Here, we present a quantitative magnetic flow cytometer that incorporates in situ magnetophoretic cell focusing for highly accurate and reproducible rolling of the cellular targets over giant magnetoresistance sensing elements. Time-of-flight analysis is used to unveil quantitative single cell information contained in its magnetic fingerprint. Furthermore, we used erythrocytes as a biological model to validate our methodology with respect to precise analysis of the hydrodynamic cell diameter, quantification of binding capacity of immunomagnetic labels, and discrimination of cell morphology. The extracted time-of-flight information should enable point-of-care quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood for clinical applications, such as immunology and primary hemostasis. PMID:27596736

  8. Investigation of superparamagnetic (Fe3O4) nanoparticles and magnetic field exposures on CHO-K1 cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Zachary; Estlack, Larry; Hussain, Saber; Choi, Tae-Youl; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2016-03-01

    Rapid development in nanomaterial synthesis and functionalization has led to advanced studies in actuation and manipulation of cellular functions for biomedical applications. Often these actuation techniques employ externally applied magnetic fields to manipulate magnetic nanomaterials inside cell bodies in order to drive or trigger desired effects. While cellular interactions with low-frequency magnetic fields and nanoparticles have been extensively studied, the fundamental mechanisms behind these interactions remain poorly understood. Additionally, modern investigations on these concurrent exposure conditions have been limited in scope, and difficult to reproduce. This study presents an easily reproducible method of investigating the biological impact of concurrent magnetic field and nanoparticle exposure conditions using an in-vitro CHO-K1 cell line model, with the purpose of establishing grounds for in-depth fundamental studies of the mechanisms driving cellular-level interactions. Cells were cultured under various nanoparticle and magnetic field exposure conditions from 0 to 500 μg/ml nanoparticle concentrations, and DC, 50 Hz, or 100 Hz magnetic fields with 2.0 mT flux density. Cells were then observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, and subject to biological assays to determine the effects of concurrent extreme-low frequency magnetic field and nanoparticle exposures on cellnanoparticle interactions, such as particle uptake and cell viability by MTT assay. Current results indicate little to no variation in effect on cell cultures based on magnetic field parameters alone; however, it is clear that deleterious synergistic effects of concurrent exposure conditions exist based on a significant decrease in cell viability when exposed to high concentrations of nanoparticles and concurrent magnetic field.

  9. Dragging Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells with the Aid of Supramolecular Assemblies of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Molecular Magnets, and Peptides in a Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia C. de Paula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs are an attractive cell source for therapeutic applicability in diverse fields for the repair and regeneration of damaged or malfunctioning tissues and organs. There is a growing number of cell therapies using stem cells due to their characteristics of modulation of immune system and reduction of acute rejection. So a challenge in stem cells therapy is the delivery of cells to the organ of interest, a specific site. The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of a supramolecular assembly composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT, molecular magnets (lawsone-Co-phenanthroline, and a synthetic peptide (FWYANHYWFHNAFWYANHYWFHNA in the hASCs cultures. The hASCs were isolated, characterized, expanded, and cultured with the SWCNT supramolecular assembly (SWCNT-MA. The assembly developed did not impair the cell characteristics, viability, or proliferation. During growth, the cells were strongly attached to the assembly and they could be dragged by an applied magnetic field of less than 0.3 T. These assemblies were narrower than their related allotropic forms, that is, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and they could therefore be used to guide cells through thin blood capillaries within the human body. This strategy seems to be useful as noninvasive and nontoxic stem cells delivery/guidance and tracking during cell therapy.

  10. Highly efficient mesenchymal stem cell proliferation on poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers with embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daňková J

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jana Danková,1,2 Matej Buzgo,1,3,4 Jana Vejpravová,5 Simona Kubíčková,5 Věra Sovková,1,2 Lucie Vysloužilová,4,6 Alice Mantlíková,5 Alois Nečas,7 Evžen Amler1–31Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Institute of Biophysics, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; 3Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Kladno, Czech Republic; 4University Center for Energy Efficient Buildings, Czech Technical University in Prague, Bustehrad, Czech Republic; 5Department of Magnetic Nanosystems, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic; 6Department of Nonwoven Textiles, Faculty of Textile Engineering, Technical University of Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic; 7Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Brno, Czech RepublicAbstract: In this study, we have developed a combined approach to accelerate the proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in vitro, using a new nanofibrous scaffold made by needleless electrospinning from a mixture of poly-ε-caprolactone and magnetic particles. The biological characteristics of porcine MSCs were investigated while cultured in vitro on composite scaffold enriched with magnetic nanoparticles. Our data indicate that due to the synergic effect of the poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers and magnetic particles, cellular adhesion and proliferation of MSCs is enhanced and osteogenic differentiation is supported. The cellular and physical attributes make this new scaffold very promising for the acceleration of efficient MSC proliferation and regeneration of hard tissues.Keywords: magnetic particles, mesenchymal stem cells, nanofibers, tissue engineering 

  11. In vitro characterization of magnetic electrospun IDA-grafted chitosan nanofiber composite for hyperthermic tumor cell treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ta-Chun; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Jui-Che

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles were the thermoseeds under an alternating magnetic field and can be used to produce highly localized hyperthermia effect on deep-seated tumor. Nevertheless, effective and precisive delivery of nanoparticles to the treatment-intended site remains a challenge. In this study, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were incorporated onto the crosslinked electrospun chitosan nanofibers using chemical co-precipitation from the Fe ions adsorbed. Such magnetic nanoparticle-nanofiber composites could be delivered to the treatment site precisely by surgical or endoscopic method. Iminodiacetic acid (IDA) functionality was grafted onto the chitosan with an aim to increase the amount of magnetic nanoparticles formed in the electrospun magnetic nanofiber composite. The morphology, crystalline phase as well as the magnetism characteristic of the magnetic electrospun nanofiber matrixes, was analyzed. Results have indicated that, with the incorporation of IDA functionality, more magnetic nanoparticles were formed in the electrospun chitosan nanofiber matrix. In addition, the magnetic IDA-grafted chitosan nanofiber composite can effectively reduced the tumor cell proliferation under the application of magnetic field. This finding suggested the magnetic electrospun chitosan nanofiber composite can be of potential for hyperthermia treatment.

  12. RF sputtered CdS/CdTe solar cells: Effects of magnetic field, RF power, target morphology, and substrate temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.D.; Shao, M.; Tabory, C.N.; Feng, Z.; Fischer, A.; Matulionis, I.; Bohn, R.G. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors present a study of the influence of substrate temperature, RF power, target erosion, and magnetic field configuration on RF sputtering of CdTe and CdS. These sputtering parameters are shown to affect deposition rate, film morphology, photoluminescence efficiency, and cell performance. The magnetic field shape and strength affects the charged particle flux on the growing film and appears to have a strong influence on the final cell performance.

  13. The influence of particle size and static magnetic fields on the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into three dimensional cell-seeded collagen gel cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Emily E L; Child, Hannah W; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; McCully, Mark; Paterson, David; Mullin, Margaret; Berry, Catherine C

    2015-08-01

    Over recent decades there has been and continues to be major advances in the imaging, diagnosis and potential treatment of medical conditions, by the use of magnetic nanoparticles. However, to date the majority of cell delivery studies employ a traditional 2D monolayer culture. This article aims to determine the ability of various sized magnetic nanoparticles to penetrate and travel through a cell seeded collagen gel model, in the presence or absence of a magnetic field. Three different sized (100, 200, and 500 nm) nanoparticles were employed in the study. The results showed cell viability was unaffected by the presence of nanoparticles over a 24-h test period. The initial uptake of the 100 nm nanoparticle into the collagen gel structure was superior compared to the larger sized nanoparticles under the influence of a magnetic field and incubated for 24 h. Interestingly, it was the 200 nm nanoparticles, which proved to penetrate the gel furthest, under the influence of a magnetic field, during the initial culture stage after 1-h incubation. PMID:25358626

  14. How Does Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Influence Glial Cells in the Central Nervous System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlie L Cullen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is widely used in the clinic, and while it has a direct effect on neuronal excitability, the beneficial effects experienced by patients are likely to include the indirect activation of other cell types. Research conducted over the past two decades has made it increasingly clear that a population of non-neuronal cells, collectively known as glia, respond to and facilitate neuronal signalling. Each glial cell type has the ability to respond to electrical activity directly or indirectly, making them likely cellular effectors of TMS. TMS has been shown to enhance adult neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation, but the effect on cell survival and differentiation is less certain. Furthermore there is limited information regarding the response of astrocytes and microglia to TMS, and a complete paucity of data relating to the response of oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to this treatment. However, due to the critical and yet multifaceted role of glial cells in the CNS, the influence that TMS has on glial cells is certainly an area that warrants careful examination.

  15. Shell matters: Magnetic targeting of SPIONs and in vitro effects on endothelial and monocytic cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszak, Jasmin; Dörfler, Philipp; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Lyer, Stefan; Dietel, Barbara; Alexiou, Christoph; Cicha, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are versatile and easily functionalized agents with high potential for diagnostic and therapeutic intravascular applications. In this study, we analyzed the responses of endothelial (ECs) and monocytic cells to three different types of SPIONs, in order to assess the influence of physico-chemical properties on the biological reactions to SPIONs. The following formulations were used: (1) Lauric acid-coated and BSA-stabilized SPION-1,(2) Lauric acid/BSA-coated SPION-2 and (3) dextran-coated SPION-3. SPION-1 were strongly internalized by ECs and reduced their viability in static conditions. Additionally, they had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on monocytic cell chemotaxis to MCP-1, but did not affect monocytic cell recruitment by ECs. SPION-2 uptake was less pronounced, both in ECs and monocytic cells, and these particles were better tolerated by the vascular cells. Not being internalized by endothelial or monocytic cells, SPION-3 did not induce relevant effects on cell viability, motility or endothelial-monocytic cell interactions.Taken together, localized accumulation of circulating SPION under physiologic-like flow conditions and their cellular uptake depends on the physicochemical characteristics. Our findings suggest that SPION-2 are suitable for magnetic targeting of atherosclerotic plaques. Due to their excellent biocompatibility and low internalization, SPION-3 may represent a suitable imaging agent for intravascular applications. PMID:26410877

  16. In vivo tracking of human neural stem cells with 19F magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Boehm-Sturm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a promising tool for monitoring stem cell-based therapy. Conventionally, cells loaded with ironoxide nanoparticles appear hypointense on MR images. However, the contrast generated by ironoxide labeled cells is neither specific due to ambiguous background nor quantitative. A strategy to overcome these drawbacks is (19F MRI of cells labeled with perfluorocarbons. We show here for the first time that human neural stem cells (NSCs, a promising candidate for clinical translation of stem cell-based therapy of the brain, can be labeled with (19F as well as detected and quantified in vitro and after brain implantation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human NSCs were labeled with perfluoropolyether (PFPE. Labeling efficacy was assessed with (19F MR spectroscopy, influence of the label on cell phenotypes studied by immunocytochemistry. For in vitro MRI, NSCs were suspended in gelatin at varying densities. For in vivo experiments, labeled NSCs were implanted into the striatum of mice. A decrease of cell viability was observed directly after incubation with PFPE, which re-normalized after 7 days in culture of the replated cells. No label-related changes in the numbers of Ki67, nestin, GFAP, or βIII-tubulin+ cells were detected, both in vitro and on histological sections. We found that 1,000 NSCs were needed to accumulate in one image voxel to generate significant signal-to-noise ratio in vitro. A detection limit of ∼10,000 cells was found in vivo. The location and density of human cells (hunu+ on histological sections correlated well with observations in the (19F MR images. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that NSCs can be efficiently labeled with (19F with little effects on viability or proliferation and differentiation capacity. We show for the first time that (19F MRI can be utilized for tracking human NSCs in brain implantation studies, which ultimately aim for restoring loss of function after

  17. High resolution in-operando microimaging of solar cells with pulsed electrically-detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Itai; Fehr, Matthias; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    The in-operando detection and high resolution spatial imaging of paramagnetic defects, impurities, and states becomes increasingly important for understanding loss mechanisms in solid-state electronic devices. Electron spin resonance (ESR), commonly employed for observing these species, cannot meet this challenge since it suffers from limited sensitivity and spatial resolution. An alternative and much more sensitive method, called electrically-detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), detects the species through their magnetic fingerprint, which can be traced in the device's electrical current. However, until now it could not obtain high resolution images in operating electronic devices. In this work, the first spatially-resolved electrically-detected magnetic resonance images (EDMRI) of paramagnetic states in an operating real-world electronic device are provided. The presented method is based on a novel microwave pulse sequence allowing for the coherent electrical detection of spin echoes in combination with powerful pulsed magnetic-field gradients. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on a device-grade 1-μm-thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell and an identical device that was degraded locally by an electron beam. The degraded areas with increased concentrations of paramagnetic defects lead to a local increase in recombination that is mapped by EDMRI with ∼20-μm-scale pixel resolution. The novel approach presented here can be widely used in the nondestructive in-operando three-dimensional characterization of solid-state electronic devices with a resolution potential of less than 100 nm.

  18. High resolution in-operando microimaging of solar cells with pulsed electrically-detected magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Itai; Fehr, Matthias; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    The in-operando detection and high resolution spatial imaging of paramagnetic defects, impurities, and states becomes increasingly important for understanding loss mechanisms in solid-state electronic devices. Electron spin resonance (ESR), commonly employed for observing these species, cannot meet this challenge since it suffers from limited sensitivity and spatial resolution. An alternative and much more sensitive method, called electrically-detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), detects the species through their magnetic fingerprint, which can be traced in the device's electrical current. However, until now it could not obtain high resolution images in operating electronic devices. In this work, the first spatially-resolved electrically-detected magnetic resonance images (EDMRI) of paramagnetic states in an operating real-world electronic device are provided. The presented method is based on a novel microwave pulse sequence allowing for the coherent electrical detection of spin echoes in combination with powerful pulsed magnetic-field gradients. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on a device-grade 1-μm-thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell and an identical device that was degraded locally by an electron beam. The degraded areas with increased concentrations of paramagnetic defects lead to a local increase in recombination that is mapped by EDMRI with ∼20-μm-scale pixel resolution. The novel approach presented here can be widely used in the nondestructive in-operando three-dimensional characterization of solid-state electronic devices with a resolution potential of less than 100 nm. PMID:25557860

  19. The effect of electric and magnetic fields on the operation of a photovoltaic cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erel, Serafettin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Letters, Kirikkale University, 71450 Yahsihan, Kirikkale (Turkey)

    2002-02-01

    In this work, we have investigated the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the operation of a CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} photovoltaic cell. Various electric field intensities changing from 0 to 35000V{sub dc}/m, were applied to the sample while it was irradiated by a He-Ne laser with a wavelength {lambda}=670nm. As a result, the typical values for the open circuit voltage of the photovoltaic cell significantly changed with various intensities of the electric field E{sub dc}. We also applied magnetic fields varying from 0.003 to 0.079T using a solenoid with an inductance of 10.55mH and the response of the sample was observed. In the third step of the experiment, instead of the laser beam, various intensities of white light of 50, 100,150 and also 250lux were utilised. 250lux was measured to be equivalent to the radiation power of He-Ne laser beam on the surface of the photovoltaic cell. The effect of electric fields from 0 up to 3x10{sup 5}V{sub dc} was applied and some significant experimental results were obtained. As a result of the illumination of the photovoltaic cell by the stimulated and spontaneous light emission sources under the effect of various intensities of electric field E{sub dc}, different electrical behaviours were observed.

  20. Effects of exposure to gradient magnetic fields emitted by nuclear magnetic resonance devices on clonogenic potential and proliferation of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Camisa, Vincenzo; Leone, Lucia; Pinto, Rosanna; Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Giorda, Ezio; Carsetti, Rita; Zaffina, Salvatore; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Teofili, Luciana; Grassi, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates effects of gradient magnetic fields (GMFs) emitted by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices on hematopoietic stem cells. Field measurements were performed to assess exposure to GMFs of staff working at 1.5 T and 3 T MRI units. Then an exposure system reproducing measured signals was realized to expose in vitro CD34+ cells to GMFs (1.5 T-protocol and 3 T-protocol). CD34+ cells were obtained by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting from six blood donors and three MRI-exposed workers. Blood donor CD34+ cells were exposed in vitro for 72 h to 1.5 T or 3 T-protocol and to sham procedure. Cells were then cultured and evaluated in colony forming unit (CFU)-assay up to 4 weeks after exposure. Results showed that in vitro GMF exposure did not affect cell proliferation but instead induced expansion of erythroid and monocytes progenitors soon after exposure and for the subsequent 3 weeks. No decrease of other clonogenic cell output (i.e., CFU-granulocyte/erythroid/macrophage/megakaryocyte and CFU-granulocyte/macrophage) was noticed, nor exposed CD34+ cells underwent the premature exhaustion of their clonogenic potential compared to sham-exposed controls. On the other hand, pilot experiments showed that CD34+ cells exposed in vivo to GMFs (i.e., samples from MRI workers) behaved in culture similarly to sham-exposed CD34+ cells, suggesting that other cells and/or microenvironment factors might prevent GMF effects on hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Accordingly, GMFs did not affect the clonogenic potential of umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells exposed in vitro together with the whole mononuclear cell fraction.

  1. Human induced pluripotent stem cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells exhibit great potential for generating functional human cells for medical therapies. In this paper, we report for use of human iPS cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) for targeted imaging and synergistic therapy of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Human iPS cells were prepared and cultured for 72 h. The culture medium was collected, and then was co-incubated with MGC803 cells. Cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells were prepared and injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice. The mouse model was observed using a small-animal imaging system. The nude mice were irradiated under an external alternating magnetic field and evaluated using an infrared thermal mapping instrument. Tumor sizes were measured weekly. iPS cells and the collected culture medium inhibited the growth of MGC803 cells. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells targeted and imaged gastric cancer cells in vivo, as well as inhibited cancer growth in vivo through the external magnetic field. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells exhibit considerable potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging and synergistic therapy for early gastric cancer

  2. Immunological identification of human T cells intracranially and tracing of neuronal projections by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the preparation and utilization of paramagnetically labelled proteins to trace neural projections in vivo, and to distinguish between human T cells and bovine T cells implanted into canine brain. The proteins are covalently coupled to the chelator (DTPA), then labelled with gadolinium and visualized in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Gadolinium labelled horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into the auditory cortex of adult cats (1-7 μ1 containing 50 μg HRP per μ1) and 48-72 hours later the brain was imaged by MRI. The HRP was labelled with an average of 20 DTPA per HRP. MRI unambiguously identified the HRP injection sites and the sites of neural projections in the medical geniculate body (MGB). MGB localization of HRP-Gd was confirmed histologically demonstrating that MRI can distinguish between paramagnetically labelled protein and local environment effects in the brain (i.e. gray vs white matter). Two monoclonal antibodies against human T cells were labelled with gadolinium. The distinguished by MRI, human from bovine T cells implanted into canine brains (each implant contained 10 million cells in 40 μ1). The T1 weighted and calculated images readily identified the human T cells as a lesion of <4 mm while the bovine T cells did not yield a significant MRI signal. The ratio of DTPA to protein during the coupling procedure, affects the formation of protein aggregates by crosslinking

  3. In-gas-cell laser spectroscopy for magnetic dipole moment of $^{199}$Pt toward $N=$ 126

    CERN Document Server

    Hirayama, Y; Watanabe, Y X; Jeong, S C; Jung, H S; Kakiguchi, Y; Kimura, S; Moon, J Y; Oyaizu, M; Park, J H; Schury, P; Wada, M; Miyatake, H

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic dipole moment and mean-square charge radius of $^{199}$Pt ($I^{\\pi}=$ 5/2$^-$) have been evaluated for the first time from the investigation of the hyperfine splitting of the $\\lambda_1=$ 248.792 nm transition by in-gas-cell laser ionization spectroscopy. Neutron-rich nucleus $^{199}$Pt was produced by multi-nucleon transfer reaction at the KISS where the nuclear spectroscopy in the vicinity of $N=$ 126 is planed from the aspect of an astrophysical interest as well as the nuclear structure. Measured magnetic dipole moment $+$0.63(13)$\\mu_{\\rm N}$ is consistent with the systematics of those of nuclei with $I^{\\pi}=$ 5/2$^-$. The deformation parameter $|^{1/2}|$ evaluated from the isotope shift indicates the gradual shape change to spherical shape of platinum isotopes with increasing neutron number toward $N=$ 126.

  4. Comparison of magnetic resonance angiography and conventional angiography in sickle cell disease: clinical significance and realibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandeel, A.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Mansoura Univ. Hospital (Egypt); Zimmerman, R.A. [Dept. of Radiology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohene-Frempong, K. [Div. of Hematology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and conventional angiograms of 21 patients with known sickle cell disease, who underwent a total of 50 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) studies. MRA and conventional angiography were assessed separately for evidence of stenosis or occulusion. Follow up MRI/MRA studies were also assessed for evidence of progression, regression or stability of the disease in these patients. In the carotid circulation, MRA made the correct diagnosis in 85% of the vessels evaluated with a sensitivity of 80.5% and a specificity of 94%. MRA was also found to show evidence of disease progression, more often than did MRI or the clinical condition of the patients. (orig.)

  5. Use of a SQUID array to detect T-cells with magnetic nanoparticles in determining transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Edward R. [Senior Scientific, 11109 Country Club NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)]. E-mail: seniorsci@nmia.com; Bryant, H.C. [Senior Scientific, 11109 Country Club NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bergemann, Christian [Chemicell GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Larson, Richard S. [Cancer Research and Treatment Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Lovato, Debbie [Cancer Research and Treatment Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Sergatskov, Dmitri A. [Senior Scientific, 11109 Country Club NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Acute rejection in organ transplant is signaled by the proliferation of T-cells that target and kill the donor cells requiring painful biopsies to detect rejection onset. An alternative non-invasive technique is proposed using a multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to detect T-cell lymphocytes in the transplanted organ labeled with magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specifically attached to lymphocytic ligand receptors. After a magnetic field pulse, the T-cells produce a decaying magnetic signal with a characteristic time of the order of a second. The extreme sensitivity of this technique, 10{sup 5} cells, can provide early warning of impending transplant rejection and monitor immune-suppressive chemotherapy.

  6. Use of a SQUID array to detect T-cells with magnetic nanoparticles in determining transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute rejection in organ transplant is signaled by the proliferation of T-cells that target and kill the donor cells requiring painful biopsies to detect rejection onset. An alternative non-invasive technique is proposed using a multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to detect T-cell lymphocytes in the transplanted organ labeled with magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specifically attached to lymphocytic ligand receptors. After a magnetic field pulse, the T-cells produce a decaying magnetic signal with a characteristic time of the order of a second. The extreme sensitivity of this technique, 105 cells, can provide early warning of impending transplant rejection and monitor immune-suppressive chemotherapy

  7. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood–brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood–brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  8. Design and experimental demonstration of low-power CMOS magnetic cell manipulation platform using charge recycling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Yoshida, Kohei; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We present the world’s first charge-recycling-based low-power technique of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) magnetic cell manipulation. CMOS magnetic cell manipulation associated with magnetic beads is a promissing tool for on-chip biomedical-analysis applications such as drug screening because CMOS can integrate control electronics and electro-chemical sensors. However, the conventional CMOS cell manipulation requires considerable power consumption. In this work, by concatenating multiple unit circuits and recycling electric charge among them, power consumption is reduced by a factor of the number of the concatenated unit circuits (1/N). For verifying the effectiveness, test chip was fabricated in a 0.6-µm CMOS. The chip successfully manipulates magnetic microbeads with achieving 49% power reduction (from 51 to 26.2 mW). Even considering the additional serial resistance of the concatenated inductors, nearly theoretical power reduction effect can be confirmed.

  9. Carbon-covered magnetic nanomaterials and their application for the thermolysis of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Yang Xu1, Meena Mahmood1, Ashley Fejleh1, Zhongrui Li1, Fumiya Watanabe1, Steve Trigwell2, Reginald B Little3, Vasyl P Kunets4, Enkeleda Dervishi1, Alexandru R Biris5, Gregory J Salamo4, Alexandru S Biris11Nanotechnology Center and Applied Science Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA; 2Applied Science and Technology, ASRC Aerospace, NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; 3Department of Chemistry, Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, NC, USA; 4Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 5National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj Napoca, RomaniaAbstract: Three types of graphitic shelled-magnetic core (Fe, Fe/Co, and Co nanoparticles (named as C-Fe, C-Fe/Co, and C-Co NPs were synthesized by radio frequency-catalytic chemical vapor deposition (RF-cCVD. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the cores inside the carbon shells of these NPs were preserved in their metallic states. Fluorescence microscopy images indicated effective penetrations of the NPs through the cellular membranes of cultured cancer HeLa cells, both inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Low RF radiation of 350 kHz induced localized heating of the magnetic NPs, which triggered cell death. Apoptosis inducement was found to be dependent on the RF irradiation time and NP concentration. It was showed that the Fe-C NPs had a much higher ability of killing the cancer cells (over 99% compared with the other types of NPs (C-Co or C-Fe/Co, even at a very low concentration of 0.83 μg/mL. The localized heating of NPs inside the cancer cells comes from the hysteresis heating and resistive heating through eddy currents generated under the RF radiation. The RF thermal ablation properties of the magnetic NPs were correlated with the analysis provided by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID.Keywords: graphitic shelled, magnetic

  10. Effect of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Tobacco BY-2 Cell Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles, electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases or imaging (contrast agents. Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis — total protein content, thiols — reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension

  11. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tobacco BY-2 cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-12-20

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis - total protein content, thiols - reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  12. Long-term MRI cell tracking after intraventricular delivery in a patient with global cerebral ischemia and prospects for magnetic navigation of stem cells within the CSF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Janowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the long-term clinical tracking of magnetically labeled stem cells after intracerebroventricular transplantation as well as to investigate in vitro feasibility for magnetic guidance of cell therapy within large fluid compartments. METHOD: After approval by our Institutional Review Board, an 18-month-old patient, diagnosed as being in a vegetative state due to global cerebral ischemia, underwent cell transplantation to the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle, with umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO contrast agent. The patient was followed over 33 months with clinical examinations and MRI. To evaluate the forces governing the distribution of cells within the fluid compartment of the ventricular system in vivo, a gravity-driven sedimentation assay and a magnetic field-driven cell attraction assay were developed in vitro. RESULTS: Twenty-four hours post-transplantation, MR imaging (MRI was able to detect hypointense cells in the occipital horn of the lateral ventricle. The signal gradually decreased over 4 months and became undetectable at 33 months. In vitro, no significant difference in cell sedimentation between SPIO-labeled and unlabeled cells was observed (p = NS. An external magnet was effective in attracting cells over distances comparable to the size of human lateral ventricles. CONCLUSIONS: MR imaging of SPIO-labeled cells allows monitoring of cells within lateral ventricles. While the initial biodistribution is governed by gravity-driven sedimentation, an external magnetic field may possibly be applied to further direct the distribution of labeled cells within large fluid compartments such as the ventricular system.

  13. Synthesis and Cell Imaging of a Near-Infrared Fluorescent Magnetic "CdHgTe-Dextran-Magnetic Layered Double Hydroxide-Fluorouracil" Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, XueQin; Zhang, Min; Gou, GuoJing; Ren, Jie

    2016-05-01

    In this article, a water-soluble near-infrared quantum dots of CdHgTe were prepared and subsequently combined with the drug delivery system "dextran-magnetic layered double hydroxide-fluorouracil" (DMF) to build a new nanostructure platform in form of CdHgTe@DMF, in which the fluorescent probe function of quantum dots and the magnetic targeting transport and slow-release curative effect of DMF were blended availably together. The luminescent property particle size, and internal structure of the composite were characterized using fluorescence spectrophotometer, ultraviolet spectrophotometer, laser particle size distribution, TEM, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared. The experimental study on fluorescent tags effect and magnetic targeting performance of the multifunctional platform were performed by fluorescent confocal imaging. The results showed that the CdHgTe could be grafted successfully onto the surface of DMF by electrostatic coupling. The CdHgTe@DMF composite showed super-paramagnetic and photoluminescence property in the near-infrared wavelength range of 575-780 nm. Compared with CdHgTe, the CdHgTe@DMF composite could significantly improve the cell imaging effect, the label intensity increased with the magnetic field intensity, and obeyed the linear relationship Dmean = 1.758 + 0.0075M under the conditions of magnetic field interference. It can be implied that the CdHgTe@DMF may be an effective multifunction tool applying to optical bioimaging and magnetic targeted therapy.

  14. Magnetic immobilization of Bacillus subtilis natto cells for menaquinone-7 fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Varma, Vikas; Yang, Shuyi; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Production of menaquinone-7 (MK-7) by Bacillus subtilis natto is associated with major drawbacks. To address the current challenges in MK-7 fermentation, studying the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the bacterial cells can open up a new domain for intensified bioprocesses. This article introduces the new concept of application of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) as a pioneer tool for MK-7 process intensification. In this order, IONs with the average size of 11 nm were successfully fabricated and characterized for possible in situ removal of target substances from the fermentation media. The prepared particles were used for decoration and immobilization of B. subtilis natto cells. Presence of iron oxide nanoparticles significantly enhanced the MK-7 specific yield (15 %) as compared to the control samples. In addition, fabricated IONs showed a promising ability for in situ recovery of bacterial cells from the fermentation media with more than 95 % capture efficiency. Based on the results, IONs can be implemented successfully as a novel tool for MK-7 production. This study provides a considerable interest for industrial application of magnetic nanoparticles and their future role in designing an intensified biological process.

  15. Electroporation of cells using EM induction of ac fields by a magnetic stimulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C; Robinson, M P [Department of Electronics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Evans, J A [Academic Unit of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Smye, S W [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds Teaching Hospitals, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); O' Toole, P [Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-21

    This paper describes a method of effectively electroporating mammalian cell membranes with pulsed alternating-current (ac) electric fields at field strengths of 30-160 kV m{sup -1}. Although many in vivo electroporation protocols entail applying square wave or monotonically decreasing pulses via needles or electrode plates, relatively few have explored the use of pulsed ac fields. Following our previous study, which established the effectiveness of ac fields for electroporating cell membranes, a primary/secondary coil system was constructed to produce sufficiently strong electric fields by electromagnetic induction. The primary coil was formed from the applicator of an established transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) system, while the secondary coil was a purpose-built device of a design which could eventually be implanted into tissue. The effects of field strength, pulse interval and cumulative exposure time were investigated using microscopy and flow cytometry. Results from experiments on concentrated cell suspensions showed an optimized electroporation efficiency of around 50%, demonstrating that electroporation can be practicably achieved by inducing such pulsed ac fields. This finding confirms the possibility of a wide range of in vivo applications based on magnetically coupled ac electroporation.

  16. Quadrupole Magnet Error Sensitivities for FODO-Cell and Triplet Lattices in the LCLS Undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The error sensitivities of quadrupole magnets in the LCLS FEL undulator are compared for a FODO-cell lattice and for a triplet lattice. The comparisons are made at a radiation wavelength of 1.5 (angstrom), where electron-to-photon phase errors are very sensitive to small trajectory variations in misaligned quadrupoles between the undulator sections. The results show that the triplet lattice is extremely sensitive, with triplet pitch and yaw alignment tolerances of ∼100 (micro)rad. The FODO-cell lattice, with its shorter, weaker quadrupoles is much more error tolerant with pitch and yaw tolerances of ∼2.5 mrad. Several other magnet errors are examined and categorized as trajectory, phase slip, and beam size effects. In nearly all cases, the FODO-cell lattice is much less sensitive with technologically achievable tolerance levels, while the triplet lattice tolerances are, in many cases, near achievable limits and may not be sustainable over the long term. Table 2 presents a brief tolerance comparison for the two lattice types

  17. Magnetic Force Nanoprobe for Direct Observation of Audio Frequency Tonotopy of Hair Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Ma, Ji-Hyun; Chung, Eunna; Choi, Hongsuh; Bok, Jinwoong; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2016-06-01

    Sound perception via mechano-sensation is a remarkably sensitive and fast transmission process, converting sound as a mechanical input to neural signals in a living organism. Although knowledge of auditory hair cell functions has advanced over the past decades, challenges remain in understanding their biomechanics, partly because of their biophysical complexity and the lack of appropriate probing tools. Most current studies of hair cells have been conducted in a relatively low-frequency range (perception of 20 kHz or higher. Here, we demonstrate that the magnetic force nanoprobe (MFN) has superb spatiotemporal capabilities to mechanically stimulate spatially-targeted individual hair cells with a temporal resolution of up to 9 μs, which is equivalent to approximately 50 kHz; therefore, it is possible to investigate avian hair cell biomechanics at different tonotopic regions of the cochlea covering a full hearing frequency range of 50 to 5000 Hz. We found that the variation of the stimulation frequency and amplitude of hair bundles creates distinct mechanical responsive features along the tonotopic axis, where the kinetics of the hair bundle recovery motion exhibits unique frequency-dependent characteristics: basal, middle, and apical hair bundles can effectively respond at their respective ranges of frequency. We revealed that such recovery kinetics possesses two different time constants that are closely related to the passive and active motilities of hair cells. The use of MFN is critical for the kinetics study of free-standing hair cells in a spatiotemporally distinct tonotopic organization. PMID:27215487

  18. Cellular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Imaging of Melanoma Cells in Lymph Nodes of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula J Foster

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is responsible for most deaths due to malignant melanoma. The clinical significance of micrometastases in the lymph is a hotly debated topic, but an improved understanding of the lymphatic spread of cancer remains important for improving cancer survival. Cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a newly emerging field of imaging research that is expected to have a large impact on cancer research. In this study, we demonstrate the cellular MRI technology required to reliably image the lymphatic system in mice and to detect iron-labeled metastatic melanoma cells within the mouse lymph nodes. Melanoma cells were implanted directly into the inguinal lymph nodes in mice, and micro-MRI was performed using a customized 1.5-T clinical MRI system. We show cell detection of as few as 100 iron-labeled cells within the lymph node, with injections of larger cell numbers producing increasingly obvious regions of signal void. In addition, we show that cellular MRI allows monitoring of the fate of these cells over time as they develop into intranodal tumors. This technology will allow noninvasive investigations of cellular events in cancer metastasis within an entire animal and will facilitate progress in understanding the mechanisms of metastasis within the lymphatic system.

