WorldWideScience

Sample records for 2nd generation bioethanol

  1. Power plant intake quantification of wheat straw composition for 2nd generation bioethanol optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomborg, Carina J.; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Jensen, Erik Steen;

    2010-01-01

    Optimization of 2nd generation bioethanol production from wheat straw requires comprehensive knowledge of plant intake feedstock composition. Near Infrared Spectroscopy is evaluated as a potential method for instantaneous quantification of the salient fermentation wheat straw components: cellulose...

  2. White paper on perspectives of biofuels in Denmark - with focus on 2nd generation bioethanol; Hvidbog om perspektiver for biobraendstoffer i Danmark - med fokus paa 2. generations bioethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gy.; Foghmar, J.

    2009-11-15

    The white paper presents the perspectives - both options and barriers - for a Danish focus on production and use of biomass, including sustainable 2nd generation bioethanol, for transport. The white paper presents the current knowledge of biofuels and bioethanol and recommendations for a Danish strategy. (ln)

  3. 1st or 2nd generation bioethanol-impacts of technology integration & on feed production and land use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Niclas Scott; Felby, Claus

    2009-01-01

    on agricultural land on a global scale, but increase the pressure on local/national scale. In contrast to that 2nd generation bioethanol based on wheat straw exhibits a poorer energy balance than 1st generation, but the induced imbalances on feed energy are smaller. Proteins are some of the plant components...... production comparable to gasoline production in terms of energy loss. Utilisation of biomass in the energy sector is inevitably linked to the utilisation of land. This is a key difference between fossil and bio based energy systems. Thus evaluations of bioethanol production based on energy balances alone...... are inadequate. 1st and 2nd generation bioethanol production exhibits major differences when evaluated on characteristics as feed energy and feed protein production and subsequently on land use changes. 1st generation bioethanol production based on wheat grain in Denmark may in fact reduce the pressure...

  4. Boosting biogas yield of anaerobic digesters by utilizing concentrated molasses from 2nd generation bioethanol plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Shiplu [Department of Renewable Energy, Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Agder, Grimstad-4879 (Norway); Moeller, Henrik Bjarne [Department of Biosystems Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Research center Foulum, Blichers Alle, Post Box 50, Tjele-8830 (Denmark)

    2013-07-01

    Concentrated molasses (C5 molasses) from 2nd generation bioethanol plant has been investigated for enhancing productivity of manure based digesters. A batch study at mesophilic condition (35+- 1 deg C) showed the maximum methane yield from molasses as 286 LCH4/kgVS which was approximately 63% of the calculated theoretical yield. In addition to the batch study, co-digestion of molasses with cattle manure in a semi-continuously stirred reactor at thermophilic temperature (50+- 1 deg C) was also performed with a stepwise increase in molasses concentration. The results from this experiment revealed the maximum average biogas yield of 1.89 L/L/day when 23% VSmolasses was co-digested with cattle manure. However, digesters fed with more than 32% VSmolasses and with short adaptation period resulted in VFA accumulation and reduced methane productivity indicating that when using molasses as biogas booster this level should not be exceeded.

  5. Boosting biogas yield of anaerobic digesters by utilizing concentrated molasses from 2nd generation bioethanol plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiplu Sarker, Henrik Bjarne Møller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated molasses (C5 molasses from 2nd generation bioethanol plant has been investigated for enhancing productivity of manure based digesters. A batch study at mesophilic condition (35±1C showed the maximum methane yield from molasses as 286 LCH4/kgVS which was approximately 63% of the calculated theoretical yield. In addition to the batch study, co-digestion of molasses with cattle manure in a semi-continuously stirred reactor at thermophilic temperature (50±1°C was also performed with a stepwise increase in molasses concentration. The results from this experiment revealed the maximum average biogas yield of 1.89 L/L/day when 23% VSmolasses was co-digested with cattle manure. However, digesters fed with more than 32% VSmolasses and with short adaptation period resulted in VFA accumulation and reduced methane productivity indicating that when using molasses as biogas booster this level should not be exceeded.

  6. 1st or 2nd generation bioethanol-impacts of technology integration & on feed production and land use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Niclas Scott; Felby, Claus

    2009-01-01

    with the poorest bio synthesis efficiency and as such the area demand for their production is relatively high. Preservation of the proteins in the biomass such as in feed by-products from bioethanol production is of paramount importance in developing sustainable utilisation of biomass in the energy sector......."1st or 2nd generation bioethanol-impacts of technology integration & on feed production and land use" Liquid bio fuels are perceived as a means of mitigating CO2 emissions from transport and thus climate change, but much concern has been raised to the energy consumption from refining biomass...... to liquid fuels. Integrating technologies such that waste stream can be used will reduce energy consumption in the production of bioethanol from wheat. We show that the integration of bio refining and combined heat an power generation reduces process energy requirements with 30-40 % and makes bioethanol...

  7. 2nd generation lignocellulosic bioethanol: is torrefaction a possible approach to biomass pretreatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaramonti, David; Rizzo, Andrea Maria; Prussi, Matteo [University of Florence, CREAR - Research Centre for Renewable Energy and RE-CORD, Florence (Italy); Tedeschi, Silvana; Zimbardi, Francesco; Braccio, Giacobbe; Viola, Egidio [ENEA - Laboratory of Technology and Equipment for Bioenergy and Solar Thermal, Rotondella (Italy); Pardelli, Paolo Taddei [Spike Renewables s.r.l., Florence (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    Biomass pretreatement is a key and energy-consuming step for lignocellulosic ethanol production; it is largely responsible for the energy efficiency and economic sustainability of the process. A new approach to biomass pretreatment for the lignocellulosic bioethanol chain could be mild torrefaction. Among other effects, biomass torrefaction improves the grindability of fibrous materials, thus reducing energy demand for grinding the feedstock before hydrolysis, and opens the biomass structure, making this more accessible to enzymes for hydrolysis. The aim of the preliminary experiments carried out was to achieve a first understanding of the possibility to combine torrefaction and hydrolysis for lignocellulosic bioethanol processes, and to evaluate it in terms of sugar and ethanol yields. In addition, the possibility of hydrolyzing the torrefied biomass has not yet been proven. Biomass from olive pruning has been torrefied at different conditions, namely 180-280 C for 60-120 min, grinded and then used as substrate in hydrolysis experiments. The bioconversion has been carried out at flask scale using a mixture of cellulosolytic, hemicellulosolitic, {beta}-glucosidase enzymes, and a commercial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experiments demonstrated that torrefied biomass can be enzymatically hydrolyzed and fermented into ethanol, with yields comparable with grinded untreated biomass and saving electrical energy. The comparison between the bioconversion yields achieved using only raw grinded biomass or torrefied and grinded biomass highlighted that: (1) mild torrefaction conditions limit sugar degradation to 5-10%; and (2) torrefied biomass does not lead to enzymatic and fermentation inhibition. Energy consumption for ethanol production has been preliminary estimated, and three different pretreatment steps, i.e., raw biomass grinding, biomass-torrefaction grinding, and steam explosion were compared. Based on preliminary results, steam explosion still has a

  8. Experimental Investigation of 2nd Generation Bioethanol Derived from Empty-fruit-bunch (EFB of Oil-palm on Performance and Exhaust Emission of SI Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanuandri Putrasari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigation of 2nd generation bioethanol derived from EFB of oil-palm blended with gasoline for 10, 20, 25% by volume and pure gasoline were conducted on performance and exhaust emission tests of SI engine. A four stroke, four cylinders, programmed fuel injection (PGMFI, 16 valves variable valve timing and electronic lift control (VTEC, single overhead camshaft (SOHC, and 1,497 cm3 SI engine (Honda/L15A was used in this investigation. Engine performance test was carried out for brake torque, power, and fuel consumption. The exhaust emission was analyzed for carbon monoxide (CO and hydrocarbon (HC. The engine was operated on speed range from1,500 until 4,500 rev/min with 85% throttle opening position. The results showed that the highest brake torque of bioethanol blends achieved by 10% bioethanol content at 3,000 to 4,500 rpm, the brake power was greater than pure gasoline at 3,500 to 4,500 rpm for 10% bioethanol, and bioethanol-gasoline blends of 10 and 20% resulted greater bsfc than pure gasoline at low speed from 1,500 to 3,500 rpm. The trend of CO and HC emissions tended to decrease when the engine speed increased.

  9. 2nd Generation Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Lars; Kjartansdóttir, Cecilia Kristin; Allebrod, Frank;

    This report provides the results of the 2nd Generation Alkaline Electrolysis project which was initiated in 2008. The project has been conducted from 2009-2012 by a consortium comprising Århus University Business and Social Science – Centre for Energy Technologies (CET (former HIRC)), Technical...

  10. Techno-economic evaluation of 2nd generation bioethanol production from sugar cane bagasse and leaves integrated with the sugar-based ethanol process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macrelli Stefano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioethanol produced from the lignocellulosic fractions of sugar cane (bagasse and leaves, i.e. second generation (2G bioethanol, has a promising market potential as an automotive fuel; however, the process is still under investigation on pilot/demonstration scale. From a process perspective, improvements in plant design can lower the production cost, providing better profitability and competitiveness if the conversion of the whole sugar cane is considered. Simulations have been performed with AspenPlus to investigate how process integration can affect the minimum ethanol selling price of this 2G process (MESP-2G, as well as improve the plant energy efficiency. This is achieved by integrating the well-established sucrose-to-bioethanol process with the enzymatic process for lignocellulosic materials. Bagasse and leaves were steam pretreated using H3PO4 as catalyst and separately hydrolysed and fermented. Results The addition of a steam dryer, doubling of the enzyme dosage in enzymatic hydrolysis, including leaves as raw material in the 2G process, heat integration and the use of more energy-efficient equipment led to a 37 % reduction in MESP-2G compared to the Base case. Modelling showed that the MESP for 2G ethanol was 0.97 US$/L, while in the future it could be reduced to 0.78 US$/L. In this case the overall production cost of 1G + 2G ethanol would be about 0.40 US$/L with an output of 102 L/ton dry sugar cane including 50 % leaves. Sensitivity analysis of the future scenario showed that a 50 % decrease in the cost of enzymes, electricity or leaves would lower the MESP-2G by about 20%, 10% and 4.5%, respectively. Conclusions According to the simulations, the production of 2G bioethanol from sugar cane bagasse and leaves in Brazil is already competitive (without subsidies with 1G starch-based bioethanol production in Europe. Moreover 2G bioethanol could be produced at a lower cost if subsidies were used to compensate for the

  11. Bioethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Charles; Larsen, Jan; Morgan, K. [DONG Energy, Fredericia (Denmark)

    2007-05-15

    Security of supply, sustainability and the market are controlling parameters for developing the energy system. Bioethanol is part of the solution to the question about security of supply and the demand for a sustainable development, and all over Europe 1st generation bioethanol plants are being established. Market demands on existing power plants and the simultaneous wish for establishing a capacity for the production of bioethanol with at first 1st generation technology and starchy biomass and then with 2nd generation technology and lignocellulose is the reason for DONG Energy's development of the concept IBUS (Integrated Biomass Utilisation System). In the IBUS concept the production of bioethanol with 1st and 2nd generation technology has been joined and integrated with the power and heat production of the central power plant. Until the summer of 2006 the IBUS straw plant at Skaerbaekvaerket was established by means of a EURO 15 mill. EU project. In addition to being a demonstration facility the plant is being upscaled to a 4 tonne straw per hour plant in preparation for demonstrating the process at a size which forms the basis of upscaling to fullscale 20 tonne per hour in 2008. The process includes continued hydrothermal pre-treatment, enzymatic hydrolysis at high dry matter concentrations, fermentation and distillation. The raw materials are wheat and maize straw. The perspective for DONG Energy is that the IBUS concept, in which bioethanol and CHP production are to be joined, is a step towards materialising the vision that a central power plant can be developed into an energy refinery. The presented development work within 2nd generation bioethanol technology will be carried out in cooperation with leading international players and Danish universities and knowledge centres Risoe National Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and Novozymes. (au)

  12. 2nd Generation alkaline electrolysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yde, L. [Aarhus Univ. Business and Social Science - Centre for Energy Technologies (CET), Aarhus (Denmark); Kjartansdottir, C.K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Mechanical Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Allebrod, F. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)] [and others

    2013-03-15

    The overall purpose of this project has been to contribute to this load management by developing a 2{sup nd} generation of alkaline electrolysis system characterized by being compact, reliable, inexpensive and energy efficient. The specific targets for the project have been to: 1) Increase cell efficiency to more than 88% (according to the higher heating value (HHV)) at a current density of 200 mA /cm{sup 2}; 2) Increase operation temperature to more than 100 degree Celsius to make the cooling energy more valuable; 3) Obtain an operation pressure more than 30 bar hereby minimizing the need for further compression of hydrogen for storage; 4) Improve stack architecture decreasing the price of the stack with at least 50%; 5) Develop a modular design making it easy to customize plants in the size from 20 to 200 kW; 6) Demonstrating a 20 kW 2{sup nd} generation stack in H2College at the campus of Arhus University in Herning. The project has included research and development on three different technology tracks of electrodes; an electrochemical plating, an atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and finally a high temperature and pressure (HTP) track with operating temperature around 250 deg. C and pressure around 40 bar. The results show that all three electrode tracks have reached high energy efficiencies. In the electrochemical plating track a stack efficiency of 86.5% at a current density of 177mA/cm{sup 2} and a temperature of 74.4 deg. C has been shown. The APS track showed cell efficiencies of 97%, however, coatings for the anode side still need to be developed. The HTP cell has reached 100 % electric efficiency operating at 1.5 V (the thermoneutral voltage) with a current density of 1. 1 A/cm{sup 2}. This track only tested small cells in an externally heated laboratory set-up, and thus the thermal loss to surroundings cannot be given. The goal set for the 2{sup nd} generation electrolyser system, has been to generate 30 bar pressure in the cell stack. An obstacle to be

  13. 2nd Generation alkaline electrolysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yde, L. [Aarhus Univ. Business and Social Science - Centre for Energy Technologies (CET), Aarhus (Denmark); Kjartansdottir, C.K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Mechanical Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Allebrod, F. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)] [and others

    2013-03-15

    The overall purpose of this project has been to contribute to this load management by developing a 2{sup nd} generation of alkaline electrolysis system characterized by being compact, reliable, inexpensive and energy efficient. The specific targets for the project have been to: 1) Increase cell efficiency to more than 88% (according to the higher heating value (HHV)) at a current density of 200 mA /cm{sup 2}; 2) Increase operation temperature to more than 100 degree Celsius to make the cooling energy more valuable; 3) Obtain an operation pressure more than 30 bar hereby minimizing the need for further compression of hydrogen for storage; 4) Improve stack architecture decreasing the price of the stack with at least 50%; 5) Develop a modular design making it easy to customize plants in the size from 20 to 200 kW; 6) Demonstrating a 20 kW 2{sup nd} generation stack in H2College at the campus of Arhus University in Herning. The project has included research and development on three different technology tracks of electrodes; an electrochemical plating, an atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and finally a high temperature and pressure (HTP) track with operating temperature around 250 deg. C and pressure around 40 bar. The results show that all three electrode tracks have reached high energy efficiencies. In the electrochemical plating track a stack efficiency of 86.5% at a current density of 177mA/cm{sup 2} and a temperature of 74.4 deg. C has been shown. The APS track showed cell efficiencies of 97%, however, coatings for the anode side still need to be developed. The HTP cell has reached 100 % electric efficiency operating at 1.5 V (the thermoneutral voltage) with a current density of 1. 1 A/cm{sup 2}. This track only tested small cells in an externally heated laboratory set-up, and thus the thermal loss to surroundings cannot be given. The goal set for the 2{sup nd} generation electrolyser system, has been to generate 30 bar pressure in the cell stack. An obstacle to be

  14. Refraction data survey: 2nd generation correlation of myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Peter R; Medina, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The objective herein is to provide refraction data, myopia progression rate, prevalence, and 1st and 2nd generation correlations, relevant to whether myopia is random or inherited. First- and second-generation ocular refraction data are assembled from N = 34 families, average of 2.8 children per family. From this group, data are available from N = 165 subjects. Inter-generation regressions are performed on all the data sets, including correlation coefficient r, and myopia prevalence [%]. Prevalence of myopia is [M] = 38.5 %. Prevalence of high myopes with |R| >6 D is [M-] = 20.5 %. Average refraction is  = -1.84 D ± 3.22 (N = 165). For the high myopes, |R| >6 D, prevalence for the parents is [M-] = 25 %, for the 2nd generation [M-] = 16.5 %. Average myopia level for the high myopes, both generations, is  = -7.52 D ± 1.31 D (N = 33). Regression parameters are calculated for all the data sets, yielding correlation coefficients in the range r = 0.48-0.72 for some groups of myopes and high myopes, fathers to daughters, and mothers to sons. Also of interest, some categories show essentially no correlation, -0.20 refractive errors occur randomly. Time series results show myopia diopter rates = -0.50 D/year.

  15. The 2nd Generation VLTI path to performance

    CERN Document Server

    Woillez, Julien; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Bonnet, Henri; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Egner, Sebastian; Eisenhauer, Frank; Gonté, Frédéric; Guieu, Sylvain; Haguenauer, Pierre; Mérand, Antoine; Pettazzi, Lorenzo; Poupar, Sébastien; Schöller, Markus; Schuhler, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the VLTI infrastructure for the 2nd generation instruments is now complete with the transformation of the laboratory, and installation of star separators on both the 1.8-m Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) and the 8-m Unit Telescopes (UTs). The Gravity fringe tracker has had a full semester of commissioning on the ATs, and a first look at the UTs. The CIAO infrared wavefront sensor is about to demonstrate its performance relative to the visible wavefront sensor MACAO. First astrometric measurements on the ATs and astrometric qualification of the UTs are on-going. Now is a good time to revisit the performance roadmap for VLTI that was initiated in 2014, which aimed at coherently driving the developments of the interferometer, and especially its performance, in support to the new generation of instruments: Gravity and MATISSE.

  16. The 2nd generation VLTI path to performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woillez, Julien; Alonso, Jaime; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Bonnet, Henri; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Egner, Sebastian; Eisenhauer, Frank; Gonté, Frédéric; Guieu, Sylvain; Haguenauer, Pierre; Mérand, Antoine; Pettazzi, Lorenzo; Poupar, Sébastien; Schöller, Markus; Schuhler, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    The upgrade of the VLTI infrastructure for the 2nd generation instruments is now complete with the transformation of the laboratory, and installation of star separators on both the 1.8-m Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) and the 8-m Unit Telescopes (UTs). The Gravity fringe tracker has had a full semester of commissioning on the ATs, and a first look at the UTs. The CIAO infrared wavefront sensor is about to demonstrate its performance relative to the visible wavefront sensor MACAO. First astrometric measurements on the ATs and astrometric qualification of the UTs are on-going. Now is a good time to revisit the performance roadmap for VLTI that was initiated in 2014, which aimed at coherently driving the developments of the interferometer, and especially its performance, in support to the new generation of instruments: Gravity and MATISSE.

  17. Super Boiler 2nd Generation Technology for Watertube Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mr. David Cygan; Dr. Joseph Rabovitser

    2012-03-31

    This report describes Phase I of a proposed two phase project to develop and demonstrate an advanced industrial watertube boiler system with the capability of reaching 94% (HHV) fuel-to-steam efficiency and emissions below 2 ppmv NOx, 2 ppmv CO, and 1 ppmv VOC on natural gas fuel. The boiler design would have the capability to produce >1500 F, >1500 psig superheated steam, burn multiple fuels, and will be 50% smaller/lighter than currently available watertube boilers of similar capacity. This project is built upon the successful Super Boiler project at GTI. In that project that employed a unique two-staged intercooled combustion system and an innovative heat recovery system to reduce NOx to below 5 ppmv and demonstrated fuel-to-steam efficiency of 94% (HHV). This project was carried out under the leadership of GTI with project partners Cleaver-Brooks, Inc., Nebraska Boiler, a Division of Cleaver-Brooks, and Media and Process Technology Inc., and project advisors Georgia Institute of Technology, Alstom Power Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase I of efforts focused on developing 2nd generation boiler concepts and performance modeling; incorporating multi-fuel (natural gas and oil) capabilities; assessing heat recovery, heat transfer and steam superheating approaches; and developing the overall conceptual engineering boiler design. Based on our analysis, the 2nd generation Industrial Watertube Boiler when developed and commercialized, could potentially save 265 trillion Btu and $1.6 billion in fuel costs across U.S. industry through increased efficiency. Its ultra-clean combustion could eliminate 57,000 tons of NOx, 460,000 tons of CO, and 8.8 million tons of CO2 annually from the atmosphere. Reduction in boiler size will bring cost-effective package boilers into a size range previously dominated by more expensive field-erected boilers, benefiting manufacturers and end users through lower capital costs.

  18. The 2nd Generation Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Goodman, M.; Hardin, D. M.; Hall, J.; Yubin He, M.; Regner, K.; Conover, H.; Smith, T.; Meyer, P.; Lu, J.; Garrett, M.

    2009-12-01

    The NASA Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) is a visualization and information system that fuses multiple Earth science data sources, to enable real time decision-making for airborne and ground validation experiments. Developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, RTMM is a situational awareness, decision-support system that integrates satellite imagery and orbit data, radar and other surface observations (e.g., lightning location network data), airborne navigation and instrument data sets, model output parameters, and other applicable Earth science data sets. The integration and delivery of this information is made possible using data acquisition systems, network communication links, network server resources, and visualizations through the Google Earth virtual globe application. In order to improve the usefulness and efficiency of the RTMM system, capabilities are being developed to allow the end-user to easily configure RTMM applications based on their mission-specific requirements and objectives. This second generation RTMM is being redesigned to take advantage of the Google plug-in capabilities to run multiple applications in a web browser rather than the original single application Google Earth approach. Currently RTMM employs a limited Service Oriented Architecture approach to enable discovery of mission specific resources. We are expanding the RTMM architecture such that it will more effectively utilize the Open Geospatial Consortium Sensor Web Enablement services and other new technology software tools and components. These modifications and extensions will result in a robust, versatile RTMM system that will greatly increase flexibility of the user to choose which science data sets and support applications to view and/or use. The improvements brought about by RTMM 2nd generation system will provide mission planners and airborne scientists with enhanced decision-making tools and capabilities to more

  19. Yeast strains designed for 2. generation bioethanol production. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennow, B.

    2013-04-15

    The aim of the project was to develop a suitable fermentation organism for 2G bioethanol production that would efficiently ferment all of the sugars in lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol at a commercially viable rate (comparable to yeast based 1G ethanol production). More specifically, a yeast strain would be developed with the ability to ferment also the pentoses in lignocellulosic biomass and thereby increase the ethanol yield of the process by 30-45% with a profound positive effect on the total process economy. The project has succeeded in developing a new industrial yeast strain V1. The yeast strain can transform the difficult C5 sugars to ethanol from waste products such as straw and the like from the agricultural sector. The classic issues relating to industrial uses such as inhibitor and ethanol tolerance and high ethanol production is resolved satisfactorily. The potential of the use of the new strain for 2nd generation bioethanol production is that the ethanol yields increase by 30-45%. With the increased ethanol yield follows a marked improvement in the overall process economics. (LN)

  20. From 1st- to 2nd-Generation Biofuel Technologies: Extended Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This report looks at the technical challenges facing 2nd-generation biofuels, evaluates their costs and examines related current policies to support their development and deployment. The potential for production of more advanced biofuels is also discussed. Although significant progress continues to be made to overcome the technical and economic challenges, 2nd-generation biofuels still face major constraints to their commercial deployment.

  1. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  2. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs., E-mail: tazsolt@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Cormos, C. C., E-mail: cormos@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Agachi, P. S. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos, Postal code: 400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  3. Characterization and calibration of 2nd generation slope measuring profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Frank; Buchheim, Jana; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    High spectral resolution and nanometer sized foci of 3rd generation SR beamlines can only be achieved by means of ultra precise optical elements. The improved brilliance and the coherence of free electron lasers (FEL) even push the accuracy limits and make the development of a new generation of ultra precise reflective optical elements mandatory. Typical elements are wave front preserving plane mirrors (lengths of up to 1 m, residual slope errors ˜0.05 μrad (rms) and values of 0.1 nm (rms) for the micro-roughness) and curved optical elements like spheres, toroids or elliptical cylinder (residual slope error ˜0.25 μrad (rms) and better). These challenging specifications and the ongoing progress in finishing technology need to be matched by improved accuracy metrology instruments. We will discuss the results of recent developments in the field of metrology made in the BESSY-II-optics laboratory (BOL) at the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB), by the use of vertical angle comparator (VAC) in use to calibrate the nanometer optical component measuring machine (NOM). The BESSY-NOM represents an ultra accurate type of slope measuring instruments characterized by an accuracy of 0.05 μrad (rms) for plane substrates and 0.2 μrad (rms) for significant curved surfaces.

  4. Intergenerational Transmission and the School-to-work Transition for 2nd Generation Immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Skyt; Rosholm, Michael; Smith, Nina;

    2001-01-01

    on the probability of completing a qualifying education and on the entry into the labour market, but it has a much smaller impact on the duration of the first employment spell and on the wage level. Growing up in neighbourhoods with a high concentration of immigrants is associated with negative labour market......We analyse the extent of intergenerational transmission through parental capital, ethnic capital and neighbourhood effects on several aspects of the school-to-work transition of 2nd generation immigrants and young ethnic Danes. The main findings are that parental capital has strong positive effects...... prospects both for young natives and 2nd generation immigrants....

  5. A Zero-Dimensional Model of a 2nd Generation Planar SOFC Using Calibrated Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thomas Frank

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a zero-dimensional mathematical model of a planar 2nd generation co-flow SOFC developed for simulation of power systems. The model accounts for the electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen as well as the methane reforming reaction and the water-gas shift reaction. An important part...

  6. Feasibility of a 2nd generation MR-compatible manipulator for transrectal prostate biopsy guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bomers, J.G.R.; Bosboom, D.G.H.; Tigelaar, G.H.; Sabisch, J.; Futterer, J.J.; Yakar, D.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of a 2nd generation MR-compatible, remote-controlled manipulator (RCM) as an aid to perform MR-guided transrectal prostate biopsy in males with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: This prospective phase I study was approved by the local ethical

  7. DSMZ 24726 for second generation bioethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel anaerobic, extreme thermophilic, ethanol high- yielding bacterium. The invention is based on the isolation of the bacterial strain referred to herein as "DTU01", which produces ethanol as the main fermentation product, followed by acetate and lactate. The ....... The isolated organism is an extremely interesting and very promising organism for the establishment of a sustainable bioethanol production process. The invention further relates to a method for producing a fermentation product such as ethanol....

  8. Bioethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenestijn, J.W. van; Abubackar, H.N.; Veiga, M.C.; Kennes, C.

    2013-01-01

    Production of bioethanol from cellulosic biomass plays an important role to support energy policies. To produce cellulosic ethanol via fermentation it is required to first break the lignocellulosic complex. Numerous technologies for such pretreatment are under development or in a pilot plant stage.

  9. Bioethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenestijn, J.W. van; Abubackar, H.N.; Veiga, M.C.; Kennes, C.

    2013-01-01

    Production of bioethanol from cellulosic biomass plays an important role to support energy policies. To produce cellulosic ethanol via fermentation it is required to first break the lignocellulosic complex. Numerous technologies for such pretreatment are under development or in a pilot plant stage.

  10. Anaerobic digestion in combination with 2nd generation ethanol production for maximizing biofuels yield from lignocellulosic biomass – testing in an integrated pilot-scale biorefinery plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    An integrated biorefinery concept for 2nd generation bioethanol production together with biogas production from the fermentation effluent was tested in pilot-scale. The pilot plant comprised pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, hexose and pentose fermentation into ethanol and anaerobic digestion...... of the fermentation effluent in a UASB (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket) reactor. Operation of the 770 liter UASB reactor was tested under both mesophilic (38ºC) and thermophilic (53ºC) conditions with increasing loading rates of the liquid fraction of the effluent from ethanol fermentation. At an OLR of 3.5 kg...... for mesophilic than for thermophilic operation. The effluent from the ethanol fermentation showed no signs of toxicity to the anaerobic microorganisms. Implementation of the biogas production from the fermentation effluent accounted for about 30% higher biofuels yield in the biorefinery compared to a system...

  11. Effects of Thermal Cycling on Control and Irradiated EPC 2nd Generation GaN FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Results of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  12. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  13. Intergenerational Transmission and the School-to-work Transition for 2nd Generation Immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Skyt; Rosholm, Michael; Smith, Nina

    2001-01-01

    We analyse the extent of intergenerational transmission through parental capital, ethnic capital and neighbourhood effects on several aspects of the school-to-work transition of 2nd generation immigrants and young ethnic Danes. The main findings are that parental capital has strong positive effects...... on the probability of completing a qualifying education and on the entry into the labour market, but it has a much smaller impact on the duration of the first employment spell and on the wage level. Growing up in neighbourhoods with a high concentration of immigrants is associated with negative labour market...

  14. A ZeroDimensional Model of a 2nd Generation Planar SOFC Using Calibrated Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Elmegaard

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a zero-dimensional mathematical model of a planar 2nd generation coflow SOFC developed for simulation of power systems. The model accounts for the electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen as well as the methane reforming reaction and the water-gas shift reaction. An important part of the paper is the electrochemical sub-model, where experimental data was used to calibrate specific parameters. The SOFC model was implemented in the DNA simulation software which is designed for energy system simulation. The result is an accurate and flexible tool suitable for simulation of many different SOFC-based power systems.

  15. The New 2nd-Generation SRF R&D Facility at Jefferson Lab: TEDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles E.; Reilly, Anthony V.

    2012-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has funded a near-complete renovation of the SRF-based accelerator research and development facilities at Jefferson Lab. The project to accomplish this, the Technical and Engineering Development Facility (TEDF) Project has completed the first of two phases. An entirely new 3,100 m{sup 2} purpose-built SRF technical work facility has been constructed and was occupied in summer of 2012. All SRF work processes with the exception of cryogenic testing have been relocated into the new building. All cavity fabrication, processing, thermal treatment, chemistry, cleaning, and assembly work is collected conveniently into a new LEED-certified building. An innovatively designed 800 m2 cleanroom/chemroom suite provides long-term flexibility for support of multiple R&D and construction projects as well as continued process evolution. The characteristics of this first 2nd-generation SRF facility are described.

  16. Development of a 2nd generation energy certificate scheme - Danish experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Ole Michael [Danish Building and Urban Research (Denmark); Hansen, Morten Tony [Danish Energy Authority (Denmark); Engelund Thomsen, Kirsten; Wittchen, Kim B. [Danish Building and Urban Research (Denmark)

    2007-07-01

    Energy certification as described in the European Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) will undoubtedly contribute to improving the energy performance of the European building stock. At the same time the Directive offers a unique opportunity to obtain valuable knowledge about the building stock for future surveys of energy saving potentials, compilation of energy saving measures and policy making. However, the knowledge attained will always depend on the quality of the energy certification scheme. Thus, developing energy certificate schemes deserves very careful consideration. This paper describes Danish experience, where mandatory energy certification schemes in operation since 1997 have been updated to accord with the EBPD requirements.On the basis of Danish experience, this paper will offer some insight about the relationship between data collection, certification procedure and quality control on one hand, and the quality of obtainable knowledge on the other. Also the relationship between the overall quality of the certificate and future possibilities to evaluate the effect of the scheme on the energy performance of the building stock will be discussed. With this background, lessons learned will be related to the current efforts in Denmark to improve the design of the 2nd generation energy certification scheme. Key issues considered include: How we can change from operational rating to asset rating and how we can ensure the quality of a new certification scheme? How can we make an expressive design to ensure transparency, reliability and 'saleability'? And how can we establish an efficient secretariat function?.

  17. Research on the 2nd generation biofuel BIOXDIESEL in aspects of emission of toxic substances in exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struś, M. S.; Poprawski, W.; Rewolte, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents results of research of Diesel engines emission of toxic substances in exhaust gases fuelled with a second generation biofuel BIOXDIESEL, which is a blend of Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters obtained from waste resources such waste vegetable and animal fats, bioethanol and standard Diesel fuel. Presented results are very promising, showing that the emission of toxic substances in exhaust gases are significantly reduced when fuelling with BIOXDIESEL fuel in comparison with standard Diesel fuel.

  18. Next Generation Millimeter/Submillimeter Array to Search for 2nd Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Masao

    2011-01-01

    ALMA is a revolutionary radio telescope at present and its full operation will start from 2012. It is expected that ALMA will resolve several cosmic questions and will show a new cosmic view to us. Our passion for astronomy naturally goes beyond ALMA because we believe that the 21st-century Astronomy should pursue the new scientific frontier. In this conference, we propose a project of the future radio telescope to search for Habitable planets and finally detect 2nd Earth as a Migratable planet. The detection of 2nd Earth is one of ultimate dreams for not only astronomers but also people.

  19. Feasibility of a 2(nd) generation MR-compatible manipulator for transrectal prostate biopsy guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomers, J G R; Bosboom, D G H; Tigelaar, G H; Sabisch, J; Fütterer, J J; Yakar, D

    2017-04-01

    To assess the feasibility of a 2(nd) generation MR-compatible, remote-controlled manipulator (RCM) as an aid to perform MR-guided transrectal prostate biopsy in males with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). This prospective phase I study was approved by the local ethical committee and written informed consent was obtained from each patient. Twenty patients with ≥1 cancer suspicious region (CSR) with a PI-RADS score of ≥3 detected on the diagnostic multi-parametric MRI and no prior prostate treatment underwent MR-guided biopsy with the aid of the RCM. Complications were classified according to the modified Clavien system for reporting surgical complications. For evaluation of the workflow, procedure- and manipulation times were recorded. All CSR's (n=20) were reachable with the MR-compatible RCM and the cancer detection rate was 70 %. The median procedure time was 36:44 minutes (range, 23 - 61 minutes) and the median manipulation time for needle guide movement was 5:48 minutes (range, 1:15 - 18:35 minutes). Two Clavien grade 1 complications were reported. It is feasible and safe to perform transrectal MR-guided prostate biopsy using a MR-compatible RCM as an aid. It is a fast and efficient way to biopsy suspicious prostate lesions with a minimum number of biopsies per patient. • It is feasible to perform transrectal prostate biopsy using a MR-compatible RCM. • Using a RCM for MR-guided biopsy is safe, fast, and efficient. • All cancer suspicious regions were reachable with the RCM.

  20. Generation of higher order Gauss-Laguerre modes in single-pass 2nd harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We present a realistic method for dynamic simulation of the development of higher order modes in second harmonic generation. The deformation of the wave fronts due to the nonlinear interaction is expressed by expansion in higher order Gauss-Laguerre modes.......We present a realistic method for dynamic simulation of the development of higher order modes in second harmonic generation. The deformation of the wave fronts due to the nonlinear interaction is expressed by expansion in higher order Gauss-Laguerre modes....

  1. Use of extremophilic bacteria for second generation bioethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    production from food crops, such as corn (starch) or sugar cane (sucrose) is already an established process, with the USA and Brazil supplying 86% of the market. The major challenge remains in the use of different waste sources – agricultural, forestry, animal and household waste - as a feedstock....... The recalcitrance of these materials and their diverse sugar composition make the industrial yeast strains currently used unsuitable for a second generation bioethanol production process. One of the alternative strategies is the use of extreme thermophilic microorganisms. Currently, selected members from the genera...... for a wild type strain reported so far. However, productivity and titer values comparable to a first generation process are yet to be achieved. Metabolic engineering to redirect the metabolism from mixed-product fermentation to ethanol production is one of the solutions proposed to improve the performance...

  2. Comparable Research of Energy and Ecology Parameters of 1st, 2nd and 3rd Generation Biofuels for Compression Ignition Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Justas Zaglinskis

    2015-01-01

    .... Main attention focused on energy and environmental characteristics of diesel engine performance using 1st, 2nd and 3rd generation alcohol, fatty acid methyl and butyl esters blends with conventional diesel fuel (EN 590...

  3. Development of industrial yeast for second generation bioethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X.

    2012-01-15

    The cost of lignocellulose-based bioethanol needs to be reduced, in order to commercialize this clean and sustainable fuel substitute for fossil fuels. A microorganism that can completely and efficiently convert all the sugars in lignocellulose into ethanol is one of the prerequisites of a cost-effective production process. In addition, the microorganisms should also have a high tolerance towards the inhibitory compounds present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate, which are formed during the pretreatment of lignocellulose. Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is generally regarded as a robust microorganism and can efficiently ferment glucose. But it lacks the ability to ferment xylose which comprises 20-35% of lignocellulose. Naturally xylose-fermenting yeast such as Pichia stipitis is much more sensitive to inhibitors than S. cerevisiae and it requires accurately controlled microaerophilic conditions during the xylose fermentation, rendering the process technically difficult and expensive. In this study, a novel xylose fermenting yeast Spathaspora passalidarum displayed fast cell growth and efficient xylose fermentation under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, P. stipitis was almost unable to utilize xylose under the same conditions. It is further demonstrated that S. passalidarum converts xylose by means of NADH-preferred xylose reductase (XR) and NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). Thus, the capacity of S. passalidarum to utilize xylose under anaerobic conditions is possibly due to a balance between supply and demand of cofactor through this XR-XDH pathway. Only one other XR with NADH preference has been reported so far. Unfortunately, S. passalidarum also has a low tolerance towards inhibitors generated during pretreatment, which prevents immediate use of this yeast in industrial application. S. passalidarum is able to convert the inhibitor furfural to furfuryl alcohol in a synthetic medium when the addition of furfural is low. The enzymes

  4. Compatibility of IEC 61400-27-1 Ed 1 and WECC 2nd Generation Wind Turbine Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Ömer; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Morales, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The IEC TC88 WG27 and the Western Electric Coordinating Council (WECC) Renewable Energy Modeling Task Force, in North America, have been developing the IEC 61400-27-1 and WECC 2nd Generation Wind Turbine generic electrical models, where the first editions are published in 2014 and 2013......, respectively. Although the two working groups have been collaborating closely, there are small differences between the approaches of the two modelling standards, especially in terms of parameter sets and complexities for different functions. In this paper, compatibility of the IEC and WECC wind turbine models...... to model comparison of the IEC and WECC wind turbines’ simulation results for the wind turbine types 3 and 4, which are the most common technologies. Additionally, detailed behavior of the IEC type 3 model during voltage drop and recovery are compared against measurements....

  5. Large-aperture $Nb_{3}Sn$ quadrupoles for $2^{nd}$ generation LHC IRs

    CERN Document Server

    Zlobin, A V; Chichili, D R; Huang Yu; Kashikhin, V V; Lamm, M J; Limon, P J; Mokhov, N V; Novitski, I; Peterson, T; Strait, J B; Yadav, S

    2002-01-01

    The 1/sup st/ generation of low-beta quadrupoles for the LHC interaction region (IR) was designed to achieve the nominal LHC luminosity of 10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/. Given that the lifetime of the 1/sup st/ generation IR quadrupoles is limited by ionizing radiation to 6-7 years, the 2/sup nd/ generation of IR quadrupoles has to be developed with the goal to achieve the ultimate luminosity up to 10/sup 35/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/. The IR quadrupole parameters such as nominal gradient, dynamic aperture and physical aperture, operation margins are the main factors limiting the machine performance. Conceptual designs of 90-mm aperture high-gradient quadrupoles, suitable for use in 2/sup nd/ generation high-luminosity LHC IRs with the similar optics, are presented. The issues related to the field gradient, field quality and operation margins are discussed. (5 refs).

  6. Second generation bioethanol potential from selected Malaysia's biodiversity biomasses: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditiya, H B; Chong, W T; Mahlia, T M I; Sebayang, A H; Berawi, M A; Nur, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Rising global temperature, worsening air quality and drastic declining of fossil fuel reserve are the inevitable phenomena from the disorganized energy management. Bioethanol is believed to clear out the effects as being an energy-derivable product sourced from renewable organic sources. Second generation bioethanol interests many researches from its unique source of inedible biomass, and this paper presents the potential of several selected biomasses from Malaysia case. As one of countries with rich biodiversity, Malaysia holds enormous potential in second generation bioethanol production from its various agricultural and forestry biomasses, which are the source of lignocellulosic and starch compounds. This paper reviews potentials of biomasses and potential ethanol yield from oil palm, paddy (rice), pineapple, banana and durian, as the common agricultural waste in the country but uncommon to be served as bioethanol feedstock, by calculating the theoretical conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and starch components of the biomasses into bioethanol. Moreover, the potential of the biomasses as feedstock are discussed based on several reported works.

  7. A MICROSCOPIC MODEL FOR THE 2ND-HARMONIC GENERATION FROM C-60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOPMANS, B; JANNER, AM; GUARDINI, R; JONKMAN, HT; SAWATZKY, GA; VANDERWOUDE, F

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the microscopic origin of the Second-Harmonic Generation (SHG) resonance at hBAR omega=1.81 eV, based on spectroscopic and thickness dependent SHG measurements on C-60 thin films. We assign the three-level diagram responsible for the observed SHG resonance, and show it to be of magnetic-d

  8. STARS 2.0: 2nd-generation open-source archiving and query software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winegar, Tom

    2008-07-01

    The Subaru Telescope is in process of developing an open-source alternative to the 1st-generation software and databases (STARS 1) used for archiving and query. For STARS 2, we have chosen PHP and Python for scripting and MySQL as the database software. We have collected feedback from staff and observers, and used this feedback to significantly improve the design and functionality of our future archiving and query software. Archiving - We identified two weaknesses in 1st-generation STARS archiving software: a complex and inflexible table structure and uncoordinated system administration for our business model: taking pictures from the summit and archiving them in both Hawaii and Japan. We adopted a simplified and normalized table structure with passive keyword collection, and we are designing an archive-to-archive file transfer system that automatically reports real-time status and error conditions and permits error recovery. Query - We identified several weaknesses in 1st-generation STARS query software: inflexible query tools, poor sharing of calibration data, and no automatic file transfer mechanisms to observers. We are developing improved query tools and sharing of calibration data, and multi-protocol unassisted file transfer mechanisms for observers. In the process, we have redefined a 'query': from an invisible search result that can only transfer once in-house right now, with little status and error reporting and no error recovery - to a stored search result that can be monitored, transferred to different locations with multiple protocols, reporting status and error conditions and permitting recovery from errors.

  9. Bellman's GAP : a 2nd generation language and system for algebraic dynamic programming

    OpenAIRE

    Sauthoff, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The dissertation describes the new Bellman’s GAP which is a programming system for writing dynamic programming algorithms over sequential data. It is the second generation implementation of the algebraic dynamic programming framework (ADP). The system includes the multi-paradigm language (GAP-L), its compiler (GAP-C), functional modules (GAP-M) and a web site (GAP Pages) to experiment with GAP-L programs. GAP-L includes declarative constructs, e.g. tree grammars to model the search space, and...

  10. Using 2 nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in frontline management of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Jayakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Choices in medicine come with responsibility. With several TKI′s (Tyrosine kinase inhibitors available for front-line management of CML (Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, an astute clinician has to personalise, rationalise and take a pragmatic approach towards selection of the best drug for the ′patient in question′. Though it is hotly debated as to which TKI will triumph, the truth of this debate lies in individualising treatment rather than a general ′all size fits all′ approach with imatinib. I personally believe that the second generation TKI′s will suit most patient clinical profiles rather than prescribing imatinib to all and I have strived to make a strong case for them in front line treatment of CML. Though Imatinib may remain the first line choice for some patients, my efforts in this debate are mainly geared towards breaking the myth that imatinib is the sole ′block buster′ on the CML landscape

  11. Second generation bioethanol production from Saccharum spontaneum L. ssp. aegyptiacum (Willd.) Hack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilo Scordia; Salvatore L. Consentino; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2010-01-01

    Saccharum (Saccharum spontaneum L. ssp. aegyptiacum (Willd.) Hack.), is a rapidly growing, wide ranging high-yield perennial, suitable for second generation bioethanol production. This study evaluated oxalic acid as a pretreatment for bioconversion. Overall sugar yields, sugar degradation products, enzymatic glucan hydrolysis and ethanol production were studied as...

  12. Steam reforming of technical bioethanol for hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rass-Hansen, Jeppe; Johansson, Roger; Møller, Martin Hulbek;

    2008-01-01

    Essentially all work on ethanol steam reforming so far has been carried out using simulated bioethanol feedstocks, which means pure ethanol mixed with water. However, technical bioethanol consists of a lot of different components including sugars, which cannot be easily vaporized and steam reformed....... For ethanol steam reforming to be of practical interest, it is important to avoid the energy-intensive purification steps to fuel grade ethanol. Therefore, it is imperative to analyze how technical bioethanol, with the relevant impurities, reacts during the steam reforming process. We show how three different...... distillation fractions of technical 2nd generation bioethanol, produced in a pilot plant, influence the performance of nickel- and ruthenium-based catalysts during steam reforming, and we discuss what is required to obtain high activity and long catalyst lifetime. We conclude that the use of technical...

  13. RF SOI CMOS technology on 1st and 2nd generation trap-rich high resistivity SOI wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi Esfeh, B.; Makovejev, S.; Basso, Didier; Desbonnets, Eric; Kilchytska, V.; Flandre, D.; Raskin, J.-P.

    2017-02-01

    In this work three different types of UNIBOND™ Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafers including one standard HR-SOI and two types of trap-rich high resistivity HR-SOI substrates named enhanced signal integrity high resistivity silicon-on-insulator (eSI HR-SOI) provided by SOITEC are studied and compared. The DC and RF performances of these wafers are compared by means of passive and active devices such as coplanar waveguide (CPW) lines, crosstalk- and noise injection-structures as well as partially-depleted (PD) SOI MOSFETs. It is demonstrated that by employing enhanced signal integrity high resistivity silicon-on-insulator (eSI HR-SOI) compared to HR-SOI wafer, a reduction of 24 dB is measured on both generations of trap-rich HR-SOI for 2nd harmonics. Furthermore, it is shown that in eSI HR-SOI, digital substrate noise is effectively reduced compared with HR-SOI. Purely capacitive behavior of eSI HR-SOI is demonstrated by crosstalk structure. Reduction of self-heating effect in the trap-rich HR-SOI with thinner BOX is finally studied.

  14. Cogeneration and production of 2nd generation bio fuels using biomass gasification; Cogeneracion y produccion de biocombustibles de 2 generacion mediante gasificacion de biomasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uruena Leal, A.; Diez Rodriguez, D.; Antolin Giraldo, G.

    2011-07-01

    Thermochemical decomposition process of gasification, in which a carbonaceous fuel, under certain conditions of temperature and oxygen deficiency, results in a series of reactions that will produce a series of gaseous products is now widely used for high performance energetic and versatility of these gaseous products for energy and 2nd generation bio fuels and reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. (Author)

  15. Differences between 2nd and 3rd generation seric parathormone determination methods on mortality in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Osorio, Laura; de la Piedra, Concepción; Rubert, Mercedes; Martín-Fernández, Marta; González Casaus, María Luisa; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Egido, Jesús; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; González Parra, Emilio

    Parathormone plays a key role in controlling mineral metabolism. PTH is considered a uremic toxin causing cardiovascular damage and cardiovascular mortality in dialysis patients. There are two different assays to measure PTH called 2nd generation or intact PTH (iPTH) and 3rd generation or bioPTH (PTHbio). To evaluate the differences in mortality of dialysis patients between both assays to measure PTH, as well as the possible prognostic role of the PTHbio/iPTH ratio. 145 haemodialysis patients were included with 2-year monitoring including baseline laboratory test and annually thereafter. 21 patients died in the first year and 28 in the second. No correlation was found between PTH, PTHbio and PTHbio/iPTH ratio with mortality. Both PTH have a perfect correlation between them and correlate similarly with other molecules of the mineral metabolism. The extreme baseline values of PTH are those of higher mortality. In survival by iPTH intervals (according to guidelines and COSMOS study), a J curve is observed. When iPTH increases, the ratio decreases, possibly when increasing fragments no. 1-84. There is no greater prognostic approximation on mortality with PTHbio than PTHi. There was also no difference in mortality when progression ratio PTHbio/PTHi was analysed. We didn't find any advantages to using bioPTH vs. PTHi as a marker of mortality. BioPTH limits of normality must be reevaluated because its relationship with iPTH is not consistent. Not knowing these limits affects its prognostic value. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Sustainability of bioethanol production from wheat with recycled residues as evaluated by Emergy assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppola, F.; Bastianoni, S.; Østergård, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    An Emergy assessment study of 24 bioethanol production scenarios was carried out for the comparison of bioethanol production using winter wheat grains and/or straw as feedstock and conversion technologies based on starch (1st generation) and/or lignocellulose (2nd generation). An integrated biomass......, were considered. Material and energy flows were assessed to evaluate the bioethanol yield, the production efficiency in terms of Emergy used compared to energy produced (transformity), and the environmental load (ELR) in terms of use of non-renewable resources. These three indicators varied among...... the four feedstock production scenarios to the same extent as among the three different industrial production scenarios and in each case the efficiency was lower and the use of non-renewables higher for the non-recycling system. The system most efficient for production of bioethanol (lowest transformity...

  17. Simulation of integrated first and second generation bioethanol production from sugarcane: comparison between different biomass pretreatment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Marina O S; da Cunha, Marcelo Pereira; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Bonomi, Antonio; Jesus, Charles D F; Rossell, Carlos E V

    2011-08-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is used as a fuel in conventional bioethanol production, providing heat and power for the plant; therefore, the amount of surplus bagasse available for use as raw material for second generation bioethanol production is related to the energy consumption of the bioethanol production process. Pentoses and lignin, byproducts of the second generation bioethanol production process, may be used as fuels, increasing the amount of surplus bagasse. In this work, simulations of the integrated bioethanol production process from sugarcane, surplus bagasse and trash were carried out. Selected pre-treatment methods followed, or not, by a delignification step were evaluated. The amount of lignocellulosic materials available for hydrolysis in each configuration was calculated assuming that 50% of sugarcane trash is recovered from the field. An economic risk analysis was carried out; the best results for the integrated first and second generation ethanol production process were obtained for steam explosion pretreatment, high solids loading for hydrolysis and 24-48 h hydrolysis. The second generation ethanol production process must be improved (e.g., decreasing required investment, improving yields and developing pentose fermentation to ethanol) in order for the integrated process to be more economically competitive.

  18. Cathode Assessment for Maximizing Current Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Utilizing Bioethanol Effluent as Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guotao Sun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs for electricity production requires effective current generation from waste products via robust cathode reduction. Three cathode types using dissolved oxygen cathodes (DOCs, ferricyanide cathodes (FeCs and air cathodes (AiCs were therefore assessed using bioethanol effluent, containing 20.5 g/L xylose, 1.8 g/L arabinose and 2.5 g/L propionic acid. In each set-up the anode and cathode had an electrode surface area of 88 cm2, which was used for calculation of the current density. Electricity generation was evaluated by quantifying current responses to substrate loading rates and external resistance. At the lowest external resistance of 27 Ω and highest substrate loading rate of 2 g chemical oxygen demand (COD per L·day, FeC-MFC generated highest average current density (1630 mA/m2 followed by AiC-MFC (802 mA/m2 and DOC-MFC (184 mA/m2. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was used to determine the impedance of the cathodes. It was thereby confirmed that the FeC-MFC produced the highest current density with the lowest internal resistance for the cathode. However, in a setup using bioethanol effluent, the AiC-MFC was concluded to be the most sustainable option since it does not require ferricyanide. The data offer a new add-on option to the straw biorefinery by using bioethanol effluent for microbial electricity production.

  19. Generation of bioethanol and VFA through anaerobic acidogenic fermentation route with press mud obtained from sugar mill as a feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruti, Kranti; Gangagni Rao, A; Gandu, Bharath; Kiran, G; Mohammad, Sameena; Sailaja, S; Swamy, Y V

    2015-09-01

    Acidogenic anaerobic fermentation route was explored for the production of bioethanol and volatile fatty acids (VFA) from the press mud (PM) obtained from sugar mill. Slurry was prepared from PM having 10% of total solids and the same was hydrolyzed under acidic thermal conditions. Both press mud slurry (PMS) and pre-treated press mud slurry (PTPMS) was used as feedstock with mixed microbial consortia (MMC) and enriched mixed microbial consortia (EMMC). Mix of bioethanol and VFA were obtained in all the four cases (PMS-MMC, PMS-EMMC, PTPMS-EMC and PTPMS-EMMC), but, bioethanol and VFA yield of 0.04 g/g and 0.27 g/g, respectively obtained from PTPMS with EMMC was found to be comparatively higher. Control experiments carried out with glucose yielded bioethanol and VFA of 0.042 g/g and 0.28 g/g, respectively demonstrating that the organism was using reducible sugars in the feedstock for the generation of bioethanol by simultaneously producing the VFA from COD.

  20. Effects of bioethanol ultrasonic generated aerosols application on diesel engine performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariasiu Florin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effects of an experimental bioethanol fumigation application using an experimental ultrasound device on performance and emissions of a single cylinder diesel engine have been experimentally investigated. Engine performance and pollutant emissions variations were considered for three different types of fuels (biodiesel, biodiesel-bioethanol blend and biodiesel and fumigated bioethanol. Reductions in brake specific fuel consumption and NOx pollutant emissions are correlated with the use of ultrasonic fumigation of bioethanol fuel, comparative to use of biodiesel-bioethanol blend. Considering the fuel consumption as diesel engine’s main performance parameter, the proposed bioethanol’s fumigation method, offers the possibility to use more efficient renewable biofuels (bioethanol, with immediate effects on environmental protection.

  1. Cathode Assessment for Maximizing Current Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Utilizing Bioethanol Effluent as Substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Guotao; Thygesen, Anders; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    responses to substrate loading rates and external resistance. At the lowest external resistance of 27 and highest substrate loading rate of 2 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) per Lday, FeC-MFC generated highest average current density (1630 mA/m(2)) followed by AiC-MFC (802 mA/m(2)) and DOC-MFC (184 mA/m(2......)). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the impedance of the cathodes. It was thereby confirmed that the FeC-MFC produced the highest current density with the lowest internal resistance for the cathode. However, in a setup using bioethanol effluent, the AiC-MFC was concluded...

  2. Methodology for measuring the impact of mobile technology change from 2nd to 3th generation percerved by users of smes in Barranquilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Polo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a research project undertaken to obtain a Masters inBusiness Administration from the Business School at the Universidad del Norte, whosepurpose was to identify and test a methodology to measure the impact exerted by thechange from 2nd to 3rd generation mobile tech, based on the perception of users belongingto Barranquilla SME, motivated by the influence of technological changes in behavior andthe knowledge creation among society members, and the importance it has taken to thesurvival of organizations the adoption of applications for process automation, web-basedapplications, voice, data and video that allow the development of competitive advantages,based on information and creativity for new and better products or services.

  3. Build Your Own Second-Generation Bioethanol Plant in the Classroom!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seters, van J.R.; Sijbers, J.P.J.; Denis, M.; Tramper, J.