  19. Application of magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring stem cell transplantation for the treatment of cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianglin Zhang; Gang Wang; Furen Dong; Zhiming Wang

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends in the application of MRI for monitoring stem cell transplantation using a bibliometric analysis of Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies relating to the application of MRI for detecting stem cell transplantation for the treatment of cerebral ischemia using papers in Web of Science published from 2002 to 2011. SELECTION CRITERIA: The inclusion criteria were: (a) peer-reviewed articles on the application of MRI for detecting transplanted stem cells published and indexed in Web of Science; (b) year of publication between 2002 and 2011. Exclusion criteria were: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) some corrected papers.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to journals; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) distribution according to country; (5) top cited authors over the last 10 years.RESULTS: A total of 1 498 studies related to the application of MRI for monitoring stem cell transplantation appeared in Web of Science from 2002 to 2011, almost half of which were derived from American authors and institutes. The number of studies on the application of MRI for detecting stem cell transplantation has gradually increased over the past 10 years. Most papers on this topic appeared in Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. CONCLUSION: This analysis suggests that few experimental studies have been investigated the use of MRI for tracking SPIO-labeled human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells during the treatment of cerebral ischemia.

  20. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy unambiguously identifies different neural cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urenjak, J; Williams, S R; Gadian, D G; Noble, M

    1993-03-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique that can provide information on a wide range of metabolites. Marked abnormalities of 1H NMR brain spectra have been reported in patients with neurological disorders, but their neurochemical implications may be difficult to appreciate because NMR data are obtained from heterogeneous tissue regions composed of several cell populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the 1H NMR profile of major neural cell types. This information may be helpful in understanding the metabolic abnormalities detected by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Extracts of cultured cerebellar granule neurons, cortical astrocytes, oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A) progenitor cells, oligodendrocytes, and meningeal cells were analyzed. The purity of the cultured cells was > 95% with all the cell lineages, except for neurons (approximately 90%). Although several constituents (creatine, choline-containing compounds, lactate, acetate, succinate, alanine, glutamate) were ubiquitously detectable with 1H NMR, each cell type had distinctive qualitative and/or quantitative features. Our most unexpected finding was a large amount of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) in O-2A progenitors. This compound, consistently detected by 1H NMR in vivo, was previously thought to ne present only in neurons. The finding that meningeal cells have an alanine:creatine ratio three to four times higher than astrocytes, neurons, or oligodendrocytes is in agreement with observations that meningiomas express a higher alanine:creatine ratio than gliomas. The data suggest that each individual cell type has a characteristic metabolic pattern that can be discriminated by 1H NMR, even by looking at only a few metabolites (e.g., NAA, glycine, beta-hydroxybutyrate).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8441018

  1. The effect of magnetic field during freezing and thawing of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, H; Kaku, M; Kojima, S-I; Sumi, H; Kojima, S-T; Yamamoto, T; Yashima, Y; Kawata, T; Tanne, K; Tanimoto, K

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies showed that a programmed freezer with magnetic field can maintain a high survival rate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influences of magnetic field during freezing and thawing on the survival of MSCs isolated from rat bone marrow. The cells were frozen by a normal programmed freezer or a programmed freezer with magnetic field (CAS-LAB1) and cryopreserved for 7 days at -150 °C. Then, the cells were thawed in the presence or absence of magnetic field. Immediately after thawing, the number of surviving or viable cells was counted. The cell proliferation was examined after 1-week culture. Cryopreserved MSCs which were frozen by a normal freezer or a CAS freezer were transplanted into bone defects artificially made in calvaria of 4-week-old rats. Non-cryopreserved MSCs were used as a control. The rats were sacrificed at 8, 16, or 24 weeks after transplantation and the bone regeneration area was measured. Proliferation rates of MSCs after 1 week were significantly higher in the CAS-freezing-thawing group than in the CAS-freezing group. The extent of new bone formation in the CAS-freezing-thawing group tended to be larger than in CAS-freezing group 24 weeks after transplantation. These results suggest that a magnetic field enhances cell survival during thawing as well as freezing. PMID:27346603

  2. Human induced pluripotent stem cells labeled with lfuorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy for gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Li; Wei-Lin Jin; Da-Xiang Cui; Jing Ruan; Meng Yang; Fei Pan; Guo Gao; Su Qu; You-Lan Shen; Yong-Jun Dang; Kan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells exhibit great potential for generating functional human cells for medical therapies. In this paper, we report for use of human iPS cells labeled with lfuorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) for targeted imaging and synergistic therapy of gastric cancer cellsin vivo. Methods: Human iPS cells were prepared and cultured for 72 h. The culture medium was collected, and then was co-incubated with MGC803 cells. Cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells were prepared and injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice. hTe mouse model was observed using a small-animal imaging system. hTe nude mice were irradiated under an external alternating magnetic ifeld and evaluated using an infrared thermal mapping instrument. Tumor sizes were measured weekly. Results: iPS cells and the collected culture medium inhibited the growth of MGC803 cells. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells targeted and imaged gastric cancer cellsin vivo, as well as inhibited cancer growthin vivo through the external magnetic ifeld. Conclusion: FMNP-labeled human iPS cells exhibit considerable potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging and synergistic therapy for early gastric cancer.

  3. Early effects of radiotherapy in small cell lung cancer xenografts monitored by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, E J; Quistorff, B;

    1990-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) and biochemical analysis of extracts were applied to study the metabolic response to X-irradiation of small cell lung cancer in nude mice. Two small cell lung cancer xenografts, CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, with different radiosensitivity, although derived...

  4. Improved and targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with magnetic layer-by-layer assembled microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Anton M.; Gabriel, Samantha A.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.; Gould, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of cell biology and the recognition of an increasing repertoire of druggable intracellular therapeutic targets, there remain a limited number of approaches to deliver bioactive molecules to cells and even fewer that enable targeted delivery. Layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules are assembled using alternate layers of oppositely charged molecules and are potential cell delivery vehicles for applications in nanomedicine. There are a wide variety of charged molecules that can be included in the microcapsule structure including metal nanoparticles that introduce physical attributes. Delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with LbL microcapsules has recently been demonstrated, so in this study we explore the delivery of bioactive molecules (luciferase enzyme and plasmid DNA) to cells using biodegradable microcapsules containing a layer of magnetite nanoparticles. Interestingly, significantly improved intracellular luciferase enzyme activity (25 fold) and increased transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (3.4 fold) was observed with magnetic microcapsules. The use of a neodymium magnet enabled efficient targeting of magnetic microcapsules which further improved the delivery efficiency of the cargoes as a consequence of increased microcapsule concentration at the magnetic site. Microcapsules were well tolerated by cells in these experiments and only displayed signs of toxicity at a capsule : cell ratio of 100 : 1 and with extended exposure. These studies illustrate how multi-functionalization of LbL microcapsules can improve and target delivery of bioactive molecules to cells.

  5. The Effect of 217 Hz Magnetic Field of Cell Phone with Different Intensities on Apoptosis of Normal and Cancerous Cells Treated with Chemotherapy Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Mansourian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the increasing development of home and business electronic equipment in today's world, the biological effects of ELF magnetic fields have been studied at two molecular-cellular and animal- human levels. Considering the therapeutic viewpoint of this study regarding the effects of low-frequency fields of mobile phone, the effect of acute exposure to this field on chemotherapy will be studied.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, based on measurement of the intensity of the magnetic fields from mobile phones in another research, flux densities of magnetic field of 159.44, 93.25 and 120µ tesla with frequency of 217Hz was generated in magnetic field generator system, and the apoptosis level in K562 cancer cells and healthy cells of lymphocytes was assessed after exposure to field using flow cytometry method. This evaluation method was also performed for the cells treated with bleomycin after exposure to this field.Results: 217 Hz magnetic field exposure significantly increases the rate of apoptosis percentage (p > 0.05 in K562 cancer cells and in two intensities of 120 and 159.44µ tesla compared to the control group, but such effect is not observed in lymphocyte cells. Bleomycin-induced apoptosis percentage following exposure to the mentioned magnetic field shows no significant difference compared to the group of treatment with drug and without field exposure. This lack of significant difference is observed between the groups of drug after field exposure and field alone as well as between groups exposed to field and groups treated with bleomycin.Conclusion: Study results showed that 217 Hz magnetic field of mobile phone can induce apoptosis on cancer cells, but it has no effect on healthy cells. Thus, in order to use mobile phone as an effective factor in their treatment, some studies should be conducted at animal-human level.

  6. Magnetic field effects on mitochondrion-activity-related optical properties in slime mold and bone forming cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukawa, Yuri; Iwasaka, Masakazu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a cellular level response of Cyto-aa3 oxidation was investigated in real time under both time-varying and strong static magnetic fields of 5 T. Two kinds of cells, a slime mold, Physarum polycephalum, and bone forming cells, MC-3T3-E1, were used for the experiments. The oxidation level of the Cyto-aa3 was calculated by optical absorptions at 690 nm, 780 nm and 830 nm. The sample, fiber-optics and an additional optical fiber for light stimulation were set in a solenoidal coil or the bore of a 5-T superconducting magnet. The solenoidal coil for time-varying magnetic fields produced sinusoidal magnetic fields of 6 mT. The slime mold showed a periodic change in Cyto-aa3 oxidation, and the oxidation-reduction cycle of Cyto-aa3 was apparently changed when visible-light irradiated the slime mold. Similarly to the case with light, time-varying magnetic stimulations changed the oxidation-reduction cycle during and after the stimulation for 10 minutes. The same phenomena were observed in the MC-3T3-E1 cell assembly, although their cycle rhythm was comparatively random. Finally, magnetic field exposure of up to 5 T exhibited a distinct suppression of Cyto-aa3 oscillation in the bone forming cells. Exposure up to 5 T was repeated five times, and the change in Cyto-aa3 oxidation reproducibly occurred. PMID:24109969

  7. Magnetic engineering of stable rod-shaped stem cell aggregates: circumventing the pitfall of self-bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, V; Fayol, D; Reffay, M; Luciani, N; Bacri, J-C; Gay, C; Wilhelm, C

    2015-02-01

    A current challenge for tissue engineering while restoring the function of diseased or damaged tissue is to customize the tissue according to the target area. Scaffold-free approaches usually yield spheroid shapes with the risk of necrosis at the center due to poor nutrient and oxygen diffusion. Here, we used magnetic forces developed at the cellular scale by miniaturized magnets to create rod-shaped aggregates of stem cells that subsequently matured into a tissue-like structure. However, during the maturation process, the tissue-rods spontaneously bent and coiled into sphere-like structures, triggered by the increasing cell-cell adhesion within the initially non-homogeneous tissue. Optimisation of the intra-tissular magnetic forces successfully hindered the transition, in order to produce stable rod-shaped stem cells aggregates. PMID:25580701

  8. Physics of a magnetic barrier in low-temperature bounded plasmas: insight from particle-in-cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of magnetic fields is quite common in low-pressure, low-temperature, gas-discharge devices for industrial applications. However, transport in such devices is still not very well clarified, mainly due to the presence of walls playing a crucial role and to the variety of configurations studied. The latter often obstruct the underlying basic physical phenomena and make the different studies valid only for very specific configurations. This work presents a numerical study of particle transport in low-pressure (0.3 Pa) plasmas across a localized transverse magnetic field (magnetic barrier) by means of the 2D3V particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collisions method. The problem is treated as generally as possible while trying to reveal the basic physics, using very simplified chemistry and considering a simple rectangular configuration. The conditions chosen for the magnetic field are common to many applications—magnetized electrons and almost unmagnetized ions. Two basic configurations with different magnetic field directions are analyzed in detail: magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation plane and along the simulation plane. An extensive parametric study is carried out in order to obtain the main trends and scaling laws for particle transport with respect to different parameters: plasma density, magnetic barrier size and magnetic field magnitude. The total current of electrons crossing the barrier is found to scale linearly with the plasma density, which extends the validity of the obtained results to a wide range of plasma density values. (paper)

  9. Proteomic signature of Arabidopsis cell cultures exposed to magnetically induced hyper- and microgravity environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Raul; Manzano, Ana I; van Loon, Jack J W A; Christianen, Peter C M; Medina, F Javier

    2013-03-01

    Earth-based microgravity simulation techniques are required due to space research constraints. Using diamagnetic levitation, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana in vitro callus cultures to environments with different levels of effective gravity and magnetic field strengths (B) simultaneously. The environments included simulated 0 g* at B=10.1 T, an internal 1 g* control (B=16.5 T), and hypergravity (2 g* at B=10.1 T). Furthermore, samples were also exposed to altered gravity environments that were created with mechanical devices, such as the Random Positioning Machine (simulated μg) and the Large Diameter Centrifuge (2 g). We have determined the proteomic signature of cell cultures exposed to these altered-gravity environments by means of the difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) technique, and we have compared the results with microarray-based transcriptomes from the same samples. The magnetic field itself produced a low number of proteomic alterations, but the combination of gravitational alteration and magnetic field exposure produced synergistic effects on the proteome of plants (the number of significant changes is 3-7 times greater). Tandem mass spectrometry identification of 19 overlapping spots in the different conditions corroborates a major role of abiotic stress and secondary metabolism proteins in the molecular adaptation of plants to unusual environments, including microgravity.

  10. Effect of static magnetic field on electricity production and wastewater treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qinqin; Zhou, Shaoqi

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a magnetic field (MF) on electricity production and wastewater treatment in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. Electricity production capacity could be improved by the application of a low-intensity static MF. When a MF of 50 mT was applied to MFCs, the maximum voltage, total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency increased from 523 ± 2 to 553 ± 2 mV, ∼93 to ∼96 %, and ∼80 to >90 %, respectively, while the start-up time and coulombic efficiency decreased from 16 to 10 days and ∼50 to ∼43 %, respectively. The MF effects were immediate, reversible, and not long lasting, and negative effects on electricity generation and COD removal seemed to occur after the MF was removed. The start-up and voltage output were less affected by the MF direction. Nitrogen compounds in magnetic MFCs were nitrified more thoroughly; furthermore, a higher proportion of electrochemically inactive microorganisms were found in magnetic systems. TP was effectively removed by the co-effects of microbe absorption and chemical precipitation. Chemical precipitates were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope capable of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to be a mixture of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl compounds.

  11. Discernment of Possible Organic Magnetic Field Effect Mechanisms Using Polymer Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, R.; Subedi, R. C.; Liang, S.; Nguyen, T. D.

    2014-07-01

    We report studies of magnetic field effect (MFE) in polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLEC) using the "super-yellow" poly-(phenylene vynilene) (SY-PPV) polymer in vertical and planar device configurations. The purpose is to discern the existing MFE mechanisms in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) where the current and electroluminescence are strongly modulated by a small applied magnetic field. In particular, we investigate the mutual relationship between magneto-conductance (MC) and magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) by studying the role of polaron density dissociated from polaron pairs (PP) on these magnetic responses. In general, the dissociated polaron density is determined by the PP dissociation rate and the PP density. For the planar PLEC, which possesses a small dissociation rate, we observe small and negative MC at all applied voltages regardless of the emission intensity, while MEL becomes positive when electroluminescence quantum efficiency increases. The MC has a much narrower width than the MEL, indicating that the MC and MEL do not share a common origin. However, MC reverses and has the same width as MEL when the device is exposed to a threshold laser power. For the vertical PLEC, characterized by a large dissociation rate, MC and MEL are positive and have the same width. We discuss the results using the existing MFE mechanism in OLEDs. We show that the PP model can explain the positive MEL and MC, while the negative MC can be explained by the bipolaron model. Finally, we present a possibility to complete an all-organic PLEC magnetic sensor by using an inkjet printer.

  12. A sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance study of structural and organisational changes in the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Tunnah, S K

    2000-01-01

    Increasing importance is being placed on understanding the role of membrane lipids in many different areas of biochemistry. It is of interest to determine what interactions may occur between membrane lipids and drug species. Furthermore, an increasing body of evidence suggests that membrane lipids are involved in the pathology of numerous diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and HIV. Clearly, the more information available on the mechanisms involved in diseases, the greater the potential for identifying a cure or even a prevention. sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the alterations in membrane lipid organisation and structure in intact, viable cultured cells. Changes in the sup 1 H NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation measurements of the human K562 and the rat FRTL-5 cell lines were observed on the addition of the fatty acid species: triolein, evening primrose oil, arachidonic acid and ITF 1779. Results indicate that the membrane lipids are reorganised to a...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of thickened pituitary stalk proceeding to langerhans cell histiocytosis in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging has shown isolated pituitary stalk thickening in certain cases of idiopathic or secondary central diabetes insipidus (Dl) due to infiltrative processes. We present a 4-year-old boy who was initially diagnosed as having central Dl. The MRI showed isolated pituitary stalk thickening with prominent homogeneous contrast enhancement. The remaining findings on MRI were within normal limits. The patient's personal and family history and laboratory and clinical findings were unremarkable; therefore, he was initially diagnosed as having idiopathic Dl. Since central Dl and isolated pituitary stalk thickening may be considered to be the first manifestations of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, we decided to follow up the patient. After 5 months, following the initial diagnosis, on skeletal X-ray survey, the patient did indeed develop multiple lytic skull lesions which, on biopsy, were histologically typical bone lesions of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Copyright (2006) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. In vivo MR tracking of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells in rat liver after intrasplenic transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging system to depict and track in vivo of magnetically labeled bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in rat liver after intrasplenic transplantation. Methods: Rat BMSCs were isolated, purified, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe2O3-PLL. Prussian blue stain was performed for showing intracellular irons. Acute liver damage was induced by subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride in 12 recipient rats. The cells allotransplantation was performed by intrasplenic injection with magnetically labeled (experimental group, n=6) or unlabeled BMSCs (control group, n=6). Serial MRI were performed before and 3 hours, 3, 7, 14 days after transplantation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of liver on T2*-weighted MR imaging obtained before and after injection were measured and compared. MR imaging findings were compared histologically with histology. Results: Rats BMSCs could be effectively labeled and the labeling efficiency was almost 100%. Iron-containing intracytoplasmatic vesicles could be observed clearly with prussian blue staining. SNR of rat livers in experimental group and control group before and 3 hours, 3, 7, 14 days after transplantation were 19.53±2.30, 3.28±1.06, 7.34±2.10, 10.25±3.96, 15.50±3.73; 20.20±4.35, 21.20±4.43, 19.13±2.80, 21.43±5.45, 19.07±4.80, respectively. SNR decreased significantly in the experimental group liver 3 hours, 3, 7 days after injection of BMSCs (Dunnett test, P0.05). In control group, SNR demonstrated no significant differences among different time points (ANOVA, P>0.05). Results of histological analysis confirmed homing of labeled BMSCs in liver, primarily distributing in areas around centrolobular vein. Conclusion: The BMSCs can be effectively labeled with Fe2O3-PLL. 1.5-T MR imaging can monitor in vivo of magnetically labeled BMSCs in liver after intrasplenic transplantation. It potentially opens a new area of investigation for delivering stem cells

  15. Prenatal diagnosis from maternal blood: simultaneous immunophenotyping and FISH of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated by negative magnetic cell sorting.

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Y.L.; Carter, N. P.; Price, C M; Colman, S. M.; Milton, P J; Hackett, G A; Greaves, M F; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    1993-01-01

    Fetal nucleated cells in the maternal circulation constitute a potential source of cells for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal genetic abnormalities. We have investigated the use of the Magnetic Activated Cell Sorter (MACS) for enriching fetal nucleated erythrocytes. Mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for CD45 and CD32 were used to deplete leucocytes from maternal blood using MACS sorting, thus enriching for fetal nucleated erythrocytes which do not express either of these antige...

  16. Critical analysis of data concerning Saccharomyces cerevisiae free-cell proliferations and fermentations assisted by magnetic and electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hristov, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    The review analyses studies on magnetically assisted proliferations and batch fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. The results available in the literature are contradictory and show two tendencies: magnetic field suppression of the cell growth and positive effects in batch fermentation with increasing both biomass and metabolite production. The amount of data analyzed allows several concepts existing in the literature to be outlined and critically commented. Further, a new concept of magnetically induced micro-dynamos, recently conceived, is developed towards a unified explanation of the results provided by proliferation and batch fermentation experiments

  17. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and staining of cancer cells using ferrimagnetic H-ferritin nanoparticles with increasing core size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Y

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yao Cai,1–3 Changqian Cao,1,2 Xiaoqing He,1 Caiyun Yang,1–3 Lanxiang Tian,1,2 Rixiang Zhu,2 Yongxin Pan1,21France–China Bio-Mineralization and Nano-Structures Laboratory, 2Paleomagnetism and Geochronology Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Earth and Planetary Physics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of ChinaPurpose: This study is to demonstrate the nanoscale size effect of ferrimagnetic H-ferritin (M-HFn nanoparticles on magnetic properties, relaxivity, enzyme mimetic activities, and application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and immunohistochemical staining of cancer cells.Materials and methods: M-HFn nanoparticles with different sizes of magnetite cores in the range of 2.7–5.3 nm were synthesized through loading different amounts of iron into recombinant human H chain ferritin (HFn shells. Core size, crystallinity, and magnetic properties of those M-HFn nanoparticles were analyzed by transmission electron microscope and low-temperature magnetic measurements. The MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were incubated with synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles for 24 hours in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium. In vitro MRI of cell pellets after M-HFn labeling was performed at 7 T. Iron uptake of cells was analyzed by Prussian blue staining and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemical staining by using the peroxidase-like activity of M-HFn nanoparticles was carried out on MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue paraffin sections.Results: The saturation magnetization (Ms, relaxivity, and peroxidase-like activity of synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles were monotonously increased with the size of ferrimagnetic cores. The M-HFn nanoparticles with the largest core size of 5.3 nm exhibit the strongest saturation magnetization, the highest peroxidase activity in immunohistochemical staining, and the highest r2 of 321 mM-1 s-1, allowing to

  18. Trapping and dynamic manipulation of polystyrene beads mimicking circulating tumor cells using targeted magnetic/photoacoustic contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Results on magnetically trapping and manipulating micro-scale beads circulating in a flow field mimicking metastatic cancer cells in human peripheral vessels are presented. Composite contrast agents combining magneto-sensitive nanospheres and highly optical absorptive gold nanorods were conjugated to micro-scale polystyrene beads. To efficiently trap the targeted objects in a fast stream, a dual magnet system consisting of two flat magnets to magnetize (polarize) the contrast agent and an array of cone magnets producing a sharp gradient field to trap the magnetized contrast agent was designed and constructed. A water-ink solution with an optical absorption coefficient of 10  cm−1 was used to mimic the optical absorption of blood. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging helped visualize bead trapping, dynamic manipulation of trapped beads in a flow field, and the subtraction of stationary background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results show that trafficking micro-scale objects can be effectively trapped in a stream with a flow rate up to 12  ml/min and the background can be significantly (greater than 15 dB) suppressed. It makes the proposed method very promising for sensitive detection of rare circulating tumor cells within high flow vessels with a highly absorptive optical background. PMID:23223993

  19. Trapping and dynamic manipulation of polystyrene beads mimicking circulating tumor cells using targeted magnetic/photoacoustic contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Results on magnetically trapping and manipulating micro-scale beads circulating in a flow field mimicking metastatic cancer cells in human peripheral vessels are presented. Composite contrast agents combining magneto-sensitive nanospheres and highly optical absorptive gold nanorods were conjugated to micro-scale polystyrene beads. To efficiently trap the targeted objects in a fast stream, a dual magnet system consisting of two flat magnets to magnetize (polarize) the contrast agent and an array of cone magnets producing a sharp gradient field to trap the magnetized contrast agent was designed and constructed. A water-ink solution with an optical absorption coefficient of 10 cm-1 was used to mimic the optical absorption of blood. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging helped visualize bead trapping, dynamic manipulation of trapped beads in a flow field, and the subtraction of stationary background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results show that trafficking micro-scale objects can be effectively trapped in a stream with a flow rate up to 12 ml/min and the background can be significantly (greater than 15 dB) suppressed. It makes the proposed method very promising for sensitive detection of rare circulating tumor cells within high flow vessels with a highly absorptive optical background.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of single co-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells after intracardial injection in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Peldschus, K. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Wicklein, D.; Schumacher, U. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. of Anatomy II: Experimental Morphology; Didie, M. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Pharmacology; Lange, C. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Bone Marrow Transplantation

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish co-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the detection of single MSC in-vivo by MRI and histological validation. Materials and Methods: Mouse MSC were co-labeled with fluorescent iron oxide micro-particles and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE). The cellular iron content was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Cell proliferation and expression of characteristic surface markers were determined by flow cytometry. The chondrogenic differentiation capacity was assessed. Different amounts of cells (n1 = 5000, n2 = 15 000, n3 = 50 000) were injected into the left heart ventricle of 12 mice. The animals underwent sequential MRI on a clinical 3.0T scanner (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands). For histological validation cryosections were examined by fluorescent microscopy. Results: Magnetic and fluorescent labeling of MSC was established (mean cellular iron content 23.6 ± 3 pg). Flow cytometry showed similar cell proliferation and receptor expression of labeled and unlabeled MSC. Chondrogenic differentiation of labeled MSC was verified. After cell injection MRI revealed multiple signal voids in the brain and fewer signal voids in the kidneys. In the brain, an average of 4.6 ± 1.2 (n1), 9.0 ± 3.6 (n2) and 25.0 ± 1.0 (n3) signal voids were detected per MRI slice. An average of 8.7 ± 3.1 (n1), 22.0 ± 6.1 (n2) and 89.8 ± 6.5 (n3) labeled cells per corresponding stack of adjacent cryosections could be detected in the brain. Statistical correlation of the numbers of MRI signal voids in the brain and single MSC found by histology revealed a correlation coefficient of r = 0.91. Conclusion: The study demonstrates efficient magnetic and fluorescent co-labeling of MSC and their detection on a single cell level in mice by in-vivo MRI and histology. The described techniques may broaden the methods for in-vivo tracking of MSC. (orig.)

  1. Quantitative Magnetic Particle Imaging Monitors the Transplantation, Biodistribution, and Clearance of Stem Cells In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bo; von See, Marc P; Yu, Elaine; Gunel, Beliz; Lu, Kuan; Vazin, Tandis; Schaffer, David V; Goodwill, Patrick W; Conolly, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapies have enormous potential for treating many debilitating diseases, including heart failure, stroke and traumatic brain injury. For maximal efficacy, these therapies require targeted cell delivery to specific tissues followed by successful cell engraftment. However, targeted delivery remains an open challenge. As one example, it is common for intravenous deliveries of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to become entrapped in lung microvasculature instead of the target tissue. Hence, a robust, quantitative imaging method would be essential for developing efficacious cell therapies. Here we show that Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), a novel technique that directly images iron-oxide nanoparticle-tagged cells, can longitudinally monitor and quantify MSC administration in vivo. MPI offers near-ideal image contrast, depth penetration, and robustness; these properties make MPI both ultra-sensitive and linearly quantitative. Here, we imaged, for the first time, the dynamic trafficking of intravenous MSC administrations using MPI. Our results indicate that labeled MSC injections are immediately entrapped in lung tissue and then clear to the liver within one day, whereas standard iron oxide particle (Resovist) injections are immediately taken up by liver and spleen. Longitudinal MPI-CT imaging also indicated a clearance half-life of MSC iron oxide labels in the liver at 4.6 days. Finally, our ex vivo MPI biodistribution measurements of iron in liver, spleen, heart, and lungs after injection showed excellent agreement (R(2) = 0.943) with measurements from induction coupled plasma spectrometry. These results demonstrate that MPI offers strong utility for noninvasively imaging and quantifying the systemic distribution of cell therapies and other therapeutic agents. PMID:26909106

  2. Effects of ELF magnetic fields on protein expression profile of human breast cancer cell MCF7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Han; ZENG; Qunli; WENG; Yu; LU; Deqiang; JIANG; Huai; XU

    2005-01-01

    Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields (ELF MF) has been considered as a "possible human carcinogen" by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) while credible mechanisms of its carcinogenicity remain unknown. In this study, a proteomics approach was employed to investigate the changes of protein expression profile induced by ELF MF in human breast cancer cell line MCF7, in order to determine ELF MF-responsive proteins. MCF7 cells were exposed to 50 Hz, 0.4 mT ELF MF for 24 h and the changes of protein profile were examined using two dimensional electrophoresis. Up to 6 spots have been statistically significantly altered (their expression levels were changed at least 5 fold up or down) compared with sham-exposed group. 19 ones were only detected in exposure group while 19 ones were missing. Three proteins were identified by LC-IT Tandem MS as RNA binding protein regulatory subunit、Proteasome subunit beta type 7 precursor and Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein. Our finding showed that 50 Hz, 0.4 mT ELF MF alternates the protein profile of MCF7 cell and may affect many physiological functions of normal cell and 2-DE coupled with MS is a promising approach to elucidating cellular effects of electromagnetic fields.

  3. Surface engineered magnetic nanoparticles for specific immunotargeting of cadherin expressing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moros, Maria; Delhaes, Flavien; Puertas, Sara; Saez, Berta; de la Fuente, Jesús M.; Grazú, Valeria; Feracci, Helene

    2016-02-01

    In spite of historic advances in cancer biology and recent development of sophisticated chemotherapeutics, the outlook for patients with advanced cancer is still grim. In this sense nanoparticles (NPs), through their unique physical properties, enable the development of new approaches for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Thus far the most used active targeting scheme involves NPs functionalization with antibodies specific to molecules overexpressed on cancer cell’s surface. Therefore, such active targeting relies on differences in NPs uptake kinetics rates between tumor and healthy cells. Many cancers of epithelial origin are associated with the inappropriate expression of non-epithelial cadherins (e.g. N-, P-, -11) with concomitant loss of E-cadherin. Such phenomenon named cadherin switching favors tumor development and metastasis via interactions of tumor cells with stromal components. That is why we optimized the oriented functionalization of fluorescently labelled magnetic NPs with a novel antibody specific for the extracellular domain of cadherin-11. The obtained Ab-NPs exhibited high specificity when incubated with two cell lines used as models of tumor and healthy cells. Thus, cadherin switching offers a great opportunity for the development of active targeting strategies aimed to improve the early detection and treatment of cancer.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of stem cell apoptosis in arthritic joints with a caspase activatable contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Ye, Deju; Lenkov, Olga D; Donig, Jessica S; Martin, John E; Castillo, Rostislav; Derugin, Nikita; Sennino, Barbara; Rao, Jianghong; Daldrup-Link, Heike

    2015-02-24

    About 43 million individuals in the U.S. encounter cartilage injuries due to trauma or osteoarthritis, leading to joint pain and functional disability. Matrix-associated stem cell implants (MASI) represent a promising approach for repair of cartilage defects. However, limited survival of MASI creates a significant bottleneck for successful cartilage regeneration outcomes and functional reconstitution. We report an approach for noninvasive detection of stem cell apoptosis with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on a caspase-3-sensitive nanoaggregation MRI probe (C-SNAM). C-SNAM self-assembles into nanoparticles after hydrolysis by caspase-3, leading to 90% amplification of (1)H MR signal and prolonged in vivo retention. Following intra-articular injection, C-SNAM causes significant MR signal enhancement in apoptotic MASI compared to viable MASI. Our results indicate that C-SNAM functions as an imaging probe for stem cell apoptosis in MASI. This concept could be applied to a broad range of cell transplants and target sites.

  5. Study on performance of magnetic fluorescent nanoparticles as gene carrier and location in pig kidney cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cui, Haixin; Sun, Changjiao; Du, Wei; Cui, Jinhui; Zhao, Xiang

    2013-03-01

    We evaluated the performance of green fluorescent magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) as gene carrier and location in pig kidney cells. When the mass ratio of NPs to green fluorescent protein plasmid DNA reached 1:16 or above, DNA molecules can be combined completely with NPs, which indicates that the NPs have good ability to bind negative DNA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were carried out to investigate the binding mechanism between NPs and DNA. AFM images show that individual DNA strands come off of larger pieces of netlike agglomerations and several spherical nanoparticles are attached to each individual DNA strand and interact with each other. The pig kidney cells were labelled with membrane-specific red fluorescent dye 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate and nucleus-specific blue fluorescent dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride. We found that green fluorescent nanoparticles can past the cell membrane and spread throughout the interior of the cell. The NPs seem to locate more frequently in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus.

  6. Extra-Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields alter Cancer Cells through Metabolic Restriction

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Background: Biological effects of extra-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) have lacked a credible mechanism of interaction between MFs and living material. Objectives: Examine the effect of ELF-MFs on cancer cells. Methods: Five cancer cell lines were exposed to ELF-MFs within the range of 0.025 to 5 microT, and the cells were examined for karyotype changes after 6 days. Results: All cancer cells lines lost chromosomes from MF exposure, with a mostly flat dose-response. Constant MF exposures for three weeks allow a rising return to the baseline, unperturbed karyotypes. From this point, small MF increases or decreases are again capable of inducing karyotype contractions. Our data suggests that the karyotype contractions are caused by MF interference with mitochondria's ATP synthase (ATPS), compensated by the action of AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK). The effects of MFs are similar to those of the ATPS inhibitor oligomycin. They are amplified by metformin, an AMPK stimulator, and attenuated by resisti...

  7. Quantitative imaging of cell-permeable magnetic resonance contrast agents using x-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Paul J; Macrenaris, Keith W; Vogt, Stefan; Allen, Matthew J; Meade, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III) chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8-amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylamino)stilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 10(3) better than (153)Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T(1) analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination. PMID:17150161

  8. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for the differentiation of low and high grade clear cell renal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, F.; Tricaud, E.; Lasserre, A.S.; Petitpierre, F.; Le Bras, Y.; Bouzgarrou, M.; Grenier, N. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Bernhard, J.C. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Urology, Bordeaux (France); Yacoub, M. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Pathology, Bordeaux (France); Ravaud, A. [Saint-Andre Hospital, Department of Oncology, Bordeaux (France)

    2015-01-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to differentiate low from high Fuhrman grade renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MR images from 80 consecutive pathologically proven RCC (57 clear cell, 16 papillary and 7 chromophobe) were evaluated. Double-echo chemical shift, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were reviewed independently. Signal intensity index (SII), tumour-to-spleen SI ratio (TSR), ADC ratio, wash-in (WiI) and wash-out indices (WoI) between different phases were calculated and compared to pathological grade and size. The Fuhrman scoring system was used. Low grade (score ≤2) and high grade (score ≥3) tumours were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. No associations between grade and imaging factors were found for papillary and chromophobe RCCs. For clear cell RCCs, there was a significant association between the grade and parenchymal WiI (WiI2) (P = 0.02) or ADCr (P = 0.03). A significant association between tumour grade and size (P = 0.01), WiI2 (P = 0.02) and ADCr (P = 0.05) remained in multivariate analysis. Multiparametric MRI can be used to accurately differentiate low Fuhrman grade clear cell RCC from high grade. High Fuhrman grade (≥3) RCCs were larger, had lower parenchymal wash-in indices and lower ADC ratios than low grade. (orig.)

  9. Mannose-functionalized porous silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for two-photon imaging or PDT of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrier, Marine [UMR 5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (France); Gary-Bobo, Magali [Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Montpellier 1, Universite Montpellier 2, Institut des Biomolecules Max Mousseron UMR 5247 CNRS (France); Lartigue, Lenaiec; Brevet, David [UMR 5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (France); Morere, Alain; Garcia, Marcel [Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Montpellier 1, Universite Montpellier 2, Institut des Biomolecules Max Mousseron UMR 5247 CNRS (France); Maillard, Philippe [Universite Paris-Sud, UMR 176 CNRS, Institut Curie (France); Raehm, Laurence; Guari, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.guari@um2.fr; Larionova, Joulia; Durand, Jean-Olivier, E-mail: durand@univ-montp2.fr [UMR 5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (France); Mongin, Olivier [Universite de Rennes 1, Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, CNRS UMR 6226 (France); Blanchard-Desce, Mireille [Universite Bordeaux, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 5255 (France)

    2013-05-15

    An original fluorophore engineered for two-photon excitation or a porphyrin derivative were entrapped in the silica shell of magnetic porous silica nanoparticles during the synthesis of the silica moiety without damaging the structure of the organic part. The mild conditions involved allowed obtaining microporous or mesoporous silica magnetic nanoparticles, respectively. Mannose was grafted on the surface of the nanoparticles to target MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The studies of magnetic properties of these hybrid nanoparticles show that they present a blocking temperature at 190 K. The nano-objects designed with the two-photon fluorophore were efficient for two-photon imaging of MCF-7 cancer cells, whereas the nano-objects with the photosensitizer efficiently killed cancer cells. The presence of the mannose moiety was demonstrated to improve both imaging and therapy properties.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Transplanted Neural Stem Cells in Parkinson Disease Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin; XIA Ying; ZHAO Hongyang; ZHAO Jiashan; ZHU Xianli

    2006-01-01

    In this study we implanted magnetically labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) in PD rats and then monitored their survival and migration in the host brain by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).The mesencephalic NSCs were obtained from the brain of SD rats. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) was transferred to NSCs by Lipofectamine transfection. Eighteen PD lesioned rats were selected for transplantation by evaluation of their rotational behavior in response to amphetamine and randomly assigned to 3 groups, i.e., sham group, PBS group and NSCs transplanted group, with 6 rats in each group. MR scanning was performed at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 week(s) following transplantation.At the meantime, rotational behavior was assessed in each group. Our results showed that SPIO particles were clearly visible with Prissian blue staining in neurospheres and cells derived from NSCs.The rotational behavior of the NSCs transplanted group was remarkably improved compared with that of sham group and PBS group (P<0.05). In vivo MR tracking of NSCs showed that SPIO labeling led to a strong susceptibility change of signal 1 week after transplantation on T2 weighted images.And a large circular hypointense signal appeared in the transplanted area on T2* gradient echo images.Ten weeks following transplantation, the hypointense signal on T2 weighted and T2* gradient echo images was still displayed. It is concluded that SPIO particles could label NSCs effectively, and MRI detection of SPIO labeled cells is a promising method and novel approach to analyzing the NSCs following transplantation in the treatment of PD.

  11. Cell behavior observation and gene expression analysis of melanoma associated with stromal fibroblasts in a three-dimensional magnetic cell culture array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Mina; Matsumura, Taku; Yamamoto, And Shuhei; Nakayama, Eiichi; Jimbow, Kowichi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroid culture array has been fabricated using a magnetic force-based cell patterning method, analyzing the effect of stromal fibroblast on the invasive capacity of melanoma. Formation of spheroids was observed when array-like multicellular patterns of melanoma were developed using a pin-holder device made of magnetic soft iron and an external magnet, which enables the assembly of the magnetically labeled cells on the collagen gel-coated surface as array-like cell patterns. The interaction of fibroblast on the invasion of melanoma was investigated using three types of cell interaction models: (i) fibroblasts were magnetically labeled and patterned together in array with melanoma spheroids (direct-interaction model), (ii) fibroblasts coexisting in the upper collagen gel (indirect-interaction model) of melanoma spheroids, and (iii) fibroblast-sheets coexisting under melanoma spheroids (fibroblast-sheet model). The fibroblast-sheet model has largely increased the invasive capacity of melanoma, and the promotion of adhesion, migration, and invasion were also observed. In the fibroblast-sheet model, the expression of IL-8 and MMP-2 increased by 24-fold and 2-fold, respectively, in real time RT-PCR compared to the absence of fibroblasts. The results presented in this study demonstrate the importance of fibroblast interaction to invasive capacity of melanoma in the 3D in vitro bioengineered tumor microenvironment.

  12. Spin-dependent transport and recombination in solar cells studied by pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrends, Jan

    2009-11-11

    This thesis deals with spin-dependent transport and recombination of charge carriers in solar cells. A systematic study on the influence of localized paramagnetic states which act as trapping and recombination centres for photogenerated charge carriers, is presented for three different types of solar cells. The central technique used in this thesis is electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). The capabilities of pulsed (p) EDMR were extended with regard to the detection sensitivity. These improvements allowed pEDMR measurements on fully processed devices from cryogenic to room temperature. The instrumental upgrades also set the stage for pEDMR measurements at different resonance frequencies. In high-efficiency solar cells based on the heterojunction between hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si), recombination via performancelimiting interface states could directly be measured electrically for the first time. The identification of these defects could be achieved by exploiting their orientation with regard to the surface. In thin-film solar cells based on hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon ({mu}-Si:H) the situation is more complex due to the heterogeneous and disordered structure of the material itself. In addition, these cells are multilayer-systems comprising three different silicon layers with different doping levels and microstructures. By combining a systematic alteration of the sample structure with the information extracted from deconvoluting spectrally overlapping signals in the time domain, it was possible to assign the spin-dependent signals to defects in the individual layers of the solar cells. Benefiting from the instrumental improvements, recombination via dangling bond states in silicon-based solar cells could be investigated by pEDMR at room temperature for the first time. In organic bulk heterojunction solar cells based on MEH-PPV and PCBM two different spin-dependent mechanisms coexist. Both processes

  13. Optimized high gradient magnetic separation for isolation of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimma Pattamawan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly purified infected red blood cells (irbc, or highly synchronized parasite cultures, are regularly required in malaria research. Conventional isolation and synchronization rely on density and osmotic fragility of irbc, respectively. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS offers an alternative based on intrinsic magnetic properties of irbc, avoiding exposure to chemicals and osmotic stress. Successful HGMS concentration in malaria research was previously reported using polymer coated columns, while HGMS depletion has not been described yet. This study presents a new approach to both HGMS concentration and depletion in malaria research, rendering polymer coating unnecessary. Methods A dipole magnet generating a strong homogenous field was custom assembled. Polypropylene syringes were fitted with one-way stopcocks and filled with stainless steel wool. Rbc from Plasmodium falciparum cultures were resuspended in density and viscosity optimized HGMS buffers and HGMS processed. Purification and depletion results were analysed by flow cytometer and light microscopy. Viability was evaluated by calculating the infection rate after re-culturing of isolates. Results In HGMS concentration, purity of irbc isolates from asynchronous cultures consistently ranged from 94.8% to 98.4% (mean 95.7%. With further optimization, over 90% of isolated irbc contained segmented schizonts. Processing time was less than 45 min. Reinfection rates ranged from 21.0% to 56.4%. In HGMS depletion, results were comparable to treatment with sorbitol, as demonstrated by essentially identical development of cultures. Conclusion The novel HGMS concentration procedure achieves high purities of segmented stage irbc from standard asynchronous cultures, and is the first HGMS depletion alternative to sorbitol lysis. It represents a simple and highly efficient alternative to conventional irbc concentration and synchronization methods.

  14. Estimation of genetic effects of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the chromosome aberrations in the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat was studied. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields of different magnetic flux density (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5h and with different treated time (1, 3 and 5h) at magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, abnormal segregation and fragment in PMCs. The results indicated that the exposed groups of low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in aberration frequency compared with unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, but significant differences of chromosomal bridge at 5T and lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus at 7T were detected in the exposed group (p<0.05). The dose-effect relationships indicated that the increase frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with flux density of magnetic field and treated time, but no linear effect was observed. These results lead us to the conclusion that high static magnetic fields above 5T for 5h duration might cause an increase in potential damage to organisms. (authors)

  15. Particle-in-Cell Modeling of Magnetized Argon Plasma Flow Through Small Mechanical Apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam B. Sefkow and Samuel A. Cohen

    2009-04-09

    Motivated by observations of supersonic argon-ion flow generated by linear helicon-heated plasma devices, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to study whether stationary electrostatic layers form near mechanical apertures intersecting the flow of magnetized plasma. By self-consistently evaluating the temporal evolution of the plasma in the vicinity of the aperture, the PIC simulations characterize the roles of the imposed aperture and applied magnetic field on ion acceleration. The PIC model includes ionization of a background neutral-argon population by thermal and superthermal electrons, the latter found upstream of the aperture. Near the aperture, a transition from a collisional to a collisionless regime occurs. Perturbations of density and potential, with mm wavelengths and consistent with ion acoustic waves, propagate axially. An ion acceleration region of length ~ 200-300 λD,e forms at the location of the aperture and is found to be an electrostatic double layer, with axially-separated regions of net positive and negative charge. Reducing the aperture diameter or increasing its length increases the double layer strength.

  16. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al2O3), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures.

  17. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen [Faculty of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Leipzig, Linnéstrasse 5, Leipzig 04103 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures.

  18. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al2O3), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures

  19. Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields Induce Spermatogenic Germ Cell Apoptosis: Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Kon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy generated by an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF is too weak to directly induce genotoxicity. However, it is reported that an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF is related to DNA strand breakage and apoptosis. The testes that conduct spermatogenesis through a dynamic cellular process involving meiosis and mitosis seem vulnerable to external stress such as heat, MF exposure, and chemical or physical agents. Nevertheless the results regarding adverse effects of ELF-EMF on human or animal reproductive functions are inconclusive. According to the guideline of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP; 2010 for limiting exposure to time-varying MF (1 Hz to 100 kHz, overall conclusion of epidemiologic studies has not consistently shown an association between human adverse reproductive outcomes and maternal or paternal exposure to low frequency fields. In animal studies there is no compelling evidence of causal relationship between prenatal development and ELF-MF exposure. However there is increasing evidence that EL-EMF exposure is involved with germ cell apoptosis in testes. Biophysical mechanism by which ELF-MF induces germ cell apoptosis has not been established. This review proposes the possible mechanism of germ cell apoptosis in testes induced by ELF-MF.

  20. Transient electrically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy applied to organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraffert, Felix; Steyrleuthner, Robert; Meier, Christoph; Bittl, Robert; Behrends, Jan, E-mail: j.behrends@fu-berlin.de [Berlin Joint EPR Lab, Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universität Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-27

    The influence of light-induced paramagnetic states on the photocurrent generated by polymer:fullerene solar cells is studied using spin-sensitive techniques in combination with laser-flash excitation. For this purpose, we developed a setup that allows for simultaneous detection of transient electron paramagnetic resonance as well as transient electrically detected magnetic resonance (trEDMR) signals from fully processed and encapsulated solar cells. Combining both techniques provides a direct link between photoinduced triplet excitons, charge transfer states, and free charge carriers as well as their influence on the photocurrent generated by organic photovoltaic devices. Our results obtained from solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) as electron donor and a fullerene-based electron acceptor show that the resonant signals observed in low-temperature (T = 80 K) trEDMR spectra can be attributed to positive polarons in the polymer as well as negative polarons in the fullerene phase, indicating that both centers are involved in spin-dependent processes that directly influence the photocurrent.

  1. Transient electrically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy applied to organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of light-induced paramagnetic states on the photocurrent generated by polymer:fullerene solar cells is studied using spin-sensitive techniques in combination with laser-flash excitation. For this purpose, we developed a setup that allows for simultaneous detection of transient electron paramagnetic resonance as well as transient electrically detected magnetic resonance (trEDMR) signals from fully processed and encapsulated solar cells. Combining both techniques provides a direct link between photoinduced triplet excitons, charge transfer states, and free charge carriers as well as their influence on the photocurrent generated by organic photovoltaic devices. Our results obtained from solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) as electron donor and a fullerene-based electron acceptor show that the resonant signals observed in low-temperature (T = 80 K) trEDMR spectra can be attributed to positive polarons in the polymer as well as negative polarons in the fullerene phase, indicating that both centers are involved in spin-dependent processes that directly influence the photocurrent

  2. Cell volume increase in murine MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts attaching onto biocompatible Tantalum observed by magnetic AC mode Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klembt Andersen L.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic AC mode (MACmode atomic force microscopy (AFM was used to study murine (mouse MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells attached to biocompatible tantalum substrates. Cell volumes of attached cells derived from AFM images were compared to volumes of detached cells in suspension measured by the Coulter sizing technique. An increase of similar 50 % in cell volume was observed when the cells attached to planar tantalum substrates and developed a flattened structure including lamellipodia. We address thoroughly the issues general to the AFM determination of absolute cell volumes, and compare our magnetic AC mode AFM measurements to hitherto reported cell volume determinations by contact mode AFM.

  3. Application of pulsed-magnetic field enhances non-viral gene delivery in primary cells from different origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamau Chapman, Sarah W. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Hassa, Paul O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Heidelberg, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Koch-Schneidemann, Sabine; Rechenberg, Brigitte von [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty Zurich, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe [MatSearch, Chemin Jean Pavillard 14, 1009 Pully (Switzerland); Steitz, Benedikt; Petri-Fink, Alke; Hofmann, Heinrich [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Hottiger, Michael O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: hottiger@vetbio.uzh.ch

    2008-04-15

    Primary cell lines are more difficult to transfect when compared to immortalized/transformed cell lines, and hence new techniques are required to enhance the transfection efficiency in these cells. We isolated and established primary cultures of synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes, macrophages, lung fibroblasts, and embryonic fibroblasts. These cells differed in several properties, and hence were a good representative sample of cells that would be targeted for expression and delivery of therapeutic genes in vivo. The efficiency of gene delivery in all these cells was enhanced using polyethylenimine-coated polyMAG magnetic nanoparticles, and the rates (17-84.2%) surpassed those previously achieved using other methods, especially in cells that are difficult to transfect. The application of permanent and pulsating magnetic fields significantly enhanced the transfection efficiencies in synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes and lung fibroblasts, within 5 min of exposure to these magnetic fields. This is an added advantage for future in vivo applications, where rapid gene delivery is required before systemic clearance or filtration of the gene vectors occurs.

  4. A dual mode targeting probe for distinguishing HER2-positive breast cancer cells using silica-coated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jia [Medical School Southeast University, Department of Ultrasonography, Zhongda Hospital (China); An, Yan-Li; Zang, Feng-Chao [Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging (China); Zong, Shen-Fei; Cui, Yi-Ping, E-mail: cyp@seu.edu.cn [Southeast University, Advanced Photonics Center (China); Teng, Gao-Jun, E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com [Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging (China)

    2013-10-15

    We report a composite nanoprobe based on silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) for distinguishing breast cancers at different HER2 statuses. The nanoprobe has a core-shell structure, with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs as the magnetic core and dye-embedded silica as the fluorescent shell, whose average size is about 150 nm. Besides, the outmost surfaces of the probes were modified with specific antibodies to endow the probe with a targeting ability. With such a structure, the nanoprobe can accomplish dual mode targeting of human breast cancer cells based on fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the experiments, three human breast cancer cell lines were used to test the targeting ability of the nanoprobe. Specifically, SKBR3 cells with a high HER2 expression level were used as the model target cells, while MCF7 cells with a lower HER2 expression levels and HER2-negative MDA-MB-231 cells were used as the controls. Both the fluorescence and MRI imaging results confirmed that the nanoprobe can distinguish three cancer cell lines with different HER2 expression levels. With the dual mode imaging and specific targeting properties, we anticipate that the presented nanoprobe may have a great potential in the diagnosis and treatment of cancerous diseases.

  5. Application of pulsed-magnetic field enhances non-viral gene delivery in primary cells from different origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary cell lines are more difficult to transfect when compared to immortalized/transformed cell lines, and hence new techniques are required to enhance the transfection efficiency in these cells. We isolated and established primary cultures of synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes, macrophages, lung fibroblasts, and embryonic fibroblasts. These cells differed in several properties, and hence were a good representative sample of cells that would be targeted for expression and delivery of therapeutic genes in vivo. The efficiency of gene delivery in all these cells was enhanced using polyethylenimine-coated polyMAG magnetic nanoparticles, and the rates (17-84.2%) surpassed those previously achieved using other methods, especially in cells that are difficult to transfect. The application of permanent and pulsating magnetic fields significantly enhanced the transfection efficiencies in synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes and lung fibroblasts, within 5 min of exposure to these magnetic fields. This is an added advantage for future in vivo applications, where rapid gene delivery is required before systemic clearance or filtration of the gene vectors occurs

  6. Application of pulsed-magnetic field enhances non-viral gene delivery in primary cells from different origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau Chapman, Sarah W.; Hassa, Paul O.; Koch-Schneidemann, Sabine; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe; Steitz, Benedikt; Petri-Fink, Alke; Hofmann, Heinrich; Hottiger, Michael O.

    Primary cell lines are more difficult to transfect when compared to immortalized/transformed cell lines, and hence new techniques are required to enhance the transfection efficiency in these cells. We isolated and established primary cultures of synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes, macrophages, lung fibroblasts, and embryonic fibroblasts. These cells differed in several properties, and hence were a good representative sample of cells that would be targeted for expression and delivery of therapeutic genes in vivo. The efficiency of gene delivery in all these cells was enhanced using polyethylenimine-coated polyMAG magnetic nanoparticles, and the rates (17-84.2%) surpassed those previously achieved using other methods, especially in cells that are difficult to transfect. The application of permanent and pulsating magnetic fields significantly enhanced the transfection efficiencies in synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes and lung fibroblasts, within 5 min of exposure to these magnetic fields. This is an added advantage for future in vivo applications, where rapid gene delivery is required before systemic clearance or filtration of the gene vectors occurs.

  7. Cell type-specific response to high intracellular loading of polyacrylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lojk J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasna Lojk,1 Vladimir B Bregar,1 Maruša Rajh,1 Katarina Miš,2 Mateja Erdani Kreft,3 Sergej Pirkmajer,2 Peter Veranič,3 Mojca Pavlin1 1Group for Nano and Biotechnological Applications, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, 2Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, 3Institute of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia Abstract: Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs are a special type of NP with a ferromagnetic, electron-dense core that enables several applications such as cell tracking, hyperthermia, and magnetic separation, as well as multimodality. So far, superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs are the only clinically approved type of metal oxide NPs, but cobalt ferrite NPs have properties suitable for biomedical applications as well. In this study, we analyzed the cellular responses to magnetic cobalt ferrite NPs coated with polyacrylic acid (PAA in three cell types: Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO, mouse melanoma (B16 cell line, and primary human myoblasts (MYO. We compared the internalization pathway, intracellular trafficking, and intracellular fate of our NPs using fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM as well as quantified NP uptake and analyzed uptake dynamics. We determined cell viability after 24 or 96 hours’ exposure to increasing concentrations of NPs, and quantified the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS upon 24 and 48 hours’ exposure. Our NPs have been shown to readily enter and accumulate in cells in high quantities using the same two endocytic pathways; mostly by macropinocytosis and partially by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The cell types differed in their uptake rate, the dynamics of intracellular trafficking, and the uptake capacity, as well as in their response to higher concentrations of internalized NPs. The observed differences in cell responses stress the importance of evaluation of NP–cell interactions on several different cell types for better

  8. Transplantation of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells improves cardiac function in a swine myocardial infarction model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Chun-mei; JU Sheng-hong; MA Ming; TANG Yao-liang; MA Gen-shan; LIU Nai-feng; SHEN Cheng-xing; CHEN Zhong; LIU Xiao-jun; HU Yao-peng; ZHANG Xiao-li; TENG Gao-jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation provides a new approach for myocardial repair.However,many important fundamental questions about MSCs transplantation remain unanswered.There is an urgent need to identify MSCs from the beating heart and analyze the efficacy of this new approach.This study aimed to localize the magnetically labeled MSCs(MR-MSCs)and monitor the restorative effects of MR-MSCs with magnetic resonance(MR) imaging.Methods Acute myocardial infarction(AMI)was created in swine by a balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery.Cells were delivered via intracoronary infusion after myocardial infarction.Infarct size change and cardiac function were assessed with 3.0T MR scanner.The results were then confirmed by histological and western blot analysis.All statistical procedures were performed with Systat (SPSS version 12.01).Results A total of 26 swine were divided into four groups(sham-operated group,n=6;AMI group with PBS transplantation,n=6;labeled MSCs group,n=7;unlabeled MSCs group,n=7).MSCs,MR-MSCs(107 cells)or PBS were delivered by intracoronary injection after MI and serial cardiac MR imaging studies were performed at 0,4 and 8 weeks after transplantation.MR imaging demonstrated MI size decreased after MSCs transplantation in labeled and unlabeled groups,however,increases were seen in the AMI group at 8 weeks after MI.The left ventricular eiection fraction(LVEF) was slightly increased in the AMI group((41.87±2.45)%vs(39.04±2.80)%,P>0.05),but significantly improved in the MR-MSCs group((56.85±1.29)%vs(40.67±2.00)%,P<0.05)and unlabeled group((55.38±1.07)%vs(41.78±2.08)%,P<0.05) at 8 weeks after treatment.MR-MSCs were further confirmed by Prussian blue and immunofluorescent staining.Western blot analvsis demonstrated that there was an increased expression of cardiomyocyte markers such as myosin heavy chain and troponin T in the MSCs treatment groups and the ratio of matrix metalloproteinase 2 to

  9. Self-organization model for a cell system: Ferroelectric, ferroelastic, and magnetic states and related phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is proposed to explain the stability, phase state transformations, and coexistence of different phases for fungi cell ensembles (in particular, dimorphism and linear-to-spiral structure transitions with the Earth's magnetic field screened). This model is based on (i) cell-connected soft polarization modes induced by charge compensation and related ferroelectric and ferroelastic phase transitions and (ii) intracell mobile orbit-spin-lattice clusters with competitive ferromagnetic-diamagnetic behavior and with orbitlattice and spin-lattice interactions. This model makes it possible to explain the structural and magnetic properties of the systems under consideration. In particular, the Lifshitz invariants in the free energy explain the formation of orbit-lattice and spin-lattice spiral and ring-type structures that are formed when the Earth's magnetic field is effectively screened. The model proposed is not restricted to mitochondria, containing orbit-spin-lattice clusters based on the Fe3+/Fe2+ states (considered here).

  10. The promotion of in vitro vessel-like organization of endothelial cells in magnetically responsive alginate scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Sapir, Yulia; Cohen, Smadar; Friedman, Gary; Polyak, Boris

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in engineering thick, complex tissues such as cardiac muscle, is the need to pre-vascularize the engineered tissue in vitro to enable its efficient integration with host tissue upon implantation. Herein, we explored new magnetic alginate composite scaffolds to provide means of physical stimulation to cells. Magnetite-impregnated alginate scaffolds seeded with aortic endothelial cells stimulated during the first 7 days out of a total 14 day experimental course showe...

  11. Biocompatibility of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and their cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen DZ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Daozhen Chen,1,3,* Qiusha Tang,2,* Xiangdong Li,3,* Xiaojin Zhou,1 Jia Zang,1 Wen-qun Xue,1 Jing-ying Xiang,1 Cai-qin Guo11Central Laboratory, Wuxi Hospital for Matemaland Child Health Care Affiliated Medical School of Nanjing, Jiangsu Province; 2Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Medical College, Southeast University, Jiangsu Province; 3The People’s Hospital of Aheqi County, Xinjiang, China *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The objective of this study was to evaluate the synthesis and biocompatibility of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and investigate their therapeutic effects when combined with magnetic fluid hyperthermia on cultured MCF-7 cancer cells.Methods: Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared using a coprecipitation method. The appearance, structure, phase composition, functional groups, surface charge, magnetic susceptibility, and release in vitro were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and a vibrating sample magnetometer. Blood toxicity, in vitro toxicity, and genotoxicity were investigated. Therapeutic effects were evaluated by MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] and flow cytometry assays.Results: Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the shapes of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were approximately spherical, with diameters of about 26.1 ± 5.2 nm. Only the spinel phase was indicated in a comparison of the x-ray diffraction data with Joint Corporation of Powder Diffraction Standards (JCPDS X-ray powder diffraction files. The O-to-Fe ratio of the Fe3O4 was determined by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis, and approximated pure Fe3O4. The vibrating sample magnetometer hysteresis loop suggested that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were superparamagnetic at room temperature. MTT experiments showed that the toxicity of the material

  12. MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES. C. F. Blackman1, D. E. House2*, S. G. Benane3*, A. Ubeda4, M.A. TrilIo4. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, EPA,Research Triangle Park, North Caro...

  13. In vivo MR imaging of nanometer magnetically labeled bone marrow stromal cells transplanted via portal vein in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo magnetic resonance imaging with a conventional 1.5-T system for tracking of intra-portal vein transplantation nanometer magnetically labeled BMSCs in rat liver. Methods: BMSCs were isolated from 5 SD rats bone marrow with the density gradient centrifugation method. Then BMSCs were labeled with nanometer superpara-magnetic iron oxide and transfection agent. Cell labeling efficiency was assessed with determination of the percentage of Peris Prussian blue stain. Then BMSCs transplanted into normal rats' livers via portal vein. The receipts were divided into 5 groups ,including sham control,2 h ,3 d,7 d and 2 w after transplantation. Follow-up serial T1WI,T2WI and T2*-weighted gradient- echo MR imaging were performed at 1.5 T MRI system. MR imaging findings were compared with histology. Results: Cell labeling efficiency was more than 95% by Perls Prussian blue stain. After transplantation of labeled BMSCs via portal vein, liver's had diffuse granular signal intensity appearance in T2* WI MRI. Cells were detected for up to 2 w in receipts' liver's. At histologic analysis, signal intensity loss correlated with iron-loaded cells. Conclusion: MR imaging could aid in monitoring of magnetically labeled BMSCs administered via portal vein in vivo. (authors)

  14. The effect of novel magnetic nanoparticles on vascular endothelial cell function in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Le; Han, Lei [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Cells and Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Ge, Fei [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Shang Li [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Cells and Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Yun [The Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Shandong University Qilu Hospital, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhao, Bao Xiang, E-mail: bxzhao@sdu.edu.cn [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhao, Jing [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Cells and Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Miao, Jun Ying, E-mail: miaojy@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Cells and Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); The Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Shandong University Qilu Hospital, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novel nanoparticles could internalize in HUVEC and diffuse in the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-200 {mu}g/ml MNPs did not affect HUVECs and could be safe to HUVECs in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 400 {mu}g/ml MNPs inhibited cell growth regulated by caveolin-1 and eNOS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 20 mg/kg MNPs damaged endothelium in the aortic root after injected for 3 days. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After injected for 6 days and 9 days, the endothelium recovered the integrity. - Abstract: Manufactured nanoparticles are currently used for many fields. However, their potential toxicity provides a growing concern for human health. In our previous study, we prepared novel magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which could effectively remove heavy metal ions and cationic dyes from aqueous solution. To understand its biocompatibility, we investigated the effect of the nanoparticles on the function of vascular endothelial cells. The results showed that the nanoparticles were taken up by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and could inhibit cell proliferation at 400 {mu}g/ml. An increase in nitric oxide (NO) production and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity were induced, which companied with the decrease in caveolin-1 level. The endothelium in the aortic root was damaged and the NO level in serum was elevated after treated mice with 20 mg/kg nanoparticles for 3 days, but it was integrated after treated with 5 mg/kg nanoparticles. Meanwhile, an increase in eNOS activity and decrease in caveolin-1 level were induced in the endothelium. The data suggested that the low concentration of nanoparticles could not affect the function and viability of VECs. The high concentration of nanoparticles could inhibit VEC proliferation through elevation of the eNOS activity and NO production and thus present toxicity.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulation for different magnetic mirror effects on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Peng-Bo; Zhao, Yin-Jian; Yu, Da-Ren

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic mirror used as an efficient tool to confine plasma has been widely adopted in many different areas especially in recent cusped field thrusters. In order to check the influence of magnetic mirror effect on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster, three different radii of the discharge channel (6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm) in a cusped field thruster are investigated by using Particle-in-Cell Plus Monte Carlo (PIC-MCC) simulated method, under the condition of a fixed axial length of the discharge channel and the same operating parameters. It is found that magnetic cusps inside the small radius discharge channel cannot confine electrons very well. Thus, the electric field is hard to establish. With the reduction of the discharge channel’s diameter, more electrons will escape from cusps to the centerline area near the anode due to a lower magnetic mirror ratio. Meanwhile, the leak width of the cusped magnetic field will increase at the cusp. By increasing the magnetic field strength in a small radius model of a cusped field thruster, the negative effect caused by the weak magnetic mirror effect can be partially compensated. Therefore, according to engineering design, the increase of magnetic field strength can contribute to obtaining a good performance, when the radial distance between the magnets and the inner surface of the discharge channel is relatively big. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51006028) and the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51121004).

  16. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Zueqian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  17. Magnetic separation of encapsulated islet cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nano particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, Esther; Trenkler, Anja; Feilen, Peter J; Wiegand, Frederik; Fottner, Christian; Ehrhart, Friederike; Zimmermann, Heiko; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Dong Yun; Fischer, Stefan; Schreiber, Laura M; Weber, Matthias M

    2013-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising option for the restoration of normal glucose homeostasis in patients with type 1 diabetes. Because graft volume is a crucial issue in islet transplantations for patients with diabetes, we evaluated a new method for increasing functional tissue yield in xenogeneic grafts of encapsulated islets. Islets were labeled with three different superparamagnetic iron oxide nano particles (SPIONs; dextran-coated SPION, siloxane-coated SPION, and heparin-coated SPION). Magnetic separation was performed to separate encapsulated islets from the empty capsules, and cell viability and function were tested. Islets labeled with 1000 μg Fe/ml dextran-coated SPIONs experienced a 69.9% reduction in graft volume, with a 33.2% loss of islet-containing capsules. Islets labeled with 100 μg Fe/ml heparin-coated SPIONs showed a 46.4% reduction in graft volume, with a 4.5% loss of capsules containing islets. No purification could be achieved using siloxane-coated SPIONs due to its toxicity to the primary islets. SPION labeling of islets is useful for transplant purification during islet separation as well as in vivo imaging after transplantation. Furthermore, purification of encapsulated islets can also reduce the volume of the encapsulated islets without impairing their function by removing empty capsules.

  18. Clinical application of sodium-23 nuclear magnetic resonance for measurement of red cell sodium concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, S.; Kanashiro, M.; Hayashi, F. (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)) (and others)

    1989-01-01

    Red cell sodium (RBC-Na{sup +}) concentrations were measured using {sup 23}Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), without the destruction of erythrocyte membranes. Subjects were categorized into four groups: 20 normotensive subjects (NT group), 20 age-matched essential hypertensive patients (EHT group), 10 patients with primary aldosteronism (PA group), and 18 patients treated with digoxin (DIG group). Although RBC-Na{sup +} concentrations were similar between the NT group (6.14{plus minus}0.80 (Mean{plus minus}SD) mmol/1) and the EHT group (5.92{plus minus}0.99), they were significantly higher in both the PA group (7.55{plus minus}0.88, p<0.001) and the DIG group (8.43{plus minus}3.81, p<0.02). In the PA group, RBC-Na{sup +} concentrations decreased significantly after resection of the adenoma, and there was an inverse relationship between serum potassium and RBC-Na{sup +} concentrations (r=-0.65, p<0.01). In the DIG group, RBC-Na{sup +} concentrations tended to increase in proportion to serum digoxin levels (r=0.53, p<0.05). These results support the view that RBC-Na{sup +} concentrations are determined primarily by Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-pump activity of red cell membranes. This study showed also that Na{sup +} NMR is a useful method determining intracellular Na{sup +} concentrations. (author).