    2011-01-01

    The production of bioethanol from cellulosic waste is described. The experiment is suitable for students in secondary school classroom settings and leads to bioethanol in a concentration high enough to burn the liquid. The experiment consists of three steps: (i) the cellulose of the waste material i

  4. Build Your Own Second-Generation Bioethanol Plant in the Classroom!

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Sijbers, Jeroen P. J.; Denis, Misha; Tramper, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    The production of bioethanol from cellulosic waste is described. The experiment is suitable for students in secondary school classroom settings and leads to bioethanol in a concentration high enough to burn the liquid. The experiment consists of three steps: (i) the cellulose of the waste material is converted to glucose by cellulase enzymes, (ii)…

  5. Efficient 2(nd) and 4(th) harmonic generation of a single-frequency, continuous-wave fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudmeyer, Thomas; Imai, Yutaka; Masuda, Hisashi; Eguchi, Naoya; Saito, Masaki; Kubota, Shigeo

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate efficient cavity-enhanced second and fourth harmonic generation of an air-cooled, continuous-wave (cw), single-frequency 1064 nm fiber-amplifier system. The second harmonic generator achieves up to 88% total external conversion efficiency, generating more than 20-W power at 532 nm wavelength in a diffraction-limited beam (M(2) crystal operated at 25 degrees C. The fourth harmonic generator is based on an AR-coated, Czochralski-grown beta-BaB(2)O(4) (BBO) crystal optimized for low loss and high damage threshold. Up to 12.2 W of 266-nm deep-UV (DUV) output is obtained using a 6-mm long critically phase-matched BBO operated at 40 degrees C. This power level is more than two times higher than previously reported for cw 266-nm generation. The total external conversion efficiency from the fundamental at 1064 nm to the fourth harmonic at 266 nm is >50%.

  6. Lignocellulosic ethanol in Brazil : technical assessment of 1st and 2nd generation sugarcane ethanol in a Brazilian setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, M.; Bakker, R.R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Brazil is currently the largest ethanol-biofuel producer worldwide. Ethanol is produced by fermenting the sucrose part of the sugarcane that contains only one third of the sugarcane energy. The rest of the plant is burned to produce energy to run the process and to generate electricity that is sold

  7. Transapical Implantation of a 2nd-Generation JenaValve Device in Patient with Extremely High Surgical Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mieres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR is performed in patients who are poor surgical candidates. Many patients have inadequate femoral access, and alternative access sites have been used such as the transapical approach discussed in this paper. We present an elderly and fragile patient not suitable for surgery for unacceptable high risk, including poor ventricular function, previous myocardial infarction with percutaneous coronary intervention, pericardial effusion, and previous cardiac surgery with replacement of mechanical mitral valve. Transapical aortic valve replacement with a second-generation self-expanding JenaValve is performed. The JenaValve is a second-generation transapical TAVR valve consisting of a porcine root valve mounted on a low-profile nitinol stent. The valve is fully retrievable and repositionable. We discuss transapical access, implantation technique, and feasibility of valve implantation in this extremely high surgical risk patient.

  8. Control system for the 2nd generation Berkeley automounters (BAM2) at GM/CA-CAT macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, O., E-mail: makarov@anl.gov [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hilgart, M.; Ogata, C.; Pothineni, S. [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cork, C. [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    GM/CA-CAT at Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction. A second-generation Berkeley automounter is being integrated into the beamline control system at the 23BM experimental station. This new device replaces the previous all-pneumatic gripper motions with a combination of pneumatics and XYZ motorized linear stages. The latter adds a higher degree of flexibility to the robot including auto-alignment capability, accommodation of a larger capacity sample Dewar of arbitrary shape, and support for advanced operations such as crystal washing, while preserving the overall simplicity and efficiency of the Berkeley automounter design.

  9. Contribution of ion beam analysis methods to the development of 2nd generation high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usov, Igor O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arendt, Paul N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Liliana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holesinger, Terry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foltyn, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Depaula, Raymond F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    One of the crucial steps in the second generation high temperature superconducting wire program was development of the buffer layer architecture. The architecture designed at the Superconductivity Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of several oxide layers wherein each layer plays a specific role, namely: nucleation layer, diffusion barrier, biaxially textured template, and an intermediate layer with a good match to the lattice parameter of superconducting Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) compound. This report demonstrates how a wide range of ion beam analysis techniques (SIMS, RBS, channeling, PIXE, PIGE, NRA, ERD) was employed for analysis of each buffer layer and the YBCO films. These results assisted in understanding of a variety of physical processes occurring during the buffet layer fabrication and helped to optimize the buffer layer architecture as a whole.

  10. 2nd UNet conference

    CERN Document Server

    Menasche, Daniel; Sabir, Essaïd; Pellegrini, Francesco; Benjillali, Mustapha

    2017-01-01

    This volume offers the proceedings of the 2nd UNet conference, held in Casablanca May 30 - June 1, 2016. It presents new trends and findings in hot topics related to ubiquitous computing/networking, covered in three tracks and three special sessions: Main Track 1: Context-Awareness and Autonomy Paradigms Track Main Track 2: Mobile Edge Networking and Virtualization Track Main Track 3: Enablers, Challenges and Applications Special Session 1: Smart Cities and Urban Informatics for Sustainable Development Special Session 2: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles From Theory to Applications Special Session 3: From Data to Knowledge: Big Data applications and solutions.

  11. Study of recovery characteristics of 2nd generation HTS tapes with different stabilizers for resistive type superconducting fault current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Jie, E-mail: 1988725sheng@163.com; Zeng, Weina; Ma, Jun; Yao, Zhihao; Li, Zhuyong; Jin, Zhijian; Hong, Zhiyong

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Three methods of measuring the recovery time of HTS tapes are compared. • Four tapes with different stabilizers were tested to compare their recovery characteristics. • The HTS tapes with thinner stabilizers have better recovery characteristics. • Encapsulation makes the recovery characteristics of HTS tapes worse. • The results can be reference of the re-reclosed operation time interval. - Abstract: The resistive type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is one of the most important superconducting power applications nowadays. As known, this type of SFCL is settled directly in the power transmission line. When a short fault happens, the temperature of the superconductors in the SFCL will increase sharply due to the huge generated heat. This means the superconductors need time to recover the superconducting properties and be ready for the next short fault. So the recovery characteristics become one of the most crucial features of the resistive type SFCL. In this paper, several different kinds of measuring methods are presented to calculate the recovery time of the HTS tapes, and comparison of these methods is also carried out by a standard test. On basis of this, samples with different kinds of stabilizers are used to explore the influence of stabilizer on their recovery characteristics. In addition, the influence of the encapsulation technology is also discussed in this paper.

  12. An analytical benchmark and a Mathematica program for MD codes: Testing LAMMPS on the 2nd generation Brenner potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favata, Antonino; Micheletti, Andrea; Ryu, Seunghwa; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-10-01

    An analytical benchmark and a simple consistent Mathematica program are proposed for graphene and carbon nanotubes, that may serve to test any molecular dynamics code implemented with REBO potentials. By exploiting the benchmark, we checked results produced by LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) when adopting the second generation Brenner potential, we made evident that this code in its current implementation produces results which are offset from those of the benchmark by a significant amount, and provide evidence of the reason. Catalogue identifier: AFAS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFAS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 22854 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 369171 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 9. Computer: Any PC. Operating system: Any which supports Mathematica; tested under OS Yosemite. RAM: material properties (Young's modulus and Poisson coefficient) are also computed. Running time: Instantaneous, or a few seconds, depending on computer hardware

  13. Comparison of Five 2nd-Generation Supraglottic Airway Devices for Airway Management Performed by Novice Military Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Henlin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Five different second-generation supraglottic airway devices, ProSeal LMA, Supreme LMA, i-gel, SLIPA, and Laryngeal Tube Suction-D, were studied. Operators were inexperienced users with a military background, combat lifesavers, nurses, and physicians. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded study. Devices were inserted in the operating room in low light conditions after induction of general anesthesia. Primary outcome was successful insertion on the first attempt while secondary aims were insertion time, number of attempts, oropharyngeal seal pressure, ease of insertion, fibre optic position of device, efficacy of ventilation, and intraoperative trauma or regurgitation of gastric contents. Results. In total, 505 patients were studied. First-attempt insertion success rate was higher in the Supreme LMA (96%, i-gel (87.9%, and ProSeal LMA (85.9% groups than in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D (80.6% and SLIPA (69.4% groups. Insertion time was shortest in the Supreme LMA (70.4 ± 32.5 s and i-gel (74.4 ± 41.1 s groups (p<0.001. Oropharyngeal seal pressures were higher in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D and ProSeal LMA groups than in other three devices. Conclusions. Most study parameters for the Supreme LMA and i-gel were found to be superior to the other three tested supraglottic airway devices when inserted by novice military operators.

  14. Second-generation bio-ethanol (SGB) from Malaysian palm empty fruit bunch: energy and exergy analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui Teng; Lee, Keat Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2010-07-01

    Recently, second-generation bio-ethanol (SGB), which utilizes readily available lignocellulosic biomass has received much interest as another potential source of liquid biofuel comparable to biodiesel. Thus the aim of this paper is to determine the exergy efficiency and to compare the effectiveness of SGB and palm methyl ester (PME) processes. It was found that the production of bio-ethanol is more thermodynamically sustainable than that of biodiesel as the net exergy value (NExV) of SGB is 10% higher than that of PME. Contrarily, the former has a net energy value (NEV) which is 9% lower than the latter. Despite this, SGB is still strongly recommended as a potential biofuel because SGB production can help mitigate several detrimental impacts on the environment.

  15. Space Ops 2002: Bringing Space Operations into the 21st Century. Track 3: Operations, Mission Planning and Control. 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle-Concepts for Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    With the successful implementation of the International Space Station (ISS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) enters a new era of opportunity for scientific research. The ISS provides a working laboratory in space, with tremendous capabilities for scientific research. Utilization of these capabilities requires a launch system capable of routinely transporting crew and logistics to/from the ISS, as well as supporting ISS assembly and maintenance tasks. The Space Shuttle serves as NASA's launch system for performing these functions. The Space Shuttle also serves as NASA's launch system for supporting other science and servicing missions that require a human presence in space. The Space Shuttle provides proof that reusable launch vehicles are technically and physically implementable. However, a couple of problems faced by NASA are the prohibitive cost of operating and maintaining the Space Shuttle and its relative inability to support high launch rates. The 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2nd Gen RLV) is NASA's solution to this problem. The 2nd Gen RLV will provide a robust launch system with increased safety, improved reliability and performance, and less cost. The improved performance and reduced costs of the 2nd Gen RLV will free up resources currently spent on launch services. These resource savings can then be applied to scientific research, which in turn can be supported by the higher launch rate capability of the 2nd Gen RLV. The result is a win - win situation for science and NASA. While meeting NASA's needs, the 2nd Gen RLV also provides the United States aerospace industry with a commercially viable launch capability. One of the keys to achieving the goals of the 2nd Gen RLV is to develop and implement new technologies and processes in the area of flight operations. NASA's experience in operating the Space Shuttle and the ISS has brought to light several areas where automation can be used to augment or eliminate functions

  16. Flocculation causes inhibitor tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for second-generation bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Johan O; Mapelli, Valeria; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J; Franzén, Carl Johan

    2014-11-01

    Yeast has long been considered the microorganism of choice for second-generation bioethanol production due to its fermentative capacity and ethanol tolerance. However, tolerance toward inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic materials is still an issue. Flocculating yeast strains often perform relatively well in inhibitory media, but inhibitor tolerance has never been clearly linked to the actual flocculation ability per se. In this study, variants of the flocculation gene FLO1 were transformed into the genome of the nonflocculating laboratory yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D. Three mutants with distinct differences in flocculation properties were isolated and characterized. The degree of flocculation and hydrophobicity of the cells were correlated to the length of the gene variant. The effect of different strength of flocculation on the fermentation performance of the strains was studied in defined medium with or without fermentation inhibitors, as well as in media based on dilute acid spruce hydrolysate. Strong flocculation aided against the readily convertible inhibitor furfural but not against less convertible inhibitors such as carboxylic acids. During fermentation of dilute acid spruce hydrolysate, the most strongly flocculating mutant with dense cell flocs showed significantly faster sugar consumption. The modified strain with the weakest flocculation showed a hexose consumption profile similar to the untransformed strain. These findings may explain why flocculation has evolved as a stress response and can find application in fermentation-based biorefinery processes on lignocellulosic raw materials.

  17. Direct and non-destructive proof of authenticity for the 2nd generation of Brazilian real banknotes via easy ambient sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eduardo Morgado; Franco, Marcos Fernando; Regino, Karen Gomes; Lehmann, Eraldo Luiz; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi; de Carvalho Rocha, Werickson Fortunato; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2014-12-01

    Using a desorption/ionization technique, easy ambient sonic-spray ionization coupled to mass spectrometry (EASI-MS), documents related to the 2nd generation of Brazilian Real currency (R$) were screened in the positive ion mode for authenticity based on chemical profiles obtained directly from the banknote surface. Characteristic profiles were observed for authentic, seized suspect counterfeit and counterfeited homemade banknotes from inkjet and laserjet printers. The chemicals in the authentic banknotes' surface were detected via a few minor sets of ions, namely from the plasticizers bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), most likely related to the official offset printing process, and other common quaternary ammonium cations, presenting a similar chemical profile to 1st-generation R$. The seized suspect counterfeit banknotes, however, displayed abundant diagnostic ions in the m/z 400-800 range due to the presence of oligomers. High-accuracy FT-ICR MS analysis enabled molecular formula assignment for each ion. The ions were separated by 44 m/z, which enabled their characterization as Surfynol® 4XX (S4XX, XX=40, 65, and 85), wherein increasing XX values indicate increasing amounts of ethoxylation on a backbone of 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyne-4,7-diol (Surfynol® 104). Sodiated triethylene glycol monobutyl ether (TBG) of m/z 229 (C10H22O4Na) was also identified in the seized counterfeit banknotes via EASI(+) FT-ICR MS. Surfynol® and TBG are constituents of inks used for inkjet printing.

  18. Life Cycle Assessment of second generation bioethanol produced from low-input dedicated crops of Arundo donax L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucaro, Amalia; Forte, Annachiara; Basosi, Riccardo; Fagnano, Massimo; Fierro, Angelo

    2016-11-01

    This work presents a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of bioethanol (EtOH) from perennial Arundo donax L. feedstock. A "cradle-to-wheel" approach was applied considering primary data for the cultivation of dedicated crops on hilly marginal lands and innovative "second generation technologies" for feedstock conversion into EtOH. The goals of the study were to: (i) quantify impacts of lignocellulosic EtOH production/use chain, (ii) identify hotspots and (iii) compare the environmental performance of different bioethanol-gasoline vehicles, E10 (10% EtOH and 90% gasoline) and E85 (85% EtOH and 15% gasoline), with a conventional gasoline passenger car. Results for E85 underlined that the feedstock production and the use phase were the prevailing contributors, whilst for E10 the gasoline production phase shared the largest part of impacts. The comparison showed that vehicles using lignocellulosic bioethanol have potentially significant benefits on global warming, ozone depletion, photochemical oxidant formation and fossil depletion in respect to conventional passenger car.

  19. Study of the chemical composition of sweet sorghum stalks depleted in carbohydrates with applications in obtaining bioethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilica Manea; Andrei Tanase; Angela Casarica; Radu Albulesch; Georgeta Radulescu; Gheorghe Campeanu; Florentina Israel-Roming; Gheorghe Stoian

    2010-01-01

    Sweet sorghum is a great energy crop that shows the benefits to ecosystems, energy and economics, being a valuable source of energy of the category 1st, 2nd and 3rd. bioethanol generation. Purpose of the paper is to study the chemical composition of sweet sorghum stalks depleted in carbohydrates with applications in obtaining ethanol. It shows appreciable compositional values of free sugars, starch, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. All these components can be easily made av...

  20. Subcritical and supercritical technology for the production of second generation bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostagno, Mauricio A; Prado, Juliana M; Mudhoo, Ackmez; Santos, Diego T; Forster-Carneiro, Tânia; Meireles, M Angela A

    2015-01-01

    There is increased interest in reducing our reliance on fossil fuels and increasing the share of renewable raw materials in our energy supply chain due to environmental and economic concerns. Ethanol is emerging as a potential alternative to liquid fuels due to its eco-friendly characteristics and relatively low production costs. As ethanol is currently produced from commodities also used for human and animal consumption, there is an urgent need of identifying renewable raw materials that do not pose a competitive problem. Lignocellulosic agricultural residues are an ideal choice since they can be effectively hydrolyzed to fermentable sugars and integrated in the context of a biorefinery without competing with the food supply chain. However, the conventional hydrolysis methods still have major issues that need to be addressed. These issues are related to the processing rate and generation of fermentation inhibitors, which can compromise the quality of the product and the cost of the process. As the knowledge of the processes taking place during hydrolysis of agricultural residues is increasing, new techniques are being exploited to overcome these drawbacks. This review gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of hydrolysis with subcritical and supercritical water in the context of reusing agricultural residues for the production of suitable substrates to be processed during the fermentative production of bioethanol. Presently, subcritical and/or supercritical water hydrolysis has been found to yield low sugar contents mainly due to concurrent competing degradation of sugars during the hydrothermal processes. In this line of thinking, the present review also revisits the recent applications and advances to provide an insight of future research trends to optimize on the subcritical and supercritical process kinetics.

  1. Production of 2nd generation bioethanol from lucerne - Optimization of hydrothermal pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Sune T.; Jensen, Morten; Schmidt, Jens E.

    2012-01-01

    Lucerne (Medicago sativa) has many qualities associated with sustainable agriculture such as nitrogen fixation and high biomass yield. Therefore, there is interest in whether lucerne is a suitable biomass substrate for bioethanol production, and if hydrothermal pretreatment (HTT) of lucerne impro...

  2. Production of 2nd generation Bioethanol from Lucerne - Optimization of Hydrothermal Pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe; Jensen, Morten; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2012-01-01

    Lucerne (Medicago sativa) has many qualities associated with sustainable agriculture such as nitrogen fixation and high biomass yield. Therefore, there is interest in whether lucerne is a suitable biomass substrate for bioethanol production, and if hydrothermal pretreatment (HTT) of lucerne impro...

  3. Technology Evaluation of Process Configurations for Second Generation Bioethanol Production using Dynamic Model-based Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo; Meyer, Anne S.; Gernaey, Krist

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of a number of different process flowsheets for bioethanol production was performed using dynamic model-based simulations. The evaluation employed diverse operational scenarios such as, fed-batch, continuous and continuous with recycle configurations. Each configuration was evaluate...

  4. Experimental and numerical validation of the effective medium theory for the B-term band broadening in 1st and 2nd generation monolithic silica columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deridder, Sander; Vanmessen, Alison; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Desmet, Gert; Cabooter, Deirdre

    2014-07-18

    Effective medium theory (EMT) expressions for the B-term band broadening in monolithic silica columns are presented at the whole-column as well as at the mesoporous skeleton level. Given the bi-continuous nature of the monolithic medium, regular as well as inverse formulations of the EMT-expressions have been established. The established expressions were validated by applying them to a set of experimental effective diffusion (Deff)-data obtained via peak parking on a number of 1st and 2nd generation monolithic silica columns, as well as to a set of numerical diffusion simulations in a simplified monolithic column representation (tetrahedral skeleton model) with different external porosities and internal diffusion coefficients. The numerically simulated diffusion data can be very closely represented over a very broad range of zone retention factors (up to k″=80) using the established EMT-expressions, especially when using the inverse variant. The expressions also allow representing the experimentally measured effective diffusion data very closely. The measured Deff/Dmol-values were found to decrease significantly with increasing retention factor, in general going from about Deff/Dmol=0.55 to 0.65 at low k″ (k″≅1.5-3.8) to Deff/Dmol=0.25 at very high k″ (k″≅40-80). These values are significantly larger than observed in fully-porous and core-shell particles. The intra-skeleton diffusion coefficient (Dpz) was typically found to be of the order of Dpz/Dmol=0.4, compared to Dpz/Dmol=0.2-0.35 observed in most particle-based columns. These higher Dpz/Dmol values are the cause of the higher Deff/Dmol values observed. In addition, it also appears that the higher internal diffusion is linked to the higher porosity of the mesoporous skeleton that has a relatively open structure with relatively wide pores. The observed (weak) relation between Dpz/Dmol and the zone retention factor appears to be in good agreement with that predicted when applying the regular

  5. Long-term production of bioethanol in repeated-batch fermentation of microalgal biomass using immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dalatony, Marwa M; Kurade, Mayur B; Abou-Shanab, Reda A I; Kim, Hoo; Salama, El-Sayed; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-11-01

    Separate hydrolysis fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification fermentation (SSF) processes were studied for bioethanol production from microalgal biomass. SSF was selected as an efficient process to enhance the bioethanol yield through repeated-batches using immobilized yeast cells. Combined sonication and enzymatic hydrolysis of Chlamydomonas mexicana generated 10.5 and 8.48g/L of ethanol in SSF and SHF, respectively. Yeast utilized maximum portion of total reducing sugar (TRS) reaching a consumption efficiency of 91-98%. A bioethanol yield of 0.5g/g (88.2% of theoretical yield) and volumetric productivity of 0.22g/L/h was obtained after 48h of SSF. Immobilized yeast cells enabled repetitive production of ethanol for 7 cycles displaying a fermentation efficiency up to 79% for five consecutive cycles. The maximum ethanol production was 9.7g/L in 2nd-4th cycles. A total energy recovery of 85.81% was achieved from microalgal biomass in the form of bioethanol. Repeated-batch SSF demonstrated the possibility of cost-effective bioethanol production.

  6. A comparative analysis of in vitro toxicity of diesel exhaust particles from combustion of 1st- and 2nd-generation biodiesel fuels in relation to their physicochemical properties-the FuelHealth project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankoff, Anna; Brzoska, Kamil; Czarnocka, Joanna; Kowalska, Magdalena; Lisowska, Halina; Mruk, Remigiusz; Øvrevik, Johan; Wegierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Zuberek, Mariusz; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2017-07-03

    Biodiesels represent more carbon-neutral fuels and are introduced at an increasing extent to reduce emission of greenhouse gases. However, the potential impact of different types and blend concentrations of biodiesel on the toxicity of diesel engine emissions are still relatively scarce and to some extent contradictory. The objective of the present work was to compare the toxicity of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) from combustion of two 1st-generation fuels: 7% fatty acid methyl esters (FAME; B7) and 20% FAME (B20) and a 2nd-generation 20% FAME/HVO (synthetic hydrocarbon biofuel (SHB)) fuel. Our findings indicate that particulate emissions of each type of biodiesel fuel induce cytotoxic effects in BEAS-2B and A549 cells, manifested as cell death (apoptosis or necrosis), decreased protein concentrations, intracellular ROS production, as well as increased expression of antioxidant genes and genes coding for DNA damage-response proteins. The different biodiesel blend percentages and biodiesel feedstocks led to marked differences in chemical composition of the emitted DEP. The different DEPs also displayed statistically significant differences in cytotoxicity in A549 and BEAS-2B cells, but the magnitude of these variations was limited. Overall, it seems that increasing biodiesel blend concentrations from the current 7 to 20% FAME, or substituting 1st-generation FAME biodiesel with 2nd-generation HVO biodiesel (at least below 20% blends), affects the in vitro toxicity of the emitted DEP to some extent, but the biological significance of this may be moderate.

  7. An integral analysis for second generation bioethanol production via a dynamic model-based simulation approach: stochastic nonlinear optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo; Meyer, Anne S.; Gernaey, Krist

    -effectiveness. The objective of this study is to perform an integral analysis for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstock using a rigorous dynamic modelling approach for the whole process. The bioethanol production includes different sections such as, pre-treatment of the substrate, enzymatic hydrolysis...

  8. Proinflammatory effects of diesel exhaust particles from moderate blend concentrations of 1st and 2nd generation biodiesel in BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells-The FuelHealth project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuland, Tonje S; Refsnes, Magne; Magnusson, Pål; Oczkowski, Michał; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, Joanna; Kruszewski, Marcin; Mruk, Remigiusz; Myhre, Oddvar; Lankoff, Anna; Øvrevik, Johan

    2017-06-01

    Biodiesel fuel fuels are introduced at an increasing extent as a more carbon-neutral alternative to reduce CO2-emissions, compared to conventional diesel fuel. In the present study we have investigated the impact of increasing the use of 1st generation fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biodiesel from current 7% blend (B7) to 20% blend (B20), or by increasing the biodiesel content by adding 2nd generation hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) based biodiesel (SHB; Synthetic Hydrocarbon Biofuel) on toxicity of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in an in vitro system. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed for 4 and 20h to DEP from B7, B20 and SHB at different concentrations, and examined for effects on gene expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6), CXCL8 (IL-8), CYP1A1 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The results show that both B20 and SHB were more potent inducers of IL-6 expression compared to B7. Only B20 induced statistically significant increases in CXCL8 expression. By comparison the rank order of potency to induce CYP1A1 was SHB>B7>B20. No statistically significant difference were observed form HO-1 expression, suggesting that the differences in cytokine responses were not due to oxidative stress. The results show that even moderate increases in biodiesel blends, from 7% to 20%, may increase the proinflammatory potential of emitted DEP in BEAS-2B cells. This effect was observed for both addition of 1st generation FAME and 2nd generation HVO biodiesel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 2nd Tourism Postdisciplinarity Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Following the noted success of the 1st international conference on postdisciplinary approaches to tourism studies (held in Neuchatel, Switzerland, 19-22 June, 2013), we are happy to welcome you to the 2nd Tourism Postdisciplinarity Conference. Postdisciplinarity surpasses the boundaries...... of study less embedded in that system of thought. Postdisciplinarity is an epistemological endeavour that speaks of knowledge production and the ways in which the world of physical and social phenomena can be known. It is also an ontological discourse as it concerns what we call ‘tourism...

  10. Optimization of enzymatic saccharification of Chaetomorpha linum biomass for the production of macroalgae-based third generation bioethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Slaheddine Masmoudi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of marine macro-algae Chaetomorpha linum as a potential biofuel resource, the effects of the enzymatic treatment conditions on sugar yield were evaluated using a three factor three level Box-Behnken design. The hydrothermally pretreated C. linum biomass was treated with Aspergillus niger cellulase at various liquid to solid ratios (50–100 mL/g, enzyme concentrations (10–60 U/g and incubations times (4–44 h. Data obtained from the response surface methodology were subjected to the analysis of variance and analyzed using a second order polynomial equation. The fitted model was found to be robust and was used to optimize the sugar yield (% during enzymatic hydrolysis. The optimum saccharification conditions were: L/S ratio 100 mL/g; enzyme concentration 52 U/g; and time 44 h. Their application led to a maximum sugar yield of 30.2 g/100g dry matter. Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation of the algal hydrolysate provided 8.6 g ethanol/100g dry matter. These results showed a promising future of applying C. linum biomass as potential feedstock for third generation bioethanol production.

  11. Techno-Economic Analysis of Bioethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass in China: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass-based ethanol is categorized as 2nd generation bioethanol in the advanced biofuel portfolio. To make sound incentive policy proposals for the Chinese government and to develop guidance for research and development and industrialization of the technology, the paper reports careful techno-economic and sensitivity analyses performed to estimate the current competitiveness of the bioethanol and identify key components which have the greatest impact on its plant-gate price (PGP. Two models were developed for the research, including the Bioethanol PGP Assessment Model (BPAM and the Feedstock Cost Estimation Model (FCEM. Results show that the PGP of the bioethanol ranges $4.68–$6.05/gal (9,550–12,356 yuan/t. The key components that contribute most to bioethanol PGP include the conversion rate of cellulose to glucose, the ratio of five-carbon sugars converted to ethanol, feedstock cost, and enzyme loading, etc. Lignocellulosic ethanol is currently unable to compete with fossil gasoline, therefore incentive policies are necessary to promote its development. It is suggested that the consumption tax be exempted, the value added tax (VAT be refunded upon collection, and feed-in tariff for excess electricity (byproduct be implemented to facilitate the industrialization of the technology. A minimum direct subsidy of $1.20/gal EtOH (2,500 yuan/t EtOH is also proposed for consideration.

  12. 2nd Historic Mortars Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, John; Groot, Caspar; Historic Mortars : Characterisation, Assessment and Repair

    2012-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues connected with mortars on historic structures. The book is divided into four sections: Characterisation of Historic Mortars, Repair Mortars and Design Issues, Experimental Research into Properties of Repair Mortars, and Assessment and Testing. The papers present the latest work of researchers in their field. The individual contributions were selected from the contributions to the 2nd Historic Mortars Conference, which took place in Prague, September, 22-24, 2010. All papers were reviewed and improved as necessary before publication. This peer review process by the editors resulted in the 34 individual contributions included in here. One extra paper reviewing and summarising State-of-the-Art knowledge covered by this publication was added as a starting and navigational point for the reader. The editors believe that having these papers in print is important and they hope that it will stimulate further research into historic mortars and related subjects. 

  13. Single- and dual-energy CT of the abdomen: comparison of radiation dose and image quality of 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Hardie, Andrew D.; Felmly, Lloyd M.; Perry, Jonathan D.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Mangold, Stefanie [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Caruso, Damiano [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Latina (Italy); Canstein, Christian [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Malvern, PA (United States); Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To compare single-energy (SECT) and dual-energy (DECT) abdominal CT examinations in matched patient cohorts regarding differences in radiation dose and image quality performed with second- and third-generation dual-source CT (DSCT). We retrospectively analysed 200 patients (100 male, 100 female; mean age 61.2 ± 13.5 years, mean body mass index 27.5 ± 3.8 kg/m{sup 2}) equally divided into four groups matched by gender and body mass index, who had undergone portal venous phase abdominal CT with second-generation (group A, 120-kV-SECT; group B, 80/140-kV-DECT) and third-generation DSCT (group C, 100-kV-SECT; group D, 90/150-kV-DECT). The radiation dose was normalised for 40-cm scan length. Dose-independent figure-of-merit (FOM) contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for various organs and vessels. Subjective overall image quality and reader confidence were assessed. The effective normalised radiation dose was significantly lower (P < 0.001) in groups C (6.2 ± 2.0 mSv) and D (5.3 ± 1.9 mSv, P = 0.103) compared to groups A (8.8 ± 2.3 mSv) and B (9.7 ± 2.4 mSv, P = 0.102). Dose-independent FOM-CNR peaked for liver, kidney, and portal vein measurements (all P ≤ 0.0285) in group D. Subjective image quality and reader confidence were consistently rated as excellent in all groups (all ≥1.53 out of 5). With both DSCT generations, abdominal DECT can be routinely performed without radiation dose penalty compared to SECT, while third-generation DSCT shows improved dose efficiency. (orig.)

  14. Socio-demographic differences in acculturation and mental health for a sample of 2nd generation/early immigrant Arab Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Mona M; Hovey, Joseph D

    2007-10-01

    This study examined socio-demographic differences in acculturation patterns among early immigrant and second-generation Arab Americans, using data from 120 participants who completed a Web-based study. Although sex, age, education, and income did not significantly relate to the acculturation process, respondents who were female and those who were married reported greater Arab ethnic identity and religiosity. Striking differences were found based on religious affiliation. Christian patterns of acculturation and mental health were consistent with acculturation theory. For Muslims, however, integration was not associated with better mental health, and religiosity was predictive of better family functioning and less depression. The results of this study suggest unique acculturation patterns for Christian and Muslim subgroups that can better inform future research and mental health service.

  15. Control system for the 2nd generation Berkeley AutoMounters (BAM2) at GM/CA CAT macromolecular crystallography beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, O; Hilgart, M; Ogata, C; Pothineni, S; Cork, C

    2011-09-01

    GM/CA CAT at Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction.A second generation Berkeley automounter is being integrated into the beamline control system at the 23-BM experimental station. This new device replaces the previous all-pneumatic gripper motions with a combination of pneumatics and XYZ motorized linear stages. The latter adds a higher degree of flexibility to the robot including auto-alignment capability, accommodation of a larger capacity sample Dewar of arbitrary shape, and support for advanced operations such as crystal washing, while preserving the overall simplicity and efficiency of the Berkeley automounter design.

  16. A two-stage process for the anaerobic digestion of sludge generated during the production of bioethanol from sweet sorghum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamatelatou, K.; Dravillas, K.; Lyberatos, G.

    2003-07-01

    Sweet sorghum is an energy crop, often cultivated to recover energy in the form of ethanol, hydrogen etc by applying biological processes. These processes, however, produce a significant amount of sludge (bagasse) which contains the recalcitrant unconverted portion of sorghum, the non-hydrolyzed portion of the plant biomass as well as microbial biomass. In this work, the sludge from the alcoholic fermentation of sweet sorghum following a distillation step (to remove the generated bioethanol) was subjected to anaerobic digestion for further biodegradation and energy production (methane). A two-stage configuration for the anaerobic digestion of this type of industrial sludge was conceived and compared with a single stage anaerobic digestion of bagasse. For the two-stage process, the sludge was separated into one solid and one liquid stream. The solid portion of the sludge (9%) contributed mainly to the total organic load, although there was a significant organic load dissolved in the liquid portion too (28.73{+-}11.01 g/l). In the two stage system the solid and liquid phases of the sludge were separately treated under different operating conditions in two separate reactors: the solid phase in a thermophilic hydrolyzing reactor and the liquid phase in a mesophilic high-rate digester. The overall yield of the continuous two-stage process was 16 l methane/l wastewater at a hydraulic retention time of almost 20 days, while the maximum methane yield that could be achieved in batch experiments (duration 40d) was 30 l/l wastewater. (author)

  17. [Implications of TCGA Network Data on 2nd Generation Immunotherapy Concepts Based on PD-L1 and PD-1 Target Structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, I; Tezval, H; Kramer, M W; Wolters, M; Grünwald, V; Kuczyk, M A; Serth, J

    2015-11-01

    The era of cytokines, given to patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) as part of an unspecific immunomodulatory treatment concept, seems to have ended with the introduction of targeted therapies. However, preliminary data from studies on treatment with checkpoint inhibitors (e. g. anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1) may point the way to second-generation immunotherapy. The rationale of such immunomodulatory treatment is to stop or interrupt the tumour from "escaping" the body's immune defence. Thompson et al. report that increased protein expression of PD-L1 (CD274/ B7-H1) in tumour cells and tumour-infiltrating immune cells (TILs; lymphocytes and histiocytes) is associated with unfavourable clinical pathological parameters as well as poor survival. In small pilot groups of mRCC patients it was found that increased PD-L1 protein expression in tumours and TILs may be correlated with the objective response to anti-PD-1 treatment. Sometimes, however, a very wide variety of response rates was observed, which raises the question if this can be explained by individual expression levels of PD-L1 (CD 274) or PD-1 (PDCD1).Recently published data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Kidney Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma (KIRC) Network now provide a genome-wide data base that allows us to review or validate the molecular results obtained in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) to date.In this study, we analysed the TCGA KIRC mRNA expression data for PD-L1 and PD-1 for a possible association with clinical pathological parameters and the survival of 417 ccRCC patients.The mRNA expression of PD-L1 in primary nephrectomy specimens revealed no significant association with unfavourable clinical parameters. Interestingly, though, a positive correlation with patient survival was found (HR=0,59, p=0,006).These results, which partly contradict the concept applied to date, point out the necessity to ascertain the characteristics of PD-L1 and PD-1 expression at mRNA and protein

  18. Combustion parameters of spark ignition engine using waste potato bioethanol and gasoline blended fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadian, B.; Najafi, G.; Abasian, M.; Mamat, R.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combustion parameters of a SI engine operating on bioethanol-gasoline blends (E0-E20: 20% bioethanol and 80% gasoline by volume). A reactor was designed, fabricated and evaluated for bioethanol production from potato wastes. The results showed that increasing the bioethanol content in the blend fuel will decrease the heating value of the blended fuel and increase the octane number. Combustion parameters were evaluated and analyzed at different engine speeds and loads (1000-5000 rpm). The results revealed that using bioethanol-gasoline blended fuels will increase the cylinder pressure and its 1st and 2nd derivatives (P(θ), P•(θ) and P••(θ)). Moreover, using bioethanol- gasoline blends will increase the heat release (Q•(θ)) and worked of the cycle. This improvement was due to the high oxygen percentage in the ethanol.

  19. Brewer’s Spent Grain Valorization Using Phosphoric Acid Pretreatment for Second Generation Bioethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, I.; Ruiz, E.; Cara, C.

    Brewer’s spent grain constitutes a byproduct of beer making process yearly generated in big amounts and lacking of economic feasible applications. This lignocellulosic residue was characterized and pretreated by dilute phosphoric acid according to a rotatable central composite design to evaluate ...

  20. 2nd Generation QUATARA Flight Computer Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, Jay; Keys, Andrew; Fraticelli, Jose Molina; Capo-Iugo, Pedro; Peeples, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Single core flight computer boards have been designed, developed, and tested (DD&T) to be flown in small satellites for the last few years. In this project, a prototype flight computer will be designed as a distributed multi-core system containing four microprocessors running code in parallel. This flight computer will be capable of performing multiple computationally intensive tasks such as processing digital and/or analog data, controlling actuator systems, managing cameras, operating robotic manipulators and transmitting/receiving from/to a ground station. In addition, this flight computer will be designed to be fault tolerant by creating both a robust physical hardware connection and by using a software voting scheme to determine the processor's performance. This voting scheme will leverage on the work done for the Space Launch System (SLS) flight software. The prototype flight computer will be constructed with Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components which are estimated to survive for two years in a low-Earth orbit.

  1. Different Forms Aluminum Contents in the Soil of the 1st and 2nd Generation Pinus massoniana Plantations%1,2代马尾松林土壤不同形态铝含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仝雅娜; 丁贵杰

    2012-01-01

    pH and aluminum content in different forms in the soil of the 1st and 2nd generation Pinus massoniana plantations were investigated. The results showed that pH decreased with the stand age and successive rotation increase. Both the exchangeable aluminum and the soluble aluminum content increased with the stand age and successive rotation increase. Humic acid aluminum and organic complexation state aluminum decreased with the increase of successive rotation. Hydroxy monomer aluminum and acid soluble inorganic aluminum had no significant change, and had little effect on soil acidification.%分析1,2代马尾松林地土壤pH值和不同形态铝含量.结果表明:土壤pH值随林龄增加和连栽而下降;交换性铝和可溶性铝含量均随林龄增加和连栽而增加;腐殖酸铝和有机络合态铝含量随连栽而降低;单聚体羟基铝和酸溶无机铝含量无明显变化规律,且对土壤酸化影响不大.

  2. Valorization of carob waste: Definition of a second-generation bioethanol production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahry, Hajar; Pons, Agnès; Abdallah, Rawa; Pierre, Guillaume; Delattre, Cédric; Fayad, Nidal; Taha, Samir; Vial, Christophe

    2017-03-11

    The aim of this work was to develop a strategy for second-generation ethanol production from carob solid waste issued from Lebanese food industry. The pros and cons of submerged (SF) and solid-state fermentations (SSF) using S. cerevisiae on ethanol yield and productivity were compared, including the respective roles of upstream and downstream processes, such as the size reduction, or sugar and ethanol recovery processes. The design of experiments methodology was applied. Experimental results demonstrated that SSF applied to cut carob waste from carob syrup preparation was simpler to operate and more cost-effective, maintained yield and productivity (0.458g ethanol/g consumed sugar and 4.3g/(kg waste)/h) in comparison to SF (0.450g ethanol/g consumed sugar and 5.7g/(kg waste)/h), and was able to achieve ethanol production up to 155g/(kg waste) at low water demand, while SF reached only 78g/(kg waste) due to the limitations of the sugar extraction pretreatment.

  3. Structure of a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase involved in bioethanol generation in Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extance, Jonathan; Crennell, Susan J; Eley, Kirstin; Cripps, Roger; Hough, David W; Danson, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Bifunctional alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADHE) enzymes are found within many fermentative microorganisms. They catalyse the conversion of an acyl-coenzyme A to an alcohol via an aldehyde intermediate; this is coupled to the oxidation of two NADH molecules to maintain the NAD(+) pool during fermentative metabolism. The structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) domain of an ADHE protein from the ethanol-producing thermophile Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius has been determined to 2.5 Å resolution. This is the first structure to be reported for such a domain. In silico modelling has been carried out to generate a homology model of the aldehyde dehydrogenase domain, and this was subsequently docked with the ADH-domain structure to model the structure of the complete ADHE protein. This model suggests, for the first time, a structural mechanism for the formation of the large multimeric assemblies or `spirosomes' that are observed for this ADHE protein and which have previously been reported for ADHEs from other organisms.

  4. Marine Enzymes and Microorganisms for Bioethanol Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M R; Natarajan, V; Krishnan, C

    2017-01-01

    Bioethanol is a potential alternative fuel to fossil fuels. Bioethanol as a fuel has several economic and environmental benefits. Though bioethanol is produced using starch and sugarcane juice, these materials are in conflict with food availability. To avoid food-fuel conflict, the second-generation bioethanol production by utilizing nonfood lignocellulosic materials has been extensively investigated. However, due to the complexity of lignocellulose architecture, the process is complicated and not economically competitive. The cultivation of lignocellulosic energy crops indirectly affects the food supplies by extensive land use. Marine algae have attracted attention to replace the lignocellulosic feedstock for bioethanol production, since the algae grow fast, do not use land, avoid food-fuel conflict and have several varieties to suit the cultivation environment. The composition of algae is not as complex as lignocellulose due to the absence of lignin, which renders easy hydrolysis of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars. Marine organisms also produce cold-active enzymes for hydrolysis of starch, cellulose, and algal polysaccharides, which can be employed in bioethanol process. Marine microoorganisms are also capable of fermenting sugars under high salt environment. Therefore, marine biocatalysts are promising for development of efficient processes for bioethanol production.

  5. Sistema especialista de 2ª geração para diagnose técnica: modelo e procedimento 2nd generation expert system for technical diagnosis: a model and a procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néocles Alves Pereira

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho trata da diagnose em equipamentos industriais através do uso de Sistemas Especialistas. Com o objetivo de desenvolver procedimentos que contribuam na construção de Sistemas Especialistas para diagnose em Manutenção Industrial, consideramos os chamados Sistemas Especialistas de 2ª Geração. Propomos um modelo modificado e um procedimento de diagnose. Na estratégia de diagnose utilizamos uma busca "top-down best-first", que combina dois tipos de tratamento de incerteza: (i entropia, para decidir pelo melhor caminho nas estruturas de conhecimento, e (ii crença nos sintomas, para validar os diagnósticos obtidos. Esta proposta traz as seguintes vantagens: base de conhecimento mais completa, melhores explicação e apresentação de diagnósticos finais. Desenvolvemos um protótipo com base em informações reais sobre bombas centrífugas.This paper deals with the diagnosis of industrial equipments through the use of Expert Systems. Intending to develop procedures that result in diagnosis knowledge bases for Industrial Maintenance, we have considered 2nd Generation Expert Systems. We have proposed a modified model and a diagnosis procedure. We used for the diagnosis strategy a "top-down best-first search", that combines two types of uncertainty treatment: (i entropy, to find the best way in the search throughout knowledge structures, (ii belief in the symptoms, to validate the resultant diagnostics. This proposal has the following advantages: a more complete knowledge base, a better explanation and presentation of the resultant diagnostics. We have developed a prototype considering real informations about centrifugal pumps.

  6. Project 2nd Periodic Report - Section 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Healy, Mark; Knowles, Emma; Johnstone, Cameron

    The work described in this publication has received support from the European Community - Research Infrastructure Action under the FP7 “Capacities” Specific Programme through grant agreement number 262552, MaRINET. Project Periodic Report. 2nd Period: October 2012 – March 2014 inclusive....

  7. Abstracts: 2nd interventional MRI symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-09-01

    Main topics of the 2nd interventional MRI symposium were: MR compatibility and pulse sequences; MR thermometry, biopsy, musculoskeletal system; laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablations; intraoperative MR; vascular applications, breast, endoscopy; focused ultrasound, cryotherapy, perspectives; poster session with 34 posters described. (AJ)

  8. Bioethanol: fuel or feedstock?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rass-Hansen, Jeppe; Falsig, Hanne; Jørgensen, Betina

    2007-01-01

    Increasing amounts of bioethanol are being produced from fermentation of biomass, mainly to counteract the continuing depletion of fossil resources and the consequential escalation of oil prices. Today, bioethanol is mainly utilized as a fuel or fuel additive in motor vehicles, but it could also...

  9. Beyond the 2nd Fermi Pulsar Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Xian; Reposeur, Thierry; Rousseau, Romain

    2013-01-01

    Over thirteen times more gamma-ray pulsars have now been studied with the Large Area Telescope on NASA's Fermi satellite than the ten seen with the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the nineteen-nineties. The large sample is diverse, allowing better understanding both of the pulsars themselves and of their roles in various cosmic processes. Here we explore the prospects for even more gamma-ray pulsars as Fermi enters the 2nd half of its nominal ten-year mission. New pulsars will naturally tend to be fainter than the first ones discovered. Some of them will have unusual characteristics compared to the current population, which may help discriminate between models. We illustrate a vision of the future with a sample of six pulsars discovered after the 2nd Fermi Pulsar Catalog was written.

  10. 2 nd Mid-European Clay Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The 2nd Mid-European Clay Conference (MECC'04) was held between 20-24th September 2004, in Miskolc, Hungary. The idea to hold common conferences was accepted by the national clay groups of four neighbouring countries, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Croatia, during the EUROCLAY Meeting in Cracow, Poland, in 1999. The first conference was held in 2001 at Stará Lesná, in the High Tatra Mts. in Slovakia.

  11. Review on Urban Sociology(2nd Edition)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Yuting; Li; Caige

    2016-01-01

    Urban Sociology(2nd Edition)Author:Gu Chaolin,Liu Jiayan,et al.Year:2013Publisher:Tsinghua University Press ISBN:9787302337591(446 pages,in Chinese)Urban Sociology is a textbook edited by Gu Chaolin,a wellk now n schola r of u rba n st udies i n Ch i na,a nd published by Tsinghua University Press in 2013.The first edition of this book,

  12. Bioethanol from lignocellulosics: Status and perspectives in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabee, W E; Saddler, J N

    2010-07-01

    Canada has invested significantly in the development of a domestic bioethanol industry, and it is expected that bioethanol from lignocellulosics will become more desirable to the industry as it expands. Development of the Canadian industry to date is described in this paper, as are examples of domestic research programs focused on both bioconversion and thermochemical conversion to generate biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. The availability of lignocellulosic residues from agricultural and forestry operations, and the potential biofuel production associated with these residues, is described. The policy tools used to develop the domestic bioethanol industry are explored. A residue-based process could greatly extend the potential of the bioethanol industry in Canada. It is estimated that bioethanol production from residual lignocellulosic feedstocks could provide up to 50% of Canada's 2006 transportation fuel demand, given ideal conversion and full access to these feedstocks. Utilizing lignocellulosic biomass will extend the geographic range of the bioethanol industry, and increase the stability and security of this sector by reducing the impact of localized disruptions in supply. Use of disturbance crops could add 9% to this figure, but not in a sustainable fashion. If pursued aggressively, energy crops ultimately could contribute bioethanol at a volume double that of Canada's gasoline consumption in 2006. This would move Canada towards greater transportation fuel independence and a larger role in the export of bioethanol to the global market.

  13. Advances in bioethanol

    CERN Document Server

    Bajpai, Pratima

    2013-01-01

    The book provides an updated and detailed overview on advances in bioethanol. It looks at the historical perspectives, chemistry, sources and production of ethanol and discusses biotechnology breakthroughs and promising developments. The book also provides the details regarding the uses, advantages, problems, environmental effects and characteristics of bioethanol as a fuel. In addition, it presents information about ethanol in different parts of the world and also highlights the challenges and future of ethanol.

  14. 2nd Applied Electromagnetic International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, Hamzah; Othman, Mohd; Aziz, Mohamad; Malek, Mohd

    2017-01-01

    In this book, experts from academia and industry present the latest advances in scientific theory relating to applied electromagnetics and examine current and emerging applications particularly within the fields of electronics, communications, and computer technology. The book is based on presentations delivered at APPEIC 2015, the 2nd Applied Electromagnetic International Conference, held in Krabi, Thailand in December 2015. The conference provided an ideal platform for researchers and specialists to deliver both theoretically and practically oriented contributions on a wide range of topics relevant to the theme of nurturing applied electromagnetics for human technology. Many novel aspects were addressed, and the contributions selected for this book highlight the relevance of advances in applied electromagnetics to a variety of industrial engineering problems and identify exciting future directions for research.

  15. 2nd International Conference on Natural Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Rana, Sohel

    2016-01-01

    This book collects selected high quality articles submitted to the 2nd International Conference on Natural Fibers (ICNF2015). A wide range of topics is covered related to various aspects of natural fibres such as agriculture, extraction and processing, surface modification and functionalization, advanced structures, nano fibres, composites and nanocomposites, design and product development, applications, market potential, and environmental impact. Divided into separate sections on these various topics, the book presents the latest high quality research work addressing different approaches and techniques to improve processing, performance, functionalities and cost-effectiveness of natural fibre and natural based products, in order to promote their applications in various advanced technical sectors. This book is a useful source of information for materials scientists, teachers and students from various disciplines as well as for R& D staff in industries using natural fibre based materials. .

  16. Scientific challenges of bioethanol production in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Henrique V.; Lopes, Mario Lucio [Fermentec, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Castro Oliveira, Juliana Velasco de [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE), Sao Paulo (Brazil); Buckeridge, Marcos S. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE), Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade de Sao Paulo, INCT do Bioetanol (Brazil). Dept. de Botanica; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE), Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade de Sao Paulo, INCT do Bioetanol (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas

    2011-09-15

    Bioethanol (fuel alcohol) has been produced by industrial alcoholic fermentation processes in Brazil since the beginning of the twentieth century. Currently, 432 mills and distilleries crush about 625 million tons of sugarcane per crop, producing about 27 billion liters of ethanol and 38.7 million tons of sugar. The production of bioethanol from sugarcane represents a major large-scale technology capable of producing biofuel efficiently and economically, providing viable substitutes to gasoline. The combination of immobilization of CO{sub 2} by sugarcane crops by photosynthesis into biomass together with alcoholic fermentation of this biomass has allowed production of a clean and high-quality liquid fuel that contains 93% of the original energy found in sugar. Over the last 30 years, several innovations have been introduced to Brazilian alcohol distilleries resulting in the improvement of plant efficiency and economic competitiveness. Currently, the main scientific challenges are to develop new technologies for bioethanol production from first and second generation feedstocks that exhibit positive energy balances and appropriately meet environmental sustainability criteria. This review focuses on these aspects and provides special emphasis on the selection of new yeast strains, genetic breeding, and recombinant DNA technology, as applied to bioethanol production processes. (orig.)

  17. 2nd International Arctic Ungulate Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anonymous

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2nd International Arctic Ungulate Conference was held 13-17 August 1995 on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus. The Institute of Arctic Biology and the Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit were responsible for organizing the conference with assistance from biologists with state and federal agencies and commercial organizations. David R. Klein was chair of the conference organizing committee. Over 200 people attended the conference, coming from 10 different countries. The United States, Canada, and Norway had the largest representation. The conference included invited lectures; panel discussions, and about 125 contributed papers. There were five technical sessions on Physiology and Body Condition; Habitat Relationships; Population Dynamics and Management; Behavior, Genetics and Evolution; and Reindeer and Muskox Husbandry. Three panel sessions discussed Comparative caribou management strategies; Management of introduced, reestablished, and expanding muskox populations; and Health risks in translocation of arctic ungulates. Invited lectures focused on the physiology and population dynamics of arctic ungulates; contaminants in food chains of arctic ungulates and lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident; and ecosystem level relationships of the Porcupine Caribou Herd.

  18. Socio-economic well-to-wheel analysis of biofuels. Scenarios for rapeseed diesel (RME) and 1. and 2. generation bioethanol; Samfundsoekonomisk well-to-wheel-analyse af biobraendstoffer. Scenarieberegninger for rapsdiesel (RME) og 1.- og 2.-generations bioethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slentoe, E.; Moeller, F.; Winther, M.; Hjort Mikkelsen, M.

    2010-10-15

    The report examines in an integrated form, the energy, emissions and welfare economic implications of introducing Danish produced biodiesel, i.e. rapeseed diesel (RME) and the first and second generation wheat ethanol in two scenarios with low and high rate of blending with fossil fuel based automotive fuels. Within this project's, analytical framework and assumptions the welfare economic analysis shows, that it would be beneficial for society to realize the biofuel scenarios to some extent by oil prices above $ 100 a barrel, while it will cause losses by oil prices at $ 65. In all cases, the fossil fuel consumption and the emissions CO2eq emissions are reduced, the effect of which is priced and included in the welfare economic analysis. The implementation of biofuels in Denmark will be dependent on market price. As it stands now, it is not favorable in terms of biofuels. The RME is currently produced in Denmark is exported to other European countries where there are state subsidies. Subsidies would also be a significant factor in Denmark to achieve objectives for biofuel blending. (ln)

  19. The bioethanol industry in sub-Saharan Africa: history, challenges, and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deenanath, Evanie Devi; Iyuke, Sunny; Rumbold, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Recently, interest in using bioethanol as an alternative to petroleum fuel has been escalating due to decrease in the availability of crude oil. The application of bioethanol in the motor-fuel industry can contribute to reduction in the use of fossil fuels and in turn to decreased carbon emissions and stress of the rapid decline in crude oil availability. Bioethanol production methods are numerous and vary with the types of feedstock used. Feedstocks can be cereal grains (first generation feedstock), lignocellulose (second generation feedstock), or algae (third generation feedstock) feedstocks. To date, USA and Brazil are the leading contributors to global bioethanol production. In sub-Saharan Africa, bioethanol production is stagnant. During the 1980s, bioethanol production has been successful in several countries including Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Kenya. However, because of numerous challenges such as food security, land availability, and government policies, achieving sustainability was a major hurdle. This paper examines the history and challenges of bioethanol production in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and demonstrates the bioethanol production potential in SSA with a focus on using bitter sorghum and cashew apple juice as unconventional feedstocks for bioethanol production.

  20. The Bioethanol Industry in Sub-Saharan Africa: History, Challenges, and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanie Devi Deenanath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interest in using bioethanol as an alternative to petroleum fuel has been escalating due to decrease in the availability of crude oil. The application of bioethanol in the motor-fuel industry can contribute to reduction in the use of fossil fuels and in turn to decreased carbon emissions and stress of the rapid decline in crude oil availability. Bioethanol production methods are numerous and vary with the types of feedstock used. Feedstocks can be cereal grains (first generation feedstock, lignocellulose (second generation feedstock, or algae (third generation feedstock feedstocks. To date, USA and Brazil are the leading contributors to global bioethanol production. In sub-Saharan Africa, bioethanol production is stagnant. During the 1980s, bioethanol production has been successful in several countries including Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Kenya. However, because of numerous challenges such as food security, land availability, and government policies, achieving sustainability was a major hurdle. This paper examines the history and challenges of bioethanol production in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA and demonstrates the bioethanol production potential in SSA with a focus on using bitter sorghum and cashew apple juice as unconventional feedstocks for bioethanol production.