  19. Magnetic ferroferric oxide nanoparticles induce vascular endothelial cell dysfunction and inflammation by disturbing autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, XueQin; Miao, YiMing; Chen, ZhiQiang; Qiang, PengFei; Cui, LiuQing; Jing, Hongjuan; Guo, YuQi

    2016-03-01

    Despite the considerable use of magnetic ferroferric oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4NPs) worldwide, their safety is still an important topic of debate. In the present study, we detected the toxicity and biological behavior of bare-Fe3O4NPs (B-Fe3O4NPs) on human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our results showed that B-Fe3O4NPs did not induce cell death within 24h even at concentrations up to 400 μg/ml. The level of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) were decreased after exposure to B-Fe3O4NPs, whereas the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were elevated. Importantly, B-Fe3O4NPs increased the accumulation of autophagosomes and LC3-II in HUVECs through both autophagy induction and the blockade of autophagy flux. The levels of Beclin 1 and VPS34, but not phosphorylated mTOR, were increased in the B-Fe3O4NP-treated HUVECs. Suppression of autophagy induction or stimulation of autophagy flux, at least partially, attenuated the B-Fe3O4NP-induced HUVEC dysfunction. Additionally, enhanced autophagic activity might be linked to the B-Fe3O4NP-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results demonstrated that B-Fe3O4NPs disturb the process of autophagy in HUVECs, and eventually lead to endothelial dysfunction and inflammation.

  20. Improved Mitochondrial and Methylglyoxal-Related Metabolisms Support Hyperproliferation Induced by 50 Hz Magnetic Field in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falone, Stefano; Santini, Silvano; di Loreto, Silvia; Cordone, Valeria; Grannonico, Marta; Cesare, Patrizia; Cacchio, Marisa; Amicarelli, Fernanda

    2016-09-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) are common environmental agents that are suspected to promote later stages of tumorigenesis, especially in brain-derived malignancies. Even though ELF magnetic fields have been previously linked to increased proliferation in neuroblastoma cells, no previous work has studied whether ELF-MF exposure may change key biomolecular features, such as anti-glycative defence and energy re-programming, both of which are currently considered as crucial factors involved in the phenotype and progression of many malignancies. Our study investigated whether the hyperproliferation that is induced in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells by a 50 Hz, 1 mT ELF magnetic field is supported by an improved defense towards methylglyoxal (MG), which is an endogenous cancer-static and glycating α-oxoaldehyde, and by rewiring of energy metabolism. Our findings show that not only the ELF magnetic field interfered with the biology of neuron-derived malignant cells, by de-differentiating further the cellular phenotype and by increasing the proliferative activity, but also triggered cytoprotective mechanisms through the enhancement of the defense against MG, along with a more efficient management of metabolic energy, presumably to support the rapid cell outgrowth. Intriguingly, we also revealed that the MF-induced bioeffects took place after an initial imbalance of the cellular homeostasis, which most likely created a transient unstable milieu. The biochemical pathways and molecular targets revealed in this research could be exploited for future approaches aimed at limiting or suppressing the deleterious effects of ELF magnetic fields. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2014-2025, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26757151

  1. Feasibilty of a Multi-bit Cell Perpendicular Magnetic Tunnel Junction Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Soo

    The ultimate objective of this research project was to explore the feasibility of making a multi-bit cell perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (PMTJ) device to increase the storage density of spin-transfer-torque random access memory (STT-RAM). As a first step toward demonstrating a multi-bit cell device, this dissertation contributed a systematic and detailed study of developing a single cell PMTJ device using L10 FePt films. In the beginning of this research, 13 up-and-coming non-volatile memory (NVM) technologies were investigated and evaluated to see whether one of them might outperform NAND flash memories and even HDDs on a cost-per-TB basis in 2020. This evaluation showed that STT-RAM appears to potentially offer superior power efficiency, among other advantages. It is predicted that STTRAM's density could make it a promising candidate for replacing NAND flash memories and possibly HDDs if STTRAM could be improved to store multiple bits per cell. Ta/Mg0 under-layers were used first in order to develop (001) L1 0 ordering of FePt at a low temperature of below 400 °C. It was found that the tradeoff between surface roughness and (001) L10 ordering of FePt makes it difficult to achieve low surface roughness and good perpendicular magnetic properties simultaneously when Ta/Mg0 under-layers are used. It was, therefore, decided to investigate MgO/CrRu under-layers to simultaneously achieve smooth films with good ordering below 400°C. A well ordered 4 nm L10 FePt film with RMS surface roughness close to 0.4 nm, perpendicular coercivity of about 5 kOe, and perpendicular squareness near 1 was obtained at a deposition temperature of 390 °C on a thermally oxidized Si substrate when MgO/CrRu under-layers are used. A PMTJ device was developed by depositing a thin MgO tunnel barrier layer and a top L10 FePt film and then being postannealed at 450 °C for 30 minutes. It was found that the sputtering power needs to be minimized during the thin MgO tunnel barrier

  2. BIGEL analysis of gene expression in HL60 cells exposed to X rays or 60 Hz magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Han, L. H.; Harrison, G. H.; Davis, C. C.; Zhou, X. J.; Ioffe, V.; McCready, W. A.; Abraham, J. M.; Meltzer, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    We screened a panel of 1,920 randomly selected cDNAs to discover genes that are differentially expressed in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields (2 mT) or X rays (5 Gy) compared to unexposed cells. Identification of these clones was accomplished using our two-gel cDNA library screening method (BIGEL). Eighteen cDNAs differentially expressed in X-irradiated compared to control HL60 cells were recovered from a panel of 1,920 clones. Differential expression in experimental compared to control cells was confirmed independently by Northern blotting of paired total RNA samples hybridized to each of the 18 clone-specific cDNA probes. DNA sequencing revealed that 15 of the 18 cDNA clones produced matches with the database for genes related to cell growth, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, oxidative stress or apoptosis (including MYC, neuroleukin, copper zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase, TC4 RAS-like protein, peptide elongation factor 1alpha, BNIP3, GATA3, NF45, cytochrome c oxidase II and triosephosphate isomerase mRNAs). In contrast, BIGEL analysis of the same 1,920 cDNAs revealed no differences greater than 1.5-fold in expression levels in magnetic-field compared to sham-exposed cells. Magnetic-field-exposed and control samples were analyzed further for the presence of mRNA encoding X-ray-responsive genes by hybridization of the 18 specific cDNA probes to RNA from exposed and control HL60 cells. Our results suggest that differential gene expression is induced in approximately 1% of a random pool of cDNAs by ionizing radiation but not by 60 Hz magnetic fields under the present experimental conditions.

  3. Validation of Flow Cytometry and Magnetic Bead-Based Methods to Enrich CNS Single Cell Suspensions for Quiescent Microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volden, T A; Reyelts, C D; Hoke, T A; Arikkath, J; Bonasera, S J

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident mononuclear phagocytes within the CNS parenchyma that intimately interact with neurons and astrocytes to remodel synapses and extracellular matrix. We briefly review studies elucidating the molecular pathways that underlie microglial surveillance, activation, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis; we additionally place these studies in a clinical context. We describe and validate an inexpensive and simple approach to obtain enriched single cell suspensions of quiescent parenchymal and perivascular microglia from the mouse cerebellum and hypothalamus. Following preparation of regional CNS single cell suspensions, we remove myelin debris, and then perform two serial enrichment steps for cells expressing surface CD11b. Myelin depletion and CD11b enrichment are both accomplished using antigen-specific magnetic beads in an automated cell separation system. Flow cytometry of the resultant suspensions shows a significant enrichment for CD11b(+)/CD45(+) cells (perivascular microglia) and CD11b(+)/CD45(-) cells (parenchymal microglia) compared to starting suspensions. Of note, cells from these enriched suspensions minimally express Aif1 (aka Iba1), suggesting that the enrichment process does not evoke significant microglial activation. However, these cells readily respond to a functional challenge (LPS) with significant changes in the expression of molecules specifically associated with microglia. We conclude that methods employing a combination of magnetic-bead based sorting and flow cytometry produce suspensions highly enriched for microglia that are appropriate for a variety of molecular and cellular assays.

  4. In vivo tracking of neuronal-like cells by magnetic resonance in rabbit models of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruiping Zhang; Kun Zhang; Jianding Li; Qiang Liu; Jun Xie

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments have demonstrated that neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate, integrate and help to restore the function and be-haviors of spinal cord injury models, and that they may serve as a suitable approach to treating spinal cord injury. However, it is very difficult to track transplanted cells in vivo. In this study, we in-jected superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled neuronal-like cells into the subarachnoid space in a rabbit model of spinal cord injury. At 7 days after celltransplantation, a smal number of dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows were observed in the spinal cord injury region, and at 14 days, the number of these shadows increased on T2-weighted imaging. Perl’s Prussian blue staining de-tected dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows in the spinal cord injury region, indicative of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells. These findings suggest that transplanted neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can migrate to the spinal cord injury region and can be tracked by magnetic resonance in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging represents an efficient noninvasive technique for visual y tracking transplanted cells in vivo.

  5. Down-regulation of adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells by oscillating high-gradient magnetic fields and mechanical vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, V.; Lunov, O.; Novotná, B.; Churpita, O.; Trošan, P.; HoláÅ, V.; Syková, E.; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Š.

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, the focus in medicine on molecular genetics has resulted in a disregard for the physical basis of treatment even though many diseases originate from changes in cellular mechanics. Perturbations of the cellular nanomechanics promote pathologies, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Furthermore, whilst the biological and therapeutic effects of magnetic fields are a well-established fact, to date the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we show that oscillating high-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) and mechanical vibration affect adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells by the transmission of mechanical stress to the cell cytoskeleton, resulting in F-actin remodelling and subsequent down-regulation of adipogenic genes adiponectin, PPARγ, and AP2. Our findings propose an insight into the regulation of cellular nanomechanics, and provide a basis for better controlled down-regulation of stem cell adipogenesis by HGMF, which may facilitate the development of challenging therapeutic strategies suitable for the remote control of biological systems.

  6. Dual mode of cancer cell destruction for pancreatic cancer therapy using Hsp90 inhibitor loaded polymeric nano magnetic formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochani, Ankit K; Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Raveendran, Sreejith; Borah, Ankita; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Nakajima, Yoshikata; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2016-09-10

    Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) has been extensively explored as a potential drug target for cancer therapies. 17- N-allylamino- 17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG) was the first Hsp90 inhibitor to enter clinical trials for cancer therapy. However, native drug is being shown to have considerable anticancer efficacy against pancreatic cancer when used in combination therapy regime. Further, magnetic hyperthermia has shown to have promising effects against pancreatic cancer in combination with known cyto-toxic drugs under both target and non-targeted scenarios. Hence, in order to enhance the efficacy of 17AAG against pancreatic cancer, we developed poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coated, 17AAG and Fe3O4 loaded magnetic nanoparticle formulations by varying the relative concentration of polymer. We found that polymer concentration affects the magnetic strength and physicochemical properties of formulation. We were also able to see that our aqueous dispensable formulations were able to provide anti-pancreatic cancer activity for MIA PaCa-2 cell line in dose and time dependent manner in comparison to mice fibroblast cell lines (L929). Moreover, the in-vitro magnetic hyperthermia against MIA PaCa-2 provided proof principle that our 2-in-1 particles may work against cancer cell lines effectively. PMID:27469073

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Human-Derived Amniotic Membrane Stem Cells Using PEGylated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Naseroleslami

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The label and detection of cells injected into target tissues is an area of focus for researchers. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to label cells as they have special characteristics. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on human-derived amniotic membrane stem cell (hAMCs survival and to investigate the magnetic properties of these nanoparticles with increased contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we initially isolated mesenchymal stem cells from amniotic membranes and analyzed them by flow cytometry. In addition, we synthesized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs and characterized them by various methods. The SPIONs were incubated with hAMCs at concentrations of 25-800 μg/mL. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles on hAMCs was measured by the MTT assay. Next, we evaluated the effectiveness of the magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents. Solutions of SPION were prepared in water at different iron concentrations for relaxivity measurements by a 1.5 Tesla clinical MRI instrument. Results: The isolated cells showed an adherent spindle shaped morphology. Polyethylene glycol (PEG-coated SPIONs exhibited a spherical morphology. The average particle size was 20 nm and magnetic saturation was 60 emu/g. Data analysis showed no significant reduction in the percentage of viable cells (97.86 ± 0.41% after 72 hours at the 125 μg/ml concentration compared with the control. The relaxometry results of this SPION showed a transverse relaxivity of 6.966 (μg/ml.s-1 Conclusion: SPIONs coated with PEG used in this study at suitable concentrations had excellent labeling efficiency and biocompatibility for hAMCs.

  8. In vitro targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles labeled stem cells for articular cartilage defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong; Jin, Xuhong; Dai, Gang; Liu, Jun; Chen, Jiarong; Yang, Liu

    2011-04-01

    To assess a novel cell manipulation technique of tissue engineering with respect to its ability to augment superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) density at a localized cartilage defect site in an in vitro phantom by applying magnetic force. Meanwhile, non-invasive imaging techniques were use to track SPIO-labeled MSCs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human bone marrow MSCs were cultured and labeled with SPIO. Fresh degenerated human osteochondral fragments were obtained during total knee arthroplasty and a cartilage defect was created at the center. Then, the osteochondral fragments were attached to the sidewalls of culture flasks filled with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to mimic the human joint cavity. The SPIO-labeled MSCs were injected into the culture flasks in the presence of a 0.57 Tesla (T) magnetic force. Before and 90 min after cell targeting, the specimens underwent T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (SET2WI) sequence of 3.0 T MRI. MRI results were compared with histological findings. Macroscopic observation showed that SPIO-labeled MSCs were steered to the target region of cartilage defect. MRI revealed significant changes in signal intensity (P<0.01). HE staining exibited that a great number of MSCs formed a three-dimensional (3D) cell "sheet" structure at the chondral defect site. It was concluded that 0.57 T magnetic force permits spatial delivery of magnetically labeled MSCs to the target region in vitro. High-field MRI can serve as an very sensitive non-invasive technique for the visualization of SPIO-labeled MSCs.

  9. Targeting Cells With MR Imaging Probes: Cellular Interaction And Intracellular Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Uptake In Brain Capillary Endothelial and Choroidal Plexus Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambianica, I.; Bossi, M.; Gasco, P.; Gonzalez, W.; Idee, J. M.; Miserocchi, G.; Rigolio, R.; Chanana, M.; Morjan, I.; Wang, D.; Sancini, G.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in brain including their use as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. In delivery application, the critical step is the transport across cell layers and the internalization of NPs into specific cells, a process often limited by poor targeting specificity and low internalization efficiency. The development of the models of brain endothelial cells and choroidal plexus epithelial cells in culture has allowed us to investigate into these mechanisms. Our strategy is aimed at exploring different routes to the entrapment of iron oxide NPs in these brain related cells. Here we demonstrated that not only cells endowed with a good phagocytic activity like activated macrophages but also endothelial brain capillary and choroidal plexus epithelial cells do internalize iron oxide NPs. Our study of the intracellular trafficking of NPs by TEM, and confocal microscopy revealed that NPs are mainly internalized by the endocytic pathway. Iron oxide NPs were dispersed in water and coated with 3,4-dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) using standard procedures. Magnetic lipid NPs were prepared by NANOVECTOR: water in oil in water (W/O/W) microemulsion process has been applied to directly coat different iron based NPs by lipid layer or to encapsulate them into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs). By these coating/loading the colloidal stability was improved without strong alteration of the particle size distribution. Magnetic lipid NPs could be reconstituted after freeze drying without appreciable changes in stability. L-DOPA coated NPs are stable in PBS and in MEM (Modified Eagle Medium) medium. The magnetic properties of these NPs were not altered by the coating processes. We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these NPs with rat brain capillary endothelial (REB4) and choroidal plexus epithelial (Z310) cells. By means of widefield, confocal

  10. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    CERN Document Server

    Doss, C E; Swisdak, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al., J.~Geophys.~Res., 120, 7748 (2015). Applications to planetary...

  11. Triggering the apoptosis of targeted human renal cancer cells by the vibration of anisotropic magnetic particles attached to the cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leulmi, Selma; Chauchet, Xavier; Morcrette, Melissa; Ortiz, Guillermo; Joisten, Hélène; Sabon, Philippe; Livache, Thierry; Hou, Yanxia; Carrière, Marie; Lequien, Stéphane; Dieny, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Cancer cells develop resistance to chemotherapy, and the side effects encountered seriously limit the effectiveness of treatments. For these reasons, the search for alternative therapies that target cancer cells without affecting healthy tissues is currently one of the most active areas of research on cancer. The present study focuses on a recently proposed approach for cancer cell destruction based on the targeted triggering of cancer cell spontaneous death through the mechanical vibration of anisotropic magnetic micro/nanoparticles attached to the cell membranes at low frequencies (~20 Hz) and in weak magnetic fields (~30 mT). The study was conducted in vitro, on human renal cancer cells with superparamagnetic-like particles. Three types of such particles made of NiFe or magnetite were prepared and characterized (either synthetic antiferromagnetic, vortex or polycrystalline with random grain anisotropy). The triggering of the apoptosis of these cancer cells was demonstrated with NiFe vortex particles and statistically characterized by flow-cytometry studies. The death pathway via apoptosis and not necrosis was identified by the clear observation of caspase activation.

  12. Characterisation of human embryonic stem cells conditioning media by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A MacIntyre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell culture media conditioned by human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs provide a complex supplement of protein and metabolic factors that support in vitro proliferation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. However, the conditioning process is variable with different media batches often exhibiting differing capacities to maintain hESCs in culture. While recent studies have examined the protein complement of conditioned culture media, detailed information regarding the metabolic component of this media is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a (1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1H-NMR metabonomics approach, 32 metabolites and small compounds were identified and quantified in media conditioned by passage 11 HFFs (CMp11. A number of metabolites were secreted by HFFs with significantly higher concentration of lactate, alanine, and formate detected in CMp11 compared to non-conditioned media. In contrast, levels of tryptophan, folate and niacinamide were depleted in CMp11 indicating the utilisation of these metabolites by HFFs. Multivariate statistical analysis of the (1H-NMR data revealed marked age-related differences in the metabolic profile of CMp11 collected from HFFs every 24 h over 72 h. Additionally, the metabolic profile of CMp11 was altered following freezing at -20°C for 2 weeks. CM derived from passage 18 HFFs (CMp18 was found to be ineffective at supporting hESCs in an undifferentiated state beyond 5 days culture. Multivariate statistical comparison of CMp11 and CMp18 metabolic profiles enabled rapid and clear discrimination between the two media with CMp18 containing lower concentrations of lactate and alanine as well as higher concentrations of glucose and glutamine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: (1H-NMR-based metabonomics offers a rapid and accurate method of characterising hESC conditioning media and is a valuable tool for monitoring, controlling and optimising hESC culture media preparation.

  13. Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle catalyzed chemiluminescence for detection of nitric oxide in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiliang; Li, Mei; Wang, Bing; Wang, Meng; Kurash, Ibrahim; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Feng, Weiyue

    2016-08-01

    Direct and real-time measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in biological media is very difficult due to its transient nature. Fe3O4 nanoparticles (nanoFe3O4) because of their unique catalytic activities have attracted much attention as catalysts in a variety of organic and inorganic reactions. In this work, we have developed a magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle-based rapid-capture system for real-time detection of cellular NO. The basic principle is that the nanoFe3O4 can catalyze the decomposition of H2O2 in the system to generate superoxide anion (O2 (·-)) and the O2 (·-) can serve as an effective NO(·) trapping agent yielding peroxynitrite oxide anion, ONOO(-). Then the concentration of NO in cells can be facilely determined via peroxynitrite-induced luminol chemiluminescence. The linear range of the method is from 10(-4) to 10(-8) mol/L, and the detection of limit (3σ, n = 11) is as low as 3.16 × 10(-9) mol/L. By using this method, the NO concentration in 0.1 and 0.5 mg/L LPS-stimulated BV2 cells was measured as 4.9 and 11.3 μM, respectively. Surface measurements by synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SRXPS) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) demonstrate the catalytic mechanism of the nanoFe3O4-based system is that the significantly excess Fe(II) exists on the surface of nanoFe3O4 and mediates the rapid heterogeneous electron transfer, thus presenting a new Fe2O3 phase on the surface.

  14. Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle catalyzed chemiluminescence for detection of nitric oxide in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiliang; Li, Mei; Wang, Bing; Wang, Meng; Kurash, Ibrahim; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Feng, Weiyue

    2016-08-01

    Direct and real-time measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in biological media is very difficult due to its transient nature. Fe3O4 nanoparticles (nanoFe3O4) because of their unique catalytic activities have attracted much attention as catalysts in a variety of organic and inorganic reactions. In this work, we have developed a magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle-based rapid-capture system for real-time detection of cellular NO. The basic principle is that the nanoFe3O4 can catalyze the decomposition of H2O2 in the system to generate superoxide anion (O2 (·-)) and the O2 (·-) can serve as an effective NO(·) trapping agent yielding peroxynitrite oxide anion, ONOO(-). Then the concentration of NO in cells can be facilely determined via peroxynitrite-induced luminol chemiluminescence. The linear range of the method is from 10(-4) to 10(-8) mol/L, and the detection of limit (3σ, n = 11) is as low as 3.16 × 10(-9) mol/L. By using this method, the NO concentration in 0.1 and 0.5 mg/L LPS-stimulated BV2 cells was measured as 4.9 and 11.3 μM, respectively. Surface measurements by synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SRXPS) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) demonstrate the catalytic mechanism of the nanoFe3O4-based system is that the significantly excess Fe(II) exists on the surface of nanoFe3O4 and mediates the rapid heterogeneous electron transfer, thus presenting a new Fe2O3 phase on the surface. PMID:27289465

  15. Paramagnetic Gd(3+) labeled red blood cells for magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Santosh; Stigliano, Cinzia; Key, Jaehong; Ramirez, Maricela; Anderson, Jeff; Karmonik, Christof; Fung, Steve; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Despite significant advances in contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, the lack of truly blood-pool agents with long circulating property is limiting the clinical impact of this imaging technique. The terminal half-life for blood elimination of most small molecular weight gadolinium (Gd) based extracellular fluid agents is about 1.5 h when administered intravenously to subjects with normal renal function. The small size of these extracellular fluid agents does not prevent them from extravasating, especially from damaged vessels which are generally hyperpermeable. Therefore, the development of novel, clinically relevant blood pool contrast agents is critically needed to improve outcomes in the prevention, detection, and treatment of vascular diseases. We have demonstrated the fusion strategies in which the Gd-liposome without any stealth property radically fuses with red blood cells (RBCs) forming MR glowing Gd-RBC with the order of magnitude enhancements in circulation half-life (t1/2 = 50 h) and r1 relaxivity (r1 = 19.0 mM(-1) s(-1)) of Gd. The in vivo contrast enhancement of Gd-RBC was studied by using 3T clinical MR scanner for extended period of time, which clearly visualized the abdominal aorta. In summary, the vascular delivery of blood pool agents may benefit from carriage by RBCs because it naturally stays within the vascular lumen. PMID:27192419

  16. Enrichment of Fetal Nucleated Red Blood Cells by Multi-core Magnetic Composite Particles for Non-invasive Prenatal Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Ying; ZHANG Ai-chen; WANG Qing; HUANG Wen-jun; QIAO Feng-li; LIU Yu-ping; ZHANG Yu-cheng; HAl De-yang; DU Ying-ting; WANG Wen-yue

    2012-01-01

    A novel kind of multi-core magnetic composite particles,the surfaces of which were respectively modified with goat-anti-mouse IgG and antitransferrin receptor(anti-CD71 ),was prepared.The fetal nucleated red blood cells(FNRBCs) in the peripheral blood of a gravida were rapidly and effectively enriched and separated by the modified multi-core magnetic composite particles in an external magnetic field.The obtained FNRBCs were used for the identification of the fetal sex by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH) technique.The results demonstrate that the multi-core magnetic composite particles meet the requirements for the enrichment and speration of FNRBCs with a low concentration and the accuracy of detetion for the diagnosis of fetal sex reached to 95%.Moreover,the obtained FNRBCs were applied to the non-invasive diagnosis of Down syndrome and chromosome 3p21 was detected.The above facts indicate that the novel multi-core magnetic composite particles-based method is simple,reliable and cost-effective and has opened up vast vistas for the potential application in clinic non-invasive prenatal diagnosis.

  17. On-chip immune cell activation and subsequent time-resolved magnetic bead-based cytokine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsuphol, Patthara; Liu, Yunxiao; Ramadan, Qasem

    2016-10-01

    Cytokine profiling and immunophenotyping offer great potential for understanding many disease mechanisms, personalized diagnosis, and immunotherapy. Here, we demonstrate a time-resolved detection of cytokine from a single cell cluster using an in situ magnetic immune assay. An array of triple-layered microfluidic chambers was fabricated to enable simultaneous cell culture under perfusion flow and detection of the induced cytokines at multiple time-points. Each culture chamber comprises three fluidic compartments which are dedicated to, cell culture, perfusion and immunoassay. The three compartments are separated by porous membranes, which allow the diffusion of fresh nutrient from the perfusion compartment into the cell culture compartment and cytokines secretion from the cell culture compartment into the immune assay compartment. This structure hence enables capturing the released cytokines without disturbing the cell culture and without minimizing benefit gain from perfusion. Functionalized magnetic beads were used as a solid phase carrier for cytokine capturing and quantification. The cytokines released from differential stimuli were quantified in situ in non-differentiated U937 monocytes and differentiated macrophages.

  18. Quantification of choline concentration following liver cell apoptosis using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Wei Shen; Zhen Cao; Ke-Zeng You; Zhong-Xian Yang; Ye-Yu Xiao; Xiao-Fang Cheng; Yao-Wen Chen

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the feasibility of quantifying liver choline concentrations in both normal and apoptotic rabbit livers in vivo,using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS).METHODS:1H-MRS was performed in 18 rabbits using a 1.5T GE MR system with an eight-channel head/neck receiving coil.Fifteen rabbits were injected with sodium selenite at a dose of 10 μmol/kg to induce the liver cell apoptosis.Point-resolved spectroscopy sequencelocalized spectra were obtained from 10 livers once before and once 24 h after sodium selenite injection in vivo.T1 and T2 relaxation time of water and choline was measured separately in the livers of three healthy rabbits and three selenite-treated rabbits.Hematoxylin and eosin and dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining was used to detect and confirm apoptosis.Choline peak areas were measured relative to unsuppressed water using LCModel.Relaxation attenuation was corrected using the average of T1 and T2 relaxation time.The choline concentration was quantified using a formula,which was tested by a phantom with a known concentration.RESULTS:Apoptosis of hepatic cells was confirmed by TUNEL assay.In phantom experiment,the choline concentration (3.01 mmol/L),measured by 1H-MRS,was in good agreement with the actual concentration (3 mmol/L).The average T1 and T2 relaxation time of choline was 612 ± 15 ms and 74 ± 4 ms in the control group and 670 ± 27 ms and 78 ± 5 ms in apoptotic livers in vivo,respectively.Choline was quantified in 10 rabbits,once before and once after the injection with sodium selenite.The choline concentration decreased from 14.5 ± 7.57 mmol/L before sodium selenite injection to 10.8 ± 6.58 mmol/L (mean ± SD,n =10) after treatment (Z =-2.395,P < 0.05,two-sample paired Wilcoxon test).CONCLUSION:1H-MRS can be used to quantify liver choline in vivo using unsuppressed water as an internal reference.Decreased liver choline concentrations are found in sodium selenite-treated rabbits undergoing liver cell

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging tracking of human adipose derived stromal cells within three-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lalande

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For bone tissue engineering, human Adipose Derived Stem Cells (hADSCs are proposed to be associated with a scaffold for promoting bone regeneration. After implantation, cellularised scaffolds require a non-invasive method for monitoring their fate in vivo. The purpose of this study was to use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI-based tracking of these cells, labelled with magnetic agents for in vivo longitudinal assessment. hADSCs were isolated from adipose tissue and labelled with USPIO-rhodamine (Ultrasmall SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide. USPIO internalisation, absence of toxicity towards hADSCs, and osteogenic differentiation of the labelled cells were evaluated in standard culture conditions. Labelled cells were then seeded within a 3D porous polysaccharide-based scaffold and imaged in vitro using fluorescence microscopy and MRI. Cellularised scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and MRI analyses were performed from 1 to 28 d after implantation. In vitro, no effect of USPIO labelling on cell viability and osteogenic differentiation was found. USPIO were efficiently internalised by hADSCs and generated a high T2* contrast. In vivo MRI revealed that hADSCs remain detectable until 28 d after implantation and could migrate from the scaffold and colonise the area around it. These data suggested that this scaffold might behave as a cell carrier capable of both holding a cell fraction and delivering cells to the site of implantation. In addition, the present findings evidenced that MRI is a reliable technique to validate cell-seeding procedures in 3D porous scaffolds, and to assess the fate of hADSCs transplanted in vivo.

  20. Rapid detection of Clostridium difficile via magnetic bead aggregation in cost-effective polyester microdevices with cell phone image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Cabaniss, Scott T; Angotti, Morgan L; Moore, John H; Abhyankar, Mayuresh; Shukla, Nishant; Mills, Daniel L; Kessel, Bryan G; Garner, Gavin T; Swami, Nathan S; Landers, James P

    2016-10-01

    Pathogen detection has traditionally been accomplished by utilizing methods such as cell culture, immunoassays, and nucleic acid amplification tests; however, these methods are not easily implemented in resource-limited settings because special equipment for detection and thermal cycling is often required. In this study, we present a magnetic bead aggregation assay coupled to an inexpensive microfluidic fabrication technique that allows for cell phone detection and analysis of a notable pathogen in less than one hour. Detection is achieved through the use of a custom-built system that allows for fluid flow control via centrifugal force, as well as manipulation of magnetic beads with an adjustable rotating magnetic field. Cell phone image capture and analysis is housed in a 3D-printed case with LED backlighting and a lid-mounted Android phone. A custom-written application (app.) is employed to interrogate images for the extent of aggregation present following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) coupled to product-inhibited bead aggregation (PiBA) for detection of target sequences. Clostridium difficile is a pathogen of increasing interest due to its causative role in intestinal infections following antibiotic treatment, and was therefore chosen as the pathogen of interest in the present study to demonstrate the rapid, cost-effective, and sequence-specific detection capabilities of the microfluidic platform described herein.

  1. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sangram K.; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L.; Dediu, V. Alek

    2016-01-01

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial–magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26451743

  2. Acute and chronic effects of exposure to a 1-mT magnetic field on the cytoskeleton, stress proteins, and proliferation of astroglial cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the effects of exposure to static, sinusoidal (50 Hz), and combined static/sinusoidal magnetic fields on cultured astroglial cells. Confluent primary cultures of astroglial cells were exposed to a 1-mT sinusoidal, static, or combined magnetic field for 1 h. In another experiment, cells were exposed to the combined magnetic field for 1, 2, and 4 h. The hsp25, hsp60, hsp70, actin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein contents of the astroglial cells were determined by immunoblotting 24 h after exposure. No significant differences were seen between control and exposed cells with respect to their contents of these proteins, neither were any changes in cell morphology observed. In a third experiment to determine the effect of a chronic (11-day) exposure to a combined 1-mT static/sinusoidal magnetic field on the proliferation of cultured astroglial cells, no significant differences were seen between control, sham-exposed, or exposed cells. These results suggest that exposure to 1-mT sinusoidal, static, or combined magnetic fields has no significant effects on the stress, cytoskeletal protein levels in, or proliferation of cultured astroglial cells

  3. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogabathina, Hari; Olson, Peter; Rathi, Vikas K.; Biederman, Robert W. W.

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient's cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos. PMID:24826266

  4. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Bogabathina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient’s cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos.

  5. Sequential Enrichment with Titania-coated Magnetic Mesoporous Hollow Silica Microspheres and Zirconium Arsenate-modified Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Study of Phosphoproteome of HL60 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiong-Wei; Li, Xiao-Shui; Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Fan; Cai, Qian; Feng, Yu-Qi; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important types of post-translational modifications, reversible phosphorylation of proteins plays crucial roles in a large number of biological processes. However, owing to the relatively low abundance and dynamic nature of phosphorylation and the presence of the unphosphorylated peptides in large excess, phosphopeptide enrichment is indispensable in large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis. Metal oxides including titanium dioxide have become prominent affinity materials to enrich phosphopeptides prior to their analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In the current study, we established a novel strategy, which encompassed strong cation exchange chromatography, sequential enrichment of phosphopeptides using titania-coated magnetic mesoporous hollow silica microspheres (TiO2/MHMSS) and zirconium arsenate-modified magnetic nanoparticles (ZrAs-Fe3O4@SiO2), and LC-MS/MS analysis, for the proteome-wide identification of phosphosites of proteins in HL60 cells. In total, we were able to identify 11579 unique phosphorylation sites in 3432 unique proteins. Additionally, our results suggested that TiO2/MHMSS and ZrAs-Fe3O4@SiO2 are complementary in phosphopeptide enrichment, where the two types of materials displayed preferential binding of peptides carrying multiple and single phosphorylation sites, respectively. PMID:25262027

  6. Sequential enrichment with titania-coated magnetic mesoporous hollow silica microspheres and zirconium arsenate-modified magnetic nanoparticles for the study of phosphoproteome of HL60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiong-Wei; Li, Xiao-Shui; Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Fan; Cai, Qian; Feng, Yu-Qi; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-10-24

    As one of the most important types of post-translational modifications, reversible phosphorylation of proteins plays crucial roles in a large number of biological processes. However, owing to the relatively low abundance and dynamic nature of phosphorylation and the presence of the unphosphorylated peptides in large excess, phosphopeptide enrichment is indispensable in large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis. Metal oxides including titanium dioxide have become prominent affinity materials to enrich phosphopeptides prior to their analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In the current study, we established a novel strategy, which encompassed strong cation exchange chromatography, sequential enrichment of phosphopeptides using titania-coated magnetic mesoporous hollow silica microspheres (TiO2/MHMSS) and zirconium arsenate-modified magnetic nanoparticles (ZrAs-Fe3O4@SiO2), and LC-MS/MS analysis, for the proteome-wide identification of phosphosites of proteins in HL60 cells. In total, we were able to identify 11,579 unique phosphorylation sites in 3432 unique proteins. Additionally, our results suggested that TiO2/MHMSS and ZrAs-Fe3O4@SiO2 are complementary in phosphopeptide enrichment, where the two types of materials displayed preferential binding of peptides carrying multiple and single phosphorylation sites, respectively.

  7. Generation of Helical and Axial Magnetic Fields by the Relativistic Laser Pulses in Under-dense Plasma: Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chun-Yang; Zhu, Shao-Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2002-07-01

    The quasi-static magnetic fields created in the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with under-dense plasmas have been investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The relativistic ponderomotive force can drive an intense electron current in the laser propagation direction, which is responsible for the generation of a helical magnetic field. The axial magnetic field results from a difference beat of wave-wave, which drives a solenoidal current. In particular, the physical significance of the kinetic model for the generation of the axial magnetic field is discussed.

  8. Proteomic signature of arabidopsis cell cultures exposed to magnetically induced hyper- and microgravity environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Herranz; A.I. Manzano; J.J.W.A. van Loon; P.C.M. Christianen; F.J. Medina

    2013-01-01

    Earth-based microgravity simulation techniques are required due to space research constraints. Using diamagnetic levitation, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana in vitro callus cultures to environments with different levels of effective gravity and magnetic field strengths (B) simultaneously. The enviro

  9. The magnetic field of Betelgeuse: a local dynamo from giant convection cells?

    OpenAIRE

    Auriere, M.; Donati, J.-F.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Perrin, G.; Petit, P.; Roudier, T.

    2010-01-01

    Betelgeuse is an M supergiant with a complex and extended atmosphere, which also harbors spots and giant granules at its surface. A possible magnetic field could contribute to the mass loss and to the heating of the outer atmosphere. We observed Betelgeuse, to directly study and infer the nature of its magnetic field. We used the new-generation spectropolarimeter NARVAL and the least square deconvolution (LSD) method to detect circular polarization within the photospheric absorption lines of ...

  10. Increased cellular uptake of biocompatible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles into malignant cells by an external magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prijic, Sara; Scancar, Janez; Romih, Rok; Cemazar, Maja; Bregar, Vladimir B; Znidarsic, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor

    2010-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are used as delivery systems for different therapeutics including nucleic acids for magnetofection-mediated gene therapy. The aim of our study was to evaluate physicochemical properties, biocompatibility, cellular uptake and trafficking pathways of the custom-synthesized SPIONs for their potential use in magnetofection. Custom-synthesized SPIONs were tested for size, shape, crystalline composition and magnetic behavior using a transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer and magnetometer. SPIONs were dispersed in different aqueous media to obtain ferrofluids, which were tested for pH and stability using a pH meter and zetameter. Cytotoxicity was determined using the MTS and clonogenic assays. Cellular uptake and trafficking pathways were qualitatively evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and quantitatively by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. SPIONs were composed of an iron oxide core with a diameter of 8-9 nm, coated with a 2-nm-thick layer of silica. SPIONs, dispersed in 0.9% NaCl solution, resulted in a stable ferrofluid at physiological pH for several months. SPIONs were not cytotoxic in a broad range of concentrations and were readily internalized into different cells by endocytosis. Exposure to neodymium-iron-boron magnets significantly increased the cellular uptake of SPIONs, predominantly into malignant cells. The prepared SPIONs displayed adequate physicochemical and biomedical properties for potential use in magnetofection. Their cellular uptake was dependent on the cell type, and their accumulation within the cells was dependent on the duration of exposure to an external magnetic field. PMID:20602230

  11. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity

  12. Full-power test of a string of magnets comprising a half-cell of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgett, W.; Christianson, M.; Coombes, R. [and others

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we describe the full-powered operation of a string of industrially-fabricated magnets comprising a half-cell of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The completion of these tests marks the first successful operation of a major SSC subsystem. The five 15-m long dipole magnets in the string had an aperture of 50 mm and the single 5-m long quadrupole aperture was 40 mm. Power and cryogenic connections were made to the string through spool pieces that are prototypes for SSC operations. The string was cooled to cryogenic temperatures in early July, 1992, and power tests were performed at progressively higher currents up to the nominal SSC operating point above 6500 amperes achieved in mid-August. In this paper we report on the electrical and cryogenic performance of the string components and the quench protection system during these initial tests.

  13. Full-power test of a string of magnets comprising a half-cell of the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe the full-powered operation of a string of industrially-fabricated magnets comprising a half-cell of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The completion of these tests marks the first successful operation of a major SSC subsystem. The five 15-m long dipole magnets in the string had an aperture of 50 mm and the single 5-m long quadrupole aperture was 40 mm. Power and cryogenic connections were made to the string through spool pieces that are prototypes for SSC operations. The string was cooled to cryogenic temperatures in early July, 1992, and power tests were performed at progressively higher currents up to the nominal SSC operating point above 6500 amperes achieved in mid-August. In this paper we report on the electrical and cryogenic performance of the string components and the quench protection system during these initial tests

  14. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción 4070386 (Chile); Muñoz, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Viñas, Adolfo F. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, Juan A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología (CEDENNA), Santiago 9170124 (Chile)

    2015-09-15

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity.

  15. Biofunctionalized magnetic nanospheres-based cell sorting strategy for efficient isolation, detection and subtype analyses of heterogeneous circulating hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lan; Wu, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Hu, Jiao; Tang, Man; Qi, Chu-Bo; Li, Na; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-11-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an awful threat to human health. Early-stage HCC may be detected by isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood samples, which is beneficial to the diagnosis and therapy. However, the extreme rarity and high heterogeneity of HCC CTCs have been restricting the relevant research. To achieve an efficient isolation, reliable detection and subtype analyses of heterogeneous HCC CTCs, herein, we present a cell sorting strategy based on anti-CD45 antibody-modified magnetic nanospheres. By this strategy, leukocyte depletion efficiency was up to 99.9% within 30min in mimic clinical samples, and the purity of the spiked HCC cells was improved 265-317-fold. Besides, the isolated HCC cells remained viable at 92.3% and could be directly recultured. Moreover, coupling the convenient, fast and effective cell sorting strategy with specific ICC identification via biomarkers AFP and GPC3, HCC CTCs were detectable in peripheral blood samples, showing the potential for HCC CTC detection in clinic. Notably, this immunomagnetic cell sorting strategy enabled isolating more heterogeneous HCC cells compared with the established EpCAM-based methods, and further achieved characterization of three different CTC subtypes from one clinical HCC blood sample, which may assist clinical HCC analyses such as prognosis or personalized treatment. PMID:27240010

  16. Construction of Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles and the effect on Ang2 gene expression in human malignant melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, ZHAO-LIANG; YOU, CAI-LIAN; WANG, BIAO; LIN, JIAN-HONG; HU, XUE-FENG; SHAN, XIU-YING; WANG, MEI-SHUI; ZHENG, HOU-BING; ZHANG, YAN-DING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct angiopoietin-2 (Ang2)-small interfering (si)RNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles and to observe the interference effects of the nanoparticles on the expression of the Ang2 gene in human malignant melanoma cells. Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were constructed and transfected into human malignant melanoma cells in vitro. Red fluorescent protein expression was observed, and the transfection efficiency was analyzed. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to assess the inhibition efficiency of Ang2 gene expression. Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were successfully constructed, and at a mass ratio of plasmid to magnetic chitosan nanoparticles of 1:100, the transfection efficiency into human malignant melanoma cells was the highest of the ratios assessed, reaching 61.17%. RT-qPCR analysis showed that the magnetic chitosan nanoparticles effectively inhibited Ang2 gene expression in cells, and the inhibition efficiency reached 59.56% (P<0.05). Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were successfully constructed. The in vitro studies showed that the nanoparticles inhibited Ang2 gene expression in human malignant melanoma tumor cells, which laid the foundation and provided experimental evidence for additional future in vivo studies of intervention targeting malignant melanoma tumor growth in nude mice. PMID:27313729

  17. Cytotoxicity of magnetic nanoparticles derived from green chemistry against human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumandla, Pranitha

    The core-shelled Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been extensively investigated by the researchers due to their diversified applications. Recently, the study on the toxicity of nanomaterials has been drawn increasing attention to reduce or mitigate the environmental hazards and health risk. The objectives of this thesis are three fold: 1) prepare series functionalized Fe3O4 MNPs and optimize the synthesis variables of; 2) characterize their nanostructures using the state-of-the-art instrumental techniques; and 3) evaluate their cytotoxicity by measurement of nitrogen monoxide (NO) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and single oxygen species (SOS) generation. In order to prepare the crystalline Fe3O4 MNPs, a cost-effective and user-friendly wet chemistry (Sol-Gel) method was used. Two Indian medicinal plants were extracted to derive the active chemicals, which were used to functionalize the Fe3O 4 MNPs. The results indicated that the Fe3O4 MNPs were well-indexed with the standard inverse spinel structure (PDF 65-3107, a=8.3905A, α = 90°). The particle's sizes varied from 6-10 nm with the Fe3O 4 MNPs acting as cores and medicinal extracts as shell. The active chemical components extracted from two Hygrophila auriculata/ Chlorophytum borivilianum are fatty acid, Saponins, sterols, carbohydrates and amino acids, which are in agreement with the reported data. Toxicological evaluations of MNPs indicated that the Fe3O4 MNPs functionalized with Hygrophila auriculata/ Chlorophytum borivilianum extract prepared at room temperature were toxic to the cells when compared to the control, and act in a mechanism similar to the actions of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). These functionalized MNPs, which were prepared at 100 ° C, displayed similar mechanism of action to the anticancer drug (SN-38). It was also found that the MNPs prepared at lower temperatures are less toxic and showed similar mechanism of action as the sodium nitrite (NaNO 2).

  18. Development and experimental basis of local subretinal technique of xenogenic’s injection stem cells labelled by magnetic perticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Belyy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: is to develop a technique for local subretinal injection of xenogeneic stem cells labeled with magnetic particles and to prove experimentally its effectiveness.Material and methods: We used a line of stem cells HEK-293 GFP,labeled with magnetic particles. The study was made on 84 eyes of 42 chinchilla rabbits 6 months of age, the weight were from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. All right eyes were experimental (42 eyes and all left eyes (42 eyes were the control group. In the experimental group we used original complex of polymer elastic magnetic implant (PEMI with laser probe and fixed it to the sclera, then we made a median vitrectomy and injected HEK-293 GFP under the retina using a specially designed dispenser. In the control group PEMI was not fixed. We examined animals using biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, ultrasound scanning, optical coherence tomography  OCT, computer tomography (CT, morphological study (cryohistological sections in 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 day and 1 month after surgery.Results: According the results of biomicroscopy in observation periods up to 3 days the vascular injection was visualized in the area operation. According the results of ophthalmoscopy and ultrasound scanning in 1 day the local retinal detachment was visualized in the area of local injection of the stem cells, which was not visualized in terms of further observations. CT helped us to confirm the local place of PEMI fixation. The morphological study results showed that cells were located in the subretinal space up to 14 days in the experimental group, and only up 3 days in the control group.Conclusion: The suggested surgical technique enables to control the injection of cells into the subretinal space, reduces the risk of tissue damage and exit cells in the vitreous space. The suggested methodology allows the fixing of the cellular material in the local place of the injection and enables to predict cells`s movement.

  19. Supersonic Magnetic Upflows in Granular Cells Observed with Sunrise/IMaX

    CERN Document Server

    Borrero, J M; Schlichenmaier, R; Solanki, S K; Bonet, J A; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Schmidt, W; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A; Domingo, V; Knoelker, M

    2010-01-01

    Using the IMaX instrument on-board the Sunrise stratospheric balloon-telescope we have detected extremely shifted polarization signals around the Fe I 5250.217 {\\AA} spectral line within granules in the solar photosphere. We interpret the velocities associated with these events as corresponding to supersonic and magnetic upflows. In addition, they are also related to the appearance of opposite polarities and highly inclined magnetic fields. This suggests that they are produced by the reconnection of emerging magnetic loops through granular upflows. The events occupy an average area of 0.046 arcsec$^2$ and last for about 80 seconds, with larger events having longer lifetimes. These supersonic events occur at a rate of $1.3\\times10^{-5}$ occurrences per second per arcsec$^{2}$.

  20. Planar integrated magnetics design in wide input range DC-DC converter for fuel cell application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhe; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius;

    2010-01-01

    , hereby increasing the power density of converters. A new planar integrated magnetics (PIM) technique for a phase-shift plus duty cycle controlled hybrid bi-directional DC/DC converter is presented and investigated in this paper. The main magnetic components including one boost inductor and two...... independent transformers are integrated into an E-I-E core geometry. Utilizing the flux cancellation as the principle of uncoupling, the transformers and the boost inductor are integrated, to reduce the total ferrite volume and core loss. The transformers and inductor are wound in the outer legs...... and the center legs respectively. The uncoupling effect between them is determined by the winding connections. The middle I-core provides a shared low reluctance flux path, uncoupling the two independent transformers. With the air gaps shift into the center legs, the magnetizing inductance of transformers...

  1. Application of magnetic field hyperthermia and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to HIV-1-specific T-cell cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James P; Southern, Paul; Lissina, Anya; Christian, Helen C; Sewell, Andrew K; Phillips, Rodney; Pankhurst, Quentin; Frater, John

    2013-01-01

    The latent HIV-1 reservoir remains the major barrier to HIV-1 eradication. Although successful at limiting HIV replication, highly active antiretroviral therapy is unable to cure HIV infection, thus novel therapeutic strategies are needed to eliminate the virus. Magnetic field hyperthermia (MFH) generates thermoablative cytotoxic temperatures in target-cell populations, and has delivered promising outcomes in animal models, as well as in several cancer clinical trials. MFH has been proposed as a strategy to improve the killing of HIV-infected cells and for targeting the HIV latent reservoirs. We wished to determine whether MFH could be used to enhance cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) targeting of HIV-infected cells in a proof-of-concept study. Here, for the first time, we apply MFH to an infectious disease (HIV-1) using the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle FeraSpin R. We attempt to improve the cytotoxic potential of T-cell receptor-transfected HIV-specific CTLs using thermotherapy, and assess superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle toxicity, uptake, and effect on cell function using more sensitive methods than previously described. FeraSpin R exhibited only limited toxicity, demonstrated efficient uptake and cell-surface attachment, and only modestly impacted T-cell function. In contrast to the cancer models, insufficient MFH was generated to enhance CTL killing of HIV-infected cells. MFH remains an exciting new technology in the field of cancer therapeutics, which, as technology improves, may have significant potential to enhance CTL function and act as an adjunctive therapy in the eradication of latently infected HIV-positive cells. PMID:23901272

  2. Megalophallus as a sequela of priapism in sickle cell anemia: use of blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, A A; Umans, H; Nagel, R L; Fabry, M E

    2000-09-01

    Priapism is a common complication of sickle cell anemia. We report a little known sequela of priapism: painless megalophallus, with significant penile enlargement. The patient had had an intense episode of priapism 9 years previously and his penis remained enlarged. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging revealed enlarged, hypoxic corpora cavernosa. Megalophallus probably resulted from permanent loss of elasticity of the tunica albuginea due to severe engorgement during the episode of priapism. This sequela needs to be recognized by physicians because no intervention is necessary and sexual function seems to remain intact. PMID:10962334

  3. Magnetic nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  4. A Combined Chemical and Magneto-Mechanical Induction of Cancer Cell Death by the Use of Functionalized Magnetic Iron Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez Banderas, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Cancer prevails as one of the most devastating diseases being at the top of death causes for adults despite continuous development and innovation in cancer therapy. Nanotechnology may be used to achieve therapeutic dosing, establish sustained-release drug profiles, and increase the half-life of drugs. In this context, magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown a good biocompatibility and cellular internalization with a low cytotoxic effect. In this thesis, I induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of iron NWs functionalized with Doxorubicin (DOX) with mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. Two different agents, APTES and BSA, were separately used for coating NWs permitting further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal reflection analysis, BSA formulations demonstrate to have a higher internalization degree and a broader distribution within the cells in comparison to APTES formulations. Both groups of functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by the free DOX (~95% at the same concentration) and non-functionalized NWs formulations (~10% at the same NWs concentration). A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a low frequency magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with the two formulations that is again comparable (~70% at the highest concentration). Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of both groups of coated NWs without the drug increased notoriously when the field is applied (~25% at the highest concentration tested). Here, a novel bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto

  5. Magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed, X-point collapse using Particle-in-Cell simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiklauri, D.; HARUKI, T

    2007-01-01

    Two cases of weakly and strongly stressed X-point collapse were considered. Here descriptors weakly and strongly refer to 20 % and 124 % unidirectional spatial compression of the X-point, respectively. In the weakly stressed case, the reconnection rate, defined as the out-of-plane electric field in the X-point (the magnetic null) normalised by the product of external magnetic field and Alfv\\'en speeds, peaks at 0.11, with its average over 1.25 Alfv\\'en times being 0.04. Electron energy distri...

  6. Magneto-controllable capture and release of cancer cells by using a micropillar device decorated with graphite oxide-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaolei; He, Rongxiang; Li, Shasha; Cai, Bo; Zhao, Libo; Liao, Lei; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Qian; Wang, Hao; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2013-11-25

    Aiming to highly efficient capture and analysis of circulating tumor cells, a micropillar device decorated with graphite oxide-coated magnetic nanoparticles is developed for magneto-controllable capture and release of cancer cells. Graphite oxide-coated, Fe3 O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are synthesized by solution mixing and functionalized with a specific antibody, following by the immobilization of such modified MNPs on our designed micropillar device. For the proof-of-concept study, a HCT116 colorectal cancer cell line is employed to exam the capture efficiency. Under magnetic field manipulation, the high density packing of antibody-modified MNPs on the micropillars increases the local concentration of antibody, as well as the topographic interactions between cancer cells and micropillar surfaces. The flow rate and the micropillar geometry are optimized by studying their effects on capture efficiency. Then, a different number of HCT116 cells spiked in two kinds of cell suspension are investigated, yielding capture efficiency >70% in culture medium and >40% in blood sample, respectively. Moreover, the captured HCT116 cells are able to be released from the micropillars with a saturated efficiency of 92.9% upon the removal of applied magnetic field and it is found that 78% of the released cancer cells are viable, making them suitable for subsequent biological analysis. PMID:23650272

  7. Construction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Peptide Magnetic Nanovesicles with Lipid Bilayers for Enhanced Capture of Liver Cancer Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Wang, Kai; Tang, Wen-Jie; Li, Dan; Wei, You-Zhen; Lu, Ying; Li, Zong-Hai; Liang, Xiao-Fei

    2016-09-20

    Highly effective targeted tumor recognition via vectors is crucial for cancer detection. In contrast to antibodies and proteins, peptides are direct targeting ligands with a low molecular weight. In the present study, a peptide magnetic nanovector platform containing a lipid bilayer was designed using a peptide amphiphile (PA) as a skeleton material in a controlled manner without surface modification. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) peptide nanoparticles (NPs) could specifically bind to EGFR-positive liver tumor cells. EGFR peptide magnetic vesicles (EPMVs) could efficiently recognize and separate hepatoma carcinoma cells from cell solutions and treated blood samples (ratio of magnetic EPMVs versus anti-EpCAM NPs: 3.5 ± 0.29). Analysis of the circulating tumor cell (CTC) count in blood samples from 32 patients with liver cancer showed that EPMVs could be effectively applied for CTC capture. Thus, this nanoscale, targeted cargo-packaging technology may be useful for designing cancer diagnostic systems.

  8. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, C. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7748 (2015)]. Applications to planetary magnetospheres, tokamaks, and the solar wind are discussed.

  9. Aptamer-based isolation and subsequent imaging of mesenchymal stem cells in ischemic myocard by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, R.; Hermanutz-Klein, U.; Northoff, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Transfusionsmedizin; Wiskirchen, J.; Kehlbach, R.; Pintaske, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Guo, K.; Neumann, B.; Voth, V.; Walker, T.; Scheule, A.M.; Greiner, T.O.; Ziemer, G.; Wendel, H.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Thorax-, Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie; Claussen, C.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Radiologische Universitaetsklinik

    2007-10-15

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) seem to be a promising cell source for cellular cardiomyoplasty. We recently developed a new aptamer-based specific selection of MSC to provide ''ready to transplant'' cells directly after isolation. We evaluated MRI tracking of newly isolated and freshly transplanted MSC in the heart using one short ex vivo selection step combining specific aptamer-based isolation and labeling of the cells. Materials and Methods: Bone marrow (BM) was collected from healthy pigs. The animals were euthanized and the heart was placed in a perfusion model. During cold ischemia, immunomagnetic isolation of MSC from the BM by MSC-specific aptamers labeled with Dynabeads {sup registered} was performed within 2 h. For histological identification the cells were additionally stained with PKH26. Approx. 3 x 10{sup 6} of the freshly aptamer-isolated cells were injected into the ramus interventricularis anterior (RIVA) and 5 x 10{sup 5} cells were injected directly into myocardial tissue after damaging the respective area by freezing (cryo-scar). 3 x 10{sup 6} of the aptamer-isolated cells were kept for further characterization (FACS and differentiation assays). 20 h after cell transplantation, MRI of the heart using a clinical 3.0 Tesla whole body scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens, Germany) was performed followed by histological examinations. Results: The average yield of sorted cells from 120 ml BM was 7 x 10{sup 6} cells. The cells were cultured and showed MSC-like properties. MRI showed reproducible artifacts within the RIVA-perfusion area and the cryo-scar with surprisingly excellent quality. The histological examination of the biopsies showed PKH26-positive cells within the areas which were positive in the MRI in contrast to the control biopsies. Conclusion: Immunomagnetic separation of MSC by specific aptamers linked to magnetic particles is feasible, effective and combines a specific separation and labeling technique to a &apos

  10. Integration of Magnetic Components in a Step-Up Converter for Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimczak, Pawel; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    converter is a critical part. The input voltage of the converter decreases while the output power increases. It creates challenges in design of the converter's magnetic components. Scope of this paper is integration of the dc inductor and the transformer on a single core. Such integration improves...

  11. Planar Integrated Magnetics (PIM) Module in Hybrid Bidirectional DC-DC Converter for Fuel Cell Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhe; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius;

    2011-01-01

    , hereby increasing the power density of converters. In this paper, a new planar integrated magnetics (PIM) module for a phase-shift plus duty cycle controlled hybrid bi-directional dc-dc converter is proposed, which assembles one boost inductor and two transformers into an E-I-E core geometry, reducing...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging tracking of ferumoxytol-labeled human neural stem cells: studies leading to clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutova, Margarita; Frank, Joseph A; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Gilchrist, Megan M; Annala, Alexander J; Metz, Marianne Z; Abramyants, Yelena; Herrmann, Kelsey A; Ghoda, Lucy Y; Najbauer, Joseph; Brown, Christine E; Blanchard, M Suzette; Lesniak, Maciej S; Kim, Seung U; Barish, Michael E; Aboody, Karen S; Moats, Rex A

    2013-10-01

    Numerous stem cell-based therapies are currently under clinical investigation, including the use of neural stem cells (NSCs) as delivery vehicles to target therapeutic agents to invasive brain tumors. The ability to monitor the time course, migration, and distribution of stem cells following transplantation into patients would provide critical information for optimizing treatment regimens. No effective cell-tracking methodology has yet garnered clinical acceptance. A highly promising noninvasive method for monitoring NSCs and potentially other cell types in vivo involves preloading them with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) to enable cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here the preclinical studies that led to U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for first-in-human investigational use of ferumoxytol to label NSCs prior to transplantation into brain tumor patients, followed by surveillance serial MRI. A combination of heparin, protamine sulfate, and ferumoxytol (HPF) was used to label the NSCs. HPF labeling did not affect cell viability, growth kinetics, or tumor tropism in vitro, and it enabled MRI visualization of NSC distribution within orthotopic glioma xenografts. MRI revealed dynamic in vivo NSC distribution at multiple time points following intracerebral or intravenous injection into glioma-bearing mice that correlated with histological analysis. Preclinical safety/toxicity studies of intracerebrally administered HPF-labeled NSCs in mice were also performed, and they showed no significant clinical or behavioral changes, no neuronal or systemic toxicities, and no abnormal accumulation of iron in the liver or spleen. These studies support the clinical use of ferumoxytol labeling of cells for post-transplant MRI visualization and tracking.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles for oligodendrocyte precursor cell transplantation therapies: progress and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, SI; Yiu, HH; Rosseinsky, MJ; Chari, DM

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have shown high promise as a transplant population to promote regeneration in the central nervous system, specifically, for the production of myelin – the protective sheath around nerve fibers. While clinical trials for these cells have commenced in some areas, there are currently key barriers to the translation of neural cell therapies. These include the ability to (a) image transplant populations in vivo; (b) genetically engineer transplant cells to au...

  14. Magnetic field mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, R. M.; Stenger, F. J.

    1969-01-01

    Magnetic field mapper locates imperfections in cadmium sulphide solar cells by detecting and displaying the variations of the normal component of the magnetic field resulting from current density variations. It can also inspect for nonuniformities in other electrically conductive materials.

  15. Pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance study of spin relaxation and recombination in thin-film silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehr, Matthias; Behrends, Jan; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Rech, Bernd [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Silizium Photovoltaik, Berlin (Germany); Astakhov, Oleksander; Finger, Friedhelm [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEF-5 Photovoltaik

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the influence of paramagnetic states on electronic transport processes in thin-film pin solar cells with pulsed Electrically Detected Magnetic Resonance (pEDMR) at X-Band frequency and low temperature (10 K). The solar cells consist of an intrinsic microcrystalline absorber layer and amorphous or microcrystalline n/p contacting layers. In addition to the identification of the participating paramagnetic centres by their g-factors, pEDMR can be used to study the dynamics of the electronic processes in detail. We present measurements of modified EPR pulse sequences in order to identify the dominating relaxation mechanisms within correlated solid-state spin-pairs. By this technique a monitoring of the spin and charge motion is possible. In the outlook we present measurements of the electron spin echo envelope and critically discuss modulations in terms of dipolar coupling within the spin-pairs or hyperfine couplings to surrounding nuclei.

  16. Chip-Based Magnetic Solid-Phase Microextraction Online Coupled with MicroHPLC-ICPMS for the Determination of Mercury Species in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Chen, Beibei; Zhu, Siqi; Yu, Xiaoxiao; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Trace mercury speciation in cells is critical to understand its cytotoxicity and cell protection mechanism. In this work, we fabricated a chip-based magnetic solid-phase microextraction (MSPME) system, integrating a cell lysis unit as well as a sample extraction unit, and online combined it with micro high-performance liquid chromatography (microHPLC)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for the speciation of mercury in HepG2 cells. Magnetic nanoparticles with sulfhydryl functional group were synthesized and self-assembled in the microchannels for the preconcentration of mercury species in cells under an external magnetic field. The enrichment factors are ca. 10-fold, and the recoveries for the spiked samples are in the range of 98.3-106.5%. The developed method was used to analyze target mercury species in Hg(2+) or MeHg(+) incubated HepG2 cells. The results demonstrated that MeHg(+) entered into the HepG2 cells more easily than Hg(2+), and part of the MeHg(+) might demethylate into Hg(2+) in HepG2 cells. Besides, comprehensive speciation of mercury in incubated cells revealed different detoxification mechanisms of Hg(2+) and MeHg(+) in Hg(2+) or MeHg(+) incubated HepG2 cells.

  17. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Changlian [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Jianfeng [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Department of Physiology, Henan Traditional Medical University (China); Li, Qian; Huang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Hongfu [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Kuhn, Hans-Georg [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Blomgren, Klas, E-mail: klas.blomgren@neuro.gu.se [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. {yields} Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. {yields} Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. {yields} Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. {yields} Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 {sup o}C. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  18. Magnetoplex based on MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals for magnetic labeling and MR imaging of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jaemoon [Yonsei University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Eun-Kyung [Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Sook; Suh, Jin-Suck [Yonsei University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Haam, Seungjoo, E-mail: haam@yonsei.ac.k [Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Yong-Min, E-mail: ymhuh@yumc.yonsei.ac.k [Yonsei University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    For efficient labeling and tracking via magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of human mesenchymal stem cells (h-MSCs), magnetic labeling agents must be responsive to an external magnetic field. Thus, we developed ultrasensitive magnetoplex as a magnetic labeling agent composed of PEGylated MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals (PMNCs) and polycationics (poly-l-lysine, PLL) for efficient labeling of the h-MSCs and monitoring of the transplanted h-MSCs for a long term. PMNCs were prepared by nanoemulsion methods composed of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals (MNCs) and amphiphilic polymers (mPEG-dodecanoic acid). The prepared PMNCs exhibited excellent biocompatibility and their polycationic complexes (PMNCs/PLL) demonstrated remarkable sensitivity compared with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MION)/PLL or Ferumoxides/PLL. Furthermore, PMNCs demonstrated the potentials for novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies with potential applications in various biomedical fields.

  19. Optically encoded nanoprobes using single walled carbon nanotube as the building scaffold for magnetic field guided cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhuyuan; Ye, Minglang; Zong, Shenfei; Li, Mingyue; Chen, Peng; Ma, Xueqin; Cui, Yiping

    2014-02-01

    We construct a novel fluorescent, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) encoded and magnetic nanoprobe for live cell imaging. To fabricate this nanoprobe, single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is used as the building scaffold while gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and quantum dots (QDs) are employed as the building blocks. Here, Au NPs serve as the SERS substrate and QDs act as the fluorescent agent. Au NPs and SPIONs are first adsorbed on the SWNT via electrostatic interactions. Then a silica layer is coated on the SWNT. Finally, QDs are attached on the silica shell. With such a structure, various optical signals can be readily encoded to the nanoprobe simply by using different Raman molecules and QDs with different emission wavelengths. Experimental results show that the as-prepared nanoprobe exhibits well fluorescence and SERS performance. Furthermore, in vitro experiments demonstrate that the nanoprobe can fulfill magnetic field guided fluorescence and SERS dual mode imaging of live cells. As a fascinating optical encoding material and a multifunctional nanoplatform, the presented nanoprobe holds genuine potential in future biosensing applications.

  20. Pd nanoparticles encapsulated in magnetic carbon nanocages: an efficient nanoenzyme for the selective detection and multicolor imaging of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gaosong; Song, Jingjing; Zhang, Haoli; Jiang, Yuntian; Liu, Weisheng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Baodui

    2015-09-14

    Rapid and simple molecular recognition based techniques for the identification of the subtypes of cancer cells are essential in molecular medicine. However, improving the sensitivity and accuracy of the early diagnosis of this disease remains a major challenge. Herein, we develop a novel approach for the in situ growth of palladium nanoparticles in magnetic carbon nanocages (PdNPs/MCNCs). The confined Pd NPs, which have excellent dispersion in magnetic carbon nanocages, show superior catalytic performance for the cleavage reaction of N-butyl-4-NHAlloc-1,8-naphthalimide (NNPH), thereby producing significant changes in both color (from colorless to jade-green) and fluorescence (from blue to green) through the ICT process. Based on the abovementioned results, a novel sensing platform utilizing the PdNPs/MCNC nanocatalyst as an artificial enzyme and NNPH as a fluorescent and color change reporter molecule for the multicolor imaging and colorimetric detection of cancer cells was developed. We envision that this nanomaterial can be used as a power tool for a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology and medicine. PMID:26248481

  1. A Study of the Conditions of Maximum Filtration Efficiency for a HGMF-Axial Magnetic Filter Cell With Bounded Flow Field

    OpenAIRE

    Badescu, V.; Murariu, V.; Rotariu, O.; Rezlescu, N.

    1996-01-01

    The theory of magnetic particles′ capture on a HGMF-axial magnetic filter cell with bounded flow field is presented. The equations of particle motion for both potential and laminar flow are obtained. By analytical solving of these equations, the trajectories of particles are established. The flow velocity of the fluid suspension for the case of potential flow is set equal with the velocity averaged across the tube section for the laminar flow. Thus, it is possible to make a comparison between...

  2. Investigations on the mechanisms change and growth of mammary gland tumor cells under the influence of antiestrogenic drugs and low-frequency magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present project we investigated the molecular mechanism of the decreased antiproliferative effect of the antiestrogenic drug Tamoxifen and the pineal gland hormone Melatonin on breast cancer cells in the presence of low-frequency electromagnetic fields. New unique incubators were developed for the exposure of the cells to controlled, highly homogenous magnetic fields. MCF-7 p40 cells exposed to 1.2 μT expressed 20 genes more than two times stronger than control cells, MCF-7p181 cells 61 genes. 16 genes were expressed weaker in MCF-7p40 cells, 41 genes in MCF-7p181. The increased expression of the particularly interesting coactivators, AIB1 and SRC-1, and of urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen-activator inhibitor was confirmed using RT-PCR and Western blot. The corepressors, N-Cor and SMRT, and various metastasis-suppressor genes were expressed lower in the exposed cells. Investigations of signal transduction revealed only MAP-kinase Erk1 being more strongly activated after one hour exposure to the magnetic field, while stress-activated MAP-kinases, junK and p38, were not activated by the magnetic field or even slightly deactivated. Experiments on Melatonin action in the magnetic field showed that expression of the two Melatonin receptors, MT1 and RZRα, was only marginally altered at 1,2 μT. Of the target genes of Melatonin expression of tumorsuppressors p53 and p21waf was decreased in the magnetic field whereas the decrease in expression of BRCA1 and c-myc by Melatonin was less strong in the magnetic field.