  1. The Bioethanol Industry in Sub-Saharan Africa: History, Challenges, and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deenanath, Evanie Devi; Iyuke, Sunny; Rumbold, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Recently, interest in using bioethanol as an alternative to petroleum fuel has been escalating due to decrease in the availability of crude oil. The application of bioethanol in the motor-fuel industry can contribute to reduction in the use of fossil fuels and in turn to decreased carbon emissions and stress of the rapid decline in crude oil availability. Bioethanol production methods are numerous and vary with the types of feedstock used. Feedstocks can be cereal grains (first generation feedstock), lignocellulose (second generation feedstock), or algae (third generation feedstock) feedstocks. To date, USA and Brazil are the leading contributors to global bioethanol production. In sub-Saharan Africa, bioethanol production is stagnant. During the 1980s, bioethanol production has been successful in several countries including Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Kenya. However, because of numerous challenges such as food security, land availability, and government policies, achieving sustainability was a major hurdle. This paper examines the history and challenges of bioethanol production in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and demonstrates the bioethanol production potential in SSA with a focus on using bitter sorghum and cashew apple juice as unconventional feedstocks for bioethanol production. PMID:22536020

  2. [About Cryptophthalmos (2nd Czech Study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krásný, J; Čakrtová, M; Kletenský, J; Novák, V; Šach, J

    To get acquainted with the 2nd Czech study about cryptophthamos and with self-surgical methods. The boy with unilateral complete cryptophthalmos of left eye was treated from 2 to 20 years. The girls was treated from 4 month to 5 year yet for right abortive cryptophthalmos with microblepharon and left complete type still waiting for solutions.Surgical methods and results: Authors present a surgical procedures for correction of the upper and lower eyelids and ocular anomalies both patients studied. Successful reconstruction of palpebral fissure took place in several stages at the boy. The surgical procedure gradually contained: the insertion of gradually increased convex concave circular-shaped implant (silicone ruber) due a modeling of palpebral fissure, an enucleation of rudimentary eye, a reconstruction of bottom palpebral fissure by retro-auricular skin graf and a releasing of the lower transitory fold by the cul-de-sac method. An adequate depth of palpebral fissure to allow perfect position of an aesthetic protesis. Enucleated eye was atypically shaped, remiding partly sand-glass clock. The cornea was replaced by thick fibrous membrane, the iris and the lens were not revealed. Gliomatic retina was detached nearly totaly and the optic nerv was rudimental. The repairing the upper lid coloboma of girl by a lid rotation flap reconstruction using the inferior eyelid was performed at the age 17 month. Corneal dermoid simultaneously removed (histologically verified). Upper conjunctival fornix was formed using the spherical covering foil (silicone rubber) before and after the reconstruction of the lid. Plastic reconstructions required the need for patient access without trying immediate effect. An important role played silicone rubber implants (elastomer medical grade) which used temporarily. cryptophthalmos, microblepharon, relief surgery, silicon ruber implants.

  3. Life-cycle energy efficiency and environmental impacts of bioethanol production from sweet potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; Shi, Yu; Xia, Xunfeng; Li, Dinglong; Chen, Qun

    2013-04-01

    Life-cycle assessment (LCA) was used to evaluate the energy efficiency and environmental impacts of sweet potato-based bioethanol production. The scope covered all stages in the life cycle of bioethanol production, including the cultivation and treatment, transport, as well as bioethanol conversion of sweet potato. Results show that the net energy ratio of sweet potato-based bioethanol is 1.48 and the net energy gain is 6.55 MJ/L. Eutrophication is identified as the most significant environmental impact category, followed by acidification, global warming, human toxicity, and photochemical oxidation. Sensitivity analysis reveals that steam consumption during bioethanol conversion exerts the most effect on the results, followed by sweet potato yields and fertilizers input. It is suggested that substituting coal with cleaner energy for steam generation in bioethanol conversion stage and promotion of better management practices in sweet potato cultivation stage could lead to a significant improvement of energy and environmental performance.

  4. Evaluation of lignins from side-streams generated in an olive tree pruning-based biorefinery: Bioethanol production and alkaline pulping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José I; Fillat, Úrsula; Martín-Sampedro, Raquel; Eugenio, María E; Negro, María J; Ballesteros, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Ibarra, David

    2017-07-06

    In modern lignocellulosic-based biorefineries, carbohydrates can be transformed into biofuels and pulp and paper, whereas lignin is burned to obtain energy. However, a part of lignin could be converted into value-added products including bio-based aromatic chemicals, as well as building blocks for materials. Then, a good knowledge of lignin is necessary to define its valorisation procedure. This study characterized different lignins from side-streams produced from olive tree pruning bioethanol production (lignins collected from steam explosion pretreatment with water or phosphoric acid as catalysts, followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process) and alkaline pulping (lignins recovered from kraft and soda-AQ black liquors). Together with the chemical composition, the structure of lignins was investigated by FTIR, (13)C NMR, and 2D NMR. Bioethanol lignins had clearly distinct characteristics compared to pulping lignins; a certain number of side-chain linkages (mostly alkyl-aryl ether and resinol) accompanied with lower phenolic hydroxyls content. Bioethanol lignins also showed a significant amount of carbohydrates, mainly glucose and protein impurities. By contrast, pulping lignins revealed xylose together with a dramatical reduction of side-chains (some resinol linkages survive) and thereby higher phenol content, indicating rather severe lignin degradation during alkaline pulping processes. All lignins showed a predominance of syringyl units. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and Testing the Technology of Complex Transformation of Carbohydrates from Vegetable Raw Materials into Bioethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P. Tsygankov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of development and testing the tentative technology of sweet sorghum and finger millet processing into bioethanol are described. The carbohydrates content and range of the studied vegetable biomass as the raw material is defined. Bioethanol potential output from sugar sorghum and finger millet carbohydrates and key technological parameters of preparation of both types of vegetable raw material for alcohol fermentation are defined. The concept of the tentative technology of bioethanol production from carbohydrate raw material of the first and second generations is offered. Testing of complex transformation of carbohydrates from vegetable raw materials into bioethanol is performed.

  6. Elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education aligned with STEM designed projects created by Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade students in a Reggio Emilio project approach setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Nicole

    This paper examines how elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education standards (National Research Council 2011)---specifically the cross-cutting concept "cause and effect" are aligned with early childhood students' creation of projects of their choice. The study took place in a Reggio Emilio-inspired, K-12 school, in a multi-aged kindergarten, first and second grade classroom with 14 students. Students worked on their projects independently with the assistance of their peers and teachers. The students' projects and the alignment with the Next Generation Science Standards' New Framework were analyzed by using pre and post assessments, student interviews, and discourse analysis. Results indicate that elements of the New Framework for K-12 Science Education emerged through students' project presentation, particularly regarding the notion of "cause and effect". More specifically, results show that initially students perceived the relationship between "cause and effect" to be negative.

  7. Orbits 2nd order singularity-free solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2014-01-01

    In its 2nd edition, this book covers the theory of satellite orbits, derives the complete solutions of orbital disturbances, describes the algorithms of orbits determination and the applications of the theory to the phenomenon of physical satellite formation.

  8. 2nd Antibiotic Halves C-Section Infection Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161230.html 2nd Antibiotic Halves C-Section Infection Rate: Study Two medications ... 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors routinely give an antibiotic before a cesarean-section, the surgical delivery of ...

  9. Florida Investigates 2nd Possible Local Transmission of Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Florida Investigates 2nd Possible Local Transmission of Zika Virus If confirmed, cases would be first instances of ... Broward County, north of Miami. Infection with the Zika virus, which in most cases is transmitted by mosquitoes, ...

  10. On management of 2nd generation Virtual Organizations Breeding Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Afsarmanesh; L.M. Camarinha-Matos; S.S. Msanjila

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, in a wide variety of sectors from production-based to service-oriented, temporary collaboration among organizations in the so-called Virtual Organizations (VOs), is the trend adopted by most, and in particular by small and medium enterprises. Pre-existence of long-term associations/cluster

  11. Performance of 2nd generation CALICE/EUDET ASICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Taille, C.; CALICE Collaboration; EUDET Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The paper reviews the performance of the three ASICs : HARDROC2, SPIROC2 and SKIROC2 developed to readout the ILC calorimeter prototypes. The chips integrate 36 to 64 channels of front-end, digitization and backend electronics in SiGe 0.35 μm technology. This second version was found mature enough to be produced in several hundreds to equip large scale technological prototypes and establish the feasibility of these highly granular "imaging" calorimeters as required for particle flow algorithms at the ILC. The low noise and low power sequential readout as well as power-pulsing operation at detector level and in magnetic field are proven.

  12. Safety profile of bilastine: 2nd generation H1-antihistamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, F

    2012-12-01

    Bilastine is a new H1 antagonist with no sedative side effects, no cardiotoxic effects, and no hepatic metabolism. In addition, bilastine has proved to be effective for the symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria. Pharmacological studies have shown that bilastine is highly selective for the H1 receptor in both in vivo and in vitro studies, and with no apparent affinity for other receptors. The absorption of bilastine is fast, linear and dose-proportional; it appears to be safe and well tolerated at all doses levels in healthy population. Multiple administration of bilastine has confirmed the linearity of the kinetic parameters. The distribution in the brain is undetectable. The safety profile in terms of adverse effects is very similar to placebo in all Phase I, II and III clinical trials. Bilastine (20 mg), unlike cetirizine, does not increase alcohol effects on the CNS. Bilastine 20 mg does not increase the CNS depressant effect of lorazepam. Bilastine 20 mg is similar to placebo in the driving test. Therefore, it meets the current criteria for medication used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria.

  13. Advanced Virgo: a 2nd generation interferometric gravitational wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Virgo is the project to upgrade the Virgo interferometric detector of gravitational waves, with the aim of increasing the number of observable galaxies (and thus the detection rate) by three orders of magnitude. The project is now in an advanced construction phase and the assembly and integration will be completed by the end of 2015. Advanced Virgo will be part of a network with the two Advanced LIGO detectors in the US and GEO HF in Germany, with the goal of contributing to the early detections of gravitational waves and to opening a new observation window on the universe. In this paper we describe the main features of the Advanced Virgo detector and outline the status of the construction.

  14. 2nd Generation RLV Airframe Structures and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Theodore F.

    2000-01-01

    The goals and objectives of the project summarized in this viewgraph presentation are the following: (1) Develop and demonstrate verified airframe and cryotank structural design and analysis technologies, including damage tolerance, safety, reliability, and residual strength technologies, robust nonlinear shell and cryotank analysis technologies, high-fidelity analysis and design technologies for local structural detail features and joints, and high-fidelity analysis technologies for sandwich structures; (2) Demonstrate low cost, robust materials and processing, including polymeric matrix composite (PMC) and metallic materials and processing, and refractory composite and metallic hot structures materials and processing; (3) Develop and demonstrate robust airframe structures and validated integrated airframe structural concepts, including low cost fabrication and joining, operations efficient designs and inspection techniques (non-destructive evaluation), scale-up and integrated thermal structure tests, and airframe structures IVHM; (4) Demonstrate low cost, robust repair techniques; and (5) Develop verified integrated airframe structural concepts, including integrated structural concepts.

  15. Sustainable Process Design of Biofuels: Bioethanol Production from Cassava rhizome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangnimit, S.; Malakul, P.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    This study is focused on the sustainable process design of bioethanol production from cassava rhizome. The study includes: process simulation, sustainability analysis, economic evaluation and life cycle assessment (LCA). A steady state process simulation if performed to generate a base case design...... of the bioethanol conversion process using cassava rhizome as a feedstock. The sustainability analysis is performed to analyze the relevant indicators in sustainability metrics, to definedesign/retrofit targets for process improvements. Economic analysis is performed to evaluate the profitability of the process........ Also, simultaneously with sustainability analysis, the life cycle impact on environment associated with bioethanol production is performed. Finally, candidate alternative designs are generated and compared with the base case design in terms of LCA, economics, waste, energy usage and enviromental impact...

  16. Bioethanol: State and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Marija B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Processes of bioethanol production currently applied all over the world are reviewed in this paper. Attention is focused on potentially cheap biomass sources, as well as the most important operating factors controlling the progress and result of saccharification and fermentation reactions and affecting the yield of fermentable sugars and ethanol, respectively, such as: the type and concentration of acid, the type of enzyme, the type of working microorganism, operating temperature, duration time and pH. The hydrolysis conditions, namely duration time, temperature and sulfuric acid concentration, were combined in a single parameter, known as the "combined severity" (CS, in order to estimate the efficiency of bioethanol production from biomass. When the CS increases, the yield of fermentable sugars also increases. The decrease in the yield of monosaccharides coincides with the maximum concentrations of by-products, such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, which are well-known as yeast inhibitors. The highest ethanol yields has been obtained using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. With low oil prices and political reluctance to implement carbon taxes, fuel-ethanol production will remain uncompetitive unless some other form of cost reduction can be made, such as feedstock preparation costs.

  17. 2nd European Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Ralph; Grebenyuk, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The European Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop has the mission to discuss and foster methods of beam acceleration with gradients beyond state of the art in operational facilities. The most cost effective and compact methods for generating high energy particle beams shall be reviewed and assessed. This includes diagnostics methods, timing technology, special need for injectors, beam matching, beam dynamics with advanced accelerators and development of adequate simulations. This workshop is organized in the context of the EU-funded European Network for Novel Accelerators (EuroNNAc2), that includes 52 Research Institutes and universities.

  18. 2nd Quarter Transportation Report FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, L.

    2014-07-30

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the second quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2014 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. This report also includes annual summaries for FY 2014 in Tables 4 and 5. Tabular summaries are provided which include the following: Sources of and carriers for LLW and MLLW shipments to and from the NNSS; Number and external volume of LLW and MLLW shipments; Highway routes used by carriers; and Incident/accident data applicable to LLW and MLLW shipments. In this report shipments are accounted for upon arrival at the NNSS, while disposal volumes are accounted for upon waste burial. The disposal volumes presented in this report do not include minor volumes of non-radioactive materials that were approved for disposal. Volume reports showing cubic feet (ft3) generated using the Low-Level Waste Information System may vary slightly due to differing rounding conventions.

  19. Spartina argentinensis as feedstock for bioethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Jozami

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-five percent of the energy consumed in the world comes from non-renewable sources. The transportation sector, highly dependent on oil, is responsible for 20-27% of the world primary energy consumption and for 13-28% of Greenhouse Gases (GHG emissions. The main renewable energy sources that can supply this sector are bioethanol and biodiesel. Production of these biofuels is rapidly expanding mainly through food raw materials such as corn, sugar cane, soybean and rapeseed, decreasing their availability as food in the market, thereby raising their price. These food-derived biofuels are called “first generation biofuels”. There are other renewable sources that can be used to produce bioethanol, called second-generation biofuels, which have the great advantage of using lignocellulosic materials, thereafter they do not compete with food crops for fertile land. This paper describes the possibility of producing bioethanol and/or electricity using pellets from natural rangelands in the Bajos Submeridionales (Submeridional Lowlands of the province of Santa Fe, Argentina, where the dominant species is Spartina argentinensis, a C4 perennial grass with high photosynthetic rate, which tolerates the conditions of alkalinity and the recurrent droughts and floods that shape the region. According to our estimates, enough ethanol could be produced in this region to satisfy the energy demand of vehicles with Otto combustion cycle in several Argentine provinces. Pellets production would allow electricity generation via syngas and power turbines. This would allow the production of liquid fuel and/or electricity with sustainability criteria, reducing the emission of GHG and generating jobs, economical growth and development in a depopulated region.

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Experimental Stochatics (2nd edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, P.

    2004-05-01

    Otto Moeschlin and his co-authors have written a book about simulation of stochastic systems. The book comes with a CD-ROM that contains the experiments discussed in the book, and the text from the book is repeated on the CD-ROM. According to the authors, the aim of the book is to give a quick introduction to stochastic simulation for `all persons interested in experimental stochastics'. To please this diverse audience, the authors offer a book that has four parts. Part 1, called `Artificial Randomness', is the longest of the four parts. It gives an overview of the generation, testing and basic usage of pseudo random numbers in simulation. Although algorithms for generating sequences of random numbers are fundamental to simulation, it is a slightly unusual choice to give it such weight in comparison to other algorithmic topics. The remaining three parts consist of simulation case studies. Part 2, `Stochastic Models', treats four problems---Buffon's needle, a queuing system, and two problems related to the kinetic theory of gases. Part 3 is called `Stochastic Processes' and discusses the simulation of discrete time Markov chains, birth--death processes, Brownian motion and diffusions. The last section of Part 3 is about simulation as a tool to understand the traffic flow in a system controlled by stoplights, an area of research for the authors. Part4 is called `Evaluation of Statistical Procedures'. This section contains examples where simulation is used to test the performance of statistical methods. It covers four examples: the Neymann--Pearson lemma, the Wald sequential test, Bayesian point estimation and Hartigan procedures. The CD-ROM contains an easy-to-install software package that runs under Microsoft Windows. The software contains the text and simulations from the book. What I found most enjoyable about this book is the number of topics covered in the case studies. The highly individual selection of applications, which may serve as a source of inspiration

  1. Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Low Income Economy Through Biogas and Bioethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miezah, Kodwo; Obiri-Danso, Kwasi; Kádár, Zsófia;

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradable fraction of municipal solid wastes generated from households in Ghana has favourable characteristics worth considering for bioenergy production. The suitability of this biodegradable portion for biogas and bioethanol production was assessed in this study. The assessment was perf...

  2. A Handbook for Classroom Instruction That Works, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Perfect for self-help and professional learning communities, this handbook makes it much easier to apply the teaching practices from the ASCD-McREL best-seller "Classroom Instruction That Works: Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement, 2nd Edition." The authors take you through the refined Instructional Planning Guide, so you…

  3. 2nd International Conference on Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Fülöp, Zsolt; Somorjai, Endre; The European Physical Journal A : Volume 27, Supplement 1, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Launched in 2004, "Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics" has established itself in a successful topical conference series addressing the forefront of research in the field. This volume contains the selected and refereed papers of the 2nd conference, held in Debrecen in 2005 and reprinted from "The European Physical Journal A - Hadrons and Nuclei".

  4. The 2nd Seminar on Standardization Cooperation in Northeast Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The 2nd Seminar on Standardization Cooperation in Northeast Asia(2003) was held in Beijing from Oct 30th - Oct 31st, which was the succession of the first one in Korea, 2002, with the participants coming from the standardization circles in China, Japan and Korea.

  5. CEIBS Happily Welcomes Participants to Its 2nd CEO Programme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ With the heat of summer dying away, CEIBS warmly re ceived participants of its 2nd CEO program on August 19 and the whole campus was brimming over with enthusiasm and exultation. Thirty business leaders from all over the country gathered together at CEIBS' beautiful campus in combination of Chinese and Western architectural styles in Pudong and began their first day of study.

  6. Visions for Danish bio-ethanol; Visioner for dansk bioethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahring, B.K. [BioCentrum-DTU (Denmark); Felby, C. [Det Biovidenskabelige Fakultet -KU (Denmark); Jensen, Arne [Syddansk Univ., Ledelsessekretariatet (Denmark); Nielsen, Charles [DONG Energy (Denmark); Skytte, K. [Risoe National Lab., System Analysis Dept. - DTU (Denmark); Wormslev, E.C. [NIRAS A/S (Denmark); Zinck, A.M. [Dansk Landbrug (DK)] (eds.)

    2007-02-15

    In 2006 the Danish Academy of Technical Sciences set up a working group to prepare a brief and factual presentation of visions for Danish bioenergy targeted at political actors in that area. This report presents the working group's conclusions and recommendations with focus on bioethanol. Denmark has powerful actors and good opportunities to develop and commercialize this particular type of biofuel. Bioethanol has the potential to create large gains for Denmark within supply, environment and export, and the working group considers bioethanol to be the only alternative to petrol for the transport sector in the short term. However, in order to establish Denmark as a strong and relevant partner in international development, it is crucial for the Danish actors to concentrate on a joint effort. (BA)

  7. Bioethanol Production from Indigenous Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuka Roy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced rate of fossil fuel extraction is likely to deplete limited natural resources over short period of time. So search for alternative fuel is only the way to overcome this problem of upcoming energy crisis. In this aspect biofuel is a sustainable option. Agricultural lands cannot be compromised for biofuel production due to the requirement of food for the increasing population. Certain species of algae can produce ethanol during anaerobic fermentation and thus serve as a direct source for bioethanol production. The high content of complex carbohydrates entrapped in the cell wall of the microalgae makes it essential to incorporate a pre-treatment stage to release and convert these complex carbohydrates into simple sugars prior to the fermentation process. There have been researches on production of bioethanol from a particular species of algae, but this work was an attempt to produce bioethanol from easily available indigenous algae. Acid hydrolysis was carried out as pre-treatment. Gas Chromatographic analysis showed that 5 days’ fermentation by baker’s yeast had yielded 93% pure bioethanol. The fuel characterization of the bioethanol with respect to gasoline showed comparable and quite satisfactory results for its use as an alternative fuel.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v4i1.12182International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-1, Dec-Feb 2014/15, page: 112-120  

  8. Optimization of bioethanol production from carbohydrate rich wastes by extreme thermophilic microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás, Ana Faria

    Second-generation bioethanol is produced from residual biomass such as industrial and municipal waste or agricultural and forestry residues. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the microorganism currently used in industrial first-generation bioethanol production, is not capable of converting all...... of the carbohydrates present in these complex substrates into ethanol. This is in particular true for pentose sugars such as xylose, generally the second major sugar present in lignocellulosic biomass. The transition of second-generation bioethanol production from pilot to industrial scale is hindered...... by the recalcitrance of the lignocellulosic biomass, and by the lack of a microorganism capable of converting this feedstock to bioethanol with high yield, efficiency and productivity. In this study, a new extreme thermophilic ethanologenic bacterium was isolated from household waste. When assessed for ethanol...

  9. 2nd International Conference on Green Communications and Networks 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Maode; GCN 2012

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the 2nd International Conference on Green Communications and Networks 2012 (GCN 2012) is to facilitate an exchange of information on best practices for the latest research advances in the area of communications, networks and intelligence applications. These mainly involve computer science and engineering, informatics, communications and control, electrical engineering, information computing, and business intelligence and management. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Green Communications and Networks 2012 (GCN 2012) will focus on green information technology and applications, which will provide in-depth insights for engineers and scientists in academia, industry, and government. The book addresses the most innovative research developments including technical challenges, social and economic issues, and presents and discusses the authors’ ideas, experiences, findings, and current projects on all aspects of advanced green information technology and applications. Yuhang Yang is ...

  10. 2nd International Conference on Electric and Electronics (EEIC 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Advances in Electric and Electronics

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains 108 full length papers presented at the 2nd International Conference on Electric and Electronics (EEIC 2012), held on April 21-22 in Sanya, China, which brings together researchers working in many different areas of education and learning to foster international collaborations and exchange of new ideas. This volume can be divided into two sections on the basis of the classification of manuscripts considered: the first section deals with Electric and the second section with Electronics.

  11. South Lancashire Fisheries Advisory Committee 2nd April, 1980.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    This is the report from the South Lancashire Fisheries Advisory Committee meeting, which was held on the 2nd April 1980. The report contains the minutes of previous meetings, rod and line licence duties, and an update on the proposals for the development of Stocks Reservoir to become primarily a trout fishery. It also includes the report by the area fisheries officer which looks at river conditions and fishing, fish migrations, Langcliffe and Pilot hatcheries, stockings carried out by Angl...

  12. 2nd Interdiciplinary Conference on Production, Logistics and Traffic 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Hanno; Thaller, Carina; Geiger, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    This contributed volume contains the selected and reviewed papers of the 2nd Interdisciplinary Conference on Production, Logistics and Traffic (ICPLT) 2015, Dortmund, Germany. The topical focus lies on economic, ecological and societal issues related to commercial transport. The authors are international experts and the paper collection presents the state-of-the-art in the field, thus making this book a valuable read for both practitioners and researchers.

  13. 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Technologies and Engineering Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cheng-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Fu

    2014-01-01

    This book includes the original, peer reviewed research papers from the 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Technologies and Engineering Systems (ICITES2013), which took place on December 12-14, 2013 at Cheng Shiu University in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Topics covered include: laser technology, wireless and mobile networking, lean and agile manufacturing, speech processing, microwave dielectrics, intelligent circuits and systems, 3D graphics, communications, and structure dynamics and control.

  14. Selection of yeast strains for bioethanol production from UK seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostas, Emily T; White, Daniel A; Du, Chenyu; Cook, David J

    Macroalgae (seaweeds) are a promising feedstock for the production of third generation bioethanol, since they have high carbohydrate contents, contain little or no lignin and are available in abundance. However, seaweeds typically contain a more diverse array of monomeric sugars than are commonly present in feedstocks derived from lignocellulosic material which are currently used for bioethanol production. Hence, identification of a suitable fermentative microorganism that can utilise the principal sugars released from the hydrolysis of macroalgae remains a major objective. The present study used a phenotypic microarray technique to screen 24 different yeast strains for their ability to metabolise individual monosaccharides commonly found in seaweeds, as well as hydrolysates following an acid pre-treatment of five native UK seaweed species (Laminaria digitata, Fucus serratus, Chondrus crispus, Palmaria palmata and Ulva lactuca). Five strains of yeast (three Saccharomyces spp, one Pichia sp and one Candida sp) were selected and subsequently evaluated for bioethanol production during fermentation of the hydrolysates. Four out of the five selected strains converted these monomeric sugars into bioethanol, with the highest ethanol yield (13 g L(-1)) resulting from a fermentation using C. crispus hydrolysate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPS128. This study demonstrated the novel application of a phenotypic microarray technique to screen for yeast capable of metabolising sugars present in seaweed hydrolysates; however, metabolic activity did not always imply fermentative production of ethanol.

  15. Autohydrolysis Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiang

    Autohydrolysis, a simple and environmental friendly process, has long been studied but often abandoned as a financially viable pretreatment for bioethanol production due to the low yields of fermentable sugars at economic enzyme dosages. The introduction of mechanical refining can generate substantial improvements for autohydrolysis process, making it an attractive pretreatment technology for bioethanol commercialization. In this study, several lignocellulosic biomass including wheat straw, switchgrass, corn stover, waste wheat straw have been subjected to autohydrolysis pretreatment followed by mechanical refining to evaluate the total sugar recovery at affordable enzyme dosages. Encouraging results have been found that using autohydrolysis plus refining strategy, the total sugar recovery of most feedstock can be as high as 76% at 4 FPU/g enzymes dosages. The mechanical refining contributed to the improvement of enzymatic sugar yield by as much as 30%. Three non-woody biomass (sugarcane bagasse, wheat straw, and switchgrass) and three woody biomass (maple, sweet gum, and nitens) have been subjected to autohydrolysis pretreatment to acquire a fundamental understanding of biomass characteristics that affect the autohydrolysis and the following enzymatic hydrolysis. It is of interest to note that the nonwoody biomass went through substantial delignification during autohydrolysis compared to woody biomass due to a significant amount of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. It has been found that hardwood which has a higher S/V ratio in the lignin structure tends to have a higher total sugar recovery from autohydrolysis pretreatment. The economics of bioethanol production from autohydrolysis of different feedstocks have been investigated. Regardless of different feedstocks, in the conventional design, producing bioethanol and co-producing steam and power, the minimum ethanol revenues (MER) required to generate a 12% internal rate of return (IRR) are high enough to

  16. Development of glycerol-utilizing Escherichia coli strain for the production of bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Laxmi Prasad; Lee, Sang Jun; Yoo, Hah Young; Choi, Han Suk; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2013-08-15

    The production of bioethanol was studied using recombinant Escherichia coli with glycerol as a carbon source. Glycerol is an attractive feedstock for biofuels production since it is generated as a major byproduct in biodiesel industry; therefore, we investigated the conversion of glycerol to bioethanol using E. coli BL21 (DE3) which harbors several genes in ethanol production pathway of Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190. Fermentation was carried out at 34°C for 42h, pH 7.6, using defined production medium. Under optimal conditions, bioethanol production by the recombinant E. coli BL21 (DE3), strain pEB, was two-fold (3.01g/L) greater than that (1.45g/L) by the wild-type counterpart. The results obtained in this study will provide valuable guidelines for engineering bioethanol producers.

  17. SIMULATION OF THE FERMENTATION PROCESS TO OBTAIN BIOETHANOL FROM RICE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Capdevila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper presents a simulation model of the fermentation/separation process of bioethanol from hydrolyzed pretreated rice husk, using Aspen HYSYS simulator. Sensitivity studies performed on the developed model indicated levels for selected variables: biomass/water ratio of 1:2,89 ; biomass flow of 50 t/h and inlet temperature separator of 30°C, leading to maximize the yield of bioethanol. From these variables, a bioethanol production of 8,81 t/h with a purity of 65,51% w/w is obtained, corresponding to a flow of hydrolyzed treated biomass of 50 t/h. This work represents an advance in the development of the simulation model of the complete process to obtain second generation of bioethanol from rice husks.

  18. The Public Acceptance of Biofuels and Bioethanol from Straw- how does this affect Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Alexander; Ortner, Tina; Kahr, Heike

    2015-04-01

    The Public Acceptance of Biofuels and Bioethanol from Straw- how does this affect Geoscience The successful use of bioethanol as a fuel requires its widespread acceptance by consumers. Due to the planned introduction of a 10 per cent proportion of bioethanol in petrol in Austria, the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria carried out a representative opinion poll to collect information on the population's acceptance of biofuels. Based on this survey, interviews with important stakeholders were held to discuss the results and collect recommendations on how to increase the information level and acceptance. The results indicate that there is a lack of interest and information about biofuels, especially among young people and women. First generation bioethanol is strongly associated with the waste of food resources, but the acceptance of the second generation, produced from agricultural remnants like straw from wheat or corn, is considerably higher. The interviewees see more transparent, objective and less technical information about biofuels as an essential way to raise the information level and acceptance rate. As the production of bioethanol from straw is now economically feasible, there is one major scientific question to answer: In which way does the withdrawal of straw from the fields affect the formation of humus and, therefore, the quality of the soil? An interdisciplinary approach of researchers in the fields of bioethanol production, geoscience and agriculture in combination with political decision makers are required to make the technologies of renewable bioenergy acceptable to the population.

  19. Challenges in bioethanol production: Utilization of cotton fabrics as a feedstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol, as a clean and renewable fuel with its major environmental benefits, represents a promising biofuel today which is mostly used in combination with gasoline. It can be produced from different kinds of renewable feedstocks. Whereas the first generation of processes (saccharide-based have been well documented and are largely applied, the second and third generation of bioethanol processes (cellulose- or algae-based need further research and development since bioethanol yields are still too low to be economically viable. In this study, the possibilities of bioethanol production from cotton fabrics as valuable cellulosic raw material were investigated and presented. Potential lignocellulosic biomass for bioethanol production and their characteristics, especially cotton-based materials, were analyzed. Available lignocellulosic biomass, the production of textile and clothing and potential for sustainable bioethanol production in Serbia is presented. The progress possibilities are discussed in the domain of different pretreatment methods, optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis and different ethanol fermentation process modes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 31017

  20. 2nd Tbilisi-Salerno Workshop on Modeling in Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, Paolo; Tavkhelidze, Ilia

    2017-01-01

    This book contains a collection of papers presented at the 2nd Tbilisi Salerno Workshop on Mathematical Modeling in March 2015. The focus is on applications of mathematics in physics, electromagnetics, biochemistry and botany, and covers such topics as multimodal logic, fractional calculus, special functions, Fourier-like solutions for PDE’s, Rvachev-functions and linear dynamical systems. Special chapters focus on recent uniform analytic descriptions of natural and abstract shapes using the Gielis Formula. The book is intended for a wide audience with interest in application of mathematics to modeling in the natural sciences.

  1. 2nd International Conference on Mechatronics and Robotics Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Featuring selected contributions from the 2nd International Conference on Mechatronics and Robotics Engineering, held in Nice, France, February 18–19, 2016, this book introduces recent advances and state-of-the-art technologies in the field of advanced intelligent manufacturing. This systematic and carefully detailed collection provides a valuable reference source for mechanical engineering researchers who want to learn about the latest developments in advanced manufacturing and automation, readers from industry seeking potential solutions for their own applications, and those involved in the robotics and mechatronics industry.

  2. 2nd International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Systems and Informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Shaalan, Khaled; Gaber, Tarek; Azar, Ahmad; Tolba, M

    2017-01-01

    This book gathers the proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Systems and Informatics (AISI2016), which took place in Cairo, Egypt during October 24–26, 2016. This international interdisciplinary conference, which highlighted essential research and developments in the field of informatics and intelligent systems, was organized by the Scientific Research Group in Egypt (SRGE) and sponsored by the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (Egypt chapter) and the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (Egypt Chapter). The book’s content is divided into four main sections: Intelligent Language Processing, Intelligent Systems, Intelligent Robotics Systems, and Informatics.

  3. Report from the 2nd Workshop on Extremely Large Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Becla

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The complexity and sophistication of large scale analytics in science and industry have advanced dramatically in recent years. Analysts are struggling to use complex techniques such as time series analysis and classification algorithms because their familiar, powerful tools are not scalable and cannot effectively use scalable database systems. The 2nd Extremely Large Databases (XLDB workshop was organized to understand these issues, examine their implications, and brainstorm possible solutions. The design of a new open source science database, SciDB that emerged from the first workshop in this series was also debated. This paper is the final report of the discussions and activities at this workshop.

  4. Book Review: Digital Forensic Evidence Examination (2nd ed.)

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Kessler

    2010-01-01

    Cohen, F. (2010). Digital Forensic Evidence Examination (2nd ed.). Livermore, CA: ASP Press. 452 pages, ISBN: 978-1-878109-45-3, US$79.Reviewed by Gary C. Kessler, Gary Kessler Associates & Edith Cowan University ()On the day that I sat down to start to write this review, the following e-mailcame across on one of my lists:Person A and Person B write back and forth and create an email thread. Person A then forwards the email to Person C, but changes some wording in the e...

  5. 2nd conference on Continuous Media with Microstructure

    CERN Document Server

    Kuczma, Mieczysław

    2016-01-01

    This book presents research advances in the field of Continuous Media with Microstructure and considers the three complementary pillars of mechanical sciences: theory, research and computational simulation. It focuses on the following problems: thermodynamic and mathematical modeling of materials with extensions of classical constitutive laws, single and multicomponent media including modern multifunctional materials, wave propagation, multiscale and multiphysics processes, phase transformations, and porous, granular and composite materials. The book presents the proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Continuous Media with Microstructure, which was held in 2015 in Łagów, Poland, in memory of Prof. Krzysztof Wilmański. .

  6. Micro and macroalgal biomass: a renewable source for bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Rojan P; Anisha, G S; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Pandey, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Population outburst together with increased motorization has led to an overwhelming increase in the demand for fuel. In the milieu of economical and environmental concern, algae capable of accumulating high starch/cellulose can serve as an excellent alternative to food crops for bioethanol production, a green fuel for sustainable future. Certain species of algae can produce ethanol during dark-anaerobic fermentation and thus serve as a direct source for ethanol production. Of late, oleaginous microalgae generate high starch/cellulose biomass waste after oil extraction, which can be hydrolyzed to generate sugary syrup to be used as substrate for ethanol production. Macroalgae are also harnessed as renewable source of biomass intended for ethanol production. Currently there are very few studies on this issue, and intense research is required in future in this area for efficient utilization of algal biomass and their industrial wastes to produce environmentally friendly fuel bioethanol. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Afs password expiration starts Feb 2nd 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Due to security reasons, and in agreement with CERN management, afs/lxplus passwords will fall into line with Nice/Mail passwords on February 2nd and expire annually. As of the above date afs account holders who have not changed their passwords for over a year will have a 60 day grace period to make a change. Following this date their passwords will become invalid. What does this mean to you? If you have changed your afs password in the past 10 months the only difference is that 60 days before expiration you will receive a warning message. Similar warnings will also appear nearer the time of expiration. If you have not changed your password for more than 10 months, then, as of February 2nd you will have 60 days to change it using the command ‘kpasswd'. Help to choose a good password can be found at: http://security.web.cern.ch/security/passwords/ If you have been given a temporary password at any time by the Helpdesk or registration team this will automatically fall into the expiration category ...

  8. Conference report: 2nd Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastow, Orest

    2014-02-01

    2nd Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium 16 October 2013, Lund, Sweden The 2nd Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium was arranged by the Medicon Valley Inhalation Consortium. It was held at the Medicon Village, which is the former AstraZeneca site in Lund, Sweden. It was a 1 day symposium focused on inhaled drug delivery and inhalation product development. 120 delegates listened to 11 speakers. The program was organized to follow the value chain of an inhalation product development. This year there was a focus on inhaled biomolecules. The inhaled delivery of insulin was covered by two presentations and a panel discussion. The future of inhaled drug delivery was discussed together with an overview of the current market situation. Two of the inhalation platforms, capsule inhalers and metered-dose inhalers, were discussed in terms of the present situation and the future opportunities. Much focus was on the regulatory and intellectual aspects of developing inhalation products. The manufacturing of a dry powder inhaler requires precision filling of powder, and the various techniques were presented. The benefits of nebulization and nasal delivery were illustrated with some case studies and examples. The eternal challenge of poor compliance was addressed from an industrial design perspective and some new approaches were introduced.

  9. Afs password expiration starts Feb 2nd 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Due to security reasons, and in agreement with CERN management, afs/lxplus passwords will fall into line with Nice/Mail passwords on February 2nd and expire annually. As of the above date afs account holders who have not changed their passwords for over a year will have a 60 day grace period to make a change. Following this date their passwords will become invalid. What does this mean to you? If you have changed your afs password in the past 10 months the only difference is that 60 days before expiration you will receive a warning message. Similar warnings will also appear nearer the time of expiration. If you have not changed your password for more than 10 months, then, as of February 2nd you will have 60 days to change it using the command ‘kpasswd'. Help to choose a good password can be found at: http://security.web.cern.ch/security/passwords/ If you have been given a temporary password at any time by the Helpdesk or registration team this will automatically fall into the expiration category ...

  10. Pretreatment methods for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaoyang; Huang, Fang

    2014-09-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, such as wood, grass, agricultural, and forest residues, are potential resources for the production of bioethanol. The current biochemical process of converting biomass to bioethanol typically consists of three main steps: pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation. For this process, pretreatment is probably the most crucial step since it has a large impact on the efficiency of the overall bioconversion. The aim of pretreatment is to disrupt recalcitrant structures of cellulosic biomass to make cellulose more accessible to the enzymes that convert carbohydrate polymers into fermentable sugars. This paper reviews several leading acidic, neutral, and alkaline pretreatments technologies. Different pretreatment methods, including dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), steam explosion pretreatment (SEP), organosolv, liquid hot water (LHW), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), sodium hydroxide/lime pretreatments, and ozonolysis are intensively introduced and discussed. In this minireview, the key points are focused on the structural changes primarily in cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin during the above leading pretreatment technologies.

  11. Bioethanol production from Asphodelus aestivus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polycarpou, Polycarpos [Agricultural Research Institute, Soils Science Department, P.O. Box 22016, 1516 Lefkosia (Cyprus)

    2009-12-15

    The increase on the price of fossil fuels and the need to protect the environment from greenhouse gases urge the investigation of the possibility of using biofuels to replace them. Cyprus is faced with severe water shortage and unavailability of agricultural land that limit the cultivation of energy crops that supply the feedstock for biofuel production. A possibility would be to use Asphodelus aestivus L. that is encountered in Cyprus and other Mediterranean countries, growing wild in pastures. Its tubers contain starch that was measured to be 10.1%. The bioethanol is produced by fermentation of the mash produced by crashing the tubers of the plant. The first stage of the process was cooking the mash at a temperature of 95 C, combined by liquefaction and saccharification of the starch using enzymes, like alpha-amylase and glucoamylase. The process was followed by fermentation of the mash for three days and finally distillation of bioethanol. The alcohol yield per kilogram tubers was 49.52 ml/kg, compared to the theoretical value of 83.72 ml/kg, mainly due to the incomplete fermentation of the sugars. The plant seems to be a potential energy plant for bioethanol production in arid regions cultivated on degraded land. (author)

  12. Sugarcane for Bioethanol: Soil and Environmental Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2008-01-01

    Cultivation of sugarcane for bioethanol is increasing and the area under sugarcane is expanding. Much of the sugar for bioethanol comes from large plantations where it is grown with relatively high inputs. Sugarcane puts a high demands on the soil because of the use of heavy machinery and because

  13. 2nd International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wattanapongsakorn, Naruemon

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a snapshot of the current state-of-the-art in the fields of mobile and wireless technology, security and applications.  The proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology (ICMWT2015), it represents the outcome of a unique platform for researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to share cutting-edge developments in the field of mobile and wireless science technology, including those working on data management and mobile security.   The contributions presented here describe the latest academic and industrial research from the international mobile and wireless community.  The scope covers four major topical areas: mobile and wireless networks and applications; security in mobile and wireless technology; mobile data management and applications; and mobile software.  The book will be a valuable reference for current researchers in academia and industry, and a useful resource for graduate-level students working on mobile and wireless technology...

  14. 2nd International Multidisciplinary Microscopy and Microanalysis Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Oral, Ahmet; Ozer, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The 2nd International Multidisciplinary Microscopy and Microanalysis Congress & Exhibition (InterM 2014) was held on 16–19 October 2014 in Oludeniz, Fethiye/ Mugla, Turkey. The aim of the congress was to gather scientists from various branches and discuss the latest improvements in the field of microscopy. The focus of the congress has been widened in an "interdisciplinary" manner, so as to allow all scientists working on several related subjects to participate and present their work. These proceedings include 33 peer-reviewed technical papers, submitted by leading academic and research institutions from over 17 countries and representing some of the most cutting-edge research available. The papers were presented at the congress in the following sessions: ·         Applications of Microscopy in the Physical Sciences ·         Applications of Microscopy in the Biological Sciences.

  15. 2nd International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Ole; Akay, Metin

    2014-01-01

    The book is the proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR 2014), held 24th-26th June 2014 in Aalborg, Denmark. The conference featured the latest highlights in the emerging and interdisciplinary field of neural rehabilitation engineering and identified important healthcare challenges the scientific community will be faced with in the coming years. Edited and written by leading experts in the field, the book includes keynote papers, regular conference papers, and contributions to special and innovation sessions, covering the following main topics: neuro-rehabilitation applications and solutions for restoring impaired neurological functions; cutting-edge technologies and methods in neuro-rehabilitation; and translational challenges in neuro-rehabilitation. Thanks to its highly interdisciplinary approach, the book will not only be a  highly relevant reference guide for academic researchers, engineers, neurophysiologists, neuroscientists, physicians and physiotherapists workin...

  16. 2nd international conference on advanced nanomaterials and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, D; Perumal, A

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale science and technology have occupied centre stage globally in modern scientific research and discourses in the early twenty first century. The enabling nature of the technology makes it important in modern electronics, computing, materials, healthcare, energy and the environment. This volume contains selected articles presented (as Invited/Oral/Poster presentations) at the 2nd international conference on advanced materials and nanotechnology (ICANN-2011) held recently at the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, during Dec 8-10, 2011. The list of topics covered in this proceedings include: Synthesis and self assembly of nanomaterials Nanoscale characterisation Nanophotonics & Nanoelectronics Nanobiotechnology Nanocomposites  F   Nanomagnetism Nanomaterials for Enery Computational Nanotechnology Commercialization of Nanotechnology The conference was represented by around 400 participants from several countries including delegates invited from USA, Germany, Japan, UK, Taiwan, Italy, Singapor...

  17. 2nd Colombian Congress on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics

    CERN Document Server

    Cristancho, Marco; Isaza, Gustavo; Pinzón, Andrés; Rodríguez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This volume compiles accepted contributions for the 2nd Edition of the Colombian Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Congress CCBCOL, after a rigorous review process in which 54 papers were accepted for publication from 119 submitted contributions. Bioinformatics and Computational Biology are areas of knowledge that have emerged due to advances that have taken place in the Biological Sciences and its integration with Information Sciences. The expansion of projects involving the study of genomes has led the way in the production of vast amounts of sequence data which needs to be organized, analyzed and stored to understand phenomena associated with living organisms related to their evolution, behavior in different ecosystems, and the development of applications that can be derived from this analysis.  .

  18. 2nd Conference of the International Society for Nonparametric Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Manteiga, Wenceslao; Romo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This volume collects selected, peer-reviewed contributions from the 2nd Conference of the International Society for Nonparametric Statistics (ISNPS), held in Cádiz (Spain) between June 11–16 2014, and sponsored by the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the Bernoulli Society for Mathematical Statistics and Probability, the Journal of Nonparametric Statistics and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. The 15 articles are a representative sample of the 336 contributed papers presented at the conference. They cover topics such as high-dimensional data modelling, inference for stochastic processes and for dependent data, nonparametric and goodness-of-fit testing, nonparametric curve estimation, object-oriented data analysis, and semiparametric inference. The aim of the ISNPS 2014 conference was to bring together recent advances and trends in several areas of nonparametric statistics in order to facilitate the exchange of research ideas, promote collaboration among researchers...

  19. 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Computing, Communication & Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Popentiu-Vladicescu, Florin

    2017-01-01

    The book presents high quality papers presented at 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Computing, Communication & Devices (ICCD 2016) organized by Interscience Institute of Management and Technology (IIMT), Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India, during 13 and 14 August, 2016. The book covers all dimensions of intelligent sciences in its three tracks, namely, intelligent computing, intelligent communication and intelligent devices. intelligent computing track covers areas such as intelligent and distributed computing, intelligent grid and cloud computing, internet of things, soft computing and engineering applications, data mining and knowledge discovery, semantic and web technology, hybrid systems, agent computing, bioinformatics, and recommendation systems. Intelligent communication covers communication and network technologies, including mobile broadband and all optical networks that are the key to groundbreaking inventions of intelligent communication technologies. This covers communication hardware, soft...

  20. 2nd International Congress on Neurotechnology, Electronics and Informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Encarnação, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This book is a timely report on current neurotechnology research. It presents a snapshot of the state of the art in the field, discusses current challenges and identifies new directions. The book includes a selection of extended and revised contributions presented at the 2nd International Congress on Neurotechnology, Electronics and Informatics (NEUROTECHNIX 2014), held October 25-26 in Rome, Italy. The chapters are varied: some report on novel theoretical methods for studying neuronal connectivity or neural system behaviour; others report on advanced technologies developed for similar purposes; while further contributions concern new engineering methods and technological tools supporting medical diagnosis and neurorehabilitation. All in all, this book provides graduate students, researchers and practitioners dealing with different aspects of neurotechnologies with a unified view of the field, thus fostering new ideas and research collaborations among groups from different disciplines.

  1. 2nd International Conference on Communication and Computer Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Othman, Mohd; Othman, Mohd; Rahim, Yahaya; Pee, Naim

    2016-01-01

    This book covers diverse aspects of advanced computer and communication engineering, focusing specifically on industrial and manufacturing theory and applications of electronics, communications, computing and information technology. Experts in research, industry, and academia present the latest developments in technology, describe applications involving cutting-edge communication and computer systems, and explore likely future trends. In addition, a wealth of new algorithms that assist in solving computer and communication engineering problems are presented. The book is based on presentations given at ICOCOE 2015, the 2nd International Conference on Communication and Computer Engineering. It will appeal to a wide range of professionals in the field, including telecommunication engineers, computer engineers and scientists, researchers, academics and students.

  2. 2nd International Conference on Harmony Search Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Geem, Zong

    2016-01-01

    The Harmony Search Algorithm (HSA) is one of the most well-known techniques in the field of soft computing, an important paradigm in the science and engineering community.  This volume, the proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Harmony Search Algorithm 2015 (ICHSA 2015), brings together contributions describing the latest developments in the field of soft computing with a special focus on HSA techniques. It includes coverage of new methods that have potentially immense application in various fields. Contributed articles cover aspects of the following topics related to the Harmony Search Algorithm: analytical studies; improved, hybrid and multi-objective variants; parameter tuning; and large-scale applications.  The book also contains papers discussing recent advances on the following topics: genetic algorithms; evolutionary strategies; the firefly algorithm and cuckoo search; particle swarm optimization and ant colony optimization; simulated annealing; and local search techniques.   This book ...

  3. 2nd International Conference on Construction and Building Research

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Plazaola, Igor; Hidalgo-Delgado, Francisco; Martínez-Valenzuela, María; Medina-Ramón, Francisco; Oliver-Faubel, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Abad, Isabel; Salandin, Andrea; Sánchez-Grandia, Rafael; Tort-Ausina, Isabel; Construction and Building Research

    2014-01-01

    Many areas of knowledge converge in the building industry and therefore research in this field necessarily involves an interdisciplinary approach. Effective research requires strong relations between a broad variety of scientific and technological domains and more conventional construction or craft processes, while also considering advanced management processes, where all the main actors permanently interact. This publication takes an interdisciplinary approach grouping various studies on the building industry chosen from among the works presented for the 2nd International Conference on Construction and Building Research. The papers examine aspects of materials and building systems; construction technology; energy and sustainability; construction management; heritage, refurbishment and conservation. The information contained within these pages may be of interest to researchers and practitioners in construction and building activities from the academic sphere, as well as public and private sectors.

  4. 2nd International Afro-European Conference for Industrial Advancement

    CERN Document Server

    Wegrzyn-Wolska, Katarzyna; Hassanien, Aboul; Snasel, Vaclav; Alimi, Adel

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the 2nd International Afro-European Conference for Industrial Advancement -- AECIA 2015. The conference aimed at bringing together the foremost experts and excellent young researchers from Africa, Europe and the rest of the world to disseminate the latest results from various fields of engineering, information, and communication technologies. The topics, discussed at the conference, covered a broad range of domains spanning from ICT and engineering to prediction, modeling, and analysis of complex systems. The 2015 edition of AECIA featured a distinguished special track on prediction, modeling and analysis of complex systems -- Nostradamus, and special sessions on Advances in Image Processing and Colorization and Data Processing, Protocols, and Applications in Wireless Sensor Networks.

  5. 2nd CEAS Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Mulder, Bob; Choukroun, Daniel; Kampen, Erik-Jan; Visser, Coen; Looye, Gertjan

    2013-01-01

    Following the successful 1st CEAS (Council of European Aerospace Societies) Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control (CEAS EuroGNC) held in Munich, Germany in 2011, Delft University of Technology happily accepted the invitation of organizing the 2nd  CEAS EuroGNC in Delft, The Netherlands in 2013. The goal of the conference is to promote new advances in aerospace GNC theory and technologies for enhancing safety, survivability, efficiency, performance, autonomy and intelligence of aerospace systems using on-board sensing, computing and systems. A great push for new developments in GNC are the ever higher safety and sustainability requirements in aviation. Impressive progress was made in new research fields such as sensor and actuator fault detection and diagnosis, reconfigurable and fault tolerant flight control, online safe flight envelop prediction and protection, online global aerodynamic model identification, online global optimization and flight upset recovery. All of these challenges de...

  6. Sustainable bioethanol production combining biorefinery principles and intercropping strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, M.H.; Haugaard-Nielsen, H.; Petersson, A.; Thomsen, A.B.; Jensen, E.S. [Risoe National Lab., DTU, Biosystems Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2007-05-15

    Ethanol produced from pretreatment and microbial fermentation of biomass has great potential to become a sustainable transportation fuel in the near future. First generation biofuel focus on starch (from grain) fermentation, but in the present study that is regarded as a too important food source. In recent years 2nd generation technologies are developed utilizing bulk residues like wheat straw, woody materials, and corn stover. However, there is a need for integrating the biomass starting point into the energy manufacturing steps to secure that bioenergy is produced from local adapted raw materials with limited use of non-renewable fossil fuels. Produced crops can be transformed into a number of useful products using the concept of biorefining, where no waste streams are produced. An advantage of intercropping is that the intercrop components composition can be designed to produce a medium (for microbial fermentation) containing all essential nutrients. Thereby addition of e.g. urea and other fermentation nutrients produced from fossil fuels can be avoided. Intercropping, defined as the growing of two or more species simultaneously on the same area of land, is a cropping strategy based on the manipulation of plant interactions in time and space to maximize growth and productivity. Cereal-legume intercropping data from field trials show the possibility to improve the use of nitrogen resources, because the non fixing species (e.g. wheat) efficiently exploits soil mineral N sources while at the same time atmospheric N from the N{sub 2}-fixing species (e.g. pea) enter the cropping system reducing the need for N fertilizer application. Nitrogen fertilization is responsible for more than 85 % of the greenhouse gas emissions from wheat grain production in Denmark. Increase of fertilizer N supply promotes the growth of wheat and results in a decreased pea N accumulation and a different proportion of intercrop components. Intercropping introduce a dynamic change of plant

  7. Supply Portfolio of Bioethanol in the Republic of Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong Hwan Bae

    2014-01-01

    Despite the co-benefits of bioethanol, such as energy security, environmental improvement, CO2 emission reduction and development of associated industry, bioethanolblended gasoline without subsidy is more expensive than pure gasoline in Korea. The renewable fuel standard (RFS) can contribute to the development of a bioethanol market. However, without controlling the portions of domestic bioethanol, it is highly plausible that a new bioethanol market will be filled with imported bioethanol. If...

  8. Challenges for the production of bioethanol from biomass using recombinant yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kricka, William; Fitzpatrick, James; Bond, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose biomass, one of the most abundant renewable resources on the planet, is an alternative sustainable energy source for the production of second-generation biofuels. Energy in the form of simple or complex carbohydrates can be extracted from lignocellulose biomass and fermented by microorganisms to produce bioethanol. Despite 40 years of active and cutting-edge research invested into the development of technologies to produce bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass, the process remains commercially unviable. This review describes the achievements that have been made in generating microorganisms capable of utilizing both simple and complex sugars from lignocellulose biomass and the fermentation of these sugars into ethanol. We also provide a discussion on the current "roadblocks" standing in the way of making second-generation bioethanol a commercially viable alternative to fossil fuels.