  3. Generation of Helical and Axial Magnetic Fields by the Relativistic Laser Pulses in Under-dense Plasma: Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑春阳; 朱少平; 贺贤土

    2002-01-01

    The quasi-static magnetic fields created in the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with under-dense plasmashave been investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The relativistic ponderomotive force candrive an intense electron current in the laser propagation direction, which is responsible for the generation ofa helical magnetic field. The axial magnetic field results from a difference beat of wave-wave, which drives asolenoidal current. In particular, the physical significance of the kinetic model for the generation of the axialmagnetic field is discussed.

  4. In vitro study on apoptotic cell death by effective magnetic hyperthermia with chitosan-coated MnFe2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yunok; Lee, Nohyun; Kang, Hyun Wook; Oh, Junghwan

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been widely investigated as a hyperthermic agent for cancer treatment. In this study, thermally responsive Chitosan-coated MnFe2O4 (Chitosan-MnFe2O4) nanoparticles were developed to conduct localized magnetic hyperthermia for cancer treatment. Hydrophobic MnFe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal decomposition and modified with 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) for further conjugation of chitosan. Chitosan-MnFe2O4 nanoparticles exhibited high magnetization and excellent biocompatibility along with low cell cytotoxicity. During magnetic hyperthermia treatment (MHT) with Chitosan-MnFe2O4 on MDA-MB 231 cancer cells, the targeted therapeutic temperature was achieved by directly controlling the strength of the external AC magnetic fields. In vitro Chitosan-MnFe2O4-assisted MHT at 42 °C led to drastic and irreversible changes in cell morphology and eventual cellular death in association with the induction of apoptosis through heat dissipation from the excited magnetic nanoparticles. Therefore, the Chitosan-MnFe2O4 nanoparticles with high biocompatibility and thermal capability can be an effective nano-mediated agent for MHT on cancer.

  5. Isolation, cultivation and identification of brain glioma stem cells by magnetic bead sorting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuping Zhou; Chao Zheng; Qiong Shi; Xiang Li; Zhigang Shen; Rutong Yu

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a detailed process for obtaining brain glioma stem cells from freshly dissected human brain glioma samples using an immunomagnetic bead technique combined with serum-free media pressure screening. Furthermore, the proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal biological features of brain glioma stem cells were identified. Results showed that a small number of CD133 positive tumor cells isolated from brain glioma samples survived as a cell suspension in serum-free media and proliferated. Subcultured CD133 positive cells maintained a potent self-renewal and proliferative ability, and expressed the stem cell-specific markers CD133 and nestin. After incubation with fetal bovine serum, the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein and microtubule associated protein 2 positive cells increased significantly, indicating that the cultured brain glioma stem cells can differentiate into astrocytes and neurons. Western blot analysis showed that tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog was highly expressed in tumor spheres compared with the differentiated tumor cells. These experimental findings indicate that the immunomagnetic beads technique is a useful method to obtain brain glioma stem cells from human brain tumors.

  6. Crystallographic and magnetic structure of HAVAR under high-pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halevy, Itzhak, E-mail: halevyi@caltech.edu [Nuclear Research Center-Negev (Israel); Haroush, Shlomo [Soreq NRC, NRC Negev (Israel); Eisen, Yosef; Silberman, Ido; Moreno, Dany [Soreq NRC (Israel); Hen, Amir [Ben Gurion Univ., Department of Nuclear Engineering (Israel); Winterrose, Mike L. [Department of Materials Science California Institute of Technology (United States); Ghose, Sanjit; Chen Zhiqiang [Brookhaven National Laboratory, NSLS (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Annealed (H1) and cold-rolled (H2) HAVAR has been studied using high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A structural phase transformation was discovered at {approx}13 GPa at ambient temperature, transforming from m - 3 m (S.G. 225) to P 63/m m c (S.G. 194) symmetry. The transition was not reversible on pressure release. The low-pressure cubic phase was found to be more compressible than the high-pressure hexagonal phase. Conventional Moessbauer and NFS shows that the HAVAR is not magnetic at room temperature and no splitting is observed. The SQUID indicates a huge difference in the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility between the cold Rolled HAVAR compared to the annealed HAVAR.

  7. Magnetic reconnection during collionless, stressed, X-point collapse using Particle-in-Cell simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, D

    2007-01-01

    Two cases of weakly and strongly stressed X-point collapse were considered. Here descriptors weakly and strongly refer to 20 % and 124 % unidirectional spatial compression of the X-point, respectively. The reconnection rate, defined as the out-of-plane electric field in the X-point (the magnetic null) normalised by the product of external magnetic field and Alfv\\'en speeds, peaks at 0.11, with its average over 1.25 Alfv\\'en times being 0.04. Electron energy distribution in the current sheet, at the high energy end of the spectrum, shows a power law distribution with the index varying in time, attaining a maximal value of -4.1 at the final simulation time step (1.25 Alfv\\'en times). In the strongly stressed case, magnetic reconnection peak occurs 3.4 times faster and is more efficient. The peak reconnection rate now attains value 2.5, with the average reconnection rate over 1.25 Alfv\\'en times being 0.5. The power law energy spectrum for the electrons in the current sheet attains now a steeper index of -5.5, a...

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging of Stem Cells in Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R. Santoso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has broad applications in regenerative medicine and increasingly within cardiovascular disease. Stem cells have emerged as a leading therapeutic option for many diseases and have broad applications in regenerative medicine. Injuries to the heart are often permanent due to the limited proliferation and self-healing capability of cardiomyocytes; as such, stem cell therapy has become increasingly important in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Despite extensive efforts to optimize cardiac stem cell therapy, challenges remain in the delivery and monitoring of cells injected into the myocardium. Other fields have successively used nanoscience and nanotechnology for a multitude of biomedical applications, including drug delivery, targeted imaging, hyperthermia, and tissue repair. In particular, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs have been widely employed for molecular and cellular imaging. In this mini-review, we focus on the application of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in targeting and monitoring of stem cells for the treatment of myocardial infarctions.

  9. High Antimicrobial Activity and Low Human Cell Cytotoxicity of Core-Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles Functionalized with an Antimicrobial Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hajar; Rai, Akhilesh; Pinto, Sandra; Evangelista, Marta; Cardoso, Renato M S; Paulo, Cristiana; Carvalheiro, Tiago; Paiva, Artur; Imani, Mohammad; Simchi, Abdolreza; Durães, Luísa; Portugal, António; Ferreira, Lino

    2016-05-11

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) functionalized with antimicrobial agents are promising infection-targeted therapeutic platforms when coupled with external magnetic stimuli. These antimicrobial nanoparticles (NPs) may offer advantages in fighting intracellular pathogens as well as biomaterial-associated infections. This requires the development of NPs with high antimicrobial activity without interfering with the biology of mammalian cells. Here, we report the preparation of biocompatible antimicrobial SPION@gold core-shell NPs based on covalent immobilization of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) cecropin melittin (CM) (the conjugate is named AMP-NP). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the AMP-NP for Escherichia coli was 0.4 μg/mL, 10-times lower than the MIC of soluble CM. The antimicrobial activity of CM depends on the length of the spacer between the CM and the NP. AMP-NPs are taken up by endothelial (between 60 and 170 pg of NPs per cell) and macrophage (between 18 and 36 pg of NPs per cell) cells and accumulate preferentially in endolysosomes. These NPs have no significant cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory activities for concentrations up to 200 μg/mL (at least 100 times higher than the MIC of soluble CM). Our results in membrane models suggest that the selectivity of AMP-NPs for bacteria and not eukaryotic membranes is due to their membrane compositions. The AMP-NPs developed here open new opportunities for infection-site targeting. PMID:27074633

  10. The Effects of Weak Combined Magnetic Field on Cell Wall Regeneration and Frequency of Plant Protoplasts Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedukha, Olena

    The major purpose of these experiments was to investigate plant protoplast fusion frequency and regeneration of a cell wall by protoplasts at weak combined magnetic field (CMF) with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The protoplasts were isolated from Nicotiana lumbaginifolia and N. silvestris leaf mesophyll and from callus tissues (Nicotiana tabacum and Glycine max). The special extra apparatus with ferromagnetic shield was used for estimate of CMF with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The fusion of protoplasts is realized by using of parent protoplasts isolated from one plant species, as well as from various plant species. Control samples were situated near the apparatus with CMF. The laser confocal microscopy was used for study of cell wall regeneration by single and fused protoplasts. The cytochemical methods with DAPI and calcofluor dye were also applied as the detectors for protoplast fusion and regeneration of cell wall. We have been established that CMF with frequency adjusted to the cyclotron frequency Mg2+ ions have shown the most positive influence on regeneration of cell wall by protoplasts. CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of K+ ions very weakly affected on the frequency of protoplast fusion. Largest frequency of protoplasts fusion is noted in the CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ in comparison with the control samples.

  11. Influence of static magnetic fields combined with human insulin-like growth factor 1 on human satellite cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Richard; Sommer, J Ulrich; Haas, Dominik; Faber, Anne; Aderhold, Christoph; Schultz, Johannes D; Hoermann, Karl; Stern-Straeter, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering represents a promising research field, targeting the creation of new functional muscle tissue in vitro. The aim of the present study was to show the influence of static magnetic fields (SMF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), as enhancing stimuli on human satellite cell cultures, which are preferred sources of stem cells in engineering skeletal muscle tissue. To detect effects on myogenic maturation and proliferation, AlamarBlue® proliferation, assay and semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of following markers was performed: desmin (DES), myogenic factor-5 (MYF5), myogenic differentiation antigen-1 (MYOD1), myogenin (MYOG), myosin heavy chain (MYH) and α1 actin (ACTA1). As a distinct marker of differentiation, immunohistochemical staining and fusion index determination was performed on satellite cell cultures stimulated with IGF1 and IGF1-plus-SMF with an intensity of 80 mT. Proliferation was increased by additional SMF application to IGF1-stimulated cell cultures on the first day of myogenesis. Relative gene expression of measured markers was increased by IGF1 application in the first days of myogenesis except for ACTA1. Additional SMF application enhanced this effect. Nevertheless we were unable to demonstrate the formation of contractile muscle tissue. Immunhistochemical staining verified muscle origin and all markers were displayed. PMID:25189891

  12. The effect of low static magnetic field on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of human adipose stromal/stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marędziak, Monika; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A.; Lewandowski, Daniel; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) on the osteogenic properties of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). In this study in seven days viability assay we examined the impact of SMF on cells proliferation rate, population doubling time, and ability to form single-cell derived colonies. We have also examined cells' morphology, ultrastructure and osteogenic properties on the protein as well as mRNA level. We established a complex approach, which enabled us to obtain information about SMF and hASCs potential in the context of differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. We demonstrated that SMF enhances both viability and osteogenic properties of hASCs through higher proliferation factor and shorter population doubling time. We have also observed asymmetrically positioned nuclei and organelles after SMF exposition. With regards to osteogenic properties we observed increased levels of osteogenic markers i.e. osteopontin, osteocalcin and increased ability to form osteonodules with positive reaction to Alizarin Red dye. We have also shown that SMF besides enhancing osteogenic properties of hASCs, simultaneously decreases their ability to differentiate into adipogenic lineage. Our results clearly show a direct influence of SMF on the osteogenic potential of hASCs. These results provide key insights into the role of SMF on their cellular fate and properties.

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging of Stem Cells in Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Santoso, Michelle R.; Yang, Phillip C.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has broad applications in regenerative medicine and increasingly within cardiovascular disease. Stem cells have emerged as a leading therapeutic option for many diseases and have broad applications in regenerative medicine. Injuries to the heart are often permanent due to the limited proliferation and self-healing capability of cardiomyocytes; as such, stem cell therapy has become increasingly important in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Despite extensive efforts t...

  14. Nanosized As2O3/Fe2O3 complexes combined with magnetic fluid hyperthermia selectively target liver cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Yu Wang; Jian Song; Dong-Sheng Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the methods of preparing the magnetic nano-microspheres of Fe2O3 and As2O3/Fe2O3 complexes and their therapeutic effects with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). METHODS: Nanospheres were prepared by chemical co-precipitation and their shape and diameter were observed. Hemolysis, micronucleus, cell viability, and LD50 along with other in vivo tests were performed to evaluate the Fe2O3 microsphere biocompatibility. The inhibition ratio of tumors after Fe2O3 and As2O3/Fe2O3 injections combined with induced hyperthermia in xenograft human hepatocarcinoma was calculated. RESULTS: Fe2O3 and As2O3/Fe2O3 particles were round with an average diameter of 20 nm and 100 nm as observed under transmission electron microscope. Upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field (AMF), the temperature of the suspension of magnetic particles increased to 41-51℃, depending on different particle concentrations, and remained stable thereafter. Nanosized Fe2O3 microspheres are a new kind of biomaterial without cytotoxic effects. The LD50 of both Fe2O3 and As2O3/Fe2O3 in mice was higher than 5 g/kg. One to four weeks after Fe2O3 and As2O3/Fe2O3 complex injections into healthy pig livers, no significant differences were found in serum AST, ALT, BUN and Cr levels among the pigs of all groups (P > 0.05), and no obvious pathological alterations were observed. After exposure to alternating magnetic fields, the inhibition ratio of the tumors was significantly different from controls in the Fe2O3 and As2O3/Fe2O3 groups (68.74% and 82.79%, respectively; P < 0.01). Tumors of mice in treatment groups showed obvious necrosis, while normal tissues adjoining the tumor and internal organs did not.CONCLUSION: Fe2O3 and As2O3/Fe2O3 complexes exerted radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia and drug toxicity on tumors without any liver or kidney damage. Therefore, nanospheres are ideal carriers for tumortargeted therapy.

  15. Simulation of microgravity by magnetic levitation and random positioning: Effect on human A431 cell morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.A. Moes; J.C. Gielen; R.J. Bleichrodt; J.J.W.A. van Loon; P.C.M. Christianen; J. Boonstra

    2011-01-01

    Simulation of weightlessness is a desired replenishment for research in microgravity since access to space flights is limited. In real microgravity conditions, the human epidermoid cell line A431 exhibits specific changes in the actin cytoskeleton resulting ultimately in the rounding-up of cells. Th

  16. Induction of growth and proliferation of fibroblast cells in magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Ezatti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tissue engineering is generally defined as developing and changing the laboratory growth of molecules and cells in tissues or organs to replace and repair the damaged part of body. This study was carried out to stimulate the growth of cultured fibroblast cells by a physical electromagnetic method. Methods: First, an air-core coil was prepared and the cell culture plate was placed comfortably into the mold, then the plate containing the culture medium and human fibroblast cell along with air-core coil were placed in an incubator and then connected to the power supply. Thus, the sample underwent electromagnetic field at different times, and cell proliferation was studied by MTTassay. Results: Microscopic images indicated that the cells undergoing electromagnetic field (0.35 amps had a significant growth compared to the cells in control group in a definit range of stimulation. Conclusion: In conclusion, electromagnetic stimulation in a definite range led to cell proliferation and could be used as a positive factor in tissue engineering.

  17. Integrating Cell Phone Imaging with Magnetic Levitation (i-LEV) for Label-Free Blood Analysis at the Point-of-Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baday, Murat; Calamak, Semih; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-03-01

    There is an emerging need for portable, robust, inexpensive, and easy-to-use disease diagnosis and prognosis monitoring platforms to share health information at the point-of-living, including clinical and home settings. Recent advances in digital health technologies have improved early diagnosis, drug treatment, and personalized medicine. Smartphones with high-resolution cameras and high data processing power enable intriguing biomedical applications when integrated with diagnostic devices. Further, these devices have immense potential to contribute to public health in resource-limited settings where there is a particular need for portable, rapid, label-free, easy-to-use, and affordable biomedical devices to diagnose and continuously monitor patients for precision medicine, especially those suffering from rare diseases, such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Here, a magnetic levitation-based diagnosis system is presented in which different cell types (i.e., white and red blood cells) are levitated in a magnetic gradient and separated due to their unique densities. Moreover, an easy-to-use, smartphone incorporated levitation system for cell analysis is introduced. Using our portable imaging magnetic levitation (i-LEV) system, it is shown that white and red blood cells can be identified and cell numbers can be quantified without using any labels. In addition, cells levitated in i-LEV can be distinguished at single-cell resolution, potentially enabling diagnosis and monitoring, as well as clinical and research applications. PMID:26523938

  18. HYPERPOLARIZED 13C MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ITS USE IN METABOLIC ASSESSMENT OF CULTURED CELLS AND PERFUSED ORGANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes non-invasively in human patients. Although 13C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for non-invasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional 13C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), make it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of 13C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies, and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo. PMID:26358902

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  20. Complete hyperfine Paschen-Back regime at relatively small magnetic fields realized in Potassium nano-cell

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, A; Hakhumyan, G; Leroy, C; Pashayan-Leroy, Y; Sarkisyan, D

    2015-01-01

    A one-dimensional nano-metric-thin cell (NC) filled with potassium metal has been built and used to study optical atomic transitions in external magnetic fields. These studies benefit from the remarkable features of the NC allowing one to use $\\lambda/2$- and $\\lambda$-methods for effective investigations of individual transitions of the K D_1 line. The methods are based on strong narrowing of the absorption spectrum of the atomic column of thickness L equal to $\\lambda/2$ and to $\\lambda$(with $\\lambda = 770\\un{nm}$ being the resonant laser radiation wavelength). In particular, for a $\\pi$-polarized radiation excitation the $\\lambda$-method allows us to resolve eight atomic transitions (in two groups of four atomic transitions) and to reveal two remarkable transitions that we call Guiding Transitions (GT). The probabilities of all other transitions inside the group (as well as the frequency slope versus magnetic field) tend to the probability and to the slope of GT. Note that for circular polarization there ...

  1. Spherical fused silica cells filled with pure helium for nuclear magnetic resonance-magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maul, Andreas; Blümler, Peter, E-mail: bluemler@uni-mainz.de; Heil, Werner; Nikiel, Anna; Otten, Ernst [Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Petrich, Andreas; Schmidt, Thomas [ifw Günter-Köhler-Institut für Fügetechnik und Werkstoffprüfung GmbH, Otto-Schott-Str. 13, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    High magnetic fields (>1 T) are measured by NMR magnetometers with unrivaled precision if the precessing spin sample provides long coherence times. The longest coherence times are found in diluted {sup 3}He samples, which can be hyperpolarized for sufficient signal strength. In order to have minimal influence on the homogeneity and value of the measured magnetic field, the optimal container for the {sup 3}He should be a perfect sphere. A fused silica sphere with an inner diameter of 8 mm and an outer diameter of 12 mm was made from two hemispheres by diffusion bonding leaving only a small hole for cleaning and evacuation. This hole was closed in vacuum by a CO{sub 2} laser and the inner volume was filled with a few mbars of {sup 3}He via wall permeation. NMR-measurements on such a sample had coherence times of 5 min. While the hemispheres were produced with <1 μm deviation from sphericity, the bonding left a step of ca. 50 μm at maximum. The influence of such a mismatch, its orientation, and the immediate environment of the sample is analyzed by FEM-simulations and discussed in view of coherence times and absolute field measurements.

  2. Spherical fused silica cells filled with pure helium for nuclear magnetic resonance-magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High magnetic fields (>1 T) are measured by NMR magnetometers with unrivaled precision if the precessing spin sample provides long coherence times. The longest coherence times are found in diluted 3He samples, which can be hyperpolarized for sufficient signal strength. In order to have minimal influence on the homogeneity and value of the measured magnetic field, the optimal container for the 3He should be a perfect sphere. A fused silica sphere with an inner diameter of 8 mm and an outer diameter of 12 mm was made from two hemispheres by diffusion bonding leaving only a small hole for cleaning and evacuation. This hole was closed in vacuum by a CO2 laser and the inner volume was filled with a few mbars of 3He via wall permeation. NMR-measurements on such a sample had coherence times of 5 min. While the hemispheres were produced with <1 μm deviation from sphericity, the bonding left a step of ca. 50 μm at maximum. The influence of such a mismatch, its orientation, and the immediate environment of the sample is analyzed by FEM-simulations and discussed in view of coherence times and absolute field measurements

  3. Cloning and identification of magnetic field-responsive genes in Daudi cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of ELF MF biological effects, the differ- ential display (DD) technology has been used to isolate differentially expressed cDNA fragments in Daudi cells after 50 Hz MF exposure and sham-exposure. Using total RNA isolated from 0.8 mT 50 Hz MF exposed cells and those from sham-exposed cells, one differentially regulated transcript has been found by DD and the expression pattern of the same transcript has been verified by reverse-Northern and Northern analyses. DNA sequence analysis and Genbank research demonstrated that the cDNA fragment (MF-CA) is a novel gene in human cell which is induced by ELF MF.

  4. Water Transport Analysis in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Tsushima; S.Hirai

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) have beenintensively developedfor future vehicle applications andon-site power generation owing to its high energy efficiency and high power density.In PEFCs ,appropriatewater management to maintain polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) hydratedis of great i mportance ,becausethe ion conductivity of membraneislower at lower water content .Consequently,it is of great interest to watercontent and water transport process in PEMs during fuel cell operation.

  5. Splenic red pulp macrophages are intrinsically superparamagnetic and contaminate magnetic cell isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Lars Franken; Marika Klein; Marina Spasova; Anna Elsukova; Ulf Wiedwald; Meike Welz; Percy Knolle; Michael Farle; Andreas Limmer; Christian Kurts

    2015-01-01

    A main function of splenic red pulp macrophages is the degradation of damaged or aged erythrocytes. Here we show that these macrophages accumulate ferrimagnetic iron oxides that render them intrinsically superparamagnetic. Consequently, these cells routinely contaminate splenic cell isolates obtained with the use of MCS, a technique that has been widely used in immunological research for decades. These contaminations can profoundly alter experimental results. In mice deficient for the transcr...

  6. Osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells on poly(L-lactide)/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofibers with static magnetic field exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Organic–inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Shi, Yuzhou; Shan, Dingying; Jia, Wenkai; Duan, Shun [Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Deng, Xuliang [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Yang, Xiaoping, E-mail: yangxp@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic–inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of bone-related cells are modulated by many factors such as scaffold design, growth factor, dynamic culture system, and physical simulation. Nanofibrous structure and moderate-intensity (1 mT–1 T) static magnetic field (SMF) have been identified as capable of stimulating proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Herein, magnetic nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning mixture solutions of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs). The PLLA/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite nanofibers demonstrated homogeneous dispersion of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs, and their magnetism depended on the contents of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. SMF of 100 mT was applied in the culture of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts on pure PLLA and PLLA/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite nanofibers for the purpose of studying the effect of SMF on osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells on magnetic nanofibrous scaffolds. On non-magnetic PLLA nanofibers, the application of external SMF could enhance the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. In comparison with pure PLLA nanofibers, the incorporation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs could also promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in the absence or presence of external SMF. The marriage of magnetic nanofibers and external SMF was found most effective in accelerating every aspect of biological behaviors of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The findings demonstrated that the magnetic feature of substrate and microenvironment were applicable ways in regulating osteogenesis in bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanofibers containing well-dispersed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were produced. • Static magnetic field (SMF) was applied to perform the culture of osteoblasts. • Osteogenic differentiation was enhanced on magnetic substrate with exposure to SMF.

  7. Transport and entry of plasma clouds/jets across transverse magnetic discontinuities: Three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Voitcu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the interaction of a small-Larmor radius plasma cloud/jet with a transverse non-uniform magnetic field typical to a tangential discontinuity in a parallel geometry. The simulation setup corresponds to an idealized, yet relevant, magnetospheric configuration likely to be observed at the magnetopause during northward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. The numerical simulations are adapted to study the kinetic effects and their role on the transport and entry of localized plasma jets similar to those identified inside the Earth's magnetosheath propagating towards the magnetopause. The simulations reveal the formation of a polarization electric field inside the main bulk of the plasma cloud that enables its forward transport and entry across the transverse magnetic field. The jet is able to penetrate the transition region when the height of the magnetic barrier does not exceed a certain critical thres...

  8. Repetitive magnetic stimulation promotes neural stem cells proliferation by upregulating MiR-106b in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Han, Xiao-hua; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Cai-xia; Yang, Yi; Huang, Xiao-lin

    2015-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) proliferation can be influenced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in vivo via microRNA-106b-25 cluster, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the involvement of microRNA-106b-25 cluster in the proliferation of NSCs after repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) in vitro. NSCs were stimulated by rMS (200/400/600/800/1000 pulses per day, with 10 Hz frequency and 50% maximum machine output) over a 3-day period. NSCs proliferation was detected by using ki-67 and EdU staining. Ki-67, p21, p57, cyclinD1, cyclinE, cyclinA, cdk2, cdk4 proteins and miR-106b, miR-93, miR-25 mRNAs were detected by Western blotting and qRT-PCR, respectively. The results showed that rMS could promote NSCs proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The proportions of ki-67+ and Edu+ cells in 1000 pulses group were 20.65% and 4.00%, respectively, significantly higher than those in control group (9.25%, 2.05%). The expression levels of miR-106b and miR-93 were significantly upregulated in 600-1000 pulses groups compared with control group (Pp21 protein were decreased significantly in 800/1000 pulses groups, and those of cyclinD1, cyclinA, cyclinE, cdk2 and cdk4 were obviously increased after rMS as compared with control group (Pp21/cdks/cyclins pathway was involved in the process.

  9. Multifunctional biocompatible graphene oxide quantum dots decorated magnetic nanoplatform for efficient capture and two-photon imaging of rare tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongliang; Pramanik, Avijit; Tchounwou, Christine; Pedraza, Francisco; Crouch, Rebecca A; Chavva, Suhash Reddy; Vangara, Aruna; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Jones, Stacy; Sardar, Dhiraj; Hawker, Craig; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-05-27

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are extremely rare cells in blood containing billions of other cells. The selective capture and identification of rare cells with sufficient sensitivity is a real challenge. Driven by this need, this manuscript reports the development of a multifunctional biocompatible graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) coated, high-luminescence magnetic nanoplatform for the selective separation and diagnosis of Glypican-3 (GPC3)-expressed Hep G2 liver cancer tumor CTCs from infected blood. Experimental data show that an anti-GPC3-antibody-attached multifunctional nanoplatform can be used for selective Hep G2 hepatocellular carcinoma tumor cell separation from infected blood containing 10 tumor cells/mL of blood in a 15 mL sample. Reported data indicate that, because of an extremely high two-photon absorption cross section (40530 GM), an anti-GPC3-antibody-attached GOQDs-coated magnetic nanoplatform can be used as a two-photon luminescence platform for selective and very bright imaging of a Hep G2 tumor cell in a biological transparency window using 960 nm light. Experimental results with nontargeted GPC3(-) and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells show that multifunctional-nanoplatform-based cell separation, followed by two-photon imaging, is highly selective for Hep G2 hepatocellular carcinoma tumor cells.

  10. The effect of magnetic stimulation on the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of human stem cells derived from the adipose tissue (hASCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, João; Gonçalves, Ana I.; Rodrigues, Márcia T.; Reis, Rui L. [3Bs Research Group–Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Guimarães (Portugal); ICVS/3Bs–PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães (Portugal); Gomes, Manuela E., E-mail: megomes@dep.uminho.pt [3Bs Research Group–Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Guimarães (Portugal); ICVS/3Bs–PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães (Portugal)

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) towards the musculoskeletal tissues has been the focus of many studies, regarding MNPs ability to promote and direct cellular stimulation and orient tissue responses. This is thought to be mainly achieved by mechano-responsive pathways, which can induce changes in cell behavior, including the processes of proliferation and differentiation, in response to external mechanical stimuli. Thus, the application of MNP-based strategies in tissue engineering may hold potential to propose novel solutions for cell therapy on bone and cartilage strategies to accomplish tissue regeneration. The present work aims at studying the influence of MNPs on the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs). MNPs were incorporated in hASCs and cultured in medium supplemented for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. Cultures were maintained up to 28 days with/without an external magnetic stimulus provided by a magnetic bioreactor, to determine if the MNPs alone could affect the osteogenic or chondrogenic phenotype of the hASCs. Results indicate that the incorporation of MNPs does not negatively affect the viability nor the proliferation of hASCs. Furthermore, Alizarin Red staining evidences an enhancement in extracellular (ECM) mineralization under the influence of an external magnetic field. Although not as evident as for osteogenic differentiation, Toluidine blue and Safranin-O stainings also suggest the presence of a cartilage-like ECM with glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans under the magnetic stimulus provided. Thus, MNPs incorporated in hASCs under the influence of an external magnetic field have the potential to induce differentiation towards the osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. - Highlights: • Cellular viability was not negatively influenced by the nanoparticles. • Chondrogenic medium influences more the synthesis of cartilage-like ECM than MNPs. • Synergetic effect among

  11. The effect of magnetic stimulation on the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of human stem cells derived from the adipose tissue (hASCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) towards the musculoskeletal tissues has been the focus of many studies, regarding MNPs ability to promote and direct cellular stimulation and orient tissue responses. This is thought to be mainly achieved by mechano-responsive pathways, which can induce changes in cell behavior, including the processes of proliferation and differentiation, in response to external mechanical stimuli. Thus, the application of MNP-based strategies in tissue engineering may hold potential to propose novel solutions for cell therapy on bone and cartilage strategies to accomplish tissue regeneration. The present work aims at studying the influence of MNPs on the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs). MNPs were incorporated in hASCs and cultured in medium supplemented for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. Cultures were maintained up to 28 days with/without an external magnetic stimulus provided by a magnetic bioreactor, to determine if the MNPs alone could affect the osteogenic or chondrogenic phenotype of the hASCs. Results indicate that the incorporation of MNPs does not negatively affect the viability nor the proliferation of hASCs. Furthermore, Alizarin Red staining evidences an enhancement in extracellular (ECM) mineralization under the influence of an external magnetic field. Although not as evident as for osteogenic differentiation, Toluidine blue and Safranin-O stainings also suggest the presence of a cartilage-like ECM with glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans under the magnetic stimulus provided. Thus, MNPs incorporated in hASCs under the influence of an external magnetic field have the potential to induce differentiation towards the osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. - Highlights: • Cellular viability was not negatively influenced by the nanoparticles. • Chondrogenic medium influences more the synthesis of cartilage-like ECM than MNPs. • Synergetic effect among

  12. Enhancing Tumor Cell Response to Chemotherapy through the Targeted Delivery of Platinum Drugs Mediated by Highly Stable, Multifunctional Carboxymethylcellulose-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medříková, Zdenka; Novohradsky, Vojtech; Zajac, Juraj; Vrána, Oldřich; Kasparkova, Jana; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Petr, Martin; Zbořil, Radek; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanoparticles using different formulations, and which can be used for the delivery of chemotherapeutics, has recently attracted considerable attention. We describe herein an innovative approach that may ultimately allow for the selective delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells by using an external magnet. A conventional antitumor drug, cisplatin, has been incorporated into new carboxymethylcellulose-stabilized magnetite nanoparticles conjugated with the fluorescent marker Alexa Fluor 488 or folic acid as targeting agent. The magnetic nanocarriers possess exceptionally high biocompatibility and colloidal stability. These cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles overcome the resistance mechanisms typical of free cisplatin. Moreover, experiments aimed at the localization of the nanoparticles driven by an external magnet in a medium that mimics physiological conditions confirmed that this localization can inhibit tumor cell growth site-specifically. PMID:27246144

  13. Normally-off type nonvolatile static random access memory with perpendicular spin torque transfer-magnetic random access memory cells and smallest number of transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Chika; Abe, Keiko; Noguchi, Hiroki; Nomura, Kumiko; Ikegami, Kazutaka; Fujita, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel nonvolatile-random access memory (RAM) cell design based on a “normally-off memory architecture” using a perpendicular spin torque transfer-magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) based on a four-transistors static random access memory (SRAM) in order to reduce the operating power of mobile processors. After the cell design concept and basic operation are proposed, a stable and reliable operation for read/write is confirmed by circuit simulation.

  14. Intercellular imaging by a polyarginine derived cell penetrating peptide labeled magnetic resonance contrast agent,diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO You-min; LIU Min; YANG Jun-le; GUO Xiao-juan; WANG Si-cen; DUAN Xiao-yi; WANG Peng

    2007-01-01

    Background The cellular plasma membrane represents a natural barrier to many exogenous molecules including magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Cell penetrating peptide (CPP) is used to internalize proteins, peptides, and radionuclide. This study was undertaken to assess the value of a new intracellular MR contrast medium, CPP labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium (Gd-DTPA) in molecular imaging in vitro. Methods Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) and Gd-DTPA respectively labeled with CPP (FITC-CPP, Gd-DTPA-CPP) were synthesized by the solid-phase method. Human hepatic cancer cell line-HepG2 was respectively stained by FITC-CPP and FITC to observe the uptake and intracellular distribution. HepG2 was respectively incubated with 100 nmol/ml Gd-DTPA-CPP for 0, 10, 30, 60 minutes, and imaged by MR for studying the relationship between the incubation time and T1WI signal. The cytotoxicity to NIH3T3 fibroblasts cells was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assay (MTT). Results The molecular weights of CPP labeled imaging agents, which were determined by MALDI mass spectrometry (FITC-CPP MW=2163.34, Gd-DTPA-CPP MW=2285.99), were similar to the calculated molecular weights. Confocal microscopy suggested HepG2 translocated FITC-CPP in cytoplasm and nucleus independent with the incubation temperature. MR images showed HepG2 uptaken Gd-DTPA-CPP had a higher T1 weighted imaging (T1WI) signal, and that the T1WI signal intensity was increasing in a time-dependent manner (r=0.972, P=0.001), while the signal intensity between the cells incubated by Gd-DTPA for 60 minutes and the controlled cells was not significantly different (P=0.225). By MTT, all concentrations from 50 nmol/ml to 200 nmol/ml had no significant (F=0.006, P=1.000) effect on cell viability of mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts, compared with the control group. Conclusions The newly constructed CPP based on polyarginine can translocate cells by carrying FITC

  15. Regional myocardial function after intracoronary bone marrow cell injection in reperfused anterior wall infarction - a cardiovascular magnetic resonance tagging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnesen Harald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trials have brought diverse results of bone marrow stem cell treatment in necrotic myocardium. This substudy from the Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Acute Myocardial Infarction trial (ASTAMI explored global and regional myocardial function after intracoronary injection of autologous mononuclear bone marrow cells (mBMC in acute anterior wall myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR tagging was performed 2-3 weeks and 6 months after revascularization in 15 patients treated with intracoronary stem cell injection (mBMC group and in 13 controls without sham injection. Global and regional left ventricular (LV strain and LV twist were correlated to cine CMR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE. Results In the control group myocardial function as measured by strain improved for the global LV (6 months: -13.1 ± 2.4 versus 2-3 weeks: -11.9 ± 3.4%, p = 0.014 and for the infarct zone (-11.8 ± 3.0 versus -9.3 ± 4.1%, p = 0.001, and significantly more than in the mBMC group (inter-group p = 0.027 for global strain, respectively p = 0.009 for infarct zone strain. LV infarct mass decreased (35.7 ± 20.4 versus 45.7 ± 29.5 g, p = 0.024, also significantly more pronounced than the mBMC group (inter-group p = 0.034. LV twist was initially low and remained unchanged irrespective of therapy. Conclusions LGE and strain findings quite similarly demonstrate subtle differences between the mBMC and control groups. Intracoronary injection of autologous mBMC did not strengthen regional or global myocardial function in this substudy. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00199823

  16. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Qin; Tang, Ying; Fu, Rao; Meng, Qiu-Hua; Zhou, Xue; Ling, Ze-Min; Cheng, Xiao; Tian, Su-Wei; Wang, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xue-Guo; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats.

  17. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Line; Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Erik Holm;

    2013-01-01

    patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific targeting peptide onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated USPIO nanoparticles by click chemistry resulted in a five times higher uptake in vitro in a uPAR positive cell line compared...

  18. The migration of synthetic magnetic nanoparticle labeled dendritic cells into lymph nodes with optical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su H

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hang Su,1,* Yongbin Mou,1,* Yanli An,2 Wei Han,1 Xiaofeng Huang,1 Guohua Xia,3 Yanhong Ni,1 Yu Zhang,4 Jianmin Ma,1 Qingang Hu1,5 1Center Laboratory of Stomatology, Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 2Jiangsu Key Lab of Molecular and Function Imaging, Department of Radiology; 3Department of Hematology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, 4State Key Laboratory of Molecule and Bimolecular Electronics, Jiangsu Provincial Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices; Southeast University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 5Leeds Dental Institute, Faculty of Medicine and health, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The successful biotherapy of carcinoma with dendritic cell (DC vaccines pivotally relies on DCs’ migratory capability into lymph tissues and activation of T cells. Accurate imaging and evaluation of DC migration in vivo have great significance during antitumor treatment with DC vaccine. We herein examined the behavior of DCs influenced by synthetic superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticle labeling.Methods: γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were prepared and DCs, which were induced from bone marrow monocytes of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP transgenic mice, were labeled. The endocytosis of the SPIO, surface molecules, cell apoptosis and fluorescence intensity of EGFP-DCs were displayed by Prussian blue staining and flow cytometry (FCM, respectively. After EGFP-DCs, labeled with SPIO, were injected into footpads (n = 5 for 24 hours, the mice were examined in vivo by optical imaging (OPI. Meanwhile, confocal imaging and FCM were applied, respectively, to detect the migration of labeled DCs into draining lymph nodes.Results: Nearly 100% of cells were labeled by the SPIO, in which the intracellular blue color gradually deepened and the iron contents rose with the increase of labeling iron concentrations

  19. Effects of combined delivery of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field and magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles on hepatic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huixiang; Cui, Yubao; Chen, Zhiqiang; Fu, Qinping; Sun, Mingzhong; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs) have shown promise as drug carriers for treating lung and liver tumors in vivo. However, little is known about the combined delivery of these MNPs with a second approach, extremely low frequency electro-magnetic field (ELFF) exposure, which has been shown to have value for in vitro treatment of tumor cells. Here, ELFF and MNPs were combined to treat healthy (HL-7702) and cancerous (Bel-7402, HepG2) hepatic cells lines to explore the potential therapeutic effects, bio-mechanisms, and potential toxicity of a combined drug-free treatment in vitro. Flow cytometry for anti-AFP (alpha fetal protein) antibody, which coated the MNPs, indicated that the combined treatment induced Bel-7402 and HepG2 hepatoma cells lines into early apoptosis, without significant effects on healthy hepatic cells. This effect appeared to be mediated through cellular membrane ion metabolism. The presence of AFP-loaded MNPs strengthened the effects of ELFF on tumor cells, inducing a higher frequency of early apoptosis, while having minimal toxic effects on healthy HL-7702 cells. Western blotting revealed that the apoptosis-triggering BCL proteins were up regulated in hepatoma cells compared to healthy cells. Flow cytometry and patch-clamp studies revealed that this resulted from a higher MNP uptake ratio and greater cellular membrane ion exchange current in tumor cells compared to HL-7702 cells. Further, patch-clamp results showed that combining MNPs with ELFF treatment induces cells into early apoptosis through an ion metabolism disturbance in cells, similar to ELFF treatment. In brief, the combination of ELFF and MNPs had beneficial effects on tumor cells without significant toxicity on healthy cells, and these effects were associated with cellular MNP uptake. PMID:27186307

  20. Glioma cell density in a rat gene therapy model gauged by water relaxation rate along a fictitious magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Timo; Sierra, Alejandra; Hanson, Timothy; Sorce, Dennis J; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Gröhn, Olli

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal and transverse rotating-frame relaxation time constants, T(1) (ρ) and T(2) (ρ) , have previously been successfully applied to detect gene therapy responses and acute stroke in animal models. Those experiments were performed with continuous-wave irradiation or with frequency-modulated pulses operating in an adiabatic regime. The technique called Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) is a recent extension of frequency-modulated rotating-frame relaxation methods. In RAFF, spin locking takes place along a fictitious magnetic field, and the decay rate is a function of both T(1ρ) and T(2ρ) processes. In this work, the time constant characterizing water relaxation with RAFF (T(RAFF) ) was evaluated for its utility as a marker of response to gene therapy in a rat glioma model. To investigate the sensitivity to early treatment response, we measured several rotating-frame and free-precession relaxation time constants and the water apparent diffusion coefficients, and these were compared with histological cell counts in 8 days of treated and control groups of animals. T(RAFF) was the only parameter exhibiting significant association with cell density in three different tumor regions (border, intermediate, and core tissues). These results indicate that T(RAFF) may provide a marker to identify tumors responding to treatment. PMID:21721037

  1. Cell tracking using {sup 19}F magnetic resonance imaging: Technical aspects and challenges towards clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, Houshang [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Srinivas, Mangala; Vries, I.J.M. de [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Veltien, Andor; Uden, Mark J. van; Heerschap, Arend [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-11-06

    {sup 19}F MRI is emerging as a new imaging technique for cell tracking. It is particularly attractive because of its potential for direct and precise cell quantification. The most important challenge towards in vivo applications is the sensitivity of the technique, i.e. the detection limit in a reasonable imaging time. Optimal sensitivity can be achieved with dedicated {sup 19}F compounds together with specifically adapted hardware and acquisition methods. In this paper we introduce the {sup 19}F MRI technique focusing on these key sensitivity issues and review the state-of-the-art of {sup 19}F MRI and developments towards its clinical use. We calculate {sup 19}F detection limits reported in preclinical cell and clinical {sup 19}F drug studies in terms of tissue concentration in a 1 cm{sup 3} voxel, as an alternate way to compare detection limits. We estimate that a tissue concentration of a few millimoles per litre (mM) of {sup 19}F is required for a human study at a resolution of 1 cm{sup 3}. (orig.)

  2. In Vivo Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Endogenous Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Rodent Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Mei Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain have a significant level of neurogenesis plasticity. In vivo monitoring of adult endogenous NSCs would be of great benefit to the understanding of the neurogenesis plasticity under normal and pathological conditions. Here we show the feasibility of in vivo targeted MR imaging of endogenous NSCs in adult mouse brain by intraventricular delivery of monoclonal anti-CD15 antibody conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. After intraventricular administration of these nanoparticles, the subpopulation of NSCs in the anterior subventricular zone and the beginning of the rostral migratory stream could be in situ labeled and were in vivo visualized with 7.0-T MR imaging during a period from 1 day to 7 days after the injection. Histology confirmed that the injected targeted nanoparticles were specifically bound to CD15 positive cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix. Our results suggest that in vivo targeted MR imaging of endogenous neural stem cells in adult rodent brain could be achieved by using anti-CD15-SPIONs as the molecular probe; and this targeting imaging strategy has the advantage of a rapid in vivo monitoring of the subpopulation of endogenous NSCs in adult brains.

  3. The effect of magnetic stimulation on the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of human stem cells derived from the adipose tissue (hASCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, João; Gonçalves, Ana I.; Rodrigues, Márcia T.; Reis, Rui L.; Gomes, Manuela E.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) towards the musculoskeletal tissues has been the focus of many studies, regarding MNPs ability to promote and direct cellular stimulation and orient tissue responses. This is thought to be mainly achieved by mechano-responsive pathways, which can induce changes in cell behavior, including the processes of proliferation and differentiation, in response to external mechanical stimuli. Thus, the application of MNP-based strategies in tissue engineering may hold potential to propose novel solutions for cell therapy on bone and cartilage strategies to accomplish tissue regeneration. The present work aims at studying the influence of MNPs on the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs). MNPs were incorporated in hASCs and cultured in medium supplemented for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. Cultures were maintained up to 28 days with/without an external magnetic stimulus provided by a magnetic bioreactor, to determine if the MNPs alone could affect the osteogenic or chondrogenic phenotype of the hASCs. Results indicate that the incorporation of MNPs does not negatively affect the viability nor the proliferation of hASCs. Furthermore, Alizarin Red staining evidences an enhancement in extracellular (ECM) mineralization under the influence of an external magnetic field. Although not as evident as for osteogenic differentiation, Toluidine blue and Safranin-O stainings also suggest the presence of a cartilage-like ECM with glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans under the magnetic stimulus provided. Thus, MNPs incorporated in hASCs under the influence of an external magnetic field have the potential to induce differentiation towards the osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages.

  4. Improved longitudinal length accuracy of gross tumor volume delineation with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the longitudinal length accuracy of gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Forty-two patients from December 2011 to June 2012 with esophageal SCC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed. Routine computed tomography (CT) scan, T2-weighted MRI and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) were employed before surgery. Diffusion-sensitive gradient b-values were taken at 400, 600, and 800 s/mm2. Gross tumor volumes (GTV) were delineated using CT, T2-weighted MRI and DWI on different b-value images. GTV longitude length measured using the imaging modalities listed above was compared with pathologic lesion length to determine the most accurate imaging modality. CMS Xio radiotherapy planning system was used to fuse DWI scans and CT images to investigate the possibility of delineating GTV on fused images. The differences between the GTV length according to CT, T2-weighted MRI and pathology were 3.63 ± 12.06 mm and 3.46 ± 11.41 mm, respectively. When the diffusion-sensitive gradient b-value was 400, 600, and 800 s/mm2, the differences between the GTV length using DWI and pathology were 0.73 ± 6.09 mm, -0.54 ± 6.03 mm and −1.58 ± 5.71 mm, respectively. DWI scans and CT images were fused accurately using the radiotherapy planning system. GTV margins were depicted clearly on fused images. DWI displays esophageal SCC lengths most precisely when compared with CT or regular MRI. DWI scans fused with CT images can be used to improve accuracy to delineate GTV in esophageal SCC

  5. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Vascular Changes Induced by Sunitinib in Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Xenograft Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda G. Hillman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate further the antiangiogenic potential of sunitinib for renal cell carcinoma (RCC treatment, its effects on tumor vasculature were monitored by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI using an orthotopic KCI-18 model of human RCC xenografts in nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with various doses of sunitinib, and vascular changes were assessed by DCE-MRI and histologic studies. Sunitinib induced dose-dependent vascular changes, which were observed both in kidney tumors and in normal kidneys by DCE-MRI. A dosage of 10 mg/kg per day caused mild changes in Gd uptake and clearance kinetics in kidney tumors. A dosage of 40 mg/kg per day induced increased vascular tumor permeability with Gd retention, probably resulting from the destruction of tumor vasculature, and also caused vascular alterations of normal vessels. However, sunitinib at 20 mg/kg per day caused increased tumor perfusion and decreased vascular permeability associated with thinning and regularization of tumor vessels while mildly affecting normal vessels as confirmed by histologic diagnosis. Alterations in tumor vasculature resulted in a significant inhibition of KCI-18 RCC tumor growth at sunitinib dosages of 20 and 40 mg/kg per day. Sunitinib also exerted a direct cytotoxic effect in KCI-18 cells in vitro. KCI-18 cells and tumors expressed vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β molecular targets of sunitinib that were modulated by the drug treatment. These data suggest that a sunitinib dosage of 20 mg/kg per day, which inhibits RCC tumor growth and regularizes tumor vessels with milder effects on normal vessels, could be used to improve blood flow for combination with chemotherapy. These studies emphasize the clinical potential of DCE-MRI in selecting the dose and schedule of antiangiogenic compounds.

  6. Magnetic super-hydrophilic carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide composite as nanocarriers of mesenchymal stem cells: Insights into the time and dose dependences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Alessandro E C; Rodrigues, Bruno V M; Rodrigues-Junior, Dorival M; Marciano, Fernanda R; Lobo, Anderson O; Porcionatto, Marimelia A

    2016-10-01

    Among nanostructured materials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have demonstrated great potential for biomedical applications in recent years. After oxygen plasma etching, we can obtain super-hydrophilic MWCNT that contain graphene oxide (GO) at their tips. This material exhibits good dispersion in biological systems due to the presence of polar groups and its excellent magnetic properties due to metal particle residues from the catalyst that often remain trapped in its walls and tips. Here, we show for the first time a careful biological investigation using magnetic superhydrophilic MWCNT/GO (GCN composites). The objective of this study was to investigate the application of GCN for the in vitro immobilization of mesenchymal stem cells. Our ultimate goal was to develop a system to deliver mesenchymal stem cells to different tissues and organs. We show here that mesenchymal stem cells were able to internalize GCN with a consequent migration when subjected to a magnetic field. The cytotoxicity of GCN was time- and dose-dependent. We also observed that GCN internalization caused changes in the gene expression of the proteins involved in cell adhesion and migration, such as integrins, laminins, and the chemokine CXCL12, as well as its receptor CXCR4. These results suggest that GCN represents a potential new platform for mesenchymal stem cell immobilization at injury sites. PMID:27287169

  7. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A;

    1997-01-01

    centrifugation and dual antibody labeling methods. The protocol was designed to compare the efficacy of antitransferrin receptor (CD71)/antiglycophorin A (GPA) antibodies with antithrom-bospondin receptor (CD36)/anti-GPA antibodies in identifying nucleated erythrocytes in maternal blood. Cytospin preparations...... cells recovered did not differ. Seven of seven male pregnancies were correctly identified. One case of trisomy 21 was detected. CONCLUSION: The in situ hybridization analysis of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated from maternal blood using single density gradient centrifugation, anti-CD71/anti...

  8. Characterization of metabolic profile of intact non-tumor and tumor breast cells by high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Roberta M; Altei, Wanessa F; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Becceneri, Amanda B; Cominetti, Márcia R; Venâncio, Tiago; Colnago, Luiz A

    2015-11-01

    (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolic profile of an intact non-tumor breast cell line (MCF-10A) and intact breast tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). In the spectra of MCF-10A cells, six metabolites were assigned, with glucose and ethanol in higher concentrations. Fifteen metabolites were assigned in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra. They did not show glucose and ethanol, and the major component in both tumor cells was phosphocholine (higher in MDA-MB-231 than in MCF-7), which can be considered as a tumor biomarker of breast cancer malignant transformation. These tumor cells also show acetone signal that was higher in MDA-MB-231 cells than in MCF-7 cells. The high acetone level may be an indication of high demand for energy in MDA-MB-231 to maintain cell proliferation. The higher acetone and phosphocholine levels in MDA-MB-231 cells indicate the higher malignance of the cell line. Therefore, HR-MAS is a rapid reproducible method to study the metabolic profile of intact breast cells, with minimal sample preparation and contamination, which are critical in the analyses of slow-growth cells.

  9. Magnetically induced electrostimulation of human osteoblasts results in enhanced cell viability and osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemer, Bettina; Ziebart, Josefin; Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Grunert, Philip Christian; Su, Yukun; Hansmann, Doris; Bader, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    The application of electromagnetic fields to support the bone-healing processes is a therapeutic approach for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. The ASNIS-III s-series screw is a bone stimulation system providing electromagnetic stimulation; however, its influence on human osteoblasts (hOBs) has not been extensively investigated. Therefore, in the present study, the impact of this system on the viability and differentiation of hOBs was examined. We used the ASNIS-III s screw system in terms of a specific experimental test set-up. The ASNIS-III s screw system was used for the application of electromagnetic fields (EMF, 3 mT, 20 Hz) and electromagnetic fields combined with an additional alternating electric field (EMF + EF) (3 mT, 20 Hz, 700 mV). The stimulation of primary hOBs was conducted 3 times per day for 45 min over a period of 72 h. Unstimulated cells served as the controls. Subsequently, the viability, the gene expression of differentiation markers and pro-collagen type 1 synthesis of the stimulated osteoblasts and corresponding controls were investigated. The application of both EMF and EMF + EF using the ASNIS-III s screw system revealed a positive influence on bone cell viability and moderately increased the synthesis of pro-collagen type 1 compared to the unstimulated controls. Stimulation with EMF resulted in a slightly enhanced gene expression of type 1 collagen and osteocalcin; however, stimulation with EMF + EF resulted in a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase (1.4-fold) and osteocalcin (1.6-fold) levels, and a notable increase in the levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2; 1.54-fold). Our findings demonstrate that stimulation with electromagnetic fields and an additional alternating electric field has a positive influence on hOBs as regards cell viability and the expression of osteoblastic differentiation markers.

  10. Elemental speciation in biomolecules by LC-ICP-MS with magnetic sector and collision cell instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology that can monitor and identify inorganic elements in biological and environmental systems was developed. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) separates biomolecules, which are then nebulized by a microconcentric nebulizer. The resulting aerosol is desolved and introduced into either a high resolution ICP-MS device or a quadrupole device with a collision cell. Because of the high sensitivity and spectral resolution and high sample introduction efficiency, many unusual or difficult elements, such as Cr, Se, Cd and U, can be observed at ambient levels bound to proteins in human serum. These measurements are made in only a few minutes without preliminary isolation and preconcentration steps. Serum samples can be titrated with spikes of various elements to determine which proteins bind a given metal and oxidation state. Experiments concerning the effects of breaking disulfide linkages and denaturation on metal binding in proteins were also investigated. Elemental distribution in liver extract was also obtained

  11. Polymer-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for Curcumin Delivery to Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancarella, Serena; Greco, Valentina; Baldassarre, Francesca; Vergara, Daniele; Maffia, Michele; Leporatti, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The new goal of anticancer agent research is the screening of natural origin drugs with lower systemic adverse effects than synthetic compounds. Here, we focus on curcumin, an important polyphenolic pigment classically used as spice in the Indian cuisine. The molecule has high pleiotropic activities including strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its clinical potential is limited due its low solubility and bioavailability. We have developed a layer by layer functionalization of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles (nano-Fe3 O4 ) by coating biodegradable polyelectrolyte multilayers such as Dextran (DXS) and Poly(l-lysine) (PLL). Physico-chemical studies were performed to obtain a high upload of curcumin in Fe3 O4 nanoparticles. Nano-Fe3 O4 were then tested against an ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV-3, to demonstrate their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26085082

  12. Elemental speciation in biomolecules by LC-ICP-MS with magnetic sector and collision cell instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin

    1999-11-08

    A methodology that can monitor and identify inorganic elements in biological and environmental systems was developed. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) separates biomolecules, which are then nebulized by a microconcentric nebulizer. The resulting aerosol is desolved and introduced into either a high resolution ICP-MS device or a quadrupole device with a collision cell. Because of the high sensitivity and spectral resolution and high sample introduction efficiency, many unusual or difficult elements, such as Cr, Se, Cd and U, can be observed at ambient levels bound to proteins in human serum. These measurements are made in only a few minutes without preliminary isolation and preconcentration steps. Serum samples can be titrated with spikes of various elements to determine which proteins bind a given metal and oxidation state. Experiments concerning the effects of breaking disulfide linkages and denaturation on metal binding in proteins were also investigated. Elemental distribution in liver extract was also obtained.

  13. Stimulation of chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived stromal cells by a moderate-strength static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Harsh D; Brady, Mariea Alice; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Stevens, Molly M; Overby, Darryl R; Ethier, C Ross

    2014-06-01

    Tissue-engineering strategies for the treatment of osteoarthritis would benefit from the ability to induce chondrogenesis in precursor cells. One such cell source is bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs). Here, we examined the effects of moderate-strength static magnetic fields (SMFs) on chondrogenic differentiation in human BMSCs in vitro. Cells were cultured in pellet form and exposed to several strengths of SMFs for various durations. mRNA transcript levels of the early chondrogenic transcription factor SOX9 and the late marker genes ACAN and COL2A1 were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and production of the cartilage-specific macromolecules sGAG, collage type 2 (Col2), and proteoglycans was determined both biochemically and histologically. The role of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway was also examined. Results showed that a 0.4 T magnetic field applied for 14 days elicited a strong chondrogenic differentiation response in cultured BMSCs, so long as TGF-β3 was also present, that is, a synergistic response of a SMF and TGF-β3 on BMSC chondrogenic differentiation was observed. Further, SMF alone caused TGF-β secretion in culture, and the effects of SMF could be abrogated by the TGF-β receptor blocker SB-431542. These data show that moderate-strength magnetic fields can induce chondrogenesis in BMSCs through a TGF-β-dependent pathway. This finding has potentially important applications in cartilage tissue-engineering strategies. PMID:24506272

  14. In vivo research in astrocytoma cell proliferation with {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy: correlation with histopathology and immunohistochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jun; Li, Tao; Chen, Xi-Lan [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Department of Radiology, Wuhan, Hubei Province (China); Huang, Shu-Lan [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Department of Neurosurgery, Wuhan, Hubei Province (China)

    2006-05-15

    Assessment of brain tumor proliferative potential provides important prognostic information that supplements standard histopathologic grading. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) gives completely different information, relating to cell membrane proliferation, neuronal damage, energy metabolism and necrotic transformation of brain or tumor tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between {sup 1}H-MRS and tumor proliferative potential in astrocytomas. We studied 34 patients with histologically verified astrocytomas using the {sup 1}H-MRS protocol following routine MRI preoperatively. The tumor in 26 of these patients was classified as grade I/II (low grade), and the tumor in the remaining patients as grade III/IV (high grade) according to the World Health Organization classification criteria of nervous system tumors (2000). The tumor in 21 patients was homogeneous astrocytoma, and of these 17 were classified as low grade and 4 as high grade. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was determined immunohistochemically using streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (SP) staining. The ratios of choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and Cho to creatine (Cr) in those with high-grade astrocytomas (n=4) were significantly higher than in those with low-grade astrocytomas (n=17) (t=2.899, P=0.009; t=3.96, P=0.001, respectively), and were found to be significantly correlated with the expression of PCNA in 21 patients with homogeneous astrocytomas (r=0.455, P=0.038; r=0.633, P=0.002, respectively). (orig.)

  15. Encapsulating magnetic and fluorescent mesoporous silica into thermosensitive chitosan microspheres for cell imaging and controlled drug release in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Rijun; Wang, Yanfeng; Sun, Jie

    2014-01-01

    In this study, for the first time, multifunctional inorganic/organic core/shell hybrid microspheres consisted of Fe3O4 nanoparticles/CdTe quantum dots dual-embedded mesoporous silica nanocomposites (MQ-MSN) as cores and P(N-isopropylacrylamide)-graft-Chitosan microgels (PNIPAM-g-CS) as shells were prepared by copolymerization of NIPAM and CS in the presence of MQ-MSN. The preparation of microspheres (i.e., MQ-MSN/PNIPAM-g-CS) included three stages. First, Fe3O4/CdTe nanocomposites (MQ NCs) were prepared by self-assembly of electrostatic adsorption. Second, MQ NCs were encapsulated into silica spheres by modified Stöber method to obtain MQ-MSN. Third, NIPAM monomers were initiated to fabricate PNIPAM networks with MQ-MSN distributed below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM, and then PNIPAM reacted with CS to form PNIPAM-g-CS copolymers above the LCST, meanwhile the PNIPAM networks collapsed to form microspheres, resulting in the MQ-MSN encapsulated into microspheres. The microspheres were systematically characterized, displaying perfect magnetic/fluorescent properties and thermo-sensitivity. HepG2 cancer cells treated with the microspheres revealed bright fluorescence imaging. Both the efficiency and capacity of Adriamycin (ADM) loaded into the microspheres were gradually increased with ADM concentration increasing. The ADM cumulative release in vitro from ADM-loaded microspheres was significant at a higher temperature (or a lower pH). The released ADM still maintained high anticancer activity, and the blank microsphere carriers hardly produced toxicity to HepG2 cells. Hence, the multifunctional microspheres exhibited a promising application especially as thermo/pH-sensitive drug carriers for in vivo therapy. PMID:24060924

  16. Study on healthcare magnetic concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yushan; DONG Faqin; FENG Jianjun

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic concrete was prepared by adding SrFe12O9 magnetic functional elementary material into concrete, and its magnetism was charged by magnetizing machine. The effect of SrFe12O9 content on magnetic field intensity and the attenuation of magnetic field intensity were investigated in different medium. The blood viscosity of rats kept in magnetic concrete was carried out. The results show that magnetic concrete can be prepared by adding SrFe12O9, and magnetic fields intensity increases with the augment of ferrite content. The attenuation of magnetic fields is mainly related with the density of medium, but it is secondary to the properties of medium. The blood viscosity of rats decreases under magnetic condition, but the blood cells remain the same as before. Experimental results support that magnetic concrete has great healthcare function.

  17. Serum nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics and outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Martin; Pedersen, Anders; Hasselblom, Sverker; Nilsson-Ehle, Herman; Karlsson, Bengt Göran; Pinto, Rui; Andersson, Per-Ola

    2016-08-01

    The prognosis for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients with early relapse or refractory disease is dismal. To determine if clinical outcome correlated to diverse serum metabolomic profiles, we used (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and compared two groups of DLBCL patients treated with immunochemotherapy: i) refractory/early relapse (REF/REL; n=27) and ii) long-term progression-free (CURED; n = 60). A supervised multivariate analysis showed a separation between the groups. Among discriminating metabolites higher in the REF/REL group were the amino acids lysine and arginine, the degradation product cadaverine and a compound in oxidative stress (2-hydroxybutyrate). In contrast, the amino acids aspartate, valine and ornithine, and a metabolite in the glutathione cycle, pyroglutamate, were higher in CURED patients. Together, our data indicate that NMR-based serum metabolomics can identify a signature for DLBCL patients with high-risk of failing immunochemotherapy, prompting for larger validating studies which could lead to more individualized treatment of this disease. PMID:26887805

  18. Non-thermal radio frequency and static magnetic fields increase rate of hemoglobin deoxygenation in a cell-free preparation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Muehsam

    Full Text Available The growing body of clinical and experimental data regarding electromagnetic field (EMF bioeffects and their therapeutic applications has contributed to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action. This study reports that two EMF modalities currently in clinical use, a pulse-modulated radiofrequency (PRF signal, and a static magnetic field (SMF, applied independently, increased the rate of deoxygenation of human hemoglobin (Hb in a cell-free assay. Deoxygenation of Hb was initiated using the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT in an assay that allowed the time for deoxygenation to be controlled (from several min to several hours by adjusting the relative concentrations of DTT and Hb. The time course of Hb deoxygenation was observed using visible light spectroscopy. Exposure for 10-30 min to either PRF or SMF increased the rate of deoxygenation occurring several min to several hours after the end of EMF exposure. The sensitivity and biochemical simplicity of the assay developed here suggest a new research tool that may help to further the understanding of basic biophysical EMF transduction mechanisms. If the results of this study were to be shown to occur at the cellular and tissue level, EMF-enhanced oxygen availability would be one of the mechanisms by which clinically relevant EMF-mediated enhancement of growth and repair processes could occur.

  19. A prospective study on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of testicular lesions: distinctive features of Leydig cell tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manganaro, Lucia; Vinci, Valeria; Saldari, Matteo; Bernardo, Silvia; Cantisani, Vito; Catalano, Carlo [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Pozza, Carlotta; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Pofi, Riccardo; Lenzi, Andrea; Isidori, Andrea M. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome (Italy); Scialpi, Michele [Perugia University, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Department of Surgical and Biomedical Sciences, Division of Radiology 2, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Up to 20 % of incidentally found testicular lesions are benign Leydig cell tumours (LCTs). This study evaluates the role of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the identification of LCTs in a large prospective cohort study. We enrolled 44 consecutive patients with at least one solid non-palpable testicular lesion who underwent scrotal MRI. Margins of the lesions, signal intensity and pattern of wash-in and wash-out were analysed by two radiologists. The frequency distribution of malignant and benign MRI features in the different groups was compared by using the chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. The sensitivity of scrotal MRI to diagnose LCTs was 89.47 % with 95.65 % specificity; sensitivity for malignant lesions was 95.65 % with 80.95 % specificity. A markedly hypointense signal on T2-WI, rapid and marked wash-in followed by a prolonged washout were distinctive features significantly associated with LCTs. Malignant lesions were significantly associated with blurred margins, weak hypointense signal on T2-WI,and weak and progressive wash-in. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 93 %. LCTs have distinctive contrast-enhanced MRI features that allow the differential diagnosis of incidental testicular lesions. (orig.)

  20. Comparison of multi-fluid moment models with particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce an extensible multi-fluid moment model in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. This model evolves full Maxwell equations and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like electron inertia and pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressures for each species and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor for each species. We first demonstrate analytically and numerically that the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. Then, we compare ten-moment and fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Possible ways to improve the simple local closure towards a nonlocal fully three-dimensional closure are also discussed

  1. Magnetophotocurrent in Organic Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells at Low Temperatures and High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, B.; Devir-Wolfman, A. H.; Tzabari, L.; Tessler, N.; Vardeny, Z. V.; Ehrenfreund, E.

    2016-04-01

    We study high-field (up to B ˜8.5 T ) magnetophotocurrent (MPC) related to photogenerated polaron pairs (PPs) in the temperature range T =10 - 320 K in organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells. We find that in the high-field regime (B >1 T ), MPC (B ) response increases with B for temperature T >200 K but decreases with B at T <200 K . MPC (B ) response does not saturate even at the highest field studied, at all T . We attribute the observed high-field MPC (B ) response to two competing mechanisms within the PP spin states: (a) a spin-mixing mechanism caused by the difference in the donor-acceptor (or positive-negative polarons) g factors (the so-called "Δ g mechanism"), and (b) the spin polarization induced by thermal population of the PP Zeeman split levels. The nonsaturating MPC (B ) response at high fields and high temperatures indicates that there exist charge-transfer excitons (CTEs) with decay time in the subnanosecond time domain. With decreasing temperature, the CTE decay time sharply increases, thereby promoting an increase of the thermal spin-polarization contribution to the MPC (B ) response.

  2. Longitudinal Cell Tracking and Simultaneous Monitoring of Tissue Regeneration after Cell Treatment of Natural Tendon Disease by Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Berner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of tendon disease with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC is a promising option to improve tissue regeneration. To elucidate the mechanisms by which MSC support regeneration, longitudinal tracking of MSC labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI could provide important insight. Nine equine patients suffering from tendon disease were treated with SPIO-labelled or nonlabelled allogeneic umbilical cord-derived MSC by local injection. Labelling of MSC was confirmed by microscopy and MRI. All animals were subjected to clinical, ultrasonographical, and low-field MRI examinations before and directly after MSC application as well as 2, 4, and 8 weeks after MSC application. Hypointense artefacts with characteristically low signal intensity were identified at the site of injection of SPIO-MSC in T1- and T2∗-weighted gradient echo MRI sequences. They were visible in all 7 cases treated with SPIO-MSC directly after injection, but not in the control cases treated with nonlabelled MSC. Furthermore, hypointense artefacts remained traceable within the damaged tendon tissue during the whole follow-up period in 5 out of 7 cases. Tendon healing could be monitored at the same time. Clinical and ultrasonographical findings as well as T2-weighted MRI series indicated a gradual improvement of tendon function and structure.