  9. Phosphomolybdic acid and ferric iron as efficient electron mediators for coupling biomass pretreatment to produce bioethanol and electricity generation from wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Du, Bo; Zhao, Xuebing; Zhu, J Y; Liu, Dehua

    2017-03-01

    Phosphomolybdic acid (PMo12) was used as an electron mediator and proton carrier to mediate biomass pretreatment for ethanol production and electricity generation from wheat straw. In the pretreatment, lignin was oxidized anaerobically by PMo12 with solubilization of a fraction of hemicelluloses, and the PMo12 was simultaneously reduced. In an external liquid flow cell, the reduced PMo12 was re-oxidized with generation of electricity. The effects of several factors on pretreatment were investigated for optimizing the conditions. Enzymatic conversion of cellulose and xylan were about 80% and 45%, respectively, after pretreatment of wheat straw with 0.25M PMo12, at 95°C for 45min. FeCl3 was found to be an effective liquid mediator to transfer electrons to air, the terminal electron acceptor. By investigating the effects of various operation parameters and cell structural factors, the highest output power density of about 11mW/cm(2) was obtained for discharging of the reduced PMo12. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy efficiency and environmental performance of bioethanol production from sweet sorghum stem based on life cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; Chen, Yahui; Xia, Xunfeng; Li, Jun; Liu, Jianguo

    2014-07-01

    Life cycle analysis method was used to evaluate the energy efficiency and environmental performance of bioethanol production from sweet sorghum stem in China. The scope covers three units, including plant cultivation, feedstock transport, and bioethanol conversion. Results show that the net energy ratio was 1.56 and the net energy gain was 8.37 MJ/L. Human toxicity was identified as the most significant negative environmental impact, followed by eutrophication and acidification. Steam generation in the bioethanol conversion unit contributed 82.28% and 48.26% to total human toxicity and acidification potential, respectively. Fertilizers loss from farmland represented 67.23% of total eutrophication potential. The results were significantly affected by the inventory allocation methods, vinasse reusing approaches, and feedstock yields. Reusing vinasse as fuel for steam generation and better cultivation practice to control fertilizer loss could significantly contribute to enhance the energy efficiency and environmental performance of bioethanol production from sweet sorghum stem.

  11. Discrete frequency noise generated by an air jet flow from a rectangular slit. 2nd Report. Relationship between the generation of the tonal noise and flow field. Chohokei slit kara no funryu ni yotte hasseisuru risan shuhasu soon no kenkyu. 2. Soon hassei to sokudoba no shotokusei tono kankei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, I.; Kato, J. (Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan)); Fukano, T. (Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1994-06-25

    Pure tones sometimes generate unexpectedly due to air leaking from gaps between closed windows and dampers in case of a strong wind. Such pure tones are called whistle tones. The previous paper described that whistle tones can be generated by an air jet flow from a rectangular slit. In the previous paper, concerning the slit configuration that generated the clearest whistle tone, the jet velocity field and its time variation characteristics were investigated in detail, and their relationship with the generation of whistle tones was studied. In the jet velocity measurement, a constant-temperature hot-wire current meter was used, and a probe was precisely moved by a three-dimensional moving system. A typical whistle tone was generated when the representative velocity (U[sub 0]) of the potential core part of the jet was 10.6m/s. At that time, peak frequencies of spectral density distributions of both noise and jet velocity fluctuation coincided with each other. It was also found that periodic velocity fluctuation components caused the whistle tones. The scale of the jet turbulence or the range of the intense velocity fluctuation was almost equivalent to the slit outlet size. 4 refs., 16 figs.

  12. The energetic potential of bioethanol in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Károly Lakatos

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The basis of the bioethanol production is the agriculture, mostly the corn and wheat growing. With the analysis of their domesticharvest results, the process of the starch formation and the chemical-thermodynamical processes of the alcohol’s fermantation,we calculate the annual amount of the producible bioethanol on average and it’s energy. We determine the specific values of the CO2cycle. We examine the energetic possibilities of total substitution of the 2 billion litres of domestic petrol consumption with bioethanol.

  13. Evaluation of thermostable enzymes for bioethanol processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Pernille Anastasia

    Bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass is among the green alternatives to fossil fuels, but as the processing techniques are today, gasolin is still heaper than bioethanol. Lignocellulose, which remains the primary resource for ioethanol production in Denmark, is complex when it comes to release...... for the ioethanol production, but the expenses can be reduced by using thermostable enzymes, which are known for their increased stability and inhibitor olerance. However, the advantage of using thermostable enzymes has not been studied thoroughly and more knowledge is needed for development of bioethanol processes...

  14. 2nd Circuit vacates sanction against plantiff's attorney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-23

    The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals vacated sanctions against attorney Lee Nuwesra whose client claimed HIV discrimination. The court ruled that U.S. District Judge Constance Baker Motley abused her judicial discretion in ruling that Nuwesra must pay $25,000 of legal costs spent by the client's employer in defending itself against litigation that the judge found frivolous. The appeals panel faulted the judge for not specifying which conduct on the part of the attorney was actionable. Plaintiff [name removed] claimed that his firing from [name removed] & [name removed], Inc., was motivated by his HIV illness and that his rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act were violated. [Name removed] failed to establish that his employer knew his HIV status. Motley sanctioned Nuwesra for not performing adequate pre-trial investigation in the case. According to Federal Rules of Civil Procedure judges can only sanction attorneys at the request of the opposing side, which was not made by the defendants in this case.

  15. Book Review: Digital Forensic Evidence Examination (2nd ed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Kessler

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cohen, F. (2010. Digital Forensic Evidence Examination (2nd ed.. Livermore, CA: ASP Press. 452 pages, ISBN: 978-1-878109-45-3, US$79.Reviewed by Gary C. Kessler, Gary Kessler Associates & Edith Cowan University (gck@garykessler.netOn the day that I sat down to start to write this review, the following e-mailcame across on one of my lists:Person A and Person B write back and forth and create an email thread. Person A then forwards the email to Person C, but changes some wording in the email exchange between A & B. What is the easiest way (and is it even possible to find out when that earlier email message was altered before sent to Person C?Before you try to answer these questions, read Fred Cohen's Digital Forensic Evidence Examination. His book won't actually tell you how to answer these questions but it will help you understand the difficulty in even trying to answer them with any level of certainty.(see PDF for full review

  16. Evaluation of thermostable enzymes for bioethanol processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Pernille Anastasia

    Bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass is among the green alternatives to fossil fuels, but as the processing techniques are today, gasolin is still heaper than bioethanol. Lignocellulose, which remains the primary resource for ioethanol production in Denmark, is complex when it comes to release...... for the ioethanol production, but the expenses can be reduced by using thermostable enzymes, which are known for their increased stability and inhibitor olerance. However, the advantage of using thermostable enzymes has not been studied thoroughly and more knowledge is needed for development of bioethanol processes....... Enzymes are added to the bioethanol process after pretreatment. For an efficient sugar and ethanol yield, the solids content of biomass is normally increased, which results in highly viscous slurries that are difficult to mix. Therefore, the first enzymatic challenge is to ensure rapid reduction...

  17. 2nd International Open and Distance Learning (IODL Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Murat BARKAN

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This closing remarks prepared and presented by Prof. Dr. Murat BARKAN Anadolu University, Eskisehir, TURKEY DEAR GUESTS, As the 2nd International Open and Distance Learning (IODL Symposium is now drawing to end, I would like to thank you all for your outstanding speeches, distinguished presentations, constructive roundtable and session discussions, and active participation during the last five days. I hope you all share my view that the whole symposium has been a very stimulating and successful experience. Also, on behalf of all the participants, I would like to take this opportunity to thank and congratulate the symposium organization committee for their excellent job in organizing and hosting our 2nd meeting. Throughout the symposium, five workshops, six keynote speeches and 66 papers, which were prepared by more than 150 academicians and practitioners from 23 different countries, reflected remarkable and various views and approaches about open and flexible learning. Besides, all these academic endeavors, 13 educational films were displayed during the symposium. The technology exhibition, hosted by seven companies, was very effective to showcase the current level of the technology and the success of applications of theory into practice. Now I would like to go over what our scholar workshop and keynote presenters shared with us: Prof. Marina McIsaac form Arizona State University dwelled on how to determine research topics worthwhile to be examined and how to choose appropriate research design and methods. She gave us clues on how to get articles published in professional journals. Prof. Colin Latchem from Australia and Prof. Dr. Ali Ekrem Ozkul from Anadolu University pointed to the importance of strategic planning for distance and flexible learning. They highlighted the advantages of strategic planning for policy-makers, planners, managers and staff. Dr. Wolfram Laaser from Fern University of Hagen, presented different multimedia clips and

  18. PREFACE: 2nd National Conference on Nanotechnology 'NANO 2008'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, P.; Kolodziej, J. J.; Konior, J.; Szymonski, M.

    2009-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains selected papers presented at the 2nd National Conference on Nanotechnology 'NANO2008', that was held in Kraków, Poland, 25-28 June 2008. It was organized jointly by the Polish Chemical Society, Polish Physical Society, Polish Vacuum Society, and the Centre for Nanometer-scale Science and Advanced Materials (NANOSAM) of the Jagiellonian University. The meeting presentations were categorized into the following topics: 1. Nanomechanics and nanotribology 2. Characterization and manipulation in nanoscale 3. Quantum effects in nanostructures 4. Nanostructures on surfaces 5. Applications of nanotechnology in biology and medicine 6. Nanotechnology in education 7. Industrial applications of nanotechnology, presentations of the companies 8. Nanoengineering and nanomaterials (international sessions shared with the fellows of Maria-Curie Host Fellowships within the 6th FP of the European Community Project 'Nano-Engineering for Expertise and Development, NEED') 9. Nanopowders 10. Carbon nanostructures and nanosystems 11. Nanoelectronics and nanophotonics 12. Nanomaterials in catalysis 13. Nanospintronics 14. Ethical, social, and environmental aspects of nanotechnology The Conference was attended by 334 participants. The presentations were delivered as 7 invited plenary lectures, 25 invited topical lectures, 78 oral and 108 poster contributions. Only 1/6 of the contributions presented during the Conference were submitted for publication in this Proceedings volume. From the submitted material, this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains 37 articles that were positively evaluated by independent referees. The Organizing Committee gratefully acknowledges all these contributions. We also thank all the referees of the papers submitted for the Proceedings for their timely and thorough work. We would like to thank all members of the National Program Committee for their work in the selection process of

  19. Bioethanol fermentation as alternative valorization route of agricultural digestate according to a biorefinery approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambusiti, C; Monlau, F; Barakat, A

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of producing bioethanol from solid digestate after a mechanical fractionation (i.e. centrifugal milling), in order to improve the energy recovery from agricultural wastes and the sustainability of anaerobic digestion plants. A bioethanol yield of 37gkg(-1)TS was evaluated for the solid digestate fraction. Mass and energetic balances were performed and compared between two scenarios: (A) one-stage bioethanol fermentation and (B) two-stage anaerobic digestion-bioethanol fermentation, in order to evaluate the feasibility and the advantages of the two-stage process. Results revealed that, compared to the one-stage process, the dual anaerobic digestion-bioethanol process permitted: (i) to diversify biofuels production; (ii) to provide the thermal energy sufficient for drying digestate (13,351kWhthday(-1)), for the subsequent milling step; (iii) to reduce the electric energy requirement for the milling step (from 23,880 to 3580kWhelday(-1)); (iv) to produce extra electrical energy of 8483kWhelday(-1); (v) to improve the reduction of waste streams generated (from 13% to 54% of organic matter removal).

  20. 2nd Skin approach to zero energy rental properties: Occupancy patterns to improve energy simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra Santin, O.; Silvester, S.; Konstantinou, T.

    2015-01-01

    A number of second skin solutions have been developed in recent years to solve the problem of large scale renovation of housing. The 2ndSkin approach presented in this paper is currently under development by a consortium of academic and industry partners in the Netherlands. The objective of the 2ndS

  1. Development of a Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones Phase II 2nd Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, Kenzi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Doughty, Christine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gasperikova, Erika [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Peterson, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Conrad, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cook, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tiemi, Onishi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-03-31

    This is the 2nd report on the three-year program of the 2nd phase of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement. As such, this report is a compendium of the results by Kiho et al. (2011) and those by LBNL.

  2. Bioethanol Quality Improvement of Coffee Fruit Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edahwati Luluk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Indonesia’s dependence on petroleum is to be reduced and even eliminated. To overcome the problem of finding the needed alternative materials that can produce ethanol, in this case as a substitute material or a transport fuel mix, boosting the octane number, and gasoline ethanol (gasohol can be conducted. In the red coffee processing (cooking that will produce 65% and 35% of coffee beans, coffee leather waste is a source of organic material with fairly high cellulose content of 46.82%, 3.01% of pectin and 7.68% of lignin. In this case, its existence is abundant in Indonesia and optimally utilized. During the coffee fruit peeling, the peel waste is only used as a mixture of animal feed or simply left to rot. The purpose of this study was to produce and improve the quality of the fruit skin of bioethanol from coffee cellulose. However, to improve the quality of bioethanol, the production of the lignin content in the skin of the coffee fruit should be eliminated or reduced. Hydrolysis process using organosolve method is expected to improve the quality of bioethanol produced. In particular, the use of enzyme Saccharomyces and Zymmomonas will change the resulting sugar into bioethanol. On one hand, by using batch distillation process for 8 hours with Saccharomyces, bioethanol obtains high purity which is 39.79%; on the other hand, by using the same batch distillation process with Zymmomonas, the bioethanol obtains 38.78%.

  3. Production and Purification of Bioethanol from Molasses and Cassava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryana, Roni; Wahono, Satriyo Krido

    2009-09-01

    This research aim to analysis bioethanol purification process. Bioethanol from cassava has been produced in previous research and the ethanol from molasses was taken from Bekonang region. The production of bioethanol from cassava was carried out through several processes such as homogenization, adding of α-amylase, β-amylase and yeast (Saccharomyces c). Two types of laboratory scale distillator have been used, the first type is 50 cm length and 4 cm diameter. The second type distillator is 30 cm length and 9 cm diameter. Both types have been used to distill bioethanol The initial concentration after the fermentation process is 15% for bioethanol from cassava and 20-30% ethanol from molasses. The results of first type distillator are 90% of bioethanol at 50° C and yield 2.5%; 70% of bioethanol at 60° C and yield 11.2%. 32% of bioethanol at 70° C and yield 42%. Meanwhile the second distillator results are 84% of bioethanol at 50° C with yield 12%; 51% of bioethanol at 60° C with yield 35.5%; 20% of bioethanol at 70° C with yield 78.8%; 16% of bioethanol at 80° C with yield 81.6%. The ethanol from molasses has been distillated once times in Bekonang after the fermentation process, the yield was about 20%. In this research first type distillator and the initial concentration is 20% has been used. The results are 95% of bioethanol at 75° C with yield 8%; 94% of bioethanol at 85° C with yield 13% when vacuum pump was used. And 94% of bioethanol at 90° C with yield 3.7% and 94% of bioethanol at 96° C with yield 10.27% without vacuum pump. The bioethanol purification use second type distillator more effective than first type distillator.

  4. Feasibility of bioethanol production from tubers of Dioscorea sansibarensis and Pyrenacantha kaurabassana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshi, Anselm P; Nyandele, Jane P; Ndossi, Humphrey P; Eva, Sosovele M; Hosea, Ken M

    2015-11-01

    Inedible tubers from Dioscorea sansibarensis (DS) and Pyrenacantha kaurabassana (PK) were found to be suitable feedstock for bioethanol production. Important composition parameters for bioethanol production for DS and PK are dry matter (% fresh tubers) ca. 20 and 6, total carbohydrates % dry weight base (db) ca. 68 and 47 and total protein (% db) ca. 16 and 10, respectively. DS and PK were found to contain inulin and galactomannan as principal polysaccharides (% of total carbohydrate) ca. 90 and 70, respectively. Diluted acid hydrolysis yielded ca. 100% of total reducing sugars. Ethanol yield ca. 56 and 35g/L was obtained at high efficiency through batch fermentation of acid hydrolysate (25% w/v) of DS and PK, respectively. A simple technique of recording and monitoring ethanol through CO2 generated during fermentation correlated strongly with HPLC measurement R(2)=0.99. Thus, tubers from these plants are potential feedstocks for bioethanol production with no competing uses.

  5. Environmental sustainability of bioethanol produced from sweet sorghum stem on saline-alkali land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; Pan, Xinxing; Xia, Xunfeng; Xi, Beidou; Wang, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle assessment was conducted to evaluate the energy efficiency and environmental impacts of a bioethanol production system that uses sweet sorghum stem on saline-alkali land as feedstock. The system comprises a plant cultivation unit, a feedstock transport unit, and a bioethanol conversion unit, with 1000L of bioethanol as a functional unit. The net energy ratio is 3.84, and the net energy gain is 17.21MJ/L. Agrochemical production consumes 76.58% of the life cycle fossil energy. The category with the most significant impact on the environment is eutrophication, followed by acidification, fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity, human toxicity, and global warming. Allocation method, waste recycling approach, and soil salinity significantly influence the results. Using vinasse to produce pellet fuel for steam generation significantly improves energy efficiency and decreases negative environmental impacts. Promoting reasonable management practices to alleviate saline stress and increasing agrochemical utilization efficiency can further improve environmental sustainability.

  6. Upgrading of lignocellulosic biorefinery to value-added chemicals: Sustainability and economics of bioethanol-derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Posada, John A.; Gernaey, Krist

    2015-01-01

    In this study, several strategies to upgrade lignocellulosic biorefineries for production of value-added chemicals are systematically generated and evaluated with respect to economic and sustainability objectives. A superstructure-based process synthesis approach under uncertainty integrated...... with a sustainability assessment method is used as evaluation tool. First, an existing superstructure representing the lignocellulosic biorefinery design network is extended to include the options for catalytic conversion of bioethanol to value-added derivatives. Second, the optimization problem for process upgrade...... of operating profit for biorefineries producing bioethanol-derived chemicals (247 MM$/a and 241 MM$/a for diethyl ether and 1,3-butadiene, respectively). Second, the optimal designs for upgrading bioethanol (i.e. production of 1,3-butadiene and diethyl ether) performed also better with respect...

  7. Enzymatic saccharification and bioethanol production from Cynara cardunculus pretreated by steam explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria C; Ferro, Miguel D; Paulino, Ana F C; Mendes, Joana A S; Gravitis, Janis; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Xavier, Ana M R B

    2015-06-01

    The correct choice of the specific lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment allows obtaining high biomass conversions for biorefinery implementations and cellulosic bioethanol production from renewable resources. Cynara cardunculus (cardoon) pretreated by steam explosion (SE) was involved in second-generation bioethanol production using separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) or simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes. Steam explosion pretreatment led to partial solubilisation of hemicelluloses and increased the accessibility of residual polysaccharides towards enzymatic hydrolysis revealing 64% of sugars yield against 11% from untreated plant material. Alkaline extraction after SE pretreatment of cardoon (CSEOH) promoted partial removal of degraded lignin, tannins, extractives and hemicelluloses thus allowing to double glucose concentration upon saccharification step. Bioethanol fermentation in SSF mode was faster than SHF process providing the best results: ethanol concentration 18.7 g L(-1), fermentation efficiency of 66.6% and a yield of 26.6g ethanol/100 g CSEOH or 10.1 g ethanol/100 g untreated cardoon.

  8. EFFICIENT RECOVERY OF BIOETHANOL USING NOVEL PERVAPORATION-DEPHLEGMATION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioethanol is the most important liquid fuel made in the U.S. from domestically produced renewable resources. Traditional production of bioethanol involves batch fermation of biomass followed by ethanol recovery from the fermentation broths using distillation. The distillation st...

  9. 2nd interface between ecology and land development in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.; Baer-Keeley, Melanie; Fortheringham, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    The 2nd Interface Between Ecology and Land Development Conference was held in association with Earth Day 1997, five years after the first Interface Conference. Rapid population growth in California has intensified the inevitable conflict between land development and preservation of natural ecosystems. Sustainable development requires wise use of diminishing natural resources and, where possible, restoration of damaged landscapes. These Earth Week Celebrations brought together resource managers, scientists, politicians, environmental consultants, and concerned citizens in an effort to improve the communication necessary to maintain our natural biodiversity, ecosystem processes and general quality of life. As discussed by our keynote speaker, Michael Soule, the best predictor of habitat loss is population growth and nowhere is this better illustrated than in California. As urban perimeters expand, the interface between wildlands and urban areas increases. Few problems are more vexing than how to manage the fire prone ecosystems indigenous to California at this urban interface. Today resource managers face increasing challenges of dealing with this problem and the lead-off section of the proceedings considers both the theoretical basis for making decisions related to prescribed burning and the practical application. Habitat fragmentation is an inevitable consequence of development patterns with significant impacts on animal and plant populations. Managers must be increasingly resourceful in dealing with problems of fragmentation and the often inevitable consequences, including susceptibility to invasive oganisms. One approach to dealing with fragmentation problems is through careful landplanning. California is the national leader in the integration of conservation and economics. On Earth Day 1991, Governor Pete Wilson presented an environmental agenda that promised to create between land owners and environmentalists, agreements that would guarantee the protection of

  10. PREFACE: 2nd Workshop on Germanium Detectors and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, I.; Majorovits, B.; Keller, C.; Mei, D.; Wang, G.; Wei, W.

    2015-05-01

    The 2nd workshop on Germanium (Ge) detectors and technology was held at the University of South Dakota on September 14-17th 2014, with more than 113 participants from 8 countries, 22 institutions, 15 national laboratories, and 8 companies. The participants represented the following big projects: (1) GERDA and Majorana for the search of neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) (2) SuperCDMS, EDELWEISS, CDEX, and CoGeNT for search of dark matter; (3) TEXONO for sub-keV neutrino physics; (4) AGATA and GRETINA for gamma tracking; (5) AARM and others for low background radiation counting; (5) as well as PNNL and LBNL for applications of Ge detectors in homeland security. All participants have expressed a strong desire on having better understanding of Ge detector performance and advancing Ge technology for large-scale applications. The purpose of this workshop was to leverage the unique aspects of the underground laboratories in the world and the germanium (Ge) crystal growing infrastructure at the University of South Dakota (USD) by brining researchers from several institutions taking part in the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) together with key leaders from international laboratories and prestigious universities, working on the forefront of the intensity to advance underground physics focusing on the searches for dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ), and neutrino properties. The goal of the workshop was to develop opportunities for EPSCoR institutions to play key roles in the planned world-class research experiments. The workshop was to integrate individual talents and existing research capabilities, from multiple disciplines and multiple institutions, to develop research collaborations, which includes EPSCor institutions from South Dakota, North Dakota, Alabama, Iowa, and South Carolina to support multi-ton scale experiments for future. The topic areas covered in the workshop were: 1) science related to Ge

  11. Recent trends in bioethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenčenko Valentina V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid depletion of the world petroleum supply and the increasing problem of greenhouse gas effects have strenghtened the worldwide interest in alternative, nonpetroleum sources of energy. Bioethanol accounts for the majority of biofuel use worldwide, either as a fuel or a gasoline enhancer. Utilization of bioethanol can significantly reduce petroleum use and exhaust greenhouse gas emission. The production of this fuel is increasing over the years, and has reached the level of 73.9 billion liters during the year 2009. Even though ethanol production for decades mainly depended on energy crops containing starch and sugar (corn, sugar cane etc., new technologies for converting lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol are under development today. The use of lignocellulosic biomass, such as agricultural residues, forest and municipial waste, for the production of biofuels will be unavoidable if liquid fossil fuels are to be replaced by renewable and sustainable alternatives. For biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass, pretreatment plays a central role affecting all unit operations in the process and is also an important cost deterrent to the comercial viability of the process. The key obstacles are: pretreatment selection and optimization; decreasing the cost of the enzymatic hydrolysis; maximizing the conversion of sugars (including pentoses to ethanol; process scale-up and integration to minimize energy and water demand; characterization and evaluation of the lignin co-product; and lastly, the use of the representative and reliable data for cost estimation, and the determination of environmental and socio-economic impacts. Currently, not all pretreatments are capable of producing biomass that can be converted to sugars in high enough yield and concentration, while being economically viable. For the three main types of feedstocks, the developement of effective continuous fermentation technologies with near to 100% yields and elevated

  12. The fairy tale of bio-ethanol. Het sprookje van de bio-ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beverloo, W.A. (Vakgroep Levensmiddelentechnologie, Landbouwuniversiteit Wageningen (Netherlands))

    1992-03-01

    Agricultural products can be converted into bio-ethanol. Proponents of the bio-ethanol production however use inaccurate arguments with regard to the comparison of the prices per liter for bio-ethanol and petrol instead of using the net heating value of the fuels. Also their basic assumptions concerning the energy efficiency or the energy balances or the carbon dioxide emissions are incorrect. The production of biomass for energy does not serve any other societal interest than subsidized employment for agricultural farmers. 4 tabs., 9 refs.

  13. Optimized Pump Power Ratio on 2nd Order Pumping Discrete Raman Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renxiang; Huang; Youichi; Akasaka; David; L.; Harris; James; Pan

    2003-01-01

    By optimizing pump power ratio between 1st order backward pump and 2nd order forward pump on discrete Raman amplifier, we demonstrated over 2dB noise figure improvement without excessive non-linearity degradation.

  14. 2nd International Gliomatosis Cerebri Working Group Conference | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 22-23, the NIH hosted the 2nd Gliomatosis Cerebri International Conference that brought together leading neuro-oncologists, neuroscientists and families who have lost a child to the disease. Learn more...

  15. Combustion synthesis and characterization of Ba2NdSbO6 nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V T Kavitha; R Jose; S Ramakrishna; P R S Wariar; J Koshy

    2011-07-01

    Nanocrystalline Ba2NdSbO6, a complex cubic perovskite metal oxide, powders were synthesized by a self-sustained combustion method employing citric acid. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The as-prepared powders were single phase Ba2NdSbO6 and a mixture of polycrystalline spheroidal particles and single crystalline nanorods. The Ba2NdSbO6 sample sintered at 1500°C for 4 h has high density (∼ 95% of theoretical density). Sintered nanocrystalline Ba2NdSbO6 had a dielectric constant of ∼ 21; and dielectric loss = 8 × 10-3 at 5 MHz.

  16. File list: His.Lar.20.AllAg.2nd_instar [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lar.20.AllAg.2nd_instar dm3 Histone Larvae 2nd instar SRX013015,SRX013042,SRX01...3112,SRX013043,SRX013096,SRX013087 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Lar.20.AllAg.2nd_instar.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Lar.10.AllAg.2nd_instar [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lar.10.AllAg.2nd_instar dm3 Histone Larvae 2nd instar SRX013087,SRX013015,SRX01...3112,SRX013042,SRX013043,SRX013096 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Lar.10.AllAg.2nd_instar.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Lar.05.AllAg.2nd_instar [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Lar.05.AllAg.2nd_instar dm3 All antigens Larvae 2nd instar SRX013087,SRX013096,...SRX013043,SRX013015,SRX013112,SRX013042,SRX013113,SRX013016,SRX013114 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Lar.05.AllAg.2nd_instar.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Lar.20.AllAg.2nd_instar [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: ALL.Lar.50.AllAg.2nd_instar [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Lar.50.AllAg.2nd_instar dm3 All antigens Larvae 2nd instar SRX013015,SRX013042,...SRX013112,SRX013016,SRX013114,SRX013043,SRX013087,SRX013096,SRX013113 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Lar.50.AllAg.2nd_instar.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Lar.10.AllAg.2nd_instar [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Lar.10.AllAg.2nd_instar dm3 All antigens Larvae 2nd instar SRX013087,SRX013015,...SRX013112,SRX013042,SRX013043,SRX013096,SRX013113,SRX013016,SRX013114 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Lar.10.AllAg.2nd_instar.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Lar.05.AllAg.2nd_instar [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lar.05.AllAg.2nd_instar dm3 Histone Larvae 2nd instar SRX013087,SRX013096,SRX01...3043,SRX013015,SRX013112,SRX013042 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Lar.05.AllAg.2nd_instar.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Lar.50.AllAg.2nd_instar [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lar.50.AllAg.2nd_instar dm3 Histone Larvae 2nd instar SRX013015,SRX013042,SRX01...3112,SRX013043,SRX013087,SRX013096 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Lar.50.AllAg.2nd_instar.bed ...

  4. Severe weather phenomena: SQUALL LINES The case of July 2nd 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschivescu, Mihnea; Tanase, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    The wind intensity plays an important role, among the dangerous meteorological phenomena, to produce negative effects on the economy and the social activities, particularly when the wind is about to turn into a storm. During the past years one can notice an increase of wind frequency and intensity due to climate changes and, consequently, as a result of the extreme meteorological phenomena not only on a planetary level but also on a regional one. Although dangerous meteorological phenomena cannot be avoided, since they are natural, nevertheless they can be anticipated and decision making institutions and mass media can be informed. This is the reason why, in this paper, we set out to identify the synoptic conditions that led to the occurrence of the severe storm case in Bucharest on July 2nd, 2009, as well as the matrices that generate such cases. At the same time we sought to identify some indications evidence especially from radar data so as to lead to the improvement of the time interval between the nowcasting warning and the actual occurrence of the phenomenon.

  5. 2nd-order Fermi acceleration as the origin of the Fermi bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Mertsch, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-ray data from Fermi-LAT show a bi-lobular structure extending up to 50 degrees above and below the Galactic centre, coincident with a possibly related structure in the ROSAT X-ray map which presumably originated in some energy release close to the centre a few million years ago. It has been argued that the gamma-rays arise due to inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons accelerated at plasma shocks present in the bubbles. We explore the alternative possibility that the relativistic electrons undergo stochastic 2nd-order Fermi acceleration in the entire volume of the bubbles by plasma wave turbulence. This turbulence is generated behind the outer shock and propagates into the bubble volume, leading to a non-trivial spatial variation of the electron spectral index. Rather than a constant volume emissivity as predicted in other models we find an almost constant surface brightness in gamma-rays and also reproduce the observed sharp edges of the bubbles. We comment on possible cross-checks in oth...

  6. Structure of comorbid psychopathological disorders in patients with type 2nd diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Chugunov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to identify and explore the structure of comorbid psychopathological disorders in patients with type 2nd diabetes mellitus (DM. Materials and methods: 543 patients with type 2nd DM were included into the study. The average age of patients was (56.2 ± 0.65 years. The patients were divided into three groups according to the severity of DM. The first clinical group (CG-1 included 57 patients with type 2nd DM of mild severity, who was treated in outpatient department; the average age in the group was (51.8 ± 1.28 years. The second clinical group (CG-2 made up of 312 patients with type 2nd DM, moderate severity, they were in inpatient department; the median age of the group was (55.1 ± 1.12 years. The third clinical group (CG-3 included 174 patients with type 2nd DM, severe degrees of severity, they undergone inpatient treatment too; average age in the group was (61.8 ± 0.85 years. Research methods: clinical-anamnesis, clinical- psychopathological, statistical. Research results. The study established the incidence of non-psychotic mental disorders of varying severity in patients with type 2nd DM at the level of 94.11 %, among them, for 91.16 % – of psychogenic origin. Proportional correlation between the severity of type 2nd DM and the absence of comorbid psychopathological manifestations was detected (rs = -0.3416, p < 0.01. It is revealed that the dominant psychopathological syndromes among all patients with type 2nd DM were psychoorganic (62.43 %, dyssomnia (60.86 %, asthenic (55.58 % and anxiety (43.05 % syndromes. Structure of the dominant psychopathological syndromes was established depending on severity of type 2nd DM: in CG-1 dominated dyssomnia (36.84 %, anxiety (31.58 %, psychoorganic (21.05 % syndromes; in CG-2 – psychoorganic (65.38 %, asthenic (40.38 %, dyssomnia (38.46 %, anxiety (37, and 82 % syndromes; in CG-3 – dyssomnia (97.70 %, asthenic (89.08 %, organic mental (70.69 %, anxious 48.28 % syndromes. Significant

  7. Bio-ethanol from lignocellulose: Status, perspectives and challenges in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Chun Sheng; Tan, Kok Tat; Lee, Keat Teong; Bhatia, Subhash

    2010-07-01

    The present study reveals the perspective and challenges of bio-ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials in Malaysia. Malaysia has a large quantity of lignocellulosic biomass from agriculture waste, forest residues and municipal solid waste. In this work, the current status in Malaysia was laconically elucidated, including an estimation of biomass availability with a total amount of 47,402 dry kton/year. Total capacity and domestic demand of second-generation bio-ethanol production in Malaysia were computed to be 26,161 ton/day and 6677 ton/day, respectively. Hence, it was proven that the country's energy demand can be fulfilled with bio-ethanol if lignocellulosic biomass were fully converted into bio-ethanol and 19% of the total CO(2) emissions in Malaysia could be avoided. Apart from that, an integrated national supply network was proposed together with the collection, storage and transportation of raw materials and products. Finally, challenges and obstacles in legal context and policies implementation were elaborated, as well as infrastructures shortage and technology availabilities.

  8. Use of tropical maize for bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropical maize is an alternative energy crop being considered as a feedstock for bioethanol production in the North Central and Midwest United States. Tropical maize is advantageous because it produces large amounts of soluble sugars in its stalks, creates a large amount of biomass, and requires lo...

  9. Bioethanol from different Finnish agricultural carbon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautola, H.; Kymaelaeinen, M.; Tokeensuu, L.; Alatalo, T. (HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Degree Programme in Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Haemeenlinna (Finland)); Caerdenas, R. (Universidad Central del Ecuador, Facultad Ciencias Quimicas, Escuela de Quimica, Av. America. Ciudadela Universitaria, Quito (Ecuador)); Siukola, K.; Naesi, J. (Suomen Biojalostus Oy, Renko (Finland))

    2007-07-01

    Bioethanol in fuel and its domestic production has become a great issue in Finland during the last few years. There has been discussion about what kind of raw materials should be used and are there any local priorities. In the years 2004-2007 local farmers in Haem e , in southern part of Finland, started to find alternative use for sugar beet due to drastic reduction of domestic sugar production in the near future. This was also the start of the experimental studies on bi oethanol production. The aim of the study was to find out how the change of carbon source will effect on bi oethanol yield. The bioethanol production was studied in laboratory scale using carbon sources of saccharose, glucose, sugar beet juice, sugar beet mash and barley hydrolysates pretreated with amylases, (beta-glucanase and xylanase). The yeast used was Saccharomyces sp. The pre experiments were performed in 250 mL flasks to optimize carbon, nitrogen and salts contents in production medium, also comparing different carbon sources and mixtures. The production was then studied in a 30 liter fermenter running for 36 hours. The preliminary studies showed that barley hydrolysate gave the best result 2,4% in bioethanol concentration during the performed fermentations, and saccharose was the best substrate in shake flask fermentations with a 9,6% bioethanol concentration. (orig.)

  10. Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hajar Mohd Azhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.

  11. Bioethanol produced from Moringa oleifera seeds husk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, E. N.; Kemat, S. Z.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the potential of bioethanol production from Moringa oleifera seeds husk which contains lignocellulosic through Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF) process by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This paper investigates the parameters which produce optimum bioethanol yield. The husk was hydrolyzed using NaOH and fermented using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. Batch fermentation was performed with different yeast dosage of 1, 3, and 5 g/L, pH value was 4.5, 5.0 and 5.5, and fermentation time of 3, 6, 9 and 12 hours. The temperature of fermentation process in incubator shaker is kept constant at 32ºC. The samples are then filtered using a 0.20 μm nylon filter syringe. The yield of bioethanol produced was analysed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the highest yield of 29.69 g/L was obtained at 3 hours of fermentation time at pH of 4.5 and using 1g/L yeast. This research work showed that Moringa oleifera seeds husk can be considered to produce bioethanol.

  12. Integration of pulp and paper technology with bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Richard B; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou Min

    2013-01-28

    Despite decades of work and billions of dollars of investments in laboratory and pilot plant projects, commercial production of cellulosic ethanol is only now beginning to emerge. Because of: (1)high technical risk coupled with; (2) high capital investment cost relative to ethanol product value, investors have not been able to justify moving forward with large scale projects on woody biomass. Both issues have been addressed by targeting pulp and paper industry processes for application in bioethanol production, in Greenfield, Repurpose and Co-Location scenarios. Processes commercially proven in hundreds of mills for many decades have been tailored to the recalcitrance of the biomass available. Economically feasible cellulosic bioethanol can be produced in Greenfield application with hardwoods, but not softwoods, using kraft mill equipment. Both types of wood species can profitably produce ethanol when kraft mill or newsprint assets are Repurposed to a biorefinery. A third situation which can generate high financial returns is where excess kraft pulp is available at a mill which has no excess drying capacity. Each scenario is supported by laboratory simulation, engineering and financial analysis. While pretreatment is critical to providing access of the biomass to enzymes, capital investment per unit of ethanol produced can be attractive, even if ethanol yield is modest. Three guiding principles result in attractive economics: (1) re-use existing assets to the maximum extent; (2) keep the process as simple as possible; (3) match the recalcitrance of the biomass with the severity of the pretreatment.

  13. Physics design of the DARHT 2nd axis accelerator cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y J; Houck, T L; Reginato, L J; Shang, C C; Yu, S S

    1999-08-19

    The next generation of radiographic machines based on induction accelerators require very high brightness electron beams to realize the desired x-ray spot size and intensity. This high brightness must be maintained throughout the beam transport, from source to x-ray converter target. The accelerator for the second-axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility is being designed to accelerate a 4-kA, 2-{micro}s pulse of electrons to 20 MeV. After acceleration, the 2-{micro}s pulse will be chopped into a train of four 50-ns pulses with variable temporal spacing by rapidly deflecting the beam between a beam stop and the final transport section. The short beam pulses will be focused onto an x-ray converter target generating four radiographic pulses within the 2-{micro}s window. Beam instability due to interaction with the accelerator cells can very adversely effect the beam brightness and radiographic pulse quality. This paper describes the various issues considered in the design of the accelerator cell with emphasis on transverse impedance and minimizing beam instabilities.

  14. Thermoluminescent characteristics of ZrO{sub 2}:Nd films; Caracteristicas termoluminiscentes de peliculas de ZrO{sub 2}:Nd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera B, G.; Rivera M, T. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica-IPN, 04430 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Falcony G, C. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados-IPN, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia H, M.; Martinez S, E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales-UNAM, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    In this work it is exposed the obtained results after analysing the photo luminescent and thermoluminescent characteristics of activated zirconium oxide with neodymium (ZrO{sub 2} :Nd) and its possible application in the UV radiation dosimetry. The realized experiments had as objective to study the characteristics such as the optimum thermal erased treatment, the influence of light on the response, the response depending on the wavelength, the fadeout of the information, the temperature effect, the response depending on the time and the recurring of the response. The results show that the ZrO{sub 2} :Nd is a promising material to be used as Tl dosemeter for the UV radiation. (Author)

  15. 2nd International Conference on Robot Intelligence Technology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Matson, Eric; Myung, Hyun; Xu, Peter; Karray, Fakhri

    2014-01-01

    We are facing a new technological challenge on how to store and retrieve knowledge and manipulate intelligence for autonomous services by intelligent systems which should be capable of carrying out real world tasks autonomously. To address this issue, robot researchers have been developing intelligence technology (InT) for “robots that think” which is in the focus of this book. The book covers all aspects of intelligence from perception at sensor level and reasoning at cognitive level to behavior planning at execution level for each low level segment of the machine. It also presents the technologies for cognitive reasoning, social interaction with humans, behavior generation, ability to cooperate with other robots, ambience awareness, and an artificial genome that can be passed on to other robots. These technologies are to materialize cognitive intelligence, social intelligence, behavioral intelligence, collective intelligence, ambient intelligence and genetic intelligence. The book aims at serving resear...

  16. 2nd Topical Workshop on Laser Technology and Optics Design

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Lasers have a variety of applications in particle accelerator operation and will play a key role in the development of future particle accelerators by improving the generation of high brightness electron and exotic ion beams and through increasing the acceleration gradient. Lasers will also make an increasingly important contribution to the characterization of many complex particle beams by means of laser-based beam diagnostics methods. The second LANET topical workshop will address the key aspects of laser technology and optics design relevant to laser application to accelerators. The workshop will cover general optics design, provide an overview of different laser sources and discuss methods to characterize beams in details. Participants will be able to choose from a range of topical areas that go deeper in more specific aspects including tuneable lasers, design of transfer lines, noise sources and their elimination and non-linear optics effects. The format of the workshop will be mainly training-based wit...

  17. Experimental investigation of the generation mechanism of aerodynamic noise. 2nd Report. On correlation between surface pressure fluctuation and aerodynamic sound radiated from a circular cylinder; Kurikion no hassei kiko ni kansuru jikken kaiseki. 2. Hyomen atsuryoku hendo to kurikion no sogo sokan ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, A.; Kato, C.; Otaguro, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Fujita, H. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Technology

    1996-12-25

    The mechanism of aerodynamic sound generation from a circular cylinder is investigated experimentally using coherence functions between surface pressure fluctuation and radiated sound at Reynolds numbers from 10{sup 4} to 1.4 {times} 10{sup 5}. The correlation between the surface pressure fluctuation and the radiated sound at the fundamental frequency is good, indicating the strong contribution of ordered structures to aerodynamic sound generation. The characteristic length of ordered structure Lc is estimated using the integral scale of the spanwise coherence function of surface pressure fluctuations. The sound pressure is calculated using a modified Curle`s equation, with the characteristic length and measured surface pressure fluctuations. The predicted spectra of radiated sound are in good agreement with those actually measured up to five times the fundamental frequency. This result shows that Lc, is useful for estimating the character of radiated sound from a circular cylinder. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. A Soliton Hierarchy Associated with a Spectral Problem of 2nd Degree in a Spectral Parameter and Its Bi-Hamiltonian Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqin Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Associated with so~(3,R, a new matrix spectral problem of 2nd degree in a spectral parameter is proposed and its corresponding soliton hierarchy is generated within the zero curvature formulation. Bi-Hamiltonian structures of the presented soliton hierarchy are furnished by using the trace identity, and thus, all presented equations possess infinitely commuting many symmetries and conservation laws, which implies their Liouville integrability.

  19. Overview of the 2nd Gen 3.7m HIAD Static Load Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, G. T.; Kazemba, C. D.; Johnson, R. K.; Hughes, S. J.; Calomino, A. M.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Cassell, A. M.; Anderson, P.; Lowery, A.

    2015-01-01

    To support NASAs long term goal of landing humans on Mars, technologies which enable the landing of heavy payloads are being developed. Current entry, decent, and landing technologies are not practical for human class payloads due to geometric constraints dictated by current launch vehicle fairing limitations. Therefore, past and present technologies are now being explored to provide a mass and volume efficient solution to atmospheric entry, including Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIADs). In October of 2014, a 3.7m HIAD inflatable structure with an integrated flexible thermal protection sys-tem (F-TPS) was subjected to a static load test series to verify the designs structural performance. The 3.7m HIAD structure was constructed in a 70 deg sphere-cone stacked-toroid configuration using eight inflatable tori, which were joined together using adhesives and high strength textile webbing to help distribute the loads throughout the inflatable structure. The inflatable structure was fabricated using 2nd generation structural materials that permit an increase in use temperature to 400 C+ as compared to the 250 C limitation of the 1st generation materials. In addition to the temperature benefit, these materials also offer a 40 reduction in structure mass. The 3.7m F-TPS was fabricated using high performance materials to protect the inflatable structure from heat loads that would be seen during atmospheric entry. The F-TPS was constructed of 2nd generation TPS materials increasing its heating capability from 35W sq cm to over 100W sq cm. This test article is the first stacked-torus HIAD to be fabricated and tested with a 70 deg sphere-cone. All previous stacked-torus HIADs have employed a 60o sphere-cone. To perform the static load test series, a custom test fixture was constructed. The fixture consisted of a structural tub rim with enough height to allow for dis-placement of the inflatable structure as loads were applied. The tub rim was attached to the

  20. DOE performance indicators for 2nd quarter CY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a Department-wide Performance Indicator (PI) Program for trending and analysis of operational data as directed by DOE Order 5480.26. The PI Program was established to provide a means for monitoring the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) performance of the DOE at the Secretary and other management levels. This is the tenth in a series of quarterly reports generated for the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) by EG&G Idaho, Inc. to meet the requirements of the PI Program as directed by the DOE Standard (DOE-STD-1048-92). The information in this tenth quarterly report, while contributing to a historical database for supporting future trending analysis, does not at this time provide a sound basis for developing trend-related conclusions. In the future, it is expected that trending and analysis of operational data will enhance the safety culture in both DOE and contractor organizations by providing an early warning of deteriorating environment, safety, and health conditions. DOE-STD-1048-92 identifies four general areas of PIs. They are: Personnel Safety, Operational Incidents, Environment, and Management. These four areas have been subdivided into 26 performance indicators. Approximately 115 performance indicator control and distribution charts comprise the body of this report. A brief summary of PIs contained in each of these general areas is provided. The four EG&G facilities whose performance is charted herein are as follows: (1) The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), (2) The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), (3) The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF), and (4) The Test Reactor Area (TRA) Hot Cells.

  1. 2nd Skin approach to zero energy rental properties: Occupancy patterns to improve energy simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra Santin, O.; Silvester, S.; Konstantinou, T.

    2015-01-01

    A number of second skin solutions have been developed in recent years to solve the problem of large scale renovation of housing. The 2ndSkin approach presented in this paper is currently under development by a consortium of academic and industry partners in the Netherlands. The objective of the 2ndSkin project is to develop a strategy for an integrated and effective renovation solution. This approach aims at developing a market-ready zero-energy solution that can be applied to rental apartmen...

  2. A new analytic solution for 2nd-order Fermi acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Mertsch, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    A new analytic solution for 2nd-order Fermi acceleration is presented. In particular, we consider time-dependent rates for stochastic acceleration, diffusive and convective escape as well as adiabatic losses. The power law index q of the turbulence spectrum is unconstrained and can therefore account for Kolmogorov (q = 5/3) and Kraichnan (q = 3/2) turbulence, Bohm diffusion (q = 1) as well as the hard-sphere approximation (q = 2). This considerably improves beyond solutions known to date and will prove a useful tool for more realistic modelling of 2nd-order Fermi acceleration in a variety of astrophysical environments.

  3. Evaluation of the biomass potential for the production of lignocellulosic bioethanol from various agricultural residues in Austria and Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Heike; Steindl, Daniel; Wimberger, Julia; Schürz, Daniel; Jäger, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Due to the fact that the resources of fossil fuels are steadily decreasing, researchers have been trying to find alternatives over the past few years. As bioethanol of the first generation is based on potential food, its production has become an increasingly controversial topic. Therefore the focus of research currently is on the production of bioethanol of the second generation, which is made from cellulosic and lignocellulosic materials. However, for the production of bioethanol of the second generation the fibres have to be pre-treated. In this work the mass balances of various agricultural residues available in Austria were generated and examined in lab scale experiments for their bioethanol potential. The residues were pretreatment by means of state of the art technology (steam explosion), enzymatically hydrolysed and fermented with yeast to produce ethanol. Special attention was paid the mass balance of the overall process. Due to the pretreatment the proportion of cellulose increases with the duration of the pre-treatment, whereby the amount of hemicellulose decreases greatly. However, the total losses were increasing with the duration of the pre-treatment, and the losses largely consist of hemicellulose. The ethanol yield varied depending on the cellulose content of the substrates. So rye straw 200 °C 20 min reaches an ethanol yield of 169 kg/t, by far the largest yield. As result on the basis of the annual straw yield in Austria, approximately 210 000 t of bioethanol (266 million litres) could be produced from the straw of wheat (Triticum vulgare), rye (Secale cereale), oat (Avena sativa) and corn (Zea mays) as well as elephant grass (Miscanthus sinensis) using appropriate pre-treatment. So the greenhouse gas emissions produced by burning fossil fuels could be reduced significantly. About 1.8 million tons of motor gasoline are consumed in Austria every year. The needed quantity for a transition to E10 biofuels could thus be easily provided by bioethanol

  4. 2nd international expert meeting straw power; 2. Internationale Fachtagung Strohenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    Within the 2nd Guelzow expert discussions at 29th to 30th March, 2012 in Berlin (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) Promotion of the utilisation of straw in Germany (A. Schuette); (2) The significance of straw in the heat and power generation in EU-27 member states in 2020 and in 2030 under consideration of the costs and sustainability criteria (C. Panoutsou); (3) State of he art of the energetic utilization of hay goods in Europe (D. Thraen); (4) Incineration technological characterisation of straw based on analysis data as well as measured data of large-scale installations (I. Obernberger); (5) Energetic utilization of hay goods in Germany (T. Hering); (6) Actual state of the art towards establishing the first German straw thermal power station (R. Knieper); (7) Straw thermal power plants at agricultural sow farms and poultry farms (H. Heilmann); (8) Country report power from straw in Denmark (A. Evald); (9) Country report power from straw in Poland (J. Antonowicz); (10) Country report power from straw in China (J. Zhang); (11) Energetic utilisation of straw in Czechia (D. Andert); (12) Mobile pelletization of straw (S. Auth); (13) Experiences with the straw thermal power plant from Vattenfall (N. Kirkegaard); (14) Available straw potentials in Germany (potential, straw provision costs) (C. Weiser); (15) Standardization of hay good and test fuels - Classification and development of product standards (M. Englisch); (16) Measures of reduction of emissions at hay good incinerators (V. Lenz); (17) Fermentation of straw - State of the art and perspectives (G. Reinhold); (18) Cellulosis - Ethanol from agricultural residues - Sustainable biofuels (A. Hartmair); (19) Syngas by fermentation of straw (N. Dahmen); (20) Construction using straw (D. Scharmer).

  5. Biorefinery of corn cob for microbial lipid and bio-ethanol production: An environmental friendly process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Di; Dong, Zhongshi; Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Li, Ping; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    Microbial lipid and bio-ethanol were co-generated by an integrated process using corn cob bagasse as raw material. After pretreatment, the acid hydrolysate was used as substrate for microbial lipid fermentation, while the solid residue was further enzymatic hydrolysis for bio-ethanol production. The effect of acid loading and pretreatment time on microbial lipid and ethanol production were evaluated. Under the optimized condition for ethanol production, ∼131.3g of ethanol and ∼11.5g of microbial lipid were co-generated from 1kg raw material. On this condition, ∼71.6% of the overall fermentable sugars in corn cob bagasse could be converted into valuable products. At the same time, at least 33% of the initial COD in the acid hydrolysate was depredated.

  6. Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Low Income Economy Through Biogas and Bioethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miezah, Kodwo; Obiri-Danso, Kwasi; Kádár, Zsófia

    2017-01-01

    The biodegradable fraction of municipal solid wastes generated from households in Ghana has favourable characteristics worth considering for bioenergy production. The suitability of this biodegradable portion for biogas and bioethanol production was assessed in this study. The assessment was perf......The biodegradable fraction of municipal solid wastes generated from households in Ghana has favourable characteristics worth considering for bioenergy production. The suitability of this biodegradable portion for biogas and bioethanol production was assessed in this study. The assessment...... was performed on both untreated and hydrothermally treated unsorted and sorted fractions of the waste using standard methods for biomass conversion to bioenergy. Compositional analysis of the waste indicated that unsorted biodegradable municipal solid wastes (BMSW) consisted of 38.7 % dry matter (DM) glucan, 8...... the quality and effectively lead to higher yield of biofuel over the unsorted form....

  7. The BEST experiences with Bioethanol Cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-12-15

    The report contains the results of WP1 Cars, which comprised six tasks focusing on: 1,2 introduction of bioethanol cars to city/regional and private car fleets 3 conversion of conventional vehicles to run on bioethanol 4 use of test fleets 5 testing of bioethanol electric hybrid vehicles 6 training of car dealers and service staff. The results of these tasks have been analysed, in contrast to the original objectives of BEST and with reference to the contextual factors that affected the implementation of the tasks. This includes assessment of observed market developments, user attitudes, problems and opportunities that enable or hinder introduction of bioethanol cars, economic factors, and sustainability. The major findings are: Flexifuel vehicles and E85 can contribute towards a diversified fuel mix and help the EU meet its targets for alternative fuels. In the short-medium term, flexifuel vehicles can ease the transition to a cleaner vehicle fleet. Flexifuel vehicles and bioethanol fuels work very well at all sites and are appreciated by fleet managers and drivers. Flexifuel vehicles are energy efficient. Manufacturers tend to state that the fuel consumption therefore is 30-40% higher when driving on E85. However, within the BEST project flexifuel vehicles consume less fuel than previously thought - in the best case only 1.14 times more E85 than petrol was necessary. The evaluations carried out within the BEST project suggest that the energy efficiency of running on E85 may be between 1-26% higher than running on petrol. This is considered to be an important area for future research. Fuel price determines whether consumers fuel use bioethanol or fossil fuels - a competitive price per kilometre for bioethanol compared to fossil fuels is essential to market development It is possible for a city to influence the market spread of clean cars. Conventional petrol cars can be converted to flexifuel vehicles without impact on performance. Swedish legislation for this

  8. Bioethanol production from the macroalgae Sargassum spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borines, Myra G; de Leon, Rizalinda L; Cuello, Joel L

    2013-06-01

    Macroalgae, an abundant and carbon-neutral renewable resource, with several species rich in carbohydrates are suitable for bioethanol production. This study focused on the pretreatment, enzyme saccharification and fermentation of Sargassum spp., a brown macroalgae for bioethanol production. The optimal acid pretreatment condition achieved in terms of glucose and reducing sugar yields was 3.4-4.6% (w/v) H2SO4 concentration, 115°C and 1.50h. The pretreated biomass was hydrolyzed with cellulase enzyme system supplemented with β-glucosidase. After fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 40°C, pH of 4.5 for 48 h, the ethanol conversion rate of the enzyme hydrolysate reached 89%, which was markedly higher than the theoretical yield of 51% based on glucose as substrate. Since all the glucose was consumed during fermentation, other sugar sources might be present in the hydrolysate. The macroalgae, Sargassum spp., showed significant potential as a renewable feedstock for the production of bioethanol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proceedings of the 2nd international workshop on Socially-aware multimedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); M. Copper; D.A. Shamma (David); D. Williams

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIt is our pleasure to welcome you to the 2nd International Workshop on Socially-Aware Multimedia (SAM13), which is held in conjunction with the International ACM Multimedia Conference 2013. The workshop provides, for second consecutive year, an opportunity to explore sociallyaware multi

  10. Proceedings of the 2nd international workshop on Socially-aware multimedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Copper, M.; Shamma, D.A.; Williams, D.

    2013-01-01

    It is our pleasure to welcome you to the 2nd International Workshop on Socially-Aware Multimedia (SAM13), which is held in conjunction with the International ACM Multimedia Conference 2013. The workshop provides, for second consecutive year, an opportunity to explore sociallyaware multimedia, in wh

  11. Methods for the Determination of Chemical Substances in Marine and Estuarine Environmental Matrices - 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    This NERL-Cincinnati publication, “Methods for the Determination of Chemical Substances in Marine and Estuarine Environmental Matrices - 2nd Edition” was prepared as the continuation of an initiative to gather together under a single cover a compendium of standardized laborato...

  12. The Effect of Using Computer Edutainment on Developing 2nd Primary Graders' Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Abdel Raheem, Azza Ashraf

    2011-01-01

    The present study attempted to examine the effect of using computer edutainment on developing 2nd graders' writing skills. The study comprised thirty-second year primary stage enrolled in Bani Hamad primary governmental school, Minia governorate. The study adopted the quasi-experimental design. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to one…

  13. 2nd International Conference on Emerging Trends in Electrical, Communication and Information Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Amit; Sankar, V; Rao, N; Sarma, T

    2017-01-01

    This book includes the original, peer-reviewed research from the 2nd International Conference on Emerging Trends in Electrical, Communication and Information Technologies (ICECIT 2015), held in December, 2015 at Srinivasa Ramanujan Institute of Technology, Ananthapuramu, Andhra Pradesh, India. It covers the latest research trends or developments in areas of Electrical Engineering, Electronic and Communication Engineering, and Computer Science and Information.

  14. Proceedings of the 2nd symposium on valves for coal conversion and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxfield, D.A. (ed.)

    1981-01-01

    The 2nd symposium on valves for coal conversion and utilization was held October 15 to 17, 1980. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, in cooperation with the Valve Manufacturers Association. Seventeen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  15. Introduction-2nd Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: The fire environment-innovations, management, and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Cook; Bret W. Butler

    2007-01-01

    The 2nd Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: Fire Environment -- Innovations, Management and Policy was held in Destin, FL, March 26-30, 2007. Following on the success of the 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference, this conference was initiated in response to the needs of the National Wildfire Coordinating Group -- Fire Environment Working Team.

  16. EDITORIAL Re-fighting the 2nd Anglo-Boer War: historians in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some one hundred years ago, South Africa was tom apart by the 2nd Anglo-. Boer War (1899-1902). ... African participation ratio, together with the unjustness of the war in the eyes of most. Afrikaners ... Scientia Militaria - 30( 1) 2000 iii.

  17. Technical Adequacy of the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale-2nd Edition--Self-Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erford, Bradley T.; Miller, Emily M.; Isbister, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This study provides preliminary analysis of the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale-2nd Edition--Self-Report, which was designed to screen individuals aged 10 years and older for anxiety and behavior symptoms. Score reliability and internal and external facets of validity were good for a screening-level test.

  18. 2nd International Congress on Economics and Business – New Economic Trends and Business Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    ARIK, Nazlı

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In this study, the evaluation of The 2nd International Congress On Economics And Business: New Economic Trends and Business Opportunities held on May 30- June 3, 2016 in Sarajevo will be mentioned.Keywords. Economics, Economic Trends, Business Opportunities,  Labour Relations, Financial economics.JEL. M10, M20, O10.

  19. Methods for the Determination of Chemical Substances in Marine and Estuarine Environmental Matrices - 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    This NERL-Cincinnati publication, “Methods for the Determination of Chemical Substances in Marine and Estuarine Environmental Matrices - 2nd Edition” was prepared as the continuation of an initiative to gather together under a single cover a compendium of standardized laborato...

  20. Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology-Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, Adam; Pammer, Viktoria; Pannese, Lucia; Prilla, Michael; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Ullman, Thomas; Voigt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Moore, A., Pammer, V., Pannese, L., Prilla, M., Rajagopal, K., Reinhardt, W., Ullman, Th. D., & Voigt, Ch. (Eds.) (2012). Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology Enhanced Learning. In conjunction with the 7th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning: 21st

  1. Integrated bioethanol and biomanure production from potato waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintagunta, Anjani Devi; Jacob, Samuel; Banerjee, Rintu

    2016-03-01

    Disposal of potato processing waste and the problem of pollution associated with it is a vital issue that is being faced by the potato processing plants. The conventional peeling methods presently followed in the processing plants for removing the potato peel, also result in the loss of some portion of the mash which is rich in starch. Indiscriminate discharge of the waste causes detrimental effects in the environment, so this problem can be resolved by successful utilization of the waste for the generation of value added products. Hence, the present work focuses on integrated production of bioethanol and biomanure to utilize the waste completely leading to zero waste generation. The first part of the work describes a comparative study of ethanol production from potato peel and mash wastes by employing co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae at various incubation time (24-120 h) instead of application of enzymes. The solid state fermentation of potato peel and mash inoculated with co-culture, resulted in bioethanol production of 6.18% (v/v) and 9.30% (v/v) respectively. In the second part of the work, the residue obtained after ethanol production was inoculated with seven different microorganisms (Nostoc muscorum, Fischerella muscicola, Anabaena variabilis, Aulosira fertilissima, Cylindrospermum muscicola, Azospirillium lipoferum, Azotobacter chroococcum) and mixture of all the organisms in equal ratio for nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) enrichment. Among them, A. variabilis was found to enrich N, P and K content of the residue by nearly 7.66, 21.66 and 15 fold than that of the initial content, ultimately leading to improved N:P:K ratio of approximately 2:1:1. The application of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for the conversion of potato waste to ethanol and enrichment of residue obtained after ethanol production with microorganisms to be used as manure envisages environmental sustainability.

  2. Bioethanol from biomass containing lignocellulose - potential and technologies; Bioethanol aus lignocellulosehaltiger Biomasse - Potenziale und Technologien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulstich, M.; Schieder, D.; Wagner, U.; Staudenbauer, W.; Igelspacher, R.; Schwarz, W.H.; Meyer-Pittroff, R.; Antoni, D. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Prechtl, S. [ATZ Entwicklungszentrum, Sulzbach-Rosenberg (Germany); Bauer, W.P.; Kroner, T. [ia GmbH, Wissensmanagement und Ingenieurleistungen, Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The EU biofuels directive and the tax exemption of biogenic fuels have established a new market for bioethanol in the transport sector. Low-cost lignocellulose biomass (LCB) may be an option for broadening the raw materials base for bioethanol production and to meet the increasing demand for biogenic fuels. Appropriate conversion technologies have been the subject of much research worldwide during the past few years. Against this background, the Bavarian State Minister of Agriculture and Forestry initiated a feasibility study on ethanol production by bioconversion in Bavaria. (orig.)

  3. Current progress in high cell density yeast bioprocesses for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Johan O; Franzén, Carl Johan

    2015-08-01

    High capital costs and low reaction rates are major challenges for establishment of fermentation-based production systems in the bioeconomy. Using high cell density cultures is an efficient way to increase the volumetric productivity of fermentation processes, thereby enabling faster and more robust processes and use of smaller reactors. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of high cell density yeast bioprocesses for first and second generation bioethanol production. High biomass concentrations obtained by retention of yeast cells in the reactor enables easier cell reuse, simplified product recovery and higher dilution rates in continuous processes. High local cell density cultures, in the form of encapsulated or strongly flocculating yeast, furthermore obtain increased tolerance to convertible fermentation inhibitors and utilize glucose and other sugars simultaneously, thereby overcoming two additional hurdles for second generation bioethanol production. These effects are caused by local concentration gradients due to diffusion limitations and conversion of inhibitors and sugars by the cells, which lead to low local concentrations of inhibitors and glucose. Quorum sensing may also contribute to the increased stress tolerance. Recent developments indicate that high cell density methodology, with emphasis on high local cell density, offers significant advantages for sustainable second generation bioethanol production.

  4. Feature interpretability and the positions of 2nd person possessives in Brazilian Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Karla Pereira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Interpretability and valuation of φ-features (Chomsky, 2001; Pesetsky and Torrego, 2007 have played a central role in the investigation of language universals. With regard to that, in standard Brazilian Portuguese (BP, as well as in other Romance languages, possessives have uninterpretable number features, which are valued via nominal agreement. However, dialects of BP, especially the one spoken in Minas Gerais, have shown that 2nd person possessives, in postnominal position, do not have number agreement with the noun. In order to account for these facts, I will argue that, in this grammar, number features on 2nd person possessives are reanalyzed as being: (i associated with the person (rather than the noun and (ii interpretable. From the first postulation, ‘seu’ is expected to be the possessive for 2nd person singular, and ‘seus’ for 2nd person plural. From the second postulation, no number concord is expected to be triggered on the possessive. In addition, based on Danon (2011 and Norris (2014, I will argue that cardinals divide BP DPs into two domains in that phrases located above NumP are marked with the plural morpheme, while phrases below it are unmarked. In this sense, because prenominal possessives precede cardinals (NumP, they must be marked with the plural morpheme for nominal agreement; whereas postnominal possessives, which follow NumP, must be unmarked. Free from the plural marking associated with nominal agreement, postnominal 2nd person possessives favor the reanalysis of the morpheme ‘-s’ as indicating the number associated with person features.

  5. Thermotolerant Yeasts for Bioethanol Production Using Lignocellulosic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Chand; Rao, L. Venkateswar

    No other sustainable option for production of transportation fuels can match ethanol made from lignocellulosic biomass with respect to its dramatic environmental, economic, strategic and infrastructure advantages. Substantial progress has been made in advancing biomass ethanol (bioethanol) production technology to the point that it now has commercial potential, and several firms are engaged in the demanding task of introducing first-of-a-kind technology into the marketplace to make bioethanol a reality in existing fuel-blending markets. In order to lower pollution India has a long-term goal to use biofuels (bioethanol and biodiesel). Ethanol may be used either in pure form, or as a blend in petrol in different proportions. Since the cost of raw materials, which can account up to 50 % of the total production cost, is one of the most significant factors affecting the economy of alcohol, nowadays efforts are more concentrated on using cheap and abundant raw materials. Several forms of biomass resources exist (starch or sugar crops, weeds, oil plants, agricultural, forestry and municipal wastes) but of all biomass cellulosic resources represent the most abundant global source. The lignocellulosic materials include agricultural residues, municipal solid wastes (MSW), pulp mill refuse, switchgrass and lawn, garden wastes. Lignocellulosic materials contain two types of polysaccharides, cellulose and hemicellulose, bound together by a third component lignin. The principal elements of the lignocellulosic research include: i) evaluation and characterization of the waste feedstock; ii) pretreatment including initial clean up or dewatering of the feedstock; and iii) development of effective direct conversion bioprocessing to generate ethanol as an end product. Pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials is a step in which some of the hemicellulose dissolves in water, either as monomeric sugars or as oligomers and polymers. The cellulose cannot be enzymatically hydrolyzed to

  6. Development of a novel sequential pretreatment strategy for the production of bioethanol from sugarcane trash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavi, Subbiah; Sindhu, Raveendran; Binod, Parameswaran; Gnansounou, Edgard; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    A novel sequential pretreatment strategy using biodiesel industry generated waste glycerol assisted transition metal and alkali pretreatment of sugarcane trash were developed for the production of bioethanol. Various process parameters affecting pretreatment as well as hydrolysis were optimized by adopting a Taguchi design. This novel method was found to be superior when compared to conventional pretreatment strategies like acid and alkali in removing hemicelluloses and lignin and the hydrolyzate is devoid of major fermentation inhibitors like organic acids and furfurals. Physico-chemical changes of the native and the pretreated biomass were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. Under optimized hydrolysis conditions 0.796 g of reducing sugar (pentoses and hexoses) per g of dry biomass after saccharification was produced. Fermentation of the non-detoxified hydrolyzate using Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced 31.928 g of bioethanol per g of dry biomass with an efficiency of 78.89%.

  7. Two stage bioethanol refining with multi litre stacked microbial fuel cell and microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugnaux, Marc; Happe, Manuel; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Gloriod, Olivier; Huguenin, Gérald; Blatter, Maxime; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-12-01

    Ethanol, electricity, hydrogen and methane were produced in a two stage bioethanol refinery setup based on a 10L microbial fuel cell (MFC) and a 33L microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The MFC was a triple stack for ethanol and electricity co-generation. The stack configuration produced more ethanol with faster glucose consumption the higher the stack potential. Under electrolytic conditions ethanol productivity outperformed standard conditions and reached 96.3% of the theoretically best case. At lower external loads currents and working potentials oscillated in a self-synchronized manner over all three MFC units in the stack. In the second refining stage, fermentation waste was converted into methane, using the scale up MEC stack. The bioelectric methanisation reached 91% efficiency at room temperature with an applied voltage of 1.5V using nickel cathodes. The two stage bioethanol refining process employing bioelectrochemical reactors produces more energy vectors than is possible with today's ethanol distilleries.

  8. Assessment of holocellulose for the production of bioethanol by conserving Pinus radiata cones as renewable feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Amudhavalli; Pulidindi, Indra Neel; Gedanken, Aharon

    2015-10-01

    Renewable and green energy sources are much sought. Bioethanol is an environmentally friendly transportation fuel. Pine cones from Pinus radiata were shown to be a potential feedstock for the production of bioethanol. Alkaline (NaOH) pretreatment was carried out to delignify the lignocellulosic material and generate holocellulose (72 wt. % yield). The pretreated biomass was hydrolysed using HCl as catalyst under microwave irradiation and hydrothermal conditions. Microwave irradiation was found to be better than the hydrothermal process. Microwave irradiation accelerated the hydrolysis of biomass (42 wt. % conversion) with the reaction conditions being 3 M HCl and 5 min of irradiation time. Interestingly, even the xylose, which is the major component of the hydrolyzate was found to be metabolized to ethanol using Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) under the experimental conditions. 5.7 g of ethanol could be produced from 100 g of raw pine cones.

  9. Utilisation of 2nd generation web technologies in master level vocational teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Tóth

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Masters level Opportunities and Technological Innovation in Vocational Teacher Education project (project site: http://motivate.tmpk.bmf.hu/ aims to develop the use and management of virtual learning environments in the area of vocational teacher training, drawing on a well established international partnership of institutions providing both technical and educational expertise. This paper gives an overall picture of the first results and products of the collaboration. We touch upon the goals, the assessments and the learning process of using “Multimedia and e-Learning: e-learning methods and tools” module in details. The main cooperative and collaborative devices are presented in virtual learning environment. The communication during collaborative learning, the structured debate on forum and the benefits of collaborative learning in VLE are interpreted at the end of this paper.

  10. Biomass pyrolysis as an alternative process for the production of 2nd generation biofuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogdenko, Nadezda

    2010-01-01

    Bio-fuel production from renewable energy sources is the topic that have been studied by scientists and discussed in a political agenda for a couple of decades. In this period of time, however, it was discovered that approaches and technologies used until

  11. Validation of the 2nd Generation Proteasome Inhibitor Oprozomib for Local Therapy of Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Semren

    Full Text Available Proteasome inhibition has been shown to prevent development of fibrosis in several organs including the lung. However, effects of proteasome inhibitors on lung fibrosis are controversial and cytotoxic side effects of the overall inhibition of proteasomal protein degradation cannot be excluded. Therefore, we hypothesized that local lung-specific application of a novel, selective proteasome inhibitor, oprozomib (OZ, provides antifibrotic effects without systemic toxicity in a mouse model of lung fibrosis. Oprozomib was first tested on the human alveolar epithelial cancer cell line A549 and in primary mouse alveolar epithelial type II cells regarding its cytotoxic effects on alveolar epithelial cells and compared to the FDA approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZ. OZ was less toxic than BZ and provided high selectivity for the chymotrypsin-like active site of the proteasome. In primary mouse lung fibroblasts, OZ showed significant anti-fibrotic effects, i.e. reduction of collagen I and α smooth muscle actin expression, in the absence of cytotoxicity. When applied locally into the lungs of healthy mice via instillation, OZ was well tolerated and effectively reduced proteasome activity in the lungs. In bleomycin challenged mice, however, locally applied OZ resulted in accelerated weight loss and increased mortality of treated mice. Further, OZ failed to reduce fibrosis in these mice. While upon systemic application OZ was well tolerated in healthy mice, it rather augmented instead of attenuated fibrotic remodelling of the lung in bleomycin challenged mice. To conclude, low toxicity and antifibrotic effects of OZ in pulmonary fibroblasts could not be confirmed for pulmonary fibrosis of bleomycin-treated mice. In light of these data, the use of proteasome inhibitors as therapeutic agents for the treatment of fibrotic lung diseases should thus be considered with caution.

  12. Screening for an Allergic Response to 2nd Generation Biofuel Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for March 2014 Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting The use of cellulosic biofuels crops can potentially reduce our carbon footprint. However, they may have unintended ecological and health effects such as increased competitiveness and allergenicity...

  13. BASE--2nd generation software for microarray data management and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallon-Christersson, Johan; Nordborg, Nicklas; Svensson, Martin; Häkkinen, Jari

    2009-10-12

    Microarray experiments are increasing in size and samples are collected asynchronously over long time. Available data are re-analysed as more samples are hybridized. Systematic use of collected data requires tracking of biomaterials, array information, raw data, and assembly of annotations. To meet the information tracking and data analysis challenges in microarray experiments we reimplemented and improved BASE version 1.2. The new BASE presented in this report is a comprehensive annotable local microarray data repository and analysis application providing researchers with an efficient information management and analysis tool. The information management system tracks all material from biosource, via sample and through extraction and labelling to raw data and analysis. All items in BASE can be annotated and the annotations can be used as experimental factors in downstream analysis. BASE stores all microarray experiment related data regardless if analysis tools for specific techniques or data formats are readily available. The BASE team is committed to continue improving and extending BASE to make it usable for even more experimental setups and techniques, and we encourage other groups to target their specific needs leveraging on the infrastructure provided by BASE. BASE is a comprehensive management application for information, data, and analysis of microarray experiments, available as free open source software at http://base.thep.lu.se under the terms of the GPLv3 license.

  14. A 2nd generation static model of greenhouse energy requirements (horticern) : a comparison with dynamic models

    CERN Document Server

    Jolliet, O; Munday, G L

    1989-01-01

    Optimisation of a greenhouse and its components requires a suitable model permitting precise determination of its energy requirements. Existing static models are simple but lack precision; dynamic models though more precise, are unsuitable for use over long periods and difficult to handle in practice. A theoretical study and measurements from the CERN trial greenhouse have allowed the development of new static model named "HORTICERN", precise and easy to use for predicting energy consumption and which takes into account effects of solar energy, wind and radiative loss to the sky. This paper compares the HORTICERN model with the dynamic models of Bot, Takakura, Van Bavel and Gembloux, and demonstrates that its precision is comparable; differences on average being less than 5%, it is independent of type of greenhouse (e.g. single or double glazing, Hortiplus, etc.) and climate. The HORTICERN method has been developed for PC use and is proving to be a powerful tool for greenhouse optimisation by research work...

  15. BASE - 2nd generation software for microarray data management and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordborg Nicklas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray experiments are increasing in size and samples are collected asynchronously over long time. Available data are re-analysed as more samples are hybridized. Systematic use of collected data requires tracking of biomaterials, array information, raw data, and assembly of annotations. To meet the information tracking and data analysis challenges in microarray experiments we reimplemented and improved BASE version 1.2. Results The new BASE presented in this report is a comprehensive annotable local microarray data repository and analysis application providing researchers with an efficient information management and analysis tool. The information management system tracks all material from biosource, via sample and through extraction and labelling to raw data and analysis. All items in BASE can be annotated and the annotations can be used as experimental factors in downstream analysis. BASE stores all microarray experiment related data regardless if analysis tools for specific techniques or data formats are readily available. The BASE team is committed to continue improving and extending BASE to make it usable for even more experimental setups and techniques, and we encourage other groups to target their specific needs leveraging on the infrastructure provided by BASE. Conclusion BASE is a comprehensive management application for information, data, and analysis of microarray experiments, available as free open source software at http://base.thep.lu.se under the terms of the GPLv3 license.

  16. Screening for an Allergic Response to 2nd Generation Biofuel Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for March 2014 Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting The use of cellulosic biofuels crops can potentially reduce our carbon footprint. However, they may have unintended ecological and health effects such as increased competitiveness and allergenicity...

  17. Benchmarking of Modern Data Analysis Tools for a 2nd generation Transient Data Analysis Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    During the past year of operating the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the amount of transient accelerator data to be persisted and analysed has been steadily growing. Since the startup of the LHC in 2006, the amount of weekly data storage requirements exceeded what the systems was initially designed to accommodate in a full year of operation. Moreover, it is predicted that the data acquisition rates will continue to increase in the future, due to foreseen improvements in the infrastructure within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC project. Despite the efforts for improving and optimizing the current data storage infrastructures (CERN Accelerator Logging Service and Post Mortem database), some limitations still persist and require a different approach to scale up efficiently to provide efficient services for future machine upgrades. This project aims to explore one of the possibilities among novel solutions proposed to solve the problem of working with large datasets. The configuration is composed of Spark for ...

  18. Potential of bioethanol as a chemical building block for biorefineries: Preliminary sustainability assessment of 12 bioethanol-based products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posada Duque, J.A.; Patel, A.D.; Roes, A.L.; Blok, K.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Patel, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present and apply a quick screening method and to identify the most promising bioethanol derivatives using an early-stage sustainability assessment method that compares a bioethanol-based conversion route to its respective petrochemical counterpart. The method combines, b

  19. Potential of bioethanol as a chemical building block for biorefineries: Preliminary sustainability assessment of 12 bioethanol-based products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posada Duque, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337615993; Patel, A.D.; Roes, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303022388; Blok, K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07170275X; Faaij, A.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10685903X; Patel, M.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/18988097X

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present and apply a quick screening method and to identify the most promising bioethanol derivatives using an early-stage sustainability assessment method that compares a bioethanol-based conversion route to its respective petrochemical counterpart. The method combines,

  20. A review of conversion processes for bioethanol production with a focus on syngas fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatha Devarapalli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol production from corn is a well-established technology. However, emphasis on exploring non-food based feedstocks is intensified due to dispute over utilization of food based feedstocks to generate bioethanol. Chemical and biological conversion technologies for non-food based biomass feedstocks to biofuels have been developed. First generation bioethanol was produced from sugar based feedstocks such as corn and sugar cane. Availability of alternative feedstocks such as lignocellulosic and algal biomass and technology advancement led to the development of complex biological conversion processes, such as separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF, consolidated bioprocessing (CBP, and syngas fermentation. SHF, SSF, SSCF, and CBP are direct fermentation processes in which biomass feedstocks are pretreated, hydrolyzed and then fermented into ethanol. Conversely, ethanol from syngas fermentation is an indirect fermentation that utilizes gaseous substrates (mixture of CO, CO2 and H2 made from industrial flue gases or gasification of biomass, coal or municipal solid waste. This review article provides an overview of the various biological processes for ethanol production from sugar, lignocellulosic, and algal biomass. This paper also provides a detailed insight on process development, bioreactor design, and advances and future directions in syngas fermentation.

  1. Life cycle assessment and life cycle costing of bioethanol from sugarcane in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Lin; Van der Voet, Ester; Huppes, Gjalt [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2009-08-15

    Brazil has always been the pioneer in the application of bioethanol as a main fuel for automobiles, hence environmental and economic analyses of the Brazilian ethanol industries are of crucial importance. This study presents a comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) on gasoline and ethanol as fuels, and with two types of blends of gasoline with bioethanol, all used in a midsize car. The focus is on a main application in Brazil, sugarcane based ethanol. The results of two cases are presented: base case - bioethanol production from sugarcane and electricity generation from bagasse; future case - bioethanol production from both sugarcane and bagasse and electricity generation from wastes. In both cases sugar is co-produced. The life cycles of fuels include gasoline production, agricultural production of sugarcane, ethanol production, sugar and electricity co-production, blending ethanol with gasoline to produce E10 (10% of ethanol) and E85 (85%), and finally the use of gasoline, E10, E85 and pure ethanol. Furthermore, a life cycle costing (LCC) was conducted to give an indication on fuel economy in both cases. The results show that in the base case less GHG is emitted; while the overall evaluation of these fuel options depends on the importance attached to different impacts. The future case is certainly more economically attractive, which has been the driving force for development in the ethanol industry in Brazil. Nevertheless, the outcomes depend very much on the assumed price for crude oil. In LCC a steady-state cost model was used and only the production cost was taken into account. In the real market the prices of fuels are very much dependent on the taxes and subsidies. Technological development can help in lowering both the environmental impact and the prices of the ethanol fuels. (author)

  2. 2nd-Order CESE Results For C1.4: Vortex Transport by Uniform Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The Conservation Element and Solution Element (CESE) method was used as implemented in the NASA research code ez4d. The CESE method is a time accurate formulation with flux-conservation in both space and time. The method treats the discretized derivatives of space and time identically and while the 2nd-order accurate version was used, high-order versions exist, the 2nd-order accurate version was used. In regards to the ez4d code, it is an unstructured Navier-Stokes solver coded in C++ with serial and parallel versions available. As part of its architecture, ez4d has the capability to utilize multi-thread and Messaging Passage Interface (MPI) for parallel runs.

  3. Mapping and industrial IT project to a 2nd semester design-build project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Mads; Høgh, Stig

    2010-01-01

    CDIO means bringing the engineer's daily life and working practice into the educational system. In our opinion this is best done by selecting an appropriate project from industry. In this paper we describe how we have mapped an industrial IT project to a 2nd semester design-build project...... for decades has included many of the essential features of the CDIO (for example, focus on teamwork, development of social skills, the open nature of design problems). The specific project has previously been conducted on 5th Semester The project has now been brought forward to the 2nd semester of study...... in the Diploma IT program at the Technical University of Denmark. The system in question is a weighing system operating in a LAN environment. The system is used in the medical industry for producing tablets. We present the design of a curriculum to support the development of major components of the weighing...

  4. [Providing Internet-based information services at the 2nd Medical School of Charles University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejvalka, J; Ulrych, O; Vorísek, M; Mrázek, J

    1998-01-01

    Development of the internet network at the 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University from one of the first nodes of Prague Academic Network up to a complicated infrastructure with many client computers is accompanied with a corresponding development of information services available in this network. For today's users, infrastructure of the network is hidden behind the services whose technical details are not significant. The paper deals with history, current state and possible perspectives of information services (both basic as e-mail, WWW and more advanced like specialized database server, proxy, etc.) available to users at the 2nd Faculty of Medicine--taking into account the development of information technologies, networking infrastructure and the possibilities and limitations of co-operation between the faculty and its teaching hospital.

  5. Heavy vehicle simulator operations: protocol for instrumentation, data collection and data storage - 2nd draft

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jones, DJ

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available : • Site selection and establishment • Instrumentation and calibration • HVS operations and maintenance • Data collection • Post trafficking investigations • Data analysis, data storage and documentation These activities, except machine operation... and the tyre pressures of the wheels are also constantly monitored. Details on the equipment, installation and calibration are provided in Appendix A. TR-2002/22: Protocol for HVS operations - 2nd Draft 4 2. MANAGEMENT...

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis for the 2nd Quarter FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of events for the 2nd Qtr FY-15.

  7. [Complications of multiple pregnancy in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poniedziałek-Czajkowska, E; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, B; Oleszczuk, J

    2000-11-01

    Multiple pregnancy contributes to higher maternal and fetal risks than a single one. Complications typical only for multiple pregnancy such as PROM with preterm delivery, intrauterine death or IUGR of one of twins can occur during 2nd and 3rd trimester. Treatment in such situations is usually difficult and often controversial because of simultaneous presence of an alive and/or healthy fetus and possible risk for mother. The paper presents such situations and possible ways of treatment.

  8. A Communications Guide for Sustainable Development: How Interested Parties Become Partners, 2nd Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Hund, Gretchen; Engel-Cox, Jill A.

    2016-03-06

    The 2nd edition is an updated version plus an e-book. This book was developed to assist organizations in designing and managing their communication and stakeholder involvement programs. The guidebook describes a step-by-step approach, provides case studies, and presents tools to consider. The book uses a scenario approach to outline changes an organization may confront, and provides a menu of communication and engagement activities that support organizational decision making.

  9. Group field theory as the 2nd quantization of Loop Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Oriti, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    We construct a 2nd quantized reformulation of canonical Loop Quantum Gravity at both kinematical and dynamical level, in terms of a Fock space of spin networks, and show in full generality that it leads directly to the Group Field Theory formalism. In particular, we show the correspondence between canonical LQG dynamics and GFT dynamics leading to a specific GFT model from any definition of quantum canonical dynamics of spin networks. We exemplify the correspondence of dynamics in the specifi...

  10. 2nd International Conference on Mechanical, Manufacturing and Process Plant Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents selected papers from the 2nd International Conference on Mechanical, Manufacturing and Process Plant Engineering (ICMMPE 2016) which was held from 23rd to 24th November, 2016 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The proceedings discuss genuine problems of joining technologies that are heart of manufacturing sectors. It discusses the findings of experimental and numerical works from soldering, arc welding to solid state joining technology that faced by current industry. .

  11. 2nd Plenum of First Council of China-EU Association Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>On December 15, 2003 the China-EU Association (CEUA) convened its 2nd Plenum ofthe 1st Council. At the meeting the secretary general of the Council gave a report, summing up the work in the past two years since its establishment and the plan for 2004.Since its establishment in November 2001, the CEUA has carried out many significant activities and done a great deal of work in promoting

  12. Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology-Enhanced Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Adam; Pammer, Viktoria; Pannese, Lucia; Prilla, Michael; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Ullman, Thomas; Voigt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Moore, A., Pammer, V., Pannese, L., Prilla, M., Rajagopal, K., Reinhardt, W., Ullman, Th. D., & Voigt, Ch. (Eds.) (2012). Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology Enhanced Learning. In conjunction with the 7th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning: 21st Century Learning for 21st Century Skills (ARTEL/EC-TEL 2012). September, 18, 2012, Saarbrücken, Germany. Available online at http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-931/.

  13. Standardization and Innovation The 2nd Shenzhen Hi-tech Standardization Forum Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Manxue; Huang Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ "The 2nd Shenzhen Hi-tech Standardization Forum"was fulfilled in Shenzhen Civil Center on November 25th,2005. The forum lasted for two days. There were around 400 delegates from enterprises and standardization organizations participating in this forum. Nine experts from standardization, intellectual property organizations and enterprises made their excellent speeches focusing on the topic "Standardardization and Innovation". All participates agreed that standardization improves innovation efficiently.

  14. Comparison of different pretreatment methods for separation hemicellulose from straw during the lignocellulosic bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhuber, Katharina; Krennhuber, Klaus; Steinmüller, Viktoria; Kahr, Heike; Jäger, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The combustion of fossil fuels is responsible for 73% of carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and consequently contributes to global warming. This fact has enormously increased the interest in the development of methods to reduce greenhouse gases. Therefore, the focus is on the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic agricultural residues. The feedstocks used for 2nd generation bioethanol production are lignocellulosic raw materials like different straw types or energy crops like miscanthus sinensis or arundo donax. Lignocellulose consists of hemicellulose (xylose and arabinose), which is bonded to cellulose (glucose) and lignin. Prior to an enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharides and fermentation of the resulting sugars, the lignocelluloses must be pretreated to make the sugar polymers accessible to enzymes. A variety of pretreatment methods are described in the literature: thermophysical, acid-based and alkaline methods.In this study, we examined and compared the most important pretreatment methods: Steam explosion versus acid and alkaline pretreatment. Specific attention was paid to the mass balance, the recovery of C 5 sugars and consumption of chemicals needed for pretreatment. In lab scale experiments, wheat straw was either directly pretreated by steam explosion or by two different protocols. The straw was either soaked in sulfuric acid or in sodium hydroxide solution at different concentrations. For both methods, wheat straw was pretreated at 100°C for 30 minutes. Afterwards, the remaining straw was separated by vacuum filtration from the liquid fraction.The pretreated straw was neutralized, dried and enzymatically hydrolyzed. Finally, the sugar concentrations (glucose, xylose and arabinose) from filtrate and from hydrolysate were determined by HPLC. The recovery of xylose from hemicellulose was about 50% using the sulfuric acid pretreatment and less than 2% using the sodium hydroxide pretreatment. Increasing concentrations of sulfuric acid

  15. Spelling performance of 2nd to 5th grade students from public school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capellini, Simone Aparecida; Amaral, Amanda Corrêa do; Oliveira, Andrea Batista; Sampaio, Maria Nobre; Fusco, Natália; Cervera-Mérida, José Francisco; Ygual-Fernández, Amparo

    2011-09-01

    To characterize, compare and classify the performance of 2nd to 5th grade students from public schools according to the semiology of spelling errors. Participants were 120 students from 2nd to 5th grades of a public school in Marília (SP), Brazil, 30 students from each grade, who were divided into four groups: GI (2nd grade), GII (3rd grade), GIII (4th grade), and GIV (5th grade). The tasks of the Pro-Ortografia test were applied: collective version (writing of alphabet letters, randomized dictation of letters, words dictation, nonwords dictation, dictation with pictures, thematic writing induced by picture) and individual version (dictation of sentences, purposeful error, spelled dictation, orthographic lexical memory). Significant difference was found in the between-group comparison indicating better performance of students in every subsequent grade in most of the individual and collective version tasks. With the increase of grade level, the groups decreased the average of writing errors. The profile of spelling acquisition of the Portuguese writing system found in these public school students indicates normal writing development in this population.

  16. The bio-ethanol production with the thin stillage recirculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rakin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the bioethanol production with the thin stillage recirculation in mashing was investigated. The mashing was performed with recirculation of: 0, 10, 20 and 30 % of the thin stillage. The thin stillage recirculation was repeated six times. In the experiment without the thin stillage, the recirculation bioethanol yield (compared to the theoretical yield was 97.96 %, which implicates that the experiment conditions were chosen and performed well. With the addition of the thin stillage, the bioethanol yield increased and was above 100 %. Higher bioethanol yield than 100 % can be explained by the fact that the thin stillage contains carbohydrates, amino acids and yeast cells degradation products. The bioethanol yield increased with the increased number of thin stillage recirculation cycles. Dry matter content in fermenting slurry increased with the increased thin stillage quantity and the number of the thin stillage recirculation cycles (8.04 % for the first and 9.40 % for the sixth cycle. Dry matter content in thin stillage increased with the increased thin stillage quantity and the number of thin stillage recirculation cycles. Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that thin stillage recirculation increased the bioethanol yield. The highest bioethanol yields were obtained with recirculation of 10% thin stillage.

  17. Utilizing thermophilic microbe in lignocelluloses based bioethanol production: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriharti, Agustina, Wawan; Ratnawati, Lia; Rahman, Taufik; Salim, Takiyah

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of thermophilic microbe has attracted many parties, particularly in producing an alternative fuel like ethanol. Bioethanol is one of the alternative energy sources substituting for earth oil in the future. The advantage of using bioethanol is that it can reduce pollution levels and global warming because the result of bioethanol burning doesn't bring in a net addition of CO2 into environment. Moreover, decrease in the reserves of earth oil globally has also contributed to the notion on searching renewable energy resources such as bioethanol. Indonesia has a high biomass potential and can be used as raw material for bioethanol. The utilization of these raw materials will reduce fears of competition foodstuffs for energy production. The enzymes that play a role in degrading lignocelluloses are cellulolytic, hemicellulolytic, and lignolytic in nature. The main enzyme with an important role in bioethanol production is a complex enzyme capable of degrading lignocelluloses. The enzyme can be produced by the thermophilik microbes of the groups of bacteria and fungi such as Trichoderma viride, Clostridium thermocellum, Bacillus sp. Bioethanol production is heavily affected by raw material composition, microorganism type, and the condition of fermentation used.

  18. Comparison of different process strategies for bioethanol production from Eucheuma cottonii: An economic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Inn Shi; Lee, Keat Teong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of red macroalgae Eucheuma cottonii (EC) as feedstock for third-generation bioethanol production. Dowex (TM) Dr-G8 was explored as a potential solid catalyst to hydrolyzed carbohydrates from EC or macroalgae extract (ME) and pretreatment of macroalgae cellulosic residue (MCR), to fermentable sugars prior to fermentation process. The highest total sugars were produced at 98.7 g/L when 16% of the ME was treated under the optimum conditions of solid acid hydrolysis (8% (w/v) Dowex (TM) Dr-G8, 120°C, 1h) and 2% pretreated MCR (P-MCR) treated by enzymatic hydrolysis (pH 4.8, 50°C, 30 h). A two-stream process resulted in 11.6g/L of bioethanol from the fermentation of ME hydrolysates and 11.7 g/L from prehydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of P-MCR. The fixed price of bioethanol obtained from the EC is competitive with that obtained from other feedstocks.

  19. Optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation conditions for improved bioethanol production from potato peel residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Taher, Imen; Fickers, Patrick; Chniti, Sofien; Hassouna, Mnasser

    2016-12-20

    The aim of this work was the optimization of the enzyme hydrolysis of potato peel residues (PPR) for bioethanol production. The process included a pretreatment step followed by an enzyme hydrolysis using crude enzyme system composed of cellulase, amylase and hemicellulase, produced by a mixed culture of Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma reesei. Hydrothermal, alkali and acid pretreatments were considered with regards to the enhancement of enzyme hydrolysis of potato peel residues. The obtained results showed that hydrothermal pretreatment lead to a higher enzyme hydrolysis yield compared to both acid and alkali pretreatments. Enzyme hydrolysis was also optimized for parameters such as temperature, pH, substrate loading and surfactant loading using a response surface methodology. Under optimized conditions, 77 g L(-1) of reducing sugars were obtained. Yeast fermentation of the released reducing sugars led to an ethanol titer of 30 g L(-1) after supplementation of the culture medium with ammonium sulfate. Moreover, a comparative study between acid and enzyme hydrolysis of potato peel residues was investigated. Results showed that enzyme hydrolysis offers higher yield of bioethanol production than acid hydrolysis. These results highlight the potential of second generation bioethanol production from potato peel residues treated with onsite produced hydrolytic enzymes. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2016.

  20. Recycle bioreactor for bioethanol production from wheat starch. 2. Fermentation and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, X.; Hill, G.A.; MacDonald, D.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    Bioethanol has been produced using sugars from cold hydrolysis of pure wheat starch, sterile wheat flour, and unsterile wheat flour. The conversion of sugars to ethanol from pure starch reached 96% of the theoretical maximum while that from sterile wheat flour was 69% and from unsterile wheat flour only 35%. These data indicate that sequential hydrolysis and fermentation of wheat flour is not feasible. However, the simultaneous cold hydrolysis and fermentation of both wheat starch and wheat flour proved successful. Both sugar sources produced 95% of the theoretical maximum amount of ethanol. The process could be repeated in a sequential batch fashion for over 110 h of operation, achieving high ethanol yields in each run. A scale-up design of bioethanol production using sequential batch, simultaneous cold starch hydrolysis, and fermentation indicates that this process would be economically feasible. High levels of revenue are generated from both the bioethanol and the byproduct: food-grade wheat gluten. The payback period is predicted to be < 2 years with a discounted cash flow rate of return of 46%. (author)

  1. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshoma, Cyprian E; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J; Smart, Katherine A; Phister, Trevor G; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid.

  2. [Prevalence and causes of pain after cataract surgery: Comparison of 1st and 2nd eyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayadine-Harricham, Y; Amzallag, T

    2017-06-01

    In our practice, patients undergoing bilateral cataract surgery complain of more significant pain after the 2nd eye surgery. The goal of this study was to compare postoperative pain between the 1st and 2nd eyes with cataract surgery under topical anesthesia and to identify the causes of this pain. We conducted a prospective observational study between May and September 2015. We included 69 consecutive adults scheduled for bilateral cataract surgery under topical anesthesia within 2 months by the same surgeon. A self-assessment questionnaire of anxiety (the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale [APAIS]) was completed before each procedure. Postoperative pain was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS) in the recovery room. Among the 69 included patients (mean age: 70±1.3 years), 13 (19%) experienced more pain after the 2nd eye procedure. The median VAS was 0 (EI: 0-1) after the first eye versus 0 (EI: 0-2) after the second eye (P=0.836). The patients with the most pain after the second eye surgery had a median anxiety score of 5 (EI: 4 to 9.5), which was comparable to those without pain (P=0.589). On bivariate analysis, women had more pain after second eye surgery (27%) than men (4%) (P=0.026). However, this association lost its significance when the analysis was adjusted for the level of anxiety (adjusted OR 7.7, 95% CI [0.91; 64.6]). In fact, women were more anxious [median anxiety score of 6 (EI: 4 to 8.5)] before 2nd eye surgery than men [median score: 4 (EI: 4-6); P=0.013]. Pain levels appeared to be very moderate on both sides when measured postoperatively, as opposed to statements often made in the immediate postoperative period. There is a discrepancy with the literature data. However, each study had small sample sizes. We did not find any significant difference in pain between 1st and 2nd eye cataract surgery under topical local anesthesia. While postoperative pain appeared greater among women, we have noted the possible influence of

  3. Bioethanol Production By Utilizing Cassava Peels Waste Through Enzymatic And Microbiological Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witantri, R. G.; Purwoko, T.; Sunarto; Mahajoeno, E.

    2017-07-01

    Cassava peels waste contains, cellulose which is quite high at 43.626%, this is a potential candidate as a raw for bioethanol production. The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of the enzymatic hydrolysis, microbiological (Effective microbe) and fermentation in cassava peel waste is known from the results of quantitative measurement of multiple ethanol parameters (DNS Test, pH, ethanol concentration). This research was carried out in stages, the first stage is hydrolysis with completely randomized design with single factor variation of the catalyst, consisting of three levels ie cellulase enzymes, multienzyme and effective microbial EM4. The second stage is fermentation with factorial randomized block design, consisting of three groups of variations of catalyst, and has two factors: variations of fermipan levels 1, 2, 3% and the duration of fermentation, 2,4,6 days. The parameters in the test is a reducing sugar, pH and concentration of ethanol. The results showed that variation of hydrolysis treatment, fermentation time, and fermipan levels has real effect on the fermentation process. On average the highest ethanol content obtained from the treatment with multienzyme addition, with the addition of 2% fermipan levels and on the 2nd day of fermentation that is equal to 3.76%.

  4. Kappaphycus alvarezii as a source of bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambhaty, Yasmin; Mody, Kalpana; Gandhi, Mahesh R; Thampy, Sreekumaran; Maiti, Pratyush; Brahmbhatt, Harshad; Eswaran, Karuppanan; Ghosh, Pushpito K

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes production of bio-ethanol from fresh red alga, Kappaphycus alvarezii. It was crushed to expel sap--a biofertilizer--while residual biomass was saccharified at 100 °C in 0.9 N H2SO4. The hydrolysate was repeatedly treated with additional granules to achieve desired reducing sugar concentration. The best yields for saccharification, inclusive of sugar loss in residue, were 26.2% and 30.6% (w/w) at laboratory (250 g) and bench (16 kg) scales, respectively. The hydrolysate was neutralized with lime and the filtrate was desalted by electrodialysis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NCIM 3523) was used for ethanol production from this non-traditional bio-resource. Fermentation at laboratory and bench scales converted ca. 80% of reducing sugar into ethanol in near quantitative selectivity. A petrol vehicle was successfully run with E10 gasoline made from the seaweed-based ethanol. Co-production of ethanol and bio-fertilizer from this seaweed may emerge as a promising alternative to land-based bio-ethanol.

  5. Optimization of bioethanol production from carbohydrate rich wastes by extreme thermophilic microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomas, A.F.

    2013-05-15

    Second-generation bioethanol is produced from residual biomass such as industrial and municipal waste or agricultural and forestry residues. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the microorganism currently used in industrial first-generation bioethanol production, is not capable of converting all of the carbohydrates present in these complex substrates into ethanol. This is in particular true for pentose sugars such as xylose, generally the second major sugar present in lignocellulosic biomass. The transition of second-generation bioethanol production from pilot to industrial scale is hindered by the recalcitrance of the lignocellulosic biomass, and by the lack of a microorganism capable of converting this feedstock to bioethanol with high yield, efficiency and productivity. In this study, a new extreme thermophilic ethanologenic bacterium was isolated from household waste. When assessed for ethanol production from xylose, an ethanol yield of 1.39 mol mol-1 xylose was obtained. This represents 83 % of the theoretical ethanol yield from xylose and is to date the highest reported value for a native, not genetically modified microorganism. The bacterium was identified as a new member of the genus Thermoanaerobacter, named Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus and was subsequently used to investigate some of the factors that influence secondgeneration bioethanol production, such as initial substrate concentration and sensitivity to inhibitors. Furthermore, T. pentosaceus was used to develop and optimize bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass using a range of different approaches, including combination with other microorganisms and immobilization of the cells. T. pentosaceus could produce ethanol from a wide range of substrates without the addition of nutrients such as yeast extract and vitamins to the medium. It was initially sensitive to concentrations of 10 g l-1 of xylose and 1 % (v/v) ethanol. However, long term repeated batch cultivation showed that the strain

  6. Higher (2nd)-order polarization-Wigner function for `even' entangled bi-modal coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Ravi S; Yadava, Lallan; Gupta, Gyaneshwar K

    2012-01-01

    Higher (2nd)-order Wigner distribution function in quantum phase space for entangled bi-modal coherent states, a representative of higher (2nd)-order optical-polarization, is introduced by generalizing kernel (transiting) operator in Cahill-Glauber C(s)-correspondence rule. The nature is analyzed which reveals the occurrence of oscillating three peaks: 'two' for individual bi-modes and third for interference between modes. Also, the graphics of 2nd-order polarization-Wigner distribution function, incisively, demonstrates that it is of non-Gaussian nature attaining non-negative values in quantum phase space.

  7. Wavelength and oscillator strength of dipole transition 1s22p-1s2nd for Mn22+ ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZhiWen; WANG YaNan; HU MuHong; LI XinRu; LIU Ying

    2008-01-01

    The transition energies, wavelengths and dipole oscillator strengths of 1s22p-1s2nd (3≤n≤9) for Mn22+. ion are calculated. The fine structure splittings of 1s2nd (n ≤9) states for this ion are also evaluated. In calculating energy, the higher-order relativistic contribution is estimated under a hydrogenic approximation. The quantum defect of Rydberg series 1s2nd is determined according to the quantum defect theory. The results obtained in this paper excellently agree with the experi-mental data available in literatures.

  8. Wavelength and oscillator strength of dipole transition 1s22p—1s2nd for Mn22+ ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The transition energies, wavelengths and dipole oscillator strengths of 1s22p-1s2nd (3≤n≤9) for Mn22+ ion are calculated. The fine structure splittings of 1s2nd (n≤9) states for this ion are also evaluated. In calculating energy, the higher-order relativistic contribution is estimated under a hydrogenic approximation. The quantum defect of Rydberg series 1s2nd is determined according to the quantum defect theory. The results obtained in this paper excellently agree with the experi-mental data available in literatures.

  9. Bioethanol production from date palm fruit waste fermentation using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioethanol production from date palm fruit waste fermentation using solar energy. ... African Journal of Biotechnology. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced ... It is eco-friendly, moderately costly and cleaner than other gasses. Actually, due to ...

  10. Bioethanol fuel production from rambutan fruit biomass as reducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper. Bioethanol fuel production from ... in waste disposal management and reducing global warming. The aim of the study of ... When burning gasoline, there are some emissions produced like carbon ...

  11. Biotechnological Strategies to Improve Plant Biomass Quality for Bioethanol Production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2017-01-01

    .... In this review, we analyze the desirable traits of raw plant materials for the bioethanol industry and the molecular biotechnology strategies employed to improve them, in either plants already under use (as maize...

  12. Bioprocess systems applied for the production of bioethanol from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Present technologies to produce bioethanol largely depend on food-based materials and this has caused significant stress on food prices and food security. ... greenhouse gas emission and for the development of organic chemical industries.

  13. Experimental investigation of bioethanol liquid phase dehydration using natural clinoptilolite

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Samira; Ghobadian, Barat; Omidkhah, Mohammad-Reza; Towfighi, Jafar; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study of bioethanol adsorption on natural Iranian clinoptilolite was carried out. Dynamic breakthrough curves were used to investigate the best adsorption conditions in bioethanol liquid phase. A laboratory setup was designed and fabricated for this purpose. In order to find the best operating conditions, the effect of liquid pressure, temperature and flow rate on breakthrough curves and consequently, maximum ethanol uptake by adsorbent were studied. The effects of different v...

  14. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ručevskis, Sandris

    2015-11-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies (IMST 2015) took place in Riga, Latvia from 30th September - 2nd October, 2015. The first event of the conference series, dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the Faculty of Civil Engineering of Riga Technical University, was held in 2013. Following the established tradition, the aim of the conference was to promote and discuss the latest results of industrial and academic research carried out in the following engineering fields: analysis and design of advanced structures and buildings; innovative, ecological and energy efficient building materials; maintenance, inspection and monitoring methods; construction technologies; structural management; sustainable and safe transport infrastructure; and geomatics and geotechnics. The conference provided an excellent opportunity for leading researchers, representatives of the industrial community, engineers, managers and students to share the latest achievements, discuss recent advances and highlight the current challenges. IMST 2015 attracted over 120 scientists from 24 countries. After rigorous reviewing, over 80 technical papers were accepted for publication in the conference proceedings. On behalf of the organizing committee I would like to thank all the speakers, authors, session chairs and reviewers for their efficient and timely effort. The 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies was organized by the Faculty of Civil Engineering of Riga Technical University with the support of the Latvia State Research Programme under the grant agreement "INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND SMART TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, IMATEH". I would like to express sincere gratitude to Juris Smirnovs, Dean of the Faculty of Civil Engineering, and Andris Chate, manager of the Latvia State Research Programme. Finally, I would like to thank all those who helped to make this event happen. Special thanks go to Diana

  15. 6th World Conference for Graduate Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure 2nd Interdisciplinary Tourism Research Conference

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fabia Trentin; Carlos Alberto Lidizia Soares; Bianca Tempone

    2012-01-01

    In the period of 24 to 29 April, were realized the events 6th World Conference for Graduate Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure 2nd Interdisciplinary Tourism Research Conference, organized by the Anatolia...

  16. Transition energy and dipole oscillator strength for 1s22p-1s2nd of Cr21+ ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Wen; Liu Ying; Hu Mu-Hong; Li Xin-Ru; Wang Ya-Nan

    2008-01-01

    The transition energies, wavelengths and dipole oscillator strengths of 1s22p-1s2nd (3 ≤ n ≤ 9) for Cr21+ ion are calculated. The fine structure splittings of 1s2nd (n ≤ 9) states for this ion are also calculated. In calculating energy, we have estimated the higher-order relativistic contribution under a hydrogenic approximation. The quantum defect of Rydberg series 1s2nd is determined according to the quantum defect theory. The results obtained in this paper excellently agree with the experimental data available in the literature. Combining the quantum defect theory with the discrete oscillator strengths, the discrete oscillator strengths for the transitions from initial state 1s22p to highly excited 1s2nd states (n ≥ 10) and the oscillator strength density corresponding to the bound-free transitions are obtained.

  17. Overview of the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report Process, results and next steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, N.; Shrestha, G.; Najjar, R.; Romero-Lankao, P.; Mayes, M. A.; Reed, S.; Birdsey, R.; Zhu, Z.; Shrestha, G.; Cavallaro, N.; Zhu, Z.; Cavallaro, N.; Zhu, Z.; Shrestha, G.

    2016-12-01

    With official kick-off in public engagement and writing in the early Spring of 2016, the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) is now set to be completed and published by the U.S. Government as a Highly Influential Scientific (Interagency) Assessment, a product of the Sustained National Climate Assessment, in late 2017. This presentation will highlight the planning process, the achievements so far, public engagement needs and the scientific community's contribution in the production of SOCCR-2.

  18. 2nd International Conference on Multiscale Computational Methods for Solids and Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains the best papers presented at the 2nd ECCOMAS International Conference on Multiscale Computations for Solids and Fluids, held June 10-12, 2015. Topics dealt with include multiscale strategy for efficient development of scientific software for large-scale computations, coupled probability-nonlinear-mechanics problems and solution methods, and modern mathematical and computational setting for multi-phase flows and fluid-structure interaction. The papers consist of contributions by six experts who taught short courses prior to the conference, along with several selected articles from other participants dealing with complementary issues, covering both solid mechanics and applied mathematics. .

  19. 2nd EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON ELECTROCHEMICAL METHODS APPLIED TO THE CONSERVATION OF ARTWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Domenech Carbo, Mª Teresa; DOMENECH CARBO, ANTONIO

    2014-01-01

    This book is issued at the occasion of the 2nd European Conference on electrochemical methods applied to the conservation of artworks, held in Valencia, on 23th September, 2014. This Conference has been hosted by the Instituto Universitario de Restauración del Patrimonio of the Universitat Politècnica de València and has been organized under the auspices of the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, the Universitat Politécnica de València, the Universitat de València and the Universisad de Grana...

  20. Future Control and Automation : Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Future Control and Automation

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This volume Future Control and Automation- Volume 1 includes best papers selected from 2012 2nd International Conference on Future Control and Automation (ICFCA 2012) held on July 1-2, 2012, Changsha, China. Future control and automation is the use of control systems and information technologies to reduce the need for human work in the production of goods and services. This volume can be divided into five sessions on the basis of the classification of manuscripts considered, which is listed as follows: Identification and Control, Navigation, Guidance and Sensor, Simulation Technology, Future Telecommunications and Control

  1. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior of a Coarse-Grained Mg-2Zn-2Nd Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Jonas, John J.; Yue, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    Compression tests were performed on samples of Mg-2Zn-2Nd at 673 K (400 °C) and at three different strain rates. At 0.1/s, three mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were observed to operate: discontinuous DRX (DDRX), twinning DRX (TDRX), and continuous DRX (CDRX). At 0.01/s, DDRX took place as a result of grain boundary bulging, followed by CDRX on further straining. At 0.001/s, only CDRX was observed. At a strain of 0.3, the activation of multiple DRX mechanisms in the 0.1/s samples produced the weakest deformation textures.

  2. Group field theory as the 2nd quantization of Loop Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oriti, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    We construct a 2nd quantized reformulation of canonical Loop Quantum Gravity at both kinematical and dynamical level, in terms of a Fock space of spin networks, and show in full generality that it leads directly to the Group Field Theory formalism. In particular, we show the correspondence between canonical LQG dynamics and GFT dynamics leading to a specific GFT model from any definition of quantum canonical dynamics of spin networks. We exemplify the correspondence of dynamics in the specific example of 3d quantum gravity. The correspondence between canonical LQG and covariant spin foam models is obtained via the GFT definition of the latter.

  3. Secular Motion in a 2nd Degree and Order-Gravity Field with no Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Hu, W.

    2001-03-01

    The motion of a particle about a non-rotating 2nd degree and order-gravity field is investigated. Averaging conditions are applied to the particle motion and a qualitative analysis which reveals the general character of motion in this system is given. It is shown that the orbit plane will either be stationary or precess about the body's axis of minimum or maximum moment of inertia. It is also shown that the secular equations for this system can be integrated in terms of trigonometric, hyperbolic or elliptic functions. The explicit solutions are derived in all cases of interest.