  3. Polyoxometalates functionalized by bisphosphonate ligands: synthesis, structural, magnetic, and spectroscopic characterizations and activity on tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moll, Hani; Zhu, Wei; Oldfield, Eric; Rodriguez-Albelo, L Marleny; Mialane, Pierre; Marrot, Jérôme; Vila, Neus; Mbomekallé, Israel Martyr; Rivière, Eric; Duboc, Carole; Dolbecq, Anne

    2012-07-16

    We report the synthesis and characterization of eight new Mo, W, or V-containing polyoxometalate (POM) bisphosphonate complexes with metal nuclearities ranging from 1 to 6. The compounds were synthesized in water by treating Mo(VI), W(VI), V(IV), or V(V) precursors with biologically active bisphosphonates H(2)O(3)PC(R)(OH)PO(3)H(2) (R = C(3)H(6)NH(2), Ale; R = CH(2)S(CH(3))(2), Sul and R = C(4)H(5)N(2), Zol, where Ale = alendronate, Sul = (2-Hydroxy-2,2-bis-phosphono-ethyl)-dimethyl-sulfonium and Zol = zoledronate). Mo(6)(Sul)(2) and Mo(6)(Zol)(2) contain two trinuclear Mo(VI) cores which can rotate around a central oxo group while Mo(Ale)(2) and W(Ale)(2) are mononuclear species. In V(5)(Ale)(2) and V(5)(Zol)(2) a central V(IV) ion is surrounded by two V(V) dimers bound to bisphosphonate ligands. V(6)(Ale)(4) can be viewed as the condensation of one V(5)(Ale)(2) with one additional V(IV) ion and two Ale ligands, while V(3)(Zol)(3) is a triangular V(IV) POM. These new POM bisphosphonates complexes were all characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The stability of the Mo and W POMs was studied by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and showed that all compounds except the mononuclear Mo(Ale)(2) and W(Ale)(2) were stable in solution. EPR measurements performed on the vanadium derivatives confirmed the oxidation state of the V ions and evidenced their stability in aqueous solution. Electrochemical studies on V(5)(Ale)(2) and V(5)(Zol)(2) showed reduction of V(V) to V(IV), and magnetic susceptibility investigations on V(3)(Zol)(3) enabled a detailed analysis of the magnetic interactions. The presence of zoledronate or vanadium correlated with the most potent activity (IC(50)~1-5 μM) against three human tumor cell lines. PMID:22725619

  4. Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-12-19

    Magnetic nanowires can be used as an alternative method overcoming the limitations of current cancer treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Nanowires are developed so that they selectively attach to cancer cells via antibodies, potentially destroying them when a magnetic field induces their vibration. This will transmit a mechanical force to the targeted cells, which is expected to induce apoptosis on the cancer cells.

  5. RGDS-functionalized polyethylene glycol hydrogel-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles enhance specific intracellular uptake by HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nazli C; Ergenc TI; Yar Y; Acar HY; Kizilel S

    2012-01-01

    © 2012 Nazli et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd. This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012:7 1903–1920 International Journal of Nanomedicine RGDS-functionalized polyethylene glycol hydrogel-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles enhance specific intracellular uptake by HeLa cells Caner Nazli1 Tugba Ipek Ergenc2 Yasemin Ya...

  6. Feasibility of image registration and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning with hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging for non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ireland, Rob H.; Bragg, Chris M; McJury, Mark; Woodhouse, Neil; Fichele, Stan; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Wild, Jim M.; Hatton, Matthew Q.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To demonstrate the feasibility of registering hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance images ((3)He-MRI) to X-ray computed tomography (CT) for functionally weighted intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning.METHODS AND MATERIALS: Six patients with non-small-cell lung cancer underwent (3)He ventilation MRI, which was fused with radiotherapy planning CT using rigid registration. Registration accuracy was assessed using an overlap coefficient, calculated as the proportion of t...

  7. Management of brain metastasis with magnetic resonance imaging and stereotactic irradiation attenuated benefits of prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Omae, Minako; Fujii, Masato; Matsui, Takashi; KATO, Masato; Sagisaka, Shinya; Asada, Kazuhiro; Karayama, Masato; Shirai, Toshihiro; Yasuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Yutaro; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables a more sensitive detection of brain metastasis and stereotactic irradiation (SRI) efficiently controls brain metastasis. In limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC), prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in patients with good responses to initial treatment is recommended based on the survival benefit shown in previous clinical trials. However, none of these trials evaluated PCI effects using the management of brain metastasis with MRI...

  8. Optimal labeling dose, labeling time, and magnetic resonance imaging detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticle labeled mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Hansen, Louise; Friis, Tina;

    2013-01-01

    Background. Regenerative therapy is an emerging treatment modality. To determine migration and retention of implanted cells, it is crucial to develop noninvasive tracking methods. The aim was to determine ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron......-oxide (USPIO) labeled mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Materials and Methods. 248 gel-phantoms were constructed and scanned on a 1.5T MRI-scanner. Phantoms contained human MSCs preincubated with USPIO nanoparticles for 2, 6, or 21 hours using 5 or 10  μ g USPIO/10(5) MSCs. In addition, porcine hearts were...

  9. Self-assembled dual-modality contrast agents for non-invasive stem cell tracking via near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Yan; Xie, Lisi; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Bai, Jingxuan; Huang, Ping; Zhan, Wugen; Wan, Qian; Zou, Chao; Han, Yali; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-15

    Stem cells hold great promise for treating various diseases. However, one of the main drawbacks of stem cell therapy is the lack of non-invasive image-tracking technologies. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging have been employed to analyse cellular and subcellular events via the assistance of contrast agents, the sensitivity and temporal resolution of MRI and the spatial resolution of NIRF are still shortcomings. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals and IR-780 dyes were co-encapsulated in stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to form a dual-modality contrast agent with nano-size and positive charge. These resulting agents efficiently labelled stem cells and did not influence the cellular viability and differentiation. Moreover, the labelled cells showed the advantages of dual-modality imaging in vivo. PMID:27299677

  10. Self-assembled dual-modality contrast agents for non-invasive stem cell tracking via near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Yan; Xie, Lisi; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Bai, Jingxuan; Huang, Ping; Zhan, Wugen; Wan, Qian; Zou, Chao; Han, Yali; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-15

    Stem cells hold great promise for treating various diseases. However, one of the main drawbacks of stem cell therapy is the lack of non-invasive image-tracking technologies. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging have been employed to analyse cellular and subcellular events via the assistance of contrast agents, the sensitivity and temporal resolution of MRI and the spatial resolution of NIRF are still shortcomings. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals and IR-780 dyes were co-encapsulated in stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to form a dual-modality contrast agent with nano-size and positive charge. These resulting agents efficiently labelled stem cells and did not influence the cellular viability and differentiation. Moreover, the labelled cells showed the advantages of dual-modality imaging in vivo.

  11. Novel circulating peptide biomarkers for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma revealed by a magnetic bead-based MALDI-TOFMS assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Li, Wei; Wang, Feng; Qu, Haixia; Qiao, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Lanping; Sun, Yulin; Ma, Qingwei; Zhao, Xiaohang

    2016-04-26

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common malignant neoplasms worldwide. Patients are often diagnosed at advanced stages with poor prognosis due to the absence of obvious early symptoms. Here, we applied a high-throughput serum peptidome analysis to identify circulating peptide markers of ESCC. Weak cationic exchange magnetic beads coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for two-stage proteotypic peptide profiling in complex serum samples collected from 477 cancer patients and healthy controls. We established a genetic algorithm model containing three significantly differentially expressed peptides at 1,925.5, 2,950.6 and 5,900.0 Da with a sensitivity and specificity of 97.00% and 95.92% in the training set and 97.03% and 100.00% in the validation set, respectively. The model's diagnostic capability was significantly better than SCC-Ag and Cyfra 21-1, especially for early stage ESCC, with an achieved sensitivity of 96.94%. Subsequently, these peptides were identified as fragments of AHSG, TSP1 and FGA by linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid tandem mass spectrometry. Notably, increased tissue and serum levels of TSP1 in ESCC were verified and correlated with disease progression. In addition, tissue TSP1 was an independent poor prognostic factor in ESCC. In conclusion, the newly established circulating peptide panel and identified proteins could serve as potential biomarkers for the early detection and diagnosis of ESCC. Nevertheless, a larger cohort will be required for further unequivocal validation of their clinical application. PMID:26993605

  12. Detection of neural stem cells function in rats with traumatic brain injury by manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Hai-liang; SUN Hua-ping; WU Xing; SHA Hong-ying; FENG Xiao-yuan; ZHU Jian-hong

    2011-01-01

    Background Previously we had successfully tracked adult human neural stem cells (NSCs) labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs) in host human brain after transplantation In vivo non-invasively by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the function of the transplanted NSCs could not be evaluated by the method. In the study, we applied manganese-enhanced MRI (ME-MRI) to detect NSCs function after implantation in brain of rats with traumatic brain injury (TBI) In vivo.Methods Totally 40 TBI rats were randomly divided into 4 groups with 10 rats in each group. In group 1, the TBI rats did not receive NSCs transplantation. MnCl2-4H2O was intravenously injected, hyperosmolar mannitol was delivered to disrupt rightside blood brain barrier, and its contralateral forepaw was electrically stimulated. In group 2, the TBI rats received NSCs (labeled with SPIO) transplantation, and the ME-MRI procedure was same to group 1. In group 3, the TBI rats received NSCs (labeled with SPIO) transplantation, and the ME-MRI procedure was same to group 1, but diltiazem was introduced during the electrical stimulation period. In group 4, the TBI rats received phosphate buffered saline (PBS) injection, and the ME-MRI procedure was same to group 1.Results Hyperintense signals were detected by ME-MRI in the cortex areas associated with somatosensory in TBI rats of group 2. These signals, which could not be induced in TBI rats of groups 1 and 4, disappeared when diltiazem was introduced in TBI rats of group 3.Conclusion In this initial study, we mapped implanted NSCs activity and its functional participation within local brain area in TBI rats by ME-MRI technique, paving the way for further pre-clinical research.

  13. Magnetic microfluidic platform for biomedical applications using magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Stipsitz, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Microfluidic platforms are well-suited for biomedical analysis and usually consist of a set of units which guarantee the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalyte in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for perfoming the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gainining interest. This is due to the fact that magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the diagnostic system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are used. In this paper, we present some of our most recent results in research towards a) microfluidic diagnostics using MR sensors and magnetic particles and b) single cell analysis using magnetic particles. We have successfully manipulated magnetically labeled bacteria and measured their response with integrated GMR sensors and we have also managed to separate magnetically labeled jurkat cells for single cell analysis. © 2015 Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Detects Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Akt-Independent Traits Common to Pluripotent Murine Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Malignant Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna M. Romanska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells, a potential source of somatic precursors for cell therapies, cause tumors after transplantation. Studies of mammalian carcinogenesis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy have revealed changes in the choline region, particularly increased phosphocholine (PCho content. High PCho levels in murine ES (mES cells have recently been attributed to cell pluripotency. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway has been implicated in tumor-like properties of mES cells. This study aimed to examine a potential link between the metabolic profile associated with choline metabolism of pluripotent mES cells and PI3K/Akt signaling. We used mES (ES-D3 and murine embryonal carcinoma cells (EC-F9 and compared the metabolic profiles of 1 pluripotent mES (ESD0, 2 differentiated mES (ESD14, and 3 pluripotent F9 cells. Involvement of the PI3K/Akt pathway was assessed using LY294002, a selective PI3K inhibitor. Metabolic profiles were characterized in the extracted polar fraction by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Similarities were found between the levels of choline phospholipid metabolites (PCho/total choline and PCho/glycerophosphocholine [GPCho] in ESD0 and F9 cell spectra and a greater-than five-fold decrease of the PCho/GPCho ratio associated with mES cell differentiation. LY294002 caused no significant change in relative PCho levels but led to a greater-than two-fold increase in PCho/GPCho ratios. These results suggest that the PCho/GPCho ratio is a metabolic trait shared by pluripotent and malignant cells and that PI3K does not underlie its development. It is likely that the signature identified here in a mouse model may be relevant for safe therapeutic applications of human ES cells.

  15. Bare and protein-conjugated Fe3O4 ferromagnetic nanoparticles for utilization in magnetically assisted hemodialysis: biocompatibility with human blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Manios, E.; Gogola, V.; Benaki, D.; Bouziotis, P.; Niarchos, D.; Pissas, M.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetically assisted hemodialysis is a development of conventional hemodialysis and is based on the circulation of ferromagnetic nanoparticle-targeted binding substance conjugates (FN-TBS Cs) in the bloodstream of the patient and their eventual removal by means of a 'magnetic dialyzer'. Presented here is an in vitro investigation on the biocompatibility of bare Fe3O4 FNs and Fe3O4-bovine serum albumin Cs with blood cells, namely red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs) and platelets (Plts). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy (OM) enabled the examination of blood cells at the nanometer and micrometer level, respectively. The observations made on FN- and C-maturated blood samples are contrasted to those obtained on FN- and C-free reference blood samples subjected to exactly the same maturation procedure. Qualitatively, both AFM and OM revealed no changes in the overall shape of RBCs, WBCs and Plts. Incidents where bare FNs or Cs were bound onto the surface of RBCs or internalized by WBCs were very rare. Detailed examination by means of OM proved that impaired coagulation of Plts is not initiated/promoted either by FNs or Cs. Quantitatively, the statistical analysis of the obtained AFM images from RBC surfaces clearly revealed that the mean surface roughness of RBCs maturated with bare FNs or Cs was identical to the one of reference RBCs.

  16. Therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia using Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S.Y.; Chen, M.M.; Fan, J.G.; Wang, Y.Q.; Hu, Y.; Xu, L.M., E-mail: leiming.xu@aliyun.com.cn, E-mail: huying@sohu.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Du, Y.Q. [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-11-15

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells cultured in vitro were treated with ferrofluid containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles and irradiated with an alternating radio frequency magnetic field. The influence of the treatment on the cells was examined by inverted microscopy, MTT and flow cytometry. To study the therapeutic mechanism of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH, Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2 and p53 were detected by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It was shown that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH could cause cellular necrosis, induce cellular apoptosis, and significantly inhibit cellular growth, all of which appeared to be dependent on the concentration of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Immunocytochemistry results showed that MFH could induce high expression of Hsp70 and Bax, decrease the expression of mutant p53, and had little effect on Bcl-2. RT-PCR indicated that Hsp70 expression was high in the early stage of MFH (,24 h) and became low or absent after 24 h of MFH treatment. It can be concluded that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH significantly inhibited the proliferation of in vitro cultured liver cancer cells (SMMC-7721), induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH can induce high Hsp70 expression at an early stage, enhance the expression of Bax, and decrease the expression of mutant p53, which promotes the apoptosis of tumor cells. (author)

  17. A Reuse Evaluation for Solar-Cell Silicon Wafers via Shift Revolution and Tool Rotation Using Magnetic Assistance in Ultrasonic Electrochemical Micromachining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Pa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new reuse fabrication using a tool module with rotation and revolution through a process of magnetic assistance in ultrasonic electrochemical micromachining (UEMM for removal of the surface layers from silicon wafers of solar cells is demonstrated. The target of the proposed reuse fabrication method is to replace the current approach, which uses strong acid and grinding and may damage the physical structure of silicon wafers and pollute to the environment. A precisely engineered clean production approach to removal of surface microstructure layers from silicon wafers is to develop a mass production system for recycling defective or discarded silicon wafers of solar cells that can reduce pollution and cost. The high revolution speed of the shift with the high rotation speed of the designed tool increases the discharge mobility and improves the removal effect associated with the high feed rate of the workpiece. High frequency and high power of ultrasonic with large electrolyte flow rate and high magnetic strengths with a small distance between the two magnets provide a large discharge effect and good removal; only a short period of time is required to remove the epoxy film and Si3N4 layer easily and cleanly.

  18. AGS Booster prototype magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; Jackson, J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Brodowski, J.; Jablonski, E.; Keohane, G.; McDowell, B.; Rodger, E.

    1987-03-19

    Prototype magnets have been designed and constructed for two half cells of the AGS Booster. The lattice requires 2.4m long dipoles, each curved by 10/sup 0/. The multi-use Booster injector requires several very different standard magnet cycles, capable of instantaneous interchange using computer control from dc up to 10 Hz.

  19. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Non-magnetic CNTs and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayondo, Moses; Seifu, Dereje

    Magnetic nanoparticles were embedded in non-magnetic CNTs and graphene matrix to incorporate all the advantages and the unique properties of CNTs and graphene. Composites of CNTs and graphene with magnetic nanoparticles may offer new opportunities for a wide variety of potential applications such as magnetic data storage, magnetic force microscopy tip, electromagnetic interference shields, thermally conductive films, reinforced polymer composites, transparent electrodes for displays, solar cells, gas sensors, magnetic nanofluids, and magnetically guided drug delivery systems. Magnetic nanoparticles coated CNTs can also be used as an electrode in lithium ion battery to replace graphite because of the higher theoretical capacity. Graphene nanocomposites, coated with magnetic sensitive nanoparticles, have demonstrated enhanced magnetic property. We would like to acknowledge support by NSF-MRI-DMR-1337339.

  20. Intracellular labeling and quantification process by magnetic resonance imaging using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles in rat C6 glioma cell line; Marcacao intracelular e processo de quantificacao por imagem por ressonancia magnetica utilizando nanoparticulas magneticas de oxido de ferro em celulas da linhagem C6 de glioma de rato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamani, Javier Bustamante; Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Rossan, Fabiana; Silveira, Paulo Henrique; Cardenas, Walter Humberto; Gamarra, Lionel Fernel, E-mail: javierbm@einstein.br [Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miyaki, Liza Aya Mabuchi [Faculdade de Enfermagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaro Junior, Edson [Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem e Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Objective: To assess intracellular labeling and quantification by magnetic resonance imaging using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles coated with biocompatible materials in rat C6 glioma cells in vitro. These methods will provide direction for future trials of tumor induction in vivo as well as possible magnetic hyperthermia applications. Methods: Aminosilane, dextran, polyvinyl alcohol, and starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles were used in the qualitative assessment of C6 cell labeling via light microscopy. The influence of the transfection agent poly-L-lysine on cellular uptake was examined. The quantification process was performed by relaxometry analysis in T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} weighted phantom images. Results: Light microscopy revealed that the aminosilane-coated magnetic nanoparticles alone or complexed with poly-L-lysine showed higher cellular uptake than did the uncoated magnetic particles. The relaxactivities of the aminosilane-coated magnetic nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic diameter of 50nm to a 3-T field were r{sub 1}=(6.1 +- 0.3) x10{sup -5} ms{sup -1}mL/{mu}g, r{sub 2}=(5.3 +- 0.1) x 10{sup -4} ms{sup -1}mL/{mu}g, with a ratio of r{sub 2} / r{sub 1}{approx_equal} 9. The iron uptake in the cells was calculated by analyzing the relaxation rates (R{sub 1}and R{sub 2}) using a mathematical relationship. Conclusions: C6 glioma cells have a high uptake efficiency for aminosilane-coated magnetic nanoparticles complexed with the transfection agent poly-L-lysine. The large ratio r{sub 2} / r{sub 1}{approx_equal} 9 indicates that these magnetic nanoparticles are ideal for quantification by magnetic resonance imaging with T{sub 2}-weighted imaging techniques. (author)

  1. Optimal Labeling Dose, Labeling Time, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection Limits of Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron-Oxide Nanoparticle Labeled Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Bruun Mathiasen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regenerative therapy is an emerging treatment modality. To determine migration and retention of implanted cells, it is crucial to develop noninvasive tracking methods. The aim was to determine ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide (USPIO labeled mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. Materials and Methods. 248 gel-phantoms were constructed and scanned on a 1.5T MRI-scanner. Phantoms contained human MSCs preincubated with USPIO nanoparticles for 2, 6, or 21 hours using 5 or 10 μg USPIO/105 MSCs. In addition, porcine hearts were scanned after injection of USPIO labeled MSCs. Results. Using 21 h incubation time and 10 μg USPIO/105 MSCs, labeled cells were clearly separated from unlabeled cells on MRI using 250.000 (P<0.001, 500.000 (P=0.007, and 1.000.000 MSCs (P=0.008. At lower incubation times and doses, neither labeled nor unlabeled cells could be separated. In porcine hearts labeled, but not unlabeled, MSCs were identified on MRI. Conclusions. As few as 250.000 MSCs can be detected on MRI using 21 h incubation time and 10 μg USPIO/105 MSCs. At lower incubation times and doses, several million cells are needed for MRI detection. USPIO labeled cells can be visualized by MRI in porcine myocardial tissue.

  2. Non-invasive tracking of human haemopoietic CD34{sup +} stem cells in vivo in immunodeficient mice by using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemeyer, Markus; Jacobs, Volker R.; Timmer, Sebastian; Kiechle, Marion [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Gynaecology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Hippauf, Sandra; Bekker-Ruz, Viktoria [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kremer, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Pathology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Baurecht, Hansjoerg [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Statistics, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Ludwig, Georg; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Piontek, Guido [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Beer, Ambros J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    To assess migration of CD34{sup +} human stem cells to the bone marrow of athymic mice by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and Resovist, a contrast agent containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles. All animal and human procedures were approved by our institution's ethics committee, and women had given consent to donate umbilical cord blood (UCB). Balb/c-AnN Foxn1{sup nu}/Crl mice received intravenous injection of 1 x 10{sup 6} (n = 3), 5 x 10{sup 6} (n = 3) or 1 x 10{sup 7} (n = 3) human Resovist-labelled CD34{sup +} cells; control mice received Resovist (n = 3). MR imaging was performed before, 2 and 24 h after transplantation. Signal intensities of liver, muscle and bone marrow were measured and analysed by ANOVA and post hoc Student's t tests. MR imaging data were verified by histological and immunological detection of both human cell surface markers and carboxydextran-coating of the contrast agent. CD34{sup +} cells were efficiently labelled by Resovist without impairment of functionality. Twenty-four hours after administration of labelled cells, MR imaging revealed a significant signal decline in the bone marrow, and histological and immunological analyses confirmed the presence of transplanted human CD34{sup +} cells. Intravenously administered Resovist-labelled CD34{sup +} cells home to bone marrow of mice. Homing can be tracked in vivo by using clinical 1.5-T MR imaging technology. (orig.)

  3. Non-invasive tracking of human haemopoietic CD34+ stem cells in vivo in immunodeficient mice by using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess migration of CD34+ human stem cells to the bone marrow of athymic mice by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and Resovist, a contrast agent containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles. All animal and human procedures were approved by our institution's ethics committee, and women had given consent to donate umbilical cord blood (UCB). Balb/c-AnN Foxn1nu/Crl mice received intravenous injection of 1 x 106 (n = 3), 5 x 106 (n = 3) or 1 x 107 (n = 3) human Resovist-labelled CD34+ cells; control mice received Resovist (n = 3). MR imaging was performed before, 2 and 24 h after transplantation. Signal intensities of liver, muscle and bone marrow were measured and analysed by ANOVA and post hoc Student's t tests. MR imaging data were verified by histological and immunological detection of both human cell surface markers and carboxydextran-coating of the contrast agent. CD34+ cells were efficiently labelled by Resovist without impairment of functionality. Twenty-four hours after administration of labelled cells, MR imaging revealed a significant signal decline in the bone marrow, and histological and immunological analyses confirmed the presence of transplanted human CD34+ cells. Intravenously administered Resovist-labelled CD34+ cells home to bone marrow of mice. Homing can be tracked in vivo by using clinical 1.5-T MR imaging technology. (orig.)

  4. Intratumoral pharmacokinetic analysis by 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cytostatic in vivo activity of gemcitabine (dFdC) in two small cell lung cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Quistorff, B; Spang-Thomsen, M;

    1993-01-01

    small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor xenografts CPH SCCL 54A and 54B in nude mice. Non-invasive monitoring of the uptake and elimination of fluorine in the individual tumors was performed by in vivo 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, using a 2.9 T magnet. Five dose levels in the range 5-80 mg/kg i...... therapy than 54A. This difference in sensitivity seems to be related to different delivery or uptake of the compound in the two tumor lines, since the 19F-MRS demonstrated a significantly higher antitumor accumulation of fluorine in 54B tumors compared with 54A (p < 0.05, Wilcoxons 2-sided test) following...

  5. In-gas-cell laser ionization spectroscopy in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn: Magnetic moments and mean-square charge radii of N=50–54 Ag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, R., E-mail: Rafael.Ferrer@fys.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Bree, N.; Cocolios, T.E.; Darby, I.G.; De Witte, H.; Dexters, W.; Diriken, J.; Elseviers, J. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Franchoo, S. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (IPN) d' Orsay, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Huyse, M. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kesteloot, N. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); SCK-CEN, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie – Centre d' Etude de l' énergie Nucléaire, Mol B-2400 (Belgium); Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Pauwels, D.; Radulov, D.; Roger, T. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Savajols, H. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-20

    In-gas-cell laser ionization spectroscopy studies on the neutron deficient {sup 97–101}Ag isotopes have been performed with the LISOL setup. Magnetic dipole moments and mean-square charge radii have been determined for the first time with the exception of {sup 101}Ag, which was found in good agreement with previous experimental values. The reported results allow tentatively assigning the spin of {sup 97,99}Ag to 9/2 and confirming the presence of an isomeric state in these two isotopes, whose collapsed hyperfine structure suggests a spin of 1/2 . The effect of the N=50 shell closure is not only manifested in the magnetic moments but also in the evolution of the mean-square charge radii of the isotopes investigated, in accordance with the spherical droplet model predictions.

  6. First-order Freedericksz transition at the threshold point for weak anchoring nematic liquid crystal cell under external electric and magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关荣华; 杨国琛

    2003-01-01

    Based on the modified formula of Rapini-Papoular, the equilibrium equation and boundary condition of the director have been obtained and the behaviour of the Freedericksz transition at the threshold point has been studied for weak-anchoring nematic liquid crystal cells under external electric and magnetic fields with the methods of analytical derivation and numerical calculation. The results show that, except for the usual second-order transition, the first-order Freedericksz transition can also be induced by a suitable surface anchoring technique for the liquid crystal cell given in the paper. The conditions for the existence of the first-order Freedericksz transition are obtained. They are related to the material elastic coefficient k11, k33 the thickness of the liquid crystal cell, the external electric field and the strength of surface anchoring, etc.

  7. 1Application of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Magnetic Twisting Cytometry to Quantitate Mechano-Chemical Signaling Activities in a Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sungsoo; Wang, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is the process by which living cells sense mechanical forces and then convert them into biochemical signaling. Recently we showed that mechanical stress is transduced from the cell surface to remote cytoplasmic sites within 0.3 s, which is at least 40 to 50 times faster than soluble factor-induced signal transduction, and the sites of mechanotransduction colocalize with sites where mechanical stress causes microtubule displacement. These results suggest that mechanotransduction employs mechanisms different from those of soluble factor-induced signal transduction. Here we describe a protocol that utilizes fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and a magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC) device to capture rapid mechano-chemical signaling activities in living cells. PMID:18728305

  8. Gadolinium(3+)-doped mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a potential magnetic resonance tracer for monitoring the migration of stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yingying; Shao, Yuanzhi; He, Haoqiang; Tan, Yunpu; Tian, Xiumei; Xie, Fukang; Li, Li

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the tracking potential of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probe made of gadolinium-doped mesoporous silica MCM-41 (Gd(2)O(3)@MCM-41) nanoparticles for transplanted bone mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs) in vivo. The nanoparticles, synthesized using a one-step synthetic method, possess hexagonal mesoporous structures with appropriate assembly of nanoscale Gd(2)O(3) clusters. They show little cytotoxicity against proliferation and have a lower effect on the inherent differentiation potential of these labeled stem cells. The tracking of labeled NSCs in murine brains was dynamically determined with a clinical 3T MRI system for at least 14 days. The migration of labeled NSCs identified by MRI corresponded to the results of immunofluorescence imaging. Our study confirms that Gd(2)O(3)@MCM-41 particles can serve as an ideal vector for long-term MRI tracking of MSCs and NSCs in vivo.

  9. Impact of inhomogeneous static magnetic field (31.7-232.0 mT) exposure on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells during cisplatin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergallo, Cristian; Ahmadi, Meysam; Mobasheri, Hamid; Dini, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Beneficial or adverse effects of Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) are a large concern for the scientific community. In particular, the effect of SMF exposure during anticancer therapies still needs to be fully elucidated. Here, we evaluate the effects of SMF at induction levels that cisPt-treated cancer patients experience during the imaging process conducted in Low field (200-500 mT), Open field (300-700 mT) and/or inhomogeneous High field (1.5-3 T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines. Human adrenergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with 0.1 µM cisPt (i.e. the lowest concentration capable of inducing apoptosis) were exposed to SMF and their response was studied in vitro. Exposure of 0.1 µM cisPt-treated cells to SMF for 2 h decreased cell viability (30%) and caused overexpression of the apoptosis-related cleaved caspase-3 protein (46%). Furthermore, increase in ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) production (23%) and reduction in the number of mitochondria vs controls were seen. The sole exposure of SMF for up to 24 h had no effect on cell viability but increased ROS production and modified cellular shape. On the other hand, the toxicity of cisPt was significantly prevented during 24 h exposure to SMF as shown by the levels of cell viability, cleaved caspase-3 and ROS production. In conclusion, due to the cytoprotective effect of 31.7-232.0 mT SMF on low-cisPt-concentration-treated SH-SY5Y cells, our data suggest that exposure to various sources of SMF in cancer patients under a cisPt regimen should be strictly controlled.

  10. In vivo tracking of genetically engineered, anti-HER2/neu directed natural killer cells to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [UCSF Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Meier, Reinhardt; Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [Technical University Munich, Institute of Pathology, Division of Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Piert, Morand [Technical University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Uherek, Christoph; Wels, Winfried [University of Frankfurt, Georg Speyer House, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize labeling of the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with iron-oxide-based contrast agents and to monitor the in vivo distribution of genetically engineered NK-92 cells, which are directed against HER2/neu receptors, to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Parental NK-92 cells and genetically modified HER2/neu specific NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen, were labeled with ferumoxides and ferucarbotran using simple incubation, lipofection and electroporation techniques. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by MR imaging, Prussian blue stains and spectrometry. Subsequently, ferucarbotran-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta (n=3) or parental NK-92 cells were intravenously injected into the tail vein of six mice with HER2/neu-positive NIH 3T3 mammary tumors, implanted in the mammary fat pad. The accumulation of the cells in the tumors was monitored by MR imaging before and 12 and 24 h after cell injection (p.i.). MR data were correlated with histopathology. Both the parental NK-92 and the genetically modified NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be labeled with ferucarbotran and ferumoxides by lipofection and electroporation, but not by simple incubation. The intracellular cytoplasmatic iron-oxide uptake was significantly higher after labeling with ferucarbotran than ferumoxides (P<0.05). After intravenous injection of 5 x 10{sup 6} NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, MR showed a progressive signal decline in HER2/neu-positive mammary tumors at 12 and 24 h (p.i.). Conversely, injection of 5 x 10{sup 6} parental NK-92 control cells, not directed against HER2/neu receptors, did not cause significant signal intensity changes of the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the former, but not the latter cells in tumor tissue. The human natural killer cell line NK-92 can be efficiently

  11. In vivo tracking of genetically engineered, anti-HER2/neu directed natural killer cells to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to optimize labeling of the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with iron-oxide-based contrast agents and to monitor the in vivo distribution of genetically engineered NK-92 cells, which are directed against HER2/neu receptors, to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Parental NK-92 cells and genetically modified HER2/neu specific NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen, were labeled with ferumoxides and ferucarbotran using simple incubation, lipofection and electroporation techniques. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by MR imaging, Prussian blue stains and spectrometry. Subsequently, ferucarbotran-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta (n=3) or parental NK-92 cells were intravenously injected into the tail vein of six mice with HER2/neu-positive NIH 3T3 mammary tumors, implanted in the mammary fat pad. The accumulation of the cells in the tumors was monitored by MR imaging before and 12 and 24 h after cell injection (p.i.). MR data were correlated with histopathology. Both the parental NK-92 and the genetically modified NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be labeled with ferucarbotran and ferumoxides by lipofection and electroporation, but not by simple incubation. The intracellular cytoplasmatic iron-oxide uptake was significantly higher after labeling with ferucarbotran than ferumoxides (P6 NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, MR showed a progressive signal decline in HER2/neu-positive mammary tumors at 12 and 24 h (p.i.). Conversely, injection of 5 x 106 parental NK-92 control cells, not directed against HER2/neu receptors, did not cause significant signal intensity changes of the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the former, but not the latter cells in tumor tissue. The human natural killer cell line NK-92 can be efficiently labeled with clinically applicable iron-oxide contrast agents

  12. EGFR-targeted plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles suppress lung tumor growth by abrogating G2/M cell-cycle arrest and inducing DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shinji Kuroda,1 Justina Tam,2 Jack A Roth,1 Konstantin Sokolov,2 Rajagopal Ramesh3–5 1Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Pathology, 4Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, 5Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Background: We have previously demonstrated the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles (225-NP produce a therapeutic effect in human lung cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of 225-NP-mediated antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo using the EGFR-mutant HCC827 cell line. Methods: The growth inhibitory effect of 225-NP on lung tumor cells was determined by cell viability and cell-cycle analysis. Protein expression related to autophagy, apoptosis, and DNA-damage were determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. An in vivo efficacy study was conducted using a human lung tumor xenograft mouse model. Results: The 225-NP treatment markedly reduced tumor cell viability at 72 hours compared with the cell viability in control treatment groups. Cell-cycle analysis showed the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was reduced when treated with 225-NP, with a concomitant increase in the number of cells in Sub-G1 phase, indicative of cell death. Western blotting showed LC3B and PARP cleavage, indicating 225-NP-treatment activated both autophagy- and apoptosis-mediated cell death. The 225-NP strongly induced γH2AX and phosphorylated histone H3, markers indicative of DNA damage and mitosis, respectively. Additionally, significant γH2AX foci formation was observed in 225-NP-treated cells compared with control treatment groups, suggesting 225-NP induced cell death by triggering DNA damage. The 225-NP-mediated DNA damage involved abrogation of the

  13. Magnetic Cellular Switches

    OpenAIRE

    Overby, Darryl R.; Alenghat, Francis J.; Montoya-Zavala, Martín; Bei, HuCheng; Oh, Philmo; Karavitis, John; Ingber,