  4. PREFACE: 2nd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño, Ely Dannier V.

    2013-11-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions of the participants of the 2nd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology, 2nd IMRMPT, which was held from February 27 to March 2, 2013 at the Pontificia Bolivariana Bucaramanga-UPB and Santander and Industrial - UIS Universities, Bucaramanga, Colombia, organized by research groups from GINTEP-UPB, FITEK-UIS. The IMRMPT, was the second version of biennial meetings that began in 2011. The three-day scientific program of the 2nd IMRMPT consisted in 14 Magisterial Conferences, 42 Oral Presentations and 48 Poster Presentations, with the participation of undergraduate and graduate students, professors, researchers and entrepreneurs from Colombia, Russia, France, Venezuela, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Peru, Mexico, United States, among others. Moreover, the objective of IMRMPT was to bring together national and international researchers in order to establish scientific cooperation in the field of materials science and plasma technology; introduce new techniques of surface treatment of materials to improve properties of metals in terms of the deterioration due to corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, abrasion, hardness, among others; and establish cooperation agreements between universities and industry. The topics covered in the 2nd IMRMPT include New Materials, Surface Physics, Laser and Hybrid Processes, Characterization of Materials, Thin Films and Nanomaterials, Surface Hardening Processes, Wear and Corrosion / Oxidation, Modeling, Simulation and Diagnostics, Plasma Applications and Technologies, Biomedical Coatings and Surface Treatments, Non Destructive Evaluation and Online Process Control, Surface Modification (Ion Implantation, Ion Nitriding, PVD, CVD). The editors hope that those interested in the are of materials science and plasma technology, enjoy the reading that reflect a wide range of topics. It is a pleasure to thank the sponsors and all the participants and contributors for

  5. The 2nd International Association of Neurorestoratology Annual Conference(IANAC)Summary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin CHEN; Da-Qian HUANG; Di CHEN; Hong-Yun HUANG

    2009-01-01

    The 2nd International Association of Neurorestoratology Annual Conference(IANAC)was successfully held in Beijing, China,from April 24 to 26,2009.More than 200 representatives from 30 countries and regions attended the meeting and carried out extensive academic communications and reached important consensus on many issues in neuroregeneration,neural structural repair,neural replacement,neuroprotection,neuromodulation,neurorehabilitation,neuroplasticity and other areas in the field of neurorestoratology.The general assembly adopted"Beijing Declaration of International Association of Neurorestoratology"(Beijing Declaration)that was proposed by 32 scientists from 18 countries.

  6. Effect of wheat gluten proteins on bioethanol yield from grain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buresova, Iva [Agrotest Fyto, Ltd., Havlickova 2787/121, 767 01 Kromeriz (Czech Republic); Hrivna, Ludek [Mendel University in Brno, Zemedelska 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-04-15

    Bioethanol can be used as motor fuel and/or as a gasoline enhancer. A high yield feedstock for bioethanol production is cereal grain. Cereal grains containing less gluten proteins (glutenin and gliadin), but high starch, are favoured by distillers because they increase the bioethanol conversion. The direct effect of wheat gluten proteins on bioethanol yield was studied on triticale grain. Examined triticale Presto 1R.1D{sub 5+10}-2 and Presto Valdy were developed by introducing selected segments of wheat chromosome 1D into triticale chromosome 1R. Even if the samples analysed in this study do not afford to make definitive assumptions, it can be noticed that in analysed cases the presence of gliadin had more significant effect on investigated parameters than the presence of glutenin. Despite the presence of glutenin subunits did not significantly decrease the investigated parameters - specific weight, Hagberg falling number and starch content in grain met the requirements for grain for bioethanol production - protein content was higher than is optimal. The fermentation experiments demonstrated good bioethanol yields but depression in grain yields caused by the presence of wheat gliadin and glutenin decreased the energy balance of Presto Valdy and Presto 1R.1D{sub 5+10}-2. (author)

  7. To bioethanol through genomics of microbial synergies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein,

    2013-08-27

    The strategic goal of this project was to advance our understanding of activities and interactions of microorganisms through the advancement of microbial cultivation approaches. In this project we aimed to develop, advance, and use both culture-dependent techniques to address our main hypothesis: “uncultivable” microorganisms and their consortia represent a untapped source of novel species for efficient production of bioethanol. This project has two specific goals: 1. To develop and optimize a high throughput diffusion chamber cultivation approach to isolation of novel environmental bacteria relevant to DOE missions. 2. To use the optimized method to identify and cultivate novel microbial species and their consortia that synergistically hydrolyze various substrates and ferment the sugars to ethanol.

  8. Production of Bioethanol from Waste Potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Duruyurek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Using primary energy sources in World as fossil fuels, causes air pollution and climate change. Because of these reasons, people looking for renewable energy suppliers which has less carbondioxide and less pollution. Carbon in biofuels is producing from photosynthesis. For this, burning biofuels don’t increase carbondioxide in atmosphere. Scientists predict that plants with high carbonhydrate and protein contents are 21. centuries biofuels. Potatoes are producing over 280 million in whole world and Turkey is 6th potato producer. Turkey produces 5250000 tonne of potatoes. Approximately 20% of potatoes are waste in Niğde. Our study aimed to produce bioethanol from Solanum tuberosum by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As a result renewable energy sources can be produced from natural wastes.

  9. Fueling industrial biotechnology growth with bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, José Manuel; Panagiotou, Gianni; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology is the conversion of biomass via biocatalysis, microbial fermentation, or cell culture to produce chemicals, materials, and/or energy. Industrial biotechnology processes aim to be cost-competitive, environmentally favorable, and self-sustaining compared to their petrochemical equivalents. Common to all processes for the production of energy, commodity, added value, or fine chemicals is that raw materials comprise the most significant cost fraction, particularly as operating efficiencies increase through practice and improving technologies. Today, crude petroleum represents the dominant raw material for the energy and chemical sectors worldwide. Within the last 5 years petroleum prices, stability, and supply have increased, decreased, and been threatened, respectively, driving a renewed interest across academic, government, and corporate centers to utilize biomass as an alternative raw material. Specifically, bio-based ethanol as an alternative biofuel has emerged as the single largest biotechnology commodity, with close to 46 billion L produced worldwide in 2005. Bioethanol is a leading example of how systems biology tools have significantly enhanced metabolic engineering, inverse metabolic engineering, and protein and enzyme engineering strategies. This enhancement stems from method development for measurement, analysis, and data integration of functional genomics, including the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome. This review will show that future industrial biotechnology process development will benefit tremendously from the precedent set by bioethanol - that enabling technologies (e.g., systems biology tools) coupled with favorable economic and socio-political driving forces do yield profitable, sustainable, and environmentally responsible processes. Biofuel will continue to be the keystone of any industrial biotechnology-based economy whereby biorefineries leverage common raw materials and unit operations to integrate

  10. Looking beyond Saccharomyces: the potential of non-conventional yeast species for desirable traits in bioethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecka, Dorota; Mukherjee, Vaskar; Mateo, Raquel Quintilla; Stojiljkovic, Marija; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; Thevelein, Johan M

    2015-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for millennia in the production of food and beverages and is by far the most studied yeast species. Currently, it is also the most used microorganism in the production of first-generation bioethanol from sugar or starch crops. Second-generation bioethanol, on the other hand, is produced from lignocellulosic feedstocks that are pretreated and hydrolyzed to obtain monomeric sugars, mainly D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose. Recently, S. cerevisiae recombinant strains capable of fermenting pentose sugars have been generated. However, the pretreatment of the biomass results in hydrolysates with high osmolarity and high concentrations of inhibitors. These compounds negatively influence the fermentation process. Therefore, robust strains with high stress tolerance are required. Up to now, more than 2000 yeast species have been described and some of these could provide a solution to these limitations because of their high tolerance to the most predominant stress conditions present in a second-generation bioethanol reactor. In this review, we will summarize what is known about the non-conventional yeast species showing unusual tolerance to these stresses, namely Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (osmotolerance), Kluyveromyces marxianus and Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha (thermotolerance), Dekkera bruxellensis (ethanol tolerance), Pichia kudriavzevii (furan derivatives tolerance) and Z. bailii (acetic acid tolerance).

  11. The relation between 1st grade grey matter volume and 2nd grade math competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gavin R; Wilkey, Eric D; Yeo, Darren J; Cutting, Laurie E

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and numerical competence is a critical foundation for individual success in modern society yet the neurobiological sources of individual differences in math competence are poorly understood. Neuroimaging research over the last decade suggests that neural mechanisms in the parietal lobe, particularly the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) are structurally aberrant in individuals with mathematical learning disabilities. However, whether those same brain regions underlie individual differences in math performance across the full range of math abilities is unknown. Furthermore, previous studies have been exclusively cross-sectional, making it unclear whether variations in the structure of the IPS are caused by or consequences of the development of math skills. The present study investigates the relation between grey matter volume across the whole brain and math competence longitudinally in a representative sample of 50 elementary school children. Results show that grey matter volume in the left IPS at the end of 1st grade relates to math competence a year later at the end of 2nd grade. Grey matter volume in this region did not change over that year, and was still correlated with math competence at the end of 2nd grade. These findings support the hypothesis that the IPS and its associated functions represent a critical foundation for the acquisition of mathematical competence.

  12. A novel 2nd-order bandpass MFSS filter with miniaturized structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, C. Y.; Gao, J. S.; Feng, X. G.

    2015-08-01

    In order to effectively obtain a miniaturized structure and good filtering properties, we propose a novel 2nd-order bandpass metamaterial frequency selective surface (MFSS) filter which contains two capacitive layers and one inductive layer, where there are multi-loop metallic patches as shunt capacitor C and planar wire grids as series inductor L respectively. Unlike the traditional operation way—the tuned elements used in resonant surface approximately equal to one wavelength in circumference and the structure thickness with a spacing of a quarter wavelength apart, by changing the value of L and C and matching multilayer dielectric to adjust the LC coupling resonance and the resonance impedance respectively, the proposed MFSS filter can achieves a miniatured structure with ideal bandpass properties. Measurement results of the fabricated prototype of the bandpass filter (BPF) indicate that the dimension of the tuned element on resonant surface is approximately 0.025 wavelength, i.e., 0.025λ. At the same time, the filter has the stable center frequency of f0 = 1.53GHz and the transmittance of T ⩾ 96.3% and high Q-value for the TE/TM wave polarization at various incidence angles. The novel 2nd-order bandpass MFSS filter with miniaturized structure not only can decrease structure dimension, but also has a wide range of applications to microwave and infrared band.

  13. A novel 2nd-order bandpass MFSS filter with miniaturized structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Fang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to effectively obtain a miniaturized structure and good filtering properties, we propose a novel 2nd-order bandpass metamaterial frequency selective surface (MFSS filter which contains two capacitive layers and one inductive layer, where there are multi-loop metallic patches as shunt capacitor C and planar wire grids as series inductor L respectively. Unlike the traditional operation way—the tuned elements used in resonant surface approximately equal to one wavelength in circumference and the structure thickness with a spacing of a quarter wavelength apart, by changing the value of L and C and matching multilayer dielectric to adjust the LC coupling resonance and the resonance impedance respectively, the proposed MFSS filter can achieves a miniatured structure with ideal bandpass properties. Measurement results of the fabricated prototype of the bandpass filter (BPF indicate that the dimension of the tuned element on resonant surface is approximately 0.025 wavelength, i.e., 0.025λ. At the same time, the filter has the stable center frequency of f0 = 1.53GHz and the transmittance of T ⩾ 96.3% and high Q-value for the TE/TM wave polarization at various incidence angles. The novel 2nd-order bandpass MFSS filter with miniaturized structure not only can decrease structure dimension, but also has a wide range of applications to microwave and infrared band.

  14. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-wen; Li, Bin

    2016-02-19

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON.

  15. Characterization of the 1st and 2nd EF-hands of NADPH oxidase 5 by fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry, and circular dichroism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chin-Chuan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Superoxide generated by non-phagocytic NADPH oxidases (NOXs is of growing importance for physiology and pathobiology. The calcium binding domain (CaBD of NOX5 contains four EF-hands, each binding one calcium ion. To better understand the metal binding properties of the 1st and 2nd EF-hands, we characterized the N-terminal half of CaBD (NCaBD and its calcium-binding knockout mutants. Results The isothermal titration calorimetry measurement for NCaBD reveals that the calcium binding of two EF-hands are loosely associated with each other and can be treated as independent binding events. However, the Ca2+ binding studies on NCaBD(E31Q and NCaBD(E63Q showed their binding constants to be 6.5 × 105 and 5.0 × 102 M-1 with ΔHs of -14 and -4 kJ/mol, respectively, suggesting that intrinsic calcium binding for the 1st non-canonical EF-hand is largely enhanced by the binding of Ca2+ to the 2nd canonical EF-hand. The fluorescence quenching and CD spectra support a conformational change upon Ca2+ binding, which changes Trp residues toward a more non-polar and exposed environment and also increases its α-helix secondary structure content. All measurements exclude Mg2+-binding in NCaBD. Conclusions We demonstrated that the 1st non-canonical EF-hand of NOX5 has very weak Ca2+ binding affinity compared with the 2nd canonical EF-hand. Both EF-hands interact with each other in a cooperative manner to enhance their Ca2+ binding affinity. Our characterization reveals that the two EF-hands in the N-terminal NOX5 are Ca2+ specific. Graphical abstract

  16. Using Populus as a lignocellulosic feedstock for bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porth, Ilga; El-Kassaby, Yousry A

    2015-04-01

    Populus species along with species from the sister genus Salix will provide valuable feedstock resources for advanced second-generation biofuels. Their inherent fast growth characteristics can particularly be exploited for short rotation management, a time and energy saving cultivation alternative for lignocellulosic feedstock supply. Salicaceae possess inherent cell wall characteristics with favorable cellulose to lignin ratios for utilization as bioethanol crop. We review economically important traits relevant for intensively managed biofuel crop plantations, genomic and phenotypic resources available for Populus, breeding strategies for forest trees dedicated to bioenergy provision, and bioprocesses and downstream applications related to opportunities using Salicaceae as a renewable resource. Challenges need to be resolved for every single step of the conversion process chain, i.e., starting from tree domestication for improved performance as a bioenergy crop, bioconversion process, policy development for land use changes associated with advanced biofuels, and harvest and supply logistics associated with industrial-scale biorefinery plants using Populus as feedstock. Significant hurdles towards cost and energy efficiency, environmental friendliness, and yield maximization with regards to biomass pretreatment, saccharification, and fermentation of celluloses and the sustainability of biorefineries as a whole still need to be overcome.

  17. Spirogyra biomass a renewable source for biofuel (bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Salem Eshaq

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels refer to renewable fuels from biological sources that can be used for heat, electricity and fuel. The fuels obtained from algae are termed as third generation fuels. The production of fuel from algae provides many advantages when compared to the fuel produced from other sources like agrobased raw materials. Other than environmental pollution control the algal biofuel will help in reduction of the fuel cost when compared to the agrobased and fossil fuels. In the present study algae specifically Spirogyra was used for the production of bioethanol by the fermentative process. A comparative study was carried out by using chemically pre-treated anduntreated Spirogyra biomass. The Spirogyra has a very simple cell wall made up of cellulose and starch that can be converted to ethanol by the fermentation process. The Spirogyra biomass was subjected to saccharification process by the fungal organism Aspergillus niger MTCCC 2196 for the hydrolysis, this process was followed by the fermentation using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC170 for the production of alcohol. A high yield of ethanol was recorded for untreated Spirogyra biomass when compared to chemically pre-treated biomass. The yield of alcohol using algal biomass is more when compared to alcohol produced from other sources like agrobased rawmaterials.

  18. Energy and Environmental Performance of Bioethanol from Different Lignocelluloses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Luo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and the wish to reduce the dependence on oil are the incentives for the development of alternative energy sources. The use of lignocellulosic biomass together with cellulosic processing technology provides opportunities to produce fuel ethanol with less competition with food and nature. Many studies on energy analysis and life cycle assessment of second-generation bioethanol have been conducted. However, due to the different methodology used and different system boundary definition, it is difficult to compare their results. To permit a direct comparison of fuel ethanol from different lignocelluloses in terms of energy use and environmental impact, seven studies conducted in our group were summarized in this paper, where the same technologies were used to convert biomass to ethanol, the same system boundaries were defined, and the same allocation procedures were followed. A complete set of environmental impacts ranging from global warming potential to toxicity aspects is used. The results provide an overview on the energy efficiency and environmental performance of using fuel ethanol derived from different feedstocks in comparison with gasoline.

  19. Energy from whey - comparison of the biogas and bioethanol processes; Energie a partir de petit-lait : comparaison des filieres biogaz et bioethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruteau de Laclos, H.; Membrez, Y. [Erep SA, Aclens (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project which investigated how energy could be generated from the whey produced in the cheese-making process. The first part of the project aimed to validate a concept for on-site production and use of biogas at a medium-sized cheese factory. The results of the first step, an experimental study carried out using a down-flow fixed-film bio-reactor, are discussed. This allowed the determination of the optimal working parameters as well as providing an estimate of the performance of the process. The second part of the project aimed to compare the bio-ethanol and biogas production processes. It was carried out in collaboration with AlcoSuisse and the Energy Systems Laboratory at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne. The results of a life-cycle assessment (LCA) are discussed, which compared the two processes from an environmental point of view. Here, two impacts were considered: fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse effect. The replacement of fuel-oil with biogas for heat production and the replacement of conventional petrol with mixture including 5% bio-ethanol were examined. The results are presented that show that there was no significant difference between the two processes. According to the authors, the treatment of one cubic meter of cheese-whey allows savings of more than 20 litres of oil equivalent and 60 kg of CO{sub 2} emissions.

  20. Proteins for breaking barriers in lignocellulosic bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaganathan, Kandasamy; Goud, Burragoni S; Reddy, Mettu M; Kumar, Vanaparthi P; Balsingh, Jatoth; Radhakrishna, Surabhi

    2015-01-01

    Reduction in fossil fuel consumption by using alternate sources of energy is a major challenge facing mankind in the coming decades. Bioethanol production using lignocellulosic biomass is the most viable option for addressing this challenge. Industrial bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass, though possible now, is not economically viable due to presence of barriers that escalate the cost of production. As cellulose and hemicellulose are the major constituents of terrestrial biomass, which is available in massive quantities, hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose by the microorganisms are the most prominent biochemical processes happening in the earth. Microorganisms possess different categories of proteins associated with different stages of bioethanol production and a number of them are already found and characterized. Many more of these proteins need to be identified which suit the specificities needed for the bioethanol production process. Discovery of proteins with novel specificities and application of genetic engineering technologies to harvest the synergies existing between them with the aim to develop consolidated bioprocess is the major direction of research in the future. In this review, we discuss the different categories of proteins used for bioethanol production in the context of breaking the barriers existing for the economically feasible lignocellulosic bioethanol production.

  1. Book Review: The Communicating Leader: The key to strategic alignment (2nd Ed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. C. Birkenbach

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Title: The Communicating Leader: The key to strategic alignment (2nd Ed Author: Gustav Puth Publisher: Van Schaik Publishers Reviewer: XC Birkenbach The aim of the book according to the author, is "meant to be a usable tool, an instrument in the toolbox of the real leader and leadership student". The book is written in conversational style (as intended by the author and the 219 pages of the 10 chapters are logically packaged into three parts. While the main emphasis is naturally on leadership and communication, the coverage includes topics typically encountered in Organisational Behaviour or Management texts, e.g., organizational culture, managing change, motivation, conflict management and strategic management.

  2. 2nd Response to "Feasibility of 3D reconstruction from a single 2D diffraction measurement"

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    We present our 2nd response to Thibault's commentary article [1] and his reply [2], in which he commented upon our ankylography paper [3] and our 1st response [4]. In this article, we further explain why we think Thibault's theoretical analysis is flawed and his interpretation of our experiment is incorrect. Furthermore, we provide a quantitative analysis and a numerical experiment to illustrate why ankylography can in principle be applicable to general samples. Finally, we present detailed procedures for our numerical experiment on ankylographic reconstructions, which uses the traditional HIO algorithm only with the positivity constraint [5]. We welcome anyone (including Thibault) interested in ankylography to perform numerical experiments and verify our results. We will be very happy to provide any help if needed.

  3. 2nd FP7 Conference and International Summer School Nanotechnology : From Fundamental Research to Innovations

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    This book presents some of the latest achievements in nanotechnology and nanomaterials from leading researchers in Ukraine, Europe, and beyond. It features contributions from participants in the 2nd International Summer School “Nanotechnology: From Fundamental Research to Innovations” and International Research and Practice Conference “Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials”, NANO-2013, which were held in Bukovel, Ukraine on August 25-September 1, 2013. These events took place within the framework of the European Commission FP7 project Nanotwinning, and were organized jointly by the Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, University of Tartu (Estonia), University of Turin (Italy), and Pierre and Marie Curie University (France). Internationally recognized experts from a wide range of universities and research institutions share their knowledge and key results on topics ranging from nanooptics, nanoplasmonics, and interface studies to energy storage and biomedical applications. Pr...

  4. Simultaneous vibrant soundbridge implantation and 2nd stage auricular reconstruction for microtia with aural atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Hsueh Yee Lim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aural atresia and severe microtia are associated malformations that result in problems with hearing and cosmesis, associated speech and language difficulties and diminished self-esteem. In cases where middle ear ossiculoplasty and aural atresia canalplasty are expected to give poor hearing outcomes that would eventually require the use of hearing aids, bone anchored hearing aids or active middle ear implants may be better options. This case report describes a simultaneous Vibrant Soundbridge implantation and 2nd stage auricular reconstruction with rib graft cartilage for an 11-year-old boy with grade III microtia and aural atresia 8 months after the 1st stage reconstruction. Audiometric results of the Vibrant Soundbridge aided ear were comparable to that of the contralateral hearing aid aided ear.

  5. 2nd International Colloquium on Sports Science, Exercise, Engineering and Technology 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, Norasrudin; Adnan, Rahmat

    2016-01-01

    The proceeding is a collection of research papers presented at the 2nd International Colloquium on Sports Science, Exercise, Engineering and Technology (ICoSSEET2015), a conference dedicated to address the challenges in the areas of sports science, exercise, sports engineering and technology including other areas of sports, thereby presenting a consolidated view to the interested researchers in the aforesaid fields. The goal of this conference was to bring together researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to focus on the scope of the conference and establishing new collaborations in these areas. The topics of interest are in mainly (1) Sports and Exercise Science (2) Sports Engineering and Technology Application (3) Sports Industry and Management.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamics of Memristor Based 2nd and 3rd Order Oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz

    2011-05-01

    Exceptional behaviours of Memristor are illustrated in Memristor based second order (Wien oscillator) and third order (phase shift oscillator) oscillator systems in this Thesis. Conventional concepts about sustained oscillation have been argued by demonstrating the possibility of sustained oscillation with oscillating resistance and dynamic poles. Mathematical models are also proposed for analysis and simulations have been presented to support the surprising characteristics of the Memristor based oscillator systems. This thesis also describes a comparative study among the Wien family oscillators with one Memristor. In case of phase shift oscillator, one Memristor and three Memristors systems are illustrated and compared to generalize the nonlinear dynamics observed for both 2nd order and 3rd order system. Detail explanations are provided with analytical models to simplify the unconventional properties of Memristor based oscillatory systems.

  7. 2nd International Conference on Education and Educational Technology (EET 2011)

    CERN Document Server

    Education and Educational Technology

    2012-01-01

    This volume includes extended and revised versions of a set of selected papers from the 2011 2nd International Conference on Education and Educational Technology (EET 2011) held in Chengdu, China, October 1-2, 2011. The mission of EET 2011 Volume 1 is to provide a forum for researchers, educators, engineers, and government officials involved in the general areas of education and educational technology to disseminate their latest research results and exchange views on the future research directions of these fields. 130 related topic papers were selected into this volume. All the papers were reviewed by 2 program committee members and selected by the volume editor Prof. Yuanzhi Wang, from Intelligent Information Technology Application Research Association, Hong Kong. The conference will bring together leading researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest. We hope every participant can have a good opportunity to exchange their research ideas and results and to discuss the state of the art in th...

  8. 2nd International Conference on Education and Educational Technology (EET 2011)

    CERN Document Server

    Education Management, Education Theory and Education Application

    2012-01-01

    This volume includes extended and revised versions of a set of selected papers from the 2011 2nd International Conference on Education and Educational Technology (EET 2011) held in Chengdu, China, October 1-2, 2011. The mission of EET 2011 Volume 2 is to provide a forum for researchers, educators, engineers, and government officials involved in the general areas of education management, education theory and education application to disseminate their latest research results and exchange views on the future research directions of these fields. 133 related topic papers were selected into this volume. All the papers were reviewed by 2 program committee members and selected by the volume editor Prof. Yuanzhi Wang, from Intelligent Information Technology Application Research Association, Hong Kong. The conference will bring together leading researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest. We hope every participant can have a good opportunity to exchange their research ideas and results and to discus...

  9. A Perpendicular Biased 2nd Harmonic Cavity for the Fermilab Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C. Y.; Dey, J. [Fermilab; Madrak, R. L. [Fermilab; Pellico, W. [Fermilab; Romanov, G. [Fermilab; Sun, D. [Fermilab; Terechkine, I. [Fermilab

    2015-07-13

    A perpendicular biased 2nd harmonic cavity is currently being designed for the Fermilab Booster. Its purpose cavity is to flatten the bucket at injection and thus change the longitudinal beam distribution so that space charge effects are decreased. It can also with transition crossing. The reason for the choice of perpendicular biasing over parallel biasing is that the Q of the cavity is much higher and thus allows the accelerating voltage to be a factor of two higher than a similar parallel biased cavity. This cavity will also provide a higher accelerating voltage per meter than the present folded transmission line cavity. However, this type of cavity presents technical challenges that need to be addressed. The two major issues are cooling of the garnet material from the effects of the RF and the cavity itself from eddy current heating because of the 15 Hz bias field ramp. This paper will address the technical challenge of preventing the garnet from overheating.

  10. Simultaneous Vibrant Soundbridge Implantation and 2nd Stage Auricular Reconstruction for Microtia with Aural Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lynne Hsueh Yee; Xiang, Ling; Del Prado, Jocelynne; Ee Chin, Ling; Beltrame, Millo Achille

    2011-07-01

    Aural atresia and severe microtia are associated malformations that result in problems with hearing and cosmesis, associated speech and language difficulties and diminished self-esteem. In cases where middle ear ossiculoplasty and aural atresia canalplasty are expected to give poor hearing outcomes that would eventually require the use of hearing aids, bone anchored hearing aids or active middle ear implants may be better options. This case report describes a simultaneous Vibrant Soundbridge implantation and 2(nd) stage auricular reconstruction with rib graft cartilage for an 11-year-old boy with grade III microtia and aural atresia 8 months after the 1(st) stage reconstruction. Audiometric results of the Vibrant Soundbridge aided ear were comparable to that of the contralateral hearing aid aided ear.

  11. Estimation of 2nd-order derivative thermodynamic properties using the crossover lattice equation of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yongjin; Shin, Moon Sam [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Institute of Chemical Processes, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hwayong [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Institute of Chemical Processes, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hwayongk@snu.ac.kr

    2008-11-15

    We apply the crossover lattice equation of state (xLF EOS) [M.S. Shin, Y. Lee, H. Kim, J. Chem. Thermodyn. 40 (2007) 174-179] to the calculations of thermodynamic 2nd-order derivative properties (isochoric heat capacity, isobaric heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient, Joule-Thompson coefficient, and sound speed). This equation of state is used to calculate the same properties of pure systems (carbon dioxide, normal alkanes from methane to propane). We show that, over a wide range of states, the equation of state yields properties with better accuracy than the lattice equation of state (LF EOS), and near the critical region, represents singular behavior well.

  12. Language and pragmatic profile in children with ADHD measured by Children's Communication Checklist 2nd edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, Raija; Loukusa, Soile; Moilanen, Irma; Yliherva, Anneli

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have language and/or pragmatic difficulties compared to typically developing children. Nineteen children with ADHD (age 5-12 years) and nineteen typically developing children (age 5-8 years) were evaluated using the Finnish version of Children's Communication Checklist 2nd edition (CCC-2). The CCC-2 questionnaire was filled in by their parents. According to the CCC-2 questionnaire, differences between the groups were found in linguistic abilities, pragmatics skills, and social interaction. According to the CCC-2 profiles, many children with ADHD may have various kinds of communication difficulties, even if they do not have a diagnosed language disorder.

  13. 2nd Symposium on Fluid-Structure-Sound Interactions and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Lixi; Hodges, Dewey

    2014-01-01

    With rapid economic and industrial development in China, India and elsewhere, fluid-related structural vibration and noise problems are widely encountered in many fields, just as they are in the more developed parts of the world, causing increasingly grievous concerns. Turbulence clearly has a significant impact on many such problems. On the other hand, new opportunities are emerging with the advent of various new technologies, such as signal processing, flow visualization and diagnostics, new functional materials, sensors and actuators, etc. These have revitalized interdisciplinary research activities, and it is in this context that the 2nd symposium on fluid-structure-sound interactions and control (FSSIC) was organized. Held in Hong Kong (May 20-21, 2013) and Macau (May 22-23, 2013), the meeting brought together scientists and engineers working in all related branches from both East and West and provided them with a forum to exchange and share the latest progress, ideas and advances and to chart the fronti...

  14. Mesocosm soil ecological risk assessment tool for GMO 2nd tier studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Annibale, Alessandra; Maraldo, Kristine; Larsen, Thomas

    Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) of GMO is basically identical to ERA of chemical substances, when it comes to assessing specific effects of the GMO plant material on the soil ecosystem. The tiered approach always includes the option of studying more complex but still realistic ecosystem level...... effects in 2nd tier caged experimental systems, cf. the new GMO ERA guidance: EFSA Journal 2010; 8(11):1879. We propose to perform a trophic structure analysis, TSA, and include the trophic structure as an ecological endpoint to gain more direct insight into the change in interactions between species, i.......e. the food-web structure, instead of relying only on the indirect evidence from population abundances. The approach was applied for effect assessment in the agro-ecosystem where we combined factors of elevated CO2, viz. global climate change, and GMO plant effects. A multi-species (Collembola, Acari...

  15. 2nd International Conference on Electrical Systems, Technology and Information 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Tanoto, Yusak; Lim, Resmana; Santoso, Murtiyanto; Pah, Nemuel

    2016-01-01

    This book includes the original, peer-reviewed research papers from the 2nd International Conference on Electrical Systems, Technology and Information (ICESTI 2015), held in September 2015 at Patra Jasa Resort & Villas Bali, Indonesia. Topics covered include: Mechatronics and Robotics, Circuits and Systems, Power and Energy Systems, Control and Industrial Automation, and Information Theory.    It explores emerging technologies and their application in a broad range of engineering disciplines, including communication technologies and smart grids. It examines hybrid intelligent and knowledge-based control, embedded systems, and machine learning. It also presents emerging research and recent application in green energy system and storage. It discusses the role of electrical engineering in biomedical, industrial and mechanical systems, as well as multimedia systems and applications, computer vision and image and signal processing. The primary objective of this series is to provide references for disseminat...

  16. 2nd international KES conference on Smart Education and Smart e-Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Howlett, Robert; Jain, Lakhmi

    2015-01-01

    This book contains the contributions presented at the 2nd international KES conference on Smart Education and Smart e-Learning, which took place in Sorrento, Italy, June 17-19, 2015. It contains a total of 45 peer-reviewed book chapters that are grouped into several parts: Part 1 - Smart Education, Part 2 – Smart Educational Technology, Part 3 – Smart e-Learning, Part 4 – Smart Professional Training and Teachers’ Education, and Part 5 – Smart Teaching and Training related Topics.  This book can be a useful source of research data and valuable information for faculty, scholars, Ph.D. students, administrators, and practitioners  - those who are interested in innovative areas of smart education and smart e-learning.  .

  17. Bioethanol production from fermentable sugar juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabed, Hossain; Faruq, Golam; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Hashim, Rosli; Boyce, Amru Nasrulhaq

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production from renewable sources to be used in transportation is now an increasing demand worldwide due to continuous depletion of fossil fuels, economic and political crises, and growing concern on environmental safety. Mainly, three types of raw materials, that is, sugar juice, starchy crops, and lignocellulosic materials, are being used for this purpose. This paper will investigate ethanol production from free sugar containing juices obtained from some energy crops such as sugarcane, sugar beet, and sweet sorghum that are the most attractive choice because of their cost-effectiveness and feasibility to use. Three types of fermentation process (batch, fed-batch, and continuous) are employed in ethanol production from these sugar juices. The most common microorganism used in fermentation from its history is the yeast, especially, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, though the bacterial species Zymomonas mobilis is also potentially used nowadays for this purpose. A number of factors related to the fermentation greatly influences the process and their optimization is the key point for efficient ethanol production from these feedstocks.

  18. Bioethanol production from dried sweet sorghum stalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almodares, A.; Etemadifar, Z.; Ghoreishi, F.; Yosefi, F. [Biology Dept. Univ. of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], e-mail: aalmodares@yahoo.com

    2012-11-01

    Bioethanol as a renewable transportation fuel has a great potential for energy and clean environment. Among crops sweet sorghum is one of the best feedstock for ethanol production under hot and dry climatic conditions. Because it has higher tolerance to salt and drought comparing to sugarcane and corn that are currently used for bio-fuel production in the world. Generally mills are used to extract the juice from sweet sorghum stalks. Three roller mills extract around nearly 50 percent of the juice and more mills is needed to extract higher percentage of the juice. More over under cold weather the stalks become dry and juice is not extracted from the stalk, therefore reduce harvesting period. In this study stalks were harvested, leaves were stripped from the stalks and the stalks were chopped to nearly 4 mm length and sun dried. The dry stalks were grounded to 60 mesh powder by a mill. Fermentation medium consists of 15-35% (w/w) sweet sorghum powder, micronutrients and active yeast inoculum from 0.5-1% (w/w) by submerge fermentation method. The fermentation time and temperature were 48-72 hours and 30 deg, respectively. The results showed the highest amount of ethanol (14.5 % w/w sorghum) was produced with 10% sweet sorghum powder and 1% of yeast inoculum, three day fermentation at 30 deg.

  19. Evaluation on Microalgae Biomass for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, L. M.; Lee, K. T.; Chan, D. C. J.

    2017-06-01

    The depletion of energy resources has triggered worldwide concern for alternative sources, especially renewable energy. Microalgae biomass offers the most promising feedstock for renewable energy because of their impressive efficient growing characteristics and valuable composition. Simple cell structure of the microalgae would simplify the pretreatment technology thus increase the cost-effectiveness of biofuel production. Scenedesmus dimorphus is a carbohydrate-rich microalgae that has potential as biomass for bioethanol. The cultivation of Scenedesmus dimorphus under aeration of carbon dioxide enriched air resulted 1.47 g/L of dry biomass with composition of 12 w/w total lipid, 53.7 w/w carbohydrate and 17.4 protein. Prior to ethanolic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, various pre-treatment methods were investigated to release and degrade the complex carbohydrate in cell biomass thus obtaining the maximal amount of digestible sugar for ethanolic yeast. In this study, sulfuric acid was used as hydrolysis agent while amyloglucosidase as enzymatic agent. Dried biomass via hydrothermal acidic hydrolysis yielded sugar which is about 89 of total carbohydrate at reaction temperature of 125 °C and acid concentration of 4 v/v. While combination of organosolv treatment (mixture of methanol and chloroform) with enzymatic hydrolysis yielded comparable amount of sugar with 0.568 g glucose/g treated-biomass. In this study, the significant information in pre-treatment process ensures the sustainability of the biofuel produced.

  20. Bioethanol Production from Fermentable Sugar Juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabed, Hossain; Faruq, Golam; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Hashim, Rosli; Nasrulhaq Boyce, Amru

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production from renewable sources to be used in transportation is now an increasing demand worldwide due to continuous depletion of fossil fuels, economic and political crises, and growing concern on environmental safety. Mainly, three types of raw materials, that is, sugar juice, starchy crops, and lignocellulosic materials, are being used for this purpose. This paper will investigate ethanol production from free sugar containing juices obtained from some energy crops such as sugarcane, sugar beet, and sweet sorghum that are the most attractive choice because of their cost-effectiveness and feasibility to use. Three types of fermentation process (batch, fed-batch, and continuous) are employed in ethanol production from these sugar juices. The most common microorganism used in fermentation from its history is the yeast, especially, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, though the bacterial species Zymomonas mobilis is also potentially used nowadays for this purpose. A number of factors related to the fermentation greatly influences the process and their optimization is the key point for efficient ethanol production from these feedstocks. PMID:24715820

  1. Bioethanol production from coconut husk fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirelle Márcio Santos Cabral

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Population growth and the increasing search for healthy foods have led to a major consumption of coconut water and, hence, to an environmental impact caused by the inappropriate disposal of green coconut husks. This lignocellulosic biomass has deserved attention of researchers concerning the seeking of new usages, as, for example, in renewable fuels production technologies. This study examines the potential of green coconut husk fibers as a feedstock for the production of bioethanol. The coconut fibers were pretreated through an alkaline method, hydrolyzed enzymatically and submitted to ethanol fermentation with commercial yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Despite the significant loss of cellulose (4.42% in relation to the fiber and 17.9% concerning the original cellulose content, the alkaline pretreatment promoted an efficient solubilization of lignin (80%, turning the coconut fibers into a feasible raw material for 2G ethanol production studies. Enzymatic hydrolysis converted 87% of the sugars and the ethanolic fermentation consumed 81% of the substrate in the hydrolyzate, leading to a sugar to ethanol convertion efficiency of 59.6%. These results points out that green coconut husks are a promising alternative to the production of renewable energy.

  2. Primary certification of reference material for electrolytic conductivity of bioethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, L. F.; Gomes, M. R. F.; Cassini, G. C.; Faria, A. C. V.; Fraga, I. C. S.

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays the preservation of the planet is spreading into the international scene with the use of renewable energy sources such as bioethanol. The challenge is to guarantee the quality of produced bioethanol, and the electrolytic conductivity (EC) is one of the specified parameters for this purpose. However, is necessary to demonstrate the metrological traceability of the measurement results for EC in this matrix. This study presents the certification of a reference material for EC in bioethanol by using only primary measurements. The value of primary certified reference material (CRM) is (0.77 ± 0.06) µS.cm-1, and its use will provide the metrological traceability needed for measurement results in laboratories.

  3. Certified reference material to water content determination in bioethanol fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína M. Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol is a strategic biofuel in Brazil. Thus, a strong metrological basis for its measurements is required to ensure the quality and promote its exportation. Recently, Inmetro certified a reference material for water content in bioethanol. This paper presents the results of these studies. The characterization, homogeneity, short-term stability and long-term stability uncertainty contributions values were 0.00500, 0.0166, 0.0355 and 0.0391 mg g-1, respectively. The certificated value for water content of bioethanol fuel was (3.65 ± 0.11 mg g-1. This CRM is the first and up to now the unique in the world.

  4. Microalgae for economic applications: advantages and perspectives for bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simas-Rodrigues, Cíntia; Villela, Helena D M; Martins, Aline P; Marques, Luiza G; Colepicolo, Pio; Tonon, Angela P

    2015-07-01

    Renewable energy has attracted significant interest in recent years as a result of sustainability, environmental impact, and socio-economic considerations. Given existing technological knowledge and based on projections relating to biofuels derived from microalgae, microalgal feedstock is considered to be one of the most important renewable energy sources potentially available for industrial production. Therefore, this review examines microalgal bioethanol technology, which converts biomass from microalgae to fuel, the chemical processes involved, and possible ways of increasing the bioethanol yield, such as abiotic factors and genetic manipulation of fermenting organisms.

  5. Bioethanol production from Ficus religiosa leaves using microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Miri; Griess, Ofir; Pulidindi, Indra Neel; Perkas, Nina; Gedanken, Aharon

    2016-07-15

    A microwave assisted feasible process for the production of bioethanol from Ficus religiosa leaves was developed. Under the process conditions (8 min. microwave irradiation, 1 M HCl), 10.1 wt% glucose yield was obtained from the leaves. Microwave based hydrolysis process yielded higher glucose content (10.1 wt%) compared to the conventional hydrothermal process (4.1 wt%). Upon fermentation of the hydrolysate using Baker's yeast, 3 wt% (dry wt. basis) of bioethanol was produced.

  6. HOLISTIC APPROACH OF TEACHING OF GROSS PATHOLOGICAL SPECIMEN FOR 2ND PROFESSIONAL MBBS STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Study of pathological specimen is necessary for the students towards their practical (including viva as well as theoretical examinations. Past experiences show that most of the students of 2nd Professional MBBS cannot answer properly the questions related to the pathological specimen, especially the histopathological portion when asked by the examiners. This is due to the conventional method of teaching where students are given only didactic lectures on histopathological features, which is not convenient for students to understand the histopathology and related questions. AIMS To assess the impact of new teaching method of gross pathological specimen using visual aids (PowerPoint to show histopathology. MATERIALS AND METHODS Total 41 students present in 2nd Prof. MBBS were divided into 4 groups under the leadership of class assistants or demonstrators. 20 practical classes were arranged for 4 months of study period. In the first one hour, each group was shown power-point presentation of histopathological features, related questions and answers of the gross specimen to be studied. All the aspects were discussed simultaneously. In the next one hour, there was a joint teaching session consisting of all four groups, moderated by the concerned professor with PowerPoint projection. Assessment was done by three mock tests comprising of Viva, Multiple Choice Questions and Short Assay type Questions and a routine internal assessment in the last week of the study period. Then a comparison was made with regards to presence of students and results of successive three mock tests. Result of internal assessment was compared with that of previous two batches in which students were taught with only routine lectures on the same gross pathological specimen. RESULTS The use of new method increased the average attendance of students significantly. The percentage of passing students in the mock tests was very good. There was notable increase of passing

  7. Microwave pretreatment of switchgrass for bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshwani, Deepak Radhakrishin

    Lignocellulosic materials are promising alternative feedstocks for bioethanol production. These materials include agricultural residues, cellulosic waste such as newsprint and office paper, logging residues, and herbaceous and woody crops. However, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass necessitates a pretreatment step to improve the yield of fermentable sugars. The overall goal of this dissertation is to expand the current state of knowledge on microwave-based pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Existing research on bioenergy and value-added applications of switchgrass is reviewed in Chapter 2. Switchgrass is an herbaceous energy crop native to North America and has high biomass productivity, potentially low requirements for agricultural inputs and positive environmental impacts. Based on results from test plots, yields in excess of 20 Mg/ha have been reported. Environmental benefits associated with switchgrass include the potential for carbon sequestration, nutrient recovery from run-off, soil remediation and provision of habitats for grassland birds. Published research on pretreatment of switchgrass reported glucose yields ranging from 70-90% and xylose yields ranging from 70-100% after hydrolysis and ethanol yields ranging from 72-92% after fermentation. Other potential value-added uses of switchgrass include gasification, bio-oil production, newsprint production and fiber reinforcement in thermoplastic composites. Research on microwave-based pretreatment of switchgrass and coastal bermudagrass is presented in Chapter 3. Pretreatments were carried out by immersing the biomass in dilute chemical reagents and exposing the slurry to microwave radiation at 250 watts for residence times ranging from 5 to 20 minutes. Preliminary experiments identified alkalis as suitable chemical reagents for microwave-based pretreatment. An evaluation of different alkalis identified sodium hydroxide as the most effective alkali reagent. Under optimum pretreatment

  8. Production of bioethanol by direct bioconversion of oil-palm industrial effluent in a stirred-tank bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Zahangir; Kabbashi, Nassereldeen A; Hussin, S Nahdatul I S

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of producing bioethanol from palm-oil mill effluent generated by the oil-palm industries through direct bioconversion process. The bioethanol production was carried out through the treatment of compatible mixed cultures such as Thrichoderma harzianum, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Mucor hiemalis, and yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Simultaneous inoculation of T. harzianum and S. cerevisiae was found to be the mixed culture that yielded the highest ethanol production (4% v/v or 31.6 g/l). Statistical optimization was carried out to determine the operating conditions of the stirred-tank bioreactor for maximum bioethanol production by a two-level fractional factorial design with a single central point. The factors involved were oxygen saturation level (pO(2)%), temperature, and pH. A polynomial regression model was developed using the experimental data including the linear, quadratic, and interaction effects. Statistical analysis showed that the maximum ethanol production of 4.6% (v/v) or 36.3 g/l was achieved at a temperature of 32 degrees C, pH of 6, and pO(2) of 30%. The results of the model validation test under the developed optimum process conditions indicated that the maximum production was increased from 4.6% (v/v) to 6.5% (v/v) or 51.3 g/l with 89.1% chemical-oxygen-demand removal.

  9. Action programme of the Community in the field of efficient energy utilization (REN) - 2nd series, guidelines and recommendations. Proposal for guideline of the Council concerning performance, regulation, maintenance and control of heat generators as well as the insulation of heat distribution networks in new buildings. Aktionsprogramm der Gemeinschaft im Bereich der rationellen Energienutzung (REN) - 2. Serie, Richtlinien und Empfehlung. Vorschlag fuer eine Richtlinie des Rates betreffend Leistung, Regelung, Wartung und Kontrolle von Waermeerzeugern sowie die Isolierung der Waermeverteilungsnetze in Neubauten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    Within the framework of the action program of the Community for efficient energy utilization, the Commission suggests to the Council to issue a guideline on the basis of which member states make sure that every type of heat generator for space heating and central hot water supply in new buildings is subjected to construction type licensing through appropriate inspectorates; heat generators according to this guideline are fossil-fuel fired hot water boilers, steam boilers and warm air generators. Another recommendation is proposed to the member states according to which the heating systems in new public buildings are fitted with automatic control in order that room temperatures do not exceed 20/sup 0/C; in new residential buildings the heat flow is to be regulated in dependence of outer and inner temperature, the temperature of service water is not to exceed 60/sup 0/C, and every room is to be fitted during construction work with measuring devices for heat and hot water supply. A further recommendation concerns the setup of internal organization units for carrying out energy conservation programmes. Finally, it is recommended that individual member states make use of advisory bodies for combined heat/power production; they are to advocate in particular an increase in heat supply from public power stations, if this is economically justified, and a concentration of heat generation and increased application of combined heat/power production in industry.

  10. Perspectives on Art Therapy: The Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Conference on Art Therapy (2nd, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, May 20, 1977).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Ellen A., Ed.; Rubin, Judith A., Ed.

    The proceedings of the 2nd annual Pittsburgh Conference on Art Therapy (with handicapped persons) consists of 44 items including full length papers, summaries of previously published papers, descriptions of workshops, and a limited number of abstracts (submitted by those who chose not to present a paper or workshop description). The papers are…

  11. Report from the 2nd Summer School in Computational Biology organized by the Queen's University of Belfast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Emmert-Streib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a meeting report for the 2nd Summer School in Computational Biology organized by the Queen's University of Belfast. We describe the organization of the summer school, its underlying concept and student feedback we received after the completion of the summer school.

  12. Transition Energy and Oscillator Strength of 1s22p——1s2nd for Fe23+ ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Wen; LI Xin-Ru; HU Mu-Hong; LIU Ying; WANG Ya-Nan

    2008-01-01

    Transition energies, wavelengths and dipole oscillator strengths of 1s22p - 1s2nd (3 ≤ n ≤ 9) for Fe23+ ion are calculated. The fine structure splittings of 1s2nd (n ≤ 9) states for this ion are also evaluated. The higher-order relativistic contribution to the energy is estimated under a hydrogenic approximation. The quantum defect of Rydberg series 1s2nd is determined according to the quantum defect theory. The energies of any highly excited states with (n ≥ 10) for this series can be reliably predicted using these quantum defects as input. The results in this paper excellently agree with the experimental data available in the literature. Combining the quantum defect theory with the discrete oscillator strengths, the discrete oscillator strengths for the transitions from same given initial state 1s22p to highly excited 1s2nd states (n ≥ 10) and the oscillator strength density corresponding to the bound-free transitions is obtained.

  13. 6th World Conference for Graduate Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure 2nd Interdisciplinary Tourism Research Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabia Trentin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the period of 24 to 29 April, were realized the events 6th World Conference for Graduate Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure 2nd Interdisciplinary Tourism Research Conference, organized by the Anatolia – An International Journal of Tourism and Hospitality Research, in Fethiye, Turkey. This text is a brief relate of the events and his contributions for the tourism.

  14. VALOIR 2012 2nd Workshop on Managing the Client Value Creation Process in Agile Projects: Message from the Chairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez, Jennifer; Buglione, Luigi; Daneva, Maya; Dieste, Oscar; Jedlitschka, Andreas; Juristo, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the 2nd Workshop on Managing the Client Value Creation Process in Agile Projects (VALOIR) at the PROFES 2012 conference! The overall goal of VALOIR is to make the knowledge on value creation and management explicit, encouraging the discussion on the use of measurement and estimation appro

  15. 8. Book Review: ‘Broken Bones: Anthropological Analysis of Blunt Force Trauma’ 2 nd edition, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gaur

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 'Broken Bones: Anthropological Analysis of Blunt Force Trauma' 2nd edition, 2014. Editors: Vicki L. Wedel and Alison Galloway; Publisher: Charles C. Thomas, Illinois. pp 479 + xxiii ISBN: 978-0-398-08768-5 (Hard ISBN: 978-0-398-08769-2 (eBook

  16. Observation in a School without Walls: Peer Observation of Teaching in a 2nd-12th Grade Independent School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    What happens when teachers start to observe each other's classes? How do teachers make meaning of observing and being observed? What effects, if any, does requiring peer observation have on the teaching community? This research explores these questions in a qualitative study of peer observation of teaching (POT) in the 2nd-12th grades of an…

  17. Optical DC overlay measurement in the 2nd level process of 65 nm alternating phase shift mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Han, Ke; Lee, Kyung; Korobko, Yulia; Silva, Mary; Chavez, Joas; Irvine, Brian; Henrichs, Sven; Chakravorty, Kishore; Olshausen, Robert; Chandramouli, Mahesh; Mammen, Bobby; Padmanaban, Ramaswamy

    2005-11-01

    Alternating phase shift mask (APSM) techniques help bridge the significant gap between the lithography wavelength and the patterning of minimum features, specifically, the poly line of 35 nm gate length (1x) in Intel's 65 nm technology. One of key steps in making APSM mask is to pattern to within the design tolerances the 2nd level resist so that the zero-phase apertures will be protected by the resist and the pi-phase apertures will be wide open for quartz etch. The ability to align the 2nd level to the 1st level binary pattern, i.e. the 2nd level overlay capability is very important, so is the capability of measuring the overlay accurately. Poor overlay could cause so-called the encroachment after quartz etch, producing undesired quartz bumps in the pi-apertures or quartz pits in the zero-apertures. In this paper, a simple, low-cost optical setup for the 2nd level DC (develop check) overlay measurements in the high volume manufacturing (HVM) of APSM masks is presented. By removing systematic errors in overlay associated with TIS and MIS (tool-induced shift and Mask-process induced shift), it is shown that this setup is capable of supporting the measurement of DC overlay with a tolerance as small as +/- 25 nm. The outstanding issues, such as DC overlay error component analysis, DC - FC (final check) overlay correlation and the overlay linearity (periphery vs. indie), are discussed.

  18. Phase-space resolved measurement of 2nd harmonic ion cyclotron heating using FIDA tomography at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiland, M.; Bilato, R.; Geiger, B.

    2017-01-01

    Recent upgrades to the FIDA (fast-ion D-alpha) diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade allow to reconstruct the fast-ion phase space at several radial positions with decent energy and pitch resolution. These new diagnostic capabilities are applied to study the physics of 2nd harmonic ion cyclotron heating, w...

  19. 2nd E.AMALDI Conférence on Gravitationel Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; CERN. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    From 1-4 July 1997, CERN will play host to the 2nd Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves, which will bring together scientists from all over the world involved in the various aspects of todayÕs gravitational-wave research. The Conference aims to provide a forum for discussing the recent developments in this field and to promote coordinated efforts towards an international network of gravitational-wave detectors. The Conference will consist of three and a half days of plenary sessions at which invited talks and contributed papers will be presented. Topics covered will include: interferometers and resonant-mass detectors; experiments in space; astrophysical sources; stochastic backgrounds; data analysis; and other aspects of todayÕs gravitational-wave research. Mornings will be devoted to experiments and afternoons will include sessions on contributed papers, as well as Òtopical discussion sessionsÓ on subjects such as discrete sources, sources and spectra of stochastic backgrounds, data analysis...

  20. The Development of Information Literacy Assessment for 2nd Grade Students and Their Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ching Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to develop an Information Literacy Assessment for 2nd-grade students and evaluate their performance. The assessment included a regular test and a portfolio assessment. There were 30 multiple-choice items and 3 constructed-response items in the test, while the portfolio assessment was based on the Super3 model. This study was conducted in an elementary school located in southern Taiwan. One hundred and forty-two second graders took the test, and only one class was randomly selected as the subjects for the portfolio assessment. The results showed that the test and portfolio assessment had good validity and reliability. In the fields of library literacy and media literacy, second-grade students with different abilities performed differently, while boys and girls performed similarly. Students performed well in the process of the Super3 model, only in the Plan Phase, they still needed teachers’ help to pose inquiry questions. At last, several suggestions were proposed for information literacy assessment and future research.

  1. Synthesis and electrical characterization of Ca2Nd4Ti6O20 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Raz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ca2Nd4Ti6O20, a layered perov skite structured material was synthesized via a chemical (citrate sol-gel route for the first time using nitrates and alkoxide precursors. Phase analysis of a sample sintered at 1625 °C revealed the formation of an orthorhombic (Pbn21 symmetry. The microstructure of the sample after sintering comprised rod-shaped grains of a size of 1.5 to 6.5µm. The room temperature dielectric constant of the sintered sample was 38 at 100 kHz. The remnant polarization (Pr and the coercive field (Ec were about 400 μC/cm2 and 8.4 kV/cm, respectively. Impedance spectroscopy revealed that the capacitance (13.7 pF and activation energy (1.39 eV of the grain boundary was greater than the capacitance (5.7 pF and activation energy (1.13 eV of the grain.

  2. Boundary value problems for the 2nd-order Seiberg-Witten equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Melchiades Doria

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the nonhomogeneous Dirichlet and Neuman problems for the 2nd-order Seiberg-Witten equation on a compact 4-manifold X admit a regular solution once the nonhomogeneous Palais-Smale condition ℋ is satisfied. The approach consists in applying the elliptic techniques to the variational setting of the Seiberg-Witten equation. The gauge invariance of the functional allows to restrict the problem to the Coulomb subspace 𝒞αℭ of configuration space. The coercivity of the 𝒮𝒲α-functional, when restricted into the Coulomb subspace, imply the existence of a weak solution. The regularity then follows from the boundedness of L∞-norms of spinor solutions and the gauge fixing lemma.

  3. Academic Training - 2nd Term: 08.01.2007 - 31.03.2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME 2nd Term : 08.01.2007 - 31.03.2007 LECTURE SERIES Applied Superconductivity by V. Palmieri, INFN, Padova, It. 17, 18, 19 January 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 String Theory for Pedestrians by B. Zwiebach, M.I.T. Cambridge, USA 29, 30, 31 January 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 29, 30 January TH Auditorium on 31 January Introduction to Supersymmetry by D. Kaplan, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA 12, 13, 14, 15 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 The Hunt for the Higgs Particle by F. Zwirner, University of Padova, It 27, 28 February, 1st March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming by F. Fernandez de Vega 15, 16, March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the WWW, and ...

  4. Academic Training - 2nd Term: 08.01.2007 - 31.03.2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME 2nd Term : 08.01.2007 - 31.03.2007 LECTURE SERIES Applied Superconductivity by V. Palmieri, INFN, Padova, It. 17, 18, 19 January 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 String Theory for Pedestrians by B. Zwiebach, M.I.T. Cambridge, USA 29, 30, 31 January 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 on 29, 30 January TH Auditorium on 31 January Introduction to Supersymmetry by D. Kaplan, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA 12, 13, 14, 15 February 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The Hunt for the Higgs Particle by F. Zwirner, University of Padova, It 27, 28 February, 1st March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic by F. Fernandez de Vega 15, 16, March 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, an...

  5. The validity and reliability of developmental test of visual perception-2nd edition (DTVP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Hockey, Sarah Caitlin

    2013-11-01

    The Developmental Test of Visual Perception-2nd edition (DTVP-2) is frequently used by occupational therapists to evaluate school-age children. It is important that therapists use assessments with established validity and reliability. This study investigated the convergent validity and internal consistency of the DTVP-2. Forty-five healthy participants from Australia, aged 6-12 years, completed the DTVP-2, the Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration-6th edition (VMI), and the Test of Visual Perceptual Skills-3rd edition (TVPS-3). A Spearman rho correlation coefficient was used to investigate the DTVP-2's convergent validity and Cronbach alpha coefficients were used to determine the DTVP-2's internal consistency. Statistically significant correlations between the DTVP-2, VMI, and TVPS-3 total scale scores and subscale scores were found. Internal consistency of items for the DTVP-2, VMI, and TVPS-3 total scores was >0.80 and internal consistency of items for subscale scores was >0.70. The DTVP-2 exhibited evidence of convergent validity with the VMI and TVPS-3, and moderate to high levels of internal consistency.

  6. Study of Application for Excursion Observation Method in Primary School 2nd Grade Social Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ali GAZEL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate how field trips are conducted at 2nd grade of primary schools as a part of social studies course. Data for this research is compiled from 143 permanent Social Studies teachers working throughout 2011–2012 Education Year in the primary schools of central Kütahya and its districts. Data is compiled by using descriptive search model. In the research, after taking expert opinions, a measuring tool developed by the researcher is used. Data obtained from the research were transferred to computer, and analyses were made. In the analysis of the data, frequency and percentage values have been used to determine the distribution. Also a single factor variance analysis and t-test for independent samples have been used to determine the significance of difference between the variables. As a result of the research, it has been realized that insufficient importance is given to field trip method in Social Studies lessons. Most of the teachers using this method apply it in spring months. Teachers usually make use of field trips independent from unit/topic to increase the students’ motivation, and they generally use verbal expression in the class after tours. The biggest difficulty teachers encounter while using tour-observation method is the students’ undisciplined behavior.

  7. Production of artificial ionospheric layers by frequency sweeping near the 2nd gyroharmonic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pedersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial ionospheric plasmas descending from the background F-region have been observed on multiple occasions at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP facility since it reached full 3.6 MW power. Proximity of the transmitter frequency to the 2nd harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency (2fce has been noted as a requirement for their occurrence, and their disappearance after only a few minutes has been attributed to the increasing frequency mismatch at lower altitudes. We report new experiments employing frequency sweeps to match 2fce in the artificial plasmas as they descend. In addition to revealing the dependence on the 2fce resonance, this technique reliably produces descending plasmas in multiple transmitter beam positions and appears to increase their stability and lifetime. High-speed ionosonde measurements are used to monitor the altitude and density of the artificial plasmas during both the formation and decay stages.

  8. [Quality of medical records in Naples (Italy) 2nd University School of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agozzino, E; Esposito, S; Parmeggiani, C; Piro, A; Grippo, N; Di Palma, M A

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate and improve the quality of medical-record keeping, in clinics and surgery departments. The evaluation involved 66 Operative Units (O.U.) of the "2nd University Hospital" in Naples (Italy). 10 medical records for each O.U. were randomly selected, for a total of 660. The quality was evaluated in all sections of medical records using the criteria of completeness, clarity and traceability of the data. The most critical issues are: unclear handwriting in almost all sections, in the whole scarse presence of a discharge letter (17.0%) in surgery (1.4%), almost total absence of the physicians signature in the clinical diary (2.3%). The completeness of medical records (presence of patient's history, physical examination, informed consent) is significantly higher in the surgery departments. The medical records are significantly righter in the clinic departments. In general, a poor quality of medical-record keeping was detected. This indicates the need to improve the quality by involving the staff in the importance of correct compilation.

  9. 2nd Arab Forensic Science & Forensic Medicine Meeting, ASFSFM 2016: Meeting Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsallam Bakdash

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main objectives of Naif Arab University for Security Sciences (NAUSS is to enhance peace, security, and justice in Arab societies through education, research, and advanced professional training in various disciplines of security and forensic sciences. NAUSS strives to improve the academic and professional skills of forensic scientists and security personnel to combat crime and terrorism by utilizing all the available tools of modern technology. NAUSS also realizes the importance of scientific research in the social, economic, and technological development of a society and is, therefore, committed to encouraging and supporting research at every level. NAUSS has given the fields of forensic sciences and forensic medicine a top priority and the attention they deserve. In pursuit of its objectives, and in cooperation with other Arab member organizations, NAUSS launched the Arab Society for Forensic Sciences and Forensic Medicine (ASFSFM in 2013. The Society had the honour of being officially launched by His Royal Highness, Prince Mohammed bin Naif bin Abdul Aziz, Crown Prince, Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister of the Interior, Honorary President of the Council of Arab Ministers of Interior and Chairman of the Supreme Council of NAUSS. The 2nd Arab Forensic Science & Forensic Medicine Meeting (ASFSFM Meeting 2016 was yet another part of the efforts and concern of NAUSS to advance the skills and knowledge of Arab specialists and to facilitate cooperation among forensic scientists and institutions engaged in the practice, education and research of forensic sciences and forensic medicine at various levels.

  10. CELEBRATED APRIL 2nd – INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PERSONS WITH AUTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela KRCHANOSKA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available On April 2nd, the Macedonian Scientific Society for Autism, for the fourth time organized an event on the occasion of the International Day of Persons with Autism. The event with cultural and artistic character was held at the Museum of the Macedonian Struggle under the motto “They are not alone, we are with them”. The huge number of citizens only confirmed the motto. It seemed that the hall of the Museum of the Macedonian Struggle is too small for the warm hearts of the audience. More than 300 guests were present in the hall, among which there were children with autism and their families, prominent professors, doctors, special educators and rehabilitators, psychologists, students and other citizens with glad heart and will who decided to enrich the event with their presence. The event was opened by the violinist Plamenka Trajkovska, which performed one song. After her, the President of the Macedonian Scientific Society for Autism, PhD. Vladimir Trajkovski delivered his speech. The professor told the parents of autistic children, who were present in large number, not to lose hope, to fight for their children, and that the Macedonian Scientific Society for Autism will provide tremendous support and assistance in this struggle.

  11. DRS // CUMULUS Oslo 2013. The 2nd International Conference for Design Education Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Merete Nielsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 14-17 May 2013, Oslo, NorwayWe have received more than 200 full papers for the 2nd International Conference for Design Education Researchers in Oslo.This international conference is a springboard for sharing ideas and concepts about contemporary design education research. Contributors are invited to submit research that deals with different facets of contemporary approaches to design education research. All papers will be double-blind peer-reviewed. This conference is open to research in any aspect and discipline of design educationConference themeDesign Learning for Tomorrow - Design Education from Kindergarten to PhDDesigned artefacts and solutions influence our lives and values, both from a personal and societal perspective. Designers, decision makers, investors and consumers hold different positions in the design process, but they all make choices that will influence our future visual and material culture. To promote sustainability and meet global challenges for the future, professional designers are dependent on critical consumers and a design literate general public.  For this purpose design education is important for all. We propose that design education in general education represents both a foundation for professional design education and a vital requirement for developing the general public’s competence for informed decision making.REGISTRATION AT http://www.hioa.no/DRScumulus

  12. Phase Relations of the CaO-SiO2-Nd2O3 System and the Implication for Rare Earths Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thu Hoai; Malfliet, Annelies; Blanpain, Bart; Guo, Muxing

    2016-06-01

    CaO-SiO2-Nd2O3 slags were equilibrated at 1773 K and 1873 K (1500 °C and 1600 °C) for 24 hours in Ar, and quenched in water to determine the operative phase relations. The composition and crystallinity of the phases in equilibrium were determined by EPMA-WDS and EBSD, respectively. Based on these analyses, the liquid stability region was accurately determined, and a large part of the isothermal section of the phase diagram was constructed. Data resulting from this work can be used to generate a thermodynamic database for rare-earth oxide-containing systems and to support further investigation on separation of rare earths from metallurgical slags or other residues through high-temperature processing.

  13. A simple method to determine bioethanol content in gasoline using two-step extraction and liquid scintillation counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Shunji; Saito, Masaaki

    2009-12-01

    A simple method for determining bioethanol content in gasoline containing bioethanol (denoted as E-gasoline in this study) is urgently required. Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was employed based on the principle that (14)C exists in bioethanol but not in synthetic ethanol. Bioethanol was extracted in two steps by water from E-gasoline containing 3% (E3) or 10% (E10) bioethanol. The (14)C radioactivity was measured by LSC and converted to the amount of bioethanol. The bioethanol content in E-gasoline was determined precisely from the partition coefficient in the extraction and the amount of bioethanol in the water phases: 2.98+/-0.10% for E3 and 10.0+/-0.1% for E10 (means+/-SD; n=3). It appears that this method can be used to determine bioethanol content in E-gasoline quickly and easily.

  14. Experimental investigation of bioethanol liquid phase dehydration using natural clinoptilolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Samira; Ghobadian, Barat; Omidkhah, Mohammad-Reza; Towfighi, Jafar; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    An experimental study of bioethanol adsorption on natural Iranian clinoptilolite was carried out. Dynamic breakthrough curves were used to investigate the best adsorption conditions in bioethanol liquid phase. A laboratory setup was designed and fabricated for this purpose. In order to find the best operating conditions, the effect of liquid pressure, temperature and flow rate on breakthrough curves and consequently, maximum ethanol uptake by adsorbent were studied. The effects of different variables on final bioethanol concentration were investigated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The results showed that by working at optimum condition, feed with 96% (v/v) initial ethanol concentration could be purified up to 99.9% (v/v). In addition, the process was modeled using Box-Behnken model and optimum operational conditions to reach 99.9% for final ethanol concentration were found equal to 10.7 °C, 4.9 bar and 8 mL/min for liquid temperature, pressure and flow rate, respectively. Therefore, the selected natural Iranian clinoptilolite was found to be a promising adsorbent material for bioethanol dehydration process.

  15. Thermodynamic evaluation of hydrogen production via bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zsolt; Cormos, Ana-Maria; Imre-Lucaci, Árpád; Cormos, Cǎlin C.

    2013-11-01

    In this article, a thermodynamic analysis for bioethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production is presented. Bioethanol is a newly proposed renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Reforming of bioethanol provides a promising method for hydrogen production from renewable resources. Steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) takes place under the action of a metal catalyst capable of breaking C-C bonds into smaller molecules. A large domain for the water/bioethanol molar ratio as well as the temperature and average pressure has been used in the present work. The interval of investigated temperature was 100-800°C, the pressure was in the range of 1-10 bar and the molar ratio was between 3-25. The variations of gaseous species concentration e.g. H2, CO, CO2, CH4 were analyzed. The concentrations of the main products (H2 and CO) at lower temperature are smaller than the ones at higher temperature due to by-products formation (methane, carbon dioxide, acetylene etc.). The concentration of H2 obtained in the process using high molar ratio (>20) is higher than the one at small molar ratio (near stoichiometric). When the pressure is increased the hydrogen concentration decreases. The results were compared with literature data for validation purposes.

  16. Thermodynamic evaluation of hydrogen production via bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zsolt; Cormos, Ana-Maria; Imre-Lucaci, Árpád; Cormos, Călin C. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Arany Janos 11, RO-400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    In this article, a thermodynamic analysis for bioethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production is presented. Bioethanol is a newly proposed renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Reforming of bioethanol provides a promising method for hydrogen production from renewable resources. Steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) takes place under the action of a metal catalyst capable of breaking C-C bonds into smaller molecules. A large domain for the water/bioethanol molar ratio as well as the temperature and average pressure has been used in the present work. The interval of investigated temperature was 100-800°C, the pressure was in the range of 1-10 bar and the molar ratio was between 3-25. The variations of gaseous species concentration e.g. H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} were analyzed. The concentrations of the main products (H{sub 2} and CO) at lower temperature are smaller than the ones at higher temperature due to by-products formation (methane, carbon dioxide, acetylene etc.). The concentration of H2 obtained in the process using high molar ratio (>20) is higher than the one at small molar ratio (near stoichiometric). When the pressure is increased the hydrogen concentration decreases. The results were compared with literature data for validation purposes.

  17. Evaluation and Modification of Processes for Bioethanol Separation and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnner P Sitompul

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns on process evaluation and modification for bioethanol separation and production by applying pinch technology. Further, the paper is also focused on obtaining a most energy-efficient process among several processes. Three basic process configurations of bioethanol separation and production were selected for this study. The three separations and production systems are Othmer process, Barbet process and a separation process that operates under vacuum condition. Basically, each process is combination of Danish Distilleries process with a separation system yielding 95% (v/v bioethanol. The production capacity of the plant is estimated about 4 x 107 litre of bioethanol 95% (v/v per year. The result of the studies shows that the most energy efficient process among the three processes evaluated is the Othmer process, followed by the Barbet process and the process involving vacuum operation. The evaluation also shows that further energy saving can be carried for Barbet and Othmer process configuration when Tmin = 10oC for heat exchange possible.

  18. Study of Wastewaters Contaminated with Heavy Metals in Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartošová Alica

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol as a substitute for traditional sources of energy, especially oil transport, is currently one of the most researched alternative motor fuels. Normally, bioethanol is produced from agricultural crops such as sugar cane or corn. However, this is counter-productive, because agriculture is primarily serving to ensure enough food for the people. It is therefore necessary to look for new production of appropriate non-food crops or find an added value to this process. Utilisation of contaminated water from metal industry could be one of them. Based on the hypothesis of reduction of some toxic metals with higher oxidation number is opening the possibility of using this wastewater in alcohol fermentation of any kind of biomass. In this study, hexavalent chromium Cr(VI was used as a model contaminant in the process of aerobic fermentation of corn to bioethanol. To determine the reduction potential of glucose to Cr(VI, and to quantitatively determinate the glucose content after saccharification, UV/VIS spectrophotometry was used. As a method of qualitative determination of fermentation product, gas chromatography with mass detection was used. Infrared spectrometry was used for qualitative analyses of produced ethanol. Based on the established results shown in this paper, we can conclude that the presence of hexavalent chromium in the fermentation process does not have a significant negative impact, while offering the opportunity of using the industrial wastewaters for the production of bioethanol fuel.

  19. Study of Wastewaters Contaminated with Heavy Metals in Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartošová, Alica; Blinová, Lenka

    2017-06-01

    Bioethanol as a substitute for traditional sources of energy, especially oil transport, is currently one of the most researched alternative motor fuels. Normally, bioethanol is produced from agricultural crops such as sugar cane or corn. However, this is counter-productive, because agriculture is primarily serving to ensure enough food for the people. It is therefore necessary to look for new production of appropriate non-food crops or find an added value to this process. Utilisation of contaminated water from metal industry could be one of them. Based on the hypothesis of reduction of some toxic metals with higher oxidation number is opening the possibility of using this wastewater in alcohol fermentation of any kind of biomass. In this study, hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) was used as a model contaminant in the process of aerobic fermentation of corn to bioethanol. To determine the reduction potential of glucose to Cr(VI), and to quantitatively determinate the glucose content after saccharification, UV/VIS spectrophotometry was used. As a method of qualitative determination of fermentation product, gas chromatography with mass detection was used. Infrared spectrometry was used for qualitative analyses of produced ethanol. Based on the established results shown in this paper, we can conclude that the presence of hexavalent chromium in the fermentation process does not have a significant negative impact, while offering the opportunity of using the industrial wastewaters for the production of bioethanol fuel.

  20. Continuous Cellulosic Bioethanol Fermentation by Cyclic Fed-Batch Cocultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, He-Long; He, Qiang; He, Zhili; Hemme, Christopher L.; Wu, Liyou

    2013-01-01

    Cocultivation of cellulolytic and saccharolytic microbial populations is a promising strategy to improve bioethanol production from the fermentation of recalcitrant cellulosic materials. Earlier studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of cocultivation in enhancing ethanolic fermentation of cellulose in batch fermentation. To further enhance process efficiency, a semicontinuous cyclic fed-batch fermentor configuration was evaluated for its potential in enhancing the efficiency of cellulose fermentation using cocultivation. Cocultures of cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum LQRI and saccharolytic Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus strain X514 were tested in the semicontinuous fermentor as a model system. Initial cellulose concentration and pH were identified as the key process parameters controlling cellulose fermentation performance in the fixed-volume cyclic fed-batch coculture system. At an initial cellulose concentration of 40 g liter−1, the concentration of ethanol produced with pH control was 4.5-fold higher than that without pH control. It was also found that efficient cellulosic bioethanol production by cocultivation was sustained in the semicontinuous configuration, with bioethanol production reaching 474 mM in 96 h with an initial cellulose concentration of 80 g liter−1 and pH controlled at 6.5 to 6.8. These results suggested the advantages of the cyclic fed-batch process for cellulosic bioethanol fermentation by the cocultures. PMID:23275517

  1. Pressurized liquidextraction of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) with bioethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Jiajin; Guo, Zheng; Glasius, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    To develop an efficient green extraction approach for recovery of bioactive compounds from natural plants, we examined the potential of pressurized liquidextraction (PLE) of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) with bioethanol/water as solvents. The advantages of PLE over other extraction approaches...

  2. Ultrasound-assisted bioethanol production from waste newspaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2015-11-01

    The present work deals with intensification of bioethanol production from waste newspaper using Saccharomyces cerevisiae using ultrasonic irradiations. The effect of different process parameters such as application of ultrasonic irradiation at different growth phases, irradiation time, ultrasonic power and duty cycle on the bioethanol production has been investigated. The favorable conditions for the maximum yield were established as application of ultrasonic irradiation (duration of 10 min) to fermentation broth at 12 h of growth phase with 25 kHz frequency, 160 W power and 20% duty cycle. The bioethanol productivity was increased by 1.8 times from 7.8 to 14.1 g/L compared with the non-sonicated control fermentation. Decrease in glucose concentration from 0.63% to 0.2% w/v in ultrasound-assisted fermentation confirmed the improved substrate uptake of the microbial cell due to the application of ultrasound. ESEM analysis also confirmed the changes in the cell morphology leading to improved cell permeability. Results were fitted to an unstructured kinetic model comprising of the kinetic and physiological parameters. Overall, the work has demonstrated an intensified approach for the bioethanol production based on the use of ultrasound.

  3. Energy Efficient Bioethanol Purification by Heat Pump Assisted Extractive Distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, Anton A.; Luo, Hao; Bildea, Costin Sorin

    2015-01-01

    The purification of bioethanol fuel requires an energy demanding separation process to concentrate the diluted streams obtained in the fermentation stage and to overcome the azeotropic behaviour of ethanol-water mixture. The classic separation sequence consists of three distillation columns that

  4. The water footprint of sweeteners and bio-ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Hoekstra, A.Y.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing demand for food together with a growing demand for energy crops result in an increasing demand for and competition over water. Sugar cane, sugar beet and maize are not only essential food crops, but also important feedstock for bio-ethanol. Crop growth requires water, a scarce resource

  5. Bioethanol production from date palm fruit waste fermentation using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lenovo

    2016-07-27

    Jul 27, 2016 ... and is significant for industrial development, investment, and use. ... Actually, due to modern biotechnologies, it is possible to valorise the ... Keywords: Algerian Sahara, bioethanol, dates-palms waste valorization, distillation, fermentation, solar .... with the solar water heater, in order to reduce the energy.

  6. Progress in the production of bioethanol on starch-based feedstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragiša Savić

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol produced from renewable biomass, such as sugar, starch, or lignocellulosic materials, is one of the alternative energy resources, which is both renewable and environmentally friendly. Although, the priority in global future ethanol production is put on lignocellulosic processing, which is considered as one of the most promising second-generation biofuel technologies, the utilizetion of lignocellulosic material for fuel ethanol is still under improvement. Sugar- based (molasses, sugar cane, sugar beet and starch-based (corn, wheat, triticale, potato, rice, etc. feedstock are still currently predominant at the industrial level and they are, so far, economically favorable compared to lingocelluloses. Currently, approx. 80 % of total world ethanol production is obtained from the fermentation of simple sugars by yeast. In Serbia, one of the most suitable and available agricultural raw material for the industrial ethanol production are cereals such as corn, wheat and triticale. In addition, surpluses of this feedstock are being produced in our country constantly. In this paper, a brief review of the state of the art in bioethanol production and biomass availability is given, pointing out the progress possibilities on starch-based production. The progress possibilities are discussed in the domain of feedstock choice and pretreatment, optimization of fermentation, process integration and utilization of the process byproducts.

  7. Combined Biogas and Bioethanol Production: Opportunities and Challenges for Industrial Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Cesaro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the increasing energy requirements along with the need to face the consequences of climate change have driven the search for renewable energy sources, in order to replace as much as possible the use of fossil fuels. In this context biomass has generated great interest as it can be converted into energy via several routes, including fermentation and anaerobic digestion. The former is the most common option to produce ethanol, which has been recognized as one of the leading candidates to substitute a large fraction of the liquid fuels produced from oil. As the economic competitiveness of bioethanol fermentation processes has to be enhanced in order to promote its wider implementation, the most recent trends are directed towards the use of fermentation by-products within anaerobic digestion. The integration of both fermentation and anaerobic digestion, in a biorefinery concept, would allow the production of ethanol along with that of biogas, which can be used to produce heat and electricity, thus improving the overall energy balance. This work aims at reviewing the main studies on the combination of both bioethanol and biogas production processes, in order to highlight the strength and weakness of the integrated treatment for industrial application.

  8. Reduction of water consumption in bioethanol production from triticale by recycling the stillage liquid phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Gumienna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background. The distillery stillage is a major and arduous byproduct generated during ethanol production in distilleries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of the stillage recirculation in the mashing process of triticale for non-byproducts production and reducing the fresh water consumption. The number of recirculation cycles which can be applied without disturbances in the ethanol fermentation process was investigated. Material and methods. Winter triticale BOGO and “Ethanol Red” Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast were used in the experiments. The method of non-pressure cooking was used for gelatinizingthe triticale, commercial α-amylase SPEZYME ETHYL and glucoamylase FERMENZYME L-400 were applied for starch liquefaction and saccharification. The process was conducted at 30°C for 72 h, next after distillation the stillage was centrifuged and the liquid fraction was used instead of 75% of process water. Results. Ethanol yield from triticale fermentations during 40 cycles ranged between 82% and 95% of theoretical yield preserving yeast vitality and quantity on the same level. The obtained distillates were characterized with enhanced volatile compounds (fusel oil, esters, aldehydes, methanol as well as protein and potassium concentrations. Conclusions. The liquid part of stillage was proved that can be reused instead of water in bioethanol production from triticale, without disturbing the fermentation process. This investigated solution of distillery byproducts utilization (liquid phase of stillage constitutes the way which could significantly decrease the bioethanol production costs by reducing the water consumption, as well as wastewater production.  

  9. Quarterly report on the electric power industry in the Federal Republic of Germany. 2nd quarter 1997. Power generation in publicly-owned electric utilities, the industrial independent units and the Deutsche Bahn AG, and overall power consumption in the Federal Republic of Germany; Vierteljahresbericht ueber die Elektrizitaetswirtschaft in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. 2. Vierteljahr 1997. Stromerzeugung der oeffentlichen Elektrizitaetswerke, der industriellen Eigenanlagen und der Deutschen Bahn AG sowie Gesamtstromverbrauch in der Bundesrepublik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The report provides data on public electricity supply, on power generation in plants of the mining industry and the manufacturing industry, and on the German Federal Railways. The data have been derived from the monthly reports of the Federal Office of Statistics. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Bericht enthaelt Zahlen fuer die oeffentliche Versorgung, fuer die Eigenanlagen im Bergbau und Verarbeitenden Gewerbe und fuer die Deutsche Bundesbahn. Die Zahlen sind den monatlichen Berichten des Statistischen Bundesamtes entnommen. (orig.)

  10. Quarterly report on the electric power industry in the Federal Republic of Germany. 2nd quarter 1999. Power generation in publicly-owend electric utilities, the industrial independent units and the Federal Railways, and overall power consumption in the Federal Republic of Germany; Vierteljahresbericht ueber die Elektrizitaetswirtschaft in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. 2. Vierteljahr 1999. Stromerzeugung der oeffentlich Elektrizitaetswerke, der industriellen Eigenanlagen und der Deutschen Bahn AG sowie Gesamtstromverbrauch in der Bundesrepublik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, L.

    1999-11-01

    The report provides data on public electricity supply, on power generation in plants of the mining industry and the manufacturing industry, and on the German Federal Railways. The data have been derived from the monthly reports of the Federal Office of Statistics. (orig.) [German] Der Bericht enthaelt Zahlen fuer die oeffentliche Versorgung, fuer die Eigenanlagen im Bergbau und Verarbeitenden Gewerbe und fuer die Deutsche Bundesbahn. Die Zahlen sind den monatlichen Berichten des Statistischen Bundesamtes entnommen. (orig.)

  11. Quarterly report on the electric power industry in the Federal Republic of Germany. 2nd quarter 2000. Power generation in public-owned electric utilities, the industrial independent units, and the Deutsche Bahn AG, and overall power consumption in the Federal Republic of Germany; Vierteljahresbericht ueber die Elektrizitaetswirtschaft in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. 2. Vierteljahr 2000. Stromerzeugung der oeffentlichen Elektrizitaetswerke, der industriellen Eigenanlagen und der Deutschen Bahn AG sowie Gesamtstromverbrauch in der Bundesrepublik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, L.

    2001-01-01

    The report provides data on public electricity supply, on power generation in plants of the mining industry and the manufacturing industry, and on the German Federal Railways. The data have been derived from the monthly reports of the Federal Office of Statistics. (HS) [German] Der Bericht enthaelt Zahlen fuer die oeffentliche Versorgung, fuer die Eigenanlagen im Bergbau und Verarbeitendes Gewerbe und fuer die Deutsche Bundesbahn. Die Zahlen sind den monatlichen Berichten des Statistischen Bundesamtes entnommen. (HS)

  12. Quarterly report on the electric power industry in the Federal Republic of Germany. 2nd quarter 1998. Power generation in publicly-owned electric utilities, the industrial independent units and the Deutsche Bahn AG, and overall power consumption in the Federal Republic of Germany; Vierteljahresbericht ueber die Elektrizitaetswirtschaft in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. 2. Vierteljahr 1998. Stromerzeugung der oeffentlichen Elektrizitaetswerke, der industriellen Eigenanlagen und der Deutschen Bahn AG sowie Gesamtstromverbrauch in der Bundesrepublik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, L.

    1998-10-01

    The report provides data on public electricity supply, on power generation in plants of the mining industry and the manufacturing industry, and on the German Federal Railways. The data have been derived from the monthly reports of the Federal Office of Statistics. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Bericht enthaelt Zahlen fuer die oeffentliche Versorgung, fuer die Eigenanlagen im Bergbau und Verarbeitenden Gewerbe und fuer die Deutsche Bundesbahn. Die Zahlen sind den monatlichen Berichten des Statistischen Bundesamtes entnommen. (orig.)

  13. FOOD VS. FUEL – A TURNING POINT FOR BIOETHANOL?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Harlander

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently concerns have been raised that biofuels would affect food prices. Bioethanol is made from sugar or starch containing plants that are also used in food production. In public perception this led to an emotional resistance against biofuels that in real terms is not substantiated. Generally, biofuels are a political product. Triggered by the oil crisis in the early 1970ies national fuel ethanol programmes were first launched in Brazil and in the United States. Concerns regarding energy security and sustainability together with the option of new markets for surplus agricultural production in recent years led to similar policy measures in the European Union and in numerous countries around the globe. Accordingly the industry invested heavily in new bioethanol plants - especially in the US – and created an additional demand for corn and wheat with some record-breaking prices noted in late 2007. A look back into statistics shows a drastic decline of real prices for decades and by now they are only back at the level of 30 years ago. One important detail is the real portion of grain used for bioethanol, which is still only 1.6 percent in the EU and therefore unlikely to be the real driver for the price development. Moreover the share of raw material is up to 70% of bioethanol production cost that makes the bioethanol industry itself a victim of price increases. Subsequently investor interest in this field slowed down, a development also watched in the US. The prospects of the agricultural markets of the European Commission conclude that Europe can do both, nutrition and biofuels.

  14. The water footprint of sweeteners and bio-ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbens-Leenes, Winnie; Hoekstra, Arjen Y

    2012-04-01

    An increasing demand for food together with a growing demand for energy crops result in an increasing demand for and competition over water. Sugar cane, sugar beet and maize are not only essential food crops, but also important feedstock for bio-ethanol. Crop growth requires water, a scarce resource. This study aims to assess the green, blue and grey water footprint (WF) of sweeteners and bio-ethanol from sugar cane, sugar beet and maize in the main producing countries. The WFs of sweeteners and bio-ethanol are mainly determined by the crop type that is used as a source and by agricultural practise and agro-climatic conditions; process water footprints are relatively small. The weighted global average WF of sugar cane is 209 m(3)/tonne; for sugar beet this is 133 m(3)/tonne and for maize 1222 m(3)/tonne. Large regional differences in WFs indicate that WFs of crops for sweeteners and bio-ethanol can be improved. It is more favourable to use maize as a feedstock for sweeteners or bio-ethanol than sugar beet or sugar cane. The WF of sugar cane contributes to water stress in the Indus and Ganges basins. In the Ukraine, the large grey WF of sugar beet contributes to water pollution. In some western European countries, blue WFs of sugar beet and maize need a large amount of available blue water for agriculture. The allocation of the limited global water resources to bio-energy on a large scale will be at the cost of water allocation to food and nature.

  15. Potential of bioethanol as a chemical building block for biorefineries: Preliminary sustainability assessment of 12 bioethanol-based products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posada Duque, J.A.; Patel, A.D.; Roes, A.L.; Blok, K.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Patel, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present and apply aquick screening method and to identify the most promising bioethanol derivatives using an early- stage sustainability assessment method that compares abioetha- nol-base d conversion route to its respective petrochemical counterpart. The method

  16. Simultaneous measurements of three velocity components by a flying hot-wire method using an x-array hot-wire probe. 2nd Report. Calibration technique and its application to a flow field downstream of a vortex generator; X gata nessen probe wo mochiita flying hot wire ho ni yoru sokudo no sanhoko seibun no doji keisoku. 2. Nessen sensor no kosei hoho to uzu hasseiki karyu no keisokurei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiino, T. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, K.; Shizawa, T.; Honami, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-12-25

    This paper proposes a calibration technique for a flying hot-wire method that uses with an X-array hot-wire probe. The flying hot-wire system moves the hot-wire probe in the span wise Z-direction of the flow field. The calibration of yaw and pitch angle sensitivities of the probe is of utmost importance to this system. After careful calibration, the system is applied to a three-dimensional flow to obtain three components of the mean velocity and six components of the Reynolds stress. The mean velocities and the Reynolds shear stresses downstream of a pair of vortex generators embedded in a two-dimensional boundary layer show the same profiles as those obtained with an ordinary X-array hot-wire probe. In one traverse, the flying hot-wire system can measure 60 points of six components of the Reynolds stress with good accuracy. 6 refs., 15 figs.

  17. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technological Processes (IC-CMTP2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, Gömze A.

    2013-12-01

    Competitiveness is one of the most important factors in our life and it plays a key role in the efficiency both of organizations and societies. The more scientifically supported and prepared organizations develop more competitive materials with better physical, chemical and biological properties and the leading companies apply more competitive equipment and technology processes. The aims of the 2nd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technology Processes (ic-cmtp2) are the following: Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of material, biological, environmental and technology sciences; Change information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implantations. Promote the communication between the scientist of different nations, countries and continents. Among the major fields of interest are materials with extreme physical, chemical, biological, medical, thermal, mechanical properties and dynamic strength; including their crystalline and nano-structures, phase transformations as well as methods of their technological processes, tests and measurements. Multidisciplinary applications of materials science and technological problems encountered in sectors like ceramics, glasses, thin films, aerospace, automotive and marine industry, electronics, energy, construction materials, medicine, biosciences and environmental sciences are of particular interest. In accordance to the program of the conference ic-cmtp2, more than 250 inquiries and registrations from different organizations were received. Researchers from 36 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa, North and South America arrived at the venue of conference. Including co-authors, the research work of more than 500 scientists are presented in this volume. Professor Dr Gömze A László Chair, ic-cmtp2 The PDF also contains lists of the boards, session chairs and sponsors.

  18. A convective divertor utilizing a 2nd-order magnetic field null

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognlien, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    New results motivate a detailed study of a magnetic divertor concept characterized by strong plasma convection near a poloidal magnetic field (Bp) null region. The configuration is that of a near-2nd-order Bp null (Bp ~ Δ r2) , as in a snowflake divertor. The concept has 2 key features: (A) Convection spreads the heat flux between multiple divertor legs and further broadens the heat-flux profile within each leg, thereby greatly reducing target-plate heat loads. (B) The heat flux is further reduced by line radiation in each leg in detachment-like ionization zones. Theory indicates that convective turbulence arises when the poloidal plasma beta, βp = 2μ0nT/B p 2 >> 1 . Measurements in TCV now more fully quantify earlier NSTX and TCV observations of plasma mixing, and related modeling of TCV indicates that strongly enhanced null-region transport is present. Convective mixing provides a stabilizing mechanism to prevent the ionization fronts (hydrogenic and impurity) from collapsing to a highly radiating core MARFE. Also, the radiating zone maps to a very small region at the midplane owing to the very weak Bp in the convective region, thus minimizing its impact on the core plasma. Detailed calculations are reported that combine features A and B noted above. The plasma mixing mechanisms are described together with the corresponding transport model implemented in the 2D UEDGE edge transport code. UEDGE calculations are presented that quantify the roles of mixing, impurity radiation, and detachment stability for a realistic snowflake configuration. Work in collaboration with D.D. Ryutov, S.I. Krasheninnikov, and M.V. Umansky. Performed for the U.S. DoE by LLNS, LLC, LLNL, under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Re-fighting the 2nd Anglo-Boer War: historians in the trenches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Van der Waag

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Some one hundred years ago, South Africa was tom apart by the 2nd Anglo- Boer War (1899-1902. The war was a colossal psychological experience fought at great expense: It cost Britain twenty-two thousand men and £223 million. The social, economic and political cost to South Africa was greater than the statistics immediately indicate: at least ten thousand fighting men in addition to the camp deaths, where a combination of indifference and incompetence resulted in the deaths of 27 927 Boers and at least 14 154 Black South Africans. Yet these numbers belie the consequences. It was easy for the British to 'forget' the pain of the war, which seemed so insignificant after the losses sustained in 1914-18. With a long history of far-off battles and foreign wars, the British casualties of the Anglo-Boer War became increasingly insignificant as opposed to the lesser numbers held in the collective Afrikaner mind. This impact may be stated somewhat more candidly in terms of the war participation ratio for the belligerent populations. After all, not all South Africans fought in uniform. For the Australian colonies these varied between 4½per thousand (New South Wales to 42.3 per thousand (Tasmania. New Zealand 8 per thousand, Britain 8½ per thousand: and Canada 12.3 per thousand; while in parts of South Africa this was perhaps as high as 900 per thousand. The deaths and high South African participation ratio, together with the unjustness of the war in the eyes of most Afrikaners, introduced bitterness, if not a hatred, which has cast long shadows upon twentieth-century South Africa.

  20. Impact of bioethanol fuel implementation in transport based on modelled acetaldehyde concentration in the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundvor, Ingrid; López-Aparicio, Susana

    2014-10-15

    This study shows the results obtained from emission and air dispersion modelling of acetaldehyde in the city of Oslo and associated with the circulation of bioethanol vehicles. Two scenarios of bioethanol implementation, both realistic and hypothetical, have been considered under winter conditions; 1) realistic baseline scenario, which corresponds to the current situation in Oslo where one bus line is running with bioethanol (E95; 95% ethanol-5% petrol) among petrol and diesel vehicles; and 2) a hypothetical scenario characterized by a full implementation of high-blend bioethanol (i.e. E85) as fuel for transportation, and thus an entire bioethanol fleet. The results indicate that a full implementation of bioethanol will have a certain impact on urban air quality due to direct emissions of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde emissions are estimated to increase by 233% and concentration levels increase up to 650% with regard to the baseline.

  1. Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Karsten; Thyø, Kathrine Anker; Wenzel, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    of whether a global or European perspective is applied, the amount of biomass, which can become available for bioethanol or other energy uses, will be physically and economically constrained. This implies that use of biomass or land for bioethanol production will most likely happen at the expense......Among the existing environmental assessments of bioethanol, the studies suggesting an environmental benefit of bioethanol all ignore the constraints on the availability of biomass resources and the implications competition for biomass has on the assessment. We show that toward 2030, regardless...... of alternative uses. In this perspective, we show that for the case of a new advanced bioethanol technology, in terms of reducing greenhouse emissions and fossil fuel dependency, more is lost than gained when prioritizing biomass or land for bioethanol. Technology pathways involving heat and power production and...

  2. The Influence of Instructional Climates on Time Spent in Management Tasks and Physical Activity of 2nd-Grade Students during Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Samuel W.; Robinson, Leah E.; Webster, E. Kipling; Rudisill, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of two physical education (PE) instructional climates (mastery, performance) on the percentage of time students spent in a) moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and b) management tasks during PE in 2nd-grade students. Forty-eight 2nd graders (mastery, n = 23; performance, n = 25)…

  3. The Influence of Instructional Climates on Time Spent in Management Tasks and Physical Activity of 2nd-Grade Students during Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Samuel W.; Robinson, Leah E.; Webster, E. Kipling; Rudisill, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of two physical education (PE) instructional climates (mastery, performance) on the percentage of time students spent in a) moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and b) management tasks during PE in 2nd-grade students. Forty-eight 2nd graders (mastery, n = 23; performance, n = 25)…

  4. Evaluation of the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition, Screening Test for Use in States' Child Outcomes Measurement Systems under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaum, Batya; Gattamorta, Karina A.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition, Screening Test (BDI-2 ST) for use in states' child outcomes accountability systems under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Complete Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition (BDI-2), assessment data were obtained for 142 children, ages 2 to 62 months, who…

  5. Process design and sustainability in the production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Felipe; Quintero,Julián; Morales,Marjorie; Conejeros, Raúl; Cardona, Carlos; Aroca, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bioethanol is produced mainly from sugar cane and corn. In the last years it has been subject of debate due to the effects in food prices and land use change. The use of lignocellulosic materials for bioethanol production, such as agroindustry, forestry and municipal residues, wood or dendroenergetic species, has been proposed as a sustainable way for producing this biofuel. The design of a sustainable process for producing bioethanol requires a methodological approach whereby eco...

  6. The 2nd CAAP Convention & International Symposium on Modern and Contemporary English Literatures (June 8 -9, 2013 )%The 2nd CAAP Convention & International Symposium on Modern and Contemporary English Literatures (June 8 -9, 2013 )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    In order to further promote literary scholarship and international academic exchange, the University of Pennsylvania-based Chinese/American Association for Poetry and Poetics (CAAP) will collaborate with the School of Foreign Languages and School of Humanities of Central China Normal University, Foreign Literature Studies, and Forum for World Literature Studies in hosting "The 2nd CAAP Convention and International Symposium on Literatures in English" (June 8 -9, 2013) in Wuhan, China. Scholars and writers all over the world are welcome.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Zeolite Membrane for Bioethanol Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilina Purbasari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of bioethanol as an alternative fuel with a purity of more than 99.5% wt has prompted research on bioethanol purification. One of the promising methods used for bioethanol purification is pervaporation membrane. This research is aimed to prepare and characterize zeolite membranes for pervaporation membrane. The membrane preparation consisted of two stages, namely support preparation and zeolite deposition on the support. In support preparation, α- alumina and kaolin with specific composition (50:30; 40:40; 50:30 was mixed with additives and water. After pugging and aging process, the mixture became paste and extruded into tubular shape. The tube was then calcined at temperature of 1250 °C for 3 hours. After that, zeolite 4A was deposited on the tubes using clear solution made of 10 %wt zeolite and 90 %wt water and heated at temperature of 80 °C for 3 hours. Furthermore, the resulting zeolite membranes was washed with deionized water for 5 minutes and dried in oven at temperature of 100 °C for 24 hours. Characterization of zeolite membranes included mechanical strength test, XRD, and SEM. In the mechanical strength test, the membrane sample with α- alumina:kaolin = 50:30 (membrane A has the highest mechanical strength of 46.65 N/mm2. Result of XRD analysis for the membrane A indicated that mullite and corundum phases were formed, which mullite phase was more dominant. Meanwhile the result of SEM analysis shows that zeolite crystals have been formed and covered the pores support, but the deposition of zeolite has not been optimal yet. The performance examination for bioethanol purification showed that the membrane could increase the purity of bioethanol from 95% to 98.5% wt. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 23rd October 2012; Revised: 15th February 2013; Accepted: 16th February 2013[How to Cite: Purbasari, A., Istirokhatun, T., Devi, A.M., Mahsunnah, L. , Susanto, H. (2013. Preparation and Characterization of Zeolite

  8. CPAPD Held the 9th Joint Conference of Member Organizations and The 2nd Conference of the Board of Directors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>On April 4,2014,the Chinese People’s Association for Peace and Disarmament(CPAPD)held the 9th Joint Conference of Member Organizations and the 2nd Conference of the Board of Directors in Beijing.Yan Junqi,Vice-Chairperson of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress(NPC):Han Qide,Vice-Chairman of the National Committee of the

  9. 2nd Nordic NJF Seminar on Reindeer Husbandry Research "Reindeer herding and land use management - Nordic perspectives"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Soppela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The 2nd NJF Seminar on Reindeer Husbandry Research was held at the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland from 19 to 21 October 2014. The seminar was organised under the framework of Reindeer Husbandry Research Section of NJF (Nordic Association of Agricultural Scientists, established in 2012. Over 100 Nordic and international delegates including researchers, managers, educators, students and reindeer herders participated in the seminar.

  10. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Louthan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); PNNL, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history, residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed to

  11. Public Health Genomics European Network: Report from the 2nd Network Meeting in Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Rosenkötter

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Dear Sirs,

    The Public Health Genomics European Network (PHGEN is a mapping exercise for the responsible and effective integration of genome-based knowledge and technologies into public policy and health services for the benefit of population health. In 2005, the European Commission called for a “networking exercise…to lead to an inventory report on genetic determinants relevant for public health”[1], this lead to the funding of a PHGEN three year project (EC project 2005313.This project started in early 2006 with a kick-off meeting in Bielefeld / Germany.The project work is comprised of, according to the public health trias, three one year periods of assessment, policy development and assurance.At the end of the assessment phase a network meeting was held in Rome from January, 31st to February 2nd 2007 with over 90 network members and network observers in attendance. The participants represented different organisations throughout the European Union with expertise in areas such as human genetics and other medical disciplines,epidemiology,public health, law, ethics, political and social sciences. The aim of the meeting was to wrap up the last year’s assessment period and to herald the policy development phase.The assessment period of PHGEN was characterised by several activities: - Contact and cooperation with other European and internationally funded networks and projects on public health genomics or related issues (e.g. EuroGenetest, EUnetHTA, Orphanet, IPTS, PHOEBE, GRaPHInt, P3G - Identification of key experts in public health genomics in the European members states, applicant countries and EFTA/EEA countries from different disciplines (e.g. human genetics and other medical disciplines, public health, law, philosophy, epidemiology, political and social sciences - Building up national task forces on public health genomics in the above mentioned countries - Establishing and work in three working groups: public health genomics

  12. Archaeometric study of glass beads from the 2nd century BC cemetery of Numantia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Heras, Manuel

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent archaeologícalf ieldwork undertaken in the Celtiberian cremation necropolis of Numantia (Soria, Spain has provided a group of glass beads from the 2nd century BC. Such glass beads were part, together with other metallic and ceramic items, of the offerings deposited with the dead. They are ring-shaped in typology and deep-blue, amber, or semitransparent white in colour. This paper reports results derived from the chemical and microstructural characterization carried out on a representative sample set of this group of beads. The main goal of the research was to find out about their production technology to explore their probable provenance. In addítion, corrosion mechanisms were also assessed to determine the influence of crematíon on the beads' structure. The resulting data suggest that these blue and amber beads were made using soda-lime silicate glass, whereas semi-transparent white ones were manufactured from alumino-silicate glass. It has also determined that some transition metal oxides were used as chromophores, as well as lead oxide for decoration.

    La reciente excavación de la necrópolis celtibérica de Numancia (Garray, Soria ha permitido recuperar un conjunto de cuentas de vidrio del siglo II a.C. Las cuentas, junto con otros objetos de metaly cerámica, formaban parte de las ofrendas depositadas con el difunto, siendo de tipología anular y coloreadas en azul oscuro, ambar y blanco semitransparente. Este trabajo presenta los resultados obtenidos en la caracterización química y microestructural de una muestra representativa de este conjunto. El objetivo principal de la investigación consistió en recabar información sobre su tecnología de manufactura y evaluar su posible procedencia. Asimismo, también se investigaron sus mecanismos de corrosión para determinar si la cremación había inducido cambios en su estructura. Los resultados indican que las cuentas azules y ámbar se realizaron con vidrio de silicato s

  13. LCA of bioethanol and furfural production from vetiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Jegannathan Kenthorai; Gnansounou, Edgard

    2015-06-01

    In this study a prospective life cycle assessment of biorefinery system from vetiver leaves was carried out to know the environmental benefits of this system over conventional systems considering the geographical context of India. The composition of vetiver leaves from the experimental analysis revealed that vetiver is rich in cellulose (32.6%), hemicellulose (31.5%) and lignin (17.3%) that could be used as a feedstock for biorefinery. The comparative life cycle assessment results show that the carbon dioxide emission and fossil oil depletion could be reduced by 95% and 23% respectively in case of standalone bioethanol system, and 99% and 17% respectively in case of bioethanol and furfural system compared to that of conventional petrol and furfural systems. The sensitivity study indicates that the impact could be further reduced if vetiver biomass is used as a source of energy in biorefinery plant instead to the coal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Feasibility and energetic evaluation of air stripping for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schläfle, Sandra; Senn, Thomas; Gschwind, Peter; Kohlus, Reinhard

    2017-05-01

    Stripping of mashes with air as stripping gas and low ethanol contents between 3 and 5wt% was investigated in terms of its suitability for continuous bioethanol production. Experiments in a Blenke cascade system were carried out and the results were compared with values obtained from theoretical vapour-liquid-equilibrium calculations. The whole stripping process was energetically evaluated by a simulation in ChemCAD and compared to conventional distillation. Therefore several parameters such as temperature, air volume flow and initial ethanol load of the mash were varied. Air stripping was found to be a suitable separation method for bioethanol from mashes with low concentrations. However, energetic aspects have to be considered, when developing a new process.

  15. Bioethanol production from sweet potato using Saccharomyces diastaticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Suryani, Irma; Pradia Paundradewa, J.

    2015-12-01

    Sweet potato contains about 16 to 40% dry matter and about 70-90% of the dry matter is a carbohydrate made up of starch, sugar, cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin so suitable for used as raw material for bioethanol. In this study focused on the manufacture of bioethanol with changes in temperature and concentration variations of yeast with sweet potato raw materials used yeast Saccharomyces diastaticus. Operating variables used are at a temperature of 30°C; 31,475°C; 35°C; 38,525°C; and 40°C with a yeast concentration of 25.9%; 30%; 40%; 50% and 54.1%. The experimental results obtained, the optimum conditions of ethanol fermentation with yeast Saccharomyces diastaticus on 36,67 °C temperature and yeast concentration of 43,43 % v / v.

  16. Multistage process for the production of bioethanol from almond shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacem, Imen; Koubaa, Mohamed; Maktouf, Sameh; Chaari, Fatma; Najar, Taha; Chaabouni, Moncef; Ettis, Nadia; Ellouz Chaabouni, Semia

    2016-07-01

    This work describes the feasibility of using almond shell as feedstock for bioethanol production. A pre-treatment step was carried out using 4% NaOH for 60min at 121°C followed by 1% sulfuric acid for 60min at 121°C. Enzymatic saccharification of the pre-treated almond shell was performed using Penicillium occitanis enzymes. The process was optimized using a hybrid design with four parameters including the incubation time, temperature, enzyme loads, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration. The optimum hydrolysis conditions led to a sugar yield of 13.5%. A detoxification step of the enzymatic hydrolysate was carried out at pH 5 using 1U/ml of laccase enzyme produced by Polyporus ciliatus. Fermenting efficiency of the hydrolysates was greatly improved by laccase treatment, increasing the ethanol yield from 30% to 84%. These results demonstrated the efficiency of using almond shell as a promising source for bioethanol production.

  17. Cyanobacterial biomass as carbohydrate and nutrient feedstock for bioethanol production by yeast fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllers, K Benedikt; Canella, D.; Jørgensen, Henning;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Microbial bioconversion of photosynthetic biomass is a promising approach to the generation of biofuels and other bioproducts. However, rapid, high-yield, and simple processes are essential for successful applications. Here, biomass from the rapidly growing photosynthetic marine...... cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was fermented using yeast into bioethanol. Results: The cyanobacterium accumulated a total carbohydrate content of about 60% of cell dry weight when cultivated under nitrate limitation. The cyanobacterial cells were harvested by centrifugation and subjected to enzymatic...... cyanobacteria or microalgae. Importantly, as well as fermentable carbohydrates, the cyanobacterial hydrolysate contained additional nutrients that promoted fermentation. This hydrolysate is therefore a promising substitute for the relatively expensive nutrient additives (such as yeast extract) commonly used...

  18. Decolorization of black liquor from bioethanol G2 production using iron oxide coating sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlianti, Vera; Triwahyuni, Eka; Waluyo, Joko; Sari, Ajeng Arum

    2017-01-01

    Bioethanol G2 production using oil palm empty fruit bunch as raw material consists of four steps, namely pretreatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, and purification process. Pretreatment process generates black liquor that causes serious environmental pollution if it is released to the environment. The objective of this research is studying the ability of iron oxide coating sands to adsorb the color of black liquor. The iron oxide coating sands were synthesized from FeCl3.6H2O with quartz sands as support material. This research was conducted on batch mode using black liquor in various pH values. Result obtained that kind of iron oxide on quartz sands's surface was goethite. The result also indicated decreasing of color intensity of black liquor after adsorption process. This research supports local material utilization in environmental technology development to solve some environmental problems.

  19. Optimal synthesis and design of extractive distillation systems for bioethanol separation: From simple to complex columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Errico, M.; Rong, B. G.; Tola, G.

    2013-01-01

    Bioethanol has been considered as a green fuel and a valid alternative to reduce the dependence on fossil distillates. The development of an optimal separation process is considered as a key element in the design of an efficient process able to be cost effective and competitive. Despite many...... are investigated. The complex column subspace is generated introducing one or more thermal couplings and considering the possibility to intensify the process combining the column sections performing the same separation task. All the configurations considered, simulated by means of Aspen Plus V 7.3, are compared...... considering the total condenser and reboiler duty as energy index. The capital costs and the solvent consumption are also taken into account in the final selection. Among all the complex configurations considered the two-column sequence can reduce the capital cost above 10% compared to the best simple column...

  20. Application of bioethanol derived lignin for improving physico-mechanical properties of thermoset biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Dilpreet S; Wang, Xinnan; Sitz, Evan; Loll, Tyler; Bhattacharjee, Sujal

    2016-08-01

    Lignin is the most abundant of renewable polymers next to cellulose with a global annual production of 70million tons, largely produced from pulping and second generation biofuel industries. Low value of industrial lignin makes it an attractive biomaterial for wide range of applications. The study investigated the application of wheat straw and corn stover based lignin derived from ethanol production for use in thermoset biocomposites. The biocomposite matrix constituted a two component low viscosity Araldite(®)LY 8601/Aradur(®) 8602 epoxy resin system and the lignin content varied from 0 to 25% by weight fraction. The analysis of the physical and mechanical properties of the biocomposites show bioethanol derived lignin can improve selective properties such as impact strength, and thermal stability without compromising the modulus and strength attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Model-Based Methodology for Simultaneous Design and Control of a Bioethanol Production Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Abd.Hamid, Mohd-Kamaruddin; Sin, Gürkan

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a framework for the simultaneous solution of design and control problems is presented. Within this framework, two methodologies are presented, the integrated process design and controller design (IPDC) methodology and the process-group contribution (PGC) methodology. The concepts...... of attainable region (AR), driving force (DF), process-group (PG) and reverse simulation are used within these methodologies. The IPDC methodology is used to find the optimal design-control strategy of a process by locating the maximum point in the AR and DF diagrams for reactor and separator, respectively....... The PGC methodology is used to generate more efficient separation designs in terms of energy consumption by targeting the separation task at the largest DF. Both methodologies are highlighted through the application of two case studies, a bioethanol production process and a succinic acid production...

  2. Life cycle assessment of advanced bioethanol production from pulp and paper sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastião, Diogo; Gonçalves, Margarida S; Marques, Susana; Fonseca, César; Gírio, Francisco; Oliveira, Ana C; Matos, Cristina T

    2016-05-01

    This work evaluates the environmental performance of using pulp and paper sludge as feedstock for the production of second generation ethanol. An ethanol plant for converting 5400 tons of dry sludge/year was modelled and evaluated using a cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment approach. The sludge is a burden for pulp and paper mills that is mainly disposed in landfilling. The studied system allows for the valorisation of the waste, which due to its high polysaccharide content is a valuable feedstock for bioethanol production. Eleven impact categories were analysed and the results showed that enzymatic hydrolysis and neutralisation of the CaCO3 are the environmental hotspots of the system contributing up to 85% to the overall impacts. Two optimisation scenarios were evaluated: (1) using a reduced HCl amount in the neutralisation stage and (2) co-fermentation of xylose and glucose, for maximal ethanol yield. Both scenarios displayed significant environmental impact improvements.

  3. Selection of process alternatives for lignocellulosic bioethanol production using a MILP approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Felipe; Venturini, Fabrizio; Aroca, Germán; Conejeros, Raúl

    2013-11-01

    This work proposes a decision-making framework for the selection of processes and unit operations for lignocellulosic bioethanol production. Process alternatives are described by its capital and operating expenditures, its contribution to process yield and technological availability information. A case study in second generation ethanol production using Eucalyptus globulus as raw material is presented to test the developed process synthesis tool. Results indicate that production cost does not necessarily decrease when yield increases. Hence, optimal processes can be found at the inflexion point of total costs and yield. The developed process synthesis tool provides results with an affordable computational cost, existing optimization tools and an easy-to-upgrade description of the process alternatives. These features made this tool suitable for process screening when incomplete information regarding process alternatives is available.

  4. Price determination for hydrogen produced from bio-ethanol in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregorini, V.A.; Pasquevich, D. [Instituto de Energia y Desarrollo Sustentable - CNEA, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Laborde, M. [Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    A massive penetration for hydrogen as a fuel vector requires a price reduction against fossil fuels (up to lower or at less equal to current prices). That is why it is important to calculate the current prices, so that we can determinate the gap between them and work in reducing them. In order to follow properly prices evolution it is necessary been able to compare data generated by Universities, Laboratories and Industries. So that, DOE creates in 2003 a tool (H2A) to determine prices for hydrogen, with some assumptions and pre defined values, to facilitate transparency and consistency of data. In this work we will use the H2A tool to calculate de price of hydrogen produced in a bio-ethanol semi-industrial Plant in Argentina, and we will compare it with the prices of USA studies. (author)

  5. Modelling and L1 Adaptive Control of pH in Bioethanol Enzymatic Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Blanke, Mogens; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic process is a key step in second generation bioethanol production. Pretreated biomass fibers are liquefied with the help of enzymes to facilitate fermentation. Enzymes are very sensitive to pH and temperature and the main control challenge in the nonlinear process is to ensure minimum...... deviations from the optimal pH level. This article develops a mathematical model for the pH, which has not been reported earlier for this particular process. The new model embeds flow dynamics and pH calculations and serves both for simulation and control design. Two control strategies are then formulated...... for pH level regulation: one is a classical PI controller; the other an L1 adaptive output feedback controller. Model-based feed-forward terms are added to the controllers to enhance their performances. A new tuning method of the L1 adaptive controller is also proposed. Further, a new performance...

  6. Operator Training Simulator for an Industrial Bioethanol Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Gerlach; Sören Tholin; Hass, Volker C; Carl-Fredrik Mandenius

    2016-01-01

    Operator training simulators (OTS) are software tools for training process operators in large-scale industrial applications. Here, we describe the development, implementation and training of an OTS for a large-scale industrial plant for bioethanol production. The design of the OTS is based on conceptual analysis (previously reported by us in this journal) of various configuration alternatives and training procedures at the plant. In this article, we report on how the conceptual design is used...

  7. Bioethanol production from germinated grain by inherent enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Kádár, Zsófia; Christensen, Anne Deen; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2009-01-01

    The malting in brewing process develops enzymes that are required to hydrolyze the complex starch in grain into simple fermentable sugars. These proceed the three following steps: Steeping encourages germination to start, germination prepares the conversion of the starch to sugars, and kilning stops the germination. In this study, a method for bioethanol production from rye grain was developed by utilizing the inherent amylase activity from germination of the seed. Grain germination was pe...

  8. Dynamic global sensitivity analysis in bioreactor networks for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, M P; Estrada, V; Di Maggio, J; Hoch, P M

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic global sensitivity analysis (GSA) was performed for three different dynamic bioreactor models of increasing complexity: a fermenter for bioethanol production, a bioreactors network, where two types of bioreactors were considered: aerobic for biomass production and anaerobic for bioethanol production and a co-fermenter bioreactor, to identify the parameters that most contribute to uncertainty in model outputs. Sobol's method was used to calculate time profiles for sensitivity indices. Numerical results have shown the time-variant influence of uncertain parameters on model variables. Most influential model parameters have been determined. For the model of the bioethanol fermenter, μmax (maximum growth rate) and Ks (half-saturation constant) are the parameters with largest contribution to model variables uncertainty; in the bioreactors network, the most influential parameter is μmax,1 (maximum growth rate in bioreactor 1); whereas λ (glucose-to-total sugars concentration ratio in the feed) is the most influential parameter over all model variables in the co-fermentation bioreactor.

  9. Scale-up and kinetic modeling for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamoglu, Esra; Sukan, Fazilet Vardar

    2013-09-01

    Bioethanol was produced from acidic hydrolysate of rice hulls using recombinant Escherichia coli KO11. Two different issues (scale-up and kinetic modeling) were evaluated simultaneously and concomitantly for bioethanol production. During the step-wise scale-up process from 100 mL shaken flask to 10 L stirred-tank bioreactor, the constant Reynolds number and the constant impeller tip speed were evaluated as scale-up methodologies under laboratory conditions. It was determined that the volumetric bioethanol productivity was 88% higher in 10 L bioreactor in comparison to the value of 0.21 g L(-1) h(-1) in shaken flask. The modified Monod and Luedeking-Piret models provided an accurate approach for the modeling of the experimental data. Ethanol concentration reached the maximum level of 29.03 g/L, which was 5% higher than the value of model prediction in 10 L bioreactor. The findings of this research could contribute to the industrial scale productions especially from lignocellulosic raw materials.

  10. Studi Awal Proses Fermentasi pada Desain Pabrik Bioethanol dari Molasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilia Yasinta Retnaningtyas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tebu sebagai bahan baku industri gula juga memiliki peranan penting dalam perekonomian Indonesia. Molasses adalah hasil samping yang berasal dari pembuatan gula tebu (Saccharum officinarum. Molasses yang telah diproses menjadi etanol akan memiliki nilai jual ekspor yang tinggi yaitu sekitar US$ 866,07 per ton. Diperkirakan pada tahun 2020 kebutuhan dalam negeri terhadap etanol sebesar 248.983,9 kg etanol per tahun. Dari total kebutuhan yang telah disebutkan sebelumnya maka pabrik bioethanol dengan bahan baku molasses dapat memenuhi permintaan dalam negeri dan luar negeri untuk menambah devisa. Pabrik bioethanol ini berkapasitas 8500 kg/jam molasses masuk dan beroperasi selama 24 jam per hari dengan hari kerja 330 hari per tahun. Terdapat tiga tahapan utama dalam pembuatan bioethanol dari molasses, yaitu tahap persiapan bahan baku yang bertujuan untuk menyiapkan bahan baku yang akan digunakan dalam proses, terdiri dari proses pengenceran. Kemudian tahap fermentasi yang merupakan tahap penting dalam produksi etanol yakni menggunakan fermentasi bakteri yang telah dipersiapkan dari tangki propagasi dalam proses ini akan dihasilkan etanol dengan kadar 6-10%. Dan yang terakhir adalah tahap pemurnian yang merupakan pemurnian dari hasil fermentasi terdiri dari proses penyaringan, distilasi dan adsorpsi. Fungsi tahap ini untuk memurnikan hasil fermentasi sehingga menjadi etanol dengan kadar 99,5% Pabrik ini membutuhkan investasi sebesar Rp. 368.226.944.4301,00 dengan Internal Rate of Return sebesar 21,02%, Pay Out Time selama 3,46 tahun dan BEP sebesar 30,61 %.

  11. Energy analysis of biochemical conversion processes of biomass to bioethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakari, M.; Ngadi, M.; Bergthorson, T. [McGill Univ., Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Bioresource Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Bioethanol is among the most promising of biofuels that can be produced from different biomass such as agricultural products, waste and byproducts. This paper reported on a study that examined the energy conversion of different groups of biomass to bioethanol, including lignocelluloses, starches and sugar. Biochemical conversion generally involves the breakdown of biomass to simple sugars using different pretreatment methods. The energy needed for the conversion steps was calculated in order to obtain mass and energy efficiencies for the conversions. Mass conversion ratios of corn, molasses and rice straw were calculated as 0.3396, 0.2300 and 0.2296 kg of bioethanol per kg of biomass, respectively. The energy efficiency of biochemical conversion of corn, molasses and rice straw was calculated as 28.57, 28.21 and 31.33 per cent, respectively. The results demonstrated that lignocelluloses can be efficiently converted with specific microorganisms such as Mucor indicus, Rhizopus oryzae using the Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF) methods.

  12. Strategies for the production of high concentrations of bioethanol from seaweeds: production of high concentrations of bioethanol from seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Mitsunori; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Murata, Kousaku

    2013-01-01

    Bioethanol has attracted attention as an alternative to petroleum-derived fuel. Seaweeds have been proposed as some of the most promising raw materials for bioethanol production because they have several advantages over lignocellulosic biomass. However, because seaweeds contain low contents of glucans, i.e., polysaccharides composed of glucose, the conversion of only the glucans from seaweed is not sufficient to produce high concentrations of ethanol. Therefore, it is also necessary to produce ethanol from other specific carbohydrate components of seaweeds, including sulfated polysaccharides, mannitol, alginate, agar and carrageenan. This review summarizes the current state of research on the production of ethanol from seaweed carbohydrates for which the conversion of carbohydrates to sugars is a key step and makes comparisons with the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. This review provides valuable information necessary for the production of high concentrations of ethanol from seaweeds.

  13. Potential of bioethanol as a chemical building block for biorefineries: preliminary sustainability assessment of 12 bioethanol-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, John A; Patel, Akshay D; Roes, Alexander; Blok, Kornelis; Faaij, André P C; Patel, Martin K

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to present and apply a quick screening method and to identify the most promising bioethanol derivatives using an early-stage sustainability assessment method that compares a bioethanol-based conversion route to its respective petrochemical counterpart. The method combines, by means of a multi-criteria approach, quantitative and qualitative proxy indicators describing economic, environmental, health and safety and operational aspects. Of twelve derivatives considered, five were categorized as favorable (diethyl ether, 1,3-butadiene, ethyl acetate, propylene and ethylene), two as promising (acetaldehyde and ethylene oxide) and five as unfavorable derivatives (acetic acid, n-butanol, isobutylene, hydrogen and acetone) for an integrated biorefinery concept.

  14. Development of a 2nd Generation Decision Support Tool to Optimize Resource and Energy Recovery for Municipal Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2012, EPA’s Office of Research and Development released the MSW decision support tool (MSW-DST) to help identify strategies for more sustainable MSW management. Depending upon local infrastructure, energy grid mix, population density, and waste composition and quantity, the m...

  15. A 2nd generation static model for predicting greenhouse energy inputs, as an aid for production planning

    CERN Document Server

    Jolliet, O; Munday, G L

    1985-01-01

    A model which allows accurate prediction of energy consumption of a greenhouse is a useful tool for production planning and optimisation of greenhouse components. To date two types of model have been developed; some very simple models of low precision, others, precise dynamic models unsuitable for employment over long periods and too complex for use in practice. A theoretical study and measurements at the CERN trial greenhouse have allowed development of a new static model named "HORTICERN", easy to use and as precise as more complex dynamic models. This paper demonstrates the potential of this model for long-term production planning. The model gives precise predictions of energy consumption when given greenhouse conditions of use (inside temperatures, dehumidification by ventilation, …) and takes into account local climatic conditions (wind radiative losses to the sky and solar gains), type of greenhouse (cladding, thermal screen …). The HORTICERN method has been developed for PC use and requires less...

  16. Research at the CEA in the field of safety in 2nd and 3rd generation light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billot, Philippe

    2012-05-01

    The research programs at the CEA in the field of safety in nuclear reactors are carried out in a framework of international partnerships. Their purpose is to develop studies on: The methods allowing for the determination of earthquake hazards and their consequences; The behaviour of fuel in an accident situation; The comprehension of deflagration and detonation phenomena of hydrogen and the search for effective prevention methods involving an explosion risk; The cooling of corium in order to stop its progression in and outside the vessel thereby reducing the risk of perforating the basemat; The behaviour of the different fission product families according to their volatility for the UO2 and MOX fuels.

  17. STRUCTURE AND 2ND-HARMONIC GENERATION OF LANGMUIR-BLODGETT-FILMS OF 2 CHIRAL AMPHIPHILIC AZO DYES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOONDORP, MA; SCHOUTEN, AJ; HULSHOF, JBE; FERINGA, BL

    1993-01-01

    The properties and structure of Langmuir-Blodgett films of two new amphiphilic nonlinear optical dyes containing stereogenic (chiral) centers were studied. The dye molecule 4-[[4'-[(3R)-palmitoylpyrrolidin-1-yl]phenyl]azo]-3-nitrobenzoic acid (KZ16) forms homogeneous structures in the plane of the s

  18. Explaining the Success of High-Achieving 2nd-Generation Latino Students at Elite Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Stacy M.

    2013-01-01

    Latinos represent the largest minority population in the US, yet are one of the most underserved groups in the educational system. As such, they have been the focus of much attention by educational researchers. However, there is little work enabling researchers to understand how many factors might interactively support achievement. Moreover, the…

  19. Development of a 2nd Generation Decision Support Tool to Optimize Resource and Energy Recovery for Municipal Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2012, EPA’s Office of Research and Development released the MSW decision support tool (MSW-DST) to help identify strategies for more sustainable MSW management. Depending upon local infrastructure, energy grid mix, population density, and waste composition and quantity, the m...

  20. Demonstration test results of organic materials' volumetric reduction using bio-ethanol, thermal decomposition and burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Masahisa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Chiyoda-KU, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    To discover technologies that can be utilized for decontamination work and verify their effects, economic feasibility, safety, and other factors, the Ministry of the Environment launched the 'FY2011 Decontamination Technology Demonstrations Project' to publicly solicit decontamination technologies that would be verified in demonstration tests and adopted 22 candidates. JAEA was commissioned by the Ministry of the Environment to provide technical assistance related to these demonstrations. This paper describes the volume reduction due to bio-ethanol, thermal decomposition and burning of organic materials in this report. The purpose of this study is that to evaluate a technique that can be used as biomass energy source, while performing volume reduction of contamination organic matter generated by decontamination. An important point of volume reduction technology of contaminated organic matter, is to evaluate the mass balance in the system. Then, confirming the mass balance of radioactive material and where to stay is important. The things that are common to all technologies, are ensuring that the radioactive cesium is not released as exhaust gas, etc.. In addition, it evaluates the cost balance and energy balance in order to understand the applicability to the decontamination of volume reduction technology. The radioactive cesium remains in the carbides when organic materials are carbonized, and radioactive cesium does not transfer to bio-ethanol when organic materials are processed for bio-ethanol production. While plant operating costs are greater if radioactive materials need to be treated, if income is expected by business such as power generation, depreciation may be calculated over approximately 15 years. (authors)

  1. FOREWORD: 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, (NCMIP 2012). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 15 May 2012, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The first edition of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finance. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, kernel methods, learning methods, convex optimization, free discontinuity problems, metamodels, proper orthogonal decomposition

  2. Brain order disorder 2nd group report of f-EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Francois; Gogtay, Nitin; Giedd, Jay; Vydelingum, Nadarajen; Brown, David; Tran, Binh Q.; Hsu, Charles; Hsu, Ming-Kai; Cha, Jae; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Ma, Lien; Willey, Jefferson; Wu, Jerry; Oh, Kenneth; Landa, Joseph; Lin, C. T.; Jung, T. P.; Makeig, Scott; Morabito, Carlo Francesco; Moon, Qyu; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Lee, Soo-Young; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Szu, Harold H.; Kaur, Balvinder; Byrd, Kenneth; Dang, Karen; Krzywicki, Alan; Familoni, Babajide O.; Larson, Louis; Harkrider, Susan; Krapels, Keith A.; Dai, Liyi

    2014-05-01

    Since the Brain Order Disorder (BOD) group reported on a high density Electroencephalogram (EEG) to capture the neuronal information using EEG to wirelessly interface with a Smartphone [1,2], a larger BOD group has been assembled, including the Obama BRAIN program, CUA Brain Computer Interface Lab and the UCSD Swartz Computational Neuroscience Center. We can implement the pair-electrodes correlation functions in order to operate in a real time daily environment, which is of the computation complexity of O(N3) for N=102~3 known as functional f-EEG. The daily monitoring requires two areas of focus. Area #(1) to quantify the neuronal information flow under arbitrary daily stimuli-response sources. Approach to #1: (i) We have asserted that the sources contained in the EEG signals may be discovered by an unsupervised learning neural network called blind sources separation (BSS) of independent entropy components, based on the irreversible Boltzmann cellular thermodynamics(ΔS correlation function. (i) Although the entropy itself is not the information per se, but the concurrence of the entropy sources is the information flow as a functional-EEG, sketched in this 2nd BOD report. Area #(2) applying EEG bio-feedback will improve collective decision making (TBD). Approach to #2: We introduce a novel performance quality metrics, in terms of the throughput rate of faster (Δt) & more accurate (ΔA) decision making, which applies to individual, as well as team brain dynamics. Following Nobel Laureate Daniel Kahnmen's novel "Thinking fast and slow", through the brainwave biofeedback we can first identify an individual's "anchored cognitive bias sources". This is done in order to remove the biases by means of individually tailored pre-processing. Then the training effectiveness can be maximized by the collective product Δt * ΔA. For Area #1, we compute a spatiotemporally windowed EEG in vitro average using adaptive time-window sampling. The sampling rate depends on the type of

  3. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones -- Phase I, 2nd Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Black, Bill; Biraud, Sebastien

    2009-03-31

    This is the year-end report of the 2nd year of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix 3. Literature survey of published information on the relationship between geologic and hydrologic characteristics of faults was conducted. The survey concluded that it may be possible to classify faults by indicators based on various geometric and geologic attributes that may indirectly relate to the hydrologic property of faults. Analysis of existing information on the Wildcat Fault and its surrounding geology was performed. The Wildcat Fault is thought to be a strike-slip fault with a thrust component that runs along the eastern boundary of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is believed to be part of the Hayward Fault system but is considered inactive. Three trenches were excavated at carefully selected locations mainly based on the information from the past investigative work inside the LBNL property. At least one fault was encountered in all three trenches. Detailed trench mapping was conducted by CRIEPI (Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industries) and LBNL scientists. Some intriguing and puzzling discoveries were made that may contradict with the published work in the past. Predictions are made regarding the hydrologic property of the Wildcat Fault based on the analysis of fault structure. Preliminary conceptual models of the Wildcat Fault were proposed. The Wildcat Fault appears to have multiple splays and some low angled faults may be part of the flower structure. In parallel, surface geophysical investigations were conducted using electrical resistivity survey and seismic reflection profiling along three lines on the north and south of the LBNL site. Because of the steep terrain, it was difficult to find optimum locations for survey lines as it is desirable for them to be as

  4. 2nd Radio and Antenna Days of the Indian Ocean (RADIO 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    It was an honor and a great pleasure for all those involved in its organization to welcome the participants to the ''Radio and Antenna Days of the Indian Ocean'' (RADIO 2014) international conference that was held from 7th to 10th April 2014 at the Sugar Beach Resort, Wolmar, Flic-en-Flac, Mauritius. RADIO 2014 is the second of a series of conferences organized in the Indian Ocean region. The aim of the conference is to discuss recent developments, theories and practical applications covering the whole scope of radio-frequency engineering, including radio waves, antennas, propagation, and electromagnetic compatibility. The RADIO international conference emerged following discussions with engineers and scientists from the countries of the Indian Ocean as well as from other parts of the world and a need was felt for the organization of such an event in this region. Following numerous requests, the Island of Mauritius, worldwide known for its white sandy beaches and pleasant tropical atmosphere, was again chosen for the organization of the 2nd RADIO international conference. The conference was organized by the Radio Society, Mauritius and the Local Organizing Committee consisted of scientists from SUPELEC, France, the University of Mauritius, and the University of Technology, Mauritius. We would like to take the opportunity to thank all people, institutions and companies that made the event such a success. We are grateful to our gold sponsors CST and FEKO as well as URSI for their generous support which enabled us to partially support one PhD student and two scientists to attend the conference. We would also like to thank IEEE-APS and URSI for providing technical co-sponsorship. More than hundred and thirty abstracts were submitted to the conference. They were peer-reviewed by an international scientific committee and, based on the reviews, either accepted, eventually after revision, or rejected. RADIO 2014 brought together participants from twenty countries spanning

  5. 2nd International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials (IC-RMM2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the rheological properties of materials and their rheological behaviors during their manufacturing processes and in their applications in many cases can help to increase the efficiency and competitiveness not only of the finished goods and products but the organizations and societies also. The more scientific supported and prepared organizations develop more competitive products with better thermal, mechanical, physical, chemical and biological properties and the leading companies apply more competitive equipment and technology processes. The aims of the 2nd International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials (ic-rmm2) and the parallel organized symposiums of the 1st International Symposium on Powder Injection Molding (is-pim1) and the 1st International Symposium on Rheology and Fracture of Solids (is-rfs1) are the followings: Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of modeling and measurements of rheological properties and behavior of materials under processing and applications; Change information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implantations. Promote the communication and collaboration between the scientists, researchers and engineers of different disciplines, different nations, countries and continents. The international conference ic-rmm2 and symposiums of is-pim1 and is-rfs1 provide a platform among the leading international scientists, researchers, PhD students and engineers for discussing recent achievements in measurement, modeling and application of rheology in materials technology and materials science of liquids, melts, solids, crystals and amorphous structures. Among thr major fields of interest are the influence of materials structures, mechanical stresses, temperatures, deformation speeds and shear rates on rheological and physical properties, phase transformation of foams, foods, polymers, plastics and other competitive materials like ceramics

  6. Energy Balance of Bio-ethanol - A Review; Energibalans foer bioetanol - en kunskapsoeversikt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerjesson, Paal

    2006-03-15

    This review presents a synthesis of various Swedish and international studies on the bio-ethanol energy balance, and an analysis of how and why their results differ. Other methods, such as exergy- and emergy analysis, are discussed and compared with the energy analysis method. Finally, potential improvements of the energy efficiency in bio-ethanol production are discussed. The energy balance is here expressed as the ratio of the energy content of the fuel to the primary energy input for the entire production cycle of the fuel. The energy balance of ethanol from cereals is, on average, 1.6, and varies between 0.7 and 2.8. Corresponding average figures for ethanol from corn, sugar beets and lignocellulosic biomass (e.g. energy forest) are 1.4, 1.8 and 3.2, respectively. There are several reasons why the energy balances differ between the different studies, even where the feedstock is identical. The sources of differences can be divided between those related to differences in local and geographical conditions, and those related to differences in the methodological approach applied. Depending on the definition of the system that is studied (systems boundaries), and how the energy input is divided between the ethanol and the by-products generated in the process (allocation methods), the energy balance may differ by a factor of 5. Thus, it is impossible to make reliable and fair comparisons between different studies unless all assumptions are clearly presented and defined. Results from exergy- and emergy analysis of bio-ethanol often show significantly different results from those presented in energy analyses. It is, however, not useful to compare these different results since the various methods have different focuses and are answering different questions. The energy balance of cereal-based ethanol can be improved by more efficient cultivation methods, but mainly by improved conversion processes. One possibility is by using bio-refineries where not only ethanol but also

  7. The enzymatic conversion of major algal and cyanobacterial carbohydrates to bioethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qusai Al Abdallah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The production of fuels from biomass is categorized as first-, second- or third-generation depending upon the source of raw materials, either food crops, lignocellulosic material, or algal biomass, respectively. Thus far, the emphasis has been on using food crops creating several environmental problems. To overcome these problems, there is a shift toward bioenergy production from non-food sources. Algae, which store high amounts of carbohydrates, are a potential producer of raw materials for sustainable production of bioethanol. Algae store their carbohydrates in the form of food storage sugars and structural material. In general, algal food storage polysaccharides are composed of glucose subunits, however they vary in the glycosidic bond that links the glucose molecules. In starch-type polysaccharides (starch, floridean starch, and glycogen, the glucose subunits are linked together by α-(1→4 and α-(1→6 glycosidic bonds. Laminarin-type polysaccharides (laminarin, chrysolaminarin, and paramylon are made of glucose subunits that are linked together by β-(1→3 and β-(1→6 glycosidic bonds. In contrast to food storage polysaccharides, structural polysaccharides vary in composition and glycosidic bond. The industrial production of bioethanol from algae requires efficient hydrolysis and fermentation of different algal sugars. However, the hydrolysis of algal polysaccharides employs more enzymatic mixes in comparison to terrestrial plants. Similarly, algal fermentable sugars display more diversity than plants, and therefore more metabolic pathways are required to produce ethanol from these sugars. In general, the fermentation of glucose, galactose, and glucose isomers is carried out by wild type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis. In these strains, glucose enters glycolysis, where is it converted to pyruvate through either Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway or Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Other monosaccharides must be

  8. Fuel consumption and emission on fuel mixer low-grade bioethanol fuelled motorcycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abikusna Setia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol is currently used as an alternative fuel for gasoline substitute (fossil fuel because it can reduce the dependence on fossil fuel and also emissions produced by fossil fuel which are CO2, HO, NOx. Bioethanol is usually used as a fuel mixed with gasoline with certain comparison. In Indonesia, the usage is still rare. Bioethanol that is commonly used is bioethanol anhydrous 99.5%. In the previous studies, bioethanol was distilled from low to high grade to produce ethanol anhydrous. But the result is only able to reach 95% or ethanol hydrous. This study is objected to design a simple mechanism in the mixing of bioethanol hydrous with the gasoline using a fuel mixer mechanism. By this mechanism, the fuel consumption and the resulting emissions from combustion engine can be analyzed. The fuel blend composition is prepared as E5, E10, and E15/E20, the result of fuel consumption and emission will be compared with pure gasoline. The using of bioethanol hydrous as a fuel mixture was tended to produce more stable bioethanol fuel consumption. However, the utilization of the mixture was found able to reduce the exhaust emissions (CO, HC, and NOx.

  9. Certified reference material of bioethanol for metrological traceability in electrochemical parameters analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serta Fraga, Isabel Cristina; Ribeiro, Carla Matos; Sobral, Sidney Pereira; Dias, Júlio Cesar; Gonçalves, Mary Ane; Borges, Paulo Paschoal; Gonzaga, Fabiano Barbieri

    2012-09-15

    Bioethanol has become an important biofuel because it is a source of renewable energy and can help to decrease global warming. However, the quality of bioethanol needs to be guaranteed so that it can be trusted and accepted in international trade. The Brazilian Metrology Institute (Inmetro) has been developing a certified reference material (CRM) for bioethanol to ensure quality control for measurement in the bioethanol matrix. Inmetro has certified 11 quality parameters. Using these, the CRM of bioethanol will contribute to guaranteeing metrological traceability and reliable measurement results. These factors can be used to compare different bioethanols produced to comply with legislation in different countries in order to avoid technical barriers and thus increase the international trade in Brazilian bioethanol. The aim of this paper is to present the results of certification studies using three important electrochemical quality parameters in the CRM of bioethanol-total acid number, pHe and electrolytic conductivity-which are crucial in protecting the metallic parts of a vehicle from corrosion. The certified results obtained for total acid number, pHe and electrolytic conductivity parameters were (16.2±1.7)mg L(-1), 6.07±0.30, and (1.03±0.11)μS cm(-1), respectively. The uncertainties for all parameters were the expanded uncertainty obtained by multiplying the combined standard uncertainty by a coverage factor of k=2, which represents an approximately 95% confidence level.

  10. Phenotypic evaluation of natural and industrial Saccharomyces yeasts for different traits desirable in industrial bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Vaskar; Steensels, Jan; Lievens, Bart; Van de Voorde, Ilse; Verplaetse, Alex; Aerts, Guido; Willems, Kris A; Thevelein, Johan M; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Ruyters, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the organism of choice for many food and beverage fermentations because it thrives in high-sugar and high-ethanol conditions. However, the conditions encountered in bioethanol fermentation pose specific challenges, including extremely high sugar and ethanol concentrations, high temperature, and the presence of specific toxic compounds. It is generally considered that exploring the natural biodiversity of Saccharomyces strains may be an interesting route to find superior bioethanol strains and may also improve our understanding of the challenges faced by yeast cells during bioethanol fermentation. In this study, we phenotypically evaluated a large collection of diverse Saccharomyces strains on six selective traits relevant for bioethanol production with increasing stress intensity. Our results demonstrate a remarkably large phenotypic diversity among different Saccharomyces species and among S. cerevisiae strains from different origins. Currently applied bioethanol strains showed a high tolerance to many of these relevant traits, but several other natural and industrial S. cerevisiae strains outcompeted the bioethanol strains for specific traits. These multitolerant strains performed well in fermentation experiments mimicking industrial bioethanol production. Together, our results illustrate the potential of phenotyping the natural biodiversity of yeasts to find superior industrial strains that may be used in bioethanol production or can be used as a basis for further strain improvement through genetic engineering, experimental evolution, or breeding. Additionally, our study provides a basis for new insights into the relationships between tolerance to different stressors.

  11. From biofuel to bioproduct: is bioethanol a suitable fermentation feedstock for synthesis of bulk chemicals?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusthuis, R.A.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    The first pilot-scale factories for the production of bioethanol from lignocellulose have been installed, indicating that we are on the brink of overcoming most hurdles for an economically feasible process. When bioethanol is competitive as biofuel with fuels originating from petrochemical

  12. From biofuel to bioproduct: is bioethanol a suitable fermentation feedstock for synthesis of bulk chemicals?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusthuis, R.A.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    The first pilot-scale factories for the production of bioethanol from lignocellulose have been installed, indicating that we are on the brink of overcoming most hurdles for an economically feasible process. When bioethanol is competitive as biofuel with fuels originating from petrochemical resources

  13. Bioethanol from lignocellulose. An ecological and economic assessment of selected concepts; Bioethanol aus Lignozellulose. Eine oekologische und oekonomische Bewertung ausgewaehlter Konzepte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisel, Kathleen; Zech, Konstantin [DBFZ Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum gemeinnuetzige GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Mueller-Langer, Franziska

    2014-08-01

    Against the background of an increased use of residual and waste materials in this paper the specific GHG emissions and production costs of different lignocellulosic based bioethanol concepts are assessed and compared to a conventional wheat based bioethanol concept and to the fossil reference. In order to find the best concept regarding both the environment and the economics the GHG emissions and production costs are compared and the GHG mitigation costs are calculated. Concept 5 (reference concept with C5 sugar to bioethanol and a natural gas-/biogasboiler) could be a good compromise between the both targets. Furthermore this concept has lower GHG emissions and lower production costs compared to the conventional wheat based bioethanol concept.

  14. US Army Software Symposium (2nd) Held at Williamsburg, Virginia on 25-27 October 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    operational procedure language ( NOPAL ) is used to analyze the requirements and to generate the test specifications. The programming can be performed in...MODERN LANGUAGE FOR TEST PROGRAMMING by H. Kaunzinger, CENTACS NOPAL : AUTOMATIC TEST PROGRAM GENERATION by N. Prywes, Professor of Computer Sciences...of electronic circuit boards. The NOPAL system that automates this software development process illustrates automation of software development in

  15. The Development Strategy of Sustainable Bioethanol Industry on Iconic Sumba Island, Eastern Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawarni Hasibuan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of biofuel industry in Indonesia represents the emerging phase, because of the impetus of government commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emission regulations which are decanted in President Decree No. 61 the year 2011.  Indonesia has committed to reducing greenhouse gasses by 26% below 2005 levels, equivalent to 767 million tons of greenhouse gasses on their own.  National Energy Policy set to blending bioethanol in premium 10% and 20% in 2020 and 2050 respectively.  Potency that owned by Sumba Island, especially in east eastern Indonesia, encourages the growth of bioethanol industry regarding the availability of raw material resources and tropical climate for biofuel crop cultivation. Therefore it is necessary to analyze the feasibility of bioethanol production from potential raw materials in Sumba Island. It combines a Bayes method with financial analysis and a Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT framework to propose the development strategy of sustainable bioethanol industry in the Sumba Island.  Recommended feedstock for the development of the bioethanol industry in Sumba Island is sweet sorghum and cassava.  Financial feasibility assessment of bioethanol industry is based on the assumption that at least 70% of the feedstock is supplied by the company’s land and the rest comes from the farming communities.  The proposed integration pattern is by integrating the ethanol industry with bio-farming and bio-manure to utilize the waste completely. The development of bioethanol industry in Sumba Island is still faced with many obstacles, including the sustainability of feedstock both for cassava and sweet sorghum, infrastructure constraints, and regulation enforcement. Alternative strategies for the development of an integrated bioethanol industry are (1 conducting intensification and extensification of agricultural land to meet the needs of raw materials, (2 promoting technological innovation and

  16. Bacterial Community Structure and Dynamics During Corn-Based Bioethanol Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Heist, E Patrick; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Corn-based fuel ethanol facilities mix enzymatically treated, gelatinized corn starch with water to generate a "mash" that is used as the substrate in large-scale (∼500,000 gallon) yeast-based fermentations. In contrast to other food and beverage fermentations (e.g., cheese, wine), bioethanol production is presumed to be optimal when bacteria are absent from the fermentation-thus maximizing conversion of glucose to ethanol-yet the facilities are not sterilized. Culture-based analysis has suggested that lactic acid bacteria occupy this niche and, under certain circumstances, can outcompete the dedicated fermentation yeast for nutrients. Here, we use 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to probe bacterial community structure during bioethanol fermentation. Nineteen total batches from five corn-based fuel ethanol fermentation facilities were analyzed. From each batch, five samples were taken. This includes the contents of the yeast propagation tank at inoculation, three samples taken at intervals during the fermentation, and a sample taken at the end of fermentation. Bacterial community structure was compared with time, between facility, between fermentor, between batches from the same fermentor, and against environmental variables within each fermentation. Communities were dominated by members of the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla, with lactic acid bacteria dominating the communities in two of the five facilities. In the other facilities, Proteobacteria (largely members of the Pseudomonas and Escherichia-Shigella genera) outcompete the lactic acid bacteria. In most cases, the yeast propagation tank inoculum imparted a rich bacterial community, but the batches vary regarding whether this inoculum was the primary driver of the fermentation community structure.

  17. Bio-ethanol production from wet coffee processing waste in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldesenbet, Asrat Gebremariam; Woldeyes, Belay; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Large amounts of coffee residues are generated from coffee processing plants in Ethiopia. These residues are toxic and possess serious environmental problems following the direct discharge into the nearby water bodies which cause serious environmental and health problems. This study was aimed to quantify wet coffee processing waste and estimate its bio-ethanol production. The study showed that the wastes are potential environmental problems and cause water pollution due to high organic component and acidic nature. The waste was hydrolyzed by dilute H2SO4 (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 M) and distilled water. Total sugar content of the sample was determined titrimetrically and refractometry. Maximum value (90%) was obtained from hydrolysis by 0.4 M H2SO4. Ethanol production was monitored by gas chromatography. The optimum yield of ethanol (78%) was obtained from the sample hydrolyzed by 0.4 M H2SO4 for 1 h at hydrolysis temperature of 100 °C and after fermentation for 24 h and initial pH of 4.5. Based on the data, it was concluded that reuse of the main coffee industry wastes is of significant importance from environmental and economical view points. In conclusion, this study has proposed to utilize the wet coffee processing waste to produce bio-ethanol which provides the alternative energy source from waste biomass and solves the environmental waste disposal as well as human health problem.

  18. Potential environmental impact of bioethanol production chain from fiber sorghum to be used in passenger cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Annachiara; Zucaro, Amalia; Fagnano, Massimo; Fierro, Angelo

    2017-11-15

    A life cycle assessment (LCA) was applied to assess the environmental load of a prospective local bioethanol (EtOH) production system in Southern Italy by using lignocellulosic Fiber sorghum (FS) feedstock. A two steps analysis was carried out considering: (i) a "cradle-to-farm gate" LCA to investigate thoroughly the FS cultivation on hilly marginal land and (ii) a "cradle-to-wheels" system boundary encompassing the environmental pressure of the whole EtOH supply-use chain. Primary data related to lignocellulosic biomass production were combined with experimental feedstock conversion processes through advanced second generation technology. The purpose was the evaluation of the environmental performance of different EtOH-gasoline mixtures in midsize passenger cars: E10 (10% of EtOH and 90% of gasoline) and E85 (85% of EtOH and 15% of gasoline). N fertilization appeared as the prevailing contributor of the crop phase. The "cradle-to-wheels" results concerning E10 passenger car disclosed that the main hotspots were represented by the input of low sulphur petrol (66%) and the linked tailpipe emissions (15%), for almost all the impact categories. Otherwise, for E85 flex-fuel vehicle, the major drivers were represented by the feedstock production (46%) and the imported electricity used in the conversion facility (18%). The FS EtOH blends entailed potential environmental benefits compared with the fossil counterpart (gasoline) for climate change, ozone and fossil depletions. Otherwise, they evidenced a worse profile in terms of acidification, eutrophication and particulate matter formation. Within the context of a the prospective territorial bio-refinery network, the comparison of the annual FS bioethanol based systems with similar EtOH scenarios from giant reed perennial crops highlighted: (i) the importance to optimize the N-management for FS feedstock cultivation and (ii) the need to increase the use of the renewable energy carriers along the industrial conversion

  19. A study on trait anger – anger expression and friendship commitment levels of primary school 2nd stage students who play – do not play sports

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hüseyin Kırımoğlu; Yunus Yıldırım; Ali Temiz

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the state of trait anger-anger expression and friendship commitment levels depending on the fact whether 2nd-stage-students in primary schools played sports...

  20. [In search of the ideal surgical treatment for lymphedema. Report of 2nd European Conference on supermicrosurgery (Barcelona - March 2012)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausky, J; Robert, N; Binder, J-P; Revol, M

    2012-12-01

    Since more than 50 years, many surgeons all around the world try to find the perfect surgical technique to treat limb lymphedemas. Decongestive physiotherapy associated with the use of a compressive garment has been the primary choice for lymphedema treatment. Many different surgical techniques have been developed, however, to date, there is no consensus on surgical procedure. Most surgical experts of lymphedema met in the second European Conference on supermicrosurgery, organized on March 1st and 2nd 2012, in San Pau Hospital, Barcelona. Together they tried to clarify these different options and ideally a strategy for using these techniques.

  1. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by 2nd High School of Eleftherio–Kordelio in Thessaloniki

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Our school is the 2nd High School of Eleftherio – Kordelio. It is located at the west suburbs of Thessaloniki in Greece and our students are between 15-17 years old. Thessaloniki is the second largest city in Greece with a port of a major role in trading at the area of South Balkans. During this period of time our students have heard so much about CERN and the great discoveries which have taken place there and they are really keen on visiting and learning many things about it.

  2. Alkaline Pretreatment of Sweet Sorghum Bagasse for Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanni Sudiyani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic material, which consist mainly of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin, are among the most promising renewable feedstocks for the production of energy and chemicals.   The bagasse residue of sweet sorghum can be utilized as raw material for alternative energy such as bioethanolBioethanol production consists of pretreatment, saccharification, fermentation and purification process.  The pretreatment process was of great importance to ethanol yield.  In the present study, alkaline pretreatment was conducted using a steam explosion reactor at 1300C with concentrations of NaOH  6, and 10% (kg/L for 10, and 30 min.  For ethanol production separated hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process were conducted with 30 FPU of Ctec2 and Htec2 enzyme and yeast of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.   The results showed that maximum cellulose conversion to total glucose plus xylose were showed greatest with NaOH 10% for 30 min.  The highest yield of ethanol is 96.26% and high concentration of ethanol 66.88 g/L were obtained at SSF condition during 48 h process. Using SSF process could increase yields and concentration of ethanol with less energy process. Article History: Received January 16th 2016; Received in revised form May 25th 2016; Accepted June 28th 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Sudiyani, Y., Triwahyuni, E., Muryanto, Burhani, D., Waluyo, J. Sulaswaty, A. and Abimanyu, H. (2016 Alkaline Pretreatment of Sweet Sorghum Bagasse for Bioethanol Production. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(2, 113-118. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.2.113-118 

  3. Toroidal figures of equilibrium from a 2nd-order accurate, accelerated SCF-method with subgrid approach

    CERN Document Server

    Huré, J -M

    2016-01-01

    We compute the structure of a self-gravitating torus with polytropic equation-of-state (EOS) rotating in an imposed centrifugal potential. The Poisson-solver is based on isotropic multigrid with optimal covering factor (fluid section-to-grid area ratio). We work at $2$nd-order in the grid resolution for both finite difference and quadrature schemes. For soft EOS (i.e. polytropic index $n \\ge 1$), the underlying $2$nd-order is naturally recovered for Boundary Values (BVs) and any other integrated quantity sensitive to the mass density (mass, angular momentum, volume, Virial Parameter, etc.), i.e. errors vary with the number $N$ of nodes per direction as $\\sim 1/N^2$. This is, however, not observed for purely geometrical quantities (surface area, meridional section area, volume), unless a subgrid approach is considered (i.e. boundary detection). Equilibrium sequences are also much better described, especially close to critical rotation. Yet another technical effort is required for hard EOS ($n < 1$), due to ...

  4. Influence of Nd dopant amount on microstructure and photoluminescence of TiO2:Nd thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszak, Damian; Mazur, Michal; Kaczmarek, Danuta; Morgiel, Jerzy; Zatryb, Grzegorz; Domaradzki, Jaroslaw; Misiewicz, Jan

    2015-10-01

    TiO2 and TiO2:Nd thin films were deposited using reactive magnetron sputtering process from mosaic Ti-Nd targets with various Nd concentration. The thin films were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopic techniques. Photoluminescence (PL) in the near infrared obtained upon 514.5 nm excitation was also examined. The relationship between the Nd concentration, structural, optical and photoluminescence properties of prepared thin films was investigated and discussed. XRD and TEM measurements showed that an increase in the Nd concentration in the thin films hinders the crystal growth in the deposited coatings. Depending on the Nd amount in the thin films, TiO2 with the rutile, mixed rutile-amorphous or amorphous phase was obtained. Transmittance measurements revealed that addition of Nd dopant to titania matrix did not deteriorate optical transparency of the coatings, however it influenced on the position of the fundamental absorption edge and therefore on the width of optical band gap energy. All TiO2:Nd thin films exhibited PL emission that occurred at ca. 0.91, 1.09 and 1.38 μm. Finally, results obtained for deposited coatings showed that titania with the rutile structure and 1.0 at.% of Nd was the most efficient in VIS to NIR photon conversion.

  5. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-wen; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON. PMID:26892229

  6. Oxidation of Bioethanol using Zeolite-Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite‐1 is reported and their high...... zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2–3 nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50 % conversion of ethanol with 98...

  7. Oxidation of Bioethanol using Zeolite-Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite-1 is reported and their high...... zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50% conversion of ethanol with 98...

  8. Feasibility of Hydrothermal Pretreatment on Maize Silage for Bioethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2010-01-01

    The potential of maize silage as a feedstock to produce bioethanol was evaluated in the present study. The hydrothermal pretreatment with five different pretreatment severity factors (PSF) was employed to pretreat the maize silage and compared in terms of sugar recovery, toxic test, and ethanol...... the liquors from the five conditions were not toxic to the Baker’s yeast. Pretreatment under 195°C for 7 min had the similar PSF with that of 185°C for 15 min, and both gave the higher ethanol concentration of 19.92 and 19.98 g/L, respectively. The ethanol concentration from untreated maize silage was only 7...

  9. Production of Bioethanol From Lignocellulosic Biomass Using Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.

    2006-01-01

    are residual lignocellulose (wastes) created from forest industries or from agricultural food crops (wheat straw, corn stover, rice straw). The lignocellulose contains lignin, which binds carbohydrate polymers (cellulose and hemicellulose) forming together a rather resistant structure. In this regards, a pre...... xylose conversion, effective glucose/xylose co-fermentation, and ethanol productivity of 1 g/l/h required for an economically viable bioethanol process. Furthermore, the fermentation of two undetoxified feed streams of industrial interest (acid hydrolyzed corn stover and wet-exploded wheat straw...

  10. [G. W. Leibniz: medicine and the sciences of life: 2nd part: Leibniz as a "biologist"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazaud, J

    1996-01-01

    Many features of Leibniz's philosophy are a ... "naturalization" of the finding of contemporary scientists. For instance "the Monad", the fondamental element of his system, derives from Glisson's conceptions and Leeuwenhoek's observations. Among others, his ideas on generation stem from a mediation on the Dutchman's and Swammerdam's and Malpighi's works. Through them, he became a partner in the ovulists' quarrel and in the discussion about formal specification. Most of all, he expressed an amazing transformist and paleontological intuition, sensibilizing himself to comparative anatomy and to fossil imprints study. Generation and creative evolution of beings and species were logically accompanied by a reflection on death as being part of the life processes.

  11. Algal biomass conversion to bioethanol - a step-by-step assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Razif; Yip, Jason W S; Thiruvenkadam, Selvakumar; Ghani, Wan A W A K; Cherrington, Tamara; Danquah, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    The continuous growth in global population and the ongoing development of countries such as China and India have contributed to a rapid increase in worldwide energy demand. Fossil fuels such as oil and gas are finite resources, and their current rate of consumption cannot be sustained. This, coupled with fossil fuels' role as pollutants and their contribution to global warming, has led to increased interest in alternative sources of energy production. Bioethanol, presently produced from energy crops, is one such promising alternative future energy source and much research is underway in optimizing its production. The economic and temporal constraints that crop feedstocks pose are the main downfalls in terms of the commercial viability of bioethanol production. As an alternative to crop feedstocks, significant research efforts have been put into utilizing algal biomass as a feedstock for bioethanol production. Whilst the overall process can vary, the conversion of biomass to bioethanol usually contains the following steps: (i) pretreatment of feedstock; (ii) hydrolysis; and (iii) fermentation of bioethanol. This paper reviews different technologies utilized in the pretreatment and fermentation steps, and critically assesses their applicability to bioethanol production from algal biomass. Two different established fermentation routes, single-stage fermentation and two-stage gasification/fermentation processes, are discussed. The viability of algal biomass as an alternative feedstock has been assessed adequately, and further research optimisation must be guided toward the development of cost-effective scalable methods to produce high bioethanol yield under optimum economy.

  12. Potential CO2 emission reduction by development of non-grain-based bioethanol in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongqiang; Wang, Limao; Shen, Lei

    2010-10-01

    Assessment of the potential CO(2) emission reduction by development of non-grain-based ethanol in China is valuable for both setting up countermeasures against climate change and formulating bioethanol policies. Based on the land occupation property, feedstock classification and selection are conducted, identifying sweet sorghum, cassava, and sweet potato as plantation feedstocks cultivated from low-quality arable marginal land resources and molasses and agricultural straws as nonplantation feedstocks derived from agricultural by-products. The feedstock utilization degree, CO(2) reduction coefficient of bioethanol, and assessment model of CO(2) emission reduction potential of bioethanol are proposed and established to assess the potential CO(2) emission reduction by development of non-grain-based bioethanol. The results show that China can obtain emission reduction potentials of 10.947 and 49.027 Mt CO(2) with non-grain-based bioethanol in 2015 and 2030, which are much higher than the present capacity, calculated as 1.95 Mt. It is found that nonplantation feedstock can produce more bioethanol so as to obtain a higher potential than plantation feedstock in both 2015 and 2030. Another finding is that developing non-grain-based bioethanol can make only a limited contribution to China's greenhouse gas emission reduction. Moreover, this study reveals that the regions with low and very low potentials for emission reduction will dominate the spatial distribution in 2015, and regions with high and very high potentials will be the majority in 2030.

  13. Bioethanol Production from Indica IR.64 Rice Straw Biomass by Direct Saccharification and Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ario Betha Juanssilfero

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic substances such as agricultural wastes are attractive feed stocks for bioethanol production. Indica IR.64 rice straw is one of abundant agricultural wastes in Indonesia and could be used to bioethanol production. It has several characteristics such as high content of cellulose and hemicelluloses that can be readily hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars. A simple process (the direct saccharification and fermentation process to produce ethanol from rice straw was developed in order to establish an efficient bioethanol production. In this work, no harsh pre-treatment steps were applied and also use a simple one-vat reactor without the risk of losing liberated carbohydrate. The first step in using rice straw for bioethanol production is size reduction through milling and sieving process prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. Direct saccharification and fermentation (DSF of Indica IR.64 rice straw was examined and compared with two type of control (systems devoid of yeast and enzyme. The experiment were carried out under anaerobic condition, where the cellulase crude enzyme and cellulosic substrates (rice straw produced glucose from the cellulose and Saccharomyces cerevisiae directly assimilated the glucose to bioethanol. The faster rate of bioethanol production during DSF by Saccharomyces cerevisiae was obtained within the first 12h. The maximum ethanol concentration, ethanol yield, and theoretical ethanol yield of untreated rice straw were 0.25 g/L, 10 and 14.88%, respectively. Nevertheless, the direct saccharification and fermentation shows the potential for lower cost and higher efficiency for bioethanol production.

  14. Density functional theory calculations on the active site of biotin synthase: mechanism of S transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster and the role of 1st and 2nd sphere residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Atanu; Dey, Subal; Agrawal, Amita; Dey, Abhishek

    2015-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on the active site of biotin synthase (BS) to investigate the sulfur transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster to dethiobiotin (DTB). The active site is modeled to include both the 1st and 2nd sphere residues. Molecular orbital theory considerations and calculation on smaller models indicate that only an S atom (not S²⁻) transfer from an oxidized Fe(2)S(2) cluster leads to the formation of biotin from the DTB using two adenosyl radicals generated from S-adenosyl-L-methionine. The calculations on larger protein active site model indicate that a 9-monothiobiotin bound reduced cluster should be an intermediate during the S atom insertion from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster consistent with experimental data. The Arg260 bound to Fe1, being a weaker donor than cysteine bound to Fe(2), determines the geometry and the electronic structure of this intermediate. The formation of this intermediate containing the C9-S bond is estimated to have a ΔG(≠) of 17.1 kcal/mol while its decay by the formation of the 2nd C6-S bond is calculated to have a ΔG(≠) of 29.8 kcal/mol, i.e. the 2nd C-S bond formation is calculated to be the rate determining step in the cycle and it leads to the decay of the Fe(2)S(2) cluster. Significant configuration interaction (CI), present in these transition states, helps lower the barrier of these reactions by ~30-25 kcal/mol relative to a hypothetical outer-sphere reaction. The conserved Phe285 residue near the Fe(2)S(2) active site determines the stereo selectivity at the C6 center of this radical coupling reaction. Reaction mechanism of BS investigated using DFT calculations. Strong CI and the Phe285 residue control the kinetic rate and stereochemistry of the product.

  15. 海藻酸转化生物乙醇研究进展%Research Progress of Bioethanol from Alginate Fermentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱龙; 唐丽薇; 黄庶识; 伊日布斯

    2013-01-01

    As the third-generation biofuel, the bioethanol from macroalgae biomass fermentation have received widespread attention. However, the present ethanol industry strains were not able to utilize alginate that is the main ingredient in seaweed. This is one of the major technical difficulties to impede to achieve the industrial production of alginate bio-ethanol. In recent years, the cleavage enzyme and alginate degrading bacteria metabolic pathways have been studied in depth. The researchers constructed different alginate fermentation strains, and provided a viable technological support for the efficient conversion from alginate to bio-ethanol. This article reviewed resource profile of alginate and the scientific issues of bioethanol production by fermentation with alginate.%作为第三代生物燃料,大型褐藻类生物质转化燃料乙醇的研究受到广泛的关注.但是,现有的乙醇工业菌株并不能利用褐藻中的主要成分海藻酸,这个问题是海藻生物乙醇实现工业化生产的主要技术难关.近几年随着对海藻酸裂解酶和海藻酸降解菌代谢途径的深入研究,科研人员构建了不同的海藻酸发酵菌株,为高效转化大型海藻生产生物乙醇提供了可行的技术基础.这篇文章对海藻酸资源概况和海藻酸转化生物乙醇存在的科学问题及其研究进展进行了综述.

  16. Response Surface Optimization of Bioethanol Production from Sugarcane Molasses by Pichia veronae Strain HSC-22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed I. Hamouda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pichia veronae strain HSC-22 (accession number KP012558 showed a good tolerance to relatively high temperature, ethanol and sugar concentrations. Response surface optimization based on central composite design of experiments predicted the optimal values of the influencing parameters that affect the production of bioethanol from sugarcane molasses to be as follows: initial pH 5, 25% (w : v initial molasses concentration, 35°C, 116 rpm, and 60 h. Under these optimum operating conditions the maximum bioethanol production on a batch fermenter scale was recorded as 32.32 g/L with 44% bioethanol yield.

  17. Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Karsten; Thyø, Katrine; Wenzel, Henrik

    , regardless of whether a global or European perspective is applied, the amount of biomass, which can become available for bioethanol or other energy uses, will be physically and economically constrained. This implies that use of biomass or land for bioethanol production will most likely happen at the expense...... or electricity for transport are advantageous. This is mainly caused by the significant energy conversion losses in bioethanol production compared to use of biomass in the energy sector. The losses lie in the need for pretreatment (lignocellulosic based production), the relatively low fermentation yield...

  18. Airtight storage of moist wheat grain improves bioethanol yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piens Kathleen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drying is currently the most frequently used conservation method for cereal grain, which in temperate climates consumes a major part of process energy. Airtight storage of moist feed grain using the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala as biopreservation agent can substantially reduce the process energy for grain storage. In this study we tested the potential of moist stored grain for bioethanol production. Results The ethanol yield from moist wheat was enhanced by 14% compared with the control obtained from traditionally (dry stored grain. This enhancement was observed independently of whether or not P. anomala was added to the storage system, indicating that P. anomala does not impair ethanol fermentation. Starch and sugar analyses showed that during pre-treatment the starch of moist grain was better degraded by amylase treatment than that of the dry grain. Additional pre-treatment with cellulose and hemicellulose-degrading enzymes did not further increase the total ethanol yield. Sugar analysis after this pre-treatment showed an increased release of sugars not fermentable by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion The ethanol yield from wheat grain is increased by airtight storage of moist grain, which in addition can save substantial amounts of energy used for drying the grain. This provides a new opportunity to increase the sustainability of bioethanol production.

  19. MICROALGAE AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO BIOFUELS PRODUCTION. PART 1: BIOETHANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Priscilla de Souza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The demand from the energy sector is one of the culminating factors to do researches that enable innovations in the biotechnology sector and to boost biofuel production. The variability of the existing feedstocks provides benefits to energy production, however, we must choose the ones that present plausible characteristics depending on the type of product that we want to obtained. In this context, it is noted that the microalgae have suitable characteristics to producing different types of fuels, depending on the type of treatment are subjected, the species being analyzed as well as the biochemical composition of the biomass. Bioethanol production from microalgae is a promising and growing energy alternative under a view that biomass of these microorganisms has an enormous biodiversity and contain high levels of carbohydrates, an indispensable factor for the bioconversion of microalgae in ethanol. Due to these factors, there is a constant search for more viable methods for pretreatment of biomass, hydrolysis and fermentation, having as one of the major aspects the approach of effectives methodologies in the ambit of quality and yield of ethanol. Therefore, we have to search to increase the interest in the developing of biofuels reconciling with the importance of using microalgae, analyzing whether these micro-organisms are capable of being used in bioethanol production.

  20. Bioethanol Production from Sugarcane Bagasse using Fermentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Wong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to produce bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse using fermentation process and to determine the effect of pH and temperature on bioethanol yield. Enzymes such as alpha- amylase and glucoamylase were used to breakdown the cellulose in sugarcane bagasse. Saccharomyces cerevisiea, (yeast also was used in the experiment for fermentation. Five samples were prepared at different pH was varied to determine the effects of pH on ethanol yield at 370 C and another five samples were prepared to determine the effect of temperature on ethanol yield, the pH was kept constant at 4.5. The ethanol concentrations were determined by running the samples in High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. The results showed that at highest ethanol concentration was obtained pH 4.5 and temperature 350C. This indicated that pH 4.5 and 350C was the optimum parameter for the yeast to produce ethanol